Science.gov

Sample records for larval-to-adult intestinal remodeling

  1. Endocrine remodelling of the adult intestine sustains reproduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reiff, Tobias; Jacobson, Jake; Cognigni, Paola; Antonello, Zeus; Ballesta, Esther; Tan, Kah Junn; Yew, Joanne Y; Dominguez, Maria; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The production of offspring is energetically costly and relies on incompletely understood mechanisms that generate a positive energy balance. In mothers of many species, changes in key energy-associated internal organs are common yet poorly characterised functionally and mechanistically. In this study, we show that, in adult Drosophila females, the midgut is dramatically remodelled to enhance reproductive output. In contrast to extant models, organ remodelling does not occur in response to increased nutrient intake and/or offspring demands, but rather precedes them. With spatially and temporally directed manipulations, we identify juvenile hormone (JH) as an anticipatory endocrine signal released after mating. Acting through intestinal bHLH-PAS domain proteins Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and Germ cell-expressed (Gce), JH signals directly to intestinal progenitors to yield a larger organ, and adjusts gene expression and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activity in enterocytes to support increased lipid metabolism. Our findings identify a metabolically significant paradigm of adult somatic organ remodelling linking hormonal signals, epithelial plasticity, and reproductive output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06930.001 PMID:26216039

  2. Morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-12-16

    The present study aimed to study the morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats, aged from 6 to 22 months, were used in the study. The body weight and the wet weight per length of duodenal and ileal segments were measured at the termination of the experiments. Morphometry data was obtained by measuring the wall thickness and cross-sectional area. The mechanical test was done as a step-wise distension experiment. The intestinal diameter and length were obtained from digitized images of the segments at pre-selected pressure levels and at the no-load and zero-stress states. Circumferential and longitudinal stresses (force per area) and strains (deformation) were computed from the length, diameter and pressure data and from the zero-stress state geometry. The duodenal and ileal dimensions increased slightly from 6 to 22 months, e.g. the wall thickness and the wall cross-sectional area increased about 4% and 25% for duodenum and 5% and 8% for ileum. The opening angle gradually decreased from 154 to 117 degrees for duodenum and from 144 to 87 degrees for ileum during aging. The circumferential stress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 22 months (p<0.05) whereas the longitudinal stress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 18 months (p<0.01) both for duodenum and ileum. The intestinal wall became stiffer circumferentially and longitudinally during the aging. Furthermore, the intestinal wall was stiffer longitudinally than circumferentially. In conclusion, pronounced morphometric and biomechanical remodeling occurred in the rat intestine during aging. PMID:26596717

  3. The effects of enteral ghrelin administration on the remodeling of the small intestinal mucosa in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Słupecka, Monika; Woliński, Jarosław; Pierzynowski, Stefan G

    2012-02-10

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide produced predominantly in the stomach, however substantial amounts have also been found in colostrum and milk. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exogenous ghrelin, administered intra-gastrically, on the processes of mitosis, apoptosis, autophagy, crypt fission and changes in histometry of the small intestine mucosa in neonatal pigs, fed with a milk formula. Three groups (n=6) of piglets were used in the study. The pigs were fed either milk formula (C7) or milk formula together with ghrelin, administered via a stomach tube (7.5 μg/kg body weight (BW), (LG)) and 15 μg/kg BW (HG), every 8h for 6 days. Compared to the control group (C7), feeding milk formula supplemented with ghrelin resulted in significant changes in the small intestinal morphometry and mucosa histometry. The observed changes were dependent on the dosage of hormone and the part of intestine investigated. Administration of ghrelin via the stomach tube (HG) significantly influenced epithelial cell renewal. Moreover, we demonstrated that autophagy is involved in the small intestine mucosa remodeling and ghrelin may be an important factor for its regulation. In conclusion, we found that enteral ghrelin influences the gut mucosa remodeling in a dose-related manner in the early postnatal period. Moreover in neonates, stomach activity does not interfere with the action of ghrelin in the small intestine. PMID:22137939

  4. The Osa-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex regulates stem cell commitment in the adult Drosophila intestine

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiankun; Lin, Xinhua; Hou, Steven X.

    2013-01-01

    The proportion of stem cells versus differentiated progeny is well balanced to maintain tissue homeostasis, which in turn depends on the balance of the different signaling pathways involved in stem cell self-renewal versus lineage-specific differentiation. In a screen for genes that regulate cell lineage determination in the posterior midgut, we identified that the Osa-containing SWI/SNF (Brahma) chromatin-remodeling complex regulates Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Mutations in subunits of the Osa-containing complex result in intestinal stem cell (ISC) expansion as well as enteroendocrine (EE) cell reduction. We further demonstrated that Osa regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation into enterocytes by elaborating Notch signaling, and ISC commitment to differentiation into EE cells by regulating the expression of Asense, an EE cell fate determinant. Our data uncover a unique mechanism whereby the commitment of stem cells to discrete lineages is coordinately regulated by chromatin-remodeling factors. PMID:23942514

  5. For Application to Human Spaceflight and ISS Experiments: VESGEN Mapping of Microvascular Network Remodeling during Intestinal Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Reinecker, Hans-Christian

    2012-10-01

    Challenges to long-duration space exploration and colonization in microgravity and cosmic radiation environments by humans include poorly understood risks for gastrointestinal function and cancer. Nonetheless, constant remodeling of the intestinal microvasculature is critical for tissue viability, healthy wound healing, and successful prevention or recovery from vascular-mediated inflammatory or ischemic diseases such as cancer. Currently no automated image analysis programs provide quantitative assessments of the complex structure of the mucosal vascular system that are necessary for tracking disease development and tissue recovery. Increasing abnormalities to the microvascular network geometry were therefore mapped with VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software from 3D tissue reconstructions of developing intestinal inflammation in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) mouse model. By several VESGEN parameters and a novel vascular network linking analysis, inflammation strongly disrupted the regular, lattice-like geometry that defines the normal microvascular network, correlating positively with the increased recruitment of dendritic cells during mucosal defense responses. PMID:25143705

  6. Thyroid hormone activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling involved in adult epithelial development during intestinal remodeling in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenta; Kajita, Mitsuko; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2016-08-01

    During amphibian intestinal remodeling, thyroid hormone (TH) induces some larval epithelial cells to dedifferentiate into adult stem cells, which newly generate the absorptive epithelium analogous to the mammalian epithelium. To clarify molecular mechanisms underlying adult epithelial development, we here focus on TH response genes that are associated with the canonical Wnt pathway. Our quantitative reverse transcription plus polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analyses indicate that all of the genes examined, including β-catenin, c-Myc and secreted frizzle-related protein 2 (SFRP2), are up-regulated in Xenopus laevis intestine during both natural and TH-induced metamorphosis. Moreover, immunoreactivity for nuclear β-catenin becomes detectable in adult stem cells from the start of their appearance and then increases in intensity in adult epithelial primordia derived from the stem cells, which actively proliferate and coexpress Wnt target genes c-Myc and LGR5. These expression profiles strongly suggest the involvement of the canonical Wnt pathway in the maintenance and/or proliferation of adult stem/progenitor cells. More importantly, by using organ cultures of the tadpole intestine, we have experimentally shown that the addition of exogenous SFRP2 protein to the culture medium promotes cell proliferation of the adult epithelial primordia, whereas inhibition of endogenous SFRP2 by its antibody suppresses their proliferation. The inhibition of SFRP2 suppresses larval epithelial changes in shape from simple columnar to stem-cell-like roundish cells, resulting in the failure of epithelial dedifferentiation. Thus, TH-up-regulated SFRP2 in the postembryonic intestine promotes adult stem cell development, possibly by acting as an agonist of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:27068920

  7. Intestinal Phospholipid Remodeling Is Required for Dietary-Lipid Uptake and Survival on a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Rong, Xin; Duerr, Mark A; Hermanson, Daniel J; Hedde, Per Niklas; Wong, Jinny S; Vallim, Thomas Q de Aguiar; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Gratton, Enrico; Ford, David A; Tontonoz, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipids are important determinants of membrane biophysical properties, but the impact of membrane acyl chain composition on dietary-lipid absorption is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the LXR-responsive phospholipid-remodeling enzyme Lpcat3 modulates intestinal fatty acid and cholesterol absorption and is required for survival on a high-fat diet. Mice lacking Lpcat3 in the intestine thrive on carbohydrate-based chow but lose body weight rapidly and become moribund on a triglyceride-rich diet. Lpcat3-dependent incorporation of polyunsaturated fatty acids into phospholipids is required for the efficient transport of dietary lipids into enterocytes. Furthermore, loss of Lpcat3 amplifies the production of gut hormones, including GLP-1 and oleoylethanolamide, in response to high-fat feeding, contributing to the paradoxical cessation of food intake in the setting of starvation. These results reveal that membrane phospholipid composition is a gating factor in passive lipid absorption and implicate LXR-Lpcat3 signaling in a gut-brain feedback loop that couples absorption to food intake. PMID:26833026

  8. Microbiota modulate transcription in the intestinal epithelium without remodeling the accessible chromatin landscape.

    PubMed

    Camp, J Gray; Frank, Christopher L; Lickwar, Colin R; Guturu, Harendra; Rube, Tomas; Wenger, Aaron M; Chen, Jenny; Bejerano, Gill; Crawford, Gregory E; Rawls, John F

    2014-09-01

    Microbiota regulate intestinal physiology by modifying host gene expression along the length of the intestine, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unresolved. Transcriptional specificity occurs through interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and cis-regulatory regions (CRRs) characterized by nucleosome-depleted accessible chromatin. We profiled transcriptome and accessible chromatin landscapes in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from mice reared in the presence or absence of microbiota. We show that regional differences in gene transcription along the intestinal tract were accompanied by major alterations in chromatin accessibility. Surprisingly, we discovered that microbiota modify host gene transcription in IECs without significantly impacting the accessible chromatin landscape. Instead, microbiota regulation of host gene transcription might be achieved by differential expression of specific TFs and enrichment of their binding sites in nucleosome-depleted CRRs near target genes. Our results suggest that the chromatin landscape in IECs is preprogrammed by the host in a region-specific manner to permit responses to microbiota through binding of open CRRs by specific TFs. PMID:24963153

  9. Microbiota modulate transcription in the intestinal epithelium without remodeling the accessible chromatin landscape

    PubMed Central

    Camp, J. Gray; Frank, Christopher L.; Lickwar, Colin R.; Guturu, Harendra; Rube, Tomas; Wenger, Aaron M.; Chen, Jenny; Bejerano, Gill; Crawford, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiota regulate intestinal physiology by modifying host gene expression along the length of the intestine, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unresolved. Transcriptional specificity occurs through interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and cis-regulatory regions (CRRs) characterized by nucleosome-depleted accessible chromatin. We profiled transcriptome and accessible chromatin landscapes in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from mice reared in the presence or absence of microbiota. We show that regional differences in gene transcription along the intestinal tract were accompanied by major alterations in chromatin accessibility. Surprisingly, we discovered that microbiota modify host gene transcription in IECs without significantly impacting the accessible chromatin landscape. Instead, microbiota regulation of host gene transcription might be achieved by differential expression of specific TFs and enrichment of their binding sites in nucleosome-depleted CRRs near target genes. Our results suggest that the chromatin landscape in IECs is preprogrammed by the host in a region-specific manner to permit responses to microbiota through binding of open CRRs by specific TFs. PMID:24963153

  10. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. PMID:26755265

  11. Adaptive remodelling of intestinal epithelium assessed using stereology: correlation of single cell and whole organ data with nutrient transport.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, T M

    1996-07-01

    Adaptation in the intestinal epithelium depends on cell number and the properties of individual cells but these responses operate within different time frames. Changes in number take days to accomplish but those in behaviour may occur within hours. This article reviews the value of stereology for characterising structural features of the average enterocyte and the entire organ (mammalian small intestine or avian lower intestine) during adaptation. Stereological data are correlated with the physiology and molecular biology of glucose and Na+ transport. In small intestine, account is taken of vertical (crypt-villus) and longitudinal (craniocaudal) gradients and of adaptations to chemically-induced diabetes and diet. Results show that longer-term adaptation depends critically on epithelial renewal. In diabetic small intestine, changes in glucose transport are accompanied by changes in the number, but not morphology, of villous enterocytes. In avian, lower intestine, increased Na+ transport requires changes in cell number and the extent of their apical, but not basolateral membrane surfaces. These changes allow opportunities to incorporate more (or more active) transport sites in apical and basolateral membrane domains of individual cells and of whole organs. PMID:8839763

  12. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients

    PubMed Central

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A.; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed. PMID:26226276

  13. Apical Invasion of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Salmonella typhimurium Requires Villin to Remodel the Brush Border Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Lhocine, Nouara; Arena, Ellen T.; Bomme, Perrine; Ubelmann, Florent; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Robine, Sylvie; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Salmonella invasion of intestinal epithelial cells requires extensive, though transient, actin modifications at the site of bacterial entry. The actin-modifying protein villin is present in the brush border where it participates in the constitution of microvilli and in epithelial restitution after damage through its actin-severing activity. We investigated a possible role for villin in Salmonella invasion. The absence of villin, which is normally located at the bacterial entry site, leads to a decrease in Salmonella invasion. Villin is necessary for early membrane-associated processes and for optimal ruffle assembly by balancing the steady-state level of actin. The severing activity of villin is important for Salmonella invasion in vivo. The bacterial phosphatase SptP tightly regulates villin phosphorylation, while the actin-binding effector SipA protects F-actin and counterbalances villin-severing activity. Thus, villin plays an important role in establishing the balance between actin polymerization and actin severing to facilitate the initial steps of Salmonella entry. PMID:25600187

  14. Mechanism of chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2010-02-23

    Results from biochemical and structural studies of the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex prompt a proposal for the remodeling mechanism: RSC binding to the nucleosome releases the DNA from the histone surface and initiates DNA translocation (through one or a small number of DNA base pairs); ATP binding completes translocation, and ATP hydrolysis resets the system. Binding energy thus plays a central role in the remodeling process. RSC may disrupt histone-DNA contacts by affecting histone octamer conformation and through extensive interaction with the DNA. Bulging of the DNA from the octamer surface is possible, and twisting is unavoidable, but neither is the basis of remodeling. PMID:20142505

  15. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  16. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  17. Intestinal Malrotation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines don't position themselves normally during fetal development and aren't attached inside properly as a result. The exact reason this occurs is unknown. When a fetus develops in the womb, the intestines start out ...

  18. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the major causes of intestinal obstruction in infants and children. Causes of paralytic ileus may include: Bacteria or viruses that cause intestinal infections ( gastroenteritis ) Chemical, electrolyte, or mineral imbalances (such as decreased ...

  19. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ from a deceased donor. In addition, most intestine transplants are performed in ... blood before surgery. I am looking for ... allocation About UNOS Being a living donor Calculator - CPRA Calculator - KDPI Calculator - LAS Calculator - MELD ...

  20. Remodelling the extracellular matrix in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonnans, Caroline; Chou, Jonathan; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a highly dynamic structure that is present in all tissues and continuously undergoes controlled remodelling. This process involves quantitative and qualitative changes in the ECM, mediated by specific enzymes that are responsible for ECM degradation, such as metalloproteinases. The ECM interacts with cells to regulate diverse functions, including proliferation, migration and differentiation. ECM remodelling is crucial for regulating the morphogenesis of the intestine and lungs, as well as of the mammary and submandibular glands. Dysregulation of ECM composition, structure, stiffness and abundance contributes to several pathological conditions, such as fibrosis and invasive cancer. A better understanding of how the ECM regulates organ structure and function and of how ECM remodelling affects disease progression will contribute to the development of new therapeutics. PMID:25415508

  1. Immunoregulation of bone remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai; Mehdi, Abbass A; Srivastava, Rajeshwer N; Verma, Nar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling, a continuous physiological process maintains the strength of the bones, which maintains a delicate balance between bone formation and resorption process. This review gives an insight to the complex interaction and correlation between the bone remodeling and the corresponding changes in host immunological environment and also summarises the most recent developments occuring in the understanding of this complex field. T cells, both directly and indirectly increase the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL); a vital step in the activation of osteoclasts, thus positively regulates the osteoclastogenesis. Though various cytokines, chemikines, transcription factors and co-stimulatory molecules are shared by both skeletal and immune systems, but researches are being conducted to establish and analyse their role and / or control on this complex but vital process. The understanding of this part of research may open new horizons in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, resulting into bone loss and that of osteoporosis also. PMID:22837895

  2. Intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rege, Aparna; Sudan, Debra

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal transplantation has now emerged as a lifesaving therapeutic option and standard of care for patients with irreversible intestinal failure. Improvement in survival over the years has justified expansion of the indications for intestinal transplantation beyond the original indications approved by Center for Medicare and Medicaid services. Management of patients with intestinal failure is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach to accurately select candidates who would benefit from rehabilitation versus transplantation. Significant strides have been made in patient and graft survival with several advancements in the perioperative management through timely referral, improved patient selection, refinement in the surgical techniques and better understanding of the immunopathology of intestinal transplantation. The therapeutic efficacy of the procedure is well evident from continuous improvements in functional status, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of the procedure. This current review summarizes various aspects including current practices and evidence based recommendations of intestinal transplantation. PMID:27086894

  3. Remodeling and Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigueza, Wendi V.; Williams, Kevin Jon; Rothblat, George H.; Phillips, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    In normal physiology, cells are exposed to cholesterol acceptors of different sizes simultaneously. The current study examined the possible interactions between two different classes of acceptors, one large (large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles, LUVs) and one small (HDL or other small acceptors), added separately or in combination to Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells. During a 24-hour incubation, LUVs of palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine at 1 mg phospholipid (PL) per milliliter extracted ≈20% of cellular unesterified cholesterol (UC) label and mass in a slow, continuous fashion (half-time [t½] for UC efflux was ≈50 hours) and human HDL3 at 25 μg PL per milliliter extracted ≈15% cellular UC label with no change in cellular cholesterol mass (t½ of ≈8 hours). In contrast, the combination of LUVs and HDL3 extracted over 90% of UC label (t½ of ≈4 hours) and ≈50% of the UC mass, indicating synergy. To explain this synergy, specific particle interactions were examined, namely, remodeling, in which the two acceptors alter each other’s composition and thus the ability to mobilize cellular cholesterol, and shuttling, in which the small acceptor ferries cholesterol from cells to the large acceptor. To examine remodeling, LUVs and HDL were coincubated and reisolated before application to cells. This HDL became UC depleted, PL enriched, and lost a small amount of apolipoprotein A-I. Compared with equivalent numbers of control HDL particles, remodeled HDL caused faster efflux (t½ ≈4 hours) and exhibited a greater capacity to sequester cellular cholesterol over 24 hours (≈38% versus ≈15% for control HDL), consistent with their enrichment in PL. Remodeled LUVs still extracted ≈20% of cellular UC. Thus, remodeling accounted for some but not all of the synergy between LUVs and HDL. To examine shuttling, several approaches were used. First, reisolation of particles after an 8-hour exposure to cells revealed that HDL contained very little of the cellular UC

  4. INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation is often the only alternative form of treatment for patients dependent on total parenteral nutrition for survival. Although a limited number of intestinal transplantations have been performed, results with FK 506 immunosuppression are comparable to those for other organ transplants. The impact of successful intestinal transplantation on gastroenterology will likely be similar to the impact of kidney and liver transplantation on nephrology and hepatology. PMID:7515221

  5. Composition of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae microbiota from larval to adult stages.

    PubMed

    Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Tchioffo, Majoline T; Abate, Luc; Boissière, Anne; Awono-Ambéné, Parfait H; Nsango, Sandrine E; Christen, Richard; Morlais, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    During their immature life stages, malaria mosquitoes are exposed to a wide array of microbes and contaminants from the aquatic habitats. Although prior studies have suggested that environmental exposure shapes the microbial community structure in the adult mosquito, most reports have focused on laboratory-based experiments and on a single mosquito epithelium, the gut. In this study, we investigated the influence of the breeding site on the development of the Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae microbiota in natural conditions. We characterized bacterial communities from aquatic habitats, at surface microlayer and subsurface water levels, to freshly emerge adult mosquitoes using multiplexed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and we separately analyzed the microbiota associated with the different epithelia of adult individual, midguts, ovaries and salivary glands. We found that the distribution of bacterial communities in the aquatic habitats differed according to the depth of water collections. Inter-individual variation of bacterial composition was large in larvae guts but adult mosquitoes from a same breeding site shared quite similar microbiota. Although some differences in bacterial abundances were highlighted between the different epithelia of freshly emerged An. coluzzii and An. gambiae, an intriguing feature from our study is the particular similarity of the overall bacterial communities. Our results call for further investigations on the bacterial population dynamics in the different tissues to determine the distinctive characteristics of each microbiota during the mosquito lifespan and to identify specific interactions between certain key phyla or species and the insect life history traits. PMID:25283802

  6. Remodeling with the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Bodzin, S.

    1997-05-01

    Remodeling is the perfect time to improve daylighting, direct gain heating and shading with passive solar techniques. It can also provide the best opportunity to add solar water heating or even photoboltaics to a home. This article describes addition of such energy efficient plans to a home in terms of what is needed and what the benefits are: adding windows, North glass, east and west glass, south glass, daylighting, the roof, shingles and roofing tiles, walls and floors, solar hot water, photovoltaics. Two side bars discuss the sunplace: a passive solar room and angles and overhangs.

  7. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  8. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason Blood in the stool A lump in the abdomen Imaging tests that create pictures of the small ... help diagnose intestinal cancer and show whether it has spread. Surgery is ...

  9. To Remodel or To Build?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Todd

    2009-01-01

    The question of remodeling an existing house to make it wheelchair accessible or building a new barrier-free house is a difficult decision. This article presents some initial questions and considerations followed by a list of pros and cons for remodeling an existing house vs. building a new house.

  10. Intestinal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucocorticoids as well as a tissue capable of producing and metabolizing sex steroids. This finding is based on the detection of steroidogenic enzyme expression as well as the presence of bioactive steroids in both the rodent and human gut. Within the intestinal mucosa, the intestinal epithelial cell layer is one of the main cellular sources of steroids. Glucocorticoid synthesis regulation in the intestinal epithelial cells is unique in that it does not involve the classical positive regulator steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) but a closely related homolog, namely the liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). This local production of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids contributes to intestinal homeostasis and has been linked to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal epithelial cells also possess the ability to metabolize sex steroids, notably estrogen; this mechanism may impact colorectal cancer development. In this review, we contextualize and discuss what is known about intestinal steroidogenesis and regulation as well as the key role these functions play both in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25560486

  11. No-Regrets Remodeling, 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    No-Regrets Remodeling, sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is an informative publication that walks homeowners and/or remodelers through various home remodeling projects. In addition to remodeling information, the publication provides instruction on how to incorporate energy efficiency into the remodeling process. The goal of the publication is to improve homeowner satisfaction after completing a remodeling project and to provide the homeowner with a home that saves energy and is comfortable and healthy.

  12. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Obstruction of the bowel may due to: A mechanical cause, which means something is in the way ... lung disease Use of certain medicines, especially narcotics Mechanical causes of intestinal obstruction may include: Adhesions or ...

  13. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  14. Redox regulation of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Ashley, Euan A; Ali, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a dynamic process of structural and functional changes in response to biochemical and biomechanical signals in a complex in vivo milieu. While inherently adaptive, dysregulation leads to maladaptive remodeling. Reactive oxygen species participate in homeostatic cell signaling in tightly regulated- and compartmentalized cellular circuits. It is well established that perturbations in oxidation-reduction (redox) homeostasis can lead to a state of oxidative-, and more recently, reductive stress. We provide an overview of the redox signaling in the vasculature and review the role of oxidative- and reductive stress in maladaptive vascular remodeling. Particular emphasis has been placed on essential processes that determine phenotype modulation, migration and fate of the main cell types in the vessel wall. Recent advances in systems biology and the translational opportunities they may provide to specifically target the redox pathways driving pathological vascular remodeling are discussed. PMID:26483132

  15. Plant cell remodeling by autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jimi; Lee, Han Nim; Chung, Taijoon

    2014-01-01

    Plant seedlings are not photoautotrophs until they are equipped with photosynthetic machinery. Some plant cells are remodeled after being exposed to light, and a group of peroxisomal proteins are degraded during the remodeling. Autophagy was proposed as one of the mechanisms for the degradation of peroxisomal proteins. We recently showed that ATG7-dependent autophagy is partially responsible for the degradation of obsolete peroxisomal proteins during Arabidopsis seedling growth. PMID:24492493

  16. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... the small intestine (duodenum) may be caused by cancer of the pancreas, scarring from an ulcer, or Crohn disease . Rarely, a gallstone, a mass of undigested food, or a collection of parasitic worms may block ... commonly caused by cancer, diverticulitis , or a hard lump of stool (fecal ...

  17. [Intestinal endometriosis].

    PubMed

    González Rodríguez, C I; Cires, M; Jiménez, F J; Rubio, T

    2008-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation). In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment, this will depend on the clinical features and the age of the patient, as well as her wishes with regard to pregnancy. PMID:18953367

  18. INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Warren H.

    1950-01-01

    Despite improvements in knowledge of the pathologic physiology of intestinal obstruction, the introduction of gastrointestinal decompression, and more effective antibiotics, obstruction remains a serious disease with a high mortality rate. Although the diagnosis is often obscure, it can usually be made with a fair degree of accuracy by the history alone; pain is fairly constant and characteristically is of a cramping type simulated by very few other lesions. Distention is present in low lesions but absent in high lesions; on the contrary, vomiting is minimal in low lesions but prominent in high lesions. Visible peristaltic waves are almost pathognomonic of intestinal obstruction. Increased peristaltic sounds, as noted by auscultation, are extremely helpful in diagnosis; they are absent in paralytic ileus. Although intestinal obstruction is a surgical lesion, it must be remembered that in the type produced by adhesions the obstruction can be relieved by gastrointestinal decompression in 80 to 90 per cent of cases. Operation is usually indicated a short time after relief because of the probability of recurrence. In practically all other types of obstruction decompression is indicated only while the patient is being prepared for operation. Obviously any type of strangulation demands early operation. Strangulation can usually be diagnosed, particularly if it develops while the patient is under observation. Increase in pain, muscle spasm and pulse rate are important indications of development of strangulation. Dehydration and electrolytic imbalance are produced almost universally in high obstruction. Usually, it is unwise to wait until these two deficiencies are corrected before operation is undertaken, but correction must be well under way at the time of operation. Resections should be avoided in the presence of intestinal obstruction, but obviously will be necessary in strangulation. Operative technique must be expert and carried out with minimal trauma. Postoperative

  19. Intestinal spirochaetosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F. D.; Kraszewski, A.; Gordon, J.; Howie, J. G. R.; McSeveney, D.; Harland, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    An abnormal condition of the large intestine is described in which the surface epithelium is infested by short spirochaetes. Diagnosis can be made by light microscopy. A review of 14 cases diagnosed by rectal biopsy and 62 cases involving the appendix shows no consistent symptom complex. The possible significance is discussed. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 1 PMID:5548558

  20. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine ... Embolus: Blood clots can block one of the arteries supplying the intestine. People who have had a ...

  1. Restricting Fermentative Potential by Proteome Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Clair, Gérémy; Armengaud, Jean; Duport, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenesis hinges on successful colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by pathogenic facultative anaerobes. The GI tract is a carbohydrate-limited environment with varying oxygen availability and oxidoreduction potential (ORP). How pathogenic bacteria are able to adapt and grow in these varying conditions remains a key fundamental question. Here, we designed a system biology-inspired approach to pinpoint the key regulators allowing Bacillus cereus to survive and grow efficiently under low ORP anoxic conditions mimicking those encountered in the intestinal lumen. We assessed the proteome components using high throughput nanoLC-MS/MS techniques, reconstituted the main metabolic circuits, constructed ΔohrA and ΔohrR mutants, and analyzed the impacts of ohrA and ohrR disruptions by a novel round of shotgun proteomics. Our study revealed that OhrR and OhrA are crucial to the successful adaptation of B. cereus to the GI tract environment. Specifically, we showed that B. cereus restricts its fermentative growth under low ORP anaerobiosis and sustains efficient aerobic respiratory metabolism, motility, and stress response via OhrRA-dependent proteome remodeling. Finally, our results introduced a new adaptive strategy where facultative anaerobes prefer to restrict their fermentative potential for a long term benefit. PMID:22232490

  2. The human tri-peptide GHK and tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pickart, Loren

    2008-01-01

    Tissue remodeling follows the initial phase of wound healing and stops inflammatory and scar-forming processes, then restores the normal tissue morphology. The human peptide Gly-(L-His)-(L-Lys) or GHK, has a copper 2+ (Cu(2+)) affinity similar to the copper transport site on albumin and forms GHK-Cu, a complex with Cu(2+). These two molecules activate a plethora of remodeling related processes: (1) chemoattraction of repair cells such as macrophages, mast cells, capillary cells; (2) anti-inflammatory actions (suppression of free radicals, thromboxane formation, release of oxidizing iron, transforming growth factor beta-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha and protein glycation while increasing superoxide dismutase, vessel vasodilation, blocking ultraviolet damage to skin keratinocytes and improving fibroblast recovery after X-ray treatments); (3) increases protein synthesis of collagen, elastin, metalloproteinases, anti-proteases, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, nerve growth factor, neutrotropins 3 and 4, and erythropoietin; (4) increases the proliferation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes; nerve outgrowth, angiogenesis, and hair follicle size. GHK-Cu stimulates wound healing in numerous models and in humans. Controlled studies on aged skin demonstrated that it tightens skin, improves elasticity and firmness, reduces fine lines, wrinkles, photodamage and hyperpigmentation. GHK-Cu also improves hair transplant success, protects hepatic tissue from tetrachloromethane poisoning, blocks stomach ulcer development, and heals intestinal ulcers and bone tissue. These results are beginning to define the complex biochemical processes that regulate tissue remodeling. PMID:18644225

  3. Rho Kinases and Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toru; Liao, James K

    2016-06-24

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis, which can lead to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCKs) are members of the serine/threonine protein kinase family, which mediates the downstream effects of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. There are 2 isoforms: ROCK1 and ROCK2. They have different functions in different types of cells and tissues. There is growing evidence that ROCKs contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases, including cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, and subsequent heart failure. Recent experimental studies using ROCK inhibitors, such as fasudil, have shown the benefits of ROCK inhibition in cardiac remodeling. Mice lacking each ROCK isoform also exhibit reduced myocardial fibrosis in a variety of pathological models of cardiac remodeling. Indeed, clinical studies with fasudil have suggested that ROCKs could be potential novel therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the roles of ROCKs in the development of cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy and discuss their therapeutic potential for deleterious cardiac remodeling. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1491-1498). PMID:27251065

  4. Large intestine (colon) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The large intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of water from the indigestible ... the ileum (small intestine) passes material into the large intestine at the cecum. Material passes through the ...

  5. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  6. Epigenetics in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Renewal.

    PubMed

    Roostaee, Alireza; Benoit, Yannick D; Boudjadi, Salah; Beaulieu, Jean-François

    2016-11-01

    A controlled balance between cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to maintain normal intestinal tissue renewal and physiology. Such regulation is powered by several intracellular pathways that are translated into the establishment of specific transcription programs, which influence intestinal cell fate along the crypt-villus axis. One important check-point in this process occurs in the transit amplifying zone of the intestinal crypts where different signaling pathways and transcription factors cooperate to manage cellular proliferation and differentiation, before secretory or absorptive cell lineage terminal differentiation. However, the importance of epigenetic modifications such as histone methylation and acetylation in the regulation of these processes is still incompletely understood. There have been recent advances in identifying the impact of histone modifications and chromatin remodelers on the proliferation and differentiation of normal intestinal crypt cells. In this review we discuss recent discoveries on the role of the cellular epigenome in intestinal cell fate, development, and tissue renewal. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2361-2367, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061836

  7. Frontiers in growth and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-06-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  8. Frontiers in growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  9. Advances in understanding cartilage remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yefu; Xu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage remodeling is currently among the most popular topics in osteoarthritis research. Remodeling includes removal of the existing cartilage and replacement by neo-cartilage. As a loss of balance between removal and replacement of articular cartilage develops (particularly, the rate of removal surpasses the rate of replacement), joints will begin to degrade. In the last few years, significant progress in molecular understanding of the cartilage remodeling process has been made. In this brief review, we focus on the discussion of some current “controversial” observations in articular cartilage degeneration: (1) the biological effect of transforming growth factor-beta 1 on developing and mature articular cartilages, (2) the question of whether aggrecanase 1 (ADAMTS4) and aggrecanase 2 (ADAMTS5) are key enzymes in articular cartilage destruction, and (3) chondrocytes versus chondron in the development of osteoarthritis. It is hoped that continued discussion and investigation will follow to better clarify these topics. Clarification will be critical for those in search of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26380073

  10. Intestinal dysbiosis: an emerging cause of pregnancy complications?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxin; Huang, Yinping; Ye, Duyun

    2015-03-01

    The gut microbiota is intimately involved in numerous aspects of normal human physiology, including nutrition and metabolism, immunomodulation and behavior and stress response. Intestinal dysbiosis can be a contributing cause of many diseases, altering the function of both near and far organ systems. During pregnancy, the maternal body undergoes dramatic physiological changes to support the growth of fetus-placenta, while intestinal dysbiosis may directly or indirectly disturb the remodeling of physiological balance, leading to maternal maladaptation. Thus, intestinal dysbiosis, i.e., altered composition or metabolism of microbiota may adversely affect pregnancy outcome and lead to pregnancy complications via disrupting maternal adaptation. Indeed, pregnant women with potential maladaptations are at high risk of developing pregnancy disorders, which is increasingly observed in clinical cases. Here we discuss the hypothesis that intestinal dysbiosis may induce pregnancy complications via affecting maternal adaptation and the possible mechanistic pathways. PMID:25613564

  11. Pulsatile Fluid Shear in Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frangos, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to elucidate the sensitivity to transients in fluid shear stress in bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is clearly a function of the local mechanical environment which includes interstitial fluid flow. Traditionally, load-induced remodeling has been associated with low frequency (1-2 Hz) signals attributed to normal locomotion. McLeod and Rubin, however, demonstrated in vivo remodeling events associated with high frequency (15-30 Hz) loading. Likewise, other in vivo studies demonstrated that slowly applied strains did not trigger remodeling events. We therefore hypothesized that the mechanosensitive pathways which control bone maintenance and remodeling are differentially sensitive to varying rates of applied fluid shear stress.

  12. Dynamin, a membrane remodelling GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Shawn M.; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Dynamin, the founding member of a family of dynamin-like GTPases (DLPs) implicated in membrane remodelling, has a critical role in endocytic membrane fission events. The use of complementary approaches, including live cell imaging, cell free-studies, X-ray crystallography and genetic studies in mice has greatly advanced our understanding of the mechanisms by which dynamin acts, its essential roles in cell physiology and the specific function of different dynamin isoforms. In addition, several connections between dynamin and human disease have also emerged that highlight specific contributions of this GTPase to the physiology of different tissues. PMID:22233676

  13. Osteocyte-Driven Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant cells in bone, have been long postulated to detect and respond to mechanical and hormonal stimuli and to coordinate the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The discovery that the inhibitor of bone formation sclerostin is primarily expressed in osteocytes in bone and it is downregulated by anabolic stimuli provided a mechanism by which osteocytes influence the activity of osteoblasts. Advances of the last few years provided experimental evidence demonstrating that osteocytes also participate in the recruitment of osteoclasts and the initiation of bone remodeling. Apoptotic osteocytes trigger yet to be identified signals that attract osteoclast precursors to specific areas of bone, which in turn differentiate to mature, bone resorbing osteoclasts. Osteocytes are also the source of molecules that regulate generation and activity of osteoclasts, such as OPG and RANKL; and genetic manipulations of the mouse genome leading to loss or gain of function, or to altered expression of either molecule in osteocytes, markedly affect bone resorption. This review highlights these investigations and discusses how the novel concept of osteocyte-driven bone resorption and formation impacts our understanding of the mechanisms by which current therapies control bone remodeling. PMID:24002178

  14. HDL biogenesis, remodeling, and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Zannis, Vassilis I; Fotakis, Panagiotis; Koukos, Georgios; Kardassis, Dimitris; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review how HDL is generated, remodeled, and catabolized in plasma. We describe key features of the proteins that participate in these processes, emphasizing how mutations in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and the other proteins affect HDL metabolism. The biogenesis of HDL initially requires functional interaction of apoA-I with the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and subsequently interactions of the lipidated apoA-I forms with lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Mutations in these proteins either prevent or impair the formation and possibly the functionality of HDL. Remodeling and catabolism of HDL is the result of interactions of HDL with cell receptors and other membrane and plasma proteins including hepatic lipase (HL), endothelial lipase (EL), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), apolipoprotein M (apoM), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), the F1 subunit of ATPase (Ecto F1-ATPase), and the cubulin/megalin receptor. Similarly to apoA-I, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-IV were shown to form discrete HDL particles containing these apolipoproteins which may have important but still unexplored functions. Furthermore, several plasma proteins were found associated with HDL and may modulate its biological functions. The effect of these proteins on the functionality of HDL is the topic of ongoing research. PMID:25522986

  15. Intracranial pressure and skull remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, Timothy J.; Jordan Piluek, W.; Chang, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review bony changes resulting from alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) and the implications for ophthalmologists and the patients for whom we care. Before addressing ophthalmic implications, we will begin with a brief overview of bone remodeling. Bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension and hypertension will be discussed. The primary objective of this review was to bring attention to bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypotension skull remodeling can result in enophthalmos. In advanced disease enophthalmos develops to a degree that is truly disfiguring. The most common finding for which subjects are referred is ocular surface disease, related to loss of contact between the eyelids and the cornea. Other abnormalities seen include abnormal ocular motility and optic atrophy. Recognition of such changes is important to allow for diagnosis and treatment prior to advanced clinical deterioration. Routine radiographic assessment of bony changes may allow for the identification of patient with abnormal ICP prior to the development of clinically significant disease. PMID:25859141

  16. An Analysis of the Residential Remodeling Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scruggs, Kenneth

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the residential remodeling occupation. The analysis only briefly covers the many areas of residential remodeling. The document opens with a brief introduction followed by a job description. The bulk of the…

  17. Bone remodeling and silicon deficiency in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alveolar bone undergoes continuous remodeling to meet physiologic and functional demands. The aim of the present work was to evaluate histologically and histomorphometrically the effect of silicon deficiency on bone modeling and remodeling in the periodontal cortical plate. Two groups of weaning mal...

  18. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Längst, Gernot; Manelyte, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development. PMID:26075616

  19. Multiscale Simulation of Protein Mediated Membrane Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Gary S.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins interacting with membranes can result in substantial membrane deformations and curvatures. This effect is known in its broadest terms as membrane remodeling. This review article will survey current multiscale simulation methodologies that have been employed to examine protein-mediated membrane remodeling. PMID:19922811

  20. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  1. Lipid Acyl Chain Remodeling in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Mike F.; Bao, Xue; De Smet, Cedric H.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane lipid homeostasis is maintained by de novo synthesis, intracellular transport, remodeling, and degradation of lipid molecules. Glycerophospholipids, the most abundant structural component of eukaryotic membranes, are subject to acyl chain remodeling, which is defined as the post-synthetic process in which one or both acyl chains are exchanged. Here, we review studies addressing acyl chain remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model organism that has been successfully used to investigate lipid synthesis and its regulation. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of phospholipid acyl chain exchange in cardiolipin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine is summarized, including methods and tools that have been used for detecting remodeling. Progress in the identification of the enzymes involved is reported, and putative functions of acyl chain remodeling in yeast are discussed. PMID:26819558

  2. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  4. Thyroid Hormone and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism affect the cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism is known to be associated with enhanced atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases. The accelerated atherosclerosis in the hypothyroid state has been traditionally ascribed to atherogenic lipid profile, diastolic hypertension, and impaired endothelial function. However, recent studies indicate that thyroid hormone has direct anti-atherosclerotic effects, such as production of nitric oxide and suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation. These data suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits atherogenesis through direct effects on the vasculature as well as modification of risk factors for atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the basic and clinical studies on the role of thyroid hormone in vascular remodeling. The possible application of thyroid hormone mimetics to the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis is also discussed. PMID:26558400

  5. Calcium signalling remodelling and disease.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    A wide range of Ca2+ signalling systems deliver the spatial and temporal Ca2+ signals necessary to control the specific functions of different cell types. Release of Ca2+ by InsP3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) plays a central role in many of these signalling systems. Ongoing transcriptional processes maintain the integrity and stability of these cell-specific signalling systems. However, these homoeostatic systems are highly plastic and can undergo a process of phenotypic remodelling, resulting in the Ca2+ signals being set either too high or too low. Such subtle dysregulation of Ca2+ signals have been linked to some of the major diseases in humans such as cardiac disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22435804

  6. Vertebrate Intestinal Endoderm Development

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Jason R.; Lauf, Ryan; Shroyer, Noah F.

    2010-01-01

    The endoderm gives rise to the lining of the esophagus, stomach and intestines, as well as associated organs. To generate a functional intestine, a series of highly orchestrated developmental processes must occur. In this review, we attempt to cover major events during intestinal development from gastrulation to birth, including endoderm formation, gut tube growth and patterning, intestinal morphogenesis, epithelial reorganization, villus emergence as well as proliferation and cytodifferentiation. Our discussion includes morphological and anatomical changes during intestinal development as well as molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. PMID:21246663

  7. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  8. Lead Poisoning in Remodeling of Old Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bart

    1973-01-01

    An article based on Dr. Muriel D. Wolf's study of elevated blood lead levels in children and adults present during the remodeling of old homes. Lead poisoning examples, symptoms, and precautions are given. (ST)

  9. Bone Remodeling Under Pathological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenmei; Li, Shuai; Pacios, Sandra; Wang, Yu; Graves, Dana T

    2016-01-01

    Bone is masterfully programmed to repair itself through the coupling of bone formation following bone resorption, a process referred to as coupling. In inflammatory or other conditions, the balance between bone resorption and bone formation shifts so that a net bone loss results. This review focuses on four pathologic conditions in which remodeling leads to net loss of bone, postmenopausal osteoporosis, arthritis, periodontal disease, and disuse bone loss, which is similar to bone loss associated with microgravity. In most of these there is an acceleration of the resorptive process due to increased formation of bone metabolic units. This initially leads to a net bone loss since the time period of resorption is much faster than the time needed for bone formation that follows. In addition, each of these processes is characterized by an uncoupling that leads to net bone loss. Mechanisms responsible for increased rates of bone resorption, i.e. the formation of more bone metabolic units, involve enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased expression of RANKL. Moreover, the reasons for uncoupling are discussed which range from a decrease in expression of growth factors and bone morphogenetic proteins to increased expression of factors that inhibit Wnt signaling. PMID:26599114

  10. Remodeling kitchens: A smorgasbord of energy savings

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, B.

    1995-09-01

    The kitchen is often the busiest room in the house and is most likely to remodeled repeatedly over the life of a house. The kitchen also represents a concentration of household energy use. Remodeling a kitchen can mean introducing a host of new energy-saving features or making major energy blunders. This article discusses ways to utilized the best features: layout and design; appliances; lighting; windows and skylights; ventilation; insulation and air sealing; water; household recycling; green building materials.

  11. Effect of material damping on bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Misra, J C; Samanta, S

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of internal material damping on the stresses, strains, and surface and internal remodelling behaviour in a section of axisymmetrical bone with a force-fitted axially oriented medullary pin. The bone response to several loading situations is modelled using visco-elastic equations. An approximate method is developed to analyse the proposed mathematical model. By considering a numerical example, the effect of material damping on the remodelling stresses is quantified. PMID:3584150

  12. Chromatin remodeling by nucleosome disassembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2006-02-28

    The RSC chromatin-remodeling complex completely disassembles a nucleosome in the presence of the histone chaperone Nap1 and ATP. Disassembly occurs in a stepwise manner, with the removal of H2A/H2B dimers, followed by the rest of the histones and the release of naked DNA. RSC and related chromatin-remodeling complexes may be responsible for the removal of promoter nucleosomes during transcriptional activation in vivo. PMID:16492771

  13. Biomechanics of vascular mechanosensation and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Flowing blood exerts a frictional force, fluid shear stress (FSS), on the endothelial cells that line the blood and lymphatic vessels. The magnitude, pulsatility, and directional characteristics of FSS are constantly sensed by the endothelium. Sustained increases or decreases in FSS induce vessel remodeling to maintain proper perfusion of tissue. In this review, we discuss these mechanisms and their relevance to physiology and disease, and propose a model for how information from different mechanosensors might be integrated to govern remodeling. PMID:26715421

  14. Dynamics of the Ethanolamine Glycerophospholipid Remodeling Network

    PubMed Central

    Hermansson, Martin; Somerharju, Pentti; Chuang, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Acyl chain remodeling in lipids is a critical biochemical process that plays a central role in disease. However, remodeling remains poorly understood, despite massive increases in lipidomic data. In this work, we determine the dynamic network of ethanolamine glycerophospholipid (PE) remodeling, using data from pulse-chase experiments and a novel bioinformatic network inference approach. The model uses a set of ordinary differential equations based on the assumptions that (1) sn1 and sn2 acyl positions are independently remodeled; (2) remodeling reaction rates are constant over time; and (3) acyl donor concentrations are constant. We use a novel fast and accurate two-step algorithm to automatically infer model parameters and their values. This is the first such method applicable to dynamic phospholipid lipidomic data. Our inference procedure closely fits experimental measurements and shows strong cross-validation across six independent experiments with distinct deuterium-labeled PE precursors, demonstrating the validity of our assumptions. In constrast, fits of randomized data or fits using random model parameters are worse. A key outcome is that we are able to robustly distinguish deacylation and reacylation kinetics of individual acyl chain types at the sn1 and sn2 positions, explaining the established prevalence of saturated and unsaturated chains in the respective positions. The present study thus demonstrates that dynamic acyl chain remodeling processes can be reliably determined from dynamic lipidomic data. PMID:23251394

  15. Mitochondria, myocardial remodeling, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Hugo E; del Campo, Andrea; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Gutierrez, Tomás; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Pedrozo, Zully; Munoz, Juan Pablo; Garcia, Lorena; Castro, Pablo F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    The process of muscle remodeling lies at the core of most cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac adaptation to pressure or volume overload is associated with a complex molecular change in cardiomyocytes which leads to anatomic remodeling of the heart muscle. Although adaptive at its beginnings, the sustained cardiac hypertrophic remodeling almost unavoidably ends in progressive muscle dysfunction, heart failure and ultimately death. One of the features of cardiac remodeling is a progressive impairment in mitochondrial function. The heart has the highest oxygen uptake in the human body and accordingly it has a large number of mitochondria, which form a complex network under constant remodeling in order to sustain the high metabolic rate of cardiac cells and serve as Ca(2+) buffers acting together with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, this high dependence on mitochondrial metabolism has its costs: when oxygen supply is threatened, high leak of electrons from the electron transport chain leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial failure. These three aspects of mitochondrial function (Reactive oxygen species signaling, Ca(2+) handling and mitochondrial dynamics) are critical for normal muscle homeostasis. In this article, we will review the latest evidence linking mitochondrial morphology and function with the process of myocardial remodeling and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22972531

  16. Epigenomic regulation of oncogenesis by chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Li, D-Q; Müller, S; Knapp, S

    2016-08-25

    Disruption of the intricate gene expression program represents one of major driving factors for the development, progression and maintenance of human cancer, and is often associated with acquired therapeutic resistance. At the molecular level, cancerous phenotypes are the outcome of cellular functions of critical genes, regulatory interactions of histones and chromatin remodeling complexes in response to dynamic and persistent upstream signals. A large body of genetic and biochemical evidence suggests that the chromatin remodelers integrate the extracellular and cytoplasmic signals to control gene activity. Consequently, widespread dysregulation of chromatin remodelers and the resulting inappropriate expression of regulatory genes, together, lead to oncogenesis. We summarize the recent developments and current state of the dysregulation of the chromatin remodeling components as the driving mechanism underlying the growth and progression of human tumors. Because chromatin remodelers, modifying enzymes and protein-protein interactions participate in interpreting the epigenetic code, selective chromatin remodelers and bromodomains have emerged as new frontiers for pharmacological intervention to develop future anti-cancer strategies to be used either as single-agent or in combination therapies with chemotherapeutics or radiotherapy. PMID:26804164

  17. Cardiac remodelling and RAS inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carlos M

    2016-06-01

    Risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes are known to augment the activity and tissue expression of angiotensin II (Ang II), the major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Overstimulation of the RAS has been implicated in a chain of events that contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular (CV) disease, including the development of cardiac remodelling. This chain of events has been termed the CV continuum. The concept of CV disease existing as a continuum was first proposed in 1991 and it is believed that intervention at any point within the continuum can modify disease progression. Treatment with antihypertensive agents may result in regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, with different drug classes exhibiting different degrees of efficacy. The greatest decrease in left ventricular mass is observed following treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), which inhibit Ang II formation. Although ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) provide significant benefits in terms of CV events and stroke, mortality remains high. This is partly due to a failure to completely suppress the RAS, and, as our knowledge has increased, an escape phenomenon has been proposed whereby the human sequence of the 12 amino acid substrate angiotensin-(1-12) is converted to Ang II by the mast cell protease, chymase. Angiotensin-(1-12) is abundant in a wide range of organs and has been shown to increase blood pressure in animal models, an effect abolished by the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. This review explores the CV continuum, in addition to examining the influence of the RAS. We also consider novel pathways within the RAS and how new therapeutic approaches that target this are required to further reduce Ang II formation, and so provide patients with additional benefits from a more complete blockade of the RAS. PMID:27105891

  18. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in children

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Hasan M.; Al-Arayedh, Ghadeer G.; Mohamed, Afaf M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease characterized by dilatation of intestinal lymphatics. It can be classified as primary or secondary according to the underlying etiology. The clinical presentations of IL are pitting edema, chylous ascites, pleural effusion, acute appendicitis, diarrhea, lymphocytopenia, malabsorption, and intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis is made by intestinal endoscopy and biopsies. Dietary modification is the mainstay in the management of IL with a variable response. Here we report 2 patients with IL in Bahrain who showed positive response to dietary modification. PMID:26837404

  19. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  20. A fly's view of neuronal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Shiri P; Schuldiner, Oren

    2016-09-01

    Developmental neuronal remodeling is a crucial step in sculpting the final and mature brain connectivity in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Remodeling includes degenerative events, such as neurite pruning, that may be followed by regeneration to form novel connections during normal development. Drosophila provides an excellent model to study both steps of remodeling since its nervous system undergoes massive and stereotypic remodeling during metamorphosis. Although pruning has been widely studied, our knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms is far from complete. Our understanding of the processes underlying regrowth is even more fragmentary. In this review, we discuss recent progress by focusing on three groups of neurons that undergo stereotypic pruning and regrowth during metamorphosis, the mushroom body γ neurons, the dendritic arborization neurons and the crustacean cardioactive peptide peptidergic neurons. By comparing and contrasting the mechanisms involved in remodeling of these three neuronal types, we highlight the common themes and differences as well as raise key questions for future investigation in the field. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:618-635. doi: 10.1002/wdev.241 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27351747

  1. The role of midkine in skeletal remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Liedert, A; Schinke, T; Ignatius, A; Amling, M

    2014-01-01

    Bone tissue is subjected to continuous remodelling, replacing old or damaged bone throughout life. In bone remodelling, the coordinated activities of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts ensure the maintenance of bone mass and strength. In early life, the balance of these cellular activities is tightly regulated by various factors, including systemic hormones, the mechanical environment and locally released growth factors. Age-related changes in the activity of these factors in bone remodelling can result in diseases with low bone mass, such as osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a systemic and age-related skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and structural degeneration of bone tissue, predisposing the patient to an increased fracture risk. The growth factor midkine (Mdk) plays a key role in bone remodelling and it is expressed during bone formation and fracture repair. Using a mouse deficient in Mdk, our group have identified this protein as a negative regulator of bone formation and mechanically induced bone remodelling. Thus, specific Mdk antagonists might represent a therapeutic option for diseases characterized by low bone mass, such as osteoporosis. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24102259

  2. [The biliary intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Demetrashvili, Z M; Asatiani, G A; Nemsadze, G Sh; Kenchadze, G Z

    2012-01-01

    The successful experience of treatment of 3 patients with biliary intestinal obstruction is depicted. The most informative means of diagnostics was the multispiral computed tomography. Authors state, that the volume of the operation should include only the liquidation of the intestinal obstruction. The simultaneous biliodigestive fistulae closure should be performed only in rare situations. PMID:22678540

  3. Light and electron microscopic studies of the intestinal epithelium in Notoplana humilis (Platyhelminthes, Polycladida): the contribution of mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts to intestinal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Okano, Daisuke; Ishida, Sachiko; Ishiguro, Sei-ichi; Kobayashi, Kazuya

    2015-12-01

    Some free-living flatworms in the phylum Platyhelminthes possess strong regenerative capability that depends on putative pluripotent stem cells known as neoblasts. These neoblasts are defined based on several criteria, including their proliferative capacity and the presence of cellular components known as chromatoid bodies. Polyclads, which are marine flatworms, have the potential to be a good model system for stem cell research, yet little information is available regarding neoblasts and regeneration. In this study, transmission electron microscopy and immunostaining analyses, using antibodies against phospho-histone H3 and BrdU, were used to identify two populations of neoblasts in the polyclad Notoplana humilis: mesodermal neoblasts (located in the mesenchymal space) and gastrodermal neoblasts (located within the intestine, where granular club cells and phagocytic cells are also located). Light and electron microscopic analyses also suggested that phagocytic cells and mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts, but not granular club cells, migrated into blastemas and remodeled the intestine during regeneration. Therefore, we suggest that, in polyclads, intestinal regeneration is accomplished by mechanisms underlying both morphallaxis (remodeling of pre-existing tissues) and epimorphosis (de novo tissue formation derived from mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts). Based on the assumption that gastrodermal neoblasts, which are derived from mesodermal neoblasts, are intestinal stem cells, we propose a model to study intestinal regeneration. PMID:26104134

  4. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    limitation of versions, less separation of the tendons from sclera, and thicker appearance of the scar segments. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in the repair procedure reduced the recurrence rate. Histologic examination of the clinical stretched scar specimens showed dense connective tissue that was less well organized compared with normal tendon. In the tissue culture studies, cells cultured from the stretched scar specimens grew rapidly and were irregularly shaped. A high-molecular-weight protein was identified in the culture medium. By contrast, cells cultured from normal tendon (controls) grew more slowly and regularly, stopped growing at 4 days, and produced less total protein than cultured stretched scar specimens. In the animal model studies, the collagenase-treated sites showed elongated scars with increased collagen between the muscle and the sclera, as well as increased collagen creep rates, compared with the saline-treated controls. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in collagenase-treated animal model surgery sites was associated with shorter, thicker scars compared with similar sites sutured with absorbable sutures. CONCLUSIONS: A lengthened or stretched, remodeled scar between an operated muscle tendon and sclera is a common occurrence and is a factor contributing to the variability of outcome after strabismus repair, even years later. This abnormality may be revealed by careful exploration of previously operated muscles. Definitive repair requires firm reattachment of tendon to sclera with nonabsorbable suture support. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 52

  5. Intestinal adaptation after massive intestinal resection

    PubMed Central

    Weale, A; Edwards, A; Bailey, M; Lear, P

    2005-01-01

    Patients with short bowel syndrome require long term parenteral nutrition support. However, after massive intestinal resection the intestine undergoes adaptation and nutritional autonomy may be obtained. Given that the complications of parenteral nutrition may be life threatening or result in treatment failure and the need for intestinal transplantation, a more attractive option is to wean patients off nutrition support by optimising the adaptive process. The article examines the evidence that after extensive small bowel resection adaptation occurs in humans and focuses on the factors that influence adaptation and the strategies that have been used to optimise this process. The review is based on an English language Medline search with secondary references obtained from key articles. There is evidence that adaptation occurs in humans. Adaptation is a complex process that results in response to nutrient and non-nutrient stimuli. Successful and reproducible strategies to improve adaptation remain elusive despite an abundance of experimental data. Nevertheless given the low patient survival and quality of life associated with other treatments for irreversible intestinal failure it is imperative that clinical research continues into the optimisation of the adaptation. PMID:15749794

  6. Intestinal colonization resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Trevor D; Walker, Alan W

    2013-01-01

    Dense, complex microbial communities, collectively termed the microbiota, occupy a diverse array of niches along the length of the mammalian intestinal tract. During health and in the absence of antibiotic exposure the microbiota can effectively inhibit colonization and overgrowth by invading microbes such as pathogens. This phenomenon is called ‘colonization resistance’ and is associated with a stable and diverse microbiota in tandem with a controlled lack of inflammation, and involves specific interactions between the mucosal immune system and the microbiota. Here we overview the microbial ecology of the healthy mammalian intestinal tract and highlight the microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions that promote colonization resistance. Emerging themes highlight immunological (T helper type 17/regulatory T-cell balance), microbiota (diverse and abundant) and metabolic (short-chain fatty acid) signatures of intestinal health and colonization resistance. Intestinal pathogens use specific virulence factors or exploit antibiotic use to subvert colonization resistance for their own benefit by triggering inflammation to disrupt the harmony of the intestinal ecosystem. A holistic view that incorporates immunological and microbiological facets of the intestinal ecosystem should facilitate the development of immunomodulatory and microbe-modulatory therapies that promote intestinal homeostasis and colonization resistance. PMID:23240815

  7. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Krogsdam, Anne; Orth-Höller, Dorothea; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Lusser, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:27093431

  8. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sebald, Johanna; Willi, Michaela; Schoberleitner, Ines; Krogsdam, Anne; Orth-Höller, Dorothea; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Lusser, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:27093431

  9. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  10. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  11. Strategies for Energy Efficient Remodeling: SEER 2003 Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    The goal of the Strategies for Energy Efficiency in Remodeling (SEER) project is to provide information, based on research and case studies, to remodelers and consumers about opportunities to increase home energy performance.

  12. Subdural hygroma after craniosynostosis remodeling surgery.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Praveen; Nagarjuna, Muralidhara; Shetty, Samarth; Salins, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of the cranial sutures and can cause functional impairment or cosmetic deformity. Surgical techniques for the correction of craniosynostosis have changed overtime, as so have the intraoperative and postoperative complications. Extensive surgeries involving fronto-orbital unit repositioning and cranial vault remodeling are associated with various complications. Intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage, venous infarct, air embolism, hydrocephalus, cerebrospinal fluid leak, as well as meningitis are a few complications associated with cranial vault remodeling surgery. Postoperative complications can increase the morbidity and mortality associated with these procedures. Identification of the complications and their timely management should be a part of every craniofacial reconstruction team's training program.In this article, we report a case of subdural hygroma in an infant after cranial vault remodeling procedure. Subdural hygroma is a known complication following head injuries and represents 5% to 20% of posttraumatic intracranial mass lesions. However, subdural hygroma developing after a cranial procedure is rare and has not been reported in the literature. Identification of the complication, close monitoring of the change in subdural fluid volume, and tapping of the fluid through the craniotomy site if indicated form the mainstay of management of subdural hygroma that develops after cranial vault remodeling surgery. PMID:25469899

  13. Interleukin-20 promotes airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenbin; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yuguo; Hao, Junqing; Xing, Chunyan; Chu, Qi; Wang, Guicheng; Zhao, Jiping; Wang, Junfei; Dong, Qian; Liu, Tian; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Liang

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that interleukin-20 (IL-20) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and it has been implicated in psoriasis, lupus nephritis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and ulcerative colitis. Little is known about the effects of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the function of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. To identify the expression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, in the airway epithelium in bronchial tissues, bronchial biopsy specimens were collected from patients and mice with asthma and healthy subjects and stained with specific antibodies. To characterize the effects of IL-20 in asthmatic airway remodeling, we silenced and stimulated IL-20 in cell lines isolated from mice by shRNA and recombinant protein approaches, respectively, and detected the expression of α-SMA and FN-1 by Western blot analysis. First, overexpression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, was detected in the airway epithelium collected from patients and mice with asthma. Second, IL-20 increased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA, and silencing of IL-20 in mouse lung epithelial (MLE)-12 cells decreased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA. IL-20 may be a critical cytokine in airway remodeling in asthma. This study indicates that targeting IL-20 and/or its receptors may be a new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:25028099

  14. Chromatin-modifying and -remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Kornberg, R D; Lorch, Y

    1999-04-01

    Nucleosomes have long been known to inhibit DNA transactions on chromosomes and a remarkable abundance of multiprotein complexes that either enhance or relieve this inhibition have been described. Most is known about chromatin-remodeling complexes that perturb nucleosome structure. PMID:10322131

  15. Challenging Modernization: Remodelling the Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Graham; Gunter, Helen

    2005-01-01

    This special edition enables an in-depth look at the process of modernization of education in England, in relation to other international developments. In particular we focus on the reform of teachers? work by examining the antecedence of the current policy of remodelling through three articles based on the Evaluation of the Department for…

  16. Re-Modelling as De-Professionalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Meryl

    2006-01-01

    The article sets out the consequences of the British Government's remodelling agenda and its emphasis on less demarcation, for the professional status of teachers in England. It describes how the National Agreement on Raising Standards and Tackling Workload, reached between five of the six trade unions for teachers and headteachers paves the way…

  17. Arterial Remodeling Associates with CKD Progression

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Cédric; Karras, Alexandre; Laurent, Stéphane; Bozec, Erwan; Jacquot, Christian; Stengel, Bénédicte; Houillier, Pascal; Froissart, Marc; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    In CKD, large arteries remodel and become increasingly stiff. The greater pulsatile pressure reaching the glomerulus as a result of increased aortic stiffness could induce renal damage, suggesting that the stiffening and remodeling of large arteries could affect the progression of CKD. We measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, aortic pressure and carotid remodeling and stiffness parameters in 180 patients with CKD (mean measured GFR, 32 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and followed them prospectively for a mean of 3.1 years. During follow-up, carotid stiffness significantly increased (+0.28 ± 0.05 m/s; P < 0.0001) but aortic stiffness did not. Carotid intima-media thickness decreased significantly during follow-up and the internal diameter of the carotid increased, producing increased circumferential wall stress (+2.08 ± 0.43 kPa/yr; P < 0.0001). In a linear mixed model, circumferential wall stress significantly associated with faster GFR decline after adjustment for risk factors of cardiovascular disease and progression of CKD. In a multivariable Cox model, carotid circumferential wall stress and pulse pressure independently associated with higher risk for ESRD. None of the arterial stiffness parameters associated with progression of CKD. In conclusion, maladaptive remodeling of the carotid artery and increased pulse pressure independently associate with faster decline of renal function and progression to ESRD. PMID:21493771

  18. Revealing remodeler function: Varied and unique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastlund, Allen

    Chromatin remodelers perform a necessary and required function for the successful expression of our genetic code. By modifying, shifting, or ejecting nucleosomes from the chromatin structure they allow access to the underlying DNA to the rest of the cell's machinery. This research has focused on two major remodeler motors from major families of chromatin remodelers: the trimeric motor domain of RSC and the motor domain of the ISWI family, ISWI. Using primarily stopped-flow spectrofluorometry, I have categorized the time-dependent motions of these motor domains along their preferred substrate, double-stranded DNA. Combined with collected ATP utilization data, I present the subsequent analysis and associated conclusions that stem from the underlying assumptions and models. Interestingly, there is little in common between the investigated proteins aside from their favored medium. While RSC exhibits modest translocation characteristics and highly effective motion with the ability for large molecular forces, ISWI is not only structurally different but highly inefficient in its motion leading to difficulties in determining its specific translocation mechanics. While chromatin remodeling is a ubiquitous facet of eukaryotic life, there remains much to be understood about their general mechanisms.

  19. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome). Special diets often do not work. However, vitamin B12 and other vitamin supplements should be used for ... JM, Blackshaw LA. Small intestinal motor and sensory function and dysfunction. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt ...

  20. Intestinal obstruction repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs in the body Formation of scar tissue ( adhesions ) Heart attack or stroke Infection, including the lungs, ... Saunders; 2010:chap 119. Read More Abdomen - swollen Adhesion Colostomy Cyst Intestinal obstruction Intussusception - children Large bowel ...

  1. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications. PMID:16937429

  2. Arterial grafts exhibiting unprecedented cellular infiltration and remodeling in vivo: the role of cells in the vascular wall

    PubMed Central

    Row, Sindhu; Peng, Haofan; Schlaich, Evan M.; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Swartz, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To engineer and implant vascular grafts in the arterial circulation of a pre-clinical animal model and assess the role of donor medial cells in graft remodeling and function. Approach and results Vascular grafts were engineered using Small Intestinal Submucosa (SIS)-fibrin hybrid scaffold and implanted interpositionally into the arterial circulation of an ovine model. We sought to demonstrate implantability of SIS-Fibrin based grafts; examine the remodeling; and determine whether the presence of vascular cells in the medial wall was necessary for cellular infiltration from the host and successful remodeling of the implants. We observed no occlusions or anastomotic complications in 18 animals that received these grafts. Notably, the grafts exhibited unprecedented levels of host cell infiltration that was not limited to the anastomotic sites but occurred through the lumen as well as the extramural side, leading to uniform cell distribution. Incoming cells remodeled the extracellular matrix and matured into functional smooth muscle cells as evidenced by expression of myogenic markers and development of vascular reactivity. Interestingly, tracking the donor cells revealed that their presence was beneficial but not necessary for successful grafting. Indeed, the proliferation rate and number of donor cells decreased over time as the vascular wall was dominated by host cells leading to significant remodeling and development of contractile function. Conclusions These results demonstrate that SIS-Fibrin grafts can be successfully implanted into the arterial circulation of a clinically relevant animal model, improve our understanding of vascular graft remodeling and raise the possibility of engineering mural cell-free arterial grafts. PMID:25736502

  3. Claudins in intestines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Ding, Lei; Lu, Qun; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Intestines are organs that not only digest food and absorb nutrients, but also provide a defense barrier against pathogens and noxious agents ingested. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most apical component of the junctional complex, providing one form of cell-cell adhesion in enterocytes and playing a critical role in regulating paracellular barrier permeability. Alteration of TJs leads to a number of pathophysiological diseases causing malabsorption of nutrition and intestinal structure disruption, which may even contribute to systemic organ failure. Claudins are the major structural and functional components of TJs with at least 24 members in mammals. Claudins have distinct charge-selectivity, either by tightening the paracellular pathway or functioning as paracellular channels, regulating ions and small molecules passing through the paracellular pathway. In this review, we have discussed the functions of claudin family members, their distribution and localization in the intestinal tract of mammals, their alterations in intestine-related diseases and chemicals/agents that regulate the expression and localization of claudins as well as the intestinal permeability, which provide a therapeutic view for treating intestinal diseases. PMID:24478939

  4. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Somesh

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25792565

  5. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling. PMID:17386182

  6. [Intestinal obstruction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Stukan, Maciej; Kruszewski Wiesław, Janusz; Dudziak, Mirosław; Kopiejć, Arkadiusz; Preis, Krzysztof

    2013-02-01

    This is a review of literature concerning intestinal obstruction in pregnant women. Approximately 50-90% and 30% of pregnant women, respectively suffer from nausea and vomiting, mostly during the first trimester. There is also increased risk of constipation. During the perioperative period, the administration of tocolytics should be considered only in women showing symptoms of a threatening premature delivery. Intensive hydration should be ordered to sustain uterine blood flow. The incidence of intestinal obstruction during pregnancy is estimated at 1:1500-1:66431 pregnancies and is diagnosed in II and III trimester in most cases. However, it can also occur in the I trimester (6%) or puerperium. Symptoms of intestinal obstruction in pregnancy include: abdominal pains (98%), vomiting (82%), constipation (30%). Abdominal tenderness on palpation is found in 71% and abnormal peristalsis in 55% of cases. The most common imaging examination in the diagnosis of intestinal obstruction is the abdominal X-ray. However ionizing radiation may have a harmful effect on the fetus, especially during the first trimester. X-ray is positive for intestinal obstruction in 82% of pregnant women. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered safe and applicable during pregnancy. Intestinal obstruction in pregnant women is mostly caused by: adhesions (54.6%), intestinal torsion (25%), colorectal carcinoma (3.7%), hernia (1.4%), appendicitis (0.5%) and others (10%). Adhesive obstruction occurs more frequently in advanced pregnancy (6% - I trimester 28% - II trimester; 45% - III trimester 21% - puerperium). Treatment should begin with conservative procedures. Surgical treatment may be necessary in cases where the pain turns from recurrent into continuous, with tachycardia, pyrexia and a positive Blumberg sign. If symptoms of fetal anoxia are observed, a C-section should be carried out before surgical intervention. The extent of surgical intervention depends on the

  7. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  8. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  9. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed. PMID:27161240

  10. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  11. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  12. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  13. Perspectives on biological growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, D.; Ateshian, G. A.; Arruda, E. M.; Cowin, S. C.; Dumais, J.; Goriely, A.; Holzapfel, G. A.; Humphrey, J. D.; Kemkemer, R.; Kuhl, E.; Olberding, J. E.; Taber, L. A.; Garikipati, K.

    2011-01-01

    The continuum mechanical treatment of biological growth and remodeling has attracted considerable attention over the past fifteen years. Many aspects of these problems are now well-understood, yet there remain areas in need of significant development from the standpoint of experiments, theory, and computation. In this perspective paper we review the state of the field and highlight open questions, challenges, and avenues for further development. PMID:21532929

  14. Interdependency between mechanical parameters and afferent nerve discharge in hypertrophic intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Pengmin; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Grundy, David; Gregersen, Hans

    2016-03-15

    Partial intestinal obstruction causes smooth muscle hypertrophy, enteric neuronal plasticity, motility disorders, and biomechanical remodeling. In this study we characterized the stimulus-response function of afferent fibers innervating the partially obstructed jejunum. A key question is whether changes in afferent firing arise from remodeled mechanical tissue properties or from adaptive afferent processes. Partial obstruction was created by placing a polyethylene ring for 2 wk in jejunum of seven rats. Sham obstruction was made in six rats and seven rats served as normal controls. Firing from mesenteric afferent nerve bundles was recorded during mechanical ramp, relaxation, and creep tests. Stress-strain, spike rate increase ratio (SRIR), and firing rate in single units were assessed for evaluation of interdependency of the mechanical stimulations, histomorphometry data, and afferent nerve discharge. Partial intestinal obstruction resulted in hypertrophy and jejunal stiffening proximal to the obstruction site. Low SRIR at low strains during fast distension and at high stresses during slow distension was found in the obstructed rats. Single unit analysis showed increased proportion of mechanosensitive units but absent high-threshold (HT) units during slow stimulation, decreased number of HT units during fast stimulation, and shift from HT sensitivity towards low threshold sensitivity in the obstructed jejunum. Biomechanical remodeling and altered afferent response to mechanical stimulations were found in the obstructed jejunum. Afferents from obstructed jejunum preserved their function in encoding ongoing mechanical stimulation but showed changes in their responsiveness. The findings support that mechanical factors rather than adaption are important for afferent remodeling. PMID:26585414

  15. Link between vitamin D and airway remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Berraies, Anissa; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Hamzaoui, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, many epidemiologic studies have investigated the link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. Most studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of asthma and allergies. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with asthma severity and loss of control, together with recurrent exacerbations. Remodeling is an early event in asthma described as a consequence of production of mediators and growth factors by inflammatory and resident bronchial cells. Consequently, lung function is altered, with a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second and exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness. Subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle cell hypertrophy are typical features of structural changes in the airways. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency enhances inflammation and bronchial anomalies. In severe asthma of childhood, major remodeling is observed in patients with low vitamin D levels. Conversely, the antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D in smooth muscle cells have been described in several experiments. In this review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding the relationship between vitamin D and asthma, and focus on its effect on airway remodeling and its potential therapeutic impact for asthma. PMID:24729717

  16. Tissue Remodelling following Resection of Porcine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Ingvild Engdal; Mortensen, Kim Erlend; Hedegaard, Jakob; Conley, Lene Nagstrup; Bendixen, Christian; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur; Revhaug, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To study genes regulating the extracellular matrix (ECM) and investigate the tissue remodelling following liver resection in porcine. Methods. Four pigs with 60% partial hepatectomy- (PHx-) induced liver regeneration were studied over six weeks. Four pigs underwent sham surgery and another four pigs were used as controls of the normal liver growth. Liver biopsies were taken upon laparotomy, after three and six weeks. Gene expression profiles were obtained using porcine-specific oligonucleotide microarrays. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and a proliferative index was assessed. Results. More differentially expressed genes were associated with the regulation of ECM in the resection group compared to the sham and control groups. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and collagen 1, alpha 2 (COL1A2) were both upregulated in the early phase of liver regeneration, validated by immunopositive cells during the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. A broadened connective tissue was demonstrated by Masson's Trichrome staining, and an immunohistochemical staining against pan-Cytokeratin (pan-CK) demonstrated a distinct pattern of migrating cells, followed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive nuclei. Conclusions. The present study demonstrates both a distinct pattern of PCNA positive nuclei and a deposition of ECM proteins in the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. PMID:26240819

  17. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. PMID:26895087

  18. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1–2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10051.001 PMID:26895087

  19. MicroRNA and vascular remodelling in acute vascular injury and pulmonary vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert A.; Hata, Akiko; MacLean, Margaret R.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular remodelling is an integral pathological process central to a number of cardiovascular diseases. The complex interplay between distinct cell populations in the vessel wall following vascular injury leads to inflammation, cellular dysfunction, pro-growth signals in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) compartment, and the acquisition of a synthetic phenotype. Although the signals for vascular remodelling are diverse in different pathological contexts, SMC proliferation and migration are consistently observed. It is therefore critical to elucidate key mechanisms central to these processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding sequences of RNA that have the capacity to regulate many genes, pathways, and complex biological networks within cells, acting either alone or in concert with one another. In diseases such as cancer and cardiac disease, the role of miRNA in disease pathogenesis has been documented in detail. In contrast, despite a great deal of interest in miRNA, relatively few studies have directly assessed the role of miRNA in vascular remodelling. The potential for modulation of miRNA to achieve therapeutic benefits in this setting is attractive. Here, we focus on the role of miRNA in vascular inflammation and remodelling associated with acute vascular injury (vein graft disease, angioplasty restenosis, and in-stent restenosis) as well as in vascular remodelling associated with the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:22065733

  20. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    PubMed

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  1. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections. PMID:27168147

  2. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine adenocarcinoma, by stage How is small intestine adenocarcinoma staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  3. Arterial remodeling of basilar atherosclerosis in isolated pontine infarction.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Hua, Ting; Xu, Yu; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Huang, Jing

    2015-04-01

    Isolated pontine infarctions are usually classified as paramedian pontine infarction (PPI) and lacunar pontine infarction (LPI). Although they have different shapes and locations, some recent studies proved that they might both be associated with basilar artery atherosclerosis in pathogenesis. This study aimed to explore the difference of basilar artery remodeling between two subtypes of pontine infarctions. Patients with PPI or LPI were scanned by High-resolution MRI (HR-MRI). The MR images of patients with basilar artery atherosclerosis were further analyzed to measure the vessel, lumen and wall areas at different segments of basilar arteries. Stenosis rate and remodeling index were calculated according to which arterial remodeling was divided into positive, intermediate and negative remodeling. Vascular risk factors and remodeling-related features were compared between PPI and LPI, and also between patients with and without positive remodeling. 34 patients with PPI and 21 patients with LPI had basilar artery atherosclerosis identified by HR-MRI. Positive remodeling was dominant in LPI group while in PPI group, three subtypes of remodeling were equal. Patients with positive remodeling had higher levels of low-density lipoprotein and homocysteine. Positive remodeling of basilar artery might reflect the low stability of basilar atherosclerotic plaques, which was more closely associated with LPI than PPI. PMID:25367406

  4. Immunologic and inflammatory mechanisms that drive asthma progression to remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Broide, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Although histologic features of airway remodeling have been well characterized in asthma, the immunologic and inflammatory mechanisms that drive progression of asthma to remodeling are still incompletely understood. Conceptually, airway remodeling may be due to persistent inflammation and/or aberrant tissue repair mechanisms. It is likely that several immune and inflammatory cell types and mediators are involved in mediating airway remodeling. In addition, different features of airway remodeling are likely mediated by different inflammatory pathways. Several important candidate mediators of remodeling have been identified including TGF-β and Th2 cytokines (including IL-5 and IL-13), as well as VEGF, ADAM-33, and MMP-9. Mouse models of airway remodeling have provided important insight into potential mechanisms by which TGF-β activation of the Smad 2/3 signaling pathway may contribute to airway remodeling. Human studies have demonstrated that anti-IL-5 reduces levels of airway eosinophils expressing TGF-β, as well as levels of airway remodeling as assessed by bronchial biopsies. Further such studies confirming these observations, as well as alternate studies targeting additional individual cell types, cytokines, and mediators are needed in human subjects with asthma to determine the role of candidate mediators of inflammation on the development and progression of airway remodeling. PMID:18328887

  5. Assessment of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Nikaki, K; Gupte, G L

    2016-04-01

    Significant efforts have been made in the last decade to either standardize the available tests for intestinal malabsorption or to develop new, more simple and reliable techniques. The quest is still on and, unfortunately, clinical practice has not dramatically changed. The investigation of intestinal malabsorption is directed by the patient's history and baseline tests. Endoscopy and small bowel biopsies play a major role although non-invasive tests are favored and often performed early on the diagnostic algorithm, especially in paediatric and fragile elderly patients. The current clinically available methods and research tools are summarized in this review article. PMID:27086887

  6. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Levine, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optimal treatment regimen remains elusive. Recently there has been renewed interest in SIBO and its putative association with irritable bowel syndrome. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of SIBO. PMID:21960820

  7. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  8. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  9. VESGEN Mapping of Bioactive Protection against Intestinal Inflammation: Application to Human Spaceflight and ISS Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, P. A.; Chen, X.; Kelly, C. P.; Reinecker, H. C.

    2011-01-01

    Challenges to successful space exploration and colonization include adverse physiological reactions to micro gravity and space radiation factors. Constant remodeling of the microvasculature is critical for tissue preservation, wound healing, and recovery after ischemia. Regulation of the vascular system in the intestine is particularly important to enable nutrient absorption while maintaining barrier function and mucosal defense against micro biota. Although tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular circuits regulating neovascularization, our knowledge of the adaptations of the vascular system to environmental challenges in the intestine remains incomplete. This is in part because of the lack of methods to observe and quantify the complex processes associated with vascular responses in vivo. Developed by GRC as a mature beta version, pre-release research software, VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) maps and quantifies the fractal-based complexity of vascular branching for novel insights into the cytokine, transgenic and therapeutic regulation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and microvascular remodeling. Here we demonstrate that VESGEN can be used to characterize the dynamic vascular responses to acute intestinal inflammation and mucosal recovery from in vivo confocal microscopic 3D image series. We induced transient intestinal inflammation in mice by DSS treatment and investigated whether the ability of the pro biotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) to protect against intestinal inflammation was due to regulation of vascular remodeling. A primary characteristic of inflammation is excessive neovascularization (angiogenesis) resulting in fragile vessels prone to bleeding. Morphological parameters for triplicate specimens revealed that Sb treatment greatly reduced the inflammatory response of vascular networks by an average of 78%. This resulted from Sb inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling, a major

  10. Intestinal volvulus in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Begeman, L; St Leger, J A; Blyde, D J; Jauniaux, T P; Lair, S; Lovewell, G; Raverty, S; Seibel, H; Siebert, U; Staggs, S L; Martelli, P; Keesler, R I

    2013-07-01

    Intestinal volvulus was recognized as the cause of death in 18 cetaceans, including 8 species of toothed whales (suborder Odontoceti). Cases originated from 11 institutions from around the world and included both captive (n = 9) and free-ranging (n = 9) animals. When the clinical history was available (n = 9), animals consistently demonstrated acute dullness 1 to 5 days prior to death. In 3 of these animals (33%), there was a history of chronic gastrointestinal illness. The pathological findings were similar to those described in other animal species and humans, and consisted of intestinal volvulus and a well-demarcated segment of distended, congested, and edematous intestine with gas and bloody fluid contents. Associated lesions included congested and edematous mesentery and mesenteric lymph nodes, and often serofibrinous or hemorrhagic abdominal effusion. The volvulus involved the cranial part of the intestines in 85% (11 of 13). Potential predisposing causes were recognized in most cases (13 of 18, 72%) but were variable. Further studies investigating predisposing factors are necessary to help prevent occurrence and enhance early clinical diagnosis and management of the condition. PMID:23150643

  11. Congenital intestinal atresia.

    PubMed

    Davenport, M; Bianchi, A

    1990-09-01

    Surgery for infants with intestinal atresia has evolved along with the development of specialized neonatal surgical units. This once fatal condition now carries a better than 85% chance of survival and an excellent long-term prognosis. Recent advances in bowel preservation techniques have reduced morbidity and improved gut function in both the long and the short term. PMID:2257399

  12. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine cancer include unexplained weight loss and abdominal pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... doctor if you have any of the following: Pain or cramps in the middle of the abdomen. Weight loss with no known reason. A lump ...

  13. A dynamic zone defines interneuron remodeling in the adult neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Chung Allen; Chen, Jerry L.; Huang, Hayden; Leslie, Jennifer H.; Amitai, Yael; So, Peter T.; Nedivi, Elly

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of structural remodeling to long-term adult brain plasticity is unclear. Here, we investigate features of GABAergic interneuron dendrite dynamics and extract clues regarding its potential role in cortical function and circuit plasticity. We show that remodeling interneurons are contained within a “dynamic zone” corresponding to a superficial strip of layers 2/3, and remodeling dendrites respect the lower border of this zone. Remodeling occurs primarily at the periphery of dendritic fields with addition and retraction of new branch tips. We further show that dendrite remodeling is not intrinsic to a specific interneuron class. These data suggest that interneuron remodeling is not a feature predetermined by genetic lineage, but rather, it is imposed by cortical laminar circuitry. Our findings are consistent with dynamic GABAergic modulation of feedforward and recurrent connections in response to top-down feedback and suggest a structural component to functional plasticity of supragranular neocortical laminae. PMID:19066223

  14. In Brief: Picturing the complex world of chromatin remodelling families.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Leora; Foulkes, William D

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, chromatin remodelling emerged as one of the most important causes of both abnormal development and cancer. Although much has been written about one or another of the complexes, no recent concise summary of the chromatin remodelling families as a whole is available. In this short review, we introduce the family members, briefly summarize their role in developmental abnormalities and neoplasia, and outline the different ways in which these families remodel chromatin. PMID:26174723

  15. Control of bone remodelling by applied dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The data showing the relationship between bone mass and peak strain magnitude prepared and submitted for publication. The data from experiments relating remodelling activity with static or dynamic loads were prepared and submitted for publication. Development of programs to relate the location of remodelling activity with he natural and artificial dynamic strain distributions continued. Experiments on the effect of different strain rates on the remodelling response continued.

  16. Pregnancy-induced remodeling of heart valves.

    PubMed

    Pierlot, Caitlin M; Moeller, Andrew D; Lee, J Michael; Wells, Sarah M

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated remodeling of aortic and mitral valves leaflets under the volume loading and cardiac expansion of pregnancy. Those valves' leaflets enlarge with altered collagen fiber architecture, content, and cross-linking and biphasic changes (decreases, then increases) in extensibility during gestation. This study extends our analyses to right-sided valves, with additional compositional measurements for all valves. Valve leaflets were harvested from nonpregnant heifers and pregnant cows. Leaflet structure was characterized by leaflet dimensions, and ECM composition was determined using standard biochemical assays. Histological studies assessed changes in cellular and ECM components. Leaflet mechanical properties were assessed using equibiaxial mechanical testing. Collagen thermal stability and cross-linking were assessed using denaturation and hydrothermal isometric tension tests. Pulmonary and tricuspid leaflet areas increased during pregnancy by 35 and 55%, respectively. Leaflet thickness increased by 20% only in the pulmonary valve and largely in the fibrosa (30% thickening). Collagen crimp length was reduced in both the tricuspid (61%) and pulmonary (42%) valves, with loss of crimped area in the pulmonary valve. Thermomechanics showed decreased collagen thermal stability with surprisingly maintained cross-link maturity. The pulmonary leaflet exhibited the biphasic change in extensibility seen in left side valves, whereas the tricuspid leaflet mechanics remained largely unchanged throughout pregnancy. The tricuspid valve exhibits a remodeling response during pregnancy that is significantly diminished from the other three valves. All valves of the heart remodel in pregnancy in a manner distinct from cardiac pathology, with much similarity valve to valve, but with interesting valve-specific responses in the aortic and tricuspid valves. PMID:26371175

  17. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes. PMID:25790500

  18. Adipocyte inflammation is essential for healthy adipose tissue expansion and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Tao, Caroline; Morley, Thomas S; Wang, Qiong A; Delgado-Lopez, Fernando; Wang, Zhao V; Scherer, Philipp E

    2014-07-01

    Chronic inflammation constitutes an important link between obesity and its pathophysiological sequelae. In contrast to the belief that inflammatory signals exert a fundamentally negative impact on metabolism, we show that proinflammatory signaling in the adipocyte is in fact required for proper adipose tissue remodeling and expansion. Three mouse models with an adipose tissue-specific reduction in proinflammatory potential were generated that display a reduced capacity for adipogenesis in vivo, while the differentiation potential is unaltered in vitro. Upon high-fat-diet exposure, the expansion of visceral adipose tissue is prominently affected. This is associated with decreased intestinal barrier function, increased hepatic steatosis, and metabolic dysfunction. An impaired local proinflammatory response in the adipocyte leads to increased ectopic lipid accumulation, glucose intolerance, and systemic inflammation. Adipose tissue inflammation is therefore an adaptive response that enables safe storage of excess nutrients and contributes to a visceral depot barrier that effectively filters gut-derived endotoxin. PMID:24930973

  19. An RNAi screen reveals intestinal regulators of branching morphogenesis, differentiation, and stem cell proliferation in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Forsthoefel, David J.; James, Noelle P.; Escobar, David J.; Stary, Joel M.; Vieira, Ana P.; Waters, Forrest A.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Planarians grow and regenerate organs by coordinating proliferation and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells with remodeling of post-mitotic tissues. Understanding how these processes are orchestrated requires characterizing cell type-specific gene expression programs and their regulation during regeneration and homeostasis. To this end, we analyzed the expression profile of planarian intestinal phagocytes, cells responsible for digestion and nutrient storage/distribution. Utilizing RNA interference, we identified cytoskeletal regulators required for intestinal branching morphogenesis, and a modulator of bioactive sphingolipid metabolism, ceramide synthase, required for the production of functional phagocytes. Additionally, we found that a gut-enriched homeobox transcription factor, nkx-2.2, is required for somatic stem cell proliferation, suggesting a niche-like role for phagocytes. Identification of evolutionarily conserved regulators of intestinal branching, differentiation, and stem cell dynamics demonstrates the utility of the planarian digestive system as a model for elucidating the mechanisms controlling post-embryonic organogenesis. PMID:23079596

  20. [Histamine in regulation of bone remodeling processes].

    PubMed

    Wiercigroch, Marek; Folwarczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bone remodeling is under autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and central nervous system control. One of the potential endogenous factors affecting bone remodeling is histamine, an endogenous amine which acts as a mediator of allergic reactions and neuromediator, and induces production of gastric acid. Histamine H₁ receptor antagonists are widely used in the treatment of allergic conditions, H₂ receptor antagonists in peptic ulcer disease, and betahistine (an H₃ receptor antagonist and H₁ receptor agonist) is used in the treatment of Ménière's disease. Excess histamine release in mastocytosis and allergic diseases may lead to development of osteoporosis. Clinical and population-based studies on the effects of histamine receptor antagonists on the skeletal system have not delivered unequivocal results. Expression of mRNA of histamine receptors has been discovered in bone cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts). Histamine synthesis has been demonstrated in osteoclast precursors. Histamine increases bone resorption both by direct effects on osteoclast precursors and osteoclasts, and indirectly, by increasing the expression of RANKL in osteoblasts. In in vivo studies, H₁ and H₂ receptor antagonists exerted protective effects on the bone tissue, although not in all experimental models. In the present article, in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far, concerning the effects of histamine and drugs modifying its activity on the skeletal system, have been reviewed. PMID:24018454

  1. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  2. PARP inhibition and postinfarction myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Halmosi, Robert; Deres, Laszlo; Gal, Roland; Eros, Krisztian; Sumegi, Balazs; Toth, Kalman

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease accounts for the greatest proportion of cardiovascular diseases therefore it is the major cause of death worldwide. Its therapeutic importance is indicated by still high mortality of myocardial infarction, which is one of the most severe forms of CVDs. Moreover, the risk of developing heart failure is very high among survivors. Heart failure is accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rate, therefore this topic is in the focus of researchers' interest. After a myocardial infarct, at first ventricular hypertrophy develops as a compensatory mechanism to decrease wall stress but finally leads to left ventricular dilation. This phenomenon is termed as myocardial remodeling. The main characteristics of underlying mechanisms involve cardiomyocyte growth, vessel changes and increased collagen production, in all of which several mechanical stress induced neurohumoral agents, oxidative stress and signal transduction pathways are involved. The long term activation of these processes ultimately leads to left ventricular dilation and heart failure with decreased systolic function. Oxidative stress causes DNA breaks producing the activation of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) enzyme that leads to energy depletion and unfavorable modulation of different kinase cascades (Akt-1/GSK-3β, MAPKs, various PKC isoforms) and thus it promotes the development of heart failure. Therefore inhibition of PARP enzyme could offer a promising new therapeutical approach to prevent the onset of heart failure among postinfarction patients. The purpose of this review is to give a comprehensive summary about the most significant experimental results and mechanisms in postinfarction remodeling. PMID:27392900

  3. Remodeling of the Fetal Collecting Duct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Michael J.; Ivanova, Larissa; Toran, Nuria; Tarantal, Alice F.; Matsell, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital urinary tract obstruction induces changes to the renal collecting duct epithelium, including alteration and depletion of intercalated cells. To study the effects of obstruction on the ontogeny of intercalated cell development, we examined normal and obstructed human fetal and postnatal kidneys. In the normal human fetal kidney, intercalated cells originated in the medullary collecting duct at 8 weeks gestation and remained most abundant in the inner medulla throughout gestation. In the cortex, intercalated cells were rare at 18 and 26 weeks gestation and observed at low abundance at 36 weeks gestation. Although early intercalated cells exhibit an immature phenotype, Type A intercalated cells predominated in the inner and outer medullae at 26 and 36 weeks gestation with other intercalated cell subtypes observed rarely. Postnatally, the collecting duct epithelium underwent a remodeling whereby intercalated cells become abundant in the cortex yet absent from the inner medulla. In 18-week obstructed kidneys with mild to moderate injury, the intercalated cells became more abundant and differentiated than the equivalent age-matched normal kidney. In contrast, more severely injured ducts of the late obstructed kidney exhibited a significant reduction in intercalated cells. These studies characterize the normal ontogeny of human intercalated cell development and suggest that obstruction induces premature remodeling and differentiation of the fetal collecting duct epithelium. PMID:20035053

  4. Abnormal bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bogoch, Earl R.; Moran, Erica

    1998-01-01

    Osteopenia is responsible for substantial comorbidity in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and is an important factor in the surgical management of joint disease. In animal models of bone loss stimulated by inflammatory arthritis, increased bone remodelling and altered microstructure of bone have been documented. The subchondral bone plate near the joint surface is narrow and perforated by vascular inflammatory invasion, and in the shaft the thin cortices are weakened by giant resorption defects. Biomechanical tests and a mathematical model of bone strength suggest that cortical defects, much larger than those found in normal osteonal remodelling, are principally responsible for the experimentally observed loss of strength. Similarly, these defects may explain the increased femoral fracture risk in rheumatoid arthritis. The osteoclast, the cell resorbing bone, is demonstrated in increased number and activity in rheumatoid arthritis and in animal models. Bisphosphonates, drugs that inhibit osteoclast function, have been shown experimentally to reduce both focal and generalized osteopenia and to prevent loss of bone strength. Bisphosphonates also protect articular cartilage from damage characteristic of inflammatory arthritis. The mechanism of chondroprotection may be prevention of subchondral bone resorption by the osteoclast and also an altered distribution of bone marrow cells. Thus, bisphosphonates, currently in clinical use for other bone metabolic diseases, appear to have potential as prophylaxis and treatment for osteopenia and joint damage in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9711159

  5. Hard tissue remodeling using biofabricated coralline biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Vago, Razi; Plotquin, Daniel; Bunin, Alex; Sinelnikov, Igor; Atar, Dan; Itzhak, David

    2002-01-01

    Biotechnical and biomedical approaches were combined in an attempt to identify potential uses of biofabricated marine carbonate materials in biomedical applications, particularly as biomatrices for remodeling bone and cartilage tissue. After grafting, it is desirable for bone ingrowth to proceed as quickly as possible because the strength of the implanted region depends on a good mechanical bond forming between the implant and surrounding regions in the body. Ingrowth can take place as a result of growth of tissue and cells into the implanted porous material, or it may be promoted by transplanting cells seeded onto such a material. The rate at which ingrowth occurs is dependent on many factors, including pore size and the interconnectivity of the implanted structure. In vivo graftings into osteochondral defects demonstrated that our biofabricated porous material is highly biocompatible with cartilage and bone tissue. The biofabricated matrix was well incorporated into the biphasic osteochondral area. Resorption was followed by bone and cartilage formation, and after 4 months, the biomaterial had been replaced by new tissue. Ossification was induced and enhanced without introduction of additional factors. We believe that this is the first time that such biofabricated materials have been used for biomedical purposes. In face of the obvious environmental disadvantages of harvesting from limited natural resources, we propose the use of bioengineered coralline and other materials such as those cultured by our group under field and laboratory conditions as a possible biomatrix for hard tissue remodeling. PMID:11741712

  6. Chromatin remodeling in cardiovascular development and physiology

    PubMed Central

    Han, Pei; Hang, Calvin T.; Yang, Jin; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin regulation provides an important means of controlling cardiac gene expression under different physiological and pathological conditions. Processes that direct the development of normal embryonic hearts and pathology of stressed adult hearts may share general mechanisms that govern cardiac gene expression by chromatin-regulating factors. These common mechanisms may provide a framework for us to investigate the interactions among diverse chromatin remodelers/modifiers and various transcription factors in the fine regulation of gene expression, essential for all aspects of cardiovascular biology. Aberrant cardiac gene expression, triggered by a variety of pathological insults, can cause heart diseases in both animals and humans. The severity of cardiomyopathy and heart failure correlates strongly with abnormal cardiac gene expression. Therefore, controlling cardiac gene expression presents a promising approach to the treatment of human cardiomyopathy. This review focuses on the roles of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors and chromatin-modifying enzymes in the control of gene expression during cardiovascular development and disease. PMID:21293009

  7. Atrial remodeling, fibrosis, and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Jalife, José; Kaur, Kuljeet

    2015-08-01

    The fundamental mechanisms governing the perpetuation of atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common arrhythmia seen in clinical practice, are poorly understood, which explains in part why AF prevention and treatment remain suboptimal. Although some clinical parameters have been identified as predicting a transition from paroxysmal to persistent AF in some patients, the molecular, electrophysiological, and inflammation changes leading to such a progression have not been described in detail. Oxidative stress, atrial dilatation, calcium overload, inflammation, microRNAs, and myofibroblast activation are all thought to be involved in AF-induced atrial remodeling. However, it is unknown to what extent and at which time points such alterations influence the remodeling process that perpetuates AF. Here we postulate a working model that might open new pathways for future investigation into mechanisms of AF perpetuation. We start from the premise that the progression to AF perpetuation is the result of interplay among manifold signaling pathways with differing kinetics. Some such pathways have relatively fast kinetics (e.g., oxidative stress-mediated shortening of refractory period); others likely depend on molecular processes with slower kinetics (e.g., transcriptional changes in myocyte ion channel protein expression mediated through inflammation and fibroblast activation). We stress the need to fully understand the relationships among such pathways should one hope to identify novel, truly effective targets for AF therapy and prevention. PMID:25661032

  8. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  9. Intestinal involvement is not sufficient to explain hypertransaminasemia in celiac disease?

    PubMed

    Peláez-Luna, Mario; Schmulson, Max; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    Chronic unexplained hypertransaminasemia is an isolated clinical manifestation of celiac disease (CD) and lacks of a clear physiopathological explanation. Since CD and tropical sprue (TS) have similar intestinal functional and histological pattern of injury and that an increased inflammatory response has been reported to occur in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), liver involvement might be expected to occur either in TS or IBS. However, according to author's prior observations, the frequency of hypertransaminasemia is significantly higher in CD than in TS and IBS-diarrhea predominant patients (IBS-D). Thus, based on current knowledge, intestinal mucosal damage, increased intestinal permeability and/or an active intestinal inflammatory response do not completely explain liver damage in CD. We hypothesize that other factors, unique to CD not present in TS or IBS-D, like gluten toxicity and the presence of tissular transglutaminase (tTG) an auto-antigen with pro-inflammatory and remodeling properties, act in addition to intestinal mucosal injury and account to hypertransaminasemia in CD. Further research focusing on the mechanisms of gluten and tTG hepatic toxicity, and/or the characterization of the expression, secretion and enteral-hepatic transport of certain pro-inflammatory cytokines is needed, to understand the possible links between intestinal and liver disorders seen in CD. PMID:16023789

  10. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Alonso, SJ; Navarro, R; Trujillo, J; Jorge, E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaph-thalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastro-intestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats. METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses, intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg), cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10-4, 6.4 x 10-4 and 1.2 x 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated. RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase. Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride. CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs. Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain. PMID:17131476

  11. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  12. Intestinal folate absorption

    PubMed Central

    Strum, Williamson; Nixon, Peter F.; Bertino, Joseph B.; Binder, Henry J.

    1971-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of the monoglutamate form of the principal dietary and circulating folate compound, 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid (5-MTHF), was studied in the rat utilizing a synthetic highly purified radiolabeled diastereoisomer. Chromatography confirmed that the compound was not altered after transfer from the mucosa to the serosa. Accumulation against a concentration gradient was not observed in duodenal, jejunal, or ileal segments at 5-MTHF concentration from 0.5 to 500 nmoles/liter. Unidirectional transmural flux determination also did not indicate a significant net flux. Mucosal to serosal transfer of 5-MTHF was similar in all segments of the intestine and increased in a linear fashion with increased initial mucosal concentrations. Further, no alteration in 5-MTHF transfer was found when studied in the presence of metabolic inhibitors or folate compounds. These results indicate that 5-MTHF is not absorbed by the rat small intestine by a carrier-mediated system and suggest that 5-MTHF transfer most likely represents diffusion. Images PMID:5564397

  13. National Remodelling Team: Evaluation Study (Year 2). Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Claire; Wilson, Rebekah; Sharp, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    This report sets out to provide the National Remodelling Team (NRT) with comprehensive details on stakeholders' views about the second year of the remodelling programme. This report is divided into nine chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) outlines the aims of the evaluation and the methodology used; (3) describes the findings from the survey of local…

  14. Chromatin-remodeling and the initiation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Kornberg, Roger D

    2015-11-01

    The nucleosome serves as a general gene repressor by the occlusion of regulatory and promoter DNA sequences. Repression is relieved by the SWI/SNF-RSC family of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Research reviewed here has revealed the essential features of the remodeling process. PMID:26537406

  15. Role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Hua; Li, Yu-Sheng; Luo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) plays important roles in many biological functions, such as, stimulation of contractility in the heart, vasodilation, promoting neuroendocrine-immune communication, lowering arterial blood pressure, and anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory activity. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic and degenerative bone disease, which is one of the most common causes of disability and most common in both sexes as people become older. Interestingly VIP can prevent chronic cartilage damage and joint remodeling. This review article provides update information on the association of VIP and OA and its treatment. Evidences suggest that VIP is down-regulated in synovial fluid of OA, and VIP down-regulation leads to increase in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that might contribute to the pathogenesis of OA; however contradictory reports also exist suggesting that accumulation of VIP in joints can also contribute OA. A number of studies indicated that up-regulation of VIP can counteract the action of pro-inflammatory stimuli and alleviate the pain in OA. More clinical investigations are necessary to determine the biology of VIP and its therapeutic potential in OA that might represent the future standards of care for OA. PMID:27553659

  16. Malabsorption and intestinal adaptation after one anastomosis gastric bypass compared with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in rats.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Voitellier, Eglantine; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Kapel, Nathalie; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre; Chevallier, Jean-Marc; Msika, Simon; Bado, André; Le Gall, Maude

    2016-09-01

    The technically easier one-anastomosis (mini) gastric bypass (MGB) is associated with similar metabolic improvements and weight loss as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). However, MGB is controversial and suspected to result in greater malabsorption than RYGB. In this study, we compared macronutrient absorption and intestinal adaptation after MGB or RYGB in rats. Body weight and food intake were monitored and glucose tolerance tests were performed in rats subjected to MGB, RYGB, or sham surgery. Carbohydrate, protein, and lipid absorption was determined by fecal analyses. Intestinal remodeling was evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry. Peptide and amino acid transporter mRNA levels were measured in the remodeled intestinal mucosa and those of anorexigenic and orexigenic peptides in the hypothalamus. The MGB and RYGB surgeries both resulted in a reduction of body weight and an improvement of glucose tolerance relative to sham rats. Hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide gene expression was higher in MGB rats than in RYGB or sham rats. Fecal losses of calories and proteins were greater after MGB than RYGB or sham surgery. Intestinal hyperplasia occurred after MGB and RYGB with increased jejunum diameter, higher villi, and deeper crypts than in sham rats. Peptidase and peptide or amino acid transporter genes were overexpressed in jejunal mucosa from MGB rats but not RYGB rats. In rats, MGB led to greater protein malabsorption and energy loss than RYGB. This malabsorption was not compensated by intestinal overgrowth and increased expression of peptide transporters in the jejunum. PMID:27418681

  17. Macrophage plasticity and polarization in tissue repair and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Biswas, Subhra K; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Sica, Antonio; Locati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocyte plasticity includes the expression of functions related to the resolution of inflammation, tissue repair and remodelling, particularly when these cells are set in an M2 or an M2-like activation mode. Macrophages are credited with an essential role in remodelling during ontogenesis. In extraembryonic life, under homeostatic conditions, the macrophage trophic and remodelling functions are recapitulated in tissues such as bone, mammary gland, decidua and placenta. In pathology, macrophages are key components of tissue repair and remodelling that occur during wound healing, allergy, parasite infection and cancer. Interaction with cells bearing stem or progenitor cell properties is likely an important component of the role of macrophages in repair and remodelling. These properties of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage may represent a tool and a target for therapeutic exploitation. PMID:23096265

  18. Matrix Remodeling in Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tejaswini; O'Reilly, Philip; Antony, Veena B; Gaggar, Amit; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema are chronic lung diseases characterized by a progressive decline in lung function, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. A hallmark of these diseases is recurrent or persistent alveolar epithelial injury, typically caused by common environmental exposures such as cigarette smoke. We propose that critical determinants of the outcome of the injury-repair processes that result in fibrosis versus emphysema are mesenchymal cell fate and associated extracellular matrix dynamics. In this review, we explore the concept that regulation of mesenchymal cells under the influence of soluble factors, in particular transforming growth factor-β1, and the extracellular matrix determine the divergent tissue remodeling responses seen in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. PMID:26741177

  19. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  20. Osteocytes: The master cells in bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Prideaux, Matthew; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J

    2016-06-01

    Bone remodelling is an essential process for shaping and maintaining bone mass in the mature skeleton. During our lifetime bone is constantly being removed by osteoclasts and new bone is formed by osteoblasts. The activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts must be regulated under a strict balance to ensure that bone homeostasis is maintained. Osteocytes, which form an extensive, multi-functional syncytium throughout the bone, are increasingly considered to be the cells that maintain this balance. Current research is elucidating key signalling pathways by which the osteocyte exerts control over the other cell types in bone and over its own activities, and potential ways in which these pathways may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:26927500

  1. Bone Remodeling and Energy Metabolism: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Francisco J. A.; Rosen, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone mineral, adipose tissue and energy metabolism are interconnected by a complex and multilevel series of networks. Calcium and phosphorus are utilized for insulin secretion and synthesis of high energy compounds. Adipose tissue store lipids and cholecalciferol, which, in turn, can influence calcium balance and energy expenditure. Hormones long-thought to solely modulate energy and mineral homeostasis may influence adipocytic function. Osteoblasts are a target of insulin action in bone. Moreover, endocrine mediators, such as osteocalcin, are synthesized in the skeleton but regulate carbohydrate disposal and insulin secretion. Finally, osteoblasts and adipocytes originate from the same mesenchymal progenitor. The mutual crosstalk between osteoblasts and adipocytes within the bone marrow microenvironment plays a crucial role in bone remodeling. In the present review we provide an overview of the reciprocal control between bone and energy metabolism and its clinical implications. PMID:26273493

  2. Phasic study of intestinal homeostasis disruption in experimental intestinal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang-Yang; Zou, Chang-Lin; Zhou, Zhen-Li; Shan, Tao; Li, Dong-Hua; Cui, Nai-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the phasic alteration of intestinal homeostasis in an experimental model of intestinal obstruction. METHODS: A rabbit model of intestinal obstruction was established by transforming parts of an infusion set into an in vivo pulled-type locking clamp and creating a uniform controllable loop obstruction in the mesenteric non-avascular zone 8 cm from the distal end of the ileum. The phasic alteration of intestinal homeostasis was studied after intestinal obstruction. The changes in goblet cells, intraepithelial lymphocytes, lamina propria lymphocytes, and intestinal epithelium were quantified from periodic acid-Schiff-stained sections. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and serum citrulline levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Claudin 1 mRNA expression was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Intestinal microorganisms, wet/dry weight ratios, pH values, and endotoxin levels were determined at multiple points after intestinal obstruction. Furthermore, the number and ratio of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry, and secretory IgA levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: A suitable controllable rabbit model of intestinal obstruction was established. Intestinal obstruction induced goblet cell damage and reduced cell number. Further indicators of epithelial cell damage were observed as reduced serum citrulline levels and claudin 1 gene expression, and a transient increase in ODC activity. In addition, the wet/dry weight ratio and pH of the intestinal lumen were also dramatically altered. The ratio of Bacillus bifidus and enterobacteria was reversed following intestinal obstruction. The number and area of Peyer’s patches first increased then sharply decreased after the intestinal obstruction, along with an alteration in the ratio of CD4/CD8+ T cells, driven by an increase in CD3+ and CD8+ T cells and a decrease in CD4+ T cells. The number of

  3. How to make an intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James M.; Spence, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    With the high prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders, there is great interest in establishing in vitro models of human intestinal disease and in developing drug-screening platforms that more accurately represent the complex physiology of the intestine. We will review how recent advances in developmental and stem cell biology have made it possible to generate complex, three-dimensional, human intestinal tissues in vitro through directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. These are currently being used to study human development, genetic forms of disease, intestinal pathogens, metabolic disease and cancer. PMID:24496613

  4. PNPLA3 mediates hepatocyte triacylglycerol remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ruhanen, Hanna; Perttilä, Julia; Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Zhou, You; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Ikonen, Elina; Käkelä, Reijo; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2014-04-01

    The I148M substitution in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3(I148M)) determines a genetic form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. To elucidate the mode of PNPLA3 action in human hepatocytes, we studied effects of WT PNPLA3 (PNPLA3(WT)) and PNPLA3(I148M) on HuH7 cell lipidome after [(13)C]glycerol labeling, cellular turnover of oleic acid labeled with 17 deuterium atoms ([D17]oleic acid) in triacylglycerols (TAGs), and subcellular distribution of the protein variants. PNPLA3(I148M) induced a net accumulation of unlabeled TAGs, but not newly synthesized total [(13)C]TAGs. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that both PNPLA3(WT) and PNPLA3(I148M) induced a relative enrichment of TAGs with saturated FAs or MUFAs, with concurrent enrichment of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. PNPLA3(WT) associated in PCA with newly synthesized [(13)C]TAGs, particularly 52:1 and 50:1, while PNPLA3(I148M) associated with similar preexisting TAGs. PNPLA3(WT) overexpression resulted in increased [D17]oleic acid labeling of TAGs during 24 h, and after longer incubations their turnover was accelerated, effects not detected with PNPLA3(I148M). PNPLA3(I148M) localized more extensively to lipid droplets (LDs) than PNPLA3(WT), suggesting that the substitution alters distribution of PNPLA3 between LDs and endoplasmic reticulum/cytosol. This study reveals a function of PNPLA3 in FA-selective TAG remodeling, resulting in increased TAG saturation. A defect in TAG remodeling activity likely contributes to the TAG accumulation observed in cells expressing PNPLA3(I148M). PMID:24511104

  5. Intestinal transplantation: living related.

    PubMed

    Pollard, S G

    1997-01-01

    The use of live donors in intestinal transplantation could potentially both reduce the severity of rejection responses against this highly immunogenic organ by better tissue matching and also reduce cold ischaemia times. These two advantages over cadaveric grafts could preserve mucosal integrity and reduce the risk of systemic sepsis from bacterial translocation. The disadvantages of live donation are the inherent risk to the donor and the compromise of using a shorter graft. Although only a handful of such cases have been performed, the success rate has been high and this is a therapeutic modality which should be explored further. PMID:9536535

  6. The Redox State of Transglutaminase 2 Controls Arterial Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    van den Akker, Jeroen; VanBavel, Ed; van Geel, Remon; Matlung, Hanke L.; Guvenc Tuna, Bilge; Janssen, George M. C.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Boelens, Wilbert C.; De Mey, Jo G. R.; Bakker, Erik N. T. P.

    2011-01-01

    While inward remodeling of small arteries in response to low blood flow, hypertension, and chronic vasoconstriction depends on type 2 transglutaminase (TG2), the mechanisms of action have remained unresolved. We studied the regulation of TG2 activity, its (sub) cellular localization, substrates, and its specific mode of action during small artery inward remodeling. We found that inward remodeling of isolated mouse mesenteric arteries by exogenous TG2 required the presence of a reducing agent. The effect of TG2 depended on its cross-linking activity, as indicated by the lack of effect of mutant TG2. The cell-permeable reducing agent DTT, but not the cell-impermeable reducing agent TCEP, induced translocation of endogenous TG2 and high membrane-bound transglutaminase activity. This coincided with inward remodeling, characterized by a stiffening of the artery. The remodeling could be inhibited by a TG2 inhibitor and by the nitric oxide donor, SNAP. Using a pull-down assay and mass spectrometry, 21 proteins were identified as TG2 cross-linking substrates, including fibronectin, collagen and nidogen. Inward remodeling induced by low blood flow was associated with the upregulation of several anti-oxidant proteins, notably glutathione-S-transferase, and selenoprotein P. In conclusion, these results show that a reduced state induces smooth muscle membrane-bound TG2 activity. Inward remodeling results from the cross-linking of vicinal matrix proteins, causing a stiffening of the arterial wall. PMID:21901120

  7. The multifactorial nature of microRNAs in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Welten, S M J; Goossens, E A C; Quax, P H A; Nossent, A Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular remodelling is a multifactorial process that involves both adaptive and maladaptive changes of the vessel wall through, among others, cell proliferation and migration, but also apoptosis and necrosis of the various cell types in the vessel wall. Vascular remodelling can be beneficial, e.g. during neovascularization after ischaemia, as well as pathological, e.g. during atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation. In recent years, it has become clear that microRNAs are able to target many genes that are involved in vascular remodelling processes and either can promote or inhibit structural changes of the vessel wall. Since many different processes of vascular remodelling are regulated by similar mechanisms and factors, both positive and negative vascular remodelling can be affected by the same microRNAs. A large number of microRNAs has been linked to various aspects of vascular remodelling and indeed, several of these microRNAs regulate multiple vascular remodelling processes, including both the adaptive processes angiogenesis and arteriogenesis as well as maladaptive processes of atherosclerosis, restenosis and aneurysm formation. Here, we discuss the multifactorial role of microRNAs and microRNA clusters that were reported to play a role in multiple forms of vascular remodelling and are clearly linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The microRNAs reviewed are miR-126, miR-155 and the microRNA gene clusters 17-92, 23/24/27, 143/145 and 14q32. Understanding the contribution of these microRNAs to the entire spectrum of vascular remodelling processes is important, especially as these microRNAs may have great potential as therapeutic targets for treatment of various CVDs. PMID:26912672

  8. Intratracheal Bleomycin Causes Airway Remodeling and Airflow Obstruction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Degryse, Amber L.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Jones, Brittany R.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Lee, Jae Woo; Loyd, James E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Lawson, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In addition to parenchymal fibrosis, fibrotic remodeling of the distal airways has been reported in interstitial lung diseases. Mechanisms of airway wall remodeling, which occurs in a variety of chronic lung diseases, are not well defined and current animal models are limited. Methods We quantified airway remodeling in lung sections from subjects with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and controls. To investigate intratracheal bleomycin as a potential animal model for fibrotic airway remodeling, we evaluated lungs from C57BL/6 mice after bleomycin treatment by histologic scoring for fibrosis and peribronchial inflammation, morphometric evaluation of subepithelial connective tissue volume density, TUNEL assay, and immunohistochemistry for transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), TGFβ2, and the fibroblast marker S100A4. Lung mechanics were determined at 3 weeks post-bleomycin. Results IPF lungs had small airway remodeling with increased bronchial wall thickness compared to controls. Similarly, bleomycin treated mice developed dose-dependent airway wall inflammation and fibrosis and greater airflow resistance after high dose bleomycin. Increased TUNEL+ bronchial epithelial cells and peribronchial inflammation were noted by 1 week, and expression of TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 and accumulation of S100A4+ fibroblasts correlated with airway remodeling in a bleomycin dose-dependent fashion. Conclusions IPF is characterized by small airway remodeling in addition to parenchymal fibrosis, a pattern also seen with intratracheal bleomycin. Bronchial remodeling from intratracheal bleomycin follows a cascade of events including epithelial cell injury, airway inflammation, pro-fibrotic cytokine expression, fibroblast accumulation, and peribronchial fibrosis. Thus, this model can be utilized to investigate mechanisms of airway remodeling. PMID:22394287

  9. Remodeling of Endogenous Mammary Epithelium by Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A.; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R.; Habte, Frezghi G.; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R.; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L.; Clarke, Michael F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-01-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  10. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  11. [INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRICS

    PubMed

    Alarcón M, Pedro; Alarcón M, Jorge

    1997-01-01

    Intestinal Transplantation used to be an utopia in Medicine, and this was mainly due to the factor that the surgical technique was not the best at the beginning. When this was perfectioned, the next obstacle for the adequate progress of this surgery was the limited availability of anti-rejection drugs due to the fact that Ciclosporine has been and still is a drug of relative effectiveness. With the discovery of new anti-rejection drugs and with a best knowledge of the concomitant liver transplantation roll on the prognosis of these patients, it was possible to get in this decade, specifically in the last 2 years, extraordinary results; for example, from 170 pacients who underwent intestinal transplantation around the world, more than half were done by the University of Pittsburg. This university reported a survival of 62%. But, this percentage has been improved even more, the University of Miami reported a survival of 70% through the use of corticoides and two powerful anti-rejection drugs: FK-506 and Mycophelate. PMID:12219105

  12. Antigenic variation in the intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Gargantini, Pablo Rubén; Serradell, Marianela Del Carmen; Ríos, Diego Nicolás; Tenaglia, Albano Heraldo; Luján, Hugo Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Giardia lamblia trophozoites undergo antigenic variation, where one member of the Variant-specific Surface Protein (VSP) family is expressed on the surface of proliferating trophozoites and periodically replaced by another one. Two main questions have challenged researchers since antigenic switching was discovered in Giardia: What are the mechanisms involved? How are they influenced by other cellular processes or by the environment? Two molecular mechanisms have been proposed, both involving small non-coding RNAs. Here we postulate that (a) chromatin remodeling, triggered by environmental factors, also plays an important role in selecting the VSP that will be expressed and (b) the particular VSP structure may not only protect the parasite in the small intestine but also signal the need to exchange the existing VSP for another. PMID:27177351

  13. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  14. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  15. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Luca; Brendolan, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  16. Postinfarct Left Ventricular Remodelling: A Prevailing Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality, which represents a growing challenge in medicine. A major risk factor for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is a history of myocardial infarction. The expansion of a large infarct scar and subsequent regional ventricular dilatation can cause postinfarct remodelling, leading to significant enlargement of the left ventricular chamber. It has a negative prognostic value, because it precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure. The characteristics of the infarcted myocardium predicting postinfarct remodelling can be studied with cardiac magnetic resonance and experimental imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging can identify the changes in the architecture of myocardial fibers. This review discusses all the aspects related to postinfarct left ventricular remodelling: definition, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and available therapies, together with experimental interventions that show promising results against postinfarct remodelling and heart failure. PMID:26989555

  17. 65. (Credit JTL) Filter room looking WSW across remodelled New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. (Credit JTL) Filter room looking WSW across remodelled New York horizontal pressure filters (in foreground). - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  18. Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis and Vascular Remodeling in Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Reza; Jung, Jae-Joon; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling are involved in a wide array of cardiovascular diseases, from myocardial ischemia and peripheral arterial disease, to atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm. Molecular imaging techniques to detect and quantify key molecular and cellular players in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors, αvβ3 integrin, and matrix metalloproteinases) can advance vascular biology research and serve as clinical tools for early diagnosis, risk stratification, and selection of patients who would benefit most from therapeutic interventions. To target these key mediators, a number of molecular imaging techniques have been developed and evaluated in animal models of angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. This review of the state of the art molecular imaging of angiogenesis and vascular (and valvular) remodeling, will focus mostly on nuclear imaging techniques (positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography) that offer high potential for clinical translation. PMID:27275836

  19. Emerging mechanisms of mRNP remodeling regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chyi-Ying A.

    2015-01-01

    The assembly and remodeling of the components of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are important in determining the fate of an mRNA. A combination of biochemical and cell biology research, recently complemented by genome-wide high-throughput approaches, has led to significant progress on understanding the formation, dynamics and function of mRNPs. These studies also advanced the challenging process of identifying the evolving constituents of individual mRNPs at various stages during an mRNA’s lifetime. While research on mRNP remodeling in general has been gaining momentum, there has been relatively little attention paid to the regulatory aspect of mRNP remodeling. Here, we discuss the results of some new studies and potential mechanisms for regulation of mRNP remodeling. PMID:24923990

  20. Remodeled second floor with stairs and stacks. This was formerly ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remodeled second floor with stairs and stacks. This was formerly the upper part of the original two story reading room. View to southwest. - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. Chromatin remodeling effects on enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    García-González, Estela; Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martín; Arzate-Mejía, Rodrigo; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2016-08-01

    During organism development, a diversity of cell types emerges with disparate, yet stable profiles of gene expression with distinctive cellular functions. In addition to gene promoters, the genome contains enhancer regulatory sequences, which are implicated in cellular specialization by facilitating cell-type and tissue-specific gene expression. Enhancers are DNA binding elements characterized by highly sophisticated and various mechanisms of action allowing for the specific interaction of general and tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs). However, eukaryotic organisms package their genetic material into chromatin, generating a physical barrier for TFs to interact with their cognate sequences. The ability of TFs to bind DNA regulatory elements is also modulated by changes in the chromatin structure, including histone modifications, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, and the methylation status of DNA. Furthermore, it has recently been revealed that enhancer sequences are also transcribed into a set of enhancer RNAs with regulatory potential. These interdependent processes act in the context of a complex network of chromatin interactions, which together contributes to a renewed vision of how gene activation is coordinated in a cell-type-dependent manner. In this review, we describe the interplay between genetic and epigenetic aspects associated with enhancers and discuss their possible roles on enhancer function. PMID:27026300

  2. Remodeling of the bone material containing microcracks: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramtani, S.; Zidi, M.

    1999-12-01

    The question is, what happens when the bone loses its ability for load-driven adaptation, when damage is no longer repaired as it seems to be the case for bone loss associated with age, medication or disease? In this study, we tempt to show how damage can influence the remodeling process. A thermodynamic theoretical framework is therefore provided as a basis for a consistent formulation of bone remodeling involving a chemical reaction and mass transfer between two constituents in presence of microcracks.

  3. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    PubMed

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately. PMID:26832999

  4. Autophagy and Intestinal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Khushbu K.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient absorption is the basic function that drives mammalian intestinal biology. To facilitate nutrient uptake, the host’s epithelial barrier is composed of a single layer of cells. This constraint is problematic, as a design of this type can be easily disrupted. The solution during the course of evolution was to add numerous host defense mechanisms that can help prevent local and systemic infection. These mechanisms include specialized epithelial cells that produce a physiochemical barrier overlying the cellular barrier, robust and organized adaptive and innate immune cells, and the ability to mount an inflammatory response that is commensurate with a specific threat level. The autophagy pathway is a critical cellular process that strongly influences all these functions. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the components of this pathway and their influence on inflammation, immunity, and barrier function will facilitate our understanding of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23216414

  5. Autophagy and intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Khushbu K; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient absorption is the basic function that drives mammalian intestinal biology. To facilitate nutrient uptake, the host's epithelial barrier is composed of a single layer of cells. This constraint is problematic, as a design of this type can be easily disrupted. The solution during the course of evolution was to add numerous host defense mechanisms that can help prevent local and systemic infection. These mechanisms include specialized epithelial cells that produce a physiochemical barrier overlying the cellular barrier, robust and organized adaptive and innate immune cells, and the ability to mount an inflammatory response that is commensurate with a specific threat level. The autophagy pathway is a critical cellular process that strongly influences all these functions. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the components of this pathway and their influence on inflammation, immunity, and barrier function will facilitate our understanding of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23216414

  6. The role of the epithelium in airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Davies, Donna E

    2009-12-01

    The bronchial epithelium is the barrier to the external environment and plays a vital role in protection of the internal milieu of the lung. It functions within the epithelial-mesenchymal trophic unit to control the local microenvironment and help maintain tissue homeostasis. However, in asthma, chronic perturbation of these homeostatic mechanisms leads to alterations in the structure of the airways, termed remodeling. Damage to the epithelium is now recognized to play a key role in driving airway remodeling. We have postulated that epithelial susceptibility to environmental stress and injury together with impaired repair responses results in generation of signals that act on the underlying mesenchyme to propagate and amplify inflammatory and remodeling responses in the submucosa. Many types of challenges to the epithelium, including pathogens, allergens, environmental pollutants, cigarette smoke, and even mechanical forces, can elicit production of mediators by the epithelium, which can be translated into remodeling responses by the mesenchyme. Several important mediators of remodeling have been identified, most notably transforming growth factor-beta, which is released from damaged/repairing epithelium or in response to inflammatory mediators, such as IL-13. The cross talk between the epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme to drive remodeling responses is considered in the context of subepithelial fibrosis and potential pathogenetic mechanisms linked to the asthma susceptibility gene, a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)33. PMID:20008875

  7. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  8. Fstl1 Promotes Asthmatic Airway Remodeling by Inducing Oncostatin M.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marina; Beppu, Andrew; Rosenthal, Peter; Pham, Alexa; Das, Sudipta; Karta, Maya; Song, Dae Jin; Vuong, Christine; Doherty, Taylor; Croft, Michael; Zuraw, Bruce; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Xiang; Aceves, Seema; Chouiali, Fazila; Hamid, Qutayba; Broide, David H

    2015-10-15

    Chronic asthma is associated with airway remodeling and decline in lung function. In this article, we show that follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), a mediator not previously associated with asthma, is highly expressed by macrophages in the lungs of humans with severe asthma. Chronic allergen-challenged Lys-Cre(tg) /Fstl1(Δ/Δ) mice in whom Fstl1 is inactivated in macrophages/myeloid cells had significantly reduced airway remodeling and reduced levels of oncostatin M (OSM), a cytokine previously not known to be regulated by Fstl1. The importance of the Fstl1 induction of OSM to airway remodeling was demonstrated in murine studies in which administration of Fstl1 induced airway remodeling and increased OSM, whereas administration of an anti-OSM Ab blocked the effect of Fstl1 on inducing airway remodeling, eosinophilic airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness, all cardinal features of asthma. Overall, these studies demonstrate that the Fstl1/OSM pathway may be a novel pathway to inhibit airway remodeling in severe human asthma. PMID:26355153

  9. Tissue engineering the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Spurrier, Ryan G; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) results from the loss of a highly specialized organ, the small intestine. SBS and its current treatments are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Production of tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) from the patient's own cells could restore normal intestinal function via autologous transplantation. Improved understanding of intestinal stem cells and their niche have been coupled with advances in tissue engineering techniques. Originally described by Vacanti et al of Massachusetts General Hospital, TESI has been produced by in vivo implantation of organoid units. Organoid units are multicellular clusters of epithelium and mesenchyme that may be harvested from native intestine. These clusters are loaded onto a scaffold and implanted into the host omentum. The scaffold provides physical support that permits angiogenesis and vasculogenesis of the developing tissue. After a period of 4 weeks, histologic analyses confirm the similarity of TESI to native intestine. TESI contains a differentiated epithelium, mesenchyme, blood vessels, muscle, and nerve components. To date, similar experiments have proved successful in rat, mouse, and pig models. Additional experiments have shown clinical improvement and rescue of SBS rats after implantation of TESI. In comparison with the group that underwent massive enterectomy alone, rats that had surgical anastomosis of TESI to their shortened intestine showed improvement in postoperative weight gain and serum B12 values. Recently, organoid units have been harvested from human intestinal samples and successfully grown into TESI by using an immunodeficient mouse host. Current TESI production yields approximately 3 times the number of cells initially implanted, but improvements in the scaffold and blood supply are being developed in efforts to increase TESI size. Exciting new techniques in stem cell biology and directed cellular differentiation may generate additional sources of autologous intestinal

  10. Intestinal nematodes: biology and control.

    PubMed

    Epe, Christian

    2009-11-01

    A variety of nematodes occur in dogs and cats. Several nematode species inhabit the small and large intestines. Important species that live in the small intestine are roundworms of the genus Toxocara (T canis, T cati) and Toxascaris (ie, T leonina), and hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma (A caninum, A braziliense, A tubaeforme) or Uncinaria (U stenocephala). Parasites of the large intestine are nematodes of the genus Trichuris (ie, whipworms, T vulpis). After a comprehensive description of their life cycle and biology, which are indispensable for understanding and justifying their control, current recommendations for nematode control are presented and discussed thereafter. PMID:19932365

  11. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hiradfar, Mehran; Shojaeian, Reza; Dehghanian, Paria; Hajian, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a multisystemic disorder in which impaired intestinal motor activity causes recurrent symptoms of intestinal obstruction in the absence of mechanical occlusion, associated with bladder distention without distal obstruction of the urinary tract. MMIHS and prune belly syndrome may overlap in most of the clinical features and discrimination of these two entities is important because the prognosis, management and consulting with parents are completely different. MMIHS outcome is very poor and in this article we present two neonates with MMIHS that both died in a few days. PMID:23729700

  12. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hiradfar, Mehran; Shojaeian, Reza; Dehghanian, Paria; Hajian, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a multisystemic disorder in which impaired intestinal motor activity causes recurrent symptoms of intestinal obstruction in the absence of mechanical occlusion, associated with bladder distention without distal obstruction of the urinary tract. MMIHS and prune belly syndrome may overlap in most of the clinical features and discrimination of these two entities is important because the prognosis, management and consulting with parents are completely different. MMIHS outcome is very poor and in this article we present two neonates with MMIHS that both died in a few days. PMID:23729700

  13. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula's material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element's remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than actual

  14. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula’s material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element’s remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than

  15. Obstruction-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Zou, Yu; He, Huamei; McGowan, Francis X; Zurakowski, David; Zhang, Yanhang

    2011-11-01

    Pulmonary obstruction occurs in many common forms of congenital heart disease. In this study, pulmonary artery (PA) banding is used as a model for pulmonary stenosis. Significant remodeling of the vascular bed occurs as a result of a prolonged narrowing of the PAs, and here we quantify the biophysical and molecular changes proximal and distal to the obstruction. Main and branch PAs are harvested from banded and sham rabbits and their mechanical properties are assessed using a biaxial tensile tester. Measurements defined as initial and stiff slopes are taken, assuming a linear region at the start and end of the J-shaped stress-strain curves, along with a transitional knee point. Collagen, elastin assays, Movat's pentachrome staining, and Doppler protocols are used to quantify biochemical, structural, and physiological differences. The banded main PAs have significantly greater initial slopes while banded branch PAs have lower initial slopes; however, this change in mechanical behavior cannot be explained by the assay results as the elastin content in both main and branch PAs is not significantly different. The stiff slopes of the banded main PAs are higher, which is attributed to the significantly greater amounts of insoluble collagen. Shifting of the knee points reveals a decreased toe region in the main PAs but an opposite trend in the branch PAs. The histology results show a loss of integrity of the media, increase in ground substance, and dispersion of collagen in the banded tissue samples. This indicates other structural changes could have led to the mechanical differences in banded and normal tissue. PMID:22168741

  16. PTH signaling mediates perilacunar remodeling during exercise.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Joseph D; Al-Omaishi, Salam; Morris, Michael D; Kohn, David H

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical loading and release of endogenous parathyroid hormone (PTH) during exercise facilitate the adaptation of bone. However, it remains unclear how exercise and PTH influence the composition of bone and how exercise and PTH-mediated compositional changes influence the mechanical properties of bone. Thus, the primary purpose of this study was to establish compositional changes within osteocytes' perilacunar region of cortical bone following exercise, and evaluate the influence of endogenous PTH signaling on this perilacunar adaptation. Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to evaluate tissue composition surrounding individual lacuna within the tibia of 19week old male mice exposed to treadmill running for 3weeks. As a result of exercise, tissue within the perilacunar region (within 0-5μm of the lacuna wall) had a lower mineral-to-matrix ratio (MMR) compared to sedentary controls. In addition, exercise also increased the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio (CPR) across both perilacunar and non-perilacunar regions (5-10μm and 10-15μm from the lacuna walls). Tibial post-yield work had a significant negative correlation with perilacunar MMR. Inhibition of PTH activity with PTH(7-34) demonstrated that perilacunar remodeling during exercise was dependent on the cellular response to endogenous PTH. The osteocytes' response to endogenous PTH during exercise was characterized by a significant reduction in SOST expression and significant increase in FGF-23 expression. The potential reduction in phosphate levels due to FGF-23 expression may explain the increase in carbonate substitution. Overall, this is the first study to demonstrate that adaptation in tissue composition is localized around individual osteocytes, may contribute to the changes in whole bone mechanics during exercise, and that PTH signaling during exercise contributes to these adaptations. PMID:26924474

  17. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Ysasi, Alexandra B; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-06-15

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends ("E"). Septal retraction, observed in 20-30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  18. Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Remodeling in Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Steed, Mesia M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In hypertension, an increase in arterial wall thickness and loss of elasticity over time result in an increase in pulse wave velocity, a direct measure of arterial stiffness. This change is reflected in gradual fragmentation and loss of elastin fibers and accumulation of stiffer collagen fibers in the media that occurs independently of atherosclerosis. Similar results are seen with an elevated level of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), which increases vascular thickness, elastin fragmentation, and arterial blood pressure. Studies from our laboratory have demonstrated a decrease in elasticity and an increase in pulse wave velocity in HHcy cystathionine β synthase heterozygote knockout (CBS−/+) mice. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potential regulator of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in MMP-NO-TIMP (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase) inhibitory tertiary complex. We have demonstrated the contribustion of the NO synthase (NOS) isoforms, endothelial NOS and inducible NOS, in the activation of latent MMP. The differential production of NO contributes to oxidative stress and increased oxidative/nitrative activation of MMP resulting in vascular remodeling in response to HHcy. The contribution of the NOS isoforms, endothelial and inducible in the collagen/elastin switch, has been demonstrated. We have showed that an increase in inducible NOS activity is a key contributor to HHcy-mediated collagen/elastin switch and resulting decline in aortic compliance. In addition, increased levels of Hcy compete and suppress the γ-amino butyric acid-receptor, N-methyl-d-aspartame-receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor. The HHcy causes oxidative stress by generating nitrotyrosine, activating the latent MMPs and decreasing the endothelial NO concentration. The HHcy causes elastinolysis and decrease elastic complicance of the vessel wall. The treatment with γ-amino butyric acid-receptor agonist (muscimol), N

  19. Enteral leptin administration affects intestinal autophagy in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Słupecka, M; Woliński, J; Gajewska, M; Pierzynowski, S G

    2014-01-01

    Leptin has been shown to play an integral role in the endocrine regulation of metabolism. Moreover, a substantial amount of this peptide has been found in colostrum and milk. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of exogenous leptin, administered intragastrically, on the process of autophagy and the changes in cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy in the small intestine mucosa. Three groups (n = 6) of neonatal piglets were used in the study. The pigs were fed either by their sows (sow-reared piglets) or with only milk formula, or with milk formula together with leptin administered via a stomach tube (10 μg/kg BW) every 8 h for 6 d. We have shown that pure milk formula feeding significantly elevates (P < 0.05) autophagy compared with that observed in sow-reared piglets. Compared with the control group, feeding milk formula supplemented with leptin resulted in a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in immunodetection of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, as well as significantly accelerated epithelial cell renewal (P < 0.05). We demonstrated that autophagy is involved in the remodeling of the small intestine mucosa and that leptin, when administered enterally, may be an important factor for its regulation. PMID:24135555

  20. Polarizing intestinal epithelial cells electrically through Ror2.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lin; McCaig, Colin D; Scott, Roderick H; Zhao, Siwei; Milne, Gillian; Clevers, Hans; Zhao, Min; Pu, Jin

    2014-08-01

    The apicobasal polarity of enterocytes determines where the brush border membrane (apical membrane) will form, but how this apical membrane faces the lumen is not well understood. The electrical signal across the epithelium could serve as a coordinating cue, orienting and polarizing enterocytes. Here, we show that applying a physiological electric field to intestinal epithelial cells, to mimic the natural electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference, polarized phosphorylation of the actin-binding protein ezrin, increased expression of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI, a differentiation marker) and remodeled the actin cytoskeleton selectively on the cathode side. In addition, an applied electric field also activated ERK1/2 and LKB1 (also known as STK11), key molecules in apical membrane formation. Disruption of the tyrosine protein kinase transmembrane receptor Ror2 suppressed activation of ERK1/2 and LKB1 significantly, and subsequently inhibited apical membrane formation in enterocytes. Our findings indicate that the endogenous electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference might act as an essential coordinating signal for apical membrane formation at a tissue level, through activation of LKB1 mediated by Ror2-ERK signaling. PMID:24928904

  1. Polarizing intestinal epithelial cells electrically through Ror2

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lin; McCaig, Colin D.; Scott, Roderick H.; Zhao, Siwei; Milne, Gillian; Clevers, Hans; Zhao, Min; Pu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The apicobasal polarity of enterocytes determines where the brush border membrane (apical membrane) will form, but how this apical membrane faces the lumen is not well understood. The electrical signal across the epithelium could serve as a coordinating cue, orienting and polarizing enterocytes. Here, we show that applying a physiological electric field to intestinal epithelial cells, to mimic the natural electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference, polarized phosphorylation of the actin-binding protein ezrin, increased expression of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI, a differentiation marker) and remodeled the actin cytoskeleton selectively on the cathode side. In addition, an applied electric field also activated ERK1/2 and LKB1 (also known as STK11), key molecules in apical membrane formation. Disruption of the tyrosine protein kinase transmembrane receptor Ror2 suppressed activation of ERK1/2 and LKB1 significantly, and subsequently inhibited apical membrane formation in enterocytes. Our findings indicate that the endogenous electric field created by the transepithelial potential difference might act as an essential coordinating signal for apical membrane formation at a tissue level, through activation of LKB1 mediated by Ror2–ERK signaling. PMID:24928904

  2. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bowel are reconnected. In some cases, a colostomy or ileostomy is needed. The blockage of arteries ... Intestinal infarction may require a colostomy or ileostomy, which may be ... is common in these cases. People who have a large amount ...

  3. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... while increasing enteral nutrition. Pre-digested and hypoallergenic formulas improve intestinal absorption, and extra vitamins and minerals are often added. These formulas are usually given slowly by a feeding tube ...

  4. Intestinal Stem Cells: Got Calcium?

    PubMed

    Nászai, Máté; Cordero, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    Calcium ions are well-known intracellular signalling molecules. A new study identifies local cytoplasmic calcium as a central integrator of metabolic and proliferative signals in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. PMID:26859268

  5. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  6. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Cyrany, Jiri; Kohoutova, Darina; Förstl, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. There are several endogenous defence mechanisms for preventing bacterial overgrowth: gastric acid secretion, intestinal motility, intact ileo-caecal valve, immunoglobulins within intestinal secretion and bacteriostatic properties of pancreatic and biliary secretion. Aetiology of SIBO is usually complex, associated with disorders of protective antibacterial mechanisms (e.g. achlorhydria, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, immunodeficiency syndromes), anatomical abnormalities (e.g. small intestinal obstruction, diverticula, fistulae, surgical blind loop, previous ileo-caecal resections) and/or motility disorders (e.g. scleroderma, autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus, post-radiation enteropathy, small intestinal pseudo-obstruction). In some patients more than one factor may be involved. Symptoms related to SIBO are bloating, diarrhoea, malabsorption, weight loss and malnutrition. The gold standard for diagnosing SIBO is still microbial investigation of jejunal aspirates. Non-invasive hydrogen and methane breath tests are most commonly used for the diagnosis of SIBO using glucose or lactulose. Therapy for SIBO must be complex, addressing all causes, symptoms and complications, and fully individualised. It should include treatment of the underlying disease, nutritional support and cyclical gastro-intestinal selective antibiotics. Prognosis is usually serious, determined mostly by the underlying disease that led to SIBO. PMID:20572300

  7. The role of microRNAs in arterial remodelling.

    PubMed

    Nazari-Jahantigh, M; Wei, Y; Schober, A

    2012-04-01

    Adaptive alterations of the vessel wall architecture, called vascular remodelling, can be found in arterial hypertension, during the formation of aneurysms, in restenosis after vascular interventions, and in atherosclerosis. MicroRNAs (miR) critically affect the main cellular players in arterial remodelling and may either promote or inhibit the structural changes in the vessel wall. They regulate the phenotype of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and control the inflammatory response in endothelial cells and macrophages. In SMCs, different sets of miRs induce either a synthetic or contractile phenotype, respectively. The conversion into a synthetic SMC phenotype is a crucial event in arterial remodelling. Therefore, reprogramming of the SMC phenotype by miR targeting can modulate the remodelling process. Furthermore, the effects of stimuli that induce remodelling, such as shear stress, angiotensin II, oxidised low-density lipoprotein, or apoptosis, on endothelial cells are mediated by miRs. The endothelial cell-specific miR-126, for example, is transferred in microvesicles from apoptotic endothelial cells and plays a protective role in atherogenesis. The inflammatory response of the innate immune system, especially through macrophages, promotes arterial remodelling. miR-155 induces the expression of inflammatory cytokines, whereas miR-146a and miR-147 are involved in the resolution phase of inflammation. However, in vivo data on the role of miRs in vascular remodelling are still scarce, which are required to test the therapeutic potential of the available, highly effective miR inhibitors. PMID:22371089

  8. Klotho and phosphate are modulators of pathologic uremic cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming Chang; Shi, Mingjun; Cho, Han Jun; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Paek, Jean; Hill, Kathy; Shelton, John; Amaral, Ansel P; Faul, Christian; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Wolf, Myles; Brand, Markus; Takahashi, Masaya; Kuro-O, Makoto; Hill, Joseph A; Moe, Orson W

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac dysfunction in CKD is characterized by aberrant cardiac remodeling with hypertrophy and fibrosis. CKD is a state of severe systemic Klotho deficiency, and restoration of Klotho attenuates vascular calcification associated with CKD. We examined the role of Klotho in cardiac remodeling in models of Klotho deficiency-genetic Klotho hypomorphism, high dietary phosphate intake, aging, and CKD. Klotho-deficient mice exhibited cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy before 12 weeks of age followed by fibrosis. In wild-type mice, the induction of CKD led to severe cardiovascular changes not observed in control mice. Notably, non-CKD mice fed a high-phosphate diet had lower Klotho levels and greatly accelerated cardiac remodeling associated with normal aging compared with those on a normal diet. Chronic elevation of circulating Klotho because of global overexpression alleviated the cardiac remodeling induced by either high-phosphate diet or CKD. Regardless of the cause of Klotho deficiency, the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis correlated tightly with plasma phosphate concentration and inversely with plasma Klotho concentration, even when adjusted for all other covariables. High-fibroblast growth factor-23 concentration positively correlated with cardiac remodeling in a Klotho-deficient state but not a Klotho-replete state. In vitro, Klotho inhibited TGF-β1-, angiotensin II-, or high phosphate-induced fibrosis and abolished TGF-β1- or angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, Klotho deficiency is a novel intermediate mediator of pathologic cardiac remodeling, and fibroblast growth factor-23 may contribute to cardiac remodeling in concert with Klotho deficiency in CKD, phosphotoxicity, and aging. PMID:25326585

  9. Small Intestine but Not Liver Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) Deficiency Has a Dominant Effect on Plasma Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Inamul; Li, Zhiqiang; Bui, Hai H; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Gao, Guangping; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) is involved in phosphatidylcholine remodeling in the small intestine and liver. We investigated lipid metabolism in inducible intestine-specific and liver-specificLpcat3gene knock-out mice. We producedLpcat3-Flox/villin-Cre-ER(T2)mice, which were treated with tamoxifen (at days 1, 3, 5, and 7), to deleteLpcat3specifically in the small intestine. At day 9 after the treatment, we found that Lpcat3 deficiency in enterocytes significantly reduced polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines in the enterocyte plasma membrane and reduced Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), CD36, ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), and ABCG8 levels on the membrane, thus significantly reducing lipid absorption, cholesterol secretion through apoB-dependent and apoB-independent pathways, and plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and phospholipid levels, as well as body weight. Moreover, Lpcat3 deficiency does not cause significant lipid accumulation in the small intestine. We also utilized adenovirus-associated virus-Cre to depleteLpcat3in the liver. We found that liver deficiency only reduces plasma triglyceride levels but not other lipid levels. Furthermore, there is no significant lipid accumulation in the liver. Importantly, small intestine Lpcat3 deficiency has a much bigger effect on plasma lipid levels than that of liver deficiency. Thus, inhibition of small intestine Lpcat3 might constitute a novel approach for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID:26828064

  10. Activation of Sox3 Gene by Thyroid Hormone in the Developing Adult Intestinal Stem Cell During Xenopus Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guihong; Fu, Liezhen; Wen, Luan

    2014-01-01

    The maturation of the intestine into the adult form involves the formation of adult stem cells in a thyroid hormone (T3)-dependent process in vertebrates. In mammals, this takes place during postembryonic development, a period around birth when the T3 level peaks. Due to the difficulty of manipulating late-stage, uterus-enclosed embryos, very little is known about the development of the adult intestinal stem cells. Interestingly, the remodeling of the intestine during the T3-dependent amphibian metamorphosis mimics the maturation of mammalian intestine. Our earlier microarray studies in Xenopus laevis revealed that the transcription factor SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 3 (Sox3), well known for its involvement in neural development, was upregulated in the intestinal epithelium during metamorphosis. Here, we show that Sox3 is highly and specifically expressed in the developing adult intestinal progenitor/stem cells. We further show that its induction by T3 is independent of new protein synthesis, suggesting that Sox3 is directly activated by liganded T3 receptor. Thus, T3 activates Sox3 as one of the earliest changes in the epithelium, and Sox3 in turn may facilitate the dedifferentiation of the larval epithelial cells into adult stem cells. PMID:25211587

  11. The equine intestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcio C; Weese, J Scott

    2012-06-01

    The equine intestinal tract contains a complex microbial population (microbiota) that plays an important role in health and disease. Despite the undeniable importance of a 'normal' microbiota, understanding of the composition and function of this population is currently limited. As methods to characterize the microbiota and its genetic makeup (the microbiome) have evolved, the composition and complexity of this population are starting to be revealed. As is befitting a hindgut fermenter, members of the Firmicutes phylum appear to predominate, yet there are significant populations of numerous other phyla. The microbiome appears to be profoundly altered in certain disease states, and better understanding of these alterations may offer hope for novel preventive and therapeutic measures. The development and increasing availability of next generation sequencing and bioinformatics methods offer a revolution in microbiome evaluation and it is likely that significant advances will be made in the near future. Yet, proper use of these methods requires further study of basic aspects such as optimal testing protocols, the relationship of the fecal microbiome to more proximal locations where disease occurs, normal intra- and inter-horse variation, seasonal variation, and similar factors. PMID:22626511

  12. Myocardial reverse remodeling: how far can we rewind?

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Patrícia G; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Falcão-Pires, Inês

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a systemic disease that can be divided into HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). HFpEF accounts for over 50% of all HF patients and is typically associated with high prevalence of several comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, pulmonary hypertension, obesity, and atrial fibrillation. Myocardial remodeling occurs both in HFrEF and HFpEF and it involves changes in cardiac structure, myocardial composition, and myocyte deformation and multiple biochemical and molecular alterations that impact heart function and its reserve capacity. Understanding the features of myocardial remodeling has become a major objective for limiting or reversing its progression, the latter known as reverse remodeling (RR). Research on HFrEF RR process is broader and has delivered effective therapeutic strategies, which have been employed for some decades. However, the RR process in HFpEF is less clear partly due to the lack of information on HFpEF pathophysiology and to the long list of failed standard HF therapeutics strategies in these patient's outcomes. Nevertheless, new proteins, protein-protein interactions, and signaling pathways are being explored as potential new targets for HFpEF remodeling and RR. Here, we review recent translational and clinical research in HFpEF myocardial remodeling to provide an overview on the most important features of RR, comparing HFpEF with HFrEF conditions. PMID:26993225

  13. Myocardial Remodeling: Cellular and Extracellular Events and Targets

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Jennifer A.; Spinale, Francis G.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this review is on translational studies utilizing large-animal models and clinical studies that provide fundamental insight into cellular and extracellular pathways contributing to post–myocardial infarction (MI) left ventricle (LV) remodeling. Specifically, both large-animal and clinical studies have examined the potential role of endogenous and exogenous stem cells to alter the course of LV remodeling. Interestingly, there have been alterations in LV remodeling with stem cell treatment despite a lack of long-term cell engraftment. The translation of the full potential of stem cell treatments to clinical studies has yet to be realized. The modulation of proteolytic pathways that contribute to the post-MI remodeling process has also been examined. On the basis of recent large-animal studies, there appears to be a relationship between stem cell treatment post-MI and the modification of proteolytic pathways, generating the hypothesis that stem cells leave an echo effect that moderates LV remodeling. PMID:21314431

  14. Chromatin dynamics: Interplay between remodeling enzymes and histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Swygert, Sarah G.; Peterson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics play an essential role in regulating the accessibility of genomic DNA for a variety of nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA repair. The posttranslational modification of the core histones and the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes represent two primary mechanisms by which chromatin dynamics are controlled and linked to nuclear events. Although there are examples in which a histone modification or a remodeling enzyme may be sufficient to drive a chromatin transition, these mechanisms typically work in concert to integrate regulatory inputs, leading to a coordinated alteration in chromatin structure and function. Indeed, site-specific histone modifications can facilitate the recruitment of chromatin remodeling enzymes to particular genomic regions, or they can regulate the efficiency or the outcome of a chromatin remodeling reaction. Conversely, chromatin remodeling enzymes can also influence, and sometimes directly modulate, the modification state of histones. These functional interactions are generally complex, frequently transient, and often require the association of myriad additional factors. PMID:24583555

  15. Hydrogen sulfide depletion contributes to microvascular remodeling in obesity.

    PubMed

    Candela, Joseph; Velmurugan, Gopal V; White, Carl

    2016-05-01

    Structural remodeling of the microvasculature occurs during obesity. Based on observations that impaired H2S signaling is associated with cardiovascular pathologies, the current study was designed to test the hypothesis that altered H2S homeostasis is involved in driving the remodeling process in a diet-induced mouse model of obesity. The structural and passive mechanical properties of mesenteric resistance arterioles isolated from 30-wk-old lean and obese mice were assessed using pressure myography, and vessel H2S levels were quantified using the H2S indicator sulfidefluor 7-AM. Remodeling gene expression was assessed using quantitative RT-PCR, and histological staining was used to quantify vessel collagen and elastin. Obesity was found to be associated with decreased vessel H2S concentration, inward hypertrophic remodeling, altered collagen-to-elastin ratio, and reduced vessel stiffness. In addition, mRNA levels of fibronectin, collagen types I and III, matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 were increased and elastin was decreased by obesity. Evidence that decreased H2S was responsible for the genetic changes was provided by experiments in which H2S levels were manipulated, either by inhibition of the H2S-generating enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase with dl-propargylglycine or by incubation with the H2S donor GYY4137. These data suggest that, during obesity, depletion of H2S is involved in orchestrating the genetic changes underpinning inward hypertrophic remodeling in the microvasculature. PMID:26993223

  16. Chemistry of bone remodelling preserved in extant and fossil Sirenia.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jennifer; Wogelius, Roy A; Edwards, Nicholas P; van Veelen, Arjen; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Manning, Phillip L

    2016-05-01

    Bone remodelling is a crucial biological process needed to maintain elemental homeostasis. It is important to understand the trace elemental inventories that govern these processes as malfunctions in bone remodelling can have devastating effects on an organism. In this study, we use a combination of X-ray techniques to map, quantify, and characterise the coordination chemistry of trace elements within the highly remodelled bone tissues of extant and extinct Sirenia (manatees and dugongs). The dense bone structure and unique body chemistry of sirenians represent ideal tissues for studying both high remodelling rates as well as unique fossilisation pathways. Here, elemental maps revealed uncorrelated patterning of Ca and Zn within secondary osteons in both extant and fossil sirenians, as well as elevated Sr within the connecting canals of fossil sirenians. Concentrations of these elements are comparable between extant and fossil material indicating geochemical processing of the fossil bone has been minimal. Zn was found to be bound in the same coordination within the apatite structure in both extant and fossil bone. Accurate quantification of trace elements in extant material was only possible when the organic constituents of the bone were included. The comparable distributions, concentrations, and chemical coordination of these physiologically important trace elements indicate the chemistry of bone remodelling has been preserved for 19 million years. This study signifies the powerful potential of merging histological and chemical techniques in the understanding of physiological processes in both extant and extinct vertebrates. PMID:26923825

  17. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders

    PubMed Central

    López, Alberto J.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF) complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS), schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Together, these human developmental and ID disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and ID disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development. PMID:25954173

  18. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders.

    PubMed

    López, Alberto J; Wood, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF) complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS), schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Together, these human developmental and ID disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and ID disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development. PMID:25954173

  19. Unremodeled and remodeled cardiolipin are functionally indistinguishable in yeast.

    PubMed

    Baile, Matthew G; Sathappa, Murugappan; Lu, Ya-Wen; Pryce, Erin; Whited, Kevin; McCaffery, J Michael; Han, Xianlin; Alder, Nathan N; Claypool, Steven M

    2014-01-17

    After biosynthesis, an evolutionarily conserved acyl chain remodeling process generates a final highly homogeneous and yet tissue-specific molecular form of the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin. Hence, cardiolipin molecules in different organisms, and even different tissues within the same organism, contain a distinct collection of attached acyl chains. This observation is the basis for the widely accepted paradigm that the acyl chain composition of cardiolipin is matched to the unique mitochondrial demands of a tissue. For this hypothesis to be correct, cardiolipin molecules with different acyl chain compositions should have distinct functional capacities, and cardiolipin that has been remodeled should promote cardiolipin-dependent mitochondrial processes better than its unremodeled form. However, functional disparities between different molecular forms of cardiolipin have never been established. Here, we interrogate this simple but crucial prediction utilizing the best available model to do so, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specifically, we compare the ability of unremodeled and remodeled cardiolipin, which differ markedly in their acyl chain composition, to support mitochondrial activities known to require cardiolipin. Surprisingly, defined changes in the acyl chain composition of cardiolipin do not alter either mitochondrial morphology or oxidative phosphorylation. Importantly, preventing cardiolipin remodeling initiation in yeast lacking TAZ1, an ortholog of the causative gene in Barth syndrome, ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, our data do not support the prevailing hypothesis that unremodeled cardiolipin is functionally distinct from remodeled cardiolipin, at least for the functions examined, suggesting alternative physiological roles for this conserved pathway. PMID:24285538

  20. Focal myocardial infarction induces global remodeling of cardiac sympathetic innervation: neural remodeling in a spatial context

    PubMed Central

    Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Yagishita, Daigo; Patel, Krishan J.; Vaseghi, Marmar; Zhou, Wei; Yamakawa, Kentaro; So, Eileen; Lux, Robert L.; Mahajan, Aman

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) induces neural and electrical remodeling at scar border zones. The impact of focal MI on global functional neural remodeling is not well understood. Sympathetic stimulation was performed in swine with anteroapical infarcts (MI; n = 9) and control swine (n = 9). A 56-electrode sock was placed over both ventricles to record electrograms at baseline and during left, right, and bilateral stellate ganglion stimulation. Activation recovery intervals (ARIs) were measured from electrograms. Global and regional ARI shortening, dispersion of repolarization, and activation propagation were assessed before and during sympathetic stimulation. At baseline, mean ARI was shorter in MI hearts than control hearts (365 ± 8 vs. 436 ± 9 ms, P < 0.0001), dispersion of repolarization was greater in MI versus control hearts (734 ± 123 vs. 362 ± 32 ms2, P = 0.02), and the infarcted region in MI hearts showed longer ARIs than noninfarcted regions (406 ± 14 vs. 365 ± 8 ms, P = 0.027). In control animals, percent ARI shortening was greater on anterior than posterior walls during right stellate ganglion stimulation (P = 0.0001), whereas left stellate ganglion stimulation showed the reverse (P = 0.0003). In infarcted animals, this pattern was completely lost. In 50% of the animals studied, sympathetic stimulation, compared with baseline, significantly altered the direction of activation propagation emanating from the intramyocardial scar during pacing. In conclusion, focal distal anterior MI alters regional and global pattern of sympathetic innervation, resulting in shorter ARIs in infarcted hearts, greater repolarization dispersion, and altered activation propagation. These conditions may underlie the mechanisms by which arrhythmias are initiated when sympathetic tone is enhanced. PMID:23893167

  1. Computational Study of Growth and Remodeling in the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Patrick W.; Taber, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    Opening angles (OAs) are associated with growth and remodeling in arteries. One curiosity has been the relatively large OAs found in the aortic arch of some animals. Here, we use computational models to explore the reasons behind this phenomenon. The artery is assumed to contain a smooth muscle/collagen phase and an elastin phase. In the models, growth and remodeling of smooth muscle/collagen depends on wall stress and fluid shear stress. Remodeling of elastin, which normally turns over very slowly, is neglected. The results indicate that OAs generally increase with longitudinal curvature (torus model), earlier elastin production during development, and decreased wall stiffness. Correlating these results with available experimental data suggests that all of these effects may contribute to the large OAs in the aortic arch. The models also suggest that the slow turnover rate of elastin limits longitudinal growth. These results should promote increased understanding of the causes of residual stress in arteries. PMID:18792831

  2. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wurster, Andrea L.; Pazin, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the best studied systems for mammalian chromatin remodeling is transcriptional regulation during T cell development. The variety of these studies have led to important findings in T cell gene regulation and cell fate determination. Importantly, these findings have also advanced our knowledge of the function of remodeling enzymes in mammalian gene regulation. In this review, first we briefly present biochemical/cell-free analysis of 3 types of ATP dependent remodeling enzymes (SWI/SNF, Mi2, and ISWI), to construct an intellectual framework to understand how these enzymes might be working. Second, we compare and contrast the function of these enzymes, during early (thymic) and late (peripheral) T cell development. Finally, we examine some of the gaps in our present understanding. PMID:21999456

  3. [Determinants of bone quality and strength independent of bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Saito, Mitsuru; Marumo, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Bone mineral density(BMD)and bone microstructure are regulated mainly by bone remodeling. In contrast, bone collagen enzymatic immature and mature cross-links and advanced glycation end products such as pentosidine and carboxyl methyl lysine are affected by various factors. Aging bone tissue is repaired in the process of bone remodeling. However, deterioration of bone material properties markedly advances due to increases in oxidative stress, glycation stress, reactive oxygen species, carbonyl stress associated with aging and reduced sex hormone levels, and glucocorticoid use. To improve bone material properties in osteoporosis, we should use different drug (Saito M, Calcif Tissue Int, REVIEW, 97;242-261, 2015). In this review, we summarized determinants of bone quality and strength independent of bone remodeling. PMID:26728528

  4. Iron chelation inhibits the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Ming; Preston, Ioana R; Hill, Nicholas S; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2012-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Because iron is an important regulator of ROS biology, this study examined the effects of iron chelation on the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling. The administration of an iron chelator, deferoxamine, to rats prevented chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Various iron chelators inhibited the growth of cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Protein carbonylation, an important iron-dependent biological event, was promoted in association with pulmonary vascular remodeling and cell growth. A proteomic approach identified that Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor (a negative regulator of RhoA) is carbonylated. In human plasma, the protein carbonyl content was significantly higher in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension than in healthy controls. These results suggest that iron plays an important role in the ROS-dependent mechanism underlying the development of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22974762

  5. Subject-specific bone remodelling of the scapula.

    PubMed

    Quental, Carlos; Folgado, João; Fernandes, Paulo R; Monteiro, Jacinto

    2014-08-01

    Finite element analyses, with increasing levels of detail and complexity, are becoming effective tools to evaluate the performance of joint replacement prostheses and to predict the behaviour of bone. As a first step towards the study of the complications of shoulder arthroplasty, the aim of this work was the development and validation of a 3D finite element model of an intact scapula for the prediction of the bone remodelling process based on a previously published model that attempts to follow Wolff's law. The boundary conditions applied include full muscle and joint loads taken from a multibody system of the upper limb based on the same subject whose scapula was here analysed. To validate the bone remodelling simulations, qualitative and quantitative comparisons between the predicted and the specimen's bone density distribution were performed. The results showed that the bone remodelling model was able to successfully reproduce the actual bone density distribution of the analysed scapula. PMID:23210487

  6. Anisotropic stress orients remodelling of mammalian limb bud ectoderm.

    PubMed

    Lau, Kimberly; Tao, Hirotaka; Liu, Haijiao; Wen, Jun; Sturgeon, Kendra; Sorfazlian, Natalie; Lazic, Savo; Burrows, Jeffrey T A; Wong, Michael D; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Ciruna, Brian; Scott, Ian; Simmons, Craig; Henkelman, R Mark; Williams, Trevor; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Sun, Yu; Hopyan, Sevan

    2015-05-01

    The physical forces that drive morphogenesis are not well characterized in vivo, especially among vertebrates. In the early limb bud, dorsal and ventral ectoderm converge to form the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. By live imaging mouse embryos, we show that prospective AER progenitors intercalate at the dorsoventral boundary and that ectoderm remodels by concomitant cell division and neighbour exchange. Mesodermal expansion and ectodermal tension together generate a dorsoventrally biased stress pattern that orients ectodermal remodelling. Polarized distribution of cortical actin reflects this stress pattern in a β-catenin- and Fgfr2-dependent manner. Intercalation of AER progenitors generates a tensile gradient that reorients resolution of multicellular rosettes on adjacent surfaces, a process facilitated by β-catenin-dependent attachment of cortex to membrane. Therefore, feedback between tissue stress pattern and cell intercalations remodels mammalian ectoderm. PMID:25893915

  7. Anisotropic stress orients remodelling of mammalian limb bud ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kimberly; Tao, Hirotaka; Liu, Haijiao; Wen, Jun; Sturgeon, Kendra; Sorfazlian, Natalie; Lazic, Savo; Burrows, Jeffrey T. A.; Wong, Michael D.; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Ciruna, Brian; Scott, Ian; Simmons, Craig; Henkelman, R. Mark; Williams, Trevor; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Sun, Yu; Hopyan, Sevan

    2016-01-01

    The physical forces that drive morphogenesis are not well characterized in vivo, especially among vertebrates. In the early limb bud, dorsal and ventral ectoderm converge to form the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. By live imaging mouse embryos, we show that prospective AER progenitors intercalate at the dorsoventral boundary and that ectoderm remodels by concomitant cell division and neighbour exchange. Mesodermal expansion and ectodermal tension together generate a dorsoventrally biased stress pattern that orients ectodermal remodelling. Polarized distribution of cortical actin reflects this stress pattern in a β-catenin- and Fgfr2-dependent manner. Intercalation of AER progenitors generates a tensile gradient that reorients resolution of multicellular rosettes on adjacent surfaces, a process facilitated by β-catenin-dependent attachment of cortex to membrane. Therefore, feedback between tissue stress pattern and cell intercalations remodels mammalian ectoderm. PMID:25893915

  8. Physiological bases of bone regeneration II. The remodeling process.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tresguerres-Hernández-Gil, Isabel; Alobera-Gracia, Miguel Angel; del-Canto-Pingarrón, Mariano; Blanco-Jerez, Luis

    2006-03-01

    Bone remodeling is the restructuring process of existing bone, which is in constant resorption and formation. Under normal conditions, this balanced process allows the renewal of 5-10% of bone volume per year. At the microscopic level, bone remodeling is produced in basic multicellular units, where osteoclasts resorb a certain quantity of bone and osteoblasts form the osteoid matrix and mineralize it to fill the previously created cavity. These units contain osteoclasts, macrophages, preosteoblasts and osteoblasts, and are controlled by a series of factors, both general and local, allowing normal bone function and maintaining the bone mass. When this process becomes unbalanced then bone pathology appears, either in excess (osteopetrosis) or deficit (osteoporosis). The purpose of this study is to undertake a revision of current knowledge on the physiological and biological mechanisms of the bone remodeling process; highlighting the role played by the regulating factors, in particular that of the growth factors. PMID:16505794

  9. Passive ventricular remodeling in cardiac disease: focus on heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Elise L.; Boulaksil, Mohamed; van Rijen, Harold V. M.; Vos, Marc A.; van Veen, Toon A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Passive ventricular remodeling is defined by the process of molecular ventricular adaptation to different forms of cardiac pathophysiology. It includes changes in tissue architecture, such as hypertrophy, fiber disarray, alterations in cell size and fibrosis. Besides that, it also includes molecular remodeling of gap junctions, especially those composed by Connexin43 proteins (Cx43) in the ventricles that affect cell-to-cell propagation of the electrical impulse, and changes in the sodium channels that modify excitability. All those alterations appear mainly in a heterogeneous manner, creating irregular and inhomogeneous electrical and mechanical coupling throughout the heart. This can predispose to reentry arrhythmias and adds to a further deterioration into heart failure. In this review, passive ventricular remodeling is described in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM), Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (ICM), and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy (ACM), with a main focus on the heterogeneity of those alterations mentioned above. PMID:25566084

  10. Dynamical DNA accessibility induced by chromatin remodeling and protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, F.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.; Castelnovo, M.

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodeling factors are enzymes being able to alter locally chromatin structure at the nucleosomal level and they actively participate in the regulation of gene expression. Using simple rules for individual nucleosome motion induced by a remodeling factor, we designed simulations of the remodeling of oligomeric chromatin, in order to address quantitatively collective effects in DNA accessibility upon nucleosome mobilization. Our results suggest that accessibility profiles are inhomogeneous thanks to borders effects like protein binding. Remarkably, we show that the accessibility lifetime of DNA sequence is roughly doubled in the vicinity of borders as compared to its value in bulk regions far from the borders. These results are quantitatively interpreted as resulting from the confined diffusion of a large nucleosome depleted region.

  11. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Microvascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Staiculescu, Marius C.; Foote, Christopher; Meininger, Gerald A.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    The microcirculation is a portion of the vascular circulatory system that consists of resistance arteries, arterioles, capillaries and venules. It is the place where gases and nutrients are exchanged between blood and tissues. In addition the microcirculation is the major contributor to blood flow resistance and consequently to regulation of blood pressure. Therefore, structural remodeling of this section of the vascular tree has profound implications on cardiovascular pathophysiology. This review is focused on the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play on changing the structural characteristics of vessels within the microcirculation. Particular attention is given to the resistance arteries and the functional pathways that are affected by ROS in these vessels and subsequently induce vascular remodeling. The primary sources of ROS in the microcirculation are identified and the effects of ROS on other microcirculatory remodeling phenomena such as rarefaction and collateralization are briefly reviewed. PMID:25535075

  12. Myocardial repair/remodelling following infarction: roles of local factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is a global health problem, appearing most commonly in patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI). Cardiac remodelling, particularly fibrosis, seen in both the infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium is recognized to be a major determinant of the development of impaired ventricular function, leading to a poor prognosis. Elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of extracellular matrix is essential for designing cardioprotective and reparative strategies that could regress fibrosis after infarction. Multiple factors contribute to left ventricular remodelling at different stages post-MI. This review will discuss the role of oxidative stress and locally produced angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of myocardial repair/remodelling after MI. PMID:19050008

  13. Uptake and remodeling of exogenous phosphatidylethanolamine in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kol, Matthijs A; Kuster, Diederik W D; Boumann, Henry A; de Cock, Hans; Heck, Albert J R; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2004-03-22

    The fate of exogenous short-chain analogues of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine was studied in a deep-rough derivative of E. coli mutant strain AD93 that cannot synthesize phosphatidylethanolamine de novo. Using mass spectrometry, it was shown that dicaproyl(di 6:0)-phosphatidylethanolamine is extensively remodeled, eventually adopting the phosphatidylethanolamine species profile of the parental wild-type strain of AD93. Dicaproyl-phosphatidylserine was decarboxylated to form phosphatidylethanolamine, and yielded a species profile, which strongly resembled that of the introduced phosphatidylethanolamine. This demonstrates transport of phosphatidylserine to the cytosolic leaflet of the inner membrane. The changes of the species profile of phosphatidylethanolamine indicate that the short-chain phospholipids are most likely remodeled via two consecutive acyl chain substitutions, and at least part of this remodeling involves transport to the inner membrane. PMID:15164768

  14. Assessment of bone vascularization and its role in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Roche, Bernard; Langer, Max; Cleret, Damien; Vanden Bossche, Arnaud; Olivier, Thomas; Vico, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a composite organ that fulfils several interconnected functions, which may conflict with each other in pathological conditions. Bone vascularization is at the interface between these functions. The roles of bone vascularization are better documented in bone development, growth and modeling than in bone remodeling. However, every bone remodeling unit is associated with a capillary in both cortical and trabecular envelopes. Here we summarize the most recent data on vessel involvement in bone remodeling, and we present the characteristics of bone vascularization. Finally, we describe the various techniques used for bone vessel imaging and quantitative assessment, including histology, immunohistochemistry, microtomography and intravital microscopy. Studying the role of vascularization in adult bone should provide benefits for the understanding and treatment of metabolic bone diseases. PMID:25861447

  15. A Proteoglycan-Like Molecule Offers Insights Into Ground Substance Changes During Holothurian Intestinal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Vélez, Gabriel E; Rodríguez-Molina, José F; Quiñones-Frías, Mónica C; Pagán, María; García-Arrarás, José E

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling is an essential component of regenerative processes in metazoans. Among these animals, holothurians (sea cucumbers) are distinguished by their great regenerative capacities. We have previously shown that fibrous collagen as well as other fibrous components disappear from the connective tissue (CT) early during intestinal regeneration, and later return as the organ primordia form. We now report on changes of the nonfibrous component of the CT. We have used Alcian Blue staining and an antibody, Proteoglycan Like-1 (PGL-1), that recognizes a proteoglycan-like antigen to identify the presence of proteoglycans in normal and regenerating intestines. Our results show that early in regeneration, the ground substance resembles that of the mesentery, the structure from where the new intestine originates. As regeneration proceeds, Alcian Blue staining and PGL-1 labeling reorganize, so that by 4 weeks the normal intestinal CT pattern is achieved. Together with our previous findings, the data suggest that CT components that might be detrimental to regeneration disappear early on, while those that might be beneficial to regeneration, such as proteoglycans, are present throughout the regenerative process. PMID:27126824

  16. Parallel mechanisms suppress cochlear bone remodeling to protect hearing.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel J; Akil, Omar; Acevedo, Claire; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Tsai, Betty S; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Liebenberg, Ellen; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Ritchie, Robert O; Lustig, Lawrence R; Alliston, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    Bone remodeling, a combination of bone resorption and formation, requires precise regulation of cellular and molecular signaling to maintain proper bone quality. Whereas osteoblasts deposit and osteoclasts resorb bone matrix, osteocytes both dynamically resorb and replace perilacunar bone matrix. Osteocytes secrete proteases like matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) to maintain the material quality of bone matrix through perilacunar remodeling (PLR). Deregulated bone remodeling impairs bone quality and can compromise hearing since the auditory transduction mechanism is within bone. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cochlear bone provides unique ways to assess bone quality independent of other aspects that contribute to bone mechanical behavior. Cochlear bone is singular in its regulation of remodeling by expressing high levels of osteoprotegerin. Since cochlear bone expresses a key PLR enzyme, MMP13, we examined whether cochlear bone relies on, or is protected from, osteocyte-mediated PLR to maintain hearing and bone quality using a mouse model lacking MMP13 (MMP13(-/-)). We investigated the canalicular network, collagen organization, lacunar volume via micro-computed tomography, and dynamic histomorphometry. Despite finding defects in these hallmarks of PLR in MMP13(-/-) long bones, cochlear bone revealed no differences in these markers, nor hearing loss as measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) or distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs), between wild type and MMP13(-/-) mice. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed abundant PLR by tibial osteocytes, but near absence in cochlear bone. Cochlear suppression of PLR corresponds to repression of several key PLR genes in the cochlea relative to long bones. These data suggest that cochlear bone uniquely maintains bone quality and hearing independent of MMP13-mediated osteocytic PLR. Furthermore, the cochlea employs parallel mechanisms to inhibit remodeling by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and by

  17. Intestinal failure: Pathophysiological elements and clinical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lian-An; Li, Jie-Shou

    2004-01-01

    There are two main functions of gastrointestinal tract, digestion and absorption, and barrier function. The latter has an important defensive effect, which keeps the body away from the invading and damaging of bacteria and endotoxin. It maintains the systemic homeostasis. Intestinal dysfunction would happen when body suffers from diseases or harmful stimulations. The lesser dysfunction of GI tract manifests only disorder of digestion and absorption, whereas the more serious intestinal disorders would harm the intestinal protective mechanism, or intestinal barrier function, and bacterial/endotoxin translocation, of intestinal failure (IF) would ensue. This review disscussed the theory of the intestinal failure, aiming at attracting recognition and valuable comments by clinicians. PMID:15052668

  18. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease).

    PubMed

    Vignes, Stéphane; Bellanger, Jérôme

    2008-01-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals resulting in lymph leakage into the small bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. PIL is generally diagnosed before 3 years of age but may be diagnosed in older patients. Prevalence is unknown. The main symptom is predominantly bilateral lower limb edema. Edema may be moderate to severe with anasarca and includes pleural effusion, pericarditis or chylous ascites. Fatigue, abdominal pain, weight loss, inability to gain weight, moderate diarrhea or fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies due to malabsorption may also be present. In some patients, limb lymphedema is associated with PIL and is difficult to distinguish lymphedema from edema. Exsudative enteropathy is confirmed by the elevated 24-h stool alpha1-antitrypsin clearance. Etiology remains unknown. Very rare familial cases of PIL have been reported. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic observation of intestinal lymphangiectasia with the corresponding histology of intestinal biopsy specimens. Videocapsule endoscopy may be useful when endoscopic findings are not contributive. Differential diagnosis includes constrictive pericarditis, intestinal lymphoma, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal tuberculosis, sarcoidosis or systemic sclerosis. Several B-cell lymphomas confined to the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, jejunum, midgut, ileum) or with extra-intestinal localizations were reported in PIL patients. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL medical management. The absence of fat in the diet prevents chyle engorgement of the intestinal lymphatic vessels thereby preventing their rupture with its ensuing lymph loss. Medium-chain triglycerides are absorbed directly into the portal venous circulation and avoid lacteal overloading. Other inconsistently effective

  19. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. PMID:27086886

  20. Modulators of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule modulators of phosphatases can lead to clinically useful drugs and serve as invaluable tools to study functional roles of various phosphatases in vivo. Here, we describe lead discovery strategies for identification of inhibitors and activators of intestinal alkaline phosphatases. To identify isozyme-selective inhibitors and activators of the human and mouse intestinal alkaline phosphatases, ultrahigh throughput chemiluminescent assays, utilizing CDP-Star as a substrate, were developed for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (mIAP), human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (hIAP), human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), and human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozymes. Using these 1,536-well assays, concurrent HTS screens of the MLSMR library of 323,000 compounds were conducted for human and mouse IAP isozymes monitoring both inhibition and activation. This parallel screening approach led to identification of a novel inhibitory scaffold selective for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase. SAR efforts based on parallel testing of analogs against different AP isozymes generated a potent inhibitor of the murine IAP with IC50 of 540 nM, at least 65-fold selectivity against human TNAP, and >185 selectivity against human PLAP. PMID:23860652

  1. Management of pediatric intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, S S; Matsumoto, C S

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is defined as the state of the intestinal tract where the function is below the minimum required for the absorption of macronutrients, water, and electrolytes. The etiology may be a multitude of causes, but short bowel syndrome (SBS) remains the most common. The successful management and prognosis of SBS in infants and children depends a multitude of variables such as length, quality, location, and anatomy of the remaining intestine. Prognosis, likewise, depends on these factors, but also is dependent on the clinical management of these patients. Strategies for a successful outcome and the success of therapeutic interventions are dependent upon understanding each individual's remaining intestinal function. Medical intervention success is defined by a graduated advancement of enteral nutrition (EN) and a reduction of parenteral nutrition (PN). Complications of IF and PN include progressive liver disease, bacterial overgrowth, dysmotility, renal disease, catheter related bloodstream infections, and loss of venous access. Surgical interventions such as bowel lengthening procedures show promise in carefully selected patients. Intestinal transplantation is reserved for those infants and children suffering from life-threatening complications of PN. PMID:25752806

  2. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Xing; Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target. Data Sources: This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30, 2015. Articles were selected using the following search terms: “Intestinal microbiota”, “trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)”, “trimethylamine (TMA)”, “cardiovascular”, and “atherosclerosis”. Study Selection: Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis. Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included. Results: A new CVD risk factor, TMAO, was recently identified. It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota, resulting in TMA release. TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver. Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD, particularly atherosclerosis; however, the details of this relationship remain unclear. Conclusions: Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management. PMID:26481750

  3. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  4. Sonography of the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nylund, Kim; Ødegaard, Svein; Hausken, Trygve; Folvik, Geir; Lied, Gülen Arslan; Viola, Ivan; Hauser, Helwig; Gilja, Odd-Helge

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been substantial development in the diagnostic possibilities for examining the small intestine. Compared with computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy, ultrasonography has the advantage of being cheap, portable, flexible and user- and patient-friendly, while at the same time providing the clinician with image data of high temporal and spatial resolution. The method has limitations with penetration in obesity and with intestinal air impairing image quality. The flexibility ultrasonography offers the examiner also implies that a systematic approach during scanning is needed. This paper reviews the basic scanning techniques and new modalities such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound, elastography, strain rate imaging, hydrosonography, allergosonography, endoscopic sonography and nutritional imaging, and the literature on disease-specific findings in the small intestine. Some of these methods have shown clinical benefit, while others are under research and development to establish their role in the diagnostic repertoire. However, along with improved overall image quality of new ultrasound scanners, these methods have enabled more anatomical and physiological changes in the small intestine to be observed. Accordingly, ultrasound of the small intestine is an attractive clinical tool to study patients with a range of diseases. PMID:19294761

  5. Efficient computational simulation of actin stress fiber remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ristori, T; Obbink-Huizer, C; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T; Loerakker, S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding collagen and stress fiber remodeling is essential for the development of engineered tissues with good functionality. These processes are complex, highly interrelated, and occur over different time scales. As a result, excessive computational costs are required to computationally predict the final organization of these fibers in response to dynamic mechanical conditions. In this study, an analytical approximation of a stress fiber remodeling evolution law was derived. A comparison of the developed technique with the direct numerical integration of the evolution law showed relatively small differences in results, and the proposed method is one to two orders of magnitude faster. PMID:26823159

  6. Structural remodeling of unweighted soleus myotendinous junction in monkey.

    PubMed

    Roffino, Sandrine; Carnino, Alain; Chopard, Angèle; Mutin, Murielle; Marini, Jean-François

    2006-03-01

    This study describes the morphology of the soleus myotendinous junction (MTJ) in the Rhesus monkey. Ultrastructural observations revealed a structural complexity that probably reflects functional adaptations. We also studied ultrastructural modifications of the MTJ in response to 14 days of hypokinesia and microgravity (Bion 11 mission). The reduced limb mobility of the animals, placed in a safety seat aboard the satellite, induced a sarcolemmal remodeling that was enhanced by the microgravity conditions. Signs of MTJ remodeling such as alterations of contractile apparatus and myofilament-anchoring structures, T-tubule dilation, and autophagic vacuoles could be ascribed to the microgravity. PMID:16545758

  7. Silent Synapse-Based Circuitry Remodeling in Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to cocaine, and likely other drugs of abuse, generates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor-silent glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus accumbens. These immature synaptic contacts evolve after drug withdrawal to redefine the neurocircuital properties. These results raise at least three critical questions: (1) what are the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate drug-induced generation of silent synapses; (2) how are neurocircuits remodeled upon generation and evolution of drug-generated silent synapses; and (3) what behavioral consequences are produced by silent synapse-based circuitry remodeling? This short review analyzes related experimental results, and extends them to some speculations. PMID:26721952

  8. Mechanisms of ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Motors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Coral Y; Johnson, Stephanie L; Gamarra, Nathan I; Narlikar, Geeta J

    2016-07-01

    Chromatin remodeling motors play essential roles in all DNA-based processes. These motors catalyze diverse outcomes ranging from sliding the smallest units of chromatin, known as nucleosomes, to completely disassembling chromatin. The broad range of actions carried out by these motors on the complex template presented by chromatin raises many stimulating mechanistic questions. Other well-studied nucleic acid motors provide examples of the depth of mechanistic understanding that is achievable from detailed biophysical studies. We use these studies as a guiding framework to discuss the current state of knowledge of chromatin remodeling mechanisms and highlight exciting open questions that would continue to benefit from biophysical analyses. PMID:27391925

  9. Synaptic circuit remodelling by matrix metalloproteinases in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellularly acting enzymes that have long been known to have deleterious roles in brain injury and disease. In particular, widespread and protracted MMP activity can contribute to neuronal loss and synaptic dysfunction. However, recent studies show that rapid and focal MMP-mediated proteolysis proactively drives synaptic structural and functional remodelling that is crucial for ongoing cognitive processes. Deficits in synaptic remodelling are associated with psychiatric and neurological disorders, and aberrant MMP expression or function may contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying these deficits. This Review explores the paradigm shift in our understanding of the contribution of MMPs to normal and abnormal synaptic plasticity and function. PMID:23047773

  10. Mechanisms contributing to myocardial potassium channel diversity, regulation and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2016-04-01

    In the mammalian heart, multiple types of K(+) channels contribute to the control of cardiac electrical and mechanical functioning through the regulation of resting membrane potentials, action potential waveforms and refractoriness. There are similarly vast arrays of K(+) channel pore-forming and accessory subunits that contribute to the generation of functional myocardial K(+) channel diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of K(+) channels associated with cardiac and systemic diseases results in impaired repolarization and increased propensity for arrhythmias. Here, we review the diverse transcriptional, post-transcriptional, post-translational, and epigenetic mechanisms contributing to regulating the expression, distribution, and remodeling of cardiac K(+) channels under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26391345

  11. [Bone quality and strength relating with bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Mori, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The bone has the functions of mineral reservoir and mechanical support as skeleton. Bone remodeling is the adult mode of bone metabolism, replacing old bone tissue to new one. Bone strength is determined by bone volume, structure and quality such as micro damage, degree of mineralization and collagen cross linkage, which are all controlled by bone remodeling. Bone strength decreases under high turn-over condition by decreasing bone volume and deterioration of bone structure, which also decreases under low turn-over condition by increased micro damage, increasing mineralization and AGE collagen cross linkage. PMID:26728527

  12. Silent Synapse-Based Circuitry Remodeling in Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to cocaine, and likely other drugs of abuse, generates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor-silent glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus accumbens. These immature synaptic contacts evolve after drug withdrawal to redefine the neurocircuital properties. These results raise at least three critical questions: (1) what are the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate drug-induced generation of silent synapses; (2) how are neurocircuits remodeled upon generation and evolution of drug-generated silent synapses; and (3) what behavioral consequences are produced by silent synapse-based circuitry remodeling? This short review analyzes related experimental results, and extends them to some speculations. PMID:26721952

  13. Intestinal hormones and growth factors: Effects on the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2009-01-01

    There are various hormones and growth factors which may modify the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and which might thereby be useful in a therapeutic setting, such as in persons with short bowel syndrome. In partI, we focus first on insulin-like growth factors, epidermal and transferring growth factors, thyroid hormones and glucocorticosteroids. Part II will detail the effects of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 on intestinal absorption and adaptation, and the potential for an additive effect of GLP2 plus steroids. PMID:19152442

  14. Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: evidence of intestinal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Rolle, Udo; O'Briain, Sean; Pearl, Richard H; Puri, Prem

    2002-01-01

    We investigated small- and large-bowel specimens of three newborn infants presenting with the clinical and radiological symptoms of megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS). Conventional histological staining revealed marked thinning of the longitudinal muscle layer. Electron-microscopic investigations showed typical "central core" vacuolic degeneration of smooth-muscle-cells combined with proliferation of col lagen fibres. The expression of alpha-smooth-muscle actin was absent or markedly reduced in the circular and longitudinal muscle layers and muscularis mucosae compared to the normal controls. These findings suggest that the intestinal obstruction in MMIHS is due to an abnormality of the smooth-muscle cells. PMID:11793054

  15. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females.

    PubMed

    Holditch, Sara J; Schreiber, Claire A; Burnett, John C; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb-/-) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb-/- females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb-/- female. This study highlights BNP's vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  16. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females

    PubMed Central

    Holditch, Sara J.; Schreiber, Claire A.; Burnett, John C.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb−/−) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb−/− females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb−/− female. This study highlights BNP’s vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  17. The Intestinal Absorption of Folates

    PubMed Central

    Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of intestinal folate absorption were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081

  18. The intestinal absorption of folates.

    PubMed

    Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of intestinal folate absorption were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081

  19. Characterization of moose intestinal glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Miralda Madar; Dedic, Benjamin; Lundholm, Klara; Branzell, Filip Berner; Barone, Angela; Benktander, John; Teneberg, Susann

    2015-08-01

    As a part of a systematic investigation of the species-specific expression of glycosphingolipids, acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were isolated from three small intestines and one large intestine of the moose (Alces alces). The glycosphingolipids were characterized by binding of monoclonal antibodies, lectins and bacteria in chromatogram binding assays, and by mass spectrometry. The non-acid fractions were complex mixtures, and all had glycosphingolipids belonging to the lacto- and neolactoseries (lactotriaosylceramide, lactotetraosylceramide, neolactotetraosylceramide, Galα3-Le(x) hexaosylceramide, and lacto-neolactohexaosylceramide), globo-series (globotriaosylceramide and globotetraosylceramide), and isogloboseries (isoglobotriaosylceramide). Penta- and heptaglycosylceramides with terminal Galili determinants were also characterized. Furthermore, glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group O determinants (H triaosylceramide, H type 2 pentaosylceramide, H type 1 penta- and heptaosylceramide) were characterized in two of the moose small intestines, and in the one large intestine, while the third small intestine had glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group A determinants (A tetraosylceramide, A type 1 hexa- and octaosylceramide, A dodecaosylceramide). The acid glycosphingolipid fractions of moose small and large intestine contained sulfatide, and the gangliosides GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and also NeuGc and NeuAc variants of the Sd(a) ganglioside and the sialyl-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside. In humans, the NeuAc-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside is a marker of embryonic and adult stem cells, and is also expressed in several human cancers. This is the first time sialyl-globopentaosylceramide/SSEA-4 has been characterized in a fully differentiated normal tissue, and also the first time NeuGc-globopentaosylceramide has been characterized. PMID:26104834

  20. Radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Perino, L.E.; Schuffler, M.D.; Mehta, S.J.; Everson, G.T.

    1986-10-01

    A case of intestinal pseudoobstruction occurring 30 yr after radiation therapy is described. Mechanical causes of obstruction were excluded by laparotomy. Histology of full-thickness sections of the small bowel revealed vascular ectasia and sclerosis, serosal fibrosis, neuronal proliferation within the submucosa, and degeneration of the muscle fibers of the circular layer of the muscularis propria. On the basis of the clinical and histologic findings we conclude that, in this patient, intestinal pseudoobstruction was due to muscular and neuronal injury from abdominal irradiation.

  1. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makhija, P S; Magdalene, K F; Babu, M K

    1999-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction mainly affecting female neonates. We present a case of a newborn female infant with a history of abdominal distension, bilious vomiting and decreased urine output. Barium enema showed a microcolon. Patient died soon after admission and the autopsy revealed a shortened bowel, a microcolon with abundant ganglion cells in the myenteric plexus, and an enlarged urinary bladder. An interesting finding in this case was the presence of enlarged nerve bundles containing several large ganglion cells on the lateral wall of the cervix. The salient clinical and autopsy findings in this case are presented. PMID:10798164

  2. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Puri, Prem; Shinkai, Masato

    2005-02-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare and the most severe form of functional intestinal obstruction in the newborn. The major features of this congenital and usually lethal anomaly are abdominal distension, bile-stained vomiting, and absent or decreased bowel peristalsis. Abdominal distension is a consequence of the distended, unobstructed urinary bladder with or without upper urinary tract dilation. Most patients with MMIHS are not able to void spontaneously. This article reviews the pathogenesis of MMIHS as well as the clinical, radiological, surgical and histological findings in all reported cases of this syndrome. PMID:15770589

  3. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  5. Minor Groove Binder Distamycin Remodels Chromatin but Inhibits Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Parijat; Banerjee, Amrita; Shandilya, Jayasha; Senapati, Parijat; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Kundu, Tapas K.; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2013-01-01

    The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as “chromatin remodeling”. In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance. PMID:23460895

  6. "New Professionalism," Workforce Remodeling and the Restructuring of Teachers' Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Howard; Carter, Bob; Passy, Rowena

    2007-01-01

    Since its election in 1997 the Labour government's policy has sought to promote a "new professionalism" amongst teachers. First mooted at the time when new performance management arrangements were introduced, the discourse of new professionalism has now become closely associated with the "workforce remodeling" agenda in which teachers' work is…

  7. Remodeling of University of Minnesota President's House and Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Office of the Legislative Auditor, St. Paul. Program Evaluation Div.

    A report on the remodeling projects at the University of Minnesota president's house and office is presented, noting significant shortcomings in the way the projects were managed and in the reporting relationship that existed between the Board of Regents and the university's administration. Recommendations are offered to the university on how…

  8. Role of microRNAs in Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Y-C; Yeh, C-H

    2015-01-01

    Besides being involved in the gradual formation of blood vessels during embryonic development, vascular remodeling also contributes to the progression of various cardiovascular diseases, such as; myocardial infarction, heart failure, atherosclerosis, pulmonary artery hypertension, restenosis, aneurysm, etc. The integrated mechanisms; proliferation of medial smooth muscle cell, dysregulation of intimal endothelial cell, activation of adventitial fibroblast, inflammation of macrophage, and the participation of extracellular matrix proteins are important factors in vascular remodeling. In the recent studies, microRNAs (miRs) have been shown to be expressed in all of these cell-types and play important roles in the mechanisms of vascular remodeling. Therefore, some miRs may be involved in prevention and others in the aggravation of the vascular lesions. miRs are small, endogenous, conserved, single-stranded, non-coding RNAs; which degrade target RNAs or inhibit translation post-transcriptionally. In this paper, we reviewed the function and mechanisms of miRs, which are highly expressed in various cells types, especially endothelial and smooth muscle cells, which are closely involved in the process of vascular remodeling. We also assess the functions of these miRs in the hope that they may provide new possibilities of diagnosis and treatment choices for the related diseases. PMID:26391551

  9. 19. 'Southern Pacific Company, Pacific Lines, Remodeling of Piers For ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 'Southern Pacific Company, Pacific Lines, Remodeling of Piers For Renewal of Br. 210-C Near Tehama, Sac. Division, Scale 1' = 40' & 1/4' = 1'-0', Sept. 1927, M.W.D., Drawing 5935, Sheet 2.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  10. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of U.S. households compared to piecemeal remodeling efforts. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team examines the improvement of a home’s energy performance in an opportunistic way by examining what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for energy efficiency upgrades to occur at the same time as remodeling proejcts. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home’s energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

  11. Differential remodeling of extracellular matrices by breast cancer initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Raja, Anju M; Xu, Shuoyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Tai, Dean C S; Sun, Wanxin; So, Peter T C; Welsch, Roy E; Chen, Chien-Shing; Yu, Hanry

    2015-10-01

    Cancer initiating cells (CICs) have been the focus of recent anti-cancer therapies, exhibiting strong invasion capability via potentially enhanced ability to remodel extracellular matrices (ECM). We have identified CICs in a human breast cancer cell line, MX-1, and developed a xenograft model in SCID mice. We investigated the CICs' matrix-remodeling effects using Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy to identify potential phenotypic signatures of the CIC-rich tumors. The isolated CICs exhibit higher proliferation, drug efflux and drug resistant properties in vitro; were more tumorigenic than non-CICs, resulting in more and larger tumors in the xenograft model. The CIC-rich tumors have less collagen in the tumor interior than in the CIC-poor tumors supporting the idea that the CICs can remodel the collagen more effectively. The collagen fibers were preferentially aligned perpendicular to the CIC-rich tumor boundary while parallel to the CIC-poor tumor boundary suggesting more invasive behavior of the CIC-rich tumors. These findings would provide potential translational values in quantifying and monitoring CIC-rich tumors in future anti-cancer therapies. CIC-rich tumors remodel the collagen matrix more than CIC-poor tumors. PMID:25597396

  12. Using Extracellular Matrix Proteomics: To Understand Left Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Merry L.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Lange, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Survival following myocardial infarction (MI) has improved substantially over the last 40 years; however, the incidence of subsequent congestive heart failure has dramatically increased as a consequence. Discovering plasma markers that signify adverse cardiac remodeling may allow high-risk patients to be recognized earlier and may provide an improved way to assess treatment efficacy. Alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM) regulate cardiac remodeling following MI and potentially provide a large array of candidate indicators. The field of cardiac proteomics has progressed rapidly over the past 20 years, since publication of the first two-dimensional electrophoretic gels of left ventricle proteins. Proteomic approaches are now routinely utilized to better understand how the left ventricle responds to injury. In this review, we will discuss how methods have developed to allow comprehensive evaluation of the ECM proteome. We will explain how ECM proteomic data can be used to predict adverse remodeling for an individual patient and highlight future directions. Although this review will focus on the use of ECM proteomics to better understand post-MI remodeling responses, these approaches have applicability to a wide-range of cardiac pathologies, including pressure overload hypertrophy, viral myocarditis, and non-ischemic heart failure. PMID:22337931

  13. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: Biodegradation, drug delivery and vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Belay

    2016-05-01

    The metallic stents with durable polymers have been effective in reducing the need for revascularization, but the permanent presence of the metal and polymer have been associated with persistent inflammation, hypersensitivity reactions and incidence of thrombosis. Recent innovations of bioresorbable polymers are in development which could serve as temporary scaffolds that degrade into molecules and eventually resorb overtime, and leave the artery free of any permanent prosthetic constraints. The transient scaffolding has the advantages of restoring blood vessel to natural state, improve vasomotor tone and increase lumen enlargement because of expansive remodeling following completion of polymer resorption. The success of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds will depend on the degradation timeline, such that the elastic recoil of the blood vessel and negative remodeling which could potentially lead to restenosis are prevented. Bioresorbable scaffolds with bulky backbone and thick struts could lead to prolonged biodegradation, alter blood flow dynamics and increase thrombogenicity. The development of bioresorbable scaffolds is challenging because of the complexity of finding an ideal balance of polymer biodegradation and controlled drug release over time, such that the fractional drug released achieves optimal inhibitory concentration until the blood vessel remodels to a stable set point. This review discusses the various types of biodegradable materials, factors affecting biodegradation, drug release kinetics, vascular biocompatibility, adaptive vascular remodeling, and challenges in the development of bioresorbable scaffolds to treat vascular restenosis. PMID:27001225

  14. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of the households in our nation compared to more piecemeal remodeling efforts. Even when programs like the Weatherization Assistance Program and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR are considered, homes that have had a comprehensive energy makeover still represent a small fraction of the 111.1 million households. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team looks at the improvement of a home's energy performance in an opportunistic way: it examines what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for the possibility for people who would not normally pursue energy efficiency but will remodel their kitchen or re-side their home to improve their home's performance at the same time. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home's energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

  15. DNA Looping Facilitates Targeting of a Chromatin Remodeling Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yadon, Adam N; Singh, Badri Nath; Hampsey, Michael; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes are highly abundant and play pivotal roles regulating DNA-dependent processes. The mechanisms by which they are targeted to specific loci have not been well understood on a genome-wide scale. Here we present evidence that a major targeting mechanism for the Isw2 chromatin remodeling enzyme to specific genomic loci is through sequence-specific transcription factor (TF)-dependent recruitment. Unexpectedly, Isw2 is recruited in a TF-dependent fashion to a large number of loci without TF binding sites. Using the 3C assay, we show that Isw2 can be targeted by Ume6- and TFIIB-dependent DNA looping. These results identify DNA looping as a previously unknown mechanism for the recruitment of a chromatin remodeling enzyme and defines a novel function for DNA looping. We also present evidence suggesting that Ume6-dependent DNA looping is involved in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional repression, revealing a mechanism by which the three-dimensional folding of chromatin affects DNA-dependent processes. PMID:23478442

  16. School Buildings: Remodeling; Rehabilitation; Modernization; Repair. Bulletin, 1950, No. 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiles, Nelson E.

    1950-01-01

    Adequate school plants are essential to a modern educational program. The school plant that is not properly maintained soon fails to provide the service for which it was intended. The total program of maintenance, including repairs, renovation, remodeling, rehabilitation, and modernization should be carefully planned. Some tasks will recur at…

  17. CREB Selectively Controls Learning-Induced Structural Remodeling of Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Spalloni, Alida; Longone, Patrizia; Pittenger, Christopher; O'Mara, Shane M.; Marie, Helene; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of synaptic strength associated with learning is post-synaptically regulated by changes in density and shape of dendritic spines. The transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) is required for memory formation and in vitro dendritic spine rearrangements, but its role in learning-induced remodeling of neurons…

  18. Probing Nucleosome Remodeling by Unzipping Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michelle

    2006-03-01

    At the core of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.65 turns around an octamer of histone proteins. Even this lowest level of genomic compaction presents a strong barrier to DNA-binding cellular factors that are required for essential processes such as transcription, DNA replication, recombination and repair. Chromatin remodeling enzymes use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to regulate accessibility of the genetic code by altering chromatin structure. While remodeling enzymes have been the subject of extensive research in recent years, their precise mechanism remains unclear. In order to probe the structure of individual nucleosomes and their remodeling, we assembled a histone octamer onto a DNA segment containing a strong nucleosome positioning sequence. As the DNA double helix was unzipped through the nucleosome using a feedback-enhanced optical trap, the presence of the nucleosome was detected as a series of dramatic increases in the tension in the DNA, followed by sudden tension reductions. Analysis of the unzipping force throughout the disruption accurately revealed the spatial location and fine structure of the nucleosome to near base pair precision. Using this approach, we investigate how remodeling enzymes may alter the location and structure of a nucleosome.

  19. Pentoxifylline Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling Induced by Tobacco Smoke Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Minicucci, Marcos; Oliveira, Fernando; Santos, Priscila; Polegato, Bertha; Roscani, Meliza; Fernandes, Ana Angelica; Lustosa, Beatriz; Paiva, Sergio; Zornoff, Leonardo; Azevedo, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke exposure is an important risk factor for cardiac remodeling. Under this condition, inflammation, oxidative stress, energy metabolism abnormalities, apoptosis, and hypertrophy are present. Pentoxifylline has anti‑inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-thrombotic and anti-proliferative properties. Objective The present study tested the hypothesis that pentoxifylline would attenuate cardiac remodeling induced by smoking. Methods Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: Control (C), Pentoxifylline (PX), Tobacco Smoke (TS), and PX-TS. After two months, echocardiography, invasive blood pressure measurement, biochemical, and histological studies were performed. The groups were compared by two-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. Results TS increased left atrium diameter and area, which was attenuated by PX. In the isolated heart study, TS lowered the positive derivate (+dp/dt), and this was attenuated by PX. The antioxidants enzyme superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased in the TS group; PX recovered these activities. TS increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and decreased 3-hydroxyacyl Coenzyme A dehydrogenases (OH-DHA) and citrate synthase (CS). PX attenuated LDH, 3-OH-DHA and CS alterations in TS-PX group. TS increased IL-10, ICAM-1, and caspase-3. PX did not influence these variables. Conclusion TS induced cardiac remodeling, associated with increased inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and changed energy metabolism. PX attenuated cardiac remodeling by reducing oxidative stress and improving cardiac bioenergetics, but did not act upon cardiac cytokines and apoptosis. PMID:27096523

  20. 18. Photographic copy of original remodeling drawings dated July 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photographic copy of original remodeling drawings dated July 8, 1988 (original sepia in plan room of Base Civil Engineer, Scott AFB) First and second floor demolition and framing plan - Scott Air Force Base, General Officer Quarters, 229 Birchard Street, O'Fallon, St. Clair County, IL

  1. 17. Photographic copy of original remodeling drawings dated July 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photographic copy of original remodeling drawings dated July 8, 1988 (original sepia in plan room of Base Civil Engineer, Scott AFB) First and second floor plans - Scott Air Force Base, General Officer Quarters, 229 Birchard Street, O'Fallon, St. Clair County, IL

  2. The epithelial barrier is maintained by in vivo tight junction expansion during pathologic intestinal epithelial shedding

    PubMed Central

    Marchiando, Amanda M.; Shen, Le; Graham, W. Vallen; Edelblum, Karen L.; Duckworth, Carrie A.; Guan, Yanfang; Montrose, Marshall H.; Turner, Jerrold R.; Watson, Alastair J.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) increases intestinal epithelial cell shedding and apoptosis, potentially challenging the barrier between the gastrointestinal lumen and internal tissues. We investigated the mechanism of tight junction remodeling and barrier maintenance, as well as the roles of cytoskeletal regulatory molecules during TNF-induced shedding. METHODS We studied wild-type and transgenic mice that express the fluorescent-tagged proteins enhanced green fluorescent protein–occludin or monomeric red fluorescent protein1–ZO-1. After injection of high doses of TNF (7.5µg, i.p.), laparotomies were performed and segments of small intestine were opened to visualize the mucosa by video confocal microscopy. Pharmacologic inhibitors and knockout mice were used to determine the roles of caspase activation, actomyosin, and microtubule remodeling and membrane trafficking in epithelial shedding. RESULTS Changes detected included redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occluding to lateral membranes of shedding cells. These proteins ultimately formed a funnel around the shedding cell that defined the site of barrier preservation. Claudins, E-cadherin, F-actin, myosin II, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) were also recruited to lateral membranes. Caspase activity, myosin motor activity, and microtubules were required to initiate shedding, whereas completion of the process required microfilament remodeling and ROCK, MLCK, and dynamin II activities. CONCLUSIONS Maintenance of the epithelial barrier during TNF-induced cell shedding is a complex process that involves integration of microtubules, microfilaments, and membrane traffic to remove apoptotic cells. This process is accompanied by redistribution of apical junctional complex proteins to form intercellular barriers between lateral membranes and maintain mucosal function. PMID:21237166

  3. Effects of Electrical and Structural Remodeling on Atrial Fibrillation Maintenance: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Christini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation, a common cardiac arrhythmia, often progresses unfavourably: in patients with long-term atrial fibrillation, fibrillatory episodes are typically of increased duration and frequency of occurrence relative to healthy controls. This is due to electrical, structural, and contractile remodeling processes. We investigated mechanisms of how electrical and structural remodeling contribute to perpetuation of simulated atrial fibrillation, using a mathematical model of the human atrial action potential incorporated into an anatomically realistic three-dimensional structural model of the human atria. Electrical and structural remodeling both shortened the atrial wavelength - electrical remodeling primarily through a decrease in action potential duration, while structural remodeling primarily slowed conduction. The decrease in wavelength correlates with an increase in the average duration of atrial fibrillation/flutter episodes. The dependence of reentry duration on wavelength was the same for electrical vs. structural remodeling. However, the dynamics during atrial reentry varied between electrical, structural, and combined electrical and structural remodeling in several ways, including: (i) with structural remodeling there were more occurrences of fragmented wavefronts and hence more filaments than during electrical remodeling; (ii) dominant waves anchored around different anatomical obstacles in electrical vs. structural remodeling; (iii) dominant waves were often not anchored in combined electrical and structural remodeling. We conclude that, in simulated atrial fibrillation, the wavelength dependence of reentry duration is similar for electrical and structural remodeling, despite major differences in overall dynamics, including maximal number of filaments, wave fragmentation, restitution properties, and whether dominant waves are anchored to anatomical obstacles or spiralling freely. PMID:22383869

  4. Obliterative airway remodelling in transplanted and non-transplanted lungs.

    PubMed

    Jonigk, Danny; Theophile, Katharina; Hussein, Kais; Bock, Oliver; Lehmann, Ulrich; Bockmeyer, Clemens L; Gottlieb, Jens; Fischer, Stefan; Simon, Andre; Welte, Tobias; Maegel, Lavinia; Kreipe, Hans; Laenger, Florian

    2010-09-01

    Obliterative airway remodelling is a morphological sequence in a variety of pulmonary diseases. Notably, bronchiolitis obliterans represents one of the key complications of lung transplantation, induced by (immigrating) myofibroblasts. A comparative expression analysis of obliterative airway remodelling in transplanted and non-transplanted patients has not been reported so far. Obliterated and unremodelled airways from explanted lungs (n = 19) from patients suffering from chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, graft-versus-host disease and toxic exposure were isolated by laser-assisted microdissection. Airways from lung allografts harvested shortly before and after transplantation (n = 4) as well as fibroblastic foci from lungs with interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (n = 4) served as references. Pre-amplified cDNA was analysed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for expression of fibrosis, inflammation and apoptosis-associated genes. Composition of infiltrating cells and protein expression were assessed by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry. Bronchiolitis obliterans in transplanted patients showed a significant increase of BMP-7 expression (p = 0.0141 compared with controls), while TGF-beta1 and FGF-2 as well as BMP-4 and BMP-7 were up-regulated in fibroblastic foci in interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (p < 0.0424 compared with controls). Regarding other fibrosis-associated genes (BMP-6, SMAD-3, CASP-3 and CASP-9, FASLG, NF-KB1, IL-1 and IL-2) as well as cellularity and cellular composition, no significant differences between obliterative airway remodelling in transplanted and non-transplanted patients could be shown. Obliterative airway remodelling in lung allografts and in non-transplanted patients share many morphological and genetic traits. BMPs, especially BMP-7, warrant further investigation as possible markers for the aggravation of airway remodelling. PMID:20632031

  5. Urokinase plasminogen activator gene deficiency inhibits fracture cartilage remodeling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Nicoleta L; Wergedal, Jon E; Lau, K-H William; Mohan, Subburaman; Rundle, Charles H

    2014-03-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates a proteolytic cascade of extracellular matrix degradation that functions in tissue development and tissue repair. The development and remodeling of the skeletal extracellular matrix during wound healing suggests that uPA might regulate bone development and repair. To determine whether uPA functions regulate bone development and repair, we examined the basal skeletal phenotype and endochondral bone fracture repair in uPA-deficient mice. The skeletal phenotype of uPA knockout mice was compared with that of control mice under basal conditions by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-CT analysis, and during femur fracture repair by micro-CT and histological examination of the fracture callus. No effects of uPA gene deficiency were observed in the basal skeletal phenotype of the whole body or the femur. However, uPA gene deficiency resulted in increased fracture callus cartilage abundance during femur fracture repair at 14 days healing. The increase in cartilage corresponded to reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining for osteoclasts in the uPA knockout fracture callus at this time, consistent with impaired osteoclast-mediated remodeling of the fracture cartilage. CD31 staining was reduced in the knockout fracture tissues at this time, suggesting that angiogenesis was also reduced. Osteoclasts also colocalized with CD31 expression in the endothelial cells of the fracture tissues during callus remodeling. These results indicate that uPA promotes remodeling of the fracture cartilage by osteoclasts that are associated with angiogenesis and suggest that uPA promotes angiogenesis and remodeling of the fracture cartilage at this time of bone fracture repair. PMID:23700285

  6. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 in atrial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Lung-An; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Chen, Wei-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium constitutes the main feature of atrial fibrillation (AF), which is characterized by increased oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a potent anti-oxidant system that may provide protection against various oxidative stress-related diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate whether HO-1 has a protective effect on AF-related remodeling. Cultured atrium-derived myocytes (HL-1 cell line) were used to evaluate tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, structural, and electrical remodeling. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was utilized to assess collagen (a main fibrosis-related protein) expression in atrial fibroblasts. Tachypacing in HL-1 myocytes and treatment of atrial fibroblasts with TGF-β enhanced the expression of HO-1, both of which were mediated by the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2. Over-expression of HO-1 in HL-1 cells attenuated tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, down-regulation of L-type calcium channel, and shortening of action potential duration. Furthermore, HO-1 over-expression in atrial fibroblasts blocked the up-regulation of collagen by TGF-β, implicating a protective role of HO-1 in structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium. In vivo, HO-1(-/-) mice exhibited a higher degree of oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, and collagen deposit in their atria than wild-type mice. Moreover, burst atrial pacing induced a greater susceptibility to AF in HO-1(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. In conclusion, a negative-feedback regulation of HO-1 in activated atrial myocytes and fibroblasts may provide protection against AF-related remodeling and AF development. PMID:27562817

  7. Characterizing matrix remodeling in collagen gels using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has shown promise at non-destructively characterizing engineered tissues such as collagen gels. However, as the collagen gels develop, the OCT images lose contrast of structures as the gels develop, making visual assessment difficult. Our group proposed quantitatively characterizing these gels by fitting the optical properties from the OCT signals. In this paper, we imaged collagen gels seeded with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) over a 5-day period and used the data to measure their optical properties. Our results showed that over time, the reflectivity of the samples increased 10-fold, corresponding to a decrease in anisotropy factor g, without much change in the scattering coefficient μs. Overall, the optical properties appeared to be dominated by scattering from the collagen matrix, not the cells. However, SMCs remodeled the collagen matrix, and this collagen remodeling by the cells is what causes the observed changes in optical properties. Moreover, the data showed that the optical properties were sensitive to the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes that break down local collagen fibrils into smaller fragments. Blocking MMPs in the SMC gels greatly impeded both the remodeling process and change in optical properties at day 5. Treating day 1 acellular gels with MMP-8 for 3 hr managed to partially reproduce the remodeling observed in SMC gels at day 5. Altogether, we conclude that matrix remodeling in general, and MMPs specifically, greatly affect the local optical properties of the sample, and OCT is a unique tool that can assess MMP activity in collagen gels both non-destructively and label free.

  8. Mechanisms of intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2003-02-01

    Calcium is absorbed in the mammalian small intestine by two general mechanisms: a transcellular active transport process, located largely in the duodenum and upper jejunum; and a paracellular, passive process that functions throughout the length of the intestine. The transcellular process involves three major steps: entry across the brush border, mediated by a molecular structure termed CaT1, intracellular diffusion, mediated largely by the cytosolic calcium-binding protein (calbindinD(9k) or CaBP); and extrusion, mediated largely by the CaATPase. Chyme travels down the intestinal lumen in approximately 3 h, spending only minutes in the duodenum, but over 2 h in the distal half of the small intestine. When calcium intake is low, transcellular calcium transport accounts for a substantial fraction of the absorbed calcium. When calcium intake is high, transcellular transport accounts for only a minor portion of the absorbed calcium, because of the short sojourn time and because CaT1 and CaBP, both rate-limiting, are downregulated when calcium intake is high. Biosynthesis of CaBP is fully and CaT1 function is approximately 90% vitamin D-dependent. At high calcium intakes CaT1 and CaBP are downregulated because 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), the active vitamin D metabolite, is downregulated. PMID:12520541

  9. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  10. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine cancer include unexplained weight loss and abdominal pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... doctor if you have any of the following: Pain or cramps in the middle of the abdomen. Weight loss with no known reason. A lump ...

  11. Environmental contaminants and intestinal function

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, John G.

    1979-01-01

    The environmental contaminants which have their major effects on the small intestine may be classified into five major categories: (1) bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents, (2) food and plant substances, (3) environmental and industrial products, (4) pharmaceutical agents, and (5) toxic agents whose metabolic effects are dependent on interreaction with intestinal bacterial flora, other physical agents (detergents), human intestinal enzyme deficiency states, and the nutritional state of the host. Bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents are the most important of all such agents, being responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in association with diarrheal diseases of adults and children. Several plant substances ingested as foods have unique effects on the small bowel as well as from contaminants such as fungi on poorly preserved grains and cereals. Environmental and industrial products, in spite of their widespread prevalence in industrial societies as contaminants, are less important unless unexpectedly intense exposure occurs to the intestinal tract. Pharmaceutical agents of several types interreact with the small bowel mucosa causing impairment of transport processes for fluid and electrolytes, amino acid, lipid and sugars as well as vitamins. These interreactions may be dependent on bacterial metabolic activity, association with detergents, mucosal enzyme deficiency state (disaccharidases), and the state of nutrition of the subject. PMID:540611

  12. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  13. [Intestinal-brain axis. Neuronal and immune-inflammatory mechanisms of brain and intestine pathology].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V M; Riabichenko, E V

    2013-01-01

    Mutually directed connections between intestine and brain are implemented by endocrine, neural and immune systems and nonspecific natural immunity. Intestine micro flora as an active participant of intestine-brain axis not only influences intestine functions but also stimulates the development of CNS in perinatal period and interacts with higher nervous centers causing depression and cognitive disorders in pathology. A special role belongs to intestine microglia. Apart from mechanic (protective) and trophic functions for intestine neurons, glia implements neurotransmitter, immunologic, barrier and motoric functions in the intestine. An interconnection between intestine barrier function and hematoencephalic barrier regulation exists. Chronic endotoxinemia as a result of intestine barrier dysfunction forms sustained inflammation state in periventricular zone of the brain with consequent destabilization of hematoencephalic barriers and spread oF inflammation to other parts of the brain resulting in neurodegradation development. PMID:23805681

  14. Drosophila EGFR pathway coordinates stem cell proliferation and gut remodeling following infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gut homeostasis is central to whole organism health, and its disruption is associated with a broad range of pathologies. Following damage, complex physiological events are required in the gut to maintain proper homeostasis. Previously, we demonstrated that ingestion of a nonlethal pathogen, Erwinia carotovora carotovora 15, induces a massive increase in stem cell proliferation in the gut of Drosophila. However, the precise cellular events that occur following infection have not been quantitatively described, nor do we understand the interaction between multiple pathways that have been implicated in epithelium renewal. Results To understand the process of infection and epithelium renewal in more detail, we performed a quantitative analysis of several cellular and morphological characteristics of the gut. We observed that the gut of adult Drosophila undergoes a dynamic remodeling in response to bacterial infection. This remodeling coordinates the synthesis of new enterocytes, their proper morphogenesis and the elimination of damaged cells through delamination and anoikis. We demonstrate that one signaling pathway, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, is key to controlling each of these steps through distinct functions in intestinal stem cells and enterocytes. The EGFR pathway is activated by the EGF ligands, Spitz, Keren and Vein, the latter being induced in the surrounding visceral muscles in part under the control of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway. Additionally, the EGFR pathway synergizes with the JAK/STAT pathway in stem cells to promote their proliferation. Finally, we show that the EGFR pathway contributes to gut morphogenesis through its activity in enterocytes and is required to properly coordinate the delamination and anoikis of damaged cells. This function of the EGFR pathway in enterocytes is key to maintaining homeostasis, as flies lacking EGFR are highly susceptible to

  15. Perspectives on biomechanical growth and remodeling mechanisms in glaucoma⋆

    PubMed Central

    Grytz, Rafael; Girkin, Christopher A.; Libertiaux, Vincent; Downs, J. Crawford

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is a blinding diseases in which damage to the axons results in loss of retinal ganglion cells. Experimental evidence indicates that chronic intraocular pressure elevation initiates axonal insult at the level of the lamina cribrosa. The lamina cribrosa is a porous collagen structure through which the axons pass on their path from the retina to the brain. Recent experimental studies revealed the extensive structural changes of the lamina cribrosa and its surrounding tissues during the development and progression of glaucoma. In this perspective paper we review the experimental evidence for growth and remodeling mechanisms in glaucoma including adaptation of tissue anisotropy, tissue thickening/thinning, tissue elongation/shortening and tissue migration. We discuss the existing predictive computational approaches that try to elucidate the potential biomechanical basis of theses growth and remodeling mechanisms and highlight open questions, challenges, and avenues for further development. PMID:23109748

  16. Biomechanical and biochemical remodeling of stromal extracellular matrix in cancer.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ruchi; Lelkes, Peter I; Cukierman, Edna

    2015-04-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical signals that regulate cell function. A well-controlled balance between cells and surroundings (i.e., dynamic reciprocity) is crucial for regulating ECM architecture. During cancer progression, epithelial cells undergo genetic alterations which, together with stromal changes including ECM remodeling, disturb the homeostatic dynamics of the epithelium. A parallel organization of stromal ECM fibrils is associated with tumorigenic responses. In an emerging paradigm, continuous and progressive regulation via mechanical forces and aberrant signaling are believed to be responsible for tumor-associated ECM remodeling. In this review we discuss the discrete biomechanical and biochemical mechanisms that underlie these architectural changes and highlight their particular relevance to the regulation of the alignment of ECM in the mesenchymal stroma. PMID:25708906

  17. Compensatory Effect between Aortic Stiffening and Remodelling during Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Guala, Andrea; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The arterial tree exhibits a complex spatio-temporal wave pattern, whose healthy behaviour depends on a subtle balance between mechanical and geometrical properties. Several clinical studies demonstrated that such a balance progressively breaks down during ageing, when the aorta stiffens and remodels by increasing its diameter. These two degenerative processes however, have different impacts on the arterial wave pattern. They both tend to compensate for each other, thus reducing the detrimental effect they would have had if they had arisen individually. This remarkable compensatory mechanism is investigated by a validated multi-scale model, with the aim to elucidate how aortic stiffening and remodelling quantitatively impact the complex interplay between forward and reflected backward waves in the arterial network. We focus on the aorta and on the pressure at the ventricular-aortic interface, which epidemiological studies demonstrate to play a key role in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26426360

  18. Dynamics of lung defense in pneumonia: resistance, resilience, and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Quinton, Lee J; Mizgerd, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is initiated by microbes in the lung, but physiological processes integrating responses across diverse cell types and organ systems dictate the outcome of respiratory infection. Resistance, or actions of the host to eradicate living microbes, in the lungs involves a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by air-space infection. Resilience, or the ability of the host tissues to withstand the physiologically damaging effects of microbial and immune activities, is equally complex, precisely regulated, and determinative. Both immune resistance and tissue resilience are dynamic and change throughout the lifetime, but we are only beginning to understand such remodeling and how it contributes to the incidence of severe pneumonias, which diminishes as childhood progresses and then increases again among the elderly. Here, we review the concepts of resistance, resilience, and remodeling as they apply to pneumonia, highlighting recent advances and current significant knowledge gaps. PMID:25148693

  19. Dynamics of Lung Defense in Pneumonia: Resistance, Resilience, and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Lee J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is initiated by microbes in the lung, but physiological processes integrating responses across diverse cell types and organ systems dictate the outcome of respiratory infection. Resistance, or actions of the host to eradicate living microbes, in the lungs involves a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by air-space infection. Resilience, or the ability of the host tissues to withstand the physiologically damaging effects of microbial and immune activities, is equally complex, precisely regulated, and determinative. Both immune resistance and tissue resilience are dynamic and change throughout the lifetime, but we are only beginning to understand such remodeling and how it contributes to the incidence of severe pneumonias, which diminishes as childhood progresses and then increases again among the elderly. Here, we review the concepts of resistance, resilience, and remodeling as they apply to pneumonia, highlighting recent advances and current significant knowledge gaps. PMID:25148693

  20. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes in pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael PA.; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A.; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumors have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40% and 22.2% of the cases respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine tumors, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumors but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin remodeling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids. PMID:24670920

  1. BIOMECHANICAL and BIOCHEMICAL REMODELING of STROMAL EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ruchi; Lelkes, Peter I; Cukierman, Edna

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical signals that regulate cell function. A well-controlled balance between cells and surroundings (i.e., Dynamic Reciprocity) is crucial for regulating ECM architecture. During cancer progression, epithelial cells undergo genetic alterations, which together with stromal changes, including ECM remodeling, disturb the homeostatic dynamics of the epithelium. A parallel organization of stromal ECM fibrils is associated with tumorigenic responses. In an emerging paradigm, continuous and progressive regulation via mechanical forces and aberrant signaling are believed to be responsible for tumor-associated ECM remodeling. In this review, we discuss the discrete biomechanical and biochemical mechanisms that underlie these architectural changes and highlight their particular relevance to the regulation of the alignment of ECM in the mesenchymal stroma. PMID:25708906

  2. Physical principles of membrane remodelling during cell mechanoadaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmalska, Anita Joanna; Casares, Laura; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Thottacherry, Joseph Jose; Moreno-Vicente, Roberto; González-Tarragó, Víctor; Del Pozo, Miguel Ángel; Mayor, Satyajit; Arroyo, Marino; Navajas, Daniel; Trepat, Xavier; Gauthier, Nils C.; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2015-06-01

    Biological processes in any physiological environment involve changes in cell shape, which must be accommodated by their physical envelope--the bilayer membrane. However, the fundamental biophysical principles by which the cell membrane allows for and responds to shape changes remain unclear. Here we show that the 3D remodelling of the membrane in response to a broad diversity of physiological perturbations can be explained by a purely mechanical process. This process is passive, local, almost instantaneous, before any active remodelling and generates different types of membrane invaginations that can repeatedly store and release large fractions of the cell membrane. We further demonstrate that the shape of those invaginations is determined by the minimum elastic and adhesive energy required to store both membrane area and liquid volume at the cell-substrate interface. Once formed, cells reabsorb the invaginations through an active process with duration of the order of minutes.

  3. Osteocyte Remodeling of the Perilacunar and Pericanalicular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Hai; Bonewald, Lynda F

    2009-01-01

    With additional functions of osteocytes being identified, the concept that osteocytes are just “static lacunar-dwelling cells” is no longer accepted. We reviewed most of the relevant literature on osteocyte's function in the direct remodeling of the perilucunar matrix, discussing the advantages and disadvantages. Special attention was paid to how the negative researchers argue about the “osteocytic osteolysis” principle, and how the positive side addressed the arguments. We also discussed the newly found data of osteocytic remodeling function from our group. With more biotechnology in hand, there is increased excitement in the prospect of now being able to answer the two important questions: do osteocytes have the capability to remove mineral from the perilacunar matrix and if so what are the molecular and cellular mechanisms? do osteocytes have the capability to deposit new mineral on the perilacunar matrix and if so what are the cellular and molecular mechanisms? PMID:20687297

  4. The role of microRNAs in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Dian; Hao, Jin; Shen, Yu; Tang, Ge; Li, Mei-Le; Huang, Shi-Hu; Zhao, Zhi-He

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is balanced by bone formation and bone resorption as well as by alterations in the quantities and functions of seed cells, leading to either the maintenance or deterioration of bone status. The existing evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs), known as a family of short non-coding RNAs, are the key post-transcriptional repressors of gene expression, and growing numbers of novel miRNAs have been verified to play vital roles in the regulation of osteogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and adipogenesis, revealing how they interact with signaling molecules to control these processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the roles of miRNAs in regulating bone remodeling as well as novel applications for miRNAs in biomaterials for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26208037

  5. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA. PMID:25486562

  6. Physical principles of membrane remodelling during cell mechanoadaptation.

    PubMed

    Kosmalska, Anita Joanna; Casares, Laura; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Thottacherry, Joseph Jose; Moreno-Vicente, Roberto; González-Tarragó, Víctor; del Pozo, Miguel Ángel; Mayor, Satyajit; Arroyo, Marino; Navajas, Daniel; Trepat, Xavier; Gauthier, Nils C; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes in any physiological environment involve changes in cell shape, which must be accommodated by their physical envelope--the bilayer membrane. However, the fundamental biophysical principles by which the cell membrane allows for and responds to shape changes remain unclear. Here we show that the 3D remodelling of the membrane in response to a broad diversity of physiological perturbations can be explained by a purely mechanical process. This process is passive, local, almost instantaneous, before any active remodelling and generates different types of membrane invaginations that can repeatedly store and release large fractions of the cell membrane. We further demonstrate that the shape of those invaginations is determined by the minimum elastic and adhesive energy required to store both membrane area and liquid volume at the cell-substrate interface. Once formed, cells reabsorb the invaginations through an active process with duration of the order of minutes. PMID:26073653

  7. Microvascular remodelling in chronic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Thurston, G; Maas, K; Labarbara, A; Mclean, J W; McDonald, D M

    2000-10-01

    1. Chronic inflammation is associated with blood vessel remodelling, including vessel proliferation and enlargement, and changes in vessel phenotype. We sought to characterize these changes in chronic airway inflammation and to determine whether corticosteroids that inhibit inflammation, such as dexamethasone, can also reduce microvascular remodelling. 2. Chronic airway inflammation was induced in C3H mice by infection with Mycoplasmapulmonis and the tracheal vessels treatment also decreased the immunoreactivity for P-selectin and the number of adherent leucocytes (595 +/- 203 vs 2,024 +/- 393 cells/ mm2 in treated and non-treated infected mice, respectively). 6. We conclude that microvascular enlargement and changes in vessel phenotype are features of some types of chronic inflammation and, furthermore, that dexamethasone reverses the microvascular enlargement, changes in vessel phenotype and leucocyte influx associated with chronic inflammatory airway disease. PMID:11022979

  8. Remodeling myelination: implications for mechanisms of neural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Redmond, Stephanie A; Chan, Jonah R

    2016-01-01

    One of the most significant paradigm shifts in membrane remodeling is the emerging view that membrane transformation is not exclusively controlled by cytoskeletal rearrangement, but also by biophysical constraints, adhesive forces, membrane curvature and compaction. One of the most exquisite examples of membrane remodeling is myelination. The advent of myelin was instrumental in advancing the nervous system during vertebrate evolution. With more rapid and efficient communication between neurons, faster and more complex computations could be performed in a given time and space. Our knowledge of how myelin-forming oligodendrocytes select and wrap axons has been limited by insufficient spatial and temporal resolution. By virtue of recent technological advances, progress has clarified longstanding controversies in the field. Here we review insights into myelination, from target selection to axon wrapping and membrane compaction, and discuss how understanding these processes has unexpectedly opened new avenues of insight into myelination-centered mechanisms of neural plasticity. PMID:26814588

  9. Probabilistic Study of Bone Remodeling Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Gorla, R. S. R.

    2013-08-01

    The dynamic bone remodeling process is a computationally challenging research area that struggles to understand the actual mechanisms. It has been observed that a mechanical stimulus in the bone greatly affects the remodeling process. A 3D finite element model of a femur is created and a probabilistic analysis is performed on the model. The probabilistic analysis measures the sensitivities of various parameters related to the material properties, geometric properties, and the three load cases defined as Single Leg Stance, Abduction, and Adduction. The sensitivity of each parameter is based on the calculated maximum mechanical stimulus and analyzed at various values of probabilities ranging from 0.001 to 0.999. The analysis showed that the parameters associated with the Single Leg Stance load case had the highest sensitivity with a probability of 0.99 and the angle of the force applied to the joint of the proximal femur had the overall highest sensitivity

  10. Synaptic remodeling of neuronal circuits in early retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptor degenerations are a major cause of blindness and among the most common forms of neurodegeneration in humans. Studies of mouse models revealed that synaptic dysfunction often precedes photoreceptor degeneration, and that abnormal synaptic input from photoreceptors to bipolar cells causes circuits in the inner retina to become hyperactive. Here, we provide a brief overview of frequently used mouse models of photoreceptor degenerations. We then discuss insights into circuit remodeling triggered by early synaptic dysfunction in the outer and hyperactivity in the inner retina. We discuss these insights in the context of other experimental manipulations of synaptic function and activity. Knowledge of the plasticity and early remodeling of retinal circuits will be critical for the design of successful vision rescue strategies. PMID:26500497

  11. The solid state environment orchestrates embryonic development and tissue remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damsky, C. H.; Moursi, A.; Zhou, Y.; Fisher, S. J.; Globus, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    Cell interactions with extracellular matrix and with other cells play critical roles in morphogenesis during development and in tissue homeostasis and remodeling throughout life. Extracellular matrix is information-rich, not only because it is comprised of multifunctional structural ligands for cell surface adhesion receptors, but also because it contains peptide signaling factors, and proteinases and their inhibitors. The functions of these groups of molecules are extensively interrelated. In this review, three primary cell culture models are described that focus on adhesion receptors and their roles in complex aspects of morphogenesis and remodeling: the regulation of proteinase expression by fibronectin and integrins in synovial fibroblasts; the regulation of osteoblast differentiation and survival by fibronectin, and the regulation of trophoblast differentiation and invasion by integrins, cadherins and immunoglobulin family adhesion receptors.

  12. Intradialytic Hypotension and Cardiac Remodeling: A Vicious Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jenq-Wen; Yen, Chung-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamic instability during hemodialysis is a common but often underestimated issue in the nephrologist practice. Intradialytic hypotension, namely, a decrease of systolic or mean blood pressure to a certain level, prohibits the safe and smooth achievement of ultrafiltration and solute removal goal in chronic dialysis patients. Studies have elucidated the potential mechanisms involved in the development of Intradialytic hypotension, including excessive ultrafiltration and loss of compensatory mechanisms for blood pressure maintenance. Cardiac remodeling could also be one important piece of the puzzle. In this review, we intend to discuss the role of cardiac remodeling, including left ventricular hypertrophy, in the development of Intradialytic hypotension. In addition, we will also provide evidence that a bidirectional relationship might exist between Intradialytic hypotension and left ventricular hypertrophy in chronic dialysis patients. A more complete understanding of the complex interactions in between could assist the readers in formulating potential solutions for the reduction of both phenomena. PMID:25654122

  13. Biomarker discovery in asthma-related inflammation and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Florence Quesada; Fillet, Marianne; de Seny, Dominique; Meuwis, Marie-Alice; Maree, Raphael; Crahay, Céline; Paulissen, Geneviève; Rocks, Natacha; Gueders, Maud; Wehenkel, Louis; Merville, Marie-Paule; Louis, Renaud; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnes; Cataldo, Didier

    2009-04-01

    Asthma is a complex inflammatory disease of airways. A network of reciprocal interactions between inflammatory cells, peptidic mediators, extracellular matrix components, and proteases is thought to be involved in the installation and maintenance of asthma-related airway inflammation and remodeling. To date, new proteic mediators displaying significant activity in the pathophysiology of asthma are still to be unveiled. The main objective of this study was to uncover potential target proteins by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) on lung samples from mouse models of allergen-induced airway inflammation and remodeling. In this model, we pointed out several protein or peptide peaks that were preferentially expressed in diseased mice as compared to controls. We report the identification of different five proteins: found inflammatory zone 1 or RELM alpha (FIZZ-1), calcyclin (S100A6), clara cell secretory protein 10 (CC10), Ubiquitin, and Histone H4. PMID:19322781

  14. SUN4 is essential for nuclear remodeling during mammalian spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Calvi, Alessandra; Wong, Arnette Shi Wei; Wright, Graham; Wong, Esther Sook Miin; Loo, Tsui Han; Stewart, Colin L; Burke, Brian

    2015-11-15

    One of the more dramatic examples of cellular reorganization occurs during spermiogenesis in which a roughly spherical spermatid is transformed into a mature sperm cell. A highlight of this process involves nuclear remodeling whereby the round spermatid nucleus is sculpted into an elongated and polar structure. This transformation in nuclear architecture features chromatin condensation, changes in the composition and organization of the nuclear lamina and redistribution and elimination of nuclear pore complexes. The manchette, a cytoplasmic microtubule-based structure is thought to play a crucial role in the remodeling process. Here we show that SUN4, a spermatid nuclear membrane protein has an essential function in coupling the manchette to the nuclear periphery. In the absence of SUN4, manchette microtubules appear highly disorganized and the nucleus itself fails to elongate. Consequently, mice deficient in SUN4 display globozoospermia with associated infertility. PMID:26417726

  15. [Sarcomas of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Beyrouti, M L; Abid, M; Beyrouti, R; Ben Amar, M; Gargouri, F; Frikha, F; Affes, N; Boujelbene, S; Ghorbel, A

    2005-03-12

    Sarcomas of the small intestine are rare, clearly differentiated, malignant, mesenchymatous tumours that can be of smooth muscle, Schwann cell or fibroblastic origin. From a clinical point of view, the pain and abdominal mass are the 2 types of symptoms that frequently reveal the disease. In rare cases, sarcomas of the small intestine are manifested by an acute complication. No imaging method can clearly confirm the diagnosis. Before immunohistochemistry, differential diagnosis was made on undifferentiated mesenchymatous "stromal" tumours, which are also rare. Exeresis must be complete and without perforation of the tumour because of the risk of locoregional relapse. The benefits provided by chemotherapy and radiotherapy are limited because of the low mitotic activity of the tumour cells and its weak vascularisation. Long-term survival is limited by poor prognosis criteria: high grade malignancy, size greater than 5 cm, tumour extension, perforation of the tumour, quality of surgical resection and histological type. PMID:15859576

  16. Microscopic overdiagnosis of intestinal amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Hanan Z E

    2005-12-01

    To determine the misdiagnosis of intestinal amoebiasis associated to microscopic examination of faeces, 50 stool samples of patients infected with Entamoeba histolytica were collected from different Primary Health Care Centers, hospitals and private laboratories in Ismailia G. The samples were examined using Wheatley's trichrome staining technique to differrentiate E. histolytica E. dispar complex from other non-pathogenic intestinal amoebae and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR differentiated between the two morphologic identical species (E. histolytica and E. dispar) and had the advantage to save time and resources. E. histolytica was detected in only 5 (10%) samples and in association with E. dispar in 8 (16%) samples. On the other hand, 20 samples (40%) were E. dispar. The other 17 samples were negative. E. coli, E. hartmanni and polymorphs were commonly misdiagnosed as E. histolytica. PMID:16333901

  17. Intestinal manometry: who needs it?

    PubMed Central

    Bassotti, Gabrio; Bologna, Sara; Ottaviani, Laura; Russo, Michele; Dore, Maria Pina

    2015-01-01

    The use of manometry, i.e. the recording of pressures within hollow viscera, after being successfully applied to the study of esophageal and anorectal motor dysfunctions, has also been used to investigate physiological and pathological conditions of the small bowel. By means of this technique, it has been possible to understand better the normal motor functions of the small intestine, and their relationship and variations following physiologic events, such as food ingestion. Moreover, intestinal manometry has proved useful to document motor abnormalities of the small bowel, although recognition of altered patterns specific for a determinate pathologic condition is still unavailable. However, this technique often permits the detection of abnormal gut motility in patients with abdominal symptoms such as unexplained vomiting and diarrhea, and it is sometimes also useful to address therapeutic targeting. PMID:26468344

  18. Intestinal malrotation and midgut volvulus.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Obaidy, Yalda; Maroof, Sahar

    2016-09-01

    A four-day-old boy presented with persistent bilious vomiting, bloody stained stool, and mild abdominal distension. Transabdominal ultrasound demonstrated a round soft-tissue mass-like structure in the right upper quadrant. With color Doppler ultrasound, the whirlpool sign was observed. Abdominal radiograph showed nonspecific findings. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction at the level of distal duodenum. The diagnosis of intestinal malrotation with midgut volvulus was established and the treated surgically. Intestinal malrotation is congenital abnormal positioning of the bowel loops within the peritoneal cavity resulting in abnormal shortening of mesenteric root that is predisposed to midgut volvulus. Neonates and infants with persistent bilious vomiting should undergo diagnostic workup and preferably ultrasound as the first step. With classic sonographic appearance of whirlpool sign, even further imaging investigations is often not needed, and the surgeon should be alerted to plan surgery. PMID:27594965

  19. Enhanced intestinal permeability to 51Cr-labeled EDTA in dogs with small intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Hall, E J; Batt, R M

    1990-01-01

    Intestinal permeability in dogs with small intestinal disease was measured by quantitation of 24-hour urinary excretion of 51Cr-labeled EDTA following intragastric administration. Permeability was high in dogs with a variety of naturally acquired small intestinal diseases including wheat-sensitive enteropathy of Irish Setters, small intestinal bacterial over-growth, and giardiasis, and permeability was decreased after successful treatment. These findings indicate that the assessment of intestinal permeability may be a useful technique for detecting small intestinal disease and for monitoring the efficacy of treatment in dogs. PMID:2104825

  20. Making Microvascular Networks Work: Angiogenesis, Remodeling, and Pruning

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, Timothy W.

    2014-01-01

    The adequate and efficient functioning of the microcirculation requires not only numerous vessels providing a large surface area for transport but also a structure that provides short diffusion distances from capillaries to tissue and efficient distribution of convective blood flow. Theoretical models show how a combination of angiogenesis, remodeling, and pruning in response to hemodynamic and metabolic stimuli, termed “angioadaptation,” generates well organized, functional networks. PMID:25362638

  1. Structural analysis of the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Asturias, Francisco J; Chung, Wen-Hsiang; Kornberg, Roger D; Lorch, Yahli

    2002-10-15

    Electron microscopy of the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex reveals a ring of protein densities around a central cavity. The size and shape of the cavity correspond closely to those of a nucleosome. Results of nuclease protection analysis are consistent with nucleosome binding in the cavity. Such binding could explain the ability of RSC to expose nucleosomal DNA in the presence of ATP without loss of associated histones. PMID:12368485

  2. Bone tissue remodeling and development: focus on matrix metalloproteinase functions.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Katiucia Batista Silva; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Bone-forming cells originate from distinct embryological layers, mesoderm (axial and appendicular bones) and ectoderm (precursor of neural crest cells, which mainly form facial bones). These cells will develop bones by two principal mechanisms: intramembranous and endochondral ossification. In both cases, condensation of multipotent mesenchymal cells occurs, at the site of the future bone, which differentiate into bone and cartilage-forming cells. During long bone development, an initial cartilaginous template is formed and replaced by bone in a coordinated and refined program involving chondrocyte proliferation and maturation, vascular invasion, recruitment of adult stem cells and intense remodeling of cartilage and bone matrix. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the most important enzymes for cleaving structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), as well as other non-ECM molecules in the ECM space, pericellular perimeter and intracellularly. Thus, the bioactive molecules generated act on several biological events, such as development, tissue remodeling and homeostasis. Since the discovery of collagenase in bone cells, more than half of the MMP members have been detected in bone tissues under both physiological and pathological conditions. Pivotal functions of MMPs during development and bone regeneration have been revealed by knockout mouse models, such as chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, osteoclast recruitment and function, bone modeling, coupling of bone resorption and formation (bone remodeling), osteoblast recruitment and survival, angiogenesis, osteocyte viability and function (biomechanical properties); as such alterations in MMP function may alter bone quality. In this review, we look at the principal properties of MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs and RECK), provide an up-date on their known functions in bone development and remodeling and discuss their potential application to Bone Bioengineering. PMID:25157440

  3. Emphysema and Mechanical Stress-Induced Lung Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Susumu; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Szabari, Margit V.; Takahashi, Ayuko; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet

    2013-01-01

    Transpulmonary pressure and the mechanical stresses of breathing modulate many essential cell functions in the lung via mechanotransduction. We review how mechanical factors could influence the pathogenesis of emphysema. Although the progression of emphysema has been linked to mechanical rupture, little is known about how these stresses alter lung remodeling. We present possible new directions and an integrated multiscale view that may prove useful in finding solutions for this disease. PMID:24186935

  4. Intracortical remodeling parameters are associated with measures of bone robustness

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Haviva M.; Hampson, Naomi A.; Guth, J. Jared; Lin, David; Jepsen, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Prior work identified a novel association between bone robustness and porosity, which may be part of a broader interaction whereby the skeletal system compensates for the natural variation in robustness (bone width relative to length) by modulating tissue-level mechanical properties to increase stiffness of slender bones and to reduce mass of robust bones. To further understand this association, we tested the hypothesis that the relationship between robustness and porosity is mediated through intracortical, BMU-based (basic multicellular unit) remodeling. We quantified cortical porosity, mineralization, and histomorphometry at two sites (38 and 66% of the length) in human cadaveric tibiae. We found significant correlations between robustness and several histomorphometric variables (e.g., % secondary tissue [R2 = 0.68, p < 0.004], total osteon area [R2=0.42, p<0.04]) at the 66% site. Although these associations were weaker at the 38% site, significant correlations between histological variables were identified between the two sites indicating that both respond to the same global effects and demonstrate a similar character at the whole bone level. Thus, robust bones tended to have larger and more numerous osteons with less infilling, resulting in bigger pores and more secondary bone area. These results suggest that local regulation of BMU-based remodeling may be further modulated by a global signal associated with robustness, such that remodeling is suppressed in slender bones but not in robust bones. Elucidating this mechanism further is crucial for better understanding the complex adaptive nature of the skeleton, and how inter-individual variation in remodeling differentially impacts skeletal aging and an individuals’ potential response to prophylactic treatments. PMID:24962664

  5. Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (tufting enteropathy).

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier; Salomon, Julie; Ruemmele, Frank; de Serres, Natacha Patey-Mariaud; Brousse, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), also known as tufting enteropathy, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset severe intractable diarrhea causing sometimes irreversible intestinal failure. To date, no epidemiological data are available, however, the prevalence can be estimated at around 1/50,000-100,000 live births in Western Europe. The prevalence seems higher in areas with high degree of consanguinity and in patients of Arabic origin. Infants develop within the first days after birth a watery diarrhea persistent in spite of bowel rest and parenteral nutrition. Some infants are reported to have associated choanal rectal or esophageal atresia. IED is thought to be related to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. Nonspecific punctuated keratitis was reported in more than 60% of patients. Histology shows various degree of villous atrophy, with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria but specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium with disorganization of surface enterocytes with focal crowding, resembling tufts. Several associated specific features were reported, including abnormal deposition of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) in the basement membrane, increased expression of desmoglein and ultrastructural changes in the desmosomes, and abnormal distribution of alpha2beta1 integrin adhesion molecules. One model of transgenic mice in which the gene encoding the transcription factor Elf3 is disrupted have morphologic features resembling IED. Parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggest an autosomal recessive transmission but the causative gene(s) have not been yet identified making prenatal diagnosis unavailable. Some infants have a milder phenotype than others but in most patients, the severity of the intestinal malabsorption even with enteral feeding make them totally dependent on daily long-term parenteral nutrition with a subsequent risk of complications

  6. Laparoscopic management of intestinal endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Varol, N; Maher, P; Woods, R

    2000-08-01

    Intestinal involvement by endometriosis traditionally required open laparotomy for bowel resection and anastomosis. Operative laparoscopy may offer the most effective form of treatment for these women. Two women with endometriosis of the rectum and right hemicolon, respectively, underwent transvaginal resection of the rectum and laparotomy for hemicolectomy, assisted by laparoscopy. The only morbidity was postoperative ileus in the former patient. Both women were asymptomatic at the 6-week postoperative visit. PMID:10924638

  7. Nonrotation of Intestine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Appaji, Ashwini Chamanahalli; Kulkarni, Roopa; Kadaba, Jayanthi S.

    2013-01-01

    Nonrotation of intestine is a congenital abnormality of the midgut which is due to error in the process of rotation. Errors in the 2nd and 3rd stage of rotation can lead to series of abnormalities in the form of malrotation and reversed rotation. As a consequence, the relative position of other organs likes caecum, intestine, meckel’s diverticulum changes. This can lead to missing diagnosis of common clinical conditions such as appendicitis. The incidence of nonrotation is 1:500. The congenital abnormality appears to be rare as this could be an incidental abnormality. The symptoms of nonrotation of intestine could be biliary vomiting, recurrent abdominal pain. This could be due to midgut volvulus and intestinal obstruction which happens as a consequence of nonrotation of the intestine. The investigations used for detection and confirmation are CT Imaging. Other associations of nonrotation of the intestine are peritoneal bands. Here we report a case of nonrotation of intestines. In the cadaver of age around 70 years, the small intestinal loops was situated in the right side of the abdominal cavity and large intestine looped on the left side of the abdominal cavity. This was also associated with aberrant position of the caecum and appendix. There were associated peritoneal bands extending from the ascending colon to the left side the abdominal wall. The bands had been removed to visualize the large intestinal loops. PMID:24392405

  8. Immunogenetic control of the intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Marietta, Eric; Rishi, Abdul; Taneja, Veena

    2015-01-01

    All vertebrates contain a diverse collection of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, on their various body surfaces, and the ecological community of these microorganisms is referred to as the microbiota. Mucosal sites, such as the intestine, harbour the majority of microorganisms, and the human intestine contains the largest community of commensal and symbiotic bacteria. This intestinal community of bacteria is diverse, and there is a significant variability among individuals with respect to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Both genetic and environmental factors can influence the diversity and composition of the intestinal bacteria with the predominant environmental factor being diet. So far, studies have shown that diet-dependent differences in the composition of intestinal bacteria can be classified into three groups, called enterotypes. Other environmental factors that can influence the composition include antibiotics, probiotics, smoking and drugs. Studies of monozygotic and dizygotic twins have proven that genetics plays a role. Recently, MHC II genes have been associated with specific microbial compositions in human infants and transgenic mice that express different HLA alleles. There is a growing list of genes/molecules that are involved with the sensing and monitoring of the intestinal lumen by the intestinal immune system that, when genetically altered, will significantly alter the composition of the intestinal microflora. The focus of this review will be on the genetic factors that influence the composition of the intestinal microflora. PMID:25913295

  9. Sustained Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Transmigration Induces Apoptosis in T84 Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Le'Negrate, Gaëlle; Selva, Eric; Auberger, Patrick; Rossi, Bernard; Hofman, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Acute colitis is characterized by a large number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) migrating across the columnar epithelium in response to inflammatory stimuli. Several of these inflammatory factors have been characterized as proapoptotic inducers for intestinal epithelial cells. Our aim was to elucidate the role of PMNL transmigration in the onset of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis. We found that PMNL migration, in response to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine across monolayers of intestinal epithelial cells (T84), was associated with activation of caspase-2, -3, and -9 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage within epithelial cells. Moreover, dihydrocytochalasin B treatment of T84 cells induced apoptosis with similar characteristics. Although Fas and Fas ligand were expressed on T84 cells and PMNLs, treatment of epithelial cells with an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody failed to prevent apoptosis induced by migrating PMNLs. Owing to the F-actin reorganization accompanying PMNL transmigration, these findings indicate a direct relationship between PMNL migration and induction of apoptosis in epithelial cells. This apoptotic process appears to involve remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton of enterocytes independent of the Fas/Fas ligand pathway. PMID:10995451

  10. Impact of deoxynivalenol (DON) contaminated feed on intestinal integrity and immune response in swine.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Martin; Savard, Christian; Deschene, Karine; Lauzon, Karoline; Pinilla, Vicente A; Gagnon, Carl A; Lapointe, Jérôme; Guay, Frédéric; Chorfi, Younès

    2015-06-01

    This study was performed to characterize the influence of consuming DON naturally contaminated feeds on pig's intestinal immune defenses, antibody response and cellular immunity. Sixteen 4-week-old piglets were randomly allocated to two dietary treatments: control diet or diet contaminated with 3.5 mg DON/kg. At days 7 and 21, animals were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA). On day 42, intestinal samples were collected for measurement of gene expression involved in immune response, oxidative status and barrier function. Primary IgG antibody response to OVA was increased in pigs fed DON diet compared to control animals. In the ileum of pigs fed DON diet, claudin, occludin, and vimentin genes involved in integrity and barrier function were down-regulated compared to controls. Results also revealed that expression of two chemokines (IL-8, CXCL10), interferon-γ, and major antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 2 (GPX-2) were up-regulated whereas expression of genes encoding enzymatic antioxidants including GPX-3, GPX-4 and superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD-3) were down-regulated in pigs fed DON-contaminated diet. These results strongly suggest that ingestion of DON naturally contaminated feed impaired intestinal barrier and immunological functions by modulating expression of genes coding for proteins involved in tight junctions, tissue remodelling, inflammatory reaction, oxidative stress reaction and immune response. PMID:25701311

  11. Preparing a discreet escape: Microsporidia reorganize host cytoskeleton prior to non-lytic exit from C. elegans intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Szumowski, Suzannah C; Estes, Kathleen A; Troemel, Emily R

    2012-10-01

    Intracellular pathogens commonly invade and replicate inside of intestinal cells and exit from these cells is a crucial step in pathogen transmission. For convenience, studies of intracellular pathogens are often conducted using in vitro cell culture systems, which unfortunately lack important features of polarized, intact intestinal epithelial cells. The nematode C. elegans provides a tractable system to study intracellular pathogens in vivo, where features of differentiated epithelial cells are easily visualized. In a recent paper, we used C. elegans as a host organism to study the exit strategy of Nematocida parisii, a naturally occurring intracellular pathogen in the microsporidia phylum. We showed that N. parisii remodels the C. elegans host cytoskeleton, and then exits host cells in an actin-dependent, non-lytic fashion. These findings illuminate key details about the transmission of microsporidia, which are poorly understood but ubiquitous pathogens. More generally, these findings have implications for exit strategies used by other intracellular pathogens that also infect epithelial cells. PMID:24058850

  12. Redox biology of the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Aw, Tak Yee

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal tract, known for its capability for self-renew, represents the first barrier of defense between the organism and its luminal environment. The thiol/disulfide redox systems comprising the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG), cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) and reduced and oxidized thioredoxin (Trx/TrxSS) redox couples play important roles in preserving tissue redox homeostasis, metabolic functions, and cellular integrity. Control of the thiol-disulfide status at the luminal surface is essential for maintaining mucus fluidity and absorption of nutrients, and protection against chemical-induced oxidant injury. Within intestinal cells, these redox couples preserve an environment that supports physiological processes and orchestrates networks of enzymatic reactions against oxidative stress. In this review, we focus on the intestinal redox and antioxidant systems, their subcellular compartmentation, redox signaling and epithelial turnover, and contribution of luminal microbiota, key aspects that are relevant to understanding redox-dependent processes in gut biology with implications for degenerative digestive disorders, such as inflammation and cancer. PMID:21831010

  13. ANTIBODIES TO INTESTINAL MICROVILLOUS MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Iain L.; Donaldson, Robert M.; Kopp, William L.; Trier, Jerry S.

    1968-01-01

    Microvillous membranes isolated from the distal, but not proximal, half of hamster small bowel induced in rabbits the formation of antisera which inhibited intrinsic factor-mediated uptake of vitamin B12 by hamster brush borders. The extent of inhibition was directly proportional to the concentration of antiserum, and an excess of IF-bound vitamin B12 could overcome the inhibitory effect. The inhibitory factor was absorbed from antisera by brush borders isolated from the distal, but not proximal, half of the hamster intestine. Fractionation of antisera by gel filtration and DEAE-cellulose chromatography established that immunoglobulin G contained the inhibitory factor. Antisera capable of completely blocking uptake of IF-bound vitamin B12 did not react with hamster IF or with the IF-vitamin B12 complex, did not inhibit brush border disaccharidase activity and did not impair glucose transport by everted sacs of hamster intestine. These results demonstrate that an antibody to distal microvillous membranes competes with the IF-vitamin B12 complex for a specific binding site or receptor located on the surface of distal hamster intestine. PMID:19867301

  14. Pulmonary arterial remodeling revealed by microfocal x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Johnson, Roger H.; Dhyani, Anita H.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2001-05-01

    Animal models and micro-CT imaging are useful for understanding the functional consequences of, and identifying the genes involved in, the remodeling of vascular structures that accompanies pulmonary vascular disease. Using a micro-CT scanner to image contrast-enhanced arteries in excised lungs from fawn hooded rats (a strain genetically susceptible to hypoxia induced pulmonary hypertension), we found that portions of the pulmonary arterial tree downstream from a given diameter were morphometrically indistinguishable. This 'self-consistency' property provided a means for summarizing the pulmonary arterial tree architecture and mechanical properties using a parameter vector obtained from measurements of the contiguous set of vessel segments comprising the longest (principal) pathway and its branches over a range of vascular pressures. This parameter vector was used to characterize the pulmonary vascular remodeling that occurred in rats exposed to a hypoxic (11.5% oxygen) environment and provided the input to a hemodynamic model relating structure to function. The major effect of the remodeling was a longitudinally (pulmonary artery to arterioles) uniform decrease in vessel distensibility that resulted in a 90% increase in arterial resistance. Despite the almost uniform change in vessel distensibility, over 50% of the resistance increase was attributable to vessels with unstressed diameters less than 125 microns.

  15. A microsphere-based remodelling formulation for anisotropic biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas; Waffenschmidt, Tobias

    2009-09-13

    Biological tissues possess the ability to adapt according to the respective local loading conditions, which results in growth and remodelling phenomena. The main goal of this work is the development of a new remodelling approach that, on the one hand, reflects the alignment of fibrous soft biological tissue with respect to representative loading directions. On the other hand, the continuum approach proposed is based on a sound micro-mechanically motivated formulation. To be specific, use of a worm-like chain model is made to describe the behaviour of long-chain molecules as present in, for instance, collageneous tissues. The extension of such a one-dimensional constitutive equation to the three-dimensional macroscopic level is performed by means of a microsphere formulation. Inherent with the algorithmic treatment of this type of modelling approach, a finite number of unit vectors is considered for the numerical integration over the domain of the unit sphere. As a key aspect of this contribution, remodelling is incorporated by setting up evolution equations for the referential orientations of these integration directions. Accordingly, the unit vectors considered now allow interpretation as internal variables, which characterize the material's anisotropic properties. Several numerical studies underline the applicability of the model that, moreover, nicely fits into iterative finite element formulations so that general boundary value problems can be solved. PMID:19657009

  16. Galectin-3 inhibition prevents adipose tissue remodelling in obesity.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, E; Calvier, L; Rossignol, P; Rousseau, E; Fernández-Celis, A; Jurado-López, R; Laville, M; Cachofeiro, V; López-Andrés, N

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling of the adipose tissue has a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of obesity. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is increased in obesity and mediates inflammation and fibrosis in the cardiovascular system. However, the effects of Gal-3 on adipose tissue remodelling associated with obesity remain unclear. Male Wistar rats were fed either a high-fat diet (33.5% fat) or a standard diet (3.5% fat) for 6 weeks. Half of the animals of each group were treated with the pharmacological inhibitor of Gal-3, modified citrus pectin (MCP; 100 mg kg(-1) per day) in the drinking water. In adipose tissue, obese animals presented an increase in Gal-3 levels that were accompanied by an increase in pericellular collagen. Obese rats exhibited higher adipose tissue inflammation, as well as enhanced differentiation degree of the adipocytes. Treatment with MCP prevented all the above effects. In mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Gal-3 (10(-8 )m) treatment increased fibrosis, inflammatory and differentiation markers. In conclusion, Gal-3 emerges as a potential therapeutic target in adipose tissue remodelling associated with obesity and could have an important role in the development of metabolic alterations associated with obesity. PMID:26853916

  17. Age-dependent motor unit remodelling in human limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Mathew; Ireland, Alex; Jones, David A; McPhee, Jamie S

    2016-06-01

    Voluntary control of skeletal muscle enables humans to interact with and manipulate the environment. Lower muscle mass, weakness and poor coordination are common complaints in older age and reduce physical capabilities. Attention has focused on ways of maintaining muscle size and strength by exercise, diet or hormone replacement. Without appropriate neural innervation, however, muscle cannot function. Emerging evidence points to a neural basis of muscle loss. Motor unit number estimates indicate that by age around 71 years, healthy older people have around 40 % fewer motor units. The surviving low- and moderate-threshold motor units recruited for moderate intensity contractions are enlarged by around 50 % and show increased fibre density, presumably due to collateral reinnervation of denervated fibres. Motor unit potentials show increased complexity and the stability of neuromuscular junction transmissions is decreased. The available evidence is limited by a lack of longitudinal studies, relatively small sample sizes, a tendency to examine the small peripheral muscles and relatively few investigations into the consequences of motor unit remodelling for muscle size and control of movements in older age. Loss of motor neurons and remodelling of surviving motor units constitutes the major change in ageing muscles and probably contributes to muscle loss and functional impairments. The deterioration and remodelling of motor units likely imposes constraints on the way in which the central nervous system controls movements. PMID:26667009

  18. A Computational Model for Simulating Spaceflight Induced Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2014-01-01

    An overview of an initial development of a model of bone loss due to skeletal unloading in weight bearing sites is presented. The skeletal site chosen for the initial application of the model is the femoral neck region because hip fractures can be debilitating to the overall performance health of astronauts. The paper begins with the motivation for developing such a model of the time course of change in bone in order to understand the mechanism of bone demineralization experienced by astronauts in microgravity, to quantify the health risk, and to establish countermeasures. Following this, a general description of a mathematical formulation of the process of bone remodeling is discussed. Equations governing the rate of change of mineralized bone volume fraction and active osteoclast and osteoblast are illustrated. Some of the physiology of bone remodeling, the theory of how imbalance in remodeling can cause bone loss, and how the model attempts to capture this is discussed. The results of a preliminary validation analysis that was carried out are presented. The analysis compares a set of simulation results against bone loss data from control subjects who participated in two different bed rest studies. Finally, the paper concludes with outlining the current limitations and caveats of the model, and planned future work to enhance the state of the model.

  19. Effects of spironolactone towards rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid pacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Fa; Gu, Lei; Huang, Meng-Xun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Li, Hua; Zhang, Bang-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the effects of spironolactone towards the rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid atrial pacing (RAP). 30 rabbits were randomly divided into control group, RAP group and spironolactone group, with 10 rabbits in each group. RAP was performed at the speed of 800 beats/min for 8 h, atrial effective refractory period (AERP) was determined before and at the 1(st), 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th) and 8(th) of the pacing, the expressions of atrial muscular calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA were performed the RT-PCR detection, and ultrastructural changes of atrial myocytes were observed. AERP of RAP group shortened, with poor frequency adaptability; the expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA decreased 22% and 26%, respectively, when compared with the control group; ultrastructure of atrial myocytes changed significantly. AERP of spironotlactone group shortened less that RAP group, and the frequency adaptability was maintained, the decreased expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA significantly reduced. RAP could cause atrial remodeling, while spironolactone could inhibit RAP-induced atrial remodeling. PMID:26826809

  20. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA–DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx−/− pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:27462424

  1. Remodeling of the Methylation Landscape in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Reyngold, Marsha; Turcan, Sevin; Giri, Dilip; Kannan, Kasthuri; Walsh, Logan A.; Viale, Agnes; Drobnjak, Marija; Vahdat, Linda T.; Lee, William; Chan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of breast cancer metastasis is accompanied by dynamic transcriptome changes and dramatic alterations in nuclear and chromatin structure. The basis of these changes is incompletely understood. The DNA methylome of primary breast cancers contribute to transcriptomic heterogeneity and different metastatic behavior. Therefore we sought to characterize methylome remodeling during regional metastasis. We profiled the DNA methylome and transcriptome of 44 matched primary breast tumors and regional metastases. Striking subtype-specific patterns of metastasis-associated methylome remodeling were observed, which reflected the molecular heterogeneity of breast cancers. These divergent changes occurred primarily in CpG island (CGI)-poor areas. Regions of methylome reorganization shared by the subtypes were also observed, and we were able to identify a metastasis-specific methylation signature that was present across the breast cancer subclasses. These alterations also occurred outside of CGIs and promoters, including sequences flanking CGIs and intergenic sequences. Integrated analysis of methylation and gene expression identified genes whose expression correlated with metastasis-specific methylation. Together, these findings significantly enhance our understanding of the epigenetic reorganization that occurs during regional breast cancer metastasis across the major breast cancer subtypes and reveal the nature of methylome remodeling during this process. PMID:25083786

  2. LIGHT is a crucial mediator of airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jen-Yu; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Chong, Inn-Wen; Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2015-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are major health problems globally. Airway epithelial cells play important role in airway remodeling, which is a critical process in the pathogenesis of diseases. This study aimed to demonstrate that LIGHT, an inflammatory factor secreted by T cells after allergen exposure, is responsible for promoting airway remodeling. LIGHT increased primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expressing MMP-9. The induction of EMT was associated with increased NF-κB activation and p300/NF-κB association. The interaction of NF-κB with p300 facilitated NF-κB acetylation, which in turn, was bound to the promoter of ZEB1, resulting in E-cadherin downregulation. LIGHT also stimulated HBECs to produce numerous cytokines/chemokines that could worsen airway inflammation. Furthermore, LIGHT enhanced HBECs to secrete activin A, which increased bronchial smooth muscle cell (BSMC) migration. In contrast, depletion of activin A decreased such migration. The findings suggest a new molecular determinant of LIGHT-mediated pathogenic changes in HBECs and that the LIGHT-related vicious cycle involving HBECs and BSMCs may be a potential target for the treatment of chronic inflammation airway diseases with airway remodeling. PMID:25251281

  3. Hyperhomocysteinemia promotes vascular remodeling in vein graph in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongmei; Shi, Chengwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Lavelle, Muriel; Yu, Caijia; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the role and mechanism of Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) on vascular remodeling in mice. We assessed the effect of HHcy on vascular remodeling using a carotid arterial vein patch model in mice with the gene deletion of cystathionine-beta-synthase (Cbs). Vein grafts were harvested 4 weeks after surgery. Cross sections were analyzed using Verhoeff-van Gieson staining, Masson`s Trichrome staining, and immunostaining for morphological analysis and protein level assessment. The effect of Hcy on collagen secretion was examined in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). We found that Cbs-/- mice with severe HHcy exhibited thicker neointima and a higher percentage of luminal narrowing in vein grafts. In addition, severe HHcy increased elastin and collagen deposition in the neointima. Further, severe HHcy increases CD45 positive cells and proliferative cells in vein grafts. Finally, Hcy increases collagen secretion in RASMC. These results demonstrate that HHcy increases neointima formation, elastin and collagen deposition following a carotid arterial vein patch. The capacity of Hcy to promote vascular fibrosis and inflammation may contribute to the development of vascular remodeling. PMID:24896329

  4. Myofibroblast-mediated mechanisms of pathological remodelling of the heart.

    PubMed

    Weber, Karl T; Sun, Yao; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Ahokas, Robert A; Gerling, Ivan C

    2013-01-01

    The syncytium of cardiomyocytes in the heart is tethered within a matrix composed principally of type I fibrillar collagen. The matrix has diverse mechanical functions that ensure the optimal contractile efficiency of this muscular pump. In the diseased heart, cardiomyocytes are lost to necrotic cell death, and phenotypically transformed fibroblast-like cells-termed 'myofibroblasts'-are activated to initiate a 'reparative' fibrosis. The structural integrity of the myocardium is preserved by this scar tissue, although at the expense of its remodelled architecture, which has increased tissue stiffness and propensity to arrhythmias. A persisting population of activated myofibroblasts turns this fibrous tissue into a living 'secretome' that generates angiotensin II and its type 1 receptor, and fibrogenic growth factors (such as transforming growth factor-β), all of which collectively act as a signal-transducer-effector signalling pathway to type I collagen synthesis and, therefore, fibrosis. Persistent myofibroblasts, and the resultant fibrous tissue they produce, cause progressive adverse myocardial remodelling, a pathological hallmark of the failing heart irrespective of its etiologic origin. Herein, we review relevant cellular, subcellular, and molecular mechanisms integral to cardiac fibrosis and consequent remodelling of atria and ventricles with a heterogeneity in cardiomyocyte size. Signalling pathways that antagonize collagen fibrillogenesis provide novel strategies for cardioprotection. PMID:23207731

  5. Remodeling sensory cortical maps implants specific behavioral memory.

    PubMed

    Bieszczad, K M; Miasnikov, A A; Weinberger, N M

    2013-08-29

    Neural mechanisms underlying the capacity of memory to be rich in sensory detail are largely unknown. A candidate mechanism is learning-induced plasticity that remodels the adult sensory cortex. Here, expansion in the primary auditory cortical (A1) tonotopic map of rats was induced by pairing a 3.66-kHz tone with activation of the nucleus basalis, mimicking the effects of natural associative learning. Remodeling of A1 produced de novo specific behavioral memory, but neither memory nor plasticity was consistently at the frequency of the paired tone, which typically decreased in A1 representation. Rather, there was a specific match between individual subjects' area of expansion and the tone that was strongest in each animal's memory, as determined by post-training frequency generalization gradients. These findings provide the first demonstration of a match between the artificial induction of specific neural representational plasticity and artificial induction of behavioral memory. As such, together with prior and present findings for detection, correlation and mimicry of plasticity with the acquisition of memory, they satisfy a key criterion for neural substrates of memory. This demonstrates that directly remodeling sensory cortical maps is sufficient for the specificity of memory formation. PMID:23639876

  6. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Philippe A; Fetita, Catalin I; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5-10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively. PMID:26981458

  7. Reconstructing protein remodeled membranes in molecular detail from mesoscopic models

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, Edward; Cui, Haosheng; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for “inverse coarse graining,” rebuilding a higher resolution model from a lower resolution one, in order to rebuild protein coats for remodeled membranes of complex topology. The specific case of membrane remodeling by N-BAR domain containing proteins is considered here, although the overall method is general and thus applicable to other membrane remodeling phenomena. Our approach begins with a previously developed, discretized mesoscopic continuum membrane model (EM2) which has been shown to capture the reticulated membrane topologies often observed for N-BAR/liposome systems by electron microscopy (EM). The information in the EM2 model — directions of the local curvatures and a low resolution sample of the membrane surface — is then used to construct a coarse-grained (CG) system with one site per lipid and 26 sites per protein. We demonstrate the approach on pieces of EM2 structures with three different topologies that have been observed by EM: A tubule, a “Y” junction, and a torus. We show that the approach leads to structures that are stable under subsequent constant temperature CG simulation, and end by considering the future application of the methodology as a hybrid approach that combines experimental information with computer modeling. PMID:21503332

  8. Tribbles 3: A potential player in diabetic aortic remodelling.

    PubMed

    Ti, Yun; Xie, Guo-lu; Wang, Zhi-hao; Ding, Wen-yuan; Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tribbles 3, whose expression is up-regulated by insulin resistance, was confirmed to be involved in diabetic cardiomyopathy in our previous study. However, it is not known whether Tribbles 3 has a role on conduit arteries such as the aorta in diabetes. Type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin. We evaluated the characteristics of diabetic rats by serial ultrasonography and histopathologic analyses of aortic wall architecture. Diabetic rats displayed increased aortic medial thickness, excessive collagen deposition, diminished elastic fibres and reduced vascular compliance together with Tribbles 3 overexpression. To further investigate the role of Tribbles 3 in aortic remodelling, we used Tribbles 3 gene silencing in vivo 12 weeks after onset of diabetes. Silence of Tribbles 3 significantly reversed pathological aortic remodelling without blood pressure modification. In Tribbles 3-small interfering RNA group, medial thickness and perivascular fibrosis were markedly decreased; moreover, there were prominent reductions in collagen content and collagen/elastin ratio, resulting in an improved arterial compliance. Additionally, with Tribbles 3 silencing, the diminished phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt was restored, and increased activation of MKK4/JNK was decreased. Silence of Tribbles 3 is potent in mediating reversal of aortic remodelling, implicating that Tribbles 3 is proposed to be a potential therapeutic target for vascular complication in diabetes. PMID:26410836

  9. Arrhythmogenic and metabolic remodelling of failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Gloschat, C R; Koppel, A C; Aras, K K; Brennan, J A; Holzem, K M; Efimov, I R

    2016-07-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The global burden of HF continues to rise, with prevalence rates estimated at 1-2% and incidence approaching 5-10 per 1000 persons annually. The complex pathophysiology of HF impacts virtually all aspects of normal cardiac function - from structure and mechanics to metabolism and electrophysiology - leading to impaired mechanical contraction and sudden cardiac death. Pharmacotherapy and device therapy are the primary methods of treating HF, but neither is able to stop or reverse disease progression. Thus, there is an acute need to translate basic research into improved HF therapy. Animal model investigations are a critical component of HF research. However, the translation from cellular and animal models to the bedside is hampered by significant differences between species and among physiological scales. Our studies over the last 8 years show that hypotheses generated in animal models need to be validated in human in vitro models. Importantly, however, human heart investigations can establish translational platforms for safety and efficacy studies before embarking on costly and risky clinical trials. This review summarizes recent developments in human HF investigations of electrophysiology remodelling, metabolic remodelling, and β-adrenergic remodelling and discusses promising new technologies for HF research. PMID:27019074

  10. A gene-centric study of common carotid artery remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Seamus C.; Zabaneh, Delilah; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Drenos, Fotios; Jones, Gregory T.; Shah, Sonia; Gertow, Karl; Sennblad, Bengt; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Gigante, Bruna; Holewijn, Suzanne; De Graaf, Jacqueline; Vermeulen, Sita; Folkersen, Lasse; van Rij, Andre M.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Talmud, Philippa J.; Deanfield, John E.; Agu, Obi; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Bown, Matthew J.; Nyyssönen, Kristiina; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smit, Andries J.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Giral, Philippe; Mannarino, Elmo; Silveira, Angela; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; de Borst, Gert J.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Faire, Ulf; Baas, Annette F.; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Fowkes, Gerry; Tzoulaki, Ionna; Price, Jacqueline F.; Tremoli, Elena; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Eriksson, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Expansive remodelling is the process of compensatory arterial enlargement in response to atherosclerotic stimuli. The genetic determinants of this process are poorly characterized. Methods Genetic association analyses of inter-adventitial common carotid artery diameter (ICCAD) in the IMPROVE study (n = 3427) using the Illumina 200k Metabochip was performed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that met array-wide significance were taken forward for analysis in three further studies (n = 5704), and tested for association with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). Results rs3768445 on Chromosome 1q24.3, in a cluster of protein coding genes (DNM3, PIGC, C1orf105) was associated with larger ICCAD in the IMPROVE study. For each copy of the rare allele carried, ICCAD was on average 0.13 mm greater (95% CI 0.08–0.18 mm, P = 8.2 × 10−8). A proxy SNP (rs4916251, R2 = 0.99) did not, however, show association with ICCAD in three follow-up studies (P for replication = 0.29). There was evidence of interaction between carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and rs4916251 on ICCAD in two of the cohorts studies suggesting that it plays a role in the remodelling response to atherosclerosis. In meta-analysis of 5 case–control studies pooling data from 5007 cases and 43,630 controls, rs4916251 was associated with presence of AAA 1.10, 95% CI 1.03–1.17, p = 2.8 × 10−3, I2 = 18.8, Q = 0.30). A proxy SNP, rs4916251 was also associated with increased expression of PIGC in aortic tissue, suggesting that this may the mechanism by which this locus affects vascular remodelling. Conclusions Common variation at 1q24.3 is associated with expansive vascular remodelling and risk of AAA. These findings support a hypothesis that pathways involved in systemic vascular remodelling play a role in AAA development. PMID:23246012

  11. [Intestinal parasitic infections in Serbia].

    PubMed

    Nikolić, A; Djurković-Djaković, O; Bobić, B

    1998-01-01

    To determine the public health significance of intestinal parasitism in Serbia today, systematic parasitologic examination of 16 regions (Kragujevac, Luchani, Zhagubica, Bor, Sjenica, Novi Pazar, Valjevo, Aleksandrovac, Pirot, Bosilegrad, Ivanjica, Golubac, Uzhice, Kladovo, Negotin, Beograd) in central Serbia were carried out over the period 1984-1993. The study involved a total of 5981 schoolchildren (2887 F, 3094 M), 7-11 years old representing 10% of the total age-matched population (N = 58,228) of the examined regions, residing in 91 settlements. Field parasitological examinations included the examination of perianal swabs for E. vermicularis and Taenia sp., and examination of a single feces sample by direct saline smear and Lugol stained smear for intestinal protozoa, and the Kato and Lörincz methods for intestinal helminths. Nine species of intestinal parasites were detected, of which five protozoan: Entamoeba histolytica (0.02%), Entamoeba hartmanni (0.02%), Entamoeba coli (1.3%), Iodamoeba bütschlii (0.02%), Giardia lamblia (6.8%), and four helminthic: Hymenolepis nana (0.06%), Enterobius vermicularis (14.7%), Ascaris lumbricoides (3.3%), Trichuris trichiura (1.8%). The overall prevalence of intestinal parasite infections amounted to 24.6% (1207/4913), with a highly significant difference (p < 0.001) between particular sites (range 14.4%-43.8%) (Figure 1). Helminthic infections (810) were significantly more frequent (p < 0.001) as compared to both protozoan (296) and combined helminthic-protozoan infections (101). Of these, two species (G. lamblia, E. vermicularis) were found in all examined regions, three (E. coli, A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura) were detected in two or more, while four species (E. histolytica, E. hartmanni, I. bütschlii, H. nana) were each found in a single region (Figure 2). The predominant species (E. coli, G. lamblia, E. vermicularis, A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura) were distributed at considerably different prevalence rates, with a

  12. Intestinal drug solubility estimation based on simulated intestinal fluids: comparison with solubility in human intestinal fluids.

    PubMed

    Clarysse, Sarah; Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2011-07-17

    The purpose of this study was to validate both existing fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF), and simpler, alternative media for predicting intraluminal drug solubility during drug discovery and early drug development. For 17 model drugs, the solubilizing capacity of FaSSIF(c) and FeSSIF(c) (subscript indicates the use of crude taurocholate) and different concentrations of D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) in phosphate buffer were correlated with the solubilizing capacity of human intestinal fluids (HIF) in the fasted and the early postprandial state. A good correlation between solubility in fasted HIF and FaSSIF(c) and between solubility in fed HIF and FeSSIF(c) was obtained, indicated by R(2) values of 0.91 and 0.86, respectively. Comparable values were obtained for 0.1% TPGS for the fasted state (R(2)=0.84) and 2% TPGS for the fed state (R(2)=0.84). Direct estimation of intestinal drug solubility by the measured solubilities in FaSSIF(c) and FeSSIF(c) was acceptable. However, better estimates were obtained by calculating solubilities based on the equations describing the relationship between solubilities in FaSSIF(c) and FeSSIF(c) as function of observed solubilities in HIF. Using this approach, the predictive value of the TPGS-based solvent system was also acceptable and comparable to that of FaSSIF(c) and FeSSIF(c). In conclusion, FaSSIF(c) and FeSSIF(c) can be considered biorelevant media for intestinal solubility estimation. A simpler TPGS-based system may be a valuable alternative with improved stability and lower cost. PMID:21570465

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng; Fang, Rejun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  14. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  15. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  16. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-03-14

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases. PMID:25619169

  17. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children

    PubMed Central

    JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; ICHIM, GABRIELA; GHEBAN, DAN

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison’s disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  19. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  20. Intestinal lymphosarcoma in captive African hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Clarke, K A; Schafer, K A

    1998-10-01

    Two captive adult female African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) had inappetance and bloody diarrhea for several days prior to death. Both hedgehogs had ulceration of the small intestine and hepatic lipidosis. Histopathology revealed small intestinal lymphosarcoma with metastasis to the liver. Extracellular particles that had characteristics of retroviruses were observed associated with the surface of some neoplastic lymphoid cells by transmission electron microscopy. These are the first reported cases of intestinal lymphosarcoma in African hedgehogs. PMID:9813852

  1. Mercury methylation by fish intestinal contents

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, J.W.M.; Furutani, A.; Turner, M.A.

    1980-10-01

    Microbial methylation of mercury is a severe environmental problem. A new radiochemical method was applied to determine the extent of mercury methylation in fish intestines. Fish samples were obtained from two lakes within the severely polluted Wabigoon River system in northwestern Ontario and from nearby non-mercury contaminated lakes. Intestinal contents of six freshwater fish species from both polluted and nonpolluted lakes could methylate mercury. Bacterial activity in the intestinal contents was most likely responsible for this methylation.

  2. Appendicular Tourniquet: A Cause of Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shivashankar, Santhosh Chikkanayakanahalli; Gangappa, Rajashekara Babu; Varghese, Edison Vadakkenchery

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is one of the common surgical emergencies seen in daily practice. Postoperative adhesions are notorious for being the most common cause for intestinal obstruction. Occasionally, laparotomy findings do come as a surprise to surgeons. Here one such case is discussed. A patient was operated on with suspicion of intestinal obstruction secondary to postoperative adhesions. However, laparotomy revealed the appendix to be inflamed, curled around the terminal ileum and acting as a tourniquet. PMID:27437300

  3. Appendicular Tourniquet: A Cause of Intestinal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chowdary, Prashanth Basappa; Shivashankar, Santhosh Chikkanayakanahalli; Gangappa, Rajashekara Babu; Varghese, Edison Vadakkenchery

    2016-05-01

    Intestinal obstruction is one of the common surgical emergencies seen in daily practice. Postoperative adhesions are notorious for being the most common cause for intestinal obstruction. Occasionally, laparotomy findings do come as a surprise to surgeons. Here one such case is discussed. A patient was operated on with suspicion of intestinal obstruction secondary to postoperative adhesions. However, laparotomy revealed the appendix to be inflamed, curled around the terminal ileum and acting as a tourniquet. PMID:27437300

  4. Early colonizing Escherichia coli elicits remodeling of rat colonic epithelium shifting toward a new homeostatic state

    PubMed Central

    Tomas, Julie; Reygner, Julie; Mayeur, Camille; Ducroc, Robert; Bouet, Stephan; Bridonneau, Chantal; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Thomas, Muriel; Langella, Philippe; Cherbuy, Claire

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of early colonizing bacteria on the colonic epithelium. We isolated dominant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus intestinalis, Clostridium innocuum and a novel Fusobacterium spp., from the intestinal contents of conventional suckling rats and transferred them in different combinations into germfree (GF) adult rats. Animals were investigated after various times up to 21 days. Proliferative cell markers (Ki67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, phospho-histone H3, cyclin A) were higher in rats monocolonized with E. coli than in GF at all time points, but not in rats monocolonized with E. faecalis. The mucin content of goblet cells declined shortly after E. coli administration whereas the mucus layer doubled in thickness. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that E. coli resides in this mucus layer. The epithelial mucin content progressively returned to baseline, following an increase in KLF4 and in the cell cycle arrest-related proteins p21CIP1 and p27KIP1. Markers of colonic differentiated cells involved in electrolyte (carbonic anhydrase II and slc26A3) and water (aquaglyceroporin3 (aqp3)) transport, and secretory responses to carbachol were modulated after E. coli inoculation suggesting that ion transport dynamics were also affected. The colonic responses to simplified microbiotas differed substantially according to whether or not E. coli was combined with the other four bacteria. Thus, proliferation markers increased substantially when E. coli was in the mix, but very much less when it was absent. This work demonstrates that a pioneer strain of E. coli elicits sequential epithelial remodeling affecting the structure, mucus layer and ionic movements and suggests this can result in a microbiota-compliant state. PMID:25012905

  5. Peptide YY Regulates Bone Remodeling in Mice: A Link between Gut and Skeletal Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Iris P. L.; Driessler, Frank; Khor, Ee Cheng; Shi, Yan-Chuan; Hörmer, Birgit; Nguyen, Amy D.; Enriquez, Ronaldo F.; Eisman, John A.; Sainsbury, Amanda; Herzog, Herbert; Baldock, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Gastrointestinal peptides are increasingly being linked to processes controlling the maintenance of bone mass. Peptide YY (PYY), a gut-derived satiety peptide of the neuropeptide Y family, is upregulated in some states that also display low bone mass. Importantly, PYY has high affinity for Y-receptors, particularly Y1R and Y2R, which are known to regulate bone mass. Anorexic conditions and bariatric surgery for obesity influence circulating levels of PYY and have a negative impact on bone mass, but the precise mechanism behind this is unclear. We thus examined whether alterations in PYY expression affect bone mass. Methods Bone microstructure and cellular activity were analyzed in germline PYY knockout and conditional adult-onset PYY over-expressing mice at lumbar and femoral sites using histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography. Results PYY displayed a negative relationship with osteoblast activity. Male and female PYY knockout mice showed enhanced osteoblast activity, with greater cancellous bone mass. Conversely, PYY over-expression lowered osteoblast activity in vivo, via a direct Y1 receptor mediated mechanism involving MAPK stimulation evident in vitro. In contrast to PYY knockout mice, PYY over expression also altered bone resorption, as indicated by greater osteoclast surface, despite the lack of Y-receptor expression in osteoclastic cells. While evident in both sexes, cellular changes were generally more pronounced in females. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the gut peptide PYY is critical for the control of bone remodeling. This regulatory axis from the intestine to bone has the potential to contribute to the marked bone loss observed in situations of extreme weight loss and higher circulating PYY levels, such as anorexia and bariatric obesity surgery, and may be important in the maintenance of bone mass in the general population. PMID:22792209

  6. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  7. Promoting intestinal adaptation by nutrition and medication.

    PubMed

    Neelis, E G; Olieman, J F; Hulst, J M; de Koning, B A E; Wijnen, R M H; Rings, E H H M

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate goal in the treatment of short bowel syndrome is to wean patients off parenteral nutrition, by promoting intestinal adaptation. Intestinal adaptation is the natural compensatory process that occurs after small bowel resection. Stimulating the remaining bowel with enteral nutrition can enhance this process. Additionally, medication can be used to either reduce factors that complicate the adaptation process or to stimulate intestinal adaptation, such as antisecretory drugs and several growth factors. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the best nutritional strategies and medication that best promote intestinal adaptation. PMID:27086889

  8. Diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a child.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Mika A B; Adler, Brent H; Arnold, Michael A; Kumar, Soma; Carvalho, Ryan; Besner, Gail E

    2013-05-01

    A 7 year old male with a history of congenital neutropenia and growth hormone deficiency presented with abdominal pain, fevers, and diarrhea. Imaging and endoscopy revealed significant inflammation of the ascending colon with stenosis at the level of the hepatic flexure. A right hemicolectomy was performed, and pathologic findings were consistent with diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis. Due to recurrent mass effect at the intestinal anastomotic site detected radiologically, a second intestinal resection was performed 7 months later. Genetic testing was negative for mutations in the RET protooncogene, NF1 and PTEN tumor suppressor genes. We report a case of diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a child with congenital neutropenia. PMID:23701793

  9. Application of Three-Dimensional Imaging to the Intestinal Crypt Organoids and Biopsied Intestinal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Tsai, Ya-Hui; Liu, Yuan-An; Lee, Shih-Hua; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) histopathology is the standard analytical method for intestinal biopsied tissues; however, the role of 3-dimensional (3D) imaging system in the analysis of the intestinal tissues is unclear. The 3D structure of the crypt organoids from the intestinal stem cell culture and intestinal tissues from the donors and recipients after intestinal transplantation was observed using a 3D imaging system and compared with 2D histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The crypt organoids and intestinal tissues showed well-defined 3D structures. The 3D images of the intestinal tissues with acute rejection revealed absence of villi and few crypts, which were consistent with the histopathological features. In the intestinal transplant for megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome, the donor's intestinal tissues had well-developed nerve networks and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the muscle layer, while the recipient's intestinal tissues had distorted nerve network and the ICCs were few and sparsely distributed, relative to those of the donor. The 3D images showed a clear spatial relationship between the microstructures of the small bowel and the features of graft rejection. In conclusion, integration of the 3D imaging and 2D histopathology provided a global view of the intestinal tissues from the transplant patients. PMID:24348177

  10. Epigenetic Regulation by ATP-Dependent Chromatin-Remodeling Enzymes: SNF-ing Out Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Runge, John S; Raab, Jesse R; Magnuson, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Cells utilize precise mechanisms to access genomic DNA with spatiotemporal accuracy. ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes (also known simply as "remodelers") comprise a specialized class of enzymes that is intimately involved in genomic organization and accessibility. Remodelers selectively position nucleosomes to either alleviate chromatin compaction or achieve genomic condensation locally, based on a multitude of cellular signals. By dictating nucleosome position, remodelers control local euchromatic and heterochromatic states. These activities govern the accessibility of regulatory regions like promoters and enhancers to transcription factors, RNA polymerases, and coactivators or -repressors. As studies unravel the complexities of epigenetic topography, evidence points to a chromatin-based interactome where regulators interact competitively, cooperatively, and/or codependently through physical and functional means. These types of interactions, or crosstalk, between remodelers raise important questions for tissue development. Here, we briefly review the evidence for remodeler interactions and argue for additional studies examining crosstalk. PMID:26969969

  11. [First part: the intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Capurso, Lucio

    2016-06-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract contains a large number of commensal (non pathogenic) and pathogenic microbial species that have co-evolved with the human genome and differ in composition and function based on their location, as well as age, sex, race/ethnicity, and diet of their host and we can in fact consider the human body as a mix of human and bacterial cells. It is now evident that the large intestine is much more than an organ for waste material and absorption of water, salts and drugs, and indeed has a very important impact on human health, for a major part related to the specific composition of the complex microbial community in the colon. In man, the large gut receives material from the ileum which has already been digested and the contents are then mixed and retained for 6-12 hours in the caecum and right colon. Thus, the large intestine is an open system, with nutrients flowing in the caecum, and bacteria, their metabolic products, and undigested foodstuffs being excreted as faeces. The anaerobic brakdown of carbohydrate and protein by bacteria is known conventionally as fermentation. In man the major end products are the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate, butirate, the gases H2 and CO2, ammonia, amines, phenols and energy, which the bacteria use for growth and the maintenance of cellular function. The microbiota is also an important factor in the development of the immune response. The interaction between the gastrointestinal tract and resident microbiota is well balanced in healthy individuals, but its breakdown can lead to intestinal and extraintestinal disease. PMID:27362717

  12. Management of acute intestinal ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    The acute abdomen due to a vascular catastrophe affecting the major splanchnic vessels is often a life-threatening condition that can be very difficult to diagnose. In this article the pathological and physiological changes found in large- and small-intestinal ischaemia are related to the clinical features of the illness. Radiological, biochemical, and haematological aids to diagnosis are discussed. The treatment of large- and small-bowel ischaemia and of their specific complications, such as malabsorption and gastric hypersecretion, is outlined. PMID:835982

  13. Alcohol and the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Persson, J

    1991-01-01

    Several alterations of the small-intestinal morphology and function have been documented after alcohol ingestion. There are morphologic changes macroscopically and microscopically after acute alcohol administration in the proximal part of the small intestine, which are quickly reversible. There are no macroscopic changes and, in most patients, very discrete light microscopic changes in the small intestine after chronic alcohol ingestion. The ultrastructural changes are, however, profound, as seen by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The permeability is probably increased, permitting entrance of possible noxious agents, which may explain some of the extraintestinal tissue damage observed in chronic alcoholism. The transit is increased, at least after acute alcohol administration, perhaps contributing to the diarrhea commonly seen after heavy drinking. Several of the enzymes located in the brush border are affected; lactase activity can be depressed and perhaps result in a transient milk intolerance in predisposed individuals. The activity of GGT is increased and may partly account for the GGT elevation in serum after heavy drinking. Other enzymes, such as Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, can be inhibited and result in a decreased absorption of substances that require active, energy-dependent transport mechanisms. The secretion of water and electrolytes may be increased (an effect on cAMP?). The absorption of several nutrients, vitamins, and other elements is disturbed. The bacterial flora is increased and changed, which may give rise to symptoms and also increase the production of acetaldehyde by bacterial metabolism of ethanol. Acetaldehyde is more toxic than ethanol, and an increased concentration of acetaldehyde can possibly accentuate the damage to the liver and other organs. The bacterial overgrowth can possibly cause endotoxinemia. Although studies on alcohol-related intestinal alterations have been relatively sparse, the acute and chronic effects of

  14. Intestinal epithelial tuft cells initiate type 2 mucosal immunity to helminth parasites.

    PubMed

    Gerbe, François; Sidot, Emmanuelle; Smyth, Danielle J; Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Dardalhon, Valérie; Cesses, Pierre; Garnier, Laure; Pouzolles, Marie; Brulin, Bénédicte; Bruschi, Marco; Harcus, Yvonne; Zimmermann, Valérie S; Taylor, Naomi; Maizels, Rick M; Jay, Philippe

    2016-01-14

    Helminth parasitic infections are a major global health and social burden. The host defence against helminths such as Nippostrongylus brasiliensis is orchestrated by type 2 cell-mediated immunity. Induction of type 2 cytokines, including interleukins (IL) IL-4 and IL-13, induce goblet cell hyperplasia with mucus production, ultimately resulting in worm expulsion. However, the mechanisms underlying the initiation of type 2 responses remain incompletely understood. Here we show that tuft cells, a rare epithelial cell type in the steady-state intestinal epithelium, are responsible for initiating type 2 responses to parasites by a cytokine-mediated cellular relay. Tuft cells have a Th2-related gene expression signature and we demonstrate that they undergo a rapid and extensive IL-4Rα-dependent amplification following infection with helminth parasites, owing to direct differentiation of epithelial crypt progenitor cells. We find that the Pou2f3 gene is essential for tuft cell specification. Pou2f3(-/-) mice lack intestinal tuft cells and have defective mucosal type 2 responses to helminth infection; goblet cell hyperplasia is abrogated and worm expulsion is compromised. Notably, IL-4Rα signalling is sufficient to induce expansion of the tuft cell lineage, and ectopic stimulation of this signalling cascade obviates the need for tuft cells in the epithelial cell remodelling of the intestine. Moreover, tuft cells secrete IL-25, thereby regulating type 2 immune responses. Our data reveal a novel function of intestinal epithelial tuft cells and demonstrate a cellular relay required for initiating mucosal type 2 immunity to helminth infection. PMID:26762460

  15. Alteration of Pulse Pressure Stimulates Arterial Wall Matrix Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qingping; Hayman, Danika M.; Dai, Qiuxia; Lindsey, Merry L.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2010-01-01

    The effect of pulse pressure on arterial wall remodeling remains unclear, although remodeling of the arterial wall under hypertensive pressure and elevated flow has been well documented. The objective of this study was to evaluate matrix remodeling in arteries under nonpulsatile and hyperpulsatile pressure as compared to arteries under normal pulsatile pressure. Using a novel ex vivo organ culture model that allowed us to change pressure pulsatility without changing mean pressure or flow, arteries were cultured for 7 days under normal, nonpulsatile, and hyperpulsatile pressures with the same mean pressure and flow rate. Fenestrae in internal elastic lamina (IEL), collagen content, connexin 43, and fibronectin proteins were examined in these arteries using confocal microscopy, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that the mean fenestrae size and area fraction of fenestrae to total area of IEL decreased 51 % and 45 % in arteries cultured under nonpulsatile pressure and decreased 45 % and 54 % under hyperpulsatile pressure, respectively, compared to arteries under normal pulsatile pressure. There was no difference in fibronectin (FN) and collagen III levels among the three pulse groups, while collagen I and connexin 43 expression increased 80.8% and 35.3% in the hyperpulsatile arteries, respectively, but not in nonpulsatile arteries. In conclusion, our results demonstrated, for the first time, that an increase or elimination in pulse pressure from its normal physiologic level stimulates arterial wall matrix structural changes. Hyperpulsatile pressure has a more pronounced effect than the diminished pulse pressure, which may provide a mechanism for increased wall stiffness in arteries under hyperpulsatile pressure. PMID:19831481

  16. Extracellular Ubiquitin: Role in Myocyte Apoptosis and Myocardial Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Stephanie L C; Amin, Parthiv; Singh, Mahipal; Singh, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin (UB) is a highly conserved low molecular weight (8.5 kDa) protein. It consists of 76 amino acid residues and is found in all eukaryotic cells. The covalent linkage of UB to a variety of cellular proteins (ubiquitination) is one of the most common posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. This modification generally regulates protein turnover and protects the cells from damaged or misfolded proteins. The polyubiquitination of proteins serves as a signal for degradation via the 26S proteasome pathway. UB is present in trace amounts in body fluids. Elevated levels of UB are described in the serum or plasma of patients under a variety of conditions. Extracellular UB is proposed to have pleiotropic roles including regulation of immune response, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective activities. CXCR4 is identified as receptor for extracellular UB in hematopoietic cells. Heart failure represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western society. Cardiac remodeling is a determinant of the clinical course of heart failure. The components involved in myocardial remodeling include-myocytes, fibroblasts, interstitium, and coronary vasculature. Increased sympathetic nerve activity in the form of norepinephrine is a common feature during heart failure. Acting via β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR), norepinephrine is shown to induce myocyte apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis. β-AR stimulation increases extracellular levels of UB in myocytes, and UB inhibits β-AR-stimulated increases in myocyte apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis. This review summarizes intracellular and extracellular functions of UB with particular emphasis on the role of extracellular UB in cardiac myocyte apoptosis and myocardial remodeling. PMID:26756642

  17. Galectin-3 Participates in Cardiovascular Remodeling Associated With Obesity.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; López-Ándres, Natalia; Jurado-López, Raquel; Rousseau, Elodie; Bartolomé, Mará Visitación; Fernández-Celis, Amaya; Rossignol, Patrick; Islas, Fabian; Antequera, Alfonso; Prieto, Santiago; Luaces, María; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2015-11-01

    Remodeling, diastolic dysfunction, and arterial stiffness are some of the alterations through which obesity affects the cardiovascular system. Fibrosis and inflammation are important mechanisms underlying cardiovascular remodeling, although the precise promoters involved in these processes are still unclear. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) induces inflammation and fibrosis in the cardiovascular system. We have investigated the potential role of Gal-3 in cardiac damage in morbidly obese patients, and we have evaluated the protective effect of the Gal-3 inhibition in the occurrence of cardiovascular fibrosis and inflammation in an experimental model of obesity. Morbid obesity is associated with alterations in cardiac remodeling, mainly left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Obesity and hypertension are the main determinants of left ventricular hypertrophy. Insulin resistance, left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating levels of C-reactive protein and Gal-3 are associated with a worsening of diastolic function in morbidly obese patients. Obesity upregulates Gal-3 production in the cardiovascular system in a normotensive animal model of diet-induced obesity by feeding for 6 weeks a high-fat diet (33.5% fat). Gal-3 inhibition with modified citrus pectin (100 mg/kg per day) reduced cardiovascular levels of Gal-3, total collagen, collagen I, transforming and connective growth factors, osteopontin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the heart and aorta of obese animals without changes in body weight or blood pressure. In morbidly obese patients, Gal-3 levels are associated with diastolic dysfunction. In obese animals, Gal-3 blockade decreases cardiovascular fibrosis and inflammation. These data suggest that Gal-3 could be a novel therapeutic target in cardiac fibrosis and inflammation associated with obesity. PMID:26351031

  18. Hypothyroidism and Its Rapid Correction Alter Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Itani, Tarek; Moubarak, Majed; Aftimos, Georges; Farès, Nassim

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of mild and overt thyroid disease include a vast array of pathological changes. As well, thyroid replacement therapy has been suggested for preserving cardiac function. However, the influence of thyroid hormones on cardiac remodeling has not been thoroughly investigated at the molecular and cellular levels. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of hypothyroidism and thyroid replacement therapy on cardiac alterations. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: a control (n = 10) group and a group treated with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) (n = 20) to induce hypothyroidism. Ten of the 20 rats in the PTU group were then treated with L-thyroxine to quickly re-establish euthyroidism. The serum levels of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL6) and pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), were significantly increased in hypothyroid rats; elevations in cardiac stress markers, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) were also noted. The expressions of cardiac remodeling genes were induced in hypothyroid rats in parallel with the development of fibrosis, and a decline in cardiac function with chamber dilation was measured by echocardiography. Rapidly reversing the hypothyroidism and restoring the euthyroid state improved cardiac function with a decrease in the levels of cardiac remodeling markers. However, this change further increased the levels of inflammatory and fibrotic markers in the plasma and heart and led to myocardial cellular infiltration. In conclusion, we showed that hypothyroidism is related to cardiac function decline, fibrosis and inflammation; most importantly, the rapid correction of hypothyroidism led to cardiac injuries. Our results might offer new insights for the management of hypothyroidism-induced heart disease. PMID:25333636

  19. VEGF receptors mediate hypoxic remodeling of adult ovine carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Olayemi O; Bouthors, Vincent; Hubbell, Margaret C; Williams, James M; Pearce, William J

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that VEGF contributes to hypoxic remodeling of arterial smooth muscle, although hypoxia produces only transient increases in VEGF that return to normoxic levels despite sustained changes in arterial structure and function. To explore how VEGF might contribute to long-term hypoxic vascular remodeling, this study explores the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia produces sustained increases in smooth muscle VEGF receptor density that mediate long-term vascular effects of hypoxia. Carotid arteries from adult sheep maintained at sea level or altitude (3,820 m) for 110 days were harvested and denuded of endothelium. VEGF levels were similar in chronically hypoxic and normoxic arteries, as determined by immunoblotting. In contrast, VEGF receptor levels were significantly increased by 107% (VEGF-R1) and 156% (VEGF-R2) in hypoxic compared with normoxic arteries. In arteries that were organ cultured 24 h with 3 nM VEGF, VEGF replicated effects of hypoxia on abundances of smooth muscle α actin (SMαA), myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and MLC20 and the effects of hypoxia on colocalization of MLC20 with SMαA, as measured via confocal microscopy. VEGF did not replicate the effects of chronic hypoxia on colocalization of MLCK with SMαA or MLCK with MLC20, suggesting that VEGF's role in hypoxic remodeling is highly protein specific, particularly for contractile protein organization. VEGF effects in organ culture were inhibited by VEGF receptor blockers vatalinib (240 nM) and dasatinib (6.3 nM). These findings support the hypothesis that long-term upregulation of VEGF receptors help mediate sustained effects of hypoxia on the abundance and colocalization of contractile proteins in arterial smooth muscle. PMID:25038104

  20. Ghrelin signaling in heart remodeling of adult obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lacerda-Miranda, Glauciane; Soares, Vivian M; Vieira, Anatalia K G; Lessa, Juliana G; Rodrigues-Cunha, Alessandra C S; Cortez, Erika; Garcia-Souza, Erica P; Moura, Anibal S

    2012-05-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), has been suggested to be associated to obesity, insulin secretion, cardiovascular growth and homeostasis. GHS-R has been found in most of the tissues, and among the hormone action it is included the regulation of heart energy metabolism. Therefore, hypernutrition during early life leads to obesity, induces cardiac hypertrophy, compromises myocardial function, inducing heart failure in adulthood. We examined ghrelin signaling process in cardiac remodeling in these obese adult mice. The cardiomyocytes (cmy) of left ventricle were analyzed by light microscopy and stereology, content and phosphorilation of cardiac proteins: ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, GHSR-1a), protein kinase B (AKT and pAKT), phosphatidil inositol 3 kinase (PI3K), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and pAMPK) and actin were achieved by Western blotting. GHSR-1a gene expression was analyzed by Real Time-PCR. We observed hyperglycemia and higher liver and visceral fat weight in obese when compared to control group. Obese mice presented a marked increase in heart weight/tibia length, indicating an enlarged heart size or a remodeling process. Obese mice had increased GHSR-1a content and expression in the heart associated to PI3K content and increased AKT content and phosphorylation. In contrast, AMPK content and phosphorylation in heart was not different between experimental groups. Ghrelin plasma levels in obese group were decreased when compared to control group. Our data suggest that remodeled myocardial in adult obese mice overnourished in early life are associated with higher phosphorylation of GHSR-1a, PI3K and AKT but not with AMPK. PMID:22407166

  1. Global remodeling of nucleosome positions in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic chromatin architecture is affected by intrinsic histone-DNA sequence preferences, steric exclusion between nucleosome particles, formation of higher-order structures, and in vivo activity of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Results To disentangle sequence-dependent nucleosome positioning from the other factors, we have created two high-throughput maps of nucleosomes assembled in vitro on genomic DNA from the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. A comparison of in vitro nucleosome positions with those observed in a mixed-stage, mixed-tissue population of C. elegans cells reveals that in vivo sequence preferences are modified on the genomic scale. Indeed, G/C dinucleotides are predicted to be most favorable for nucleosome formation in vitro but not in vivo. Nucleosome sequence read coverage in vivo is distinctly lower in chromosome arms than in central regions; the observed changes in apparent nucleosome sequence specificity, likely due to genome-wide chromatin remodeler activity, contribute to the formation of these megabase-scale chromatin domains. We also observe that the majority of well-positioned in vivo nucleosomes do not occupy thermodynamically favorable sequences observed in vitro. Finally, we find that exons are intrinsically more amenable to nucleosome formation compared to introns. Nucleosome occupancy of introns and exons consistently increases with G/C content in vitro but not in vivo, in agreement with our observation that G/C dinucleotide enrichment does not strongly promote in vivo nucleosome formation. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of both sequence specificity and active nucleosome repositioning in creating large-scale chromatin domains, and the antagonistic roles of intrinsic sequence preferences and chromatin remodelers in C. elegans. Sequence read data has been deposited into Sequence Read Archive (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra; accession number SRA050182). Additional data, software and computational

  2. Phosphodiesterase 10A Upregulation Contributes to Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xia; Vroom, Christina; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Weissmann, Norbert; Bieniek, Ewa; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai

    2011-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) modulate the cellular proliferation involved in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) by hydrolyzing cAMP and cGMP. The present study was designed to determine whether any of the recently identified PDEs (PDE7-PDE11) contribute to progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling in PH. All in vitro experiments were performed with lung tissue or pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) obtained from control rats or monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertensive (MCT-PH) rats, and we examined the effects of the PDE10 inhibitor papaverine (Pap) and specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, papaverine was administrated to MCT-induced PH rats from day 21 to day 35 by continuous intravenous infusion to examine the in vivo effects of PDE10A inhibition. We found that PDE10A was predominantly present in the lung vasculature, and the mRNA, protein, and activity levels of PDE10A were all significantly increased in MCT PASMCs compared with control PASMCs. Papaverine and PDE10A siRNA induced an accumulation of intracellular cAMP, activated cAMP response element binding protein and attenuated PASMC proliferation. Intravenous infusion of papaverine in MCT-PH rats resulted in a 40%–50% attenuation of the effects on pulmonary hypertensive hemodynamic parameters and pulmonary vascular remodeling. The present study is the first to demonstrate a central role of PDE10A in progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling, and the results suggest a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of PH. PMID:21494592

  3. Phosphodiesterase 10A upregulation contributes to pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xia; Vroom, Christina; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Weissmann, Norbert; Bieniek, Ewa; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai

    2011-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) modulate the cellular proliferation involved in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH) by hydrolyzing cAMP and cGMP. The present study was designed to determine whether any of the recently identified PDEs (PDE7-PDE11) contribute to progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling in PH. All in vitro experiments were performed with lung tissue or pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) obtained from control rats or monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertensive (MCT-PH) rats, and we examined the effects of the PDE10 inhibitor papaverine (Pap) and specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, papaverine was administrated to MCT-induced PH rats from day 21 to day 35 by continuous intravenous infusion to examine the in vivo effects of PDE10A inhibition. We found that PDE10A was predominantly present in the lung vasculature, and the mRNA, protein, and activity levels of PDE10A were all significantly increased in MCT PASMCs compared with control PASMCs. Papaverine and PDE10A siRNA induced an accumulation of intracellular cAMP, activated cAMP response element binding protein and attenuated PASMC proliferation. Intravenous infusion of papaverine in MCT-PH rats resulted in a 40%-50% attenuation of the effects on pulmonary hypertensive hemodynamic parameters and pulmonary vascular remodeling. The present study is the first to demonstrate a central role of PDE10A in progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling, and the results suggest a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of PH. PMID:21494592

  4. Systemic and Pulmonary Vascular Remodelling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Esquerre, Mariana; López-Sánchez, Marta; Escobar, Ignacio; Huertas, Daniel; Penín, Rosa; Molina-Molina, María; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Santos, Salud

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is associated with subclinical systemic atherosclerosis and pulmonary vascular remodelling characterized by intimal hyperplasia and luminal narrowing. We aimed to determine differences in the intimal thickening of systemic and pulmonary arteries in COPD subjects and smokers. Secondary aims include comparisons with a non-smokers group; determining the clinical variables associated with systemic and pulmonary intimal thickening, and the correlations between systemic and pulmonary remodelling changes. Methods All consecutive subjects undergoing lung resection were included and divided into 3 groups: 1) COPD, 2) smokers, and 3) non-smokers. Sections of the 5th intercostal artery and muscular pulmonary arteries were measured by histo-morphometry. Four parameters of intimal thickening were evaluated: 1) percentage of intimal area (%IA), 2) percentage of luminal narrowing, 3) intimal thickness index, and 4) intima-to-media ratio. Results In the adjusted analysis, the systemic arteries of COPD subjects showed greater intimal thickening (%IA) than those of smokers (15.6±1.5% vs. 14.2±1.6%, p = 0.038). In the pulmonary arteries, significant differences were observed for %IA between the 2 groups (37.3±2.2% vs. 29.3±2.3%, p = 0.016). Among clinical factors, metabolic syndrome, gender and COPD status were associated with the systemic intimal thickening, while only COPD status was associated with pulmonary intimal thickening. A correlation between the %IA of the systemic and pulmonary arteries was observed (Spearman’s rho = 0.46, p = 0.008). Conclusions Greater intimal thickening in systemic and pulmonary arteries is observed in COPD patients than in smokers. There is a correlation between systemic and pulmonary vascular remodelling in the overall population. PMID:27046203

  5. Hypothyroidism and its rapid correction alter cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hajje, Georges; Saliba, Youakim; Itani, Tarek; Moubarak, Majed; Aftimos, Georges; Farès, Nassim

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of mild and overt thyroid disease include a vast array of pathological changes. As well, thyroid replacement therapy has been suggested for preserving cardiac function. However, the influence of thyroid hormones on cardiac remodeling has not been thoroughly investigated at the molecular and cellular levels. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of hypothyroidism and thyroid replacement therapy on cardiac alterations. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: a control (n = 10) group and a group treated with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) (n = 20) to induce hypothyroidism. Ten of the 20 rats in the PTU group were then treated with L-thyroxine to quickly re-establish euthyroidism. The serum levels of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL6) and pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), were significantly increased in hypothyroid rats; elevations in cardiac stress markers, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) were also noted. The expressions of cardiac remodeling genes were induced in hypothyroid rats in parallel with the development of fibrosis, and a decline in cardiac function with chamber dilation was measured by echocardiography. Rapidly reversing the hypothyroidism and restoring the euthyroid state improved cardiac function with a decrease in the levels of cardiac remodeling markers. However, this change further increased the levels of inflammatory and fibrotic markers in the plasma and heart and led to myocardial cellular infiltration. In conclusion, we showed that hypothyroidism is related to cardiac function decline, fibrosis and inflammation; most importantly, the rapid correction of hypothyroidism led to cardiac injuries. Our results might offer new insights for the management of hypothyroidism-induced heart disease. PMID:25333636

  6. Atrial Remodeling and Atrial Tachyarrhythmias in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingmin; Guo, Jinrui; Zheng, Lihui; Chen, Gang; Ding, Ligang; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Wei; Yao, Yan; Zhang, Shu

    2016-09-01

    Less is known about atrial remodeling and atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATa) in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC); this cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence, characterization, and predictors of atrial remodeling and ATa in a large series of patients with ARVC. From February 2004 to September 2014, 294 consecutive patients who met the task force criteria for ARVC were enrolled. The prevalence, characterization, and predictors of atrial dilation and ATa were investigated. Right atrium (RA) dilation was identified in 160 patients (54.4%) and left atrium dilation in 66 patients (22.4%). Both RA and left atrium dilation were found in 44 patients (15.0%). Twenty-five patients (8.5%) had atrial fibrillation (AF), whereas 19 patients (6.5%) had atrial flutter (AFL). Of which, 7 patients (2.4%) had both AF and AFL. Multivariate analysis showed that AFL (odds ratio [OR] 10.309; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.770 to 38.462; p <0.001), hypertension (OR 9.174; 95% CI 2.364 to 35.714; p = 0.001), and RA dilation (OR 6.993; 95% CI 1.623 to 30.303; p = 0.009) were associated with increased risk for AF. AF (OR 10.526; 95% CI 2.786 to 40.000; p = 0.001) increased the risk of AFL. In conclusion, atrial remodeling and ATa were common in patients with ARVC. PMID:27378141

  7. Left atrium remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (results of the GISSI-3 Echo Substudy).

    PubMed

    Popescu, Bogdan A; Macor, Franco; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Temporelli, Pier L; Bosimini, Enzo; Gentile, Francesco; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Piazza, Rita; Ascione, Luigi; Stoian, Ioana; Cervesato, Eugenio; Nicolosi, Gian L

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate the existence, timing, and determinants of post-infarction left atrial remodeling, we studied a subgroup of 514 patients from the Third Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Infarto Miocardico Echo Substudy who underwent 4 serial 2-dimensional echocardiograms up to 6 months after acute myocardial infarction. This study is the first to demonstrate, in a large series of patients, the existence of early and late left atrial remodeling after low-risk acute myocardial infarction and the relation of left atrial remodeling to left ventricular remodeling. PMID:15110211

  8. Biochemical Assays for Analyzing Activities of ATP-dependent Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Ooi, Soon-Keat; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the SNF2 family of ATPases often function as components of multi-subunit chromatin remodeling complexes that regulate nucleosome dynamics and DNA accessibility by catalyzing ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling. Biochemically dissecting the contributions of individual subunits of such complexes to the multi-step ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling reaction requires the use of assays that monitor the production of reaction products and measure the formation of reaction intermediates. This JOVE protocol describes assays that allow one to measure the biochemical activities of chromatin remodeling complexes or subcomplexes containing various combinations of subunits. Chromatin remodeling is measured using an ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding assay, which monitors the movement of a nucleosome on a DNA molecule using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA)-based method. Nucleosome binding activity is measured by monitoring the formation of remodeling complex-bound mononucleosomes using a similar EMSA-based method, and DNA- or nucleosome-dependent ATPase activity is assayed using thin layer chromatography (TLC) to measure the rate of conversion of ATP to ADP and phosphate in the presence of either DNA or nucleosomes. Using these assays, one can examine the functions of subunits of a chromatin remodeling complex by comparing the activities of the complete complex to those lacking one or more subunits. The human INO80 chromatin remodeling complex is used as an example; however, the methods described here can be adapted to the study of other chromatin remodeling complexes. PMID:25407555

  9. Bone ingrowth: an application of the boundary element method to bone remodeling at the implant interface.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, A M; Luo, G M; Cowin, S C

    1993-02-01

    Surface bone remodeling theory and the boundary element method are employed to investigate the microstructural remodeling of bone at the bone-implant interface. Three situations are considered: remodeling-induced penetration between the screw threads of an implanted screw, penetration of bone tissue into a slot or cavity in an implant, and the interaction of individual trabeculae in the remodeling processes near an implant. For each case the bone ingrowth is determined as a function of the geometry and the applied load. PMID:8429059

  10. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells

    PubMed Central

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Dargham, Daria Bou; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P.; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B. Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers1–3 target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank MNase-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites (TSSs) are nevertheless chromatinized with non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac). RNA polymerase (pol) II therefore navigates hundreds of bp of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3′ end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis upon remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers play either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs. PMID:26814966

  11. Histone octamer transfer by a chromatin-remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Y; Zhang, M; Kornberg, R D

    1999-02-01

    RSC, an abundant, essential chromatin-remodeling complex related to SWI/SNF complex, catalyzes the transfer of a histone octamer from a nucleosome core particle to naked DNA. The newly formed octamer-DNA complex is identical with a nucleosome in all respects. The reaction requires ATP and involves an activated RSC-nucleosome intermediate. The mechanism may entail formation of a duplex displacement loop on the nucleosome, facilitating the entry of exogeneous DNA and the release of the endogenous molecule. PMID:10025404

  12. Expression of RANKL/OPG during bone remodeling in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Mine, T.; Ogasa, H.; Taguchi, T.; Liang, C.T.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first study to determine the relationship between osteogenic differentiation and RANKL/OPG expression during bone remodeling in vivo. {yields} The OPG expression peak occurred during the bone formation phase, whereas the marked elevation of RANKL expression was observed during the bone resorption phase. {yields} Histological analysis showed that RANKL/OPG immunoreactivity was predominantly associated with bone marrow cells in the marrow cavity. {yields} The present study confirmed that RANKL/OPG are key factors linking bone formation to resorption during the bone remodeling process. -- Abstract: The interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) plays a dominant role in osteoclastogenesis. As both proteins are produced by osteoblast lineage cells, they are considered to represent a key link between bone formation and resorption. In this study, we investigated the expression of RANKL and OPG during bone remodeling in vivo to determine the relationship between osteoclastogenic stimulation and osteoblastic differentiation. Total RNA was prepared from rat femurs after marrow ablation on days 0, 3, 6, and 9. The temporal activation patterns of osteoblast-related genes (procollagen {alpha}1 (I), alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin) were examined by Northern blot analysis. An appreciable increase in the expression of these osteoblast markers was observed on day 3. The peak increase in gene expression was observed on day 6 followed by a slight reduction by day 9. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the OPG mRNA expression was markedly upregulated on day 6 and slightly decreased on day 9. In contrast, RANKL mRNA expression was increased by more than 20-fold on day 9. The RANKL/OPG ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulation, peaked on day 9. Histological analysis showed that RANKL and OPG immunoreactivity were predominantly associated with bone marrow cells. The

  13. Altered thermogenesis and impaired bone remodeling in Misty mice.

    PubMed

    Motyl, Katherine J; Bishop, Kathleen A; DeMambro, Victoria E; Bornstein, Sheila A; Le, Phuong; Kawai, Masanobu; Lotinun, Sutada; Horowitz, Mark C; Baron, Roland; Bouxsein, Mary L; Rosen, Clifford J

    2013-09-01

    Fat mass may be modulated by the number of brown-like adipocytes in white adipose tissue (WAT) in humans and rodents. Bone remodeling is dependent on systemic energy metabolism and, with age, bone remodeling becomes uncoupled and brown adipose tissue (BAT) function declines. To test the interaction between BAT and bone, we employed Misty (m/m) mice, which were reported be deficient in BAT. We found that Misty mice have accelerated age-related trabecular bone loss and impaired brown fat function (including reduced temperature, lower expression of Pgc1a, and less sympathetic innervation compared to wild-type (+/ +)). Despite reduced BAT function, Misty mice had normal core body temperature, suggesting heat is produced from other sources. Indeed, upon acute cold exposure (4°C for 6 hours), inguinal WAT from Misty mice compensated for BAT dysfunction by increasing expression of Acadl, Pgc1a, Dio2, and other thermogenic genes. Interestingly, acute cold exposure also decreased Runx2 and increased Rankl expression in Misty bone, but only Runx2 was decreased in wild-type. Browning of WAT is under the control of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and, if present at room temperature, could impact bone metabolism. To test whether SNS activity could be responsible for accelerated trabecular bone loss, we treated wild-type and Misty mice with the β-blocker, propranolol. As predicted, propranolol slowed trabecular bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) loss in the distal femur of Misty mice without affecting wild-type. Finally, the Misty mutation (a truncation of DOCK7) also has a significant cell-autonomous role. We found DOCK7 expression in whole bone and osteoblasts. Primary osteoblast differentiation from Misty calvaria was impaired, demonstrating a novel role for DOCK7 in bone remodeling. Despite the multifaceted effects of the Misty mutation, we have shown that impaired brown fat function leads to altered SNS activity and bone loss, and for the first time that cold

  14. Thermally Induced Osteocyte Damage Initiates a Remodelling Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Eimear B.; McNamara, Laoise M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal elevations experienced by bone during orthopaedic procedures, such as cutting and drilling, exothermal reactions from bone cement, and thermal therapies such as tumor ablation, can result in thermal damage leading to death of native bone cells (osteocytes, osteoblasts, osteoclasts and mesenchymal stem cells). Osteocytes are believed to be the orchestrators of bone remodeling, which recruit nearby osteoclast and osteoblasts to control resorption and bone growth in response to mechanical stimuli and physical damage. However, whether heat-induced osteocyte damage can directly elicit bone remodelling has yet to be determined. This study establishes the link between osteocyte thermal damage and the remodeling cascade. We show that osteocytes directly exposed to thermal elevations (47°C for 1 minute) become significantly apoptotic and alter the expression of osteogenic genes (Opg and Cox2). The Rankl/Opg ratio is consistently down-regulated, at days 1, 3 and 7 in MLO-Y4s heat-treated to 47°C for 1 minute. Additionally, the pro-osteoblastogenic signaling marker Cox2 is significantly up-regulated in heat-treated MLO-Y4s by day 7. Furthermore, secreted factors from heat-treated MLO-Y4s administered to MSCs using a novel co-culture system are shown to activate pre-osteoblastic MSCs to increase production of the pro-osteoblastic differentiation marker, alkaline phosphatase (day 7, 14), and calcium deposition (day 21). Most interestingly, an initial pro-osteoclastogenic signaling response (increase Rankl and Rankl/Opg ratio at day 1) followed by later stage pro-osteoblastogenic signaling (down-regulation in Rankl and the Rankl/Opg ratio and an up-regulation in Opg and Cox2 by day 7) was observed in non-heat-treated MLO-Y4s in co-culture when these were exposed to the biochemicals produced by heat-treated MLO-Y4s. Taken together, these results elucidate the vital role of osteocytes in detecting and responding to thermal damage by means of thermally induced apoptosis

  15. Thermally induced osteocyte damage initiates a remodelling signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Haugh, Matthew G; Voisin, Muriel C; Tallon, David; McNamara, Laoise M

    2015-01-01

    Thermal elevations experienced by bone during orthopaedic procedures, such as cutting and drilling, exothermal reactions from bone cement, and thermal therapies such as tumor ablation, can result in thermal damage leading to death of native bone cells (osteocytes, osteoblasts, osteoclasts and mesenchymal stem cells). Osteocytes are believed to be the orchestrators of bone remodeling, which recruit nearby osteoclast and osteoblasts to control resorption and bone growth in response to mechanical stimuli and physical damage. However, whether heat-induced osteocyte damage can directly elicit bone remodelling has yet to be determined. This study establishes the link between osteocyte thermal damage and the remodeling cascade. We show that osteocytes directly exposed to thermal elevations (47°C for 1 minute) become significantly apoptotic and alter the expression of osteogenic genes (Opg and Cox2). The Rankl/Opg ratio is consistently down-regulated, at days 1, 3 and 7 in MLO-Y4s heat-treated to 47°C for 1 minute. Additionally, the pro-osteoblastogenic signaling marker Cox2 is significantly up-regulated in heat-treated MLO-Y4s by day 7. Furthermore, secreted factors from heat-treated MLO-Y4s administered to MSCs using a novel co-culture system are shown to activate pre-osteoblastic MSCs to increase production of the pro-osteoblastic differentiation marker, alkaline phosphatase (day 7, 14), and calcium deposition (day 21). Most interestingly, an initial pro-osteoclastogenic signaling response (increase Rankl and Rankl/Opg ratio at day 1) followed by later stage pro-osteoblastogenic signaling (down-regulation in Rankl and the Rankl/Opg ratio and an up-regulation in Opg and Cox2 by day 7) was observed in non-heat-treated MLO-Y4s in co-culture when these were exposed to the biochemicals produced by heat-treated MLO-Y4s. Taken together, these results elucidate the vital role of osteocytes in detecting and responding to thermal damage by means of thermally induced apoptosis

  16. Imaging membrane remodeling during regulated exocytosis in live mice.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Akiko; Weigert, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    In this mini-review we focus on the use of time-lapse light microscopy to study membrane remodeling during protein secretion in live animals. In particular, we highlight how subcellular intravital microscopy has enabled imaging the dynamics of both individual secretory vesicles and the plasma membrane, during different steps in the exocytic process. This powerful approach has provided us with the unique opportunity to unravel the role of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating this process under physiological conditions, and to overcome the shortcomings of more reductionist model systems. PMID:26160452

  17. Development of Bone Remodeling Model for Spaceflight Bone Physiology Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Werner, Christopher R.; Lewandowski, Beth; Thompson, Bill; Sibonga, Jean; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Current spaceflight exercise countermeasures do not eliminate bone loss. Astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1-2% a month (Lang et al. 2004, Buckey 2006, LeBlanc et al. 2007). This may lead to early onset osteoporosis and place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. NASA seeks to improve understanding of the mechanisms of bone remodeling and demineralization in 1g in order to appropriately quantify long term risks to astronauts and improve countermeasures. NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with NASA's bone discipline to develop a validated computational model to augment research efforts aimed at achieving this goal.

  18. Hierarchical Structure and Repair of Bone: Deformation, Remodelling, Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratzl, Peter; Weinkamer, Richard

    The design of natural materials follows a radically different paradigm as compared to engineering materials: organs are growing rather than being fabricated. As a main consequence, adaptation to changing conditions remains possible during the whole lifetime of a biological material. As a typical example of such a biological material, bone is constantly laid down by bone forming cells, osteoblasts, and removed by bone resorbing cells, osteoclasts. With this remodelling cycle of bone resorption and formation, the skeleton is able to adapt to changing needs at all levels of structural hierarchy. The hierarchical structure of bone is summarized in the second part of this chapter.

  19. Artery Remodeling Under Axial Twist in Three Days Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Liang; Xiao, Yangming; Voorhees, Andrew; Qi, Ying-Xin; Jiang, Zong-Lai; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-08-01

    Arteries often endure axial twist due to body movement and surgical procedures, but how arteries remodel under axial twist remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate early stage arterial wall remodeling under axial twist. Porcine carotid arteries were twisted axially and maintained for three days in ex vivo organ culture systems while the pressure and flow remained the same as untwisted controls. Cell proliferation, internal elastic lamina (IEL) fenestrae shape and size, endothelial cell (EC) morphology and orientation, as well as the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) were quantified using immunohistochemistry staining and immunoblotting. Our results demonstrated that cell proliferation in both the intima and media were significantly higher in the twisted arteries compared to the controls. The cell proliferation in the intima increased from 1.33 ± 0.21% to 7.63 ± 1.89%, and in the media from 1.93 ± 0.84% to 8.27 ± 2.92% (p < 0.05). IEL fenestrae total area decreased from 26.07 ± 2.13% to 14.74 ± 0.61% and average size decreased from 169.03 ± 18.85 μm(2) to 80.14 ± 1.96 μm(2) (p < 0.01), but aspect ratio increased in the twist group from 2.39 ± 0.15 to 2.83 ± 0.29 (p < 0.05). MMP-2 expression significantly increased (p < 0.05) while MMP-9 and TIMP-2 showed no significant difference in the twist group. The ECs in the twisted arteries were significantly elongated compared to the controls after three days. The angle between the major axis of the ECs and blood flow direction under twist was 7.46 ± 2.44 degrees after 3 days organ culture, a decrease from the initial 15.58 ± 1.29 degrees. These results demonstrate that axial twist can stimulate artery remodeling. These findings complement our understanding of arterial wall remodeling under mechanical stress resulting from pressure and flow variations. PMID:25503524

  20. Intestinal histoplasmosis in immunocompetent adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin-Lin; Wang, Jin; Wang, Zi-Jing; Wang, Yi-Ping; Yang, Jin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To present a retrospective analysis of clinical and endoscopic features of 4 cases of immunocompetent hosts with intestinal histoplasmosis (IH). METHODS: Four immunocompetent adults were diagnosed with IH between October 2005 and March 2015 at West China Hospital of Sichuan University. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics were summarized and analyzed retrospectively. GMS (Gomori methenamine silver), PAS (periodic acid-Schiff) and Giemsa staining technique were used to confirm Histoplasma capsulatum(H. capsulatum). The symptoms, signs, endoscopic presentations, radiographic imaging, pathological stain results and follow-up are presented as tables and illustrations. RESULTS: The cases were male patients, ranging from 33 to 61 years old, and primarily presented with non-specific symptoms such as irregular fever, weight loss, abdominal pain and distention. Hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy were the most common signs. Endoscopic manifestations were localized or diffuse congestion, edema, ulcers, and polypoid nodules with central erosion involving the terminal ileum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum, similar to intestinal tuberculosis, tumor, and inflammatory bowel disease. Numerous yeast-like pathogens testing positive for PAS and GMS stains but negative for Giemsa were detected in the cytoplasm of the histiocytes, which were highly suggestive of H. capsulatum. CONCLUSION: Immunocompetent individuals suffering from histoplasmosis are rarely reported. It is necessary that gastroenterologists and endoscopists consider histoplasmosis as a differential diagnosis, even in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27099446

  1. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  2. Clinical radiology of the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Herlinger, H.; Maglinte, D.

    1989-01-01

    This book discussed embryology, anatomy, physiology, and immunology of the small intestine. Radiographic procedures in the small intestine especially enterolysis are presented. Focus is on the role of other types of imaging techniques including sonography, computed tomography, radionuclide imaging, angiography, biopsy, and enteroscopy.

  3. Intestinal barrier: Molecular pathways and modifiers.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Min Kyung; Klaus, Christina; Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-11-15

    The gastrointestinal tract is frequently challenged by pathogens/antigens contained in food and water and the intestinal epithelium must be capable of rapid regeneration in the event of tissue damage. Disruption of the intestinal barrier leads to a number of immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, food allergy, and celiac disease. The intestinal mucosa is composed of different types of epithelial cells in specific barrier functions. Epithelial cells control surface-associated bacterial populations without disrupting the intestinal microflora that is crucial for host health. They are also capable of modulating mucosal immune system, and are thus essential in maintaining homeostasis in the gut. Thus, the regulation of intestinal epithelial homeostasis is crucial for the maintenance of the structure of the mucosa and the defensive barrier functions. Recent studies have demonstrated that multiple molecular pathways are involved in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell polarity. These include the Wnt, Notch, Hippo, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog pathways, most of which were identified in lower organisms where they play important roles during embryogenesis. These pathways are also used in adult organisms to regulate multiple self-renewing organs. Understanding the interactions between these molecular mechanisms and intestinal barrier function will therefore provide important insight into the pathogenesis of intestinal-based immune-mediated diseases. PMID:24244877

  4. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  5. The role of hypoxia in intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Yatrik M

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disease of the intestine. IBD is a multifactorial disorder, and IBD-associated genes are critical in innate immune response, inflammatory response, autophagy, and epithelial barrier integrity. Moreover, epithelial oxygen tension plays a critical role in intestinal inflammation and resolution in IBD. The intestines have a dynamic and rapid fluctuation in cellular oxygen tension, which is dysregulated in IBD. Intestinal epithelial cells have a steep oxygen gradient where the tips of the villi are hypoxic and the oxygenation increases at the base of the villi. IBD results in heightened hypoxia throughout the mucosa. Hypoxia signals through a well-conserved family of transcription factors, where hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α are essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. In inflamed mucosa, HIF-1α increases barrier protective genes, elicits protective innate immune responses, and activates an antimicrobial response through the increase in β-defensins. HIF-2α is essential in maintaining an epithelial-elicited inflammatory response and the regenerative and proliferative capacity of the intestine following an acute injury. HIF-1α activation in colitis leads to a protective response, whereas chronic activation of HIF-2α increases the pro-inflammatory response, intestinal injury, and cancer. In this mini-review, we detail the role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in intestinal inflammation and injury and therapeutic implications of targeting HIF signaling in IBD. PMID:26812949

  6. Immunofluorescent Staining of Mouse Intestinal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Kevin P.; Dow, Lukas E; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-01-01

    Immunofluorescent staining of organoids can be performed to visualize molecular markers of cell behavior. For example, cell proliferation marked by incorporation of nucleotide (EdU), or to observe markers of intestinal differentiation including paneth cells, goblet cells, or enterocytes (see Figure 1). In this protocol we detail a method to fix, permeabilize, stain and mount intestinal organoids for analysis by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy.

  7. Functional Interplay of Two Paralogs Encoding SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Accessory Subunits During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Iris; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Cornes, Eric; Fontrodona, Laura; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Ayuso, Cristina; Askjaer, Peter; Cabello, Juan; Cerón, Julián

    2016-03-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes have been related to several cellular processes such as transcription, regulation of chromosomal stability, and DNA repair. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene ham-3 (also known as swsn-2.1) and its paralog swsn-2.2 encode accessory subunits of SWI/SNF complexes. Using RNA interference (RNAi) assays and diverse alleles we investigated whether ham-3 and swsn-2.2 have different functions during C. elegans development since they encode proteins that are probably mutually exclusive in a given SWI/SNF complex. We found that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 display similar functions in vulva specification, germline development, and intestinal cell proliferation, but have distinct roles in embryonic development. Accordingly, we detected functional redundancy in some developmental processes and demonstrated by RNA sequencing of RNAi-treated L4 animals that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 regulate the expression of a common subset of genes but also have specific targets. Cell lineage analyses in the embryo revealed hyper-proliferation of intestinal cells in ham-3 null mutants whereas swsn-2.2 is required for proper cell divisions. Using a proteomic approach, we identified SWSN-2.2-interacting proteins needed for early cell divisions, such as SAO-1 and ATX-2, and also nuclear envelope proteins such as MEL-28. swsn-2.2 mutants phenocopy mel-28 loss-of-function, and we observed that SWSN-2.2 and MEL-28 colocalize in mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that SWSN-2.2 is required for correct chromosome segregation and nuclear reassembly after mitosis including recruitment of MEL-28 to the nuclear periphery. PMID:26739451

  8. Rehabilitation of individuals with intestinal ostomy.

    PubMed

    Martins, Lívia Módolo; Sonobe, Helena Megumi; Vieira, Flávia De Siqueira; De Oliveira, Marissa Silva; Lenza, Nariman De Felício Bortucan; Da Silva Teles, André Aparecido

    2015-12-10

    This article will discuss an ethnographic study interpreting the rehabilitation experience of 15 individuals with an intestinal ostomy in Brazil, analysed using thematic analysis from the perspective of the sociology of health. The decoded meanings included: 'dealing with treatment and intestinal ostomy', and led to the theme 'the rehabilitation experience of patients with intestinal ostomy due to chronic illness', which addressed normality of life before intestinal illness, defining oneself and life, considering personal, family, social and therapeutic difficulties, and preparing to live with an intestinal ostomy, considering both the private and public spheres. This study will contribute to the specialised care provided in the various contexts of healthcare delivery, especially in relation to the humanisation of care of patients and implementation of appropriate strategies to meet the needs of patients. PMID:26653721

  9. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N D; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C W; Kang, Jin U; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement. PMID:26440616

  10. Intestinal bile acid physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) have a long established role in fat digestion in the intestine by acting as tensioactives, due to their amphipathic characteristics. BAs are reabsorbed very efficiently by the intestinal epithelium and recycled back to the liver via transport mechanisms that have been largely elucidated. The transport and synthesis of BAs are tightly regulated in part by specific plasma membrane receptors and nuclear receptors. In addition to their primary effect, BAs have been claimed to play a role in gastrointestinal cancer, intestinal inflammation and intestinal ionic transport. BAs are not equivalent in any of these biological activities, and structural requirements have been generally identified. In particular, some BAs may be useful for cancer chemoprevention and perhaps in inflammatory bowel disease, although further research is necessary in this field. This review covers the most recent developments in these aspects of BA intestinal biology. PMID:18837078

  11. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  12. Small intestine bleeding due to multifocal angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zacarias Föhrding, Luisa; Macher, Arne; Braunstein, Stefan; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Topp, Stefan Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of an 84-year-old male patient with primary small intestinal angiosarcoma. The patient initially presented with anemia and melena. Consecutive endoscopy revealed no signs of upper or lower active gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient had been diagnosed 3 years previously with an aortic dilation, which was treated with a stent. Computed tomography suggested an aorto-intestinal fistula as the cause of the intestinal bleeding, leading to operative stent explantation and aortic replacement. However, an aorto-intestinal fistula was not found, and the intestinal bleeding did not arrest postoperatively. The constant need for blood transfusions made an exploratory laparotomy imperative, which showed multiple bleeding sites, predominately in the jejunal wall. A distal loop jejunostomy was conducted to contain the small intestinal bleeding and a segmental resection for histological evaluation was performed. The histological analysis revealed a less-differentiated tumor with characteristic CD31, cytokeratin, and vimentin expression, which led to the diagnosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma. Consequently, the infiltrated part of the jejunum was successfully resected in a subsequent operation, and adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel was planned. Angiosarcoma of the small intestine is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm that presents with bleeding and high mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve outcome. A small intestinal angiosarcoma is a challenging diagnosis to make because of its rarity, nonspecific symptoms of altered intestinal function, nonspecific abdominal pain, severe melena, and acute abdominal signs. Therefore, a quick clinical and histological diagnosis and decisive measures including surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy should be the aim. PMID:23197897

  13. Regulation of intestinal ontogeny by intraluminal nutrients.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R O; Feng, J J; Stevenson, D K; Kerner, J A; Kwong, L K

    1990-02-01

    Major events in gastrointestinal ontogeny occur in the infant rat in association with weaning, resulting in striking alterations in small intestinal structure and function. Although the dietary changes attendant to weaning are not essential for the initiation of these events, dietary nutrients have been shown to participate in the maturation of some intestinal parameters. In order to define more precisely the role of intraluminal nutrients in the regulation of small intestinal ontogeny, a longitudinal study was conducted using a unique animal model in which intraluminal nutrients were excluded from the intact maturing intestine in vivo throughout the entire weaning period without major compromise in nutritional status. The absence of intraluminal nutrients over the weaning period resulted in diminished lengthening and accretion of mucosal mass, suggesting a slower rate of intestinal growth. Lower mucosal DNA, protein, and mitotic indices in intestines of animals receiving no intraluminal nutrients suggested that the lack of intraluminal nutrients resulted in the blunting of the striking increases in cellular proliferation normally exhibited by the developing intestinal mucosa at this time. Maturation of intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and maltase-glucoamylase was not affected by the absence of intraluminal nutrients. Although the appearance of sucrase-isomaltase was not altered by the absence of intraluminal nutrients, activity levels rose to only 50% of control levels. These data suggest that during this period of rapid intestinal maturation, intestinal growth is more dependent upon intraluminal nutrients than are the characteristic enzymic alterations normally expressed during this period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2303970

  14. Pay attention to cardiac remodeling in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yawen; Chen, Han; Li, Xiaoqing; Sun, Yuping

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex and multifaceted disease state characterized by fatigue, weakness, and loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Recently, the profound negative effects of cancer cachexia on cardiac tissue draw much attention, which is likely to contribute to mortality in tumor-bearing animals. The mechanism of cardiac remodeling is not so clear and involved with a series of molecular alterations. In cancer cachexia model, progressive loss of left ventricular mass and decrease in myocardial function is observed and cardiac autonomic functions are altered. Levels of several emerging cardiovascular neurohormones are found elevating in patients with cancer, but it is still controversial whether the changes could reflect the heart injury accurately. The remedy for cardiac remodeling has been explored. It is showed that exercise can modulate signaling pathways activated by wasting cytokines and impact on the resulting outcomes on heart adaptation. Some drugs, such as bisoprolol, spironolactone, perindopril, tandospirone, and simvastatin, can mitigate adverse effects of the tumor on the heart and prolong survival. PMID:27108265

  15. Defective Membrane Remodeling in Neuromuscular Diseases: Insights from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Jean; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1), and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. In addition to centronuclear myopathy, dynamin 2 is also mutated in a dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. While several proteins from these different families are implicated in similar diseases, mutations in close homologues or in the same protein in the case of dynamin 2 lead to diseases affecting different tissues. This suggests (1) a common molecular pathway underlying these different neuromuscular diseases, and (2) tissue-specific regulation of these proteins. This review discusses the pathophysiology of the related neuromuscular diseases on the basis of animal models developed for proteins of the myotubularin, amphiphysin, and dynamin families. A better understanding of the common mechanisms between these neuromuscular disorders will lead to more specific health care and therapeutic approaches. PMID:22496665

  16. SHREC Silences Heterochromatin via Distinct Remodeling and Deacetylation Modules.

    PubMed

    Job, Godwin; Brugger, Christiane; Xu, Tao; Lowe, Brandon R; Pfister, Yvan; Qu, Chunxu; Shanker, Sreenath; Baños Sanz, José I; Partridge, Janet F; Schalch, Thomas

    2016-04-21

    Nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complexes are co-transcriptional regulators implicated in differentiation, development, and diseases. Methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins play an essential role in recruitment of NuRD complexes to their target sites in chromatin. The related SHREC complex in fission yeast drives transcriptional gene silencing in heterochromatin through cooperation with HP1 proteins. How remodeler and histone deacetylase (HDAC) cooperate within NuRD complexes remains unresolved. We determined that in SHREC the two modules occupy distant sites on the scaffold protein Clr1 and that repressive activity of SHREC can be modulated by the expression level of the HDAC-associated Clr1 domain alone. Moreover, the crystal structure of Clr2 reveals an MBD-like domain mediating recruitment of the HDAC module to heterochromatin. Thus, SHREC bi-functionality is organized in two separate modules with separate recruitment mechanisms, which work together to elicit transcriptional silencing at heterochromatic loci. PMID:27105116

  17. Embryonic multipotent progenitors remodel the Drosophila airways during metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Pitsouli, Chrysoula; Perrimon, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Adult structures in holometabolous insects such as Drosophila are generated by groups of imaginal cells dedicated to the formation of different organs. Imaginal cells are specified in the embryo and remain quiescent until the larval stages, when they proliferate and differentiate to form organs. The Drosophila tracheal system is extensively remodeled during metamorphosis by a small number of airway progenitors. Among these, the spiracular branch tracheoblasts are responsible for the generation of the pupal and adult abdominal airways. To understand the coordination of proliferation and differentiation during organogenesis of tubular organs, we analyzed the remodeling of Drosophila airways during metamorphosis. We show that the embryonic spiracular branch tracheoblasts are multipotent cells that express the homeobox transcription factor Cut, which is necessary for their survival and normal development. They give rise to three distinct cell populations at the end of larval development, which generate the adult tracheal tubes, the spiracle and the epidermis surrounding the spiracle. Our study establishes the series of events that lead to the formation of an adult tubular structure in Drosophila. PMID:20940225

  18. A CARTILAGE GROWTH MIXTURE MODEL WITH COLLAGEN REMODELING: VALIDATION PROTOCOLS

    PubMed Central

    Klisch, Stephen M.; Asanbaeva, Anna; Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Masuda, Koichi; Thonar, Eugene J-MA; Davol, Andrew; Sah, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    A cartilage growth mixture (CGM) model is proposed to address limitations of a model used in a previous study. New stress constitutive equations for the solid matrix are derived and collagen (COL) remodeling is incorporated into the CGM model by allowing the intrinsic COL material constants to evolve during growth. An analytical validation protocol based on experimental data from a recent in vitro growth study is developed. Available data included measurements of tissue volume, biochemical composition, and tensile modulus for bovine calf articular cartilage (AC) explants harvested at three depths and incubated for 13 days in 20% FBS and 20% FBS+β-aminopropionitrile. The proposed CGM model can match tissue biochemical content and volume exactly while predicting theoretical values of tensile moduli that do not significantly differ from experimental values. Also, theoretical values of a scalar COL remodeling factor are positively correlated with COL crosslink content, and mass growth functions are positively correlated with cell density. The results suggest that the CGM model may help to guide in vitro growth protocols for AC tissue via the a priori prediction of geometric and biomechanical properties. PMID:18532855

  19. Actin remodeling by Nck regulates endothelial lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Sankar P; Barhoumi, Rola; Rivera, Gonzalo M

    2015-09-01

    Multiple angiogenic cues modulate phosphotyrosine signaling to promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Despite its functional and clinical importance, how vascular cells integrate phosphotyrosine-dependent signaling to elicit cytoskeletal changes required for endothelial morphogenesis remains poorly understood. The family of Nck adaptors couples phosphotyrosine signals with actin dynamics and therefore is well positioned to orchestrate cellular processes required in vascular formation and remodeling. Culture of endothelial cells in three-dimensional collagen matrices in the presence of VEGF stimulation was combined with molecular genetics, optical imaging, and biochemistry to show that Nck-dependent actin remodeling promotes endothelial cell elongation and proper organization of VE-cadherin intercellular junctions. Major morphogenetic defects caused by abrogation of Nck signaling included loss of endothelial apical-basal polarity and impaired lumenization. Time-lapse imaging using a Förster resonance energy transfer biosensor, immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies, and GST pull-down assays showed that Nck determines spatiotemporal patterns of Cdc42/aPKC activation during endothelial morphogenesis. Our results demonstrate that Nck acts as an important hub integrating angiogenic cues with cytoskeletal changes that enable endothelial apical-basal polarization and lumen formation. These findings point to Nck as an emergent target for effective antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26157164

  20. Danger Control Programs Cause Tissue Injury and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, Jan H.; Haegele, Holger; Müller, Susanna; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Are there common pathways underlying the broad spectrum of tissue pathologies that develop upon injuries and from subsequent tissue remodeling? Here, we explain the pathophysiological impact of a set of evolutionary conserved danger control programs for tissue pathology. These programs date back to the survival benefits of the first multicellular organisms upon traumatic injuries by launching a series of danger control responses, i.e., 1. Haemostasis, or clotting to control bleeding; 2. Host defense, to control pathogen entry and spreading; 3. Re-epithelialisation, to recover barrier functions; and 4. Mesenchymal, to repair to regain tissue stability. Taking kidney pathology as an example, we discuss how clotting, inflammation, epithelial healing, and fibrosis/sclerosis determine the spectrum of kidney pathology, especially when they are insufficiently activated or present in an overshooting and deregulated manner. Understanding the evolutionary benefits of these response programs may refine the search for novel therapeutic targets to limit organ dysfunction in acute injuries and in progressive chronic tissue remodeling. PMID:23759985

  1. Vascular Remodelling and Mesenchymal Transition in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Tombetti, Enrico; Maugeri, Norma; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis of the skin and of internal organs, autoimmunity, and vascular inflammation are hallmarks of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). The injury and activation of endothelial cells, with hyperplasia of the intima and eventual obliteration of the vascular lumen, are early features of SSc. Reduced capillary blood flow coupled with deficient angiogenesis leads to chronic hypoxia and tissue ischemia, enforcing a positive feed-forward loop sustaining vascular remodelling, further exacerbated by extracellular matrix accumulation due to fibrosis. Despite numerous developments and a growing number of controlled clinical trials no treatment has been shown so far to alter SSc natural history, outlining the need of further investigation in the molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We review some processes potentially involved in SSc vasculopathy, with attention to the possible effect of sustained vascular inflammation on the plasticity of vascular cells. Specifically we focus on mesenchymal transition, a key phenomenon in the cardiac and vascular development as well as in the remodelling of injured vessels. Recent work supports the role of transforming growth factor-beta, Wnt, and Notch signaling in these processes. Importantly, endothelial-mesenchymal transition may be reversible, possibly offering novel cues for treatment. PMID:27069480

  2. Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sandra; Hilbe, Monika; Fajardo, Robert J; Hagenmüller, Henri; Nuss, Katja; Arras, Margarete; Müller, Ralph; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kaplan, David L; Merkle, Hans P; Meinel, Lorenz

    2013-09-01

    Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106-212 μm), medium (212-300 μm), and large pore diameter ranges (300-425 μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter, all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced, and bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation. PMID:23958323

  3. FIBROBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REMODELING CONTRIBUTES TO CONNECTIVE TISSUE TENSION

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Helene M.; Bouffard, Nicole A.; Fox, James R.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Wu, Junru; Iatridis, James C.; Barnes, William D.; Badger, Gary J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of connective tissue is generally attributed to the material properties of the extracellular matrix rather than cellular activity. We have previously shown that fibroblasts within areolar connective tissue exhibit dynamic cytoskeletal remodeling within minutes in response to tissue stretch ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that fibroblasts, through this cytoskeletal remodeling, actively contribute to the viscoelastic behavior of the whole tissue. We measured significantly increased tissue tension when cellular function was broadly inhibited by sodium azide and when cytoskeletal dynamics were compromised by disrupting microtubules (with colchicine) or actomyosin contractility (via Rho kinase inhibition). These treatments led to a decrease in cell body cross-sectional area and cell field perimeter (obtained by joining the end of all of a fibroblast’s processes). Suppressing lamellipodia formation by inhibiting Rac-1 decreased cell body cross-sectional area but did not affect cell field perimeter or tissue tension. Thus, by changing shape, fibroblasts can dynamically modulate the viscoelastic behavior of areolar connective tissue through Rho-dependent cytoskeletal mechanisms. These results have broad implications for our understanding of the dynamic interplay of forces between fibroblasts and their surrounding matrix, as well as for the neural, vascular and immune cell populations residing within connective tissue. PMID:20945345

  4. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Jean-Claude; Leroux, Christelle; Dardelle, Flavien; Lehner, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with the pistil, which plays key roles in pollen tube nutrition, guidance and in the rejection of the self-incompatible pollen. This review focuses on our current knowledge in the biochemistry and localization of the main cell wall polymers including pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose and callose from several pollen tube species. Moreover, based on transcriptomic data and functional genomic studies, the possible enzymes involved in the cell wall remodeling during pollen tube growth and their impact on the cell wall mechanics are also described. Finally, mutant analyses have permitted to gain insight in the function of several genes involved in the pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and their roles in pollen tube growth are further discussed. PMID:27137369

  5. Actin remodeling by Nck regulates endothelial lumen formation

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Sankar P.; Barhoumi, Rola; Rivera, Gonzalo M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple angiogenic cues modulate phosphotyrosine signaling to promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Despite its functional and clinical importance, how vascular cells integrate phosphotyrosine-dependent signaling to elicit cytoskeletal changes required for endothelial morphogenesis remains poorly understood. The family of Nck adaptors couples phosphotyrosine signals with actin dynamics and therefore is well positioned to orchestrate cellular processes required in vascular formation and remodeling. Culture of endothelial cells in three-dimensional collagen matrices in the presence of VEGF stimulation was combined with molecular genetics, optical imaging, and biochemistry to show that Nck-dependent actin remodeling promotes endothelial cell elongation and proper organization of VE-cadherin intercellular junctions. Major morphogenetic defects caused by abrogation of Nck signaling included loss of endothelial apical-basal polarity and impaired lumenization. Time-lapse imaging using a Förster resonance energy transfer biosensor, immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies, and GST pull-down assays showed that Nck determines spatiotemporal patterns of Cdc42/aPKC activation during endothelial morphogenesis. Our results demonstrate that Nck acts as an important hub integrating angiogenic cues with cytoskeletal changes that enable endothelial apical-basal polarization and lumen formation. These findings point to Nck as an emergent target for effective antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26157164

  6. Structural stability and functional remodeling of high-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Gursky, Olga

    2015-09-14

    Lipoproteins are protein-lipid nanoparticles that transport lipids in circulation and are central in atherosclerosis and other disorders of lipid metabolism. Apolipoproteins form flexible structural scaffolds and important functional ligands on the particle surface and direct lipoprotein metabolism. Lipoproteins undergo multiple rounds of metabolic remodeling that is crucial to lipid transport. Important aspects of this remodeling, including apolipoprotein dissociation and particle fusion, are mimicked in thermal or chemical denaturation and are modulated by free energy barriers. Here we review the biophysical studies that revealed the kinetic mechanism of lipoprotein stabilization and unraveled its structural basis. The main focus is on high-density lipoprotein (HDL). An inverse correlation between stability and functions of various HDLs in cholesterol transport suggests the functional role of structural disorder. A mechanism for the conformational adaptation of the major HDL proteins, apoA-I and apoA-II, to the increasing lipid load is proposed. Together, these studies help understand why HDL forms discrete subclasses separated by kinetic barriers, which have distinct composition, conformation and functional properties. Understanding these properties may help improve HDL quality and develop novel therapies for cardiovascular disease. PMID:25749369

  7. Circadian Epigenomic Remodeling and Hepatic Lipogenesis: Lessons from HDAC3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Everett, Logan J.; Bugge, Anne; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have evolved to anticipate metabolic needs across the 24-hour light/dark cycle. This is accomplished by circadian expression of metabolic genes orchestrated by transcription factors through chromatin remodeling and histone modifications. Our recent genome-wide study on histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in mouse liver provides novel insights into the molecular link between circadian rhythm and hepatic de novo lipogenesis. We found that liver-specific knockout of HDAC3 in adult mouse display severe hepatic steatosis associated with enhanced de novo lipogenesis and increased expression of lipogenic genes. Genome-wide analysis (ChIP-seq) revealed a pronounced circadian pattern of HDAC3 occupancy on genes involved in lipid metabolism, which is inversely related to histone acetylation and RNA polymerase II recruitment at these sites. The cistromes of HDAC3 and its binding partner, nuclear receptor co-repressor (NCoR), significantly overlap with that of Rev-erbα, a nuclear receptor directly involved in the core circadian machinery. Knockout of Rev-erbα in mouse also leads to hepatic steatosis and enhanced de novo lipogenesis. Collectively, these data suggest that the circadian epigenomic remodeling controlled by HDAC3, and largely directed by Rev-erbα, is essential for homeostasis of the lipogenic process in liver. PMID:21900149

  8. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchini, Andrea; Montaldo, Claudia; Conigliaro, Alice; Grimaldi, Alessio; Correani, Virginia; Mura, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Brenna, Alessia; Montalbano, Marzia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Alessandro, Riccardo; Piacentini, Mauro; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Del Nonno, Franca; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis). Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies. PMID:26998606

  9. Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Sandra; Hilbe, Monika; Fajardo, Robert J.; Hagenmüller, Henri; Nuss, Katja; Arras, Margarete; Müller, Ralph; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kaplan, David L.; Merkle, Hans P.; Meinel, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106 – 212 μm), medium (212 – 300 μm) and large pore diameter ranges (300 – 425 μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced and, bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation. PMID:23958323

  10. Facilitation of base excision repair by chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Czaja, Wioletta

    2015-12-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) is a conserved, intracellular DNA repair system that recognizes and removes chemically modified bases to insure genomic integrity and prevent mutagenesis. Aberrant BER has been tightly linked with a broad spectrum of human pathologies, such as several types of cancer, neurological degeneration, developmental abnormalities, immune dysfunction and aging. In the cell, BER must recognize and remove DNA lesions from the tightly condensed, protein-coated chromatin. Because chromatin is necessarily refractory to DNA metabolic processes, like transcription and replication, the compaction of the genomic material is also inhibitory to the repair systems necessary for its upkeep. Multiple ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling (ACR) complexes play essential roles in modulating the protein-DNA interactions within chromatin, regulating transcription and promoting activities of some DNA repair systems, including double-strand break repair and nucleotide excision repair. However, it remains unclear how BER operates in the context of chromatin, and if the chromatin remodelling processes that govern transcription and replication also actively regulate the efficiency of BER. In this review we highlight the emerging role of ACR in regulation of BER. PMID:26422134

  11. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13450.001 PMID:27130520

  12. Steroid control of muscle remodeling during metamorphosis in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Hegstrom, C D; Truman, J W

    1996-04-01

    During metamorphosis in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, the abdominal body-wall muscle DEO1 is remodeled to form the adult muscle DE5. The degeneration of muscle DEO1 involves the dismantling of its contractile apparatus followed by the degeneration of muscle nuclei. As some nuclei are degenerating, others begin to incorporate 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), indicating the onset of nuclear proliferation. This proliferation is initially most evident at the site where the motoneuron contacts the muscle remnant. The developmental events involved in muscle remodeling are under the control of the steroid hormones, the ecdysteroids. The loss of the contractile elements of the larval muscle requires the rise and fall of the prepupal peak of ecdysteroids, whereas the subsequent loss of muscle nuclei is influenced by the slight rise in ecdysteroids seen after pupal ecdysis. Incorporation of BrdU by muscle nuclei depends on both the adult peak of the ecdysteroids and contact with the motoneuron. Unilateral axotomy blocks proliferation within the rudiment, but it does not block its subsequent differentiation into a very thin muscle in the adult. PMID:8656216

  13. Protective Effects of Paricalcitol on Peritoneal Remodeling during Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Stavenuiter, Andrea W. D.; Farhat, Karima; Vila Cuenca, Marc; Schilte, Margot N.; Keuning, Eelco D.; Paauw, Nanne J.; ter Wee, Pieter M.; Beelen, Robert H. J.; Vervloet, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is associated with structural and functional alterations of the peritoneal membrane, consisting of fibrosis, angiogenesis, and loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Vitamin D receptor activation (VDRA) plays an important role in mineral metabolism and inflammation, but also antiangiogenic and antifibrotic properties have been reported. Therefore, the effects of active vitamin D treatment on peritoneal function and remodeling were investigated. Rats were either kept naïve to PDF exposure or daily exposed to 10 mL PDF and were treated for five or seven weeks with oral paricalcitol or vehicle control. Non-PDF-exposed rats showed no peritoneal changes upon paricalcitol treatment. Paricalcitol reduced endogenous calcitriol but did not affect mineral homeostasis. However, upon PDF exposure, loss of ultrafiltration capacity ensued which was fully rescued by paricalcitol treatment. Furthermore, PD-induced ECM thickening was significantly reduced and omental PD-induced angiogenesis was less pronounced upon paricalcitol treatment. No effect of paricalcitol treatment on total amount of peritoneal cells, peritoneal leukocyte composition, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) was observed. Our data indicates that oral VDRA reduces tissue remodeling during chronic experimental PD and prevents loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Therefore, VDRA is potentially relevant in the prevention of treatment technique failure in PD patients. PMID:26605330

  14. Antenatal Hypoxia and Pulmonary Vascular Function and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G.; Blood, Arlin B.; Kim, Joon H.; Wilson, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides evidence that antenatal hypoxia, which represents a significant and worldwide problem, causes prenatal programming of the lung. A general overview of lung development is provided along with some background regarding transcriptional and signaling systems of the lung. The review illustrates that antenatal hypoxic stress can induce a continuum of responses depending on the species examined. Fetuses and newborns of certain species and specific human populations are well acclimated to antenatal hypoxia. However, antenatal hypoxia causes pulmonary vascular disease in fetuses and newborns of most mammalian species and humans. Disease can range from mild pulmonary hypertension, to severe vascular remodeling and dangerous elevations in pressure. The timing, length, and magnitude of the intrauterine hypoxic stress are important to disease development, however there is also a genetic-environmental relationship that is not yet completely understood. Determining the origins of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension and their associated effects is a challenging task, but is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for pulmonary hypertension in the newborn due to antenatal hypoxia that can both treat the symptoms and curtail or reverse disease progression. PMID:24063380

  15. Integrative models of vascular remodeling during tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Heiko; Welter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Malignant solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth, and gain of metastatic potential. Angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), vessel cooption (the integration of existing blood vessels into the tumor vasculature), and vessel regression remodel the healthy vascular network into a tumor-specific vasculature that is in many respects different from the hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network of the host tissues. Integrative models based on detailed experimental data and physical laws implement in silico the complex interplay of molecular pathways, cell proliferation, migration, and death, tissue microenvironment, mechanical and hydrodynamic forces, and the fine structure of the host tissue vasculature. With the help of computer simulations high-precision information about blood flow patterns, interstitial fluid flow, drug distribution, oxygen and nutrient distribution can be obtained and a plethora of therapeutic protocols can be tested before clinical trials. In this review, we give an overview over the current status of integrative models describing tumor growth, vascular remodeling, blood and interstitial fluid flow, drug delivery, and concomitant transformations of the microenvironment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808551

  16. LPS Remodeling Triggers Formation of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Elhenawy, Wael; Bording-Jorgensen, Michael; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Haurat, M. Florencia; Wine, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are proposed to mediate multiple functions during pathogenesis and symbiosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for OMV formation remain poorly understood. It has been shown in eukaryotic membranes that lipids with an inverted-cone shape favor the formation of positive membrane curvatures. Based on these studies, we formulated the hypothesis that lipid A deacylation might impose shape modifications that result in the curvature of the outer membrane (OM) and subsequent OMV formation. We tested the effect of lipid A remodeling on OMV biogenesis employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Expression of the lipid A deacylase PagL resulted in increased vesiculation, without inducing an envelope stress response. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed profound differences in the patterns of lipid A in OM and OMV, with accumulation of deacylated lipid A forms exclusively in OMV. OMV biogenesis by intracellular bacteria upon macrophage infection was drastically reduced in a pagL mutant strain. We propose a novel mechanism for OMV biogenesis requiring lipid A deacylation in the context of a multifactorial process that involves the orchestrated remodeling of the outer membrane. PMID:27406567

  17. Multifractal and Lacunarity Analysis of Microvascular Morphology and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Daniel J.; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Poché, Ross A.; Dickinson, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Classical measures of vessel morphology including diameter and density are employed to study microvasculature in endothelial membrane labeled mice. These measurements prove sufficient for some studies; however they are less well suited for quantifying changes in microcirculatory networks lacking hierarchical structure. We demonstrate automated multifractal analysis and lacunarity may be used with classical methods to quantify microvascular morphology. Methods We present an automated extraction tool with a processing pipeline to characterize 2D representations of 3D microvasculature, using multifractal analysis and lacunarity. We apply our analysis on four tissues and the hyaloid vasculature during remodeling. Results We found that the vessel networks analyzed have multifractal geometries and that kidney microvasculature has the largest fractal dimension and the lowest lacunarity compared to microvasculature networks in the cortex, skin, and thigh muscle. Also, we found that during hyaloid remodeling, there were differences in multifractal spectra reflecting the functional transition from a space filling vasculature which nurtures the lens to a less dense vasculature as it regresses, permitting unobstructed vision. Conclusion Multifractal analysis and lacunarity are valuable additions to classical measures of vascular morphology and will have utility in future studies of normal, developing and pathological tissues. PMID:21166933

  18. Brahma is essential for Drosophila intestinal stem cell proliferation and regulated by Hippo signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yunyun; Xu, Jinjin; Yin, Meng-Xin; Lu, Yi; Hu, Lianxin; Li, Peixue; Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Zengqiang; Ho, Margaret S; Ji, Hongbin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling processes are among the most important regulatory mechanisms in controlling cell proliferation and regeneration. Drosophila intestinal stem cells (ISCs) exhibit self-renewal potentials, maintain tissue homeostasis, and serve as an excellent model for studying cell growth and regeneration. In this study, we show that Brahma (Brm) chromatin-remodeling complex is required for ISC proliferation and damage-induced midgut regeneration in a lineage-specific manner. ISCs and enteroblasts exhibit high levels of Brm proteins; and without Brm, ISC proliferation and differentiation are impaired. Importantly, the Brm complex participates in ISC proliferation induced by the Scalloped–Yorkie transcriptional complex and that the Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway directly restricted ISC proliferation by regulating Brm protein levels by inducing caspase-dependent cleavage of Brm. The cleavage resistant form of Brm protein promoted ISC proliferation. Our findings highlighted the importance of Hpo signaling in regulating epigenetic components such as Brm to control downstream transcription and hence ISC proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00999.001 PMID:24137538

  19. Pulmonary arterial remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is lobe dependent.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Jeremy P; McLean, Catriona A; Thompson, Bruce R; Stuart-Andrews, Christopher R; Paul, Eldho; Snell, Gregory I; Williams, Trevor J

    2013-09-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial remodeling has been demonstrated in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but it is not known whether lobar heterogeneity of remodeling occurs. Furthermore, the relationship between pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary arterial remodeling in COPD has not been established. Muscular pulmonary arterial remodeling in arteries 0.10-0.25 mm in diameter was assessed in COPD-explanted lungs and autopsy controls. Remodeling was quantified as the percentage wall thickness to vessel diameter (%WT) using digital image analysis. Repeat measures mixed-effects remodeling for %WT was performed according to lobar origin (upper and lower), muscular pulmonary arterial size (small, medium, and large), and echocardiography-based pulmonary arterial pressure (no PH, mild PH, and moderate-to-severe PH). Lobar perfusion and emphysema indices were determined from ventilation-perfusion and computed tomography scans, respectively. Overall, %WT was greater in 42 subjects with COPD than in 5 control subjects ([Formula: see text]). Within the COPD group, %WT was greater in the upper lobes ([Formula: see text]) and in the small muscular pulmonary arteries ([Formula: see text]). Lobar differences were most pronounced in medium and large arteries. Lobar emphysema index was not associated with arterial remodeling. However, there was a significant positive relationship between the lobar perfusion index and pulmonary arterial remodeling ([Formula: see text]). The presence of PH on echocardiography showed only a trend to a small effect on lower lobe remodeling. The pattern of pulmonary arterial remodeling in COPD is complicated and lobe dependent. Differences in regional blood flow partially account for the lobar heterogeneity of pulmonary arterial remodeling in COPD. PMID:24618551

  20. Inflammasomes of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sellin, Mikael E; Maslowski, Kendle M; Maloy, Kevin J; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-08-01

    While the functional importance of inflammasomes in blood-derived cell types is well established, it remains poorly understood how inflammasomes in nonhematopoietic cells contribute to mucosal immunity. Recent studies have revealed functional roles of inflammasomes - particularly NAIP/NLRC4, NLRP6, and noncanonical caspase-4 (caspase-11) - within epithelial cells of the gut in mucosal immune defense, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Here, we review and discuss these findings in the broader context of tissue compartment-specific mucosal immunity. We propose several models whereby activities of the intestinal epithelial inflammasomes converge on mechanisms to remove compromised epithelial cells, maintain host-microbiota mutualism, and communicate with immune cells of the underlying lamina propria. PMID:26166583

  1. Intestinal microbiota, diet and health.

    PubMed

    Power, Susan E; O'Toole, Paul W; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F

    2014-02-01

    The human intestine is colonised by 10¹³ to 10¹⁴ micro-organisms, the vast majority of which belong to the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Although highly stable over time, the composition and activities of the microbiota may be influenced by a number of factors including age, diet and antibiotic treatment. Although perturbations in the composition or functions of the microbiota are linked to inflammatory and metabolic disorders (e.g. inflammatory bowel diseases, irritable bowel syndrome and obesity), it is unclear at this point whether these changes are a symptom of the disease or a contributing factor. A better knowledge of the mechanisms through which changes in microbiota composition (dysbiosis) promote disease states is needed to improve our understanding of the causal relationship between the gut microbiota and disease. While evidence of the preventive and therapeutic effects of probiotic strains on diarrhoeal illness and other intestinal conditions is promising, the exact mechanisms of the beneficial effects are not fully understood. Recent studies have raised the question of whether non-viable probiotic strains can confer health benefits on the host by influencing the immune system. As the potential health effect of these non-viable bacteria depends on whether the mechanism of this effect is dependent on viability, future research needs to consider each probiotic strain on a case-by-case basis. The present review provides a comprehensive, updated overview of the human gut microbiota, the factors influencing its composition and the role of probiotics as a therapeutic modality in the treatment and prevention of diseases and/or restoration of human health. PMID:23931069

  2. Downregulation of β-Adrenoceptors in Isoproterenol-Induced Cardiac Remodeling through HuR

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qian; Yang, Chengzhi; Wu, Jimin; Lu, Haiyan; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhang, Youyi; Lv, Zhizhen; Zheng, Xiaopu; Li, Zijian

    2016-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) play an important role in cardiac remodeling, which is the key pathological process in various heart diseases and leads to heart failure. However, the regulation of β-AR expression in remodeling hearts is still unclear. This study aims to clarify the possible mechanisms underlying the regulation of β1- and β2-AR expression in cardiac remodeling. The rat model of cardiac remodeling was established by subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol(ISO) at the dose of 0.25 mg·kg−1·d−1 for 7days. We found that the expression of β1- and β2-ARs decreased in the remodeling heart. The mechanisms may include the inhibition of DNA transcription and the increase of mRNA degradation. cAMP-response element binding protein(CREB) is a well-known transcription factor of β-AR. However, the expression and activation of CREB was not changed in the remodeling heart. Further, human Antigen-R (HuR), a RNA binding protein, which binds to the 3'-untranslated region of the β-AR mRNA and promotes RNA degradation, was increased in the remodeling model. And in vitro, HuR deficiency reversed the reduction of β-AR mRNA induced by ISO. Therefore, the present findings indicate that HuR, but not CREB, is responsible for the reduction of β-AR expression in ISO induced cardiac remodeling. PMID:27035432

  3. 16 CFR 301.24 - Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer. 301.24 Section 301.24 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.24 Repairing, restyling and remodeling...

  4. 16 CFR 301.24 - Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer. 301.24 Section 301.24 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.24 Repairing, restyling and remodeling...

  5. A Novel Algorithm to Quantify Coronary Remodeling Using Inferred Normal Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Breno A. A.; Falcão, João Luiz A. A.; Morais, Gustavo R.; Silva, Rafael C.; Lopes, Augusto C.; Soares, Paulo R.; Mariani Jr, José; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Edelman, Elazer R.; Lemos, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular remodeling, the dynamic dimensional change in face of stress, can assume different directions as well as magnitudes in atherosclerotic disease. Classical measurements rely on reference to segments at a distance, risking inappropriate comparison between dislike vessel portions. Objective to explore a new method for quantifying vessel remodeling, based on the comparison between a given target segment and its inferred normal dimensions. Methods Geometric parameters and plaque composition were determined in 67 patients using three-vessel intravascular ultrasound with virtual histology (IVUS-VH). Coronary vessel remodeling at cross-section (n = 27.639) and lesion (n = 618) levels was assessed using classical metrics and a novel analytic algorithm based on the fractional vessel remodeling index (FVRI), which quantifies the total change in arterial wall dimensions related to the estimated normal dimension of the vessel. A prediction model was built to estimate the normal dimension of the vessel for calculation of FVRI. Results According to the new algorithm, “Ectatic” remodeling pattern was least common, “Complete compensatory” remodeling was present in approximately half of the instances, and “Negative” and “Incomplete compensatory” remodeling types were detected in the remaining. Compared to a traditional diagnostic scheme, FVRI-based classification seemed to better discriminate plaque composition by IVUS-VH. Conclusion Quantitative assessment of coronary remodeling using target segment dimensions offers a promising approach to evaluate the vessel response to plaque growth/regression. PMID:26559986

  6. Neutrophil Dependence of Vascular Remodeling after Mycoplasma Infection of Mouse Airways

    PubMed Central

    Baluk, Peter; Phillips, Keeley; Yao, Li-Chin; Adams, Alicia; Nitschké, Maximilian; McDonald, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a feature of sustained inflammation in which capillaries enlarge and acquire the phenotype of venules specialized for plasma leakage and leukocyte recruitment. We sought to determine whether neutrophils are required for vascular remodeling in the respiratory tract by using Mycoplasma pulmonis infection as a model of sustained inflammation in mice. The time course of vascular remodeling coincided with the influx of neutrophils during the first few days after infection and peaked at day 5. Depletion of neutrophils with antibody RB6-8C5 or 1A8 reduced neutrophil influx and vascular remodeling after infection by about 90%. Similarly, vascular remodeling after infection was suppressed in Cxcr2−/− mice, in which neutrophils adhered to the endothelium of venules but did not extravasate into the tissue. Expression of the venular adhesion molecule P-selectin increased in endothelial cells from day 1 to day 3 after infection, as did expression of the Cxcr2-receptor ligands Cxcl1 and Cxcl2. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) expression increased more than sixfold in the trachea of wild-type and Cxcr2−/− mice, but intratracheal administration of TNFα did not induce vascular remodeling similar to that seen in infection. We conclude that neutrophil influx is required for remodeling of capillaries into venules in the airways of mice with Mycoplasma infection and that TNFα signaling is necessary but not sufficient for vascular remodeling. PMID:24726646

  7. Relationship between self-reported residential indoor remodeling and semen quality: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Mao-Hua; Li, Zheng; Li, De-Kun; Yan, Bei; Liang, Hong; Zhi, Er-Lei; Du, Hong-Wei; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the association between residential indoor remodeling and poor semen quality. Sperm donors aged 18–45 years old were recruited in Shanghai, China. Semen specimens were collected and analyzed. An in-person interview was conducted to obtain information on the history of indoor remodeling and potential confounders. A total of 70 participants with abnormal semen quality (case group) and 68 controls were examined. A total of 20 subjects reported indoor remodeling in the recent 24 months, and among them 17 subjects reported indoor remodeling in the recent 12 months. Compared with participants with no history of indoor remodeling, participants with a history of indoor remodeling in the recent 24 months were more than three times as likely to have poor sperm quality (adjusted odds ratio = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.3–12.0) after controlling for potential confounders. The association was strengthened when the analysis was restricted to those who had indoor remodeling in the recent 12 months. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that indoor remodeling has an adverse effect on semen quality. PMID:25432500

  8. Remodeling and Tenacity of Inhibitory Synapses: Relationships with Network Activity and Neighboring Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Rubinski, Anna; Ziv, Noam E.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic synapse size remodeling is governed not only by specific activity forms but also by apparently stochastic processes with well-defined statistics. These spontaneous remodeling processes can give rise to skewed and stable synaptic size distributions, underlie scaling of these distributions and drive changes in glutamatergic synapse size “configurations”. Where inhibitory synapses are concerned, however, little is known on spontaneous remodeling dynamics, their statistics, their activity dependence or their long-term consequences. Here we followed individual inhibitory synapses for days, and analyzed their size remodeling dynamics within the statistical framework previously developed for glutamatergic synapses. Similar to glutamatergic synapses, size distributions of inhibitory synapses were skewed and stable; at the same time, however, sizes of individual synapses changed considerably, leading to gradual changes in synaptic size configurations. The suppression of network activity only transiently affected spontaneous remodeling dynamics, did not affect synaptic size configuration change rates and was not followed by the scaling of inhibitory synapse size distributions. Comparisons with glutamatergic synapses within the same dendrites revealed a degree of coupling between nearby inhibitory and excitatory synapse remodeling, but also revealed that inhibitory synapse size configurations changed at considerably slower rates than those of their glutamatergic neighbors. These findings point to quantitative differences in spontaneous remodeling dynamics of inhibitory and excitatory synapses but also reveal deep qualitative similarities in the processes that control their sizes and govern their remodeling dynamics. PMID:26599330

  9. Relationship between Left Ventricular Structural and Metabolic Remodelling in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Levelt, Eylem; Mahmod, Masliza; Piechnik, Stefan K.; Ariga, Rina; Francis, Jane M.; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Clarke, William T.; Sabharwal, Nikant; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Karamitsos, Theodoros D.; Clarke, Kieran; Rider, Oliver J.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Concentric left ventricular (LV) remodelling is associated with adverse cardiovascular events and is frequently observed in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Despite this, the cause of concentric remodelling in diabetes, per se, is unclear, but may be related to cardiac steatosis and impaired myocardial energetics. Thus, we investigated the relationship amongst myocardial metabolic changes and LV remodelling in T2DM. Forty-six non-hypertensive T2DM patients and twenty matched controls underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance to assess LV remodelling (LV mass to LV end diastolic volume ratio-LVMVR), function, pre- and post-contrast tissue characterisation using T1 mapping, 1H-, 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy for myocardial triglyceride content (MTG) and phosphocreatine to ATP ratio (PCr/ATP) respectively. When compared to body mass index and blood pressure matched controls, diabetes was associated with: concentric LV remodelling, higher MTG, impaired myocardial energetics and impaired systolic strain indicating a subtle contractile dysfunction. Importantly, cardiac steatosis independently predicted concentric remodelling and systolic strain. Extracellular volume fraction was unchanged, indicating absence of fibrosis. In conclusion, cardiac steatosis may contribute to LV concentric remodelling and contractile dysfunction in diabetes. As cardiac steatosis is modifiable, strategies aimed at reducing myocardial triglyceride may be beneficial in reversing concentric remodelling and improving contractile function in the diabetic heart. PMID:26438611

  10. Intestinal immunity and inflammation: recent progress.

    PubMed

    Elson, C O; Kagnoff, M F; Fiocchi, C; Befus, A D; Targan, S

    1986-09-01

    The previous sections illustrate that we are still defining (a) which sets of lymphoid cells are present in the intestine and which are not, (b) which sets are peculiar to the intestine, and (c) how the sets that are there function in the intestinal microenvironment. An understanding of the latter point is going to require knowledge of how these sets communicate with and regulate one another via cell surface molecules such as MHC class I and class II molecules, and via soluble mediators or lymphokines. The recent advances in various technologies make this a particularly exciting time in this field because the tools are now available to address and answer some of these basic and important questions in mucosal immunology. At the same time these advances hold great promise for our eventual understanding of chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestine. As was mentioned at the outset, the immune system has considerable power for both protection and destruction. It remains a puzzle how this latter potential is contained and controlled in the intestine of most individuals, such that they do not have inflammatory disease even in the setting of intense stimulation by substances, such as endotoxin, that are phlogistic elsewhere in the body. An answer to the question of why everyone does not have intestinal inflammation could provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases. The recent advances just detailed, as well as others sure to come, suggest that it is only a matter of time before such questions are answered. PMID:3089867

  11. The footprint of TGF-β in airway remodeling of the mustard lung.

    PubMed

    Shahriary, Alireza; Seyedzadeh, Mir Hadi; Ahmadi, Ali; Salimian, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Mustard lung is a major pulmonary complication in individuals exposed to sulfur mustard (SM) gas during the Iran-Iraq war. It shares common pathological and clinical features with some chronic inflammatory lung disorders, particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airway remodeling, which is one of the main causes of lung dysfunction and the dominant phenomenon of chronic pulmonary diseases, is seen in the mustard lung. Among all mediators involved in the remodeling process, the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β plays a pivotal role in lung fibrosis and consequently in the airway remodeling. Regarding the high levels of this mediator detected in mustard lung patients, in the present study, we have discussed the possible roles of TGF-β in airway remodeling (including epithelial layer damage, subepithelial fibrosis and angiogenesis). Finally, based on TGF-β targeting, we have reviewed new airway remodeling therapeutic approaches. PMID:26606948

  12. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  13. Persistent severe hypereosinophilic asthma is not associated with airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Alagha, Khuder; Jarjour, Baihas; Bommart, Sebastien; Aviles, Berta; Varrin, Muriel; Gamez, Anne Sophie; Molinari, Nicolas; Vachier, Isabelle; Paganin, Fabrice; Chanez, Pascal; Bourdin, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Hypereosinophilic asthma (HEA) is considered as a specific severe asthma phenotype. Whether eosinophils have a link with airway remodeling characterized by pathological (thickening of the basement membrane), functional (persistent airflow impairment and decline in lung function) and imaging features (increase airway wall thickness at CT scan) is still debated. In a one year prospective cohort of 142 severe asthma patients (according to IMI), 14 persistent HEA patients (defined by a persistent blood eosinophilia >500/mm(3) at two consecutive visits) were identified and compared with ten patients without any blood eosinophilia during the follow-up period (NEA, blood eosinophilia always <500/mm(3)). Airflow and lung volumes were recorded. Bronchial biopsies obtained at enrollment were stained for eosinophils (EG2) and basement membrane thickness (BM) was quantified. Imaging by CT scan acquisition was standardized and bronchial abnormalities quantified. ACQ score and exacerbations were prospectively recorded. HEA was not associated with preeminent features of airway remodeling assessed by airflow impairment (Best ever FEV1 values 97% ± 20 in HEA vs. 80 ± 24% in NEA, p = 0.020), decline of FEV1 (FEV1 Decline 40 ± 235 ml/y in HEA vs. 19 ± 40 ml/y in NEA, P = 0.319), submucosal abnormalities (BM thickness 7.80 ± 2.66 μm in HEA vs. 6.84 ± 2.59 in NEA, p = 0.37) and airway wall thickening at CT-scan (0.250 ± 0.036 mm vs. 0.261 ± 0.043, p = 0.92). Eosinophils blood count was inversely correlated with semiquantitative imaging score (rho -0.373, p = 0.039). Smoking history and positive skin prick tests were independent risk factors for increased BM thickening. Outcomes were similar in both populations (Control and exacerbations). Persistent HEA is not associated with evidences of airway remodeling. PMID:25592243

  14. Rutaecarpine attenuates hypoxia-induced right ventricular remodeling in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Qun; Li, Xiao-Hui; Du, Jie; Zhang, Wang; Li, Dai; Xiong, Xiao-Ming; Li, Yuan-Jian

    2016-07-01

    Rutaecarpine has been shown to exhibit wide pharmacological effects in the cardiovascular system via stimulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release. In the present study, the effect of rutaecarpine on hypoxia-induced right ventricular (RV) remodeling and the underlying mechanisms were evaluated. RV remodeling was induced by hypoxia (10 % O2, 3 weeks) in rats. Rats were treated with rutaecarpine (20 or 40 mg/kg) by intragastric administration. Proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts was induced by TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) and determined by MTS and EdU incorporation method. Cardiac fibroblasts were treated with exogenous CGRP (10 or 100 nM). The concentrations of CGRP and TGF-β1 in plasma were measured by ELISA. The expression of eIF3a, p27, α-SMA, collagen-I/III, ANP, and BNP were measured by real-time PCR or western blot. Hypoxia induced an increase of right ventricle systolic pressure (RVSP), ration of RV/LV+S, and RV/tibial length in rats, while cardiac hypertrophy, apoptosis, and fibrosis were detected. The expression of ANP, BNP, α-SMA, collagen-I, collagen-III, eIF3a, and TGF-β1 was up-regulated, and the expression of p27 was down-regulated in the right ventricle of hypoxia-treated rats. The plasma concentration of CGRP was decreased and TGF-β1 was increased in hypoxia-treated rats. All of these effects induced by hypoxia were attenuated by rutaecarpine in a dose-dependent manner. In cultured cardiac fibroblasts, TGF-β1 significantly promoted the proliferation and up-regulated the expression of α-SMA and collagen-I/III, while the expression of eIF3a was up-regulated and the expression of p27 was down-regulated. The effects of TGF-β1 were attenuated by CGRP. CGRP8-37, a selective CGRP receptor antagonist, abolished the effects of CGRP. Rutaecarpine attenuates hypoxia-induced RV remodeling via stimulation of CGRP release, and the effects of rutaecarpine involve the eIF3a/p27 pathway. PMID:27052575

  15. Intestinal Failure: Adaptation, Rehabilitation, and Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Tandon, Parul; Meka, Krishna; Rivas, John M; Jevenn, Andrea; Kuo, Ning-Tsu; Steiger, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is a state in which the nutritional demands are not met by the gastrointestinal absorptive surface. A majority of IF cases are associated with short-bowel syndrome, which is a result of malabsorption after significant intestinal resection for numerous reasons, some of which include Crohn's disease, vascular thrombosis, and radiation enteritis. IF can also be caused by obstruction, dysmotility, and congenital defects. Recognition and management of IF can be challenging, given the complex nature of this condition. This review discusses the management of IF with a focus on intestinal rehabilitation, parenteral nutrition, and transplantation. PMID:26974760

  16. Intestinal nuclear receptors in HDL cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Sabbà, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The intestine plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by functioning as an absorptive and secretory organ in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Enterocytes control cholesterol absorption, apoAI synthesis, HDL biogenesis, and nonbiliary cholesterol fecal disposal. Thus, intestine-based therapeutic interventions may hold promise in the management of diseases driven by cholesterol overload. Lipid-sensing nuclear receptors (NRs) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelium and regulate transcriptionally the handling of cholesterol by the enterocytes. Here, we discuss the NR regulation of cholesterol fluxes across the enterocytes with special emphasis on NR exploitation as a bona fide novel HDL-raising strategy. PMID:25070952

  17. Intestinal nuclear receptors in HDL cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Sabbà, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The intestine plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by functioning as an absorptive and secretory organ in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Enterocytes control cholesterol absorption, apoAI synthesis, HDL biogenesis, and nonbiliary cholesterol fecal disposal. Thus, intestine-based therapeutic interventions may hold promise in the management of diseases driven by cholesterol overload. Lipid-sensing nuclear receptors (NRs) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelium and regulate transcriptionally the handling of cholesterol by the enterocytes. Here, we discuss the NR regulation of cholesterol fluxes across the enterocytes with special emphasis on NR exploitation as a bona fide novel HDL-raising strategy. PMID:25070952

  18. The blessings and curses of intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Sebastian E.; Keestra, A. Marijke; Tsolis, Renée M.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal immune system has to strike a delicate balance between initiating inflammatory responses against invading bacterial pathogens and avoiding their induction against microbiota colonizing the lumen. Adequate inflammatory responses against bacterial invasion result in the luminal secretion of antimicrobial peptides, as well as the release of cytokines in tissue that recruit and activate phagocytes. However, pathogens have evolved to utilize these environmental changes in the inflamed intestine to promote colonization. This review focuses on the costs and benefits of intestinal inflammation and the fine interplay between the host, its microbiota and enteric pathogens. PMID:20638640

  19. The blessings and curses of intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Sebastian E; Keestra, A Marijke; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2010-07-22

    The intestinal immune system has to strike a delicate balance between initiating inflammatory responses against invading bacterial pathogens and avoiding their induction against microbiota colonizing the lumen. Adequate inflammatory responses against bacterial invasion result in the lumenal secretion of antimicrobial peptides, as well as the release of cytokines in tissue that recruit and activate phagocytes. However, pathogens have evolved to utilize these environmental changes in the inflamed intestine to promote colonization. This review focuses on the costs and benefits of intestinal inflammation and the fine interplay between the host, its microbiota, and enteric pathogens. PMID:20638640

  20. Blimp1/Prdm1 Functions in Opposition to Irf1 to Maintain Neonatal Tolerance during Postnatal Intestinal Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mould, Arne W.; Morgan, Marc A. J.; Nelson, Andrew C.; Bikoff, Elizabeth K.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal intestine is a very complex and dynamic organ that must rapidly adapt and remodel in response to a barrage of environmental stimuli during the first few postnatal weeks. Recent studies demonstrate that the zinc finger transcriptional repressor Blimp1/Prdm1 plays an essential role governing postnatal reprogramming of intestinal enterocytes during this period. Functional loss results in global changes in gene expression patterns, particularly in genes associated with metabolic function. Here we engineered a knock-in allele expressing an eGFP-tagged fusion protein under control of the endogenous regulatory elements and performed genome wide ChIP-seq analysis to identify direct Blimp1 targets and further elucidate the function of Blimp1 in intestinal development. Comparison with published human and mouse datasets revealed a highly conserved core set of genes including interferon-inducible promoters. Here we show that the interferon-inducible transcriptional activator Irf1 is constitutively expressed throughout fetal and postnatal intestinal epithelium development. ChIP-seq demonstrates closely overlapping Blimp1 and Irf1 peaks at key components of the MHC class I pathway in fetal enterocytes. The onset of MHC class I expression coincides with down-regulated Blimp1 expression during the suckling to weaning transition. Collectively, these experiments strongly suggest that in addition to regulating the enterocyte metabolic switch, Blimp1 functions as a gatekeeper in opposition to Irf1 to prevent premature activation of the MHC class I pathway in villus epithelium to maintain tolerance in the neonatal intestine. PMID:26158850

  1. Blimp1/Prdm1 Functions in Opposition to Irf1 to Maintain Neonatal Tolerance during Postnatal Intestinal Maturation.

    PubMed

    Mould, Arne W; Morgan, Marc A J; Nelson, Andrew C; Bikoff, Elizabeth K; Robertson, Elizabeth J

    2015-07-01

    The neonatal intestine is a very complex and dynamic organ that must rapidly adapt and remodel in response to a barrage of environmental stimuli during the first few postnatal weeks. Recent studies demonstrate that the zinc finger transcriptional repressor Blimp1/Prdm1 plays an essential role governing postnatal reprogramming of intestinal enterocytes during this period. Functional loss results in global changes in gene expression patterns, particularly in genes associated with metabolic function. Here we engineered a knock-in allele expressing an eGFP-tagged fusion protein under control of the endogenous regulatory elements and performed genome wide ChIP-seq analysis to identify direct Blimp1 targets and further elucidate the function of Blimp1 in intestinal development. Comparison with published human and mouse datasets revealed a highly conserved core set of genes including interferon-inducible promoters. Here we show that the interferon-inducible transcriptional activator Irf1 is constitutively expressed throughout fetal and postnatal intestinal epithelium development. ChIP-seq demonstrates closely overlapping Blimp1 and Irf1 peaks at key components of the MHC class I pathway in fetal enterocytes. The onset of MHC class I expression coincides with down-regulated Blimp1 expression during the suckling to weaning transition. Collectively, these experiments strongly suggest that in addition to regulating the enterocyte metabolic switch, Blimp1 functions as a gatekeeper in opposition to Irf1 to prevent premature activation of the MHC class I pathway in villus epithelium to maintain tolerance in the neonatal intestine. PMID:26158850

  2. TLR9 is important for protection against intestinal damage and for intestinal repair.

    PubMed

    Rose, William Alfred; Sakamoto, Kaori; Leifer, Cynthia Anne

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate receptors critical for host defense, and play a role in normal biological processes. For example, host DNA, a TLR9 ligand, stimulates epithelial repair following skin wounding. TLR signaling also plays a crucial role in regulating intestinal homeostasis. We therefore asked whether TLR9 is important for intestinal wound repair using a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced intestinal damage and repair model. We showed that TLR9-deficient mice are more susceptible to DSS, and exhibited delayed wound repair at both the clinical and histologic levels. TLR9-deficient mice showed reduced gene expression of hairy enhancer of split 1, an intestinal progenitor cell differentiation factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor, a growth factor important for epithelial cell restitution. Therefore, we conclude that TLR stimulation may play a normal role in regulating intestinal homeostasis and could potentially be a novel therapeutic target to enhance intestinal wound repair in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:22893852

  3. Chromatin Remodeling in Mammary Gland Differentiation and Breast Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tim H.-M.; Esteller, Manel

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications have essential roles in remodeling chromatin structure of genes necessary for multi-lineage differentiation of mammary stem/progenitor cells. The role of this well-defined epigenetic programming is to heritably maintain transcriptional plasticity of these loci over multiple cell divisions in the differentiated progeny. Epigenetic events can be deregulated in progenitor cells chronically exposed to xenoestrogen or inflammatory microenvironment. In addition, epigenetically mediated silencing of genes associated with tumor suppression can take place, resulting in clonal proliferation of undifferentiated or semidifferentiated cells. Alternatively, microRNAs that negatively regulate the expression of their protein-coding targets may become epigenetically repressed, leading to oncogenic expression of these genes. Here we further discuss interactions between DNA methylation and histone modifications that have significant contributions to the differentiation of mammary stem/progenitor cells and to tumor initiation and progression. PMID:20610549

  4. Pulmonary vascular remodelling in a high-altitude Aymara Indian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David

    1991-12-01

    A histological study of the pulmonary vasculature in a young male high-altitude Aymara Indian revealed four aspects of interest. There was muscularization of the terminal portion of the pulmonary arterial tree to involve pulmonary arterioles as small as 15 μm in diameter, thus forming a basis for the slightly increased pulmonary vascular resistance of native highlanders. Intimal longitudinal muscle was found in pulmonary arteries and arterioles and thought to be due to chronic alveolar hypoxia. Inner muscular tubes similar to those found in chronic obstructive lung disease were present. Pulmonary veins and venules also showed intimal muscularization suggesting that alveolar hypoxia affects vascular smooth muscle cells per se irrespective of their situation. The nature of the remodelling in a pulmonary blood vessel depends on a combination of hypoxia and haemodynamics.

  5. Rapid Hebbian axonal remodeling mediated by visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Munz, Martin; Gobert, Delphine; Schohl, Anne; Poquérusse, Jessie; Podgorski, Kaspar; Spratt, Perry; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2014-05-23

    We examined how correlated firing controls axon remodeling, using in vivo time-lapse imaging and electrophysiological analysis of individual retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons that were visually stimulated either synchronously or asynchronously relative to neighboring inputs in the Xenopus laevis optic tectum. RGCs stimulated out of synchrony rapidly lost the ability to drive tectal postsynaptic partners while their axons grew and added many new branches. In contrast, synchronously activated RGCs produced fewer new branches, but these were more stable. The effects of synchronous activation were prevented by the inhibition of neurotransmitter release and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade, which is consistent with a role for synaptic NMDAR activation in the stabilization of axonal branches and suppression of further exploratory branch addition. PMID:24855269

  6. Molecular Simulations of Actomyosin Network Self-Assembly and Remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komianos, James; Popov, Konstantin; Papoian, Garegin; Papoian Lab Team

    Actomyosin networks are an integral part of the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells and play an essential role in determining cellular shape and movement. Actomyosin network growth and remodeling in vivo is based on a large number of chemical and mechanical processes, which are mutually coupled and spatially and temporally resolved. To investigate the fundamental principles behind the self-organization of these networks, we have developed a detailed mechanochemical, stochastic model of actin filament growth dynamics, at a single-molecule resolution, where the nonlinear mechanical rigidity of filaments and their corresponding deformations under internally and externally generated forces are taken into account. Our work sheds light on the interplay between the chemical and mechanical processes governing the cytoskeletal dynamics, and also highlights the importance of diffusional and active transport phenomena. Our simulations reveal how different actomyosin micro-architectures emerge in response to varying the network composition. Support from NSF Grant CHE-1363081.

  7. Stress-induced remodeling of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bruce S

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of steroid hormone receptors in brain regions that mediate virtually every aspect of brain function has broadened the definition of 'neuroendocrinology' to include the reciprocal communication between the brain and the body via hormonal and neural pathways. The brain is the central organ of stress and adaptation to stress because it perceives and determines what is threatening, as well as determining the behavioral and physiological responses to the stressor. The adult and developing brain possess remarkable structural and functional plasticity in response to stress, including neurogenesis leading to neuronal replacement, dendritic remodeling, and synapse turnover. Stress causes an imbalance of neural circuitry subserving cognition, decision-making, anxiety and mood that can alter expression of those behaviors and behavioral states. The two Brain Research papers noted in this review played an important role in triggering these advances. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26740399

  8. Dynamics of adherens junctions in epithelial establishment, maintenance, and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Buzz

    2011-01-01

    The epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)–catenin complex binds to cytoskeletal components and regulatory and signaling molecules to form a mature adherens junction (AJ). This dynamic structure physically connects neighboring epithelial cells, couples intercellular adhesive contacts to the cytoskeleton, and helps define each cell’s apical–basal axis. Together these activities coordinate the form, polarity, and function of all cells in an epithelium. Several molecules regulate AJ formation and integrity, including Rho family GTPases and Par polarity proteins. However, only recently, with the development of live-cell imaging, has the extent to which E-cadherin is actively turned over at junctions begun to be appreciated. This turnover contributes to junction formation and to the maintenance of epithelial integrity during tissue homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:21422226

  9. Remodeling Components of the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gkretsi, Vasiliki; Stylianou, Andreas; Papageorgis, Panagiotis; Polydorou, Christiana; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumor pathophysiology is characterized by an abnormal microenvironment that guides tumor progression and poses barriers to the efficacy of cancer therapies. Most common among tumor types are abnormalities in the structure of the tumor vasculature and stroma. Remodeling the tumor microenvironment with the aim to normalize any aberrant properties has the potential to improve therapy. In this review, we discuss structural abnormalities of the tumor microenvironment and summarize the therapeutic strategies that have been developed to normalize tumors as well as their potential to enhance therapy. Finally, we present different in vitro models that have been developed to analyze and better understand the effects of the tumor microenvironment on cancer cell behavior. PMID:26528429

  10. Signaling effectors underlying pathologic growth and remodeling of the heart

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, Jop H.; Maillet, Marjorie; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of mortality in the Western world. The heart responds to many cardiopathological conditions with hypertrophic growth by enlarging individual myocytes to augment cardiac pump function and decrease ventricular wall tension. Initially, such cardiac hypertrophic growth is often compensatory, but as time progresses these changes become maladaptive. Cardiac hypertrophy is the strongest predictor for the development of heart failure, arrhythmia, and sudden death. Here we discuss therapeutic avenues emerging from molecular and genetic studies of cardiovascular disease in animal models. The majority of these are based on intracellular signaling pathways considered central to pathologic cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy, which then leads to heart failure. We focus our discussion on selected therapeutic targets that have more recently emerged and have a tangible translational potential given the available pharmacologic agents that could be readily evaluated in human clinical trials. PMID:23281408

  11. Mutually Supportive Mechanisms of Inflammation and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Whiteford, J R; De Rossi, G; Woodfin, A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is often accompanied by angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels from existing ones. This vascular response is a response to chronic hypoxia and/or ischemia, but is also contributory to the progression of disorders including atherosclerosis, arthritis, and tumor growth. Proinflammatory and proangiogenic mediators and signaling pathways form a complex and interrelated network in these conditions, and many factors exert multiple effects. Inflammation drives angiogenesis by direct and indirect mechanisms, promoting endothelial proliferation, migration, and vessel sprouting, but also by mediating extracellular matrix remodeling and release of sequestered growth factors, and recruitment of proangiogenic leukocyte subsets. The role of inflammation in promoting angiogenesis is well documented, but by facilitating greater infiltration of leukocytes and plasma proteins into inflamed tissues, angiogenesis can also propagate chronic inflammation. This review examines the mutually supportive relationship between angiogenesis and inflammation, and considers how these interactions might be exploited to promote resolution of chronic inflammatory or angiogenic disorders. PMID:27572130

  12. Extracellular matrix bioscaffolds in tissue remodeling and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Swinehart, Ilea T; Badylak, Stephen F

    2016-03-01

    During normal morphogenesis the extracellular matrix (ECM) influences cell motility, proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Tissue engineers have attempted to harness the cell signaling potential of ECM to promote the functional reconstruction, if not regeneration, of injured or missing adult tissues that otherwise heal by the formation of scar tissue. ECM bioscaffolds, derived from decellularized tissues, have been used to promote the formation of site appropriate, functional tissues in many clinical applications including skeletal muscle, fibrocartilage, lower urinary tract, and esophageal reconstruction, among others. These scaffolds function by the release or exposure of growth factors and cryptic peptides, modulation of the immune response, and recruitment of progenitor cells. Herein, we describe this process of ECM induced constructive remodeling and examine similarities to normal tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26699796

  13. Promoting brain remodeling to aid in stroke recovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng Gang; Chopp, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Endogenous brain repair after stroke involves a set of highly interactive processes, such as angiogenesis, neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, synaptogenesis, and axonal outgrowth, which together orchestrate neurological recovery. During the past several years, there have been advances in our understanding of miRNAs and histone deacetylases (HDACs) in brain repair processes after stroke. Emerging data indicate the important role of exosomes for intercellular communication in promoting coupled brain remodeling processes. These advances will likely have a major impact on the development of restorative therapies for ischemic brain repair, consequently leading to improvement of neurological function. In this review, we provide an update on our current understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of miRNAs, exosomes, and HDACs in brain restorative processes after stroke. PMID:26278490

  14. Descending thoracic aorta remodeling after multilayer stent release.

    PubMed

    Bozzani, Antonio; Arici, Vittorio; Bonalumi, Giovanni; Argenteri, Angelo

    2015-07-01

    The multilayer flow modulator (MFM) is a device whose real effectiveness in the treatment of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms is not clear yet. A 68-year-old man with a 18-mm blister-like aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta underwent endovascular exclusion, complicated by the thrombosis of a previous aortobi-iliac prosthesis, treated with embolectomy and femorofemoral bypass. Therefore, an MFM placement was planned. The postoperative course was uneventful and the 6-month computed tomography scan showed a complete thrombosis and remodeling of the aneurysm. The MFM stent could be an alternative treatment for saccular thoracic aortic aneurysm in high-risk patients but should not be used indiscriminately when other modalities of aortic repair are not feasible. Longer follow-up is mandatory to prove the efficacy of this technology. PMID:25765638

  15. Chromatin Remodeling Inactivates Activity Genes and Regulates Neural Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kelly K.; Hemberg, Martin; Reddy, Naveen C.; Cho, Ha Y.; Guthrie, Arden N.; Oldenborg, Anna; Heiney, Shane A.; Ohmae, Shogo; Medina, Javier F.; Holy, Timothy E.; Bonni, Azad

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription influences neuronal connectivity, but the roles and mechanisms of inactivation of activity-dependent genes have remained poorly understood. Genome-wide analyses in the mouse cerebellum revealed that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex deposits the histone variant H2A.z at promoters of activity-dependent genes, thereby triggering their inactivation. Purification of translating mRNAs from synchronously developing granule neurons (Sync-TRAP) showed that conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 impairs inactivation of activity-dependent genes when neurons undergo dendrite pruning. Chd4 knockout or expression of NuRD-regulated activity genes impairs dendrite pruning. Imaging of behaving mice revealed hyperresponsivity of granule neurons to sensorimotor stimuli upon Chd4 knockout. Our findings define an epigenetic mechanism that inactivates activity-dependent transcription and regulates dendrite patterning and sensorimotor encoding in the brain. PMID:27418512

  16. Ventricular Remodeling in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amil M.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is common, increasing in prevalence, and causes substantial morbidity and mortality. HFpEF has commonly been viewed as an expression of advanced hypertensive heart disease, with a cardiac phenotype characterized by an increase in wall thickness-to-chamber radius ratio (concentric hypertrophy). However, marked clinical heterogeneity within this syndrome is now well appreciated, and is mirrored in the variability in left ventricular structure. A review of larger imaging studies from epidemiology and clinical trial cohorts demonstrate that while concentric LV remodeling is common, it is by no means universal and many patients demonstrate normal LV geometry or even an eccentric pattern. More detailed assessment of cardiac structure and function in broader HFpEF populations will be necessary to better define the prevalence, determinants, and prognostic relevance of these measures, which may in turn serve as a foundation to identify pathophysiologically relevant sub-phenotypes within this diverse syndrome. PMID:24097113

  17. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz; Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar; Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the effects of VEGF165 gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Methods Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF165 treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. Results There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF165. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF165, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. Conclusion The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF165 seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct. PMID:25993074

  18. Thymoquinone inhibits inflammation, neoangiogenesis and vascular remodeling in asthma mice.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinming; Ren, Yuan; Yu, Na; Kong, Lingfei; Kang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic obstructive disease which is characterized by recurring airway inflammation, reversible airway obstruction, airway hyper responsiveness and vascular remodeling. Thymoquinone (TQ), an active ingredient isolated from Nigella sativa, was reported to exhibit anti-inflammation and anti-proliferation of in various cancer cells as well as epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of TQ on the inflammation, neoangiogenesis and vascular remodeling induced by Ovalbumin (OVA) in asthma mice in vivo and the anti-angiogenesis effects of TQ in VEGF-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Our results revealed that TQ inhibited the production of inflammatory factors interleukin-4/-5 (IL-4/-5) by enzyme-linked immunesorbent assay (ELISA). Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that the increase of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, which is also known as CD31 and α-smooth muscle actinalpha (α-SMA) expression in asthma mice challenged by OVA was suppressed by TQ. Moreover, TQ suppressed the activation of VEGFR2-PI3K-Akt pathway and up-regulated the expression of Slit glycoprotein-2 (Slit-2) both in vivo and in vitro with the inhibition of tube information in HUVEC cells. Meanwhile immunofluorescence analysis showed that Slit-2 and Roundabout-4 (Robo-4) were co-expressing after TQ treatment in OVA-challenged asthma mice. Our study demonstrates that TQ attenuated the inflammatory reaction by antagonizing IL-4/-5 while the anti-neoangiogenesis effect of TQ is mediated by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression through VEGFR2/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which supports a potential role for TQ in ameliorating asthma. PMID:27240137

  19. Erythrocyte stiffness during morphological remodeling induced by carbon ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoping; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jizeng

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR) is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy) or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy) for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy). The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study provides a new

  20. The Mineralocorticoid Receptor Promotes Fibrotic Remodeling in Atrial Fibrillation*

    PubMed Central

    Lavall, Daniel; Selzer, Christian; Schuster, Pia; Lenski, Matthias; Adam, Oliver; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    We studied the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the signaling that promotes atrial fibrosis. Left atrial myocardium of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) exhibited 4-fold increased hydroxyproline content compared with patients in sinus rhythm. Expression of MR was similar, as was 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2), which also increased. 11β-HSD2 converts cortisol to receptor-inactive metabolites allowing aldosterone occupancy of MR. 11β-HSD2 was up-regulated by arrhythmic pacing in cultured cardiomyocytes and in a mouse model of spontaneous AF (RacET). In cardiomyocytes, aldosterone induced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the absence but not in the presence of cortisol. Hydroxyproline expression was increased in cardiac fibroblasts exposed to conditioned medium from aldosterone-treated cardiomyocytes but not from cardiomyocytes treated with both cortisol and aldosterone. Aldosterone increased connective tissue growth factor and hydroxyproline expression in cardiac fibroblasts, which were prevented by BR-4628, a dihydropyridine-derived selective MR antagonist, and by spironolactone. Aldosterone activated RhoA GTPase. Rho kinase inhibition by Y-27632 prevented CTGF and hydroxyproline, whereas the RhoA activator CN03 increased CTGF expression. Aldosterone and CTGF increased lysyl oxidase, and aldosterone enhanced miR-21 expression. MR antagonists reduced the aldosterone but not the CTGF effect. In conclusion, MR signaling promoted fibrotic remodeling. Increased expression of 11β-HSD2 during AF leads to up-regulation of collagen and pro-fibrotic mediators by aldosterone, specifically RhoA activity as well as CTGF, lysyl oxidase, and microRNA-21 expression. The MR antagonists BR-4628 and spironolactone prevent these alterations. MR inhibition may, therefore, represent a potential pharmacologic target for the prevention of fibrotic remodeling of the atrial myocardium. PMID:24469458

  1. Organization and remodeling of the olivocerebellar climbing fiber projection.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Izumi

    2006-01-01

    Climbing fibers, terminal portions of the axons of inferior olive neurons, form strong synaptic connections to Purkinje cells in an exclusive one-to-one relationship. This projection is established during development by drastic reshaping in each climbing fiber and in overall axonal arborization. Early climbing fibers form loose 'creeper'-type terminal arbors that seem to make weak contact with many Purkinje cells in the first postnatal week. The terminal arbor then becomes focused on a single Purkinje cell with the aggregation of swellings ('transitional' type), and eventually tightly surrounds the Purkinje cell soma ('nest' type) in the second postnatal week. The terminal arbor is then displaced upward to the stem of the apical dendrite of the Purkinje cell ('capuchon' or 'hood') and eventually to the proximal portion of the dendritic tree (mature climbing fiber). Single-axon morphology in rats has shown that olivocerebellar axons in the creeper stage branch more frequently and have many more climbing fibers than those in adults. The climbing fibers that originate from an axon are largely organized into microzones as in adults. Concomitant with this remodeling of climbing fibers, the number of climbing fibers per olivocerebellar axon is significantly decreased by the putative retraction of climbing fibers during development from the creeper to nest stage. Due to additional retraction after the nest stage, an olivocerebellar axon in an adult has about seven climbing fibers. The above morphological remodeling and retraction during development can be closely compared to the changes in climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic interaction observed in rats and mice. Generation and aggregation of the swellings in the terminal arbor between the creeper and nest stages are correlated with maturation of the synaptic connection. The decrease in climbing fibers in the same and following periods is correlated with the elimination of overabundant synapses to establish one

  2. Phase field approaches of bone remodeling based on TIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François; Rahouadj, Rachid; Boisse, Julien; Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The process of bone remodeling includes a cycle of repair, renewal, and optimization. This adaptation process, in response to variations in external loads and chemical driving factors, involves three main types of bone cells: osteoclasts, which remove the old pre-existing bone; osteoblasts, which form the new bone in a second phase; osteocytes, which are sensing cells embedded into the bone matrix, trigger the aforementioned sequence of events. The remodeling process involves mineralization of the bone in the diffuse interface separating the marrow, which contains all specialized cells, from the newly formed bone. The main objective advocated in this contribution is the setting up of a modeling and simulation framework relying on the phase field method to capture the evolution of the diffuse interface between the new bone and the marrow at the scale of individual trabeculae. The phase field describes the degree of mineralization of this diffuse interface; it varies continuously between the lower value (no mineral) and unity (fully mineralized phase, e.g. new bone), allowing the consideration of a diffuse moving interface. The modeling framework is the theory of continuous media, for which field equations for the mechanical, chemical, and interfacial phenomena are written, based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Additional models for the cellular activity are formulated to describe the coupling of the cell activity responsible for bone production/resorption to the kinetics of the internal variables. Kinetic equations for the internal variables are obtained from a pseudo-potential of dissipation. The combination of the balance equations for the microforce associated to the phase field and the kinetic equations lead to the Ginzburg-Landau equation satisfied by the phase field with a source term accounting for the dissipative microforce. Simulations illustrating the proposed framework are performed in a one-dimensional situation showing the evolution of

  3. Renovascular remodeling and renal injury after extended angiotensin II infusion.

    PubMed

    Casare, Fernando Augusto Malavazzi; Thieme, Karina; Costa-Pessoa, Juliana Martins; Rossoni, Luciana Venturini; Couto, Gisele Kruger; Fernandes, Fernanda Barrinha; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Oliveira-Souza, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Chronic angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion for 1 or 2 wk leads to progressive hypertension and induces inward hypertrophic remodeling in preglomerular vessels, which is associated with increased renal vascular resistance (RVR) and decreased glomerular perfusion. Considering the ability of preglomerular vessels to exhibit adaptive responses, the present study was performed to evaluate glomerular perfusion and renal function after 6 wk of ANG II infusion. To address this study, male Wistar rats were submitted to sham surgery (control) or osmotic minipump insertion (ANG II 200 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1), 42 days). A group of animals was treated or cotreated with losartan (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)), an AT1 receptor antagonist, between days 28 and 42 Chronic ANG II infusion increased systolic blood pressure to 185 ± 4 compared with 108 ± 2 mmHg in control rats. Concomitantly, ANG II-induced hypertension increased intrarenal ANG II level and consequently, preglomerular and glomerular injury. Under this condition, ANG II enhanced the total renal plasma flow (RPF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urine flow and induced pressure natriuresis. These changes were accompanied by lower RVR and enlargement of the lumen of interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles, consistent with impairment of renal autoregulatory capability and outward preglomerular remodeling. The glomerular injury culminated with podocyte effacement, albuminuria, tubulointerstitial macrophage infiltration and intrarenal extracellular matrix accumulation. Losartan attenuated most of the effects of ANG II. Our findings provide new information regarding the contribution of ANG II infusion over 2 wk to renal hemodynamics and function via the AT1 receptor. PMID:26962104

  4. The effect of radiation dose on mouse skeletal muscle remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Hardee, Justin P.; Puppa, Melissa J.; Fix, Dennis K.; Gao, Song; Hetzler, Kimbell L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Carson, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two clinically relevant radiation doses on the susceptibility of mouse skeletal muscle to remodeling. Materials and methods. Alterations in muscle morphology and regulatory signaling were examined in tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles after radiation doses that differed in total biological effective dose (BED). Female C57BL/6 (8-wk) mice were randomly assigned to non-irradiated control, four fractionated doses of 4 Gy (4x4 Gy; BED 37 Gy), or a single 16 Gy dose (16 Gy; BED 100 Gy). Mice were sacrificed 2 weeks after the initial radiation exposure. Results The 16 Gy, but not 4x4 Gy, decreased total muscle protein and RNA content. Related to muscle regeneration, both 16 Gy and 4x4 Gy increased the incidence of central nuclei containing myofibers, but only 16 Gy increased the extracellular matrix volume. However, only 4x4 Gy increased muscle 4-hydroxynonenal expression. While both 16 Gy and 4x4 Gy decreased IIB myofiber mean cross-sectional area (CSA), only 16 Gy decreased IIA myofiber CSA. 16 Gy increased the incidence of small diameter IIA and IIB myofibers, while 4x4 Gy only increased the incidence of small diameter IIB myofibers. Both treatments decreased the frequency and CSA of low succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDH) fibers. Only 16 Gy increased the incidence of small diameter myofibers having high SDH activity. Neither treatment altered muscle signaling related to protein turnover or oxidative metabolism. Conclusions Collectively, these results demonstrate that radiation dose differentially affects muscle remodeling, and these effects appear to be related to fiber type and oxidative metabolism. PMID:25177239

  5. Muscle metabolic remodeling in response to endurance exercise in salmonids

    PubMed Central

    Morash, Andrea J.; Vanderveken, Mark; McClelland, Grant B.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle is relevant to swimming performance and metabolism in fishes, especially those that undergo extreme locomotory feats, such as seasonal migration. However, the influence of endurance exercise and the molecular mechanisms coordinating this remodeling are not well understood. The present study examines muscle metabolic remodeling associated with endurance exercise in fed rainbow trout as compared to migrating salmon. Trout were swum for 4 weeks at 1.5 BL/s, a speed similar to that of migrating salmon and red and white muscles were sampled after each week. We quantified changes in key enzymes in aerobic and carbohydrate metabolism [citrate synthase (CS), β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD), hexokinase (HK)] and changes in mRNA expression of major regulators of metabolic phenotype (AMPK, PPARs) and lipid (carnitine palmitoyltransferase, CPT I), protein (aspartate aminotransferase, AST) and carbohydrate (HK) oxidation pathways. After 1 week of swimming substantial increases were seen in AMPK and PPARα mRNA expression and of their downstream target genes, CPTI and HK in red muscle. However, significant changes in CS and HK activity occurred only after 4 weeks. In contrast, there were few changes in mRNA expression and enzyme activities in white muscle over the 4-weeks. Red muscle results mimic those found in migrating salmon suggesting a strong influence of exercise on red muscle phenotype. In white muscle, only changes in AMPK and PPAR expression were similar to that seen with migrating salmon. However, in contrast to exercise alone, in natural migration HK decreased while AST increased suggesting that white muscle plays a role in supplying fuel and intermediates possibly through tissue breakdown during prolonged fasting. Dissecting individual and potentially synergistic effects of multiple stressors will enable us to determine major drivers of the metabolic phenotype and their impacts on whole animal performance. PMID

  6. Specificity analysis of lectins and antibodies using remodeled glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Iskratsch, Thomas; Braun, Andreas; Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B H

    2009-03-15

    Due to their ability to bind specifically to certain carbohydrate sequences, lectins are a frequently used tool in cytology, histology, and glycan analysis but also offer new options for drug targeting and drug delivery systems. For these and other potential applications, it is necessary to be certain as to the carbohydrate structures interacting with the lectin. Therefore, we used glycoproteins remodeled with glycosyltransferases and glycosidases for testing specificities of lectins from Aleuria aurantia (AAL), Erythrina cristagalli (ECL), Griffonia simplicifolia (GSL I-B(4)), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Lens culinaris (LCA), Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA), peanut (Arachis hypogaeae) (PNA), Ricinus communis (RCA I), Sambucus nigra (SNA), Vicia villosa (VVA), and wheat germ (Triticum vulgaris) (WGA) as well as reactivities of anti-carbohydrate antibodies (anti-bee venom, anti-horseradish peroxidase [anti-HRP], and anti-Lewis(x)). After enzymatic remodeling, the resulting neoglycoforms display defined carbohydrate sequences and can be used, when spotted on nitrocellulose or in enzyme-linked lectinosorbent assays, to identify the sugar moieties bound by the lectins. Transferrin with its two biantennary complex N-glycans was used as scaffold for gaining diverse N-glycosidic structures, whereas fetuin was modified using glycosidases to test the specificities of lectins toward both N- and O-glycans. In addition, alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein and Schistosoma mansoni egg extract were chosen as controls for lectin interactions with fucosylated glycans (Lewis(x) and core alpha1,3-fucose). Our data complement and expand the existing knowledge about the binding specificity of a range of commercially available lectins. PMID:19123999

  7. Reverse remodeling and recovery from cachexia in rats with aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Yaser; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Khan, M Usman; Green, Kelly D; Ahokas, Robert A; Gerling, Ivan C; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Weber, Karl T

    2012-08-15

    The congestive heart failure (CHF) syndrome with soft tissue wasting, or cachexia, has its pathophysiologic origins rooted in neurohormonal activation. Mechanical cardiocirculatory assistance reveals the potential for reverse remodeling and recovery from CHF, which has been attributed to device-based hemodynamic unloading whereas the influence of hormonal withdrawal remains uncertain. This study addresses the signaling pathways induced by chronic aldosteronism in normal heart and skeletal muscle at organ, cellular/subcellular, and molecular levels, together with their potential for recovery (Recov) after its withdrawal. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were examined at 4 wk of aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) and following 4-wk Recov. Compared with untreated, age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by 1) a failure to gain weight, reduced muscle mass with atrophy, and a heterogeneity in cardiomyocyte size across the ventricles, including hypertrophy and atrophy at sites of microscopic scarring; 2) increased cardiomyocyte and mitochondrial free Ca(2+), coupled to oxidative stress with increased H(2)O(2) production and 8-isoprostane content, and increased opening potential of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore; 3) differentially expressed genes reflecting proinflammatory myocardial and catabolic muscle phenotypes; and 4) reversal to or toward recovery of these responses with 4-wk Recov. Aldosteronism in rats is accompanied by cachexia and leads to an adverse remodeling of the heart and skeletal muscle at organ, cellular/subcellular, and molecular levels. However, evidence presented herein implicates that these tissues retain their inherent potential for recovery after complete hormone withdrawal. PMID:22730385

  8. Reverse remodeling and recovery from cachexia in rats with aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Yaser; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Khan, M. Usman; Green, Kelly D.; Ahokas, Robert A.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.

    2012-01-01

    The congestive heart failure (CHF) syndrome with soft tissue wasting, or cachexia, has its pathophysiologic origins rooted in neurohormonal activation. Mechanical cardiocirculatory assistance reveals the potential for reverse remodeling and recovery from CHF, which has been attributed to device-based hemodynamic unloading whereas the influence of hormonal withdrawal remains uncertain. This study addresses the signaling pathways induced by chronic aldosteronism in normal heart and skeletal muscle at organ, cellular/subcellular, and molecular levels, together with their potential for recovery (Recov) after its withdrawal. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were examined at 4 wk of aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) and following 4-wk Recov. Compared with untreated, age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by 1) a failure to gain weight, reduced muscle mass with atrophy, and a heterogeneity in cardiomyocyte size across the ventricles, including hypertrophy and atrophy at sites of microscopic scarring; 2) increased cardiomyocyte and mitochondrial free Ca2+, coupled to oxidative stress with increased H2O2 production and 8-isoprostane content, and increased opening potential of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore; 3) differentially expressed genes reflecting proinflammatory myocardial and catabolic muscle phenotypes; and 4) reversal to or toward recovery of these responses with 4-wk Recov. Aldosteronism in rats is accompanied by cachexia and leads to an adverse remodeling of the heart and skeletal muscle at organ, cellular/subcellular, and molecular levels. However, evidence presented herein implicates that these tissues retain their inherent potential for recovery after complete hormone withdrawal. PMID:22730385

  9. Tie1 controls angiopoietin function in vascular remodeling and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Emilia A; Lampinen, Anita; Giri, Hemant; Anisimov, Andrey; Kim, Minah; Allen, Breanna; Fang, Shentong; D'Amico, Gabriela; Sipilä, Tuomas J; Lohela, Marja; Strandin, Tomas; Vaheri, Antti; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Koh, Gou Young; McDonald, Donald M; Alitalo, Kari; Saharinen, Pipsa

    2016-09-01

    The angiopoietin/Tie (ANG/Tie) receptor system controls developmental and tumor angiogenesis, inflammatory vascular remodeling, and vessel leakage. ANG1 is a Tie2 agonist that promotes vascular stabilization in inflammation and sepsis, whereas ANG2 is a context-dependent Tie2 agonist or antagonist. A limited understanding of ANG signaling mechanisms and the orphan receptor Tie1 has hindered development of ANG/Tie-targeted therapeutics. Here, we determined that both ANG1 and ANG2 binding to Tie2 increases Tie1-Tie2 interactions in a β1 integrin-dependent manner and that Tie1 regulates ANG-induced Tie2 trafficking in endothelial cells. Endothelial Tie1 was essential for the agonist activity of ANG1 and autocrine ANG2. Deletion of endothelial Tie1 in mice reduced Tie2 phosphorylation and downstream Akt activation, increased FOXO1 nuclear localization and transcriptional activation, and prevented ANG1- and ANG2-induced capillary-to-venous remodeling. However, in acute endotoxemia, the Tie1 ectodomain that is responsible for interaction with Tie2 was rapidly cleaved, ANG1 agonist activity was decreased, and autocrine ANG2 agonist activity was lost, which led to suppression of Tie2 signaling. Tie1 cleavage also occurred in patients with hantavirus infection. These results support a model in which Tie1 directly interacts with Tie2 to promote ANG-induced vascular responses under noninflammatory conditions, whereas in inflammation, Tie1 cleavage contributes to loss of ANG2 agonist activity and vascular stability. PMID:27548530

  10. Remodeling of the thoracic aorta after bone marrow cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Alyne; Monteiro, Nemesis; Rocha, Vinícius Novaes; Oliveira, Genilza; Moraes, Alan Cesar; Andrade, Cherley; Nascimento, Ana Lucia; de Carvalho, Laís; Thole, Alessandra; Carvalho, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and display the paracrine effect. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of therapy with bone marrow cells (BMCs) on blood glucose, lipid metabolism and aortic wall remodeling in mice through the administration of a high fat diet and subsequent BMCs transplantation. C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet (CO group) or an atherogenic diet (AT group). After 16 weeks, the AT group was divided into four groups: an AT 14 days group and AT 21 days group, that were given an injection of vehicle and sacrificed at 14 and 21 days after, respectively; AT-BMC 14 days group and AT-BMC 21 days group that was given an injection of BMCs and sacrificed at 14 and 21 days after. The CO group was sacrificed along with other groups. The BMCs transplant had reduced blood glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol. The Qa (1/mm2) was quantitatively reduced in AT 14 days group, AT 21 days group and was high in AT-BMC 21 days group. The AT 21 days group exhibited increased tunica media and elastic system fibers. The immunolabeling for α-SMA and VEGF showed less immunolabeling in transplanted groups with BMCs. The immunostaining for PCNA seems to be more expressive in the group AT-BMC 21 days group. To conclude, our results support the concept that in mice, the injection of BMCs improve glucose levels, lipid metabolism and remodeling of the aortic wall in animals using atherogenic diet. PMID:25337194

  11. Erythrocyte Stiffness during Morphological Remodeling Induced by Carbon Ion Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baoping; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jizeng

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR) is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy) or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy) for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy). The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study provides a new

  12. Cardiac remodeling in rats with renal failure shows interventricular differences.

    PubMed

    Svíglerová, Jitka; Kuncová, Jitka; Nalos, Lukás; Holas, Jaromír; Tonar, Zbynek; Rajdl, Daniel; Stengl, Milan

    2012-09-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Intensive research revealed a number of alterations in the heart during CRF; however, possible interventricular differences in CRF-induced cardiac remodeling have so far not been addressed. CRF was induced by two-stage surgical 5/6 nephrectomy (NX) in male Wistar rats. Cellular hypertrophy was quantified using immunohistological morphometric analysis. Contraction force and membrane potential were recorded in left and right ventricle papillary muscles with an isometric force transducer and high-resistance glass microelectrodes. Hypertrophy was present in the left ventricle (LV) of NX animals, but not in the right ventricle (RV) of NX animals, as documented by both ventricle/body weight ratios and cellular morphometric analysis of the cross-sectional area of myocytes. The contraction force was reduced in the LV of NX animals but increased in the RV of NX animals compared with sham-operated rats. Rest potentiation of contraction force was relatively more pronounced in the LV of NX rats. Fifty percent substitution of extracellular sodium with lithium significantly increased the contraction force only in the LV of NX animals. Action potential durations were shortened in both ventricles of CRF animals. Cardiac structural and contractile remodeling in CRF shows significant interventricular differences. CRF induces hypertrophy of the LV but not of the RV. LV hypertrophy was associated with a reduction of contraction force, whereas in the RV, the contraction force was enhanced. Partial recovery of contractile function of the LV by rest potentiation or lithium substitution indicates a role of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in this phenomenon. PMID:22929800

  13. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L.; Ferrell, William D.; Watt, Carl B.; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease. PMID:27199657

  14. Left ventricular structure and remodeling in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Pelà, Giovanna; Li Calzi, Mauro; Pinelli, Silvana; Andreoli, Roberta; Sverzellati, Nicola; Bertorelli, Giuseppina; Goldoni, Matteo; Chetta, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on cardiac alterations such as left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and lower stroke volume in patients with COPD are discordant. In this study, we investigated whether early structural and functional cardiac changes occur in patients with COPD devoid of manifest cardiovascular disease, and we assessed their associations with clinical and functional features. Methods Forty-nine patients with COPD belonging to all Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classes were enrolled and compared with 36 controls. All subjects underwent clinical history assessment, lung function testing, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiography, and conventional and Doppler tissue echocardiography. Patients were also subjected to computed tomography to quantify emphysema score. Results Patients with COPD had lower LV cavity associated with a marked increase in relative wall thickness (RWT), suggesting concentric remodeling without significant changes in LV mass. RWT was significantly associated with ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second to the forced vital capacity and emphysema score and was the only cardiac parameter that – after multivariate analysis – significantly correlated with COPD conditions in all individuals. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that RWT (with a cutoff point of 0.42) predicted the severity of COPD with 83% specificity and 56% sensitivity (area under the curve =0.69, 95% confidence interval =0.59–0.81). Patients with COPD showed right ventricular to be functional but no structural changes. Conclusion Patients with COPD without evident cardiovascular disease exhibit significant changes in LV geometry, resulting in concentric remodeling. In all individuals, RWT was significantly and independently related to COPD. However, its prognostic role should be determined in future studies. PMID:27257378

  15. Epithelial Cell Proliferation Contributes to Airway Remodeling in Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lance; E, Xueping; Tarsi, Jaime; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor; Horiuchi, Todd K.; Cochran, Rebecca; DeMartino, Steve; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Hussain, Iftikhar; Holtzman, Michael J.; Castro, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Despite long-term therapy with corticosteroids, patients with severe asthma develop irreversible airway obstruction. Objectives: To evaluate if there are structural and functional differences in the airway epithelium in severe asthma associated with airway remodeling. Methods: In bronchial biopsies from 21 normal subjects, 11 subjects with chronic bronchitis, 9 subjects with mild asthma, and 31 subjects with severe asthma, we evaluated epithelial cell morphology: epithelial thickness, lamina reticularis (LR) thickness, and epithelial desquamation. Levels of retinoblastoma protein (Rb), Ki67, and Bcl-2 were measured, reflecting cellular proliferation and death. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to study cellular apoptosis. Measurements and Main Results: Airway epithelial and LR thickness was greater in subjects with severe asthma compared with those with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects (p = 0.009 and 0.033, respectively). There was no significant difference in epithelial desquamation between groups. Active, hypophosphorylated Rb expression was decreased (p = 0.002) and Ki67 was increased (p < 0.01) in the epithelium of subjects with severe asthma as compared with normal subjects, indicating increased cellular proliferation. Bcl-2 expression was decreased (p < 0.001), indicating decreased cell death suppression. There was a greater level of apoptotic activity in the airway biopsy in subjects with severe asthma as compared with the normal subjects using the TUNEL assay (p = 0.002), suggesting increased cell death. Conclusions: In subjects with severe asthma, as compared with subjects with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects, we found novel evidence of increased cellular proliferation in the airway contributing to a thickened epithelium and LR. These changes may contribute to the progressive decline in lung function and airway remodeling in patients with severe

  16. BMP-2 Is Involved in Scleral Remodeling in Myopia Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Honghui; Cui, Dongmei; Zhao, Feng; Huo, Lijun; Hu, Jianmin; Zeng, Junwen

    2015-01-01

    The development of myopia is associated with scleral remodeling, but it is unclear which factors regulate this process. This study investigated bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) expression in the sclera of guinea pigs with lens-induced myopia (LIM) and after recovery from myopia and evaluated the effect of BMP-2 on extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis in human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs) cultured in vitro. Lens-induced myopia was brought about in two groups of guinea pigs (the lens-induced myopia and myopia recovery groups) by placing -4.00 D lenses on the right eye for three weeks. The left eye served as a contralateral control. In the recovery group, the lenses were removed after one week. The refractive power and axial length of the eyes were measured, and the BMP-2 expression levels in the sclera were measured. After three weeks, the lens-induced eyes acquired relative myopia in both groups of guinea pigs. Immunostaining of the eyeballs revealed significantly decreased BMP-2 expression in the posterior sclera of the myopic eyes compared to the contralateral eyes. One week after lens removal, BMP-2 expression recovered, and no differences were observed between the experimental and contralateral eyes in the recovery group. HSFs were cultured with BMP-2 or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Type I and type III collagen synthesis was significantly up-regulated following BMP-2 treatment in culture after one and two weeks, but the ratio of type III to type I collagen mRNA was not increased. Biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and aggrecan was increased in HSFs treated with BMP-2. Some chondrogenesis-associated genes expression increased in HSFs treated with BMP-2. From this study, we concluded that BMP-2 is involved in scleral remodeling in the development and recovery of lens-induced myopia. PMID:25965995

  17. Probiotic use decreases intestinal inflammation and increases bone density in healthy male but not female mice.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Laura R; Irwin, Regina; Schaefer, Laura; Britton, Robert A

    2013-08-01

    Osteoporosis can result from intestinal inflammation, as is seen with inflammatory bowel disease. Probiotics, microorganisms that provide a health benefit to the host when ingested in adequate amounts, can have anti-inflammatory properties and are currently being examined to treat inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we examined if treating healthy male mice with Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 (a candidate probiotic with anti-TNFα activity) could affect intestinal TNFα levels and enhance bone density. Adult male mice were given L. reuteri 6475 orally by gavage for 3×/week for 4 weeks. Examination of jejunal and ileal RNA profiles indicates that L. reuteri suppressed basal TNFα mRNA levels in the jejunum and ileum in male mice, but surprisingly not in female mice. Next, we examined bone responses. Micro-computed tomography demonstrated that L. reuteri 6475 treatment increased male trabecular bone parameters (mineral density, bone volume fraction, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness) in the distal femur metaphyseal region as well as in the lumbar vertebrae. Cortical bone parameters were unaffected. Dynamic and static histomorphometry and serum remodeling parameters indicate that L. reuteri ingestion increases osteoblast serum markers and dynamic measures of bone formation in male mice. In contrast to male mice, L. reuteri had no effect on bone parameters in female mice. Taken together our studies indicate that femoral and vertebral bone formation increases in response to oral probiotic use, leading to increased trabecular bone volume in male mice. PMID:23389860

  18. Impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Kirfel, Jutta Pantelis, Dimitrios; Kabba, Mustapha; Kahl, Philip; Roeper, Anke; Kalff, Joerg C.; Buettner, Reinhard

    2008-12-10

    Four and one half LIM domain protein FHL2 participates in many cellular processes involved in tissue repair such as regulation of gene expression, cytoarchitecture, cell adhesion, migration and signal transduction. The repair process after wounding is initiated by the release of peptides and bioactive lipids. These molecules induce synthesis and deposition of a provisional extracellular matrix. We showed previously that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) triggers a signal transduction cascade mediating nuclear translocation of FHL2 in response to activation of the RhoA GTPase. Our present study shows that FHL2 is an important signal transducer influencing the outcome of intestinal anastomotic healing. Early wound healing is accompanied by reconstitution and remodelling of the extracellular matrix and collagen is primarily responsible for wound strength. Our results show that impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen III metabolism. Impaired collagen III synthesis reduced the mechanical stability of the anastomoses and led to lower bursting pressure in Fhl2-deficient mice after surgery. Our data confirm that FHL2 is an important factor regulating collagen expression in the early phase of wound healing, and thereby is critically involved in the physiologic process of anastomosis healing after bowel surgery and thus may represent a new therapeutic target.

  19. Ultrastructural and Molecular Changes in the Developing Small Intestine of the Toad Bufo regularis

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, S. A.; Badawy, G. M.; El-Borm, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    The ontogenetic development of the small intestine of the toad Bufo regularis was investigated using twofold approaches, namely, ultrastructural and molecular. The former has been done using transmission electron microscope and utilizing the developmental stages 42, 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66. The most prominent ultrastructural changes were recorded at stage 60 and were more evident at stage 63. These included the appearance of apoptotic bodies/nuclei within the larval epithelium, the presence of macrophages, swollen mitochondria, distorted rough endoplasmic reticulum, chromatin condensation, and irregular nuclear envelop, and the presence of large vacuoles and lysosomes. The molecular investigation involved examining DNA content and fragmentation. The results showed that the DNA content decreased significantly during the metamorphic stages 60 and 63 compared with both larval (50 and 55) and postmetamorphic (66) stages. The metamorphic stages (60 and 63) displayed extensive DNA laddering compared with stages 50, 55, and 66. The percentage of DNA damage was 0.00%, 12.91%, 57.26%, 45.48%, and 4.43% for the developmental stages 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66, respectively. In conclusion, the recorded remodeling of the small intestine represents a model for clarifying the mechanism whereby cell death and proliferation are controlled. PMID:24715821

  20. Intestinal GUCY2C Prevents TGF-β Secretion Coordinating Desmoplasia and Hyperproliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Ahmara V.; Lin, Jieru E.; Kim, Gilbert W.; Marszalowicz, Glen P.; Li, Peng; Stoecker, Brian A.; Blomain, Erik S.; Rattan, Satish; Snook, Adam E.; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process that reflects intimate reciprocal interactions between epithelia and underlying stroma. However, tumor-initiating mechanisms coordinating transformation of both epithelial and stromal components are not defined. In humans and mice, initiation of colorectal cancer is universally associated with loss of guanylin and uroguanylin, the endogenous ligands for the tumor suppressor guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), disrupting a network of homeostatic mechanisms along the crypt-surface axis. Here, we reveal that silencing GUCY2C in human colon cancer cells increases Akt-dependent TGF-β secretion, activating fibroblasts through TGF-β type I receptors and Smad3 phosphorylation. In turn, activating TGF-β signaling induces fibroblasts to secrete hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), reciprocally driving colon cancer cell proliferation through cMET-dependent signaling. Elimination of GUCY2C signaling in mice (Gucy2c-/-) produces intestinal desmoplasia, with increased reactive myofibroblasts, which is suppressed by anti-TGF-β antibodies or genetic silencing of Akt. Thus, GUCY2C coordinates intestinal epithelial-mesenchymal homeostasis through reciprocal paracrine circuits mediated by TGF-β and HGF. In that context, GUCY2C signaling constitutes a direct link between the initiation of colorectal cancer and the induction of its associated desmoplastic stromal niche. The recent regulatory approval of oral GUCY2C ligands to treat chronic gastrointestinal disorders underscores the potential therapeutic opportunity for oral GUCY2C hormone replacement to prevent remodeling of the microenvironment essential for colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:24085786