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Sample records for laryngeal mask airway

  1. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion. PMID:25422617

  2. The laryngeal mask airway in obstetrical anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gataure, P S; Hughes, J A

    1995-02-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used extensively to provide a safe airway in spontaneously breathing patients who are not at risk from aspiration of gastric contents. The role of the LMA in the event of a failed intubation in an obstetrical patient, and its place in a failed intubation drill remains unclear. Two hundred and fifty consultant obstetric anaesthetists in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire regarding their views about using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in obstetrical anaesthesia. The LMA was available in 91.4% of obstetric units. Seventy-two per cent of anaesthetists were in favour of using the LMA to maintain oxygenation when tracheal intubation had failed and ventilation using a face mask was inadequate. Twenty-four respondents had had personal experience with the LMA in obstetrical anaesthesia, eight of whom stated that the LMA had proved to be a lifesaver. We believe that the LMA has a role in obstetrical anaesthesia when tracheal intubation has failed and ventilation using a face mask proves to be impossible, and it should be inserted before attempting cricothyroidectomy. PMID:7720155

  3. [Airway equipment and its maintenance for a non difficult adult airway management (endotracheal intubation and its alternative: face mask, laryngeal mask airway, laryngeal tube)].

    PubMed

    Francon, D; Estèbe, J P; Ecoffey, C

    2003-08-01

    The airway equipment for a non difficult adult airway management are described: endotracheal tubes with a specific discussion on how to inflate the balloon, laryngoscopes and blades, stylets and intubation guides, oral airways, face masks, laryngeal mask airways and laryngeal tubes. Cleaning and disinfections with the maintenance are also discussed for each type of airway management. PMID:12943860

  4. Laryngeal mask airway: an alternative for the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Jones, J R

    1995-10-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was invented by Dr. Archie Brain at the London Hospital, Whitechapel, in 1981. Dr. Brain's main objective for the LMA was that it would provide a better method of maintaining a patient's airway than by face mask. Also, the LMA would be less hemodynamically stressful than with insertion of an endotracheal tube. The LMA consists of a silicone rubber tube connected to a miniature silicone mask. The perimeter of the mask consists of an inflatable elliptical cuff, which forms a tip at the distal aspect of the LMA. The aperture bars in the dome of the mask lift the epiglottis away, so the lumen remains unobstructive. The LMA forms a low pressure seal around the larynx. The LMA is contraindicated in any situation where the patient is at risk for pulmonary aspiration. The LMA is not a substitute for a properly placed endotracheal tube in this situation. The American Society of Anesthesiologists' difficult airway algorithm recommends the insertion of an LMA when ventilation and/or intubation are difficult. The distal aperture of the LMA is in close approximation to the vocal cords, so a 6.0-mm internal diameter endotracheal tube can be passed over an intubating stylet or a pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscope to secure a patient's airway. PMID:7502644

  5. Comparing the Laryngeal Mask Airway, Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway and Face Mask in Children Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Beyza; Hatipoğlu, Zehra; Türktan, Mediha; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Objective We compared the effects of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), face mask and Cobra perilaryngeal airway (PLA) in the airway management of spontaneously breathing paediatric patients undergoing elective inguinal surgery. Methods In this study, 90 cases of 1–14-year-old children undergoing elective inguinal surgery were scheduled. The patients were randomly divided into three groups. Anaesthesia was provided with sevoflurane and 50%–50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. After providing an adequate depth of anaesthesia, supraglottic airway devices were inserted in the group I and II patients. The duration and number of insertion, haemodynamic parameters, plateau and peak inspiratory pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure of the patients were recorded preoperatively, after induction and at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min peroperatively. Results There were no statistical differences between the groups in terms of haemodynamic parameters (p>0.05). In group II, instrumentation success was higher and instrumentation time was shorter than group II. The positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau and peak inspiratory pressure values were statistically lower in group II (p<0.05). Conclusion We concluded that for airway safety and to avoid possible complications, LMA and Cobra PLA could be alternatives to face mask and that the Cobra PLA provided lower airway pressure and had a faster and more easy placement than LMA. PMID:27366563

  6. The use of laryngeal mask airway Supreme™ in rescue airway situation in the critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shahla; Seet, Edwin; Chan, Wing Yan

    2014-12-01

    We herein report a witnessed cardiopulmonary collapse of a patient with difficult mask ventilation and near-impossible laryngoscopy-cum-intubation in the critical care unit. The airway was successfully rescued with a laryngeal mask airway Supreme™, followed by an open, crash tracheostomy by the otolaryngologist. PMID:25630328

  7. The ProSeal laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, Joseph; Keller, Christian

    2002-12-01

    The ProSeal LMA is a major advance over the Classic LMA because of the following reasons: it allows ventilation at much higher airway pressures; it protects the lungs from aspiration and the stomach from gastric insufflation; it facilitates passage of a gastric tube and monitoring devices into the esophagus; it can be inserted like the Classic or Intubating LMA; it has its own built-in bite block; malposition is detected more readily; and, through use of techniques such as gum elastic bougie-guided insertion, correct positioning is almost guaranteed. The ProSeal can be considered a replacement device for the Classic LMA, but the Flexible LMA is still preferable for most intraoral procedures, and the Intubating LMA is still preferable whenever intubation is required. Limitations are that it is slightly more difficult to insert and requires more careful thought to use optimally. PMID:12512267

  8. Role of laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Beleña, José M; Ochoa, Ernesto Josué; Núñez, Mónica; Gilsanz, Carlos; Vidal, Alfonso

    2015-11-27

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures and the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is the most common supraglottic airway device used by the anesthesiologists to manage airway during general anesthesia. Use of LMA has some advantages when compared to endotracheal intubation, such as quick and ease of placement, a lesser requirement for neuromuscular blockade and a lower incidence of postoperative morbididy. However, the use of the LMA in laparoscopy is controversial, based on a concern about increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The ability of these devices to provide optimal ventilation during laparoscopic procedures has been also questioned. The most important parameter to secure an adequate ventilation and oxygenation for the LMA under pneumoperitoneum condition is its seal pressure of airway. A good sealing pressure, not only state correct patient ventilation, but it reduces the potential risk of aspiration due to the better seal of airway. In addition, the LMAs incorporating a gastric access, permitting a safe anesthesia based on these commented points. We did a literature search to clarify if the use of LMA in preference to intubation provides inadequate ventilation or increase the risk of aspiration in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We found evidence stating that LMA with drain channel achieves adequate ventilation for these procedures. Limited evidence was found to consider these devices completely safe against aspiration. However, we observed that the incidence of regurgitation and aspiration associated with the use of the LMA in laparoscopic surgery is very low. PMID:26649155

  9. Laryngo-tracheal ultrasonography to confirm correct endotracheal tube and laryngeal mask airway placement.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Jacek A; Cattano, Davide

    2014-12-01

    Waveform capnography was recommended as the most reliable method to confirm correct endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway placements. However, capnography may be unreliable during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and during low flow states. It may lead to an unnecessary removal of a well-placed endotracheal tube, re-intubation and interruption of chest compressions. Real-time upper airway (laryngo-tracheal) ultrasonography to confirm correct endotracheal tube placement was shown to be very useful in cadaveric models and during emergency intubation. Tracheal ultrasonography does not interrupt chest compressions and is not affected by low pulmonary flow or airway obstruction, but is limited by ultrasonography scattering and acoustic artifacts generated in air - mucosa interfaces. Sonographic upper airway assessment emerges as a rapid and easily available method to predict difficult intubation, to assess the laryngeal and hypopharyngeal size and visualize the position of the laryngeal mask airway in situ. This study demonstrates that the replacement of air with saline in endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway cuffs and the use of the contrast agents enables detection of cuffs in the airway. It also allows visualization of the surrounding structures or tissues as the ultrasound beam can be transmitted through the fluid - filled cuffs without being reflected from air - mucosal interfaces. PMID:26672974

  10. Awake intubating laryngeal mask airway placement in a morbidly obese patient with ankylosing spondylitis and unstable thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Herman, Abbey G; Mahla, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Intubating laryngeal mask airways can be used to provide continuous ventilation throughout intubation. This is a case of a morbidly obese (body mass index = 58) 65-year-old woman with T10 and T11 compression fractures. Optimal positioning for airway management was hindered by her unstable spine, minimal neck range of motion, and extreme pain with any movement. An intubating laryngeal mask airway was placed in the awake, topically anesthetized patient, and the laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube combination was left in place throughout surgery. PMID:27290947

  11. Airway Management and Endoscopic Treatment of Subglottic and Tracheal Stenosis: The Laryngeal Mask Airway Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vorasubin, Nopawan; Vira, Darshni; Jamal, Nausheen; Chhetri, Dinesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective is to present clinical outcomes of subglottic and tracheal stenosis treated by flexible bronchoscopic delivery of carbon dioxide (CO2) laser via laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Methods All consecutive, nontracheotomy dependent cases of subglottic and tracheal stenosis treated endoscopically over a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical approach consisted of radial incisions using a flexible fiber-based CO2 laser, balloon dilation, and topical application of mitomycin C. Ventilation during the procedure occurred through the LMA, and the CO2 laser fiber was delivered through the working channel of a flexible bronchoscope passed through the LMA. Number of dilations, period between dilations, and operative times were reviewed. Results Eleven patients who underwent airway intervention during the study period were identified. Average follow-up was 28 months. Etiologies of airway stenosis included intubation injury (6), idiopathic (4), or autoimmune disease (1), requiring an average of 1.3, 1.5, and 3 dilations, respectively. Average operative time was 67 minutes. Autoimmune etiology correlated with more frequent dilations. Conclusion LMA is an effective way to manage ventilation while simultaneously allowing unencumbered flexible bronchoscopic access for laser surgery, balloon dilation, and mitomycin C application for airway stenosis. Long-term success in treating stenosis is achievable using this technique. PMID:24671485

  12. Application of the laryngeal mask airway for anesthesia in three chimpanzees and one gibbon.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jacob A; Atkins, Adrienne L; Heard, Darryl J

    2010-09-01

    Three pediatric chimpanzees and one pediatric gibbon were anesthetized for routine physical examination. Anesthesia was maintained with inhalant delivered via a laryngeal mask airway (LMA). The LMA was easy to insert, provided adequate control of the airway for ventilation, and caused no tracheal stimulation. No complications were observed. As compared with a face mask, the LMA has the advantage of a more secure airway; the ability to effectively ventilate the patient; less dead space, which leads to lower rebreathing of carbon dioxide; and less exposure of personnel to waste gases. As compared with an endotracheal tube, the LMA causes less airway trauma, is easier to place, and is less stimulating to the patient. The LMA should be considered for use in fasted non-human primates presented for procedures lasting less than 60 min where high peak inspiratory pressures are not needed. PMID:20945657

  13. Use of a laryngeal mask airway in a brachycephalic dog with masticatory myositis and trismus

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Frances; Iff, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    An 8-month old, male, neutered bulldog was presented for investigation of a 2-day history of trismus. Endotracheal intubation was impossible as the dog was only able to open his mouth approximately 2 cm. A laryngeal mask airway was blindly inserted after induction of general anesthesia to maintain the patient on inhalational anesthesia and improve respiration for computed tomography and muscle biopsy. The dog recovered from anesthesia uneventfully. PMID:22942446

  14. Use of a laryngeal mask airway in a brachycephalic dog with masticatory myositis and trismus.

    PubMed

    Reed, Frances; Iff, Isabelle

    2012-03-01

    An 8-month old, male, neutered bulldog was presented for investigation of a 2-day history of trismus. Endotracheal intubation was impossible as the dog was only able to open his mouth approximately 2 cm. A laryngeal mask airway was blindly inserted after induction of general anesthesia to maintain the patient on inhalational anesthesia and improve respiration for computed tomography and muscle biopsy. The dog recovered from anesthesia uneventfully. PMID:22942446

  15. [Intubating laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Langenstein, H; Möller, F

    1998-01-01

    To improve the success of blind intubation through a laryngeal mask, Dr. A.I.J. Brain constructed the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA), marketed under the name Fastrach. The new construction allows blind intubation with highly flexible endotracheal tubes up to 8 mm ID with cuff (straight Woodbridge type), securing the airway around the intubation process and maintaining most of the characteristics of a standard laryngeal mask airway (SLMA), including contraindications. An additional contraindication is the existence of a Zenker diverticle. Up to now, eight working groups reported a success rate of blind intubation through the ILMA of more than 90% in about 1,200 patients, with a success rate of blind intubation of more than 50% for the first intubation attempt. Ten percent of the patients were difficult to intubate with the same success rate for blind intubation as in normal patients. Reduced mouth opening does not seem to hinder the use of the ILMA in spite of its increased outer diameter of 2 cm, as long as it is possible to enlarge the mouth opening to > 2 cm during anaesthesia. The new ILMA more than doubles the success of blind intubation compared to an SLMA, irrespective of a large variety of intubation difficulties. Correct judgement of endotracheal tube position is mandatory. The ILMA has the potential to be used in patients who are difficult to intubate and to substitute the SLMA in "cannot ventilate--cannot intubate" situations. The future will show if the ILMA also will improve emergency airway management by inexperienced personnel, including intubation, as has been shown for the standard laryngeal mask airway in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for ventilation only. PMID:9611362

  16. Acute unilateral submandibular gland swelling associated with the laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Suhitharan, Thangavelautham; Seevanayagam, Sathyendran; Parker, Francis Christopher; Teoh, Wendy Hui Ling

    2013-12-01

    We describe a rare complication of acute unilateral submandibular gland swelling following the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in two patients with otherwise uneventful perioperative airway management. This is likely to be a consequence of the pressure exerted by the airway cuff on the tissues within the submandibular triangle. As this complication is rarely reported, its true incidence may in fact be higher, suggesting a need for greater attention on LMA cuff pressures and degree of cuff inflation. We discuss the presenting clinical features, pathophysiology and utilisation of ultrasonographic confirmation of sialadenopathy, and review the current anaesthetic literature to raise awareness of this unusual and under-reported complication of LMA. This complication can be mitigated by incorporating routine manometric checks and limiting intracuff pressures to < 60 cmH2O, potentially avoiding LMA insertions in patients with sialolithiasis and avoiding the use of nitrous oxide. PMID:24356762

  17. The Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway Facilitates Tracheal Intubation in the Lateral Position

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Ryu; Nagata, Osamu; Sessler, Daniel I.; Ozaki, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Although the difficulty of tracheal intubation in the lateral position has not been systematically evaluated, airway loss during surgery in a laterally positioned patient may have hazardous consequences. We explored whether the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) facilitates tracheal intubation in patients with normal airway anatomy, i.e., Mallampati grade ≤ 3 and thyromental distance ≥ 5 cm, positioned in the lateral position. And we evaluated whether this technique can be used as a rescue when the airway is lost mid-case in laterally positioned patients with respect to success rate and intubation time. Anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, and vecuronium in 50 patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar disk herniation (Lateral) and 50 undergoing other surgical procedures (Supine). Patients having disk surgery (Lateral) were positioned on their right or left sides before induction of general anesthesia, and intubation was performed in that position. Patients in control group (Supine) were anesthetized in supine position, and intubation was performed in that position. Intubation was performed blindly via an ILMA in both groups. The time required for intubation and number and types of adjusting maneuvers employed were recorded. Data were compared by Mann-Whitney U, Fisher’s exact, chi-square, or unpaired t-tests, as appropriate. Data presented as mean (SD). Demographic and airway measures were similar in the two groups, except for mouth opening which was slightly wider in patients in the lateral position: 5.1 (0.9) vs. 4.6 (0.7) cm. The time required for intubation was similar in each group (≈25 s), as was intubation success (96%). We conclude that blind intubation via an ILMA offers a frequent success rate and a clinically acceptable intubation time (< one min) even in the lateral position. Summary Blind intubation via the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) offers a high success rate and a clinically acceptable intubation time even in

  18. Submental intubation with reinforced tube for intubating laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Ha, Ji-Young; Park, Hyun; Han, Dong Woo

    2005-08-31

    Submental endotracheal intubation is a simple and secure alternative to either nasoendotracheal intubation or a tracheostomy in the airway management of maxillofacial trauma. However, a submental endotracheal intubation is quite difficult to manage if adverse events such as a tube obstruction, accidental extubation, or a leaking cuff with the endotracheal tube in the submental route occur, which could endanger the patient. This paper describes the use of a LMA-FastrachTMETT in the submental endotracheal intubation of patients suffering from maxillofacial trauma. One of the patients was a 16-year-old male, and the other was a 19-year-old male. They were scheduled for an open reduction and internal fixation of the maxillofacial fracture including naso-orbital-ethmoidal (NOE) complex, and a zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture. A submental intubation with a LMA-FastrachTMETT was performed in both cases, and the operation proceeded without any difficulties. These cases show that the use of the LMA- FastrachTMETT can improve the safety and efficacy of submental endotracheal intubation. This is because the LMA- FastrachTMETT has a freely detachable connector, and is flexible enough to keep the patency despite the acute angle of airway. PMID:16127785

  19. Comparison of laryngeal mask airway use with endotracheal intubation during anesthesia of western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Cerveny, Shannon N; D'Agostino, Jennifer J; Davis, Michelle R; Payton, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    The laryngeal mask airway is an alternative to endotracheal intubation that achieves control of the airway by creating a seal around the larynx with an inflatable cuff. This study compared use of the laryngeal mask airway with endotracheal intubation in anesthetized western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Eight adult gorillas were immobilized for routine and diagnostic purposes for a total of nine anesthetic events. During each anesthetic event, gorillas were either intubated (n = 4; group A) or fitted with a laryngeal mask airway (n= 5; group B). Time required to place each airway device, physiologic parameters, and arterial blood gas were measured and compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups for time required to place airway device, heart rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, end-tidal carbon dioxide, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, or arterial pH between the two groups. Mean arterial partial pressure of oxygen was significantly greater in group B, 15 (group A: 94 +/- 44 mm Hg; group B: 408 +/- 36 mm Hg; P= 0.0025) and 45 (group A: 104 +/- 21 mm Hg; group B: 407 +/- 77 mm Hg; P = 0.0026) min after airway device placement. Mean respiratory rate was significantly greater in group A at multiple time points. Mean arterial pressure (group A: 129 +/- 16 mm Hg; group B: 60 +/- 8 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (group A: 115 +/- 21 mm Hg; group B: 36 +/- 10 mm Hg) were significantly greater in group A at the time of airway device placement. The laryngeal mask airway maintained oxygenation and ventilation effectively in all gorillas and is a useful alternative to endotracheal intubation in western lowland gorillas. PMID:23272342

  20. Anesthetic management by laryngeal mask airway in a patient with a history of difficult intubation resulting in dental injuries.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Fujii, Ryosuke; Usui, Naoko; Kagamiuchi, Hajime; Omichi, Shiro; Kotani, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Disabled patients may face respiratory problems during general anesthesia because of head and neck anomalies. We describe a case of dental treatment under general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway in a disabled patient who faced difficulty in endotracheal intubation on several occasions, 5 of which resulted in dental injuries. PMID:25849470

  1. Anesthetic Management by Laryngeal Mask Airway in a Patient With a History of Difficult Intubation Resulting in Dental Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Fujii, Ryosuke; Usui, Naoko; Kagamiuchi, Hajime; Omichi, Shiro; Kotani, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Disabled patients may face respiratory problems during general anesthesia because of head and neck anomalies. We describe a case of dental treatment under general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway in a disabled patient who faced difficulty in endotracheal intubation on several occasions, 5 of which resulted in dental injuries. PMID:25849470

  2. Assessment of Mini-dose Succinylcholine Effect on FacilitatingLaryngeal Mask Airway Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadi, Dawood; Eydi, Mahmood; Hosseinzadeh, Hamzeh; Amiri Rahimi, Maryam; EJ Golzari, Samad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) has gained wide acceptance for routine airway management and with increasing emphasis on day care surgery it is widely used. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of mini dose succinylcholine (0.1mg/kg) with semi-inflated cuff on facilitation of laryngeal mask airway insertion in order to achieve more satisfaction yet less complications . Methods: In a randomized double-blinded study, sixty ASA 1, 2 and 3 patients aged 20-60 years scheduled for urologic surgical procedures were included. Thirty patients received succinylcholine (Group S), and thirty received 0.9% sodium choride as a placebo (Group C). Results: Coughing occured in 33.3% of patients in the control group and there was no incidence in succ group (P=0.002). Head or limb movement occurred in 70% of the patients in the control group vs. 10% in succ group (P<0.001). Laryngospasm occurred in 36.6 % of the patients in the control group but there was no incidence in succ group (P=0.004). Additional propofol was required in 53% of the patients in control group vs. 10% for succ group (P=0.001). Ease of insertion and first successfull attempt of LMA were achieved in 93.3% and 90% of the patients respectively in group S (P<0.05). Myalgia and sore throat occurred in 66.7 % of patients in the group C in comparison with 33.3% in group S (P=0.06).Conclusion: The combination of propofol with mini dose succinylcholine, provided a significantly better method for LMA insertion, while reduced propofol doses were needed and number of attempts decreased. PMID:24251004

  3. [Difficult Ventilation Requiring Emergency Endotracheal Intubation during Awake Craniotomy Managed by Laryngeal Mask Airway].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Asako; Mizota, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Segawa, Hajime; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of difficult ventilation requiring emergency endotracheal intubation during awake craniotomy managed by laryngeal mask airway (LMA). A 45-year-old woman was scheduled to receive awake craniotomy for brain tumor in the frontal lobe. After anesthetic induction, airway was secured using ProSeal LMA and patient was mechanically ventilated in pressure-control mode. Patient's head was fixed with head-pins at anteflex position, and the operation started. About one hour after the start of the operation, tidal volume suddenly decreased. We immediately started manual ventilation, but the airway resistance was extremely high and we could not adequately ventilate the patient. We administered muscle relaxant for suspected laryngospasm, but ventilatory status did not improve; so we decided to conduct emergency endotracheal intubation. We tried to intubate using Airwayscope or LMA-Fastrach, but they were not effective in our case. Finally trachea was intubated using transnasal fiberoptic bronchoscopy. We discuss airway management during awake craniotomy, focusing on emergency endotracheal intubation during surgery. PMID:27188111

  4. [Cardiovascular responses during laryngeal mask airway insertion in normotensive, hypertensive and chronic renal failure patients].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, M; Igarashi, M; Tsunoda, K; Edanaga, M; Suzuki, H; Tohdoh, Y; Namiki, A

    1999-08-01

    The hemodynamic response to the insertion of the laryngeal mask airway (LM) following induction with propofol 2 mg.kg-1 was assessed and compared in normotensive (Normal), hypertensive (HT) and chronic renal failure (CRF) patients (n = 23 in each group). Before induction, in HT and CRF groups blood pressure and rate pressure products (RPP) were higher than in Normal group (P < 0.05). Although blood pressure and RPP were decreased in every patient by induction with propofol, no patients needed vasopressor drugs. The decreases of blood pressure and RPP were larger in HT and CRF groups than in Normal group (P < 0.05). There were no differences between groups in heart rate and rate of successful LM insertion. We concluded that LM insertion with propofol 2 mg.kg-1 was an effective induction method preventing the adverse circulatory responses in normotensive, hypertensive and chronic renal failure patients. PMID:10481421

  5. Effect of continuous cuff pressure regulator in general anaesthesia with laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Y-S; Choi, J-W; Jung, H-S; Kim, Y-S; Kim, D-W; Kim, J-H; Lee, J-A

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal complications (PPLC) occur during anaesthesia due to increased cuff pressure following the insertion of laryngeal mask airways. The use of a pressure regulator to prevent PPLC was evaluated in a prospective, randomized study. Sixty patients scheduled to receive general anaesthesia were randomly assigned to two equal groups of 30, either with or without the regulator. The 'just seal' cuff pressure (JSCP), cuff pressure at 5-min intervals during anaesthesia, incidence of pharyngeal sore throat (PST), dysphagia, dysphonia and other complications were evaluated at 1 and 24 h postoperatively. The combined mean ± SD JSCP of both groups was 20.3 ± 3.2 mmHg. In the group with the regulator, cuff pressure was maintained at a constant level during anaesthesia. This study demonstrated that the regulator is a simple, functional device that can reduce the incidence of PST significantly at 1 h postoperatively, following general anaesthesia. PMID:22117992

  6. Removal of Laryngeal Mask Airway in Adults Under Target-Controlled, Propofol–Fentanyl Infusion Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ren-Chih; Hung, Nan-Kai; Lu, Chueng-He; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After emergence from anesthesia, the incidence and severity of adverse airway effects caused by the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) can vary, depending on when the device was removed; nonetheless, reports differ regarding the exact optimal timing of LMA removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the rate of adverse events between 2 groups: those whose LMA was removed under general anesthesia (“deep” group) or under target-controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol (“awake” group). Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent were obtained; 124 patients were then randomly allocated into either the “awake” group or the “deep” group. Anesthesia was induced and maintained using TCI of propofol, as well as intravenous fentanyl. In the “deep” group, the LMA was removed after surgery while the patients were deeply anesthetized using a target effect-site propofol concentration of 2 μg/mL, whereas in the “awake” group, the device was removed while the patients followed verbal instructions. The incidence of the following adverse events was recorded: coughing, straining, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, clenching, breath holding, gross purposeful movement, airway obstruction, retching, vomiting, and oxygen desaturation. If any such event occurred, the LMA removal was considered a failure. Airway hyperreactivity was recorded and graded – based on the severity of cough, breath holding, and oxygen desaturation. The failure rate was higher in the “awake” group (15/61; 24.6%) than in the “deep” group (5/60; 8.3%). Airway hyperreactivity was mild (score, <3) in both groups. Removal of the LMA under deep anesthesia using a target-controlled, effect-site propofol concentration of 2 μg/mL may be safer and more successful than removal when patients are fully awake after surgery. PMID:27124034

  7. Improving patient safety after rigid bronchoscopy in adults: laryngeal mask airway versus face mask – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Nisi, Fulvio; Galzerano, Antonio; Cicchitto, Gaetano; Puma, Francesco; Peduto, Vito Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Background There are still no clear guidelines in the literature on per procedural bronchoscopic management for anesthesiologists, and few relevant datasets are available. To obtain rapid recovery from anesthesia, it is often necessary to keep patients in the recovery room for several hours until they become clinically stable. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) enables better respiratory and hemodynamic recovery than the oxygen face mask (FM) in patients undergoing rigid bronchoscopy. Methods Twenty-one patients undergoing elective bronchoscopy of the upper airway were randomized to ventilation assistance with FM or LMA after a rigid bronchoscopy procedure under general anesthesia. The primary endpoint was duration of post-surgical recovery and the secondary endpoints were postoperative hemodynamic and respiratory parameters. Assessment of the study endpoints was performed by an intensive care specialist blinded to the method of ventilation used. The statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher’s Exact test for nominal data and the Student’s t-test for continuous data. Results There was no statistically significant difference in post-procedural time between the two groups (P=0.972). The recovery parameters were significantly better in the LMA group than in the FM group, with significantly fewer desaturation, hypotensive, and bradycardic events (P<0.05). Conclusion We conclude that the LMA may be safer and more comfortable than the FM in patients undergoing rigid bronchoscopy. PMID:25995652

  8. A randomized control study comparing the pharyngolaryngeal morbidity of laryngeal mask airway versus endotracheal tube

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, A.; Jacob, Ron Mathew; Koshy, Rachel Cherian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Endotracheal tube (ETT) has been associated with various pharyngolaryngeal morbidities (PLMs) following general anesthesia (GA). Laryngeal mask airway (LMA), currently the most commonly used supraglottic airway device, has several advantageous over the ETT but has been associated with varying results of PLM. The aim of our study was to compare the PLM between them and to know whether LMA is a better alternative. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy American Society of Anesthesiologists Grades 1 and 2 women scheduled for elective mastectomy were included in the study, 85 each in either group, E Group (intubated with ETT) and L Group (using LMA) on a random basis. All patients received GA with controlled ventilation using a muscle relaxant. PLMs such as hoarseness, pain on phonation, sore throat, and difficulty in swallowing were documented by an interview done postoperatively. Peroperative parameters such as intubation attempts, trauma during airway device insertion, and intraoperative incidents were also analyzed. A sample size of 85 patients in each group was calculated in order to achieve a study power of 0.8 and alpha level was taken as 0.05. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 using Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test and Fisher's exact test were used as nonparametric tests. A two-tailed P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Patients in E Group had statistically significant increased incidence of a sore throat and voice complaints whereas L Group showed a statistically significant increase of swallowing problems. There was also a significant correlation between traumatic insertion and sore throat, pain on swallowing in the L Group, which could be due to direct trauma. Conclusions: ETT was associated with an increased incidence of voice problems and sore throat whereas LMA had an increased incidence of dysphagia and odynophagia. Use of LMA changes the pharyngolaryngeal profile to a more acceptable one. PMID:27212745

  9. Better Hemodynamic Profile of Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion Compared to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Jarineshin, Hashem; Kashani, Saeed; Vatankhah, Majid; Abdulahzade Baghaee, Alireza; Sattari, Sahar; Fekrat, Fereydoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation can cause serious cardiovascular responses in patients such as hypertension, tachycardia, and arrhythmias. Alternative airway maintenance techniques may attenuate these hemodynamic stress responses. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the immediate hemodynamic effects of the insertion of laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMA-S) and classic (LMA-C) with laryngoscopy and Endotracheal Intubation (ETT). Patients and Methods: This study was a prospective, double-blind, and randomized clinical trial conducted on 150 patients aged 18 to 50 years with ASA I (American Society of Anesthesiologists), in the general operating room of Shahid Mohammadi hospital, Hormozgan university of medical sciences, Bandar Abbas, Iran. In the ETT group, endotracheal intubation was performed using the Macintosh laryngoscope; while for the LMA-C and LMA-S groups, LMA Classic and LMA Supreme were inserted, respectively. The induction and maintenance of anesthesia were similar in all patients. The hemodynamic parameters such as heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured before (baseline) and after induction of anesthesia at 4 different time points. The statistical analysis was done and P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Participants in all groups were similar in terms of gender, age, weight, height, and Mallampati class. The mean ± SD of SBPs (105.62 ± 12.12, 112.90 ± 12.2, and 112.48 ± 15.14 mm Hg, respectively for ETT, LMA-C, and LMA-S) and DBPs (64.64 ± 10.23, 73.78 ± 9.70, and 71.20 ± 12.27 mm Hg, respectively for ETT, LMA-C, and LMA-S) were significantly lower in the ETT group compared to LMA groups 5 minutes after device insertion (P < 0.01 for SBPs and P < 0.001 for DBPs); however these values were lower than the baseline values in all groups. There were no differences in the mean SBP and DBPs between the three groups at the other time points. The mean

  10. Optimal flexible laryngeal mask airway size in children weighing 10 to 20 kg.

    PubMed

    Kz, Chen; Tj, Liu; Wx, Li; X, Shen

    2016-09-01

    This prospective, randomised study was conducted to assess the effect of flexible laryngeal mask airway (FLMA) size on oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP) in children at the recommended intracuff pressure. A total of 120 children undergoing elective ophthalmic surgery were randomly assigned to the size 2 FLMA group or size 2.5 FLMA group. The primary measurement was OLP at an intracuff pressure of 40 cmH2O. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of OLP <10 cmH2O, insufficient ventilation, gastric insufflation, insertion time, successful first-attempt insertion rate, fibreoptic view grade and pharyngolaryngeal adverse events. The median OLP was comparable for the size 2 and size 2.5 FLMA (18 cmH2O versus 18 cmH2O, P=0.38). However, the size 2 FLMA group had a higher incidence of OLP <10 cmH2O and insufficient ventilation (13.3% versus 0, P=0.006). In subgroup analyses based on weight, the size 2.5 FLMA had a lower occurrence of OLP <10 cmH2O and insufficient ventilation (27% versus 0, P=0.0046) in children 16-20 kg. We conclude that at a 40 cmH2O intracuff pressure, the OLP with the size 2 and size 2.5 FLMA was similar in children weighing 10-15.9 kg. However, in children weighing 16-20 kg, size 2 devices had a higher incidence of low OLP and insufficient ventilation, so a 2.5 FLMA may be preferable in this subgroup. PMID:27608342

  11. Laryngeal mask airway without muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    KONG, MING; LI, BEIPING; TIAN, YUNPING

    2016-01-01

    The number of elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement surgeries is on the increase. These patients often suffer from comorbidity such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications, which limits the ability of medical teams to employ anesthesia. Thus, alternative methods are required. The aim of this study was to examine the advantage of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in the absence of muscle relaxant in elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement operations. Fifty patients (27 males and 23 females) undergoing femoral head replacements were selected for the study between March 2013 and May 2014. The mean value for the age in this group was 74.6±12.5 years. The patients were randomly distributed into two groups of 25. One group was designated as the treatment group and the second group as the control group. For the treatment group, LMA without muscle relaxant was used, and the control group received routine anesthesia. Variations in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and oxygen saturation (SPO2) in the two groups were monitored at different times. Clinical efficacy and muscle relaxation effects were also analyzed. For the treatment group, the HR, MAP and SPO2 measurements did not reveal any significant variation while these values in the control group demonstrated important dissimilarities. Time to recovery, time to extubation and incidence of throat pain in the treatment group were all markedly decreased as compared to those in control group. The operation time in the treatment group was not significantly different to that of control group. The satisfaction of the muscle relaxation effect in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group while the incidence of adverse reactions was not considerably different. In conclusion, the use of LMA without using muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement surgeries performed on elderly patients showed to be effective and safe. PMID:26889218

  12. Sealing of tracheoesophageal fistula using a Y stent through fiberoptic bronchoscope during general anesthesia under laryngeal mask airway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Yang, Pingliang; Zuo, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    A 64-yr-old man was admitted because of repeated pneumonia. Both fiberoptic bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy revealed a large tracheoesophageal fistula (15 mm) in the right posterior trachea 1 cm beyond the carina. Coated nickel-titanium shape memory alloy Y shaped stent was planned to seal this fistula under general anesthesia. We took advantage of laryngeal mask airway to insert the fiberoptic bronchoscope to guide the stent placement. Our method of sealing a large tracheoesophageal fistula with LMA under total intravenous anesthesia was successful. PMID:25664132

  13. Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 2: Should bite guards be used with laryngeal mask airways in adults?

    PubMed

    Mackway-Jones, Kevin C

    2015-02-01

    A shortcut review was carried out to establish whether bite blocks should be used when a laryngeal mask airway is used in the emergency department. Eighteen papers were found using the reported searches and a further eight were found by scanning the reference lists. Ten presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. It is concluded that bite guards should be used when laryngeal mask airways are employed in the emergency department. PMID:25605264

  14. Comparison of hemodynamic and metabolic stress responses caused by endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Güleç, Handan; Çakan, Türkay; Yaman, Halil; Kilinç, Aytül Şadan; Başar, Hülya

    2012-01-01

    Background: We aimed to compare hemodynamic and endocrine alterations caused by stress response due to Proseal laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube usage in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty-three ASA I-II patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups of endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway. Standard general anaesthesia was performed in both groups with the same drugs in induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. After anaesthesia induction and 20 minutes after CO2 insufflations, venous blood samples were obtained for measuring adrenalin, noradrenalin, dopamine and cortisol levels. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were recorded at the 1st, 5th, 15th, 30th and 45th minutes after the insertion of airway devices. Results: No statistically significant differences in age, body mass index, gender, ASA physical status, and operation time were found between the groups (p > 0.05). Changes in hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were not statistically significant when compared between and within groups (p > 0.05). Although no statistically significant differences were observed between and within groups when adrenalin, noradrenalin and dopamine values were compared, serum cortisol levels after CO2 insufflation in PLMA group were significantly lower than the ETT group (p = 0.024). When serum cortisol levels were compared within groups, cortisol levels 20 minutes after CO2 insufflation were significantly higher (46.1 (9.5-175.7) and 27.0 (8.3-119.4) in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively) than cortisol levels after anaesthesia induction (11.3 (2.8-92.5) and 16.6 (4.4-45.4) in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively) in both groups (p = 0.001). Conclusion: PLMA usage is a suitable, effective and safe alternative to ETT in laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients with lower metabolic stress. PMID:23264788

  15. Comparison of endotracheal intubation, combitube, and laryngeal mask airway between inexperienced and experienced emergency medical staff: A manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi, Morteza; Hajiseyedjavadi, Houman; Seyedhosseini, Javad; Eslami, Vahid; Sheikhmotaharvahedi, Hojat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emergency Medical Service (EMS) personnel manage the airway, but only a group of them are allowed to engage in Endotracheal Intubation (ETI). Our purpose was to evaluate if the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) or Combitube can be used by inexperienced care providers. Materials and Methods: A randomized, prospective manikin study was conducted. Fifty-nine participants were randomly assigned into two groups. Experienced group included 16 paramedics, eight anesthetic-technicians, and inexperienced group included 27 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMT-B) and eight nurses. Our main outcomes were success rate and time to airway after only one attempt. Results: Airway success was 73% for ETI, 98.3% for LMA, and 100% for Combitube. LMA and Combitube were faster and had greater success than ETI (P = 0.0001). Inexperienced had no differences in time to securing LMA compared with experienced (6.05 vs. 5.4 seconds, respectively, P = 0.26). One failure in inexperienced, and no failure in experienced group occurred to secure the LMA (P = 0.59). The median time to Combitube placement in experienced and inexperienced was 5.05 vs. 5.00 seconds, P = 0.65, respectively. Inexperienced and experienced groups performed ETI in 19.15 and 17 seconds, respectively (P = 0.001). After the trial, 78% preferred Combitube, 15.3% LMA, and 6.8% ETI as the device of choice in prehospital setting. Conclusion: Time to airway was decreased and success rate increased significantly with the use of LMA and combitube compared with ETI, regardless of the experience level. This study suggests that both Combitube and LMA may be acceptable choices for management of airway in the prehospital setting for experienced and especially inexperienced EMS personnel. PMID:25625062

  16. Endotracheal tube intubation with the aid of a laryngeal mask airway, a fiberoptic bronchoscope, and a tube exchanger in a difficult airway patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joon Kyung; Kim, Hyung Gon; Kim, Jung Eun; Jang, Myung-Soo; Kang, Jong-Man

    2014-03-01

    A 28-year-old male patient with occipito-atlanto-axial instability underwent a cervical fusion with posterior technique. Post-operatively, the endotracheal tube (ETT) was removed, and the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. After transfer, an upper airway obstruction developed and reintubations with a laryngoscope were attempted but failed. We inserted a #4 proseal laryngeal mask airway (LMA) and passed a 5.0 mm ETT through the LMA with the aid of a fiberoptic bronchoscope. We passed a tube exchanger through the 5.0 mm ETT and exchanged it with a 7.5 mm ETT. This method may be a useful alternative for difficult tracheal intubations. PMID:24729847

  17. Ease of insertion of the laryngeal mask airway in pediatric surgical patients: Predictors of failure and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Asida, SM; Ahmed, SS

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is an useful alternative to endotracheal tube for airway management. The risk of life-threatening adverse respiratory events during its use is rare, but we need to know about the risk-adjusted prediction of its insertion failure requiring rescue tracheal intubation and its impact on patient outcome. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients; 6 months to 12-year-old, American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II scheduled to undergo elective surgical procedures that require general anesthesia were included in this study. LMA was inserted after induction of anesthesia. The insertion conditions, intra, and postoperative events were recorded. Our primary outcome variable was trial success from the first time. Results: We recorded 426 cases (85.2%) of first trial success with clear airway compared to 46 case (9.2%) of second trial success (P ≤ 0.001). Predictors of failure of first attempt of LMA insertion include abnormal airway anatomy (91%), body weight <16 kg and age below 5 years (44%), the use of LMA size of 1 and 1.5 (3.8%), the intraoperative lateral position (3.8%). Conclusion: The data obtained from this study support the use of the LMA as a reliable pediatric supraglottic airway device, demonstrating relatively low failure rates. Predictors of LMA failure in the pediatric surgical population should be independently considered. Trial Registration: The study is registered in the Australian and New Zealand clinical trial registry with the allocated trial number: ACTRN12614000994684. Web address of trial: http://www.ANZCTR.org.au/A CTRN12614000994684.aspx. PMID:27375384

  18. The comparison of Proseal laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries under general anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Saraswat, Namita; Kumar, Aditya; Mishra, Abhijeet; Gupta, Amrita; Saurabh, Gyan; Srivastava, Uma

    2011-01-01

    Aims to compare the efficacy of Proseal laryngeal mask airway(PLMA) and endotracheal tube (ETT) in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries under general anaesthesia. This prospective randomised study was conducted on 60 adult patients, 30 each in two groups, of ASA I-II who were posted for laparoscopic procedures under general anaesthesia. After preoxygenation, anaesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl and vecuronium. PLMA or ETT was inserted and cuff inflated. Nasogastric tube (NGT) was passed in all patients. Anaesthesia was maintained with N2 O, O2, halothane and vecuronium. Ventilation was set at 8 ml/kg and respiratory rate of 12/min. The attempts and time taken for insertion of devices, haemodynamic changes, oxygenation, ventilation and intraoperative and postoperative laryngopharyngeal morbidity (LPM) were noted. There was no failed insertion of devices. Time taken for successful passage of NGT was 9.77 s (6-16 s) and 11.5 s (8-17 s) for groups P and E, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in oxygen saturation (SpO2) or end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) between the two groups before or during peritoneal insufflation. Median (range) airway pressure at which oropharyngeal leak occurred during the leak test with PLMA was 35 (24-40) cm of H2O. There was no case of inadequate ventilation, regurgitation, or aspiration recorded. No significant difference in laryngopharyngeal morbidity was noted. A properly positionedPLMA proved to be a suitable and safe alternative to ETT for airway management in elective fasted, adult patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries. It provided equally effective pulmonary ventilation despite high airway pressures without gastric distention, regurgitation, and aspiration. PMID:21712868

  19. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway: An alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Jaya; Dubey, Kamta Prasad; Sahu, Bal Swaroop; Shah, Pratibha Jain

    2010-01-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is a supraglottic airway management device. The LMA is preferred for airway management in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures. The recently introduced ProSeal (PLMA), a modification of Classic LMA, has a gastric drainage tube placed lateral to main airway tube which allows the regurgitated gastric contents to bypass the glottis and prevents the pulmonary aspiration. This study was done to compare the efficacy of ProSeal LMA with an endotracheal tube in paediatric patients with respect to number of attempts for placement of devices, haemodynamic responses and perioperative respiratory complications. Sixty children, ASA I and II, weighing 10-20 kg between 2 and 8 years of age group of either sex undergoing elective ophthalmological and lower abdominal surgeries of 30-60 min duration, randomly divided into two groups of 30 patients each were studied. The number of attempts for endotracheal intubation was less than the placement of PLMA. Haemodynamic responses were significantly higher (P<0.05) after endotracheal intubation as compared to the placement of PLMA. There were no significant differences in mean SpO2 (%) and EtCO2 levels recorded at different time intervals between the two groups. The incidence of post-operative respiratory complications cough and bronchospasm was higher after extubation than after removal of PLMA. The incidence of soft tissue trauma was noted to be higher for PLMA after its removal. There were no incidences of aspiration and hoarseness/sore throat in either group. It is concluded that ProSeal LMA can be safely considered as a suitable and effective alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures. PMID:21224972

  20. Effect of low dose rocuronium in preventing ventilation leak for flexible laryngeal mask airway during radical mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ya-Hong; Yi, Jie; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Li

    2015-01-01

    The flexible laryngeal mask airway (FLMA) is becoming more and more popular in general anesthesia during surgery of head, neck and upper chest. But very limited information has been published about whether muscle relaxant was necessary or not for anesthesia with FLMA. To investigate whether low-dose muscle relaxant is necessary in preventing ventilation leak of FLMA in radical mastectomy, forty-eight female patients undergoing radical mastectomy were enrolled in the study. They were randomly divided into low-dose muscle relaxant (LD-MR) group and non-muscle relaxant (non-MR) group. All the included patients received total intravenous anesthesia (with propofol, fentanyl and remifentanil) and controlled mechanical ventilation with FLMA during the surgery. Patients in LD-MR group received 0.4 mg/kg rocuronium during anesthesia induction, while patients in non-MR group received equivalent volumes of physiological saline. Insertion time was shorter in LD-MR group than that in non-MR group (P < 0.05). Peak airway pressures and ventilation leak volumes at 10, 20 and 30 minutes were lower in LD-MR group than those in non-MR group (P < 0.05). No difference was found between LD-MR and non-MR group in terms of emergence time, FLMA extraction time, and maximum tidal volumes before FLMA extraction. The results show that low-dose rocuronium could reduce the ventilation leak for mechanical ventilation with FLMA during radical mastectomy without prolonging the emergence time. PMID:26550303

  1. Effect of Paralysis at the Time of ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion on Pharyngolaryngeal Morbidities. A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Ah-Young; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Hwang, Jung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular block results in the loss of muscular tone in the upper airway, which might contribute to the increased postoperative airway morbidity followed by ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) insertion. We compared the pharyngolaryngeal discomfort exerted by the PLMA according to the neuromuscular block. One hundred sixty patients undergoing surgery for breast disease or inguinal hernia were anesthetized with propofol and remifentanil by target controlled infusion. Rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg (NMBA group, n = 80) or normal saline (No-NMBA group, n = 80) was administered after the loss of consciousness, and one anesthesiologist inserted the PLMA. Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal discomfort was evaluated at postoperative 1 h. Traumatic event was recorded based on the blood trace on the surface of the PLMA cuff. Insertion time, insertion attempt number, sealing pressure, and fiberoptic brochoscopic grades were evaluated. Patients’ characteristics and the PLMA insertion condition (insertion time, successful insertion attempt number, fiberoptic bronchoscopic grade, and sealing pressure) were similar between the two groups. The PLMA can be successfully inserted in non-paralyzed patients with less postoperative pharyngolaryngeal discomfort than when a neuromuscular blocking agent is used (13.8% vs. 30.0%, P = 0.021). The incidence of traumatic events is also reduced when no neuromuscular blocking agent is used (16.3% vs. 32.5%, P = 0.026). Regardless of whether or not a surgical procedure requires muscular relaxation, there is no need to administer neuromuscular blocking agents solely for the purpose of PLMA insertion. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01035021 PMID:26252522

  2. Airway Complications during and after General Anesthesia: A Comparison, Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Using Flexible Laryngeal Mask Airways and Endotracheal Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Lian, Ying; Li, Wen Xian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Flexible laryngeal mask airways (FLMAs) have been widely used in thyroidectomy as well as cleft palate, nasal, upper chest, head and neck oncoplastic surgeries. This systematic review aims to compare the incidence of airway complications that occur during and after general anesthesia when using the FLMA and endotracheal intubation (ETT). We performed a quantitative meta-analysis of the results of randomized trials. Methods A comprehensive search of the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases was conducted using the key words "flexible laryngeal mask airway" and "endotracheal intubation". Only prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the FLMA and ETT were included. The relative risks (RRs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using a quality effects model in MetaXL 1.3 software to analyze the outcome data. Results Ten RCTs were included in this meta-analysis. There were no significant differences between the FLMA and ETT groups in the incidence of difficulty in positioning the airway [RR = 1.75, 95% CI = (0.70–4.40)]; the occurrence of sore throat at one hour and 24 hours postoperative [RR = 0.90, 95% CI = (0.13–6.18) and RR = 0.95, 95% CI = (0.81–1.13), respectively]; laryngospasms [RR = 0.58, 95% CI = (0.27–1.23)]; airway displacement [RR = 2.88, 95% CI = (0.58–14.33)]; aspiration [RR = 0.76, 95% CI = (0.06–8.88)]; or laryngotracheal soiling [RR = 0.34, 95% CI = (0.10–1.06)]. Patients treated with the FLMA had a lower incidence of hoarseness [RR = 0.31, 95% CI = (0.15–0.62)]; coughing [RR = 0.28, 95% CI = (0.15–0.51)] during recovery in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU); and oxygen desaturation [RR = 0.43, 95% CI = (0.26–0.72)] than did patients treated with ETT. However, the incidence of partial upper airway obstruction in FLMA patients was significantly greater than it was for ETT patients [RR = 4.01, 95% CI = (1.44–11.18)]. Conclusion This systematic review showed

  3. Use of laryngeal mask airway for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaojun; Mao, Songsong; Cui, Jianxiu; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Haiyu; Xie, Liang; Zhang, Dongkun; Shi, Ruiqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the safety and feasibility of the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum (PE) undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure. Methods Between July 2015 and December 2015, 30 selected patients with PE were planned to undergo a thoracoscopic Nuss procedure using LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia in the Guangdong General Hospital. The clinical data were analyzed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of this technique. Results Of the 30 selected patients, two were female, the mean age was 16.04±5.09 years and the average Haller index was 3.37±0.88. A total of 27 cases (90%) succeeded at the first attempt, one patient required conversion to an endotracheal tube (ETT) because of continuous air leak. The peripheral O2 saturation (SpO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) values, heart rate (HR), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) remained stable throughout the procedure in all cases. All of the 30 patients were successfully corrected without requiring conversion to an open surgery. Two patients experienced postoperative nausea and one reported a sore throat. Neither gastro-esophageal reflux nor in-hospital mortality occurred. Conclusions The use of LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for selected patients with PE undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure is clinically safe and technically feasible. PMID:27621860

  4. Respiratory and hemodynamic outcomes following exchange extubation with laryngeal mask airway as compared to traditional awake extubation

    PubMed Central

    Suppiah, Ramanathan Kannan; Rajan, Sunil; Paul, Jerry; Kumar, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional awake extubation leads to respiratory complications and hemodynamic response which are detrimental in neurosurgery, ENT surgery and patients with comorbidities. Aims: The primary objective was to compare the respiratory complications and hemodynamic stress response between traditional awake extubation of a endotracheal tube (ETT) and that following exchange extubation of ETT by using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Settings and Design: This prospective randomized study was conducted in a Tertiary Care Centre in 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients coming for general surgery. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomized by permuted blocks into traditional awake extubation group and exchange extubation group. At the end of surgery in traditional group, awake extubation of ETT was done. In exchange group, 0.3 mg/kg propofol was administered, and the ETT was exchanged for a LMA. Awake extubation of LMA was then performed. Respiratory complications such as bucking, coughing, desaturation and the need for airway maneuvers and hemodynamic response were noted in both groups. Analysis Tools: Chi-square test, independent sample t- and paired t-tests were used as applicable. Results: Incidence of respiratory complication was 93.3% in traditional extubation while it was only 36.7% in exchange extubation group (P < 0.001). Hemodynamic response measured immediately at extubation in terms of heart rate, systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and rate pressure product were all significantly lesser in exchange group when compared to traditional extubation. Conclusion: Exchange extubation with LMA decreases respiratory complications and hemodynamic stress response when compared to traditional awake extubation. PMID:27212749

  5. Predicted EC50 and EC95 of Remifentanil for Smooth Removal of a Laryngeal Mask Airway Under Propofol Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Go Wun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effect-site concentration (Ce) of remifentanil in 50% of patients (EC50) and 95% of patients (EC95) for smooth laryngeal mask airway (LMA) removal in adults under propofol and remifentanil anesthesia. Materials and Methods Twenty-five patients of ASA physical status I-II and ages 18-60 years who were to undergo minor gynecological or orthopedic surgery were assessed in this study. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusion (TCI). Remifentanil was maintained at a predetermined Ce during the emergence period. The modified Dixon's up-and-down method was used to determine the remifentanil concentration, starting from 1.0 ng/mL (step size of 0.2 ng/mL). Successful removal of the LMA was regarded as absence of coughing/gagging, clenched teeth, gross purposeful movements, breath holding, laryngospasm, or desaturation to SpO2<90%. Results The mean±SD Ce of remifentanil for smooth LMA removal after propofol anesthesia was 0.83±0.16 ng/mL. Using isotonic regression with a bootstrapping approach, the estimated EC50 and EC95 of remifentanil Ce were 0.91 ng/mL [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.77-1.07 ng/mL] and 1.35 ng/mL (95% CI, 1.16-1.38 ng/mL), respectively. Conclusion Our results showed that remifentanil TCI at an established Ce is a reliable technique for achieving safe and smooth emergence without coughing, laryngospasm, or other airway reflexes. PMID:26069139

  6. The 50% and 95% effective doses of desflurane for removal of the classic laryngeal mask airway in spontaneously breathing anaesthetised adults.

    PubMed

    Hui, M T; Subash, S; Wang, C Y

    2011-04-01

    The 50% and 95% effective doses of desflurane for removal of the classic laryngeal mask airway after suction of the upper airway, in anaesthetised spontaneously breathing adult patients, are not known. To determine these, we studied 38 healthy patients, aged between 18 and 44 years. The target desflurane concentration in each individual patient was determined by the Dixon up-and-down method. When the predetermined target end-tidal desflurane concentration reached steady state, we kept a constant end-expiratory partial pressure between the alveolus and the brain for 10 min before attempting to remove the classic laryngeal mask airway after suctioning the upper airway. The initial desflurane target concentration was set at 6% and up-down desflurane increments were 0.1%. This continued until there were at least six crossover pairs. From the probit analysis, the 50% effective dose of desflurane was 5.29% (95% CI 5.132-5.379%) and the 95% effective dose was 5.55% (95% CI 5.429-6.394%). PMID:21401540

  7. Evaluation of the Effect of Tracheal Tube Orientation on Success of Intubation through Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway

    PubMed Central

    Chhatrapati, Swati; Auti, Subhhash Sadashiv; Aswar, Swapnil Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyvinyl Chloride Endotracheal Tube (PVC ETT) can be used as an alternative to Fastrach Silicone Wire-Reinforced Tube (FTST) for intubation through Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) as the latter is expensive and has low volume high pressure cuff. Aim To evaluate the effects of orientation of PVC ETT (normal curve and reverse curve) on the success of intubation through ILMA, haemodynamic response and postoperative sore throat. Materials and Methods Sixty healthy adult patients of ASA physical status I & II scheduled for elective surgery under general anaesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation were randomly divided into two groups. In Normal (N) group (n=30), the tracheal tube was inserted with its natural curve following the 90° curvature of ILMA. In Reverse (R) group (n=30), the tracheal tube was inserted with its natural curve directed opposite to the curvature of ILMA. The time taken to intubate, number of attempts, and maneuvers required for successful endotracheal intubation along with haemodynamics and oxygen saturation were noted. Postoperative sore throat was evaluated using a Verbal Analogue Scale (VAS) (0-10). Qualitative data was analysed by Chi-Square test and Fisher’s exact test. Quantitative data was analysed by unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results Placement of ILMA was successful in all patients. Total Intubation Time (mean±SD) in Group N was 12.53±1.78 seconds and in Group R was 11.97±1.33 seconds (p>0.05). Tracheal intubation through ILMA was successful in all patients. First attempt success rate in R Group (26 patients, 86.7%) was higher than N Group (22 patients, 73.3%) (p>0.05). Four patients (13.3%) in R Group and 8 patients (26.7%) in N Group required 2nd step of Chandy’s maneuver during second attempt for successful intubation. Incidence of sore throat 6 hours postoperatively was statistically significant (median value 2.00 in N Group vs. 0.00 in R Group) between two groups. Conclusion PVC ETT with

  8. End-tidal sevoflurane concentration for ProSeal(TM) versus Classic(TM) laryngeal mask airway insertion in unpremedicated anaesthetised adult females.

    PubMed

    Ghai, B; Jain, K; Bansal, D; Bhatia, N

    2016-03-01

    The optimal end-tidal sevoflurane concentration for successful ProSealTM (Teleflex, Morrisville, NC, USA) laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) versus ClassicTM (Teleflex, Morrisville, NC, USA) laryngeal mask airway (CLMA) insertion in unpremedicated anaesthetised adults is unknown. We determined end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations for successful insertion in fifty percent of anaesthetised adults. This randomised, prospective, double-blind study was conducted in the operating theatre of a government tertiary care hospital. Forty-four unpremedicated American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II women with cervical carcinoma (aged 30 to 60 years), scheduled for intracavity caesium implantation under general anaesthesia with a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) were included in the study. The participants were randomised to one of the two groups, to receive either a PLMA or CLMA. After anaesthetic induction with sevoflurane, a predetermined end-tidal sevoflurane concentration (starting at 2.5%) was sustained for 10 minutes before LMA insertion was attempted. End-tidal sevoflurane concentration was increased/decreased (step-size 0.25%) using Dixon and Massey's up-and-down method for the next patient based on the previous patient's response. Placement without clenching, movement, coughing or biting within one minute was considered successful insertion. The end-tidal sevoflurane concentration required for successful LMA insertion in fifty percent of anaesthetised adults was calculated as the mean of the crossover pairs' midpoints in each group and further confirmed by probit regression analysis. The end-tidal sevoflurane concentration (95% confidence interval) required for successful PLMA insertion in 50% of anaesthetised adults (3.15% [3.12% to 3.18%]) was significantly higher than that for CLMA insertion (2.71% [2.66% to 2.76%], P<0.001). These findings suggest that deeper anaesthesia is required for placement of a PLMA in comparison to a CLMA. PMID:27029654

  9. Learning and performance of endotracheal intubation by paramedical students: Comparison of GlideScope® and intubating laryngeal mask airway with direct laryngoscopy in manikins

    PubMed Central

    Bahathiq, Adil Omar; Abdelmontaleb, Tharwat Helmy; Newigy, Mohammed Khairt

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: GlideScope video laryngoscope (GVL) and intubating laryngeal mask airway (I-LMA) may be used to facilitate intubation and secure the airway in patients with normal and abnormal airways. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether (GVL) and (I-LMA) facilitate and improve the tracheal intubation success rate and could be learned and performed easily by paramedic students when compared with Macintosh direct laryngoscopy (DL). Methods: This study was a prospective, randomised crossover trial that included 100 paramedic students. Macintosh DL, I-LMA and GVL were tested in both normal and difficult airway scenarios. Each participant was allowed up to three intubation attempts with each device, in each scenario. The time required to perform tracheal intubation, the success rate, number of intubation attempts and of optimisation manoeuvres and the severity of dental trauma were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square, one-way ANOVA, or Kruskal-Wallis test as appropriate, followed by post hoc test. Results: GVL and I-LMA required less time to successfully perform tracheal intubation, showed a greater success rate of intubation, reduced the number of intubation attempts and optimization manoeuvres required and reduced the severity of dental trauma compared to Macintosh DL in both normal and difficult airway scenarios. Conclusion: GVL and I-LMA provide better airway management than Macintosh DL in both normal and difficult airway scenarios. PMID:27212721

  10. RETROGRADE INTUBATION VIA LARYNGEAL MASK AIRWAY IN A PAEDIATRIC PATIENT WITH FALLOT-TYPE VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECT AND CLEFT PALATE DEFORMITY.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Taner; Erbatur, Serkan

    2016-02-01

    We report the case ofa pediatric patient with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and cleft palate deformity with difficult intubation in which a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was used and converted into an endotracheal tube through retrograde intubation. The patient with TOF was scheduled for repair of the congenital bilateral cleft lip and palate. Inhalational induction with 4% sevoflurane was started. Conventional tracheal intubation was impossible because the patient had a difficult airway, and the procedure could cause severe cyanosis and respiratory distress. An LMA was inserted to maintain ventilation and anesthesia and to facilitate intubation. Retrograde intubation and a catheter mount were used to convert the LMA into a conventional endotracheal tube without difficulty. Airway management for patients with TOF and cleft palate deformity is not clear. Retrograde intubation permits replacing an LMA with an endotracheal tube. This method enables maintaining the airway until the LMA is exchanged with an endotracheal tube. This technique seems useful to facilitate difficult airway intubation in pediatric patients with TOF and cleft palate deformity. PMID:27382820

  11. Relationship Between Respiratory Dynamics and Body Mass Index in Patients Undergoing General Anesthesia with Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) and Comparison Between Lithotomy and Supine Positions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao; Huang, Shiwei; Wang, Zhaomin; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare respiratory dynamics in patients undergoing general anesthesia with a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in lithotomy and supine positions and to validate the impact of operational position on effectiveness of LMA ventilation. Material/Methods A total of 90 patients (age range, 18–65 years) who underwent general anesthesia were selected and divided into supine position (SP group) and lithotomy position groups (LP group). Vital signs and respiratory dynamic parameters of the 2 groups were measured at different time points and after implantation of an LMA. The arterial blood gas was monitored at 15 min after induction. The intraoperative changes of hemodynamic indexes and postoperative adverse reactions of LMA were recorded. The possible correlation between body mass index (BMI) and respiratory dynamic indexes was analyzed. Results With prolonged duration of the operation, the inspiratory plateau pressure (Pplat), inspiratory resistance (RI), and work of breathing (WOB) gradually increased, while chest-lung compliance (Compl) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in end-expiratory gas (PetCO2) gradually decreased (all P value <0.05). The mean airway pressure (Pmean), Pplat, and expiratory resistance (Re) in the LP group were significantly higher than in the SP group (P<0.05), while the peak inspiratory flow (FImax), peak expiratory flow (FEmax), WOB, and Compl in the LP group were significantly lower than in the SP group (P<0.05). BMI was positively correlated with peak airway pressure (PIP/Ppeak), Pplat, and airway resistance (Raw) and was negatively correlated with Compl; the differences among patients in lithotomy position were more remarkable (P<0.05). Conclusions The inspiratory plateau pressure and airway resistance increased with prolonged duration of the operation, accompanied by decreased chest-lung compliance. Peak airway pressure and airway resistance were positively correlated with BMI, and chest-lung compliance was

  12. Safety and efficacy of bronchoalveolar lavage using a laryngeal mask airway in cases of acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure with diffuse lung infiltrates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takafumi; Sato, Yoko; Fukuda, Satoshi; Katayama, Shinshu; Miyazaki, Yuya; Ozaki, Makoto; Kotani, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibre-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (FOB-BAL) is an important tool for diagnosing and selecting treatment for acutely hypoxaemic patients with diffuse lung infiltrates. However, FOB-BAL carries a risk of significant hypoxaemia and subsequent tracheal intubation during and after the procedure. The application of FOB-BAL using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in combination with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may minimize the incidence of hypoxaemia; however, the safety and efficacy of this procedure have not been investigated. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed from April to September 2013. Data regarding the recovered volume of BAL fluid, incidence of tracheal intubation within eight hours after the completion of FOB-BAL, respiratory and haemodynamic parameters and treatment modifications were collected for the evaluation. Results Ten trials of FOB-BAL using an LMA and CPAP were performed in nine patients with severe acute hypoxaemia associated with diffuse lung infiltrates. The BAL fluid recovery rate was 56%, and the procedure was completed without subsequent complications. In addition, the percutaneous arterial oxygen saturation decreased to 95.7%±3.8%, although it was never lower than 90.0% during the procedure, and no patients required intubation. Furthermore, the arterial blood pressure significantly but transiently decreased due to sedation, and the procedure yielded diagnostic information in all nine patients. Conclusion FOB-BAL using LMA and CPAP appears to be safe and effective in patients who develop severe acute hypoxaemia. PMID:25832933

  13. Assessment of suitability of i-gel and laryngeal mask airway-supreme for controlled ventilation in anesthetized paralyzed patients: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, Kusuma Srividya; Sripriya, R.; Ravishankar, M.; Hemanth Kumar, V. R.; Jaya, V.; Parthasarathy, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMA-S) has an inflatable cuff while i-gel has a noninflatable cuff made of thermoplastic elastomer. Aims: To study the efficacy of ventilation and the laryngeal seal pressures (LSPs) with either device. Our secondary objectives were to compare the ease of insertion, adequacy of positioning the device, hemodynamic response to device insertion, and any postoperative oropharyngeal morbidity. Settings and Design: A prospective, randomized, single-blinded study at Teaching Medical School in South India. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients posted for surgery under general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups - LMA-S and i-gel. After a standardized premedication and anesthesia induction sequence, the supra-glottic devices were introduced. Ease of insertion was assessed from the number of attempts taken to insert, insertion time, and any maneuvers required to insert the device. Position of the device was assessed by the ease of gastric catheter placement and the fibreoptic grading of laryngeal visualization. Efficacy of ventilation was determined from the LSP, peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), and end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2)values. Any postoperative oropharyngeal morbidity was also recorded. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive analysis was reported as a mean and standard deviation, median, and range of continuous variables. Demographics were analyzed using a unpaired t-test for parametric data and Chi-square test for nonparametric data. Respiratory and hemodynamic data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA to find statistical difference within and between the two groups. Results: LMA-S was successfully inserted in 95% of patients and i-gel in 85.5% of patients. There was a significant difference (P = 0.021) in the LSPs between the two groups (18.15 cmH2O in LMA-S and 21.28 cmH2O in the i-gel group). There was no significant difference in the PIPs, leak fraction, and the EtCO2values. Conclusion: Both devices are

  14. Effect of laryngeal mask airway placement on the optimal site and success rate of venipuncture via the right internal jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan-Qiu; Li, Xin-Bai; Zhang, Yu-Shuang; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The placement of a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) changes the relative positions of the common carotid artery (CCA) and right internal jugular vein (IJV), thereby affecting venipuncture via the right IJV. Therefore, we went on to determine the optimal site for puncturing the IJV after LMA-Supreme™ placement. In this study, forty-six patients were placed with a LMA-Supreme™ (size 3 or 4), and the right IJV was punctured at either of the three points (anterior, middle or posterior point). The CCA diameters and overlap between the right IJV and CCA were recorded before and after the LMA-Supreme™ placement. Finally, the success rates of IJV puncturing at the three aforementioned points were compared. We found that the size of the LMA-Supreme™ had no effect on patient respiration during the procedure. Overlap between the right IJV and CCA at the anterior and middle points was significantly increased after size 3 LMA-Supreme™ placements; Size 4 masks decreased the CCA diameters at the middle and posterior points, and significantly increased overlap between the right IJV and CCA at all the three points; IJV punctures performed after placement of size 3 LMA-Supreme™ had higher success rate than those performed after placement of size 4 masks, and were less likely to result in accidental arterial puncture. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that placement of size 3 LMA-Supreme™ caused little change in overlapping between the right IJV and CCA and the incidence of accidental arterial puncture; particularly for punctures performed at the posterior point. Therefore, we recommend venipuncture at the posterior point after placement of a LMA-Supreme™. PMID:26550241

  15. Comparative assessment of ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway intervention versus standard technique of endotracheal extubation for attenuation of pressor response in controlled hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raj Pal; Gulabani, Michell; Kaur, Mohandeep; Sood, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Swapping of the endotracheal tube with laryngeal mask airway (LMA) before emergence from anaesthesia is one of the methods employed for attenuation of pressor response at extubation. We decided to compare the placement of ProSeal™ LMA (PLMA) before endotracheal extubation versus conventional endotracheal extubation in controlled hypertensive patients scheduled for elective surgeries under general anaesthesia. Methods: Sixty consenting adult patients were randomly allocated to two groups of thirty each; Group E in whom extubation was performed using standard technique and Group P in whom PLMA was inserted before endotracheal extubation (Bailey manoeuvre). The primary outcome parameter was heart rate (HR). The secondary outcomes were systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure (MBP), electrocardiogram, oxygen saturation and end-tidal carbon dioxide. Two-tailed paired Student's t-test was used for comparison between the two study groups. The value of P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The patient characteristics, demographic data and surgical procedures were comparable in the two groups. A statistically significant decrease was observed in HR in Group P as compared to Group E. Secondary outcomes such as systolic, diastolic and MBP depicted a statistically insignificant difference. Conclusion: Bailey manoeuvre was not effective method to be completely relied upon during extubation when compared to standard extubation. PMID:27512160

  16. Management of Difficult Airway With Laryngeal Mask in a Child With Mucopolysaccharidosis and Mitral Regurgitation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Ferasatkish, Rasoul; Dashti, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) are a group of heredity storage diseases, transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner, associated with the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in various tissues and organs. The concerned patients have multiple concomitant hereditary anomalies. Considering the craniofacial abnormality in these patients, airway management may be difficult for anesthesiologists. In these patients, preanesthetic assessment is necessary and performed with the accurate assessment of airways, consisting of the physical exam and radiography, MRI or CT of head and neck. An anesthesiologist should set up a “difficult intubation set” with a flexible fiber-optic bronchoscope and also, it may be necessary to discuss with an ear-nose and throat (ENT) specialist if required, for unpredicted emergency situations. Case Presentation: In this case-report we presented a 2-year-old boy with known MPSs with psychomotor retardation, bilateral corneal opacities, impaired hearing and vision, inguinal hernia, severe mitral regurgitation, micrognathia, coarse facial feature, stiff and short neck and restricted mouth opening. He scheduled for left inguinal hernia repair surgery. Discussion: The patient’s difficult airway was managed successfully and the anesthesia of his surgical procedure had an uneventful course. PMID:25478534

  17. Awake intubation using fast-track laryngeal mask airway as an alternative to fiberoptic bronchoscopy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parnell, J David; Mills, Jeff

    2006-12-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pose a unique challenge to the anesthetist. The manifestations of RA may include cervical spine instability, limited range of motion, and temperomandibular joint involvement limiting mouth opening. Therefore, securing the airway while maintaining the head and neck in a neutral position is of particular concern to the anesthetist. While this is most commonly accomplished using an awake fiberoptic technique, the following case is presented as a safe and efficient initial alternative to the primary use of fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the appropriate patient population. PMID:17236388

  18. I-gel Laryngeal Mask Airway Combined with Tracheal Intubation Attenuate Systemic Stress Response in Patients Undergoing Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chaoliang; Chai, Xiaoqing; Kang, Fang; Huang, Xiang; Hou, Tao; Tang, Fei; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The adverse events induced by intubation and extubation may cause intracranial hemorrhage and increase of intracranial pressure, especially in posterior fossa surgery patients. In this study, we proposed that I-gel combined with tracheal intubation could reduce the stress response of posterior fossa surgery patients. Methods. Sixty-six posterior fossa surgery patients were randomly allocated to receive either tracheal tube intubation (Group TT) or I-gel facilitated endotracheal tube intubation (Group TI). Hemodynamic and respiratory variables, stress and inflammatory response, oxidative stress, anesthesia recovery parameters, and adverse events during emergence were compared. Results. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were lower in Group TI during intubation and extubation (P < 0.05 versus Group TT). Respiratory variables including peak airway pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension were similar intraoperative, while plasma β-endorphin, cortisol, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, malondialdehyde concentrations, and blood glucose were significantly lower in Group TI during emergence relative to Group TT. Postoperative bucking and serious hypertensions were seen in Group TT but not in Group TI. Conclusion. Utilization of I-gel combined with endotracheal tube in posterior fossa surgery patients is safe which can yield more stable hemodynamic profile during intubation and emergence and lower inflammatory and oxidative response, leading to uneventful recovery. PMID:26273146

  19. An Evaluation of Thyromental Distance-based Method or Weight-based Method in Determining the Size of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Meilin; Ding, Ming; Xu, Yajun; Yang, Xijun; Li, Lihong; Zhong, Jing; Miao, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The successful placement of Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) Supreme in adults largely depends on right selection of its size. Most anesthesiologists determine the size of LMA according to patients’ body weight, which does not always work well. An alternative method should be established to guarantee higher efficacy of ventilation through LMA Supreme placement. This controlled study was designed to compare the efficacy of LMA Supreme placement, when the size of it is determined by body weight or by thyromental distance. Eighty healthy individuals with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 to 2 scheduled for elective ambulatory surgery were randomly allocated into 2 groups: thyromental distance-based group (n = 40) and weight-based group (n = 40). Efficacy of controlled ventilation through LMA, easy of device placement, and pharyngeal sealing were evaluated between the groups. The tidal volume under 10 cm H2O pressure-controlled ventilation in thyromental distance-based group was significantly higher than that in weight-based group (523.9 ± 135.4 vs 477.1 ± 185.6; P = 0.031). The number of patients who achieved “excellent” tidal volume (>8 mL/kg) were significantly more in the thyromental distance-based group (24/40 vs 13/40; P = 0.019). Among overweight patients (body mass index >23), those who achieved “excellent” tidal volume (>8 mL/kg) under 10 cm H2O pressure-controlled ventilation were also more in thyromental distanced-based group than in weight-based group (11/24 vs 2/24; P = 0.031). The time taken for successful insertion was shorter with the thyromental distance-based group compared with the weight-based group (54.6 ± 33.6 vs 87.8 ± 98.9; P = 0.021). Oropharyngeal leak pressure was pretty close between the 2 groups (26.4 ± 5.1 vs 25.0 ± 5.7 cm H2O; P = 0.180). In terms of guaranteeing better positive pressure ventilation, facilitating device placement, and

  20. A comparison of blind and lightwand-guided tracheal intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask.

    PubMed

    Kihara, S; Watanabe, S; Taguchi, N; Suga, A; Brimacombe, J R

    2000-05-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that intubation success rates, haemodynamic changes, airway complications and postoperative pharyngolaryngeal morbidity differ between blind and lightwand-guided intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask airway. One hundred and twenty paralysed anasthetised adult patients (ASA I-II, no known or predicted difficult airways) were assigned in a random manner to one of two equal-sized groups. In the blind group, patients were intubated blindly through the intubating laryngeal mask airway. In the lightwand group, patients were intubated through the intubating laryngeal mask airway assisted by transillumination of the neck with a lightwand. A standard sequence of adjusting manoeuvres was followed if resistance occurred during intubation or if transillumination was incorrect. The number of adjusting manoeuvres, time to intubation, intubation success rates, haemodynamic changes (pre-induction, pre-intubation, postintubation), oesophageal intubation, mucosal trauma (blood detected), hypoxia (oxygen saturation < 95%) and postoperative pharyngolaryngeal morbidity (double-blinded) were documented. Overall intubation success was similar (blind, 93%; lightwand, 100%), but time to successful intubation was significantly shorter (67 vs. 46 s, p = 0. 027) and the number of adjusting manoeuvres was significantly fewer (p = 0.024) in the lightwand group. There were no significant differences in blood pressure or heart rate between the groups at any time. Oesophageal intubation occurred more frequently in the blind group (18 vs. 0%, p = 0.002). The incidence and severity of mucosal injury, sore throat and hoarseness were similar between the groups. We conclude that lightwand-guided intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask is superior to the blind technique. PMID:10792132

  1. Laryngeal amyloidosis causing hoarseness and airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gallivan, Gregory J; Gallivan, Helen K

    2010-03-01

    Amyloidosis constitutes a fraction of 1% of benign localized laryngeal tumors and may occasionally be associated with systemic disease. A chronic, insidious, progressive, recurrent disease characterized by hoarseness, dyspnea, and stridor, it is caused by extracellular deposition of insoluble, abnormal tissue injurious fibrils. Submucosal lesions occur frequently in the vestibular folds and ventricles, less commonly in the subglottis and aryepiglottic folds and least on the vocal folds. Apple green birefrigence under polarized light after Congo red staining, electron microscopic fibrillar structure, and a beta-pleated sheet structure observed by x-ray diffraction are confirmatory. Two presented cases add to the small literature review of similar patients. Case 1 was a 70-year-old man with severe hoarseness, incomplete glottic closure, ovoid concentric stenosis of the inferior glottis and subglottis, who initially was not diagnosed by several laryngologists and speech therapists. He required multiple microlaryngoscopic excisions and dilations. Because low dose radiation induces plasma cell apoptosis in other diseases, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was hypothesized to eliminate amyloidogenic plasma cells. Case 2 was a 46-year-old welder with progressive dyspnea for 2-3 years and hoarseness, voice loss, and stridor over 6-7 months. Masses caused airway obstruction of the anterior commissure, vestibular, and vocal folds, with extension to the subglottis. Two phonomicrosurgical CO(2) laser-assisted resections relieved upper airway obstruction and restored voice. Conservative surgical intervention and long-term followup are essential. Further studies are needed to determine if a radiation dose response relationship exists to control laryngeal amyloidosis. PMID:19111441

  2. Intubation Success through I-Gel® and Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway® Using Flexible Silicone Tubes: A Randomised Noninferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Neerja; Sen, Indu Mohini; Sondekoppam, Rakesh V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The study aims to test whether flexible silicone tubes (FST) improve performance and provide similar intubation success through I-Gel as compared to ILMA. Our trial is registered in CTRI and the registration number is “CTRI/2016/06/006997.” Methods. One hundred and twenty ASA status I-II patients scheduled for elective surgical procedures needing tracheal intubation were randomised to endotracheal intubation using FST through either I-Gel or ILMA. In the ILMA group (n = 60), intubation was attempted through ILMA using FST and, in the I-Gel group (n = 60), FST was inserted through I-Gel airway. Results. Successful intubation was achieved in 36.67% (95% CI 24.48%–48.86%) on first attempt through I-Gel (n = 22/60) compared to 68.33% (95% CI 56.56%–80.1%) in ILMA (n = 41/60) (p = 0.001). The overall intubation success rate was also lower with I-Gel group [58.3% (95% CI 45.82%–70.78%); n = 35] compared to ILMA [90% (95% CI 82.41%–97.59%); n = 54] (p < 0.001). The number of attempts, ease of intubation, and time to intubation were longer with I-Gel compared to ILMA. There were no differences in the other secondary outcomes. Conclusion. The first pass success rate and overall success of FST through an I-Gel airway were inferior to those of ILMA. PMID:27478436

  3. Comparison of effects of ProSeal LMA™ laryngeal mask airway cuff inflation with air, oxygen, air:oxygen mixture and oxygen:nitrous oxide mixture in adults: A randomised, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mona; Sinha, Renu; Trikha, Anjan; Ramachandran, Rashmi; Chandralekha, C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) cuff pressure increases when the air is used for the cuff inflation during oxygen: nitrous oxide (O2:N2O) anaesthesia, which may lead to various problems. We compared the effects of different gases for ProSeal LMA™ (PLMA) cuff inflation in adult patients for various parameters. Methods: A total of 120 patients were randomly allocated to four groups, according to composition of gases used to inflate the PLMA cuff to achieve 40 cmH2 O cuff pressure, air (Group A), 50% O2 :air (Group OA), 50% O2:N2O (Group ON) and 100% O2 (Group O). Cuff pressure, cuff volume and ventilator parameters were monitored intraoperatively. Pharyngolaryngeal parameters were assessed at 1, 2 and 24 h postoperatively. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA, Fisher's exact test and step-wise logistic regression. Results: Cuff pressure significantly increased at 10, 15 and 30 min in Group A, OA and O from initial pressure. Cuff pressure decreased at 5 min in Group ON (36.6 ± 3.5 cmH2 O) (P = 0.42). PLMA cuff volume increased in Group A, OA, O, but decreased in Group ON (6.16 ± 2.8 ml [P < 0.001], 4.7 ± 3.8 ml [P < 0.001], 1.4 ± 3.19 ml [P = 0.023] and − 1.7 ± 4.9 ml [P = 0.064], respectively), from basal levels. Ventilatory parameters were comparable in all four groups. There was no significant association between sore throat and cuff pressure, with odds ratio 1.002. Conclusion: Cuff inflation with 50% O2:N2O mixture provided more stable cuff pressure in comparison to air, O2 :air, 100% O2 during O2:N2O anaesthesia. Ventilatory parameters did not change with variation in PLMA cuff pressure. Post-operative sore throat had no correlation with cuff pressure. PMID:27601739

  4. Air-Q intubating laryngeal airway: A study of the second generation supraglottic airway device

    PubMed Central

    Attarde, Viren Bhaskar; Kotekar, Nalini; Shetty, Sarika M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILA) is used as a supraglottic airway device and as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. This study aims to assess the efficacy of the Air-Q ILA regarding ease of insertion, adequacy of ventilation, rate of successful intubation, haemodynamic response and airway morbidity. Methods: Sixty patients presenting for elective surgery at our Medical College Hospital were selected. Following adequate premedication, baseline vital parameters, pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded. Air-Q size 3.5 for patients 50-70 kg and size 4.5 for 70-100 kg was selected. After achieving adequate intubating conditions, Air-Q ILA was introduced. Confirming adequate ventilation, appropriate sized endotracheal tube was advanced through the Air-Q blindly to intubate the trachea. Placement of the endotracheal tube in trachea was confirmed. Results: Air-Q ILA was successfully inserted in 88.3% of patients in first attempt and 11.7% patients in second attempt. Ventilation was adequate in 100% of patients. Intubation was successful in 76.7% of patients with Air-Q ILA. 23.3% of patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy following failure with two attempts using Air-Q ILA. Post-intubation the change in heart rate was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). 10% of patients were noted to have a sore throat and 5% of patients had mild airway trauma. Conclusion: Air-Q ILA is a reliable device as a supraglottic airway ensuring adequate ventilation as well as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. It benefits the patient by avoiding the stress of direct laryngoscopy and is also superior alternative device for use in a difficult airway. PMID:27212722

  5. Laryngeal schwannoma as an acute airway presentation.

    PubMed

    Markou, Konstantinos; Dova, Stamatia; Poulios, Christos; Karkos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    A schwannoma is a neurogenic tumour arising from nerve sheaths. Between 25% and 45% of schwannomas occur in the head and neck region. Schwannomas of the larynx are extremely rare. They usually occur in women during the fourth and fifth decades of life. We present a case of a laryngeal schwannoma in a 76-year-old patient with acute stridor, hoarseness and dysphagia. Laryngeal conservation surgery was performed without the need for a tracheostomy. One year later, the patient remains symptom-free with no evidence of recurrence. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and management are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:26969364

  6. Layperson mouth-to-mask ventilation using a modified I-gel laryngeal mask after brief onsite instruction: a manikin-based feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Schälte, Gereon; Bomhard, Lilli-Theresa; Rossaint, Rolf; Coburn, Mark; Stoppe, Christian; Zoremba, Norbert; Rieg, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Objective The intention of this manikin-based trial was to evaluate whether laypersons are able to operate an I-gel laryngeal mask (I-gel) modified for mouth-to-mask ventilation after receiving brief on-site instruction. Setting Entrance hall of a university hospital and the city campus of a public technical university, using a protected manikin scenario. Methods Laypersons were handed a labelled, mouthpiece-integrated I-gel laryngeal mask and a corresponding instruction chart and were asked to follow the printed instructions. Outcome measures The overall process was analysed and evaluated according to quality and duration. Results Data from 100 participants were analysed. Overall, 79% of participants were able to effectively ventilate the manikin, 90% placed the laryngeal mask with the correct turn and direction, 19% did not position the mask deep enough and 85% believed that their inhibition threshold for performing resuscitation was lowered. A significant reduction in reluctance before and after the trial was found (p<0.0001). A total of 35% of participants had concerns about applying first aid in an emergency. Former basic life support (BLS) training significantly reduced the time of insertion (19.6 s, 95% CI 17.8 to 21.5, p=0.0004) and increased overall success (p=0.0096). Conclusions Laypersons were able to manage mouth-to-mask ventilation in the manikin with a reasonable success rate after receiving brief chart-based on-site instructions using a labelled I-gel mask. Positioning the mask deep enough and identifying whether the manikin was successfully ventilated were the main problems observed. A significant reduction in reluctance towards initialising BLS by using a modified supraglottic airway device (SAD) may lead to better acceptance of bystander resuscitation in laypersons, supporting the introduction of SADs into BLS courses and the stocking of SADs in units with public automatic external defibrillators. PMID:27173811

  7. [Successful tracheal intubation through the air-Q intubating laryngeal airway in a patient with severe pharyngeal edema].

    PubMed

    Ishio, Junichi; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nakano, Shoko; Omoto, Haruka; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Tanaka, Motoshige; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was diagnosed with severe pharyngeal edema after neck lymph node dissection for cancer of the external ear canal. He was scheduled for an emergency tracheotomy, but preoperative fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed airway and glottic obstruction due to severe pharyngeal edema. As difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation were anticipated, intubation under spontaneous ventilation was performed to avoid a "can't ventilate, can't intubate" situation. The first attempt to intubate the patient using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope with a thin Intlock resulted in failure due to hindered visualization of the glottis. Therefore, a size 3.5 air-Q intubating laryngeal airway was inserted using a bronchofiberscope to perform tracheal intubation through a laryngeal mask. Successful tracheal intubation was achieved while maintaining spontaneous ventilation. The air-Q intubating laryngeal airway can be useful in the setting of anticipated difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation, as in the case of severe pharyngeal edema. PMID:24558935

  8. Reconstructive procedures for impaired upper airway function: laryngeal respiration

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The larynx is the "bottleneck" of the human airway. For this reason, the effects of stenosing laryngeal pathologies on the vital factor respiratory gas exchange are particularly critical. Internal stabilization is a prerequisite for recovery of the laryngeal respiratory function in severe forms of inspiratory collapse (laryngomalacia). Effective laser surgery techniques have been developed to this end in recent years. Glottis-dilating surgery in cases of bilateral vocal cord motion impairment is now moving in the direction of endoscopic laser cordotomy or cordectomy, whereas arytenoidectomy and open surgical procedures are now used only rarely due to higher secondary morbidity rates. In individual cases, in particular if functional recovery is expected, temporary laterofixation of a vocal cord using an endoscopic suturing technique can be a helpful approach. Extensive laryngeal defects can be covered by means of composite grafts with mucosal lining, a supporting skeleton and their own vascularization. Autologous transplantation of the larynx, with its complex surgical and immunological problems, has become a manageable procedure. The problems of post-transplantation reinnervation and risk assessment of immunosuppression-induced recurrence of the tumor are still under consideration. Reanimation of the bilaterally paralyzed larynx by means of neurorrhaphy (neurosuture), neural grafting and, more recently, functional electrostimulation (pacemaker) represents a challenge for the coming years. In most cases of paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, a part of the muscles is maintained by synkinetic reinnervation when therapy is carried out, which however also prevents effective vocal cord movement due to simultaneous activity of agonists and antagonists. Modulation of reinnervation by means of electrostimulation and modern genetic therapy approaches justify hopes of better outcomes in the future. PMID:22073057

  9. Air-Q laryngeal airway for rescue and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Ads, Ayman; Auerbach, Frederic; Ryan, Kelly; El-Ganzouri, Abdel R

    2016-08-01

    We report the successful use of the Air-Q laryngeal airway (Air-Q LA) as a ventilatory device and a conduit for tracheal intubation to rescue the airway in a patient with difficult airway and tracheal stenosis. This is the first case report of the device to secure the airway after two episodes of hypoxemia in the operating room and intensive care unit. Consent for submission of this case report was obtained from our institution's human studies institutional review board given that the patient died a few months after his discharge from the hospital before his personal consent could be obtained and before preparation of this report. All personal identifiers that could lead to his identification have been removed from this report. A 59-year-old man was scheduled for a flexible and rigid bronchoscopy with possible laser excision of tracheal stenosis. He had a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes. Assessment of airway revealed a thyromental distance of 6.5 cm, Mallampati class II, and body weight of 110 kg. He had hoarseness and audible inspiratory/expiratory stridor with Spo2 90% breathing room air. After induction and muscle relaxation, tracheal intubation and flexible bronchoscopy were achieved without incident. The patient was then extubated and a rigid bronchoscopy was attempted but failed with Spo2 dropping to 92%; rocuronium 60 mg was given, and reintubation was accomplished with a 7.5-mm endotracheal tube. A second rigid bronchoscopy attempt failed, with Spo2 dropping to 63%. Subsequent direct laryngoscopy revealed a bloody hypopharynx. A size 4.5 Air-Q LA was placed successfully and confirmed with capnography, and Spo2 returned to 100%. The airway was suctioned through the Air-Q LA device, and the airway was secured using a fiberoptic bronchoscope to place an endotracheal tube of 7.5-mm internal diameter. The case was canceled because of edema of the upper airway from multiple attempts with rigid bronchoscopy. The patient was transported

  10. Effects of Masking Noise on Laryngeal Resistance for Breathy, Normal, and Pressed Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grillo, Elizabeth U.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini; Lee, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of masking noise on laryngeal resistance for breathy, normal, and pressed voice in vocally trained women. Method: Eighteen vocally trained women produced breathy, normal, and pressed voice across 7 fundamental frequencies during a repeated CV utterance of /pi/ under normal and…

  11. Steroids for intubated croup masking airway haemangioma.

    PubMed Central

    Kiff, K M; Mok, Q; Dunne, J; Tasker, R C

    1996-01-01

    Recently, the beneficial role of steroids for acute laryngotracheobronchitis has been more clearly defined for both intubated and unintubated patients. However, corticosteroids also improve the clinical signs of airway haemangiomata. Two patients are described who illustrate how this can be a source of diagnostic confusion. PMID:8660054

  12. Computed tomographic imaging of dogs with primary laryngeal or tracheal airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krystina; Hartman, Susan; Matheson, Jodi; O'Brien, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen dogs with clinical signs attributable to nonneoplastic obstruction of the larynx, trachea, or large bronchi underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging. In 16 of the 17 dogs, CT was performed without general anesthesia using a positioning device. Fifteen of these 16 dogs were imaged without sedation or general anesthesia. Three-dimensional (3D) internal rendering was performed on each image set based on lesion localization determined by routine image planes. Visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, video fluoroscopy, and necropsy were used for achieving the cause of the upper airway obstruction. The CT and 3D internal rendering accurately indicated the presence and cause of upper airway obstruction in all dogs. CT findings indicative of laryngeal paralysis included failure to abduct the arytenoid cartilages, narrowed rima glottis, and air-filled laryngeal ventricles. Laryngeal collapse findings depended on the grade of collapse and included everted laryngeal saccules, collapse of the cuneiform processes and corniculate processes, and narrowed rima glottis. Trachea abnormalities included hypoplasia, stenosis, or collapse syndrome. The CT findings in tracheal hypoplasia consisted of a severely narrowed lumen throughout the entire length. Tracheal stenosis was represented by a circumferential decrease in tracheal lumen size limited to one region. Tracheal collapse syndrome was diagnosed by severe asymmetric narrowing. Lobar bronchi collapse appeared in CT images as a narrowed asymmetric lumen diameter. CT imaging of unanesthetized dogs with upper airway obstruction compares favorably with traditional definitive diagnostic methods. PMID:21447037

  13. The Effects of Hyper- and Hypocapnia on Phonatory Laryngeal Airway Resistance in Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Amanda I.; Slivka, William; Atwood, Charles W., Jr.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The larynx has a dual role in the regulation of gas flow into and out of the lungs while also establishing resistance required for vocal fold vibration. This study assessed reciprocal relations between phonatory functions--specifically, phonatory laryngeal airway resistance (R[subscript law])--and respiratory homeostasis during states of…

  14. TotalTrack video intubating laryngeal mask in super-obese patients – series of cases

    PubMed Central

    Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background Super-obese patients are at increased risk of difficult mask ventilation and difficult intubation. Therefore, devices that allow for simultaneous ventilation/oxygenation during attempts to visualize the entrance to the larynx, increase patient safety. TotalTrack video intubating laryngeal mask is a new device that allows for ventilation during intubation efforts. Patients and methods Twenty-four super-obese patients (body mass index >50 kg/m2) were divided into two subgroups: intubation efforts using 1) TotalTrack and 2) Macintosh blade standard laryngoscope in induction of general anesthesia. Visualization and successful intubation was evaluated for both groups with ventilation and post-mask complications additionally evaluated for TotalTrack. Results In all cases in the TotalTrack group, the Cormack-Lehane score was 1, ventilation and intubation was successful in 11/12 patients. No hypoxia during intubation efforts was recorded. No serious complications of use of TotalTrack were observed. In the Macintosh blade laryngoscope group, all patients were intubated, but the Cormack-Lehane score was 2 in four cases, and 3 in three cases. Conclusion TotalTrack video intubating laryngeal mask is a device that allows for better visualization of the larynx compared to the standard Macintosh blade laryngoscope, it provides effective ventilation/oxygenation and intubation in super-obese patients. PMID:27042078

  15. Anesthesia management in a child with laryngeal papilloma causing near complete airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Harshad, Parate Leena; Pujari, Vinayak; Channappa, Nagaraj Mungasuvalli; Anandaswamy, Tejesh Channasandra

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, chronic disease of viral etiology affecting most commonly larynx. A 5-year-old child with stridor was posted for microlaryngoscopic excision of laryngeal papilloma. We discuss the perioperative management of case with the various ventilation strategies. In child with stridor intubation remains the safest option. It is suggested to maintain spontaneous ventilation until intubation as mask ventilation could be difficult. PMID:25558205

  16. Anesthesia management in a child with laryngeal papilloma causing near complete airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harshad, Parate Leena; Pujari, Vinayak; Channappa, Nagaraj Mungasuvalli; Anandaswamy, Tejesh Channasandra

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, chronic disease of viral etiology affecting most commonly larynx. A 5-year-old child with stridor was posted for microlaryngoscopic excision of laryngeal papilloma. We discuss the perioperative management of case with the various ventilation strategies. In child with stridor intubation remains the safest option. It is suggested to maintain spontaneous ventilation until intubation as mask ventilation could be difficult. PMID:25558205

  17. LARYNGEAL CHONDROSARCOMA: SUCCESSFUL USE OF VIDEO LARYNGOSCOPE IN ANTICIPATED DIFFICULT AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Dolinaj, Vladimir; Milošev, Sanja; Janjević, Dušanka

    2016-03-01

    Laryngeal chondrosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor, most frequently affecting cricoid cartilage. The objective of this report is to present successful video laryngoscope usage in a patient with anticipated difficult airway who refused awake fiberoptic endotracheal intubation (AFOI). A 59-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital due to difficulty breathing and swallowing. On clinical examination performed by ENT surgeon, preoperative endoscopic airway examination (PEAE) could not be performed properly due to the patient's uncooperativeness. Computed tomography revealed a spherical tumor that obstructed the subglottic area almost entirely. Due to the narrowed airway, the first choice for the anticipated difficult airway management was AFOI, which the patient refused. Consequently, we decided to perform endotracheal intubation with indirect laryngoscope using a C-MAC video laryngoscope (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). Reinforced endotracheal tube (6.0 mm internal diameter) was placed gently between the tumor mass and the posterior wall of the trachea in the first attempt. Confirmation of endotracheal intubation was done by capnography. In a patient with subglottic area chondrosarcoma refusing PEAE and AFOI, video laryngoscope is a particularly helpful device for difficult airway management when difficult airway is anticipated. PMID:27276783

  18. Laryngeal lipoma: a rare cause of acute intermittent airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Peter George; O'Connell, Janet

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 62-year-old man with a lipoma in the exceedingly rare location of the larynx, causing intermittent airway obstruction and dysphagia. The lipoma was excised endoscopically with complete resolution of symptoms. Lipomas are relatively common, accounting for 4-5% of all benign tumours in the body. They traditionally occur in areas of large depositions of subcutaneous fat, most frequently the trunk and limbs. They are recognised to occur in the head and neck but these only represent 13-15% of all lipomas. Lipomas are typically asymptomatic unless their impingement of nearby structures causes symptoms. PMID:27107059

  19. The Effects of Hyper- and Hypocapnia on Phonatory Laryngeal Airway Resistance in Women

    PubMed Central

    Slivka, William; Atwood, Charles W.; Verdolini Abbott, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The larynx has a dual role in the regulation of gas flow into and out of the lungs while also establishing resistance required for vocal fold vibration. This study assessed reciprocal relations between phonatory functions—specifically, phonatory laryngeal airway resistance (Rlaw)—and respiratory homeostasis during states of ventilatory gas perturbations. Method Twenty-four healthy women performed phonatory tasks while exposed to induced hypercapnia (high CO2), hypocapnia (low CO2), and normal breathing (eupnea). Effects of gas perturbations on Rlaw were investigated as were the reciprocal effects of Rlaw modulations on respiratory homeostasis. Results Rlaw remained stable despite manipulations of inspired gas concentrations. In contrast, end-tidal CO2 levels increased significantly during all phonatory tasks. Thus, for the conditions tested, Rlaw did not adjust to accommodate ventilatory needs as predicted. Rather, stable Rlaw was spontaneously accomplished at the cost of those needs. Conclusions Findings provide support for a theory of regulation wherein Rlaw may be a control parameter in phonation. Results also provide insight into the influence of phonation on respiration. The work sets the foundation for future studies on laryngeal function during phonation in individuals with lower airway disease and other patient populations. PMID:25764093

  20. Hazard of CO₂ laser-induced airway fire in laryngeal surgery: experimental data of contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Stuermer, Konrad Johannes; Ayachi, Stefan; Gostian, Antoniu-O; Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2013-09-01

    In carbon dioxide (CO2) laser surgery of the larynx, the potentially dangerous combination of laser-induced heat in an oxygen-enriched atmosphere typically occurs when jet ventilation is used or due to an insufficiently blocked endotracheal tube. Until now, no limitations for safe oxygen concentrations or laser intervals have been established. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the factors that may contribute to an airway fire in laryngeal laser surgery. Fat, muscle and cartilage were irradiated with a CO2 laser at 2, 4, 6 and 8 W in five different oxygen concentrations with and without smoke exhaustion. The time to ignition was recorded for each different experimental setup. Fat burnt fastest, followed by cartilage and muscle. The elevation of laser energy or oxygen concentration reduced the time to inflammation of any tissue. The elevation of oxygen by 10 % increases the risk of inflammation more than the elevation of laser power by 2 W. Under smoke exhaustion, inflammation and burning occurred delayed or were even inhibited at lower oxygen concentrations. Lasing in more than 50 % oxygen is comparatively dangerous and can cause airway fire in less than 5 s, especially when laser energies of more than 5 W are applied. In equal or lower than 50 % oxygen, an irradiation interval of 5 s can be considered a comparatively safe time limit to prevent inflammation in laryngeal laser surgery. Smoke exhaustion should always be applied. PMID:23636479

  1. Laryngitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling and irritation (inflammation) of the voice box (larynx). The problem is most often associated with hoarseness ... The voice box (larynx) is located at the top of the airway to the lungs (trachea). The larynx contains the vocal cords. When ...

  2. Electrostatic Charge Effects on Pharmaceutical Aerosol Deposition in Human Nasal–Laryngeal Airways

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua; Longest, Worth

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic charging occurs in most aerosol generation processes and can significantly influence subsequent particle deposition rates and patterns in the respiratory tract through the image and space forces. The behavior of inhaled aerosols with charge is expected to be most affected in the upper airways, where particles come in close proximity to the narrow turbinate surface, and before charge dissipation occurs as a result of high humidity. The objective of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the deposition of charged aerosols in an MRI-based nasal–laryngeal airway model. Particle sizes of 5 nm–30 µm and charge levels ranging from neutralized to ten times the saturation limit were considered. A well-validated low Reynolds number (LRN) k–ω turbulence model and a discrete Lagrangian tracking approach that accounted for electrostatic image force were employed to simulate the nasal airflow and aerosol dynamics. For ultrafine aerosols, electrostatic charge was observed to exert a discernible but insignificant effect. In contrast, remarkably enhanced depositions were observed for micrometer particles with charge, which could be one order of magnitude larger than no-charge depositions. The deposition hot spots shifted towards the anterior part of the upper airway as the charge level increased. Results of this study have important implications for evaluating nasal drug delivery devices and for assessing doses received from pollutants, which often carry a certain level of electric charges. PMID:24481172

  3. Characteristics of the turbulent laryngeal jet and its effect on airflow in the human intra-thoracic airways

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics technique is applied to understand the relative importance of the upper and intra-thoracic airways and their role in determining central airflow patterns with particular attention paid to the importance of turbulence. The geometry of the human upper respiratory tract is derived from volumetric scans of a volunteer imaged via multidetector-row computed tomography. Geometry 1 consists of a mouth piece, the mouth, the oropharynx, the larynx, and the intra-thoracic airways of up to 6 generations. Geometry 2 comprises only the intra-thoracic airways. The results show that a curved sheet-like turbulent laryngeal jet is observed only in geometry 1 with turbulence intensity in the trachea varying from 10% to 20%, whereas the turbulence in geometry 2 is negligible. The presence of turbulence is found to increase the maximum localised wall shear stress by three folds. The proper orthogonal decomposition analysis reveals that the regions of high turbulence intensity are associated with Taylor-Görtler-like vortices. We conclude that turbulence induced by the laryngeal jet could significantly affect airway flow patterns as well as tracheal wall shear stress. Thus airflow modeling, particularly subject specific evaluations, should consider upper as well as intra-thoracic airway geometry. PMID:17360247

  4. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  5. CHALLENGES OF OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA: DIFFICULT LARYNGEAL VISUALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Alanoğlu, Zekeriyya; Erkoç, Süheyla Karadağ; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yildirim; Meço, Başak Ceyda Orbey; Baytaş, Volkan; Can, Özlem Selvi; Alkiş, Neslihan

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric anesthesia is one of the high risk subspecialties of anesthesia practice. Anesthesia related complications are the sixth leading cause of maternal mortality. Difficult or failed intubation following induction of general anesthesia for CS remains the major contributory factor to anesthesia-related maternal complications. The airway management of obstetric patients is a challenging issue for several reasons. Anatomic and physiologic changes related to pregnancy may increase the difficult and failed intubation rates compared to the general surgical population. Proper evaluation of the airway anatomy and airway structures is vital to prevent airway management related catastrophes. In addition to basic airway and intubation equipment, each anesthesia department must have difficult intubation equipment cart including fiber optic laryngoscope, video laryngoscopes, and different types of laryngeal masks. It is essential that all anesthesiologists have a preconceived and well thought-out algorithm and emergency airway equipment to deal with airway emergencies during difficult or failed intubation of a parturient. PMID:27276775

  6. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  7. Recent advances and key challenges in investigations of the flow inside human oro-pharyngeal-laryngeal airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, A.; Uddin, M.; Shinneeb, A.-M.; Ball, C. G.

    2012-07-01

    The oro-pharyngeal-laryngeal human airway is a complex geometry; the flow physics within are subjected to and influenced by a variety of different factors that produce jet-like flow, re-circulating flows that are enhanced by curvature, detached and secondary flows. Simulation and experiment are the tools available to the fluid dynamics researcher. Simulation results obtained from direct and large-eddy simulation, and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and associated models of turbulence are reviewed. Experimental data obtained through the use of flow visualisation, hot-wire anemometry and particle image velocimetry are also reviewed. A comparison of data obtained from the application of these tools reveals many inconsistencies that are explored in this article. While much progress has been made to understand some of the physics of the flow in the human airway, we continue to uncover new and significant fluid dynamic behaviour. Finally, future research directions are suggested.

  8. Use of the ETView Tracheoscopic Ventilation Tube in airway management of a patient with unanticipated difficult bag-mask ventilation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Zuo, Ming-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    The management of unanticipated difficult airway is a clinical challenge to anesthesiologists. The ETView Tracheoscopic Ventilation Tube (ETView), which is capable of real-time video imaging of the airway without needing additional equipment, may provide a promising settlement for the cases. Here, we reported a successful management of unanticipated difficult bag-mask ventilation airway with the ETView. More importantly, we successfully maintained oxygenation by modifying its injection and suction port. PMID:27206419

  9. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  10. Breathing resistance and ultrafine particle deposition in nasal-laryngeal airways of a newborn, an infant, a child, and an adult.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Berlinski, Ariel; Zhou, Yue; Greenberg, Bruce; Ou, Xiawei

    2012-12-01

    As a human grows from birth to adulthood, both airway anatomy and breathing conditions vary, altering the deposition rate and pattern of inhaled aerosols. However, deposition studies have typically focused on adult subjects, results of which may not be readily extrapolated to children. This study numerically evaluated the age-related effects on the airflow and aerosol dynamics in image-based nose-throat models of a 10-day-old newborn, a 7-month-old infant, a 5-year-old child, and a 53-year-old adult. Differences in airway physiology, breathing resistance, and aerosol filtering efficiency among the four models were quantified and compared. A high-fidelity fluid-particle transport model was employed to simulate the multi-regime airflows and particle transport within the nasal-laryngeal airways. Ultrafine particles were evaluated under breathing conditions ranging from sedentary to heavy activities. Results of this study indicate that the nasal-laryngeal airways at different ages, albeit differ significantly in morphology and dimension, do not significantly affect the total deposition fractions or maximum local deposition enhancement for ultrafine aerosols. Further, the deposition partitioning in the sub-regions of interest is different among the four models. Results of this study corroborate the use of the in vivo-based diffusion parameter (D(0.5)Q(-0.28)) over the replica-based parameter in correlating nasal-laryngeal depositions of ultrafine aerosols. Improved correlations have been developed for the four age groups by implementing this in vivo-based diffusion parameter as well as the Cunningham correction factor. PMID:22660850

  11. Management of an anticipated difficult airway in Hurler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gurumurthy, T; Shailaja, S; Kishan, Shetty; Stephen, Madona

    2014-10-01

    Management of an anticipated difficult airway in Hurler syndrome. Hurler syndrome is a subtype of Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type 1. Mucopolysaccharidosis (lysosomal storage diseases) are a group of inherited disorders caused by deficiency of specific lysosomal enzyme required for a normal degradation of glycosaminoglycons (GAGs). Administration of general anaesthesia in patients who have congenital syndromes such as Hurler's is often a challenge because of progressive airway, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities that may make both the ventilation and intubation difficult. We encountered difficult mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation was not possible and finally ventilated with laryngeal mask airway in a known case of Hurler syndrome posted for umbilical hernia repair. PMID:25425785

  12. Assessment of the use of the laryngeal tube for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a manikin.

    PubMed

    Genzwuerker, H V; Finteis, T; Slabschi, D; Groeschel, J; Ellinger, K

    2001-12-01

    During 60 3-min CPR sequences, the face mask, laryngeal tube and tracheal tube were compared using an Ambu Megacode Trainer. Ten 3-min sequences each were performed for both a combination of the face mask and laryngeal tube with a bag-valve device (compression-ventilation ratio 5:1). With continuous chest compressions, ten 3-min CPR sequences each were performed for a combination of the laryngeal tube and tracheal tube with a bag-valve device and ten 3-min CPR sequences each for a combination of the laryngeal tube and tracheal tube with an automatic transport ventilator. Signs of gastric inflation occurred only with the face mask. Ventilation with the laryngeal tube was significantly better than with the face mask and comparable to the tracheal tube during ventilation with the bag-valve device and with the automatic transport ventilator. Chest compressions caused a significant decrease in tidal volumes during ventilation with the automatic transport ventilator. The findings of this study support the idea of the laryngeal tube as a new adjunct for emergency airway management, but will have to be verified during clinical practice. PMID:11738781

  13. Advances in prehospital airway management

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, PE; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts. PMID:24741499

  14. Laryngeal disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Macphail, Catriona

    2014-01-01

    The most common disease process involving the larynx is laryngeal paralysis, which occurs much more frequently in dogs than in cats. Diagnosis of laryngeal paralysis requires close attention to anesthetic plane and coordination of respiratory effort with laryngeal motion. Surgical arytenoid lateralization improves respiration and quality of life in dogs with laryngeal paralysis; however, aspiration pneumonia is a recognized complication, and generalized neuropathy can progress. Laryngeal collapse can result from any cause of chronic upper airway obstruction, but is most often associated with unaddressed brachycephalic airway syndrome. Laryngeal neoplasia, while generally uncommon, occurs more frequently in cats than in dogs. PMID:24268331

  15. Awake Craniotomy: A New Airway Approach.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Chitra; Schlichter, Rolf A; Baranov, Dimitry; Kofke, W Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Awake craniotomies have been performed regularly at the University of Pennsylvania since 2004. Varying approaches to airway management are described for this procedure, including intubation with an endotracheal tube and use of a laryngeal mask airway, simple facemask, or nasal cannula. In this case series, we describe the successful use (i.e., no need for endotracheal intubation related to inadequate gas exchange) of bilateral nasopharyngeal airways in 90 patients undergoing awake craniotomies. The use of nasopharyngeal airways can ease the transition between the asleep and awake phases of the craniotomy without the need to stimulate the airway. Our purpose was to describe our experience and report adverse events related to this technique. PMID:26579845

  16. A pillow of 8 cm height did not improve laryngeal view and alignment of airway axes but increased anesthesiologist discomfort compared to a pillow of 4 cm height during tracheal intubation in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyo Ju; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hwang, Jung Won; Lee, Hyung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background Neck flexion by head elevation using an 8 to 10 cm thick pillow and head extension has been suggested to align the laryngeal, pharyngeal and oral axis and facilitate tracheal intubation. Presently, the laryngeal view and discomfort for tracheal intubation were evaluated according to two different degrees of head elevation in adult patients. Methods This prospective randomized, controlled study included 50 adult patients aged 18 to 90 years. After induction of anesthesia, the Cormack Lehane grade was evaluated in 25 patients using a direct laryngoscope while the patient's head was elevated with a 4 cm pillow (4 cm group) and then an 8 cm pillow (8 cm group). In the other 25 patients, the grades were evaluated in the opposite sequence and tracheal intubation was performed. The success rate and anesthesiologist's discomfort score for tracheal intubation, and laryngeal, pharyngeal and oral axes were assessed. Results There were no differences in the laryngeal view and success rate for tracheal intubation between the two groups. The discomfort score during tracheal intubation was higher in the 8 cm group when the patient's head was elevated 4 cm first and then 8 cm. The alignment of laryngeal, pharyngeal and oral axes were not different between the two degrees of head elevation. Conclusions A pillow of 8 cm height did not improve laryngeal view and alignment of airway axes but increased the anesthesiologist discomfort, compared to a pillow of 4 cm height, during tracheal intubation in adult patients. PMID:27066204

  17. Insertion of six different supraglottic airway devices whilst wearing chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Castle, N; Pillay, Y; Spencer, N

    2011-11-01

    Six different supraglottic airway devices: Combitube™, laryngeal mask airway, intubating laryngeal mask airway (Fastrach™), i-gel™, Laryngeal Tube™ and Pro-Seal™ laryngeal mask airway were assessed by 58 paramedic students for speed and ease of insertion in a manikin, whilst wearing either chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment (CBRN-PPE) or a standard uniform. All devices took significantly longer to insert when wearing CBRN-PPE compared with standard uniform (p < 0.001). In standard uniform, insertion time was shorter than 45 s in 90% of attempts for all devices except the Combitube, for which 90% of attempts were completed by 53 s. Whilst wearing CBRN-PPE the i-gel was the fastest device to insert with a mean (SD (95% CI)) insertion time of 19 (8 (17-21))s, p < 0.001, with the Combitube the slowest with mean (65 (23 (59-71))s. Wearing of CBRN-PPE has a negative impact on supraglottic airway insertion time. PMID:21883122

  18. Histoplasmosis laryngeal

    PubMed Central

    Moriones Robayo, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal histoplasmosis is a fungal infection that is frequent in Colombia. Laryngeal histoplasmosis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients through the dissemination of the fungus from the lungs to other organs. Histoplasmosis isolated laryngeal (primary) is rare. If a patient presents with a history of immunosuppression by renal transplant, primary laryngeal histoplasmosis with supraglottic granulomatous inflammation that was treated with amphotericin B and Itraconazole, with complete resolution of laryngeal lesions. PMID:25767308

  19. Impact of the type of mask on the effectiveness of and adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea*

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Rafaela Garcia Santos; Piccin, Vivien Schmeling; Nascimento, Juliana Araújo; Viana, Fernanda Madeiro Leite; Genta, Pedro Rodrigues; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although CPAP was originally applied with a nasal mask, various interfaces are currently available. This study reviews theoretical concepts and questions the premise that all types of interfaces produce similar results. We revised the evidence in the literature about the impact that the type of CPAP interface has on the effectiveness of and adherence to OSA treatment. We searched the PubMed database using the search terms "CPAP", "mask", and "obstructive sleep apnea". Although we identified 91 studies, only 12 described the impact of the type of CPAP interface on treatment effectiveness (n = 6) or adherence (n = 6). Despite conflicting results, we found no consistent evidence that nasal pillows and oral masks alter OSA treatment effectiveness or adherence. In contrast, most studies showed that oronasal masks are less effective and are more often associated with lower adherence and higher CPAP abandonment than are nasal masks. We concluded that oronasal masks can compromise CPAP OSA treatment adherence and effectiveness. Further studies are needed in order to understand the exact mechanisms involved in this effect. PMID:25610507

  20. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in the World Trade Center-exposed population: the role for respiratory retraining.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Daniel; Altman, Kenneth W

    2012-09-01

    Upper airway symptoms among responders to the terrorist attack on 9/11 are progressive and multifactorial. For those symptoms that are laryngeal in origin, we are using a multidisciplinary approach that includes respiratory retraining and laryngeal desensitization through a speech pathologist trained in airway disorders. Our treatment paradigm and laryngeal hypersensitivity are discussed in this essay. PMID:22942344

  1. Laryngeal pressure receptors.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P; Sant'Ambrogio, G; Fisher, J T; Sant'Ambrogio, F B

    1984-07-01

    We studied the response characteristics of laryngeal pressure receptors in anesthetized dogs, breathing through a tracheal cannula, by recording single unit action potentials from the peripheral cut end of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. The larynx, with the rest of the upper airway, was isolated and cannulated separately for the application of distending and collapsing pressures. We identified receptors responding to either negative or positive pressure and a few responding to both. All these receptors showed a marked dynamic sensitivity and had the characteristics of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors. The majority of pressure receptors were active at zero transmural pressure and the gain of their response to pressure was higher at lower values, suggesting a role for these receptors in eupnea. Reflex alterations in breathing pattern and upper airway muscle activity during upper airway pressure changes, previously reported, are presumably mediated by the receptors described here. Moreover, these receptors may play a role in certain pathological states, such as obstructive sleep apnea, in which the upper airway is transiently subjected to large collapsing pressure. PMID:6484319

  2. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis--a rare cause of acute respiratory failure managed with nasal mask bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation.

    PubMed

    Lin, M C; Liaw, M Y; Huang, C C; Chuang, M L; Tsai, Y H

    1997-08-01

    A 68 yr old woman presented with acute respiratory failure. She was suspected of having a phrenic-diaphragmatic impairment, without evidence of an intrinsic lung disease or generalized neuromuscular disorder, after 3 weeks of prolonged mechanical ventilation. A series of studies, including fluoroscopy, phrenic nerve stimulation test and diaphragmatic electromyography, was performed before the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) was confirmed. The patient was successfully weaned from the conventional mechanical ventilator, and was placed on nasal mask bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation. A high degree of clinical suspicion of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis should always be raised in patients suffering respiratory failure without definite predisposing factors. Weaning with noninvasive nasal mask ventilation should be tried first instead of direct tracheostomy. PMID:9272940

  3. Incidence of unanticipated difficult airway in obstetric patients in a teaching institution.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weike; Edwards, Jason T; Tu, Faping; Xie, Yang; Sharma, Shiv K

    2012-01-31

    PURPOSE: Our aim was to determine the incidence of difficult intubation during pregnancy-related surgery at a high-risk, high-volume teaching institution. METHODS: Airway experience was analyzed among patients who had pregnancy-related surgery under general anesthesia from January 2001 through February 2006. A difficult airway was defined as needing three or more direct laryngoscopy (DL) attempts, use of the additional airway equipment after the DL attempts, or conversion to regional anesthesia due to inability to intubate. Airway characteristics were compared between patients with and without a difficult airway. In addition, pre- and postoperative airway evaluations were compared to identify factors closely related to changes from pregnancy. RESULTS: In a total of 30,766 operations, 2,158 (7%) were performed with general anesthesia. Among these, 1,026 (47.5%) were for emergency cesarean delivery (CD), 610 (28.3%) for nonemergency CD, and 522 (24.2%) for non-CD procedures. A total of 12 patients (0.56%) were identified as having a difficult airway. Four patients were intubated with further DL attempts; others required mask ventilation and other airway equipment. Two patients were ventilated through a laryngeal mask airway without further intubation attempts. Ten of the 12 difficult airway cases were encountered by residents during their first year of clinical anesthesia training. There were no maternal or fetal complications except one possible aspiration. CONCLUSION: Unanticipated difficult airways accounted for 0.56% of all pregnancy-related surgical patients. More than 99.9% of all obstetric patients could be intubated. A difficult airway is more likely to be encountered by anesthesia providers with <1 year of experience. Proper use of airway equipment may help secure the obstetric airway or provide adequate ventilation. Emergency CD did not add an additional level of difficulty over nonemergency CD. PMID:22290734

  4. Comparative Efficacy of the Air-Q Intubating Laryngeal Airway during General Anesthesia in Pediatric Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Eun Jin; Choi, Geun Joo; Kang, Hyun; Baek, Chong Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol; Bang, Si Ra

    2016-01-01

    Air-Q® (air-Q) is a supraglottic airway device which can be used as a guidance of intubation in pediatric as well as in adult patients. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of air-Q compared to other airway devices during general anesthesia in pediatric patients by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 10 studies including 789 patients were included in the final analysis. Compared with other supraglottic airway devices, air-Q showed no evidence for a difference in leakage pressure and insertion time. The ease of insertion was significantly lower than other supraglottic airway devices. The success rate of intubation was significantly lower than other airway devices. However, fiberoptic view was better through the air-Q than other supraglottic airway devices. Therefore, air-Q could be a safe substitute for other airway devices and may provide better fiberoptic bronchoscopic view. PMID:27419134

  5. Anesthesia airway management in a patient with upper tracheal tumor.

    PubMed

    Wendi, Chen; Zongming, Jiang; Zhonghua, Chen

    2016-08-01

    The main challenge for surgical resection of tumors located at the upper trachea is contemplate formulated plan for providing maximal surgical access to the trachea while ensuring patent airway and adequate oxygenation at the same time. In this report, we describe a patient who presented with an upper tracheal tumor located 3cm from the vocal cord and severe tracheal constriction, occluding tracheal lumen by 90%. Initial ventilation was established by implantation with a supreme laryngeal mask airway. An emergent tracheotomy and distal tracheal intubation were used to combat bleeding and subsequent airway obstruction. Eventually, tracheal tumor resection plus tracheal reconstruction via median sternotomy was successfully conducted under general anesthesia. The whole process is uneventful. PMID:27290961

  6. Diagnosis and management of laryngeal trauma in sports.

    PubMed

    Hanft, K; Posternack, C; Astor, F; Attarian, D

    1996-06-01

    The management of sports-related laryngeal trauma presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The application of basic treatment principles such as airway monitoring, thorough physical examination, and fiberoptic laryngeal examination will direct the management. Further radiologic examination or surgical intervention may be required to adequately assess and manage the injury. We review the diagnosis, treatment, and management in a case of laryngeal fracture that occurred during a National Hockey League game. PMID:8638209

  7. Laryngeal structure and function in dogs with cough.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lynelle R

    2016-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the prevalence and type of laryngeal abnormalities in dogs examined because of cough that did not have signs of upper airway disease and to compare the prevalence of those abnormalities among dogs with various respiratory tract diseases. DESIGN Prospective study. ANIMALS 138 dogs with cough that did not have signs of upper airway disease. PROCEDURES The study was conducted between July 2001 and October 2014 and included dogs examined for cough that had laryngoscopic and bronchoscopic examinations performed by 1 examiner. Laryngeal hyperemia and swelling were recorded, and laryngeal function was assessed before and after doxapram stimulation when indicated. Results were compared among dogs on the basis of cough duration (acute [< 2 weeks], subacute [2 weeks to 2 months], and chronic [> 2 months]) and disease diagnosed (inflammatory airway disease, airway collapse, lower respiratory tract infection, and eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy). RESULTS Laryngeal hyperemia was detected in 73 of 134 (54%) dogs with cough of subacute or chronic duration, and its prevalence did not vary significantly among dogs with various diseases. Thirteen dogs had laryngeal paresis, and 13 dogs had laryngeal paralysis; dysphonia (n = 2) and stridor (1) were uncommon findings in those dogs. The prevalence of laryngeal dysfunction (paresis or paralysis) did not differ significantly among diseases. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that 26 of 138 (19%) dogs examined because of cough alone had laryngeal dysfunction, which suggested that a complete laryngoscopic examination should be included in the diagnostic evaluation of dogs with cough. PMID:27379595

  8. Comparison of i-gel supraglottic airway and LMA-ProSeal™ in pediatric patients under controlled ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Saran, Sai; Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Badhe, Ashok Shankar; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Elakkumanan, Lenin Babu; Mishra, Gayatri

    2014-01-01

    Background: i-gel™ and the ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) are two supraglottic airway devices with gastric channel used for airway maintenance in anesthesia. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of i-gel compared with PLMA for airway maintenance in pediatric patients under general anesthesia with controlled ventilation. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2 patients were included in the study and randomized to either i-gel or PLMA group. After induction of anesthesia using a standardized protocol for all the patients, one of supraglottic airway devices was inserted. Insertion parameters, ease of gastric tube insertion and fiber-optic scoring of the glottis were noted. Airway parameters such as end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2), peak airway pressures and leak airway pressures were noted. Patients were observed for any complications in the first 12 h of the post-operative period. Results: Both groups were comparable in terms of ease of insertion, number of attempts and other insertion parameters. Ease of gastric tube insertion, EtCO2, airway pressures (peak and leak airway pressure) and fiber-optic view of the glottis were comparable in both groups. There were no clinically significant complications in the first 12 h of the post-operative period. Conclusion: i-gel is as effective as PLMA in pediatric patients under controlled ventilation. PMID:24803756

  9. Perinatal development of laryngeal function.

    PubMed

    Harding, R

    1984-06-01

    The resistance of the upper airway is strongly influenced by the action of opposing sets of laryngeal muscles. Expiratory airflow may be retarded by active adduction of the arytenoid cartilages or by a reduction in the activity of abductor muscles. In developing sheep the adductor muscles appear to represent the principal means by which lung recoil is opposed. This mechanism, which is most pronounced during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, is regulated by afferent traffic from the lungs. In fetal sheep the laryngeal muscles are also influenced by breathing movements and sleep states. The adductor muscles are normally tonically active during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep when rhythmical breathing movements are absent. It is possible that this activity is at least partially responsible for elevated tracheal pressures and depressed flow of tracheal fluid during fetal apnea. This hypothesis has been tested by observing the effects of fetal paralysis and recurrent laryngeal nerve section. These experiments suggest that in the fetus near term the larynx makes a major contribution to upper airway resistance and hence to the maintenance of pulmonary expansion which has been shown to influence lung development. PMID:6747226

  10. Surgeons' exposure to sevoflurane during paediatric adenoidectomy: a comparison of three airway devices.

    PubMed

    Herzog-Niescery, J; Gude, P; Gahlen, F; Seipp, H-M; Bartz, H; Botteck, N M; Bellgardt, M; Dazert, S; Weber, T P; Vogelsang, H

    2016-08-01

    Although sevoflurane is commonly used in anaesthesia, a threshold value for maximum exposure to personnel does not exist and although anaesthetists are aware of the problem, surgeons rarely focus on it. We used a photo-acoustic infrared device to measure the exposure of surgeons to sevoflurane during paediatric adenoidectomies. Sixty children were randomly allocated to laryngeal mask, cuffed tracheal tube or uncuffed tracheal tube. The average mean (maximum) sevoflurane concentrations within the surgeons' operating area were 1.05 (10.05) ppm in the laryngeal mask group, 0.33 (1.44) ppm in the cuffed tracheal tube group and 1.79 (18.02) ppm in the uncuffed tracheal tube group, (p < 0.001), laryngeal mask and cuffed tracheal tube groups vs. uncuffed tube group. The presence of sevoflurane was noticed by surgeons in 20% of cases but there were no differences between the groups (p = 0.193). Surgical and anaesthetic complications were similar in all three groups. We conclude that sevoflurane can be safely used during adenoidectomies with all three airway devices, but in order to minimise sevoflurane peak concentrations, cuffed tracheal tubes are preferred. PMID:27277674

  11. Laryngeal verruca vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Topdag, Murat; Erdogan, Selvet; Kara, Ahmet; Derin, Serhan

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal verruca vulgaris is a rare disease of the larynx that is easily misdiagnosed as other laryngeal lesions. This article reports three patients with laryngeal verruca vulgaris and discusses the differential diagnosis of laryngeal verrucous lesions to avoid over treatment. PMID:25935911

  12. Laryngeal histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hina A; Saeed, Noora; Khan, Nazoora; Hasan, Naba

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal infection, having interesting synonyms such as Cave disease, Darling's disease, Ohio Valley disease, reticuloendotheliosis, Spelunker's lung and Caver's disease. The aetiological agent is a dimorphic fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum, causing chronic granulomatous disease. The route of transmission is by inhalation of dust particles from soil contaminated by excrement of birds or bats, harbouring the small spores or microconidia, which is considered the infectious form of fungus. The spectrum of illness ranges from subclinical infection of the lung to progressive disseminated disease. The major bulk of histoplasmosis infections are asymptomatic or present with mild influenza like illness and involve immunocompetent individuals. However, the immunocompromised or immunodeficient cases have disseminated/haematogenous infections with multiple organs involved and are usually fatal unless treated immediately. Laryngeal involvement is associated with the disseminated form of the disease. Histoplasmosis of larynx is a rare entity and poses diagnostic difficulty to otolaryngologists because clinically it may be mistaken for malignancy. We report an unusual case of laryngeal histoplasmosis in a man aged 60 years who presented with provisional diagnosis of tuberculosis/malignancy. PMID:27535733

  13. Laryngeal pseudosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, A.M.; Ewing, S.; Adams, G.; Maisel, R.

    1983-06-01

    In the past laryngeal pseudosarcomas have been diagnosed as a. carcinosarcomas, b. pleomorphic or spindle cell carcinomas, or c. squamous cell carcinomas with pseudosarcomatous reactive stroma. Arguments have centered around the nature of the sarcomatous stroma. Because of this confusion there is disagreement as to the treatment and prognosis of these tumors. Seven pseudosarcomas were treated between 1969-1979, 4 were pedunculated and 3 exophytic. Treatment consisted of primary CO60 irradiation in 2 patients, surgery in 3 cases and combined therapy in 2 cases with no recurrences. Three of the 7 have died, 1 of a poorly differentiated adenosquamous carcinoma of the right main stem bronchus and the other 2 of natural causes at ages 77 and 85. From a review of the literature as well as our experience, we have reached the following conclusions. 1. Stromal cells are a malignant morphologic variant of the squamous cell and are best termed spindled cells. 2. Neck metastasis at any time is a poor prognostic sign. 3. The pattern of metastasis and survival seems to parallel laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and thus treatment should be similar for given stages.

  14. The Role of Airway and Endobronchial Ultrasound in Perioperative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Votruba, Jiri; Zemanová, Petra; Lambert, Lukas; Vesela, Michaela Michalkova

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increased use of ultrasound in evaluation of the airway and the lower parts of the respiratory system. Ultrasound examination is fast and reliable and can be performed at the bedside and does not carry the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Apart from use in diagnostics it may also provide safe guidance for invasive and semi-invasive procedures. Ultrasound examination of the oral cavity structures, epiglottis, vocal cords, and subglottic space may help in the prediction of difficult intubation. Preoperative ultrasound may diagnose vocal cord palsy or deviation or stenosis of the trachea. Ultrasonography can also be used for confirmation of endotracheal tube, double-lumen tube, or laryngeal mask placement. This can be achieved by direct examination of the tube inside the trachea or by indirect methods evaluating lung movements. Postoperative airway ultrasound may reveal laryngeal pathology or subglottic oedema. Conventional ultrasound is a reliable real-time navigational tool for emergency cricothyrotomy or percutaneous dilational tracheostomy. Endobronchial ultrasound is a combination of bronchoscopy and ultrasonography and is used for preoperative examination of lung cancer and solitary pulmonary nodules. The method is also useful for real-time navigated biopsies of such pathological structures. PMID:26788507

  15. The Role of Airway and Endobronchial Ultrasound in Perioperative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Votruba, Jiri; Zemanová, Petra; Lambert, Lukas; Vesela, Michaela Michalkova

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increased use of ultrasound in evaluation of the airway and the lower parts of the respiratory system. Ultrasound examination is fast and reliable and can be performed at the bedside and does not carry the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Apart from use in diagnostics it may also provide safe guidance for invasive and semi-invasive procedures. Ultrasound examination of the oral cavity structures, epiglottis, vocal cords, and subglottic space may help in the prediction of difficult intubation. Preoperative ultrasound may diagnose vocal cord palsy or deviation or stenosis of the trachea. Ultrasonography can also be used for confirmation of endotracheal tube, double-lumen tube, or laryngeal mask placement. This can be achieved by direct examination of the tube inside the trachea or by indirect methods evaluating lung movements. Postoperative airway ultrasound may reveal laryngeal pathology or subglottic oedema. Conventional ultrasound is a reliable real-time navigational tool for emergency cricothyrotomy or percutaneous dilational tracheostomy. Endobronchial ultrasound is a combination of bronchoscopy and ultrasonography and is used for preoperative examination of lung cancer and solitary pulmonary nodules. The method is also useful for real-time navigated biopsies of such pathological structures. PMID:26788507

  16. A pilot study to examine the effect of the Tulip oropharyngeal airway on ventilation immediately after mask ventilation following the induction of anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P N; Shaikh, A; Sabir, N M; Vaughan, D J A; Kynoch, M; Hasan, M

    2014-07-01

    The Tulip airway is an adult, disposable, single-sized oropharyngeal airway, that is connectable to an anaesthetic circuit. After a standardised induction of anaesthesia in 75 patients, the ease of insertion, intracuff pressure and intracuff volume were measured, as were the end-tidal carbon dioxide levels, airway pressures and tidal volumes over three breaths. Successful first-time insertion was achieved in 72 patients (96%, CI 88.8-99.2%) and after two attempts in 74 patients (99%, CI 92.8-100%). There was outright failure only in one patient. In 60 patients (80%, CI 72.2-90.4%), the Tulip airway provided a patent airway without additional manoeuvres, but in 14 patients, jaw thrust or head extension was necessary for airway patency. The main need for these adjuncts appeared to be an initial under-inflation of the cuff. These promising results are consistent with recent manikin studies using this device. PMID:24773326

  17. Primary laryngeal leishmaniasis: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bipin; Ghimire, Anand; Karki, Smriti; Upadhyaya, Paricha

    2009-01-01

    Laryngeal leishmaniasis is extremely rare. We report a case of primary laryngeal leishmaniasis in a 70-year-old male who was admitted with complaints of gradual progressive hoarseness of the voice, dyspnea, cough for the past 3 months and noisy breathing for the past 5 days. An X-ray of the soft tissue of the neck showed a prevertebral soft tissue mass causing narrowing of the airway at the C6-C7 vertebral level. A computerized tomography (CT) scan showed a soft tissue mass in the subglottic region causing significant narrowing of the airway. A direct laryngoscopy showed a pinkish-white, friable mass involving the subglottic region and the anterior half of the vocal cords. With the clinical suspicion of malignancy, an endoscopic biopsy was done. A histopathological examination showed diffuse mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate in subepithelium with numerous Leishmania donovani bodies in the cytoplasm of histiocytes. PMID:19136784

  18. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Sant'Ambrogio, F.B.; Orani, G.P.; Sant'Ambrogio, G.; Mathew, O.P. )

    1990-02-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.

  19. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  20. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: pathophysiology and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-07-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Primary malformations include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea, which cause an increase in negative pressure within the upper airways that can eventually lead to secondary abnormalities such as everted laryngeal saccules, everted tonsils, and laryngeal and tracheal collapse. Abnormal nasopharyngeal turbinates are also encountered, but have not been classified as primary or secondary. BAS is readily diagnosed, and quality of life is improved with appropriate medical and/or surgical management. PMID:22847322

  1. Treatment of laryngeal sarcoidosis with intralesional steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Krespi, Y P; Mitrani, M; Husain, S; Meltzer, C J

    1987-01-01

    Laryngeal sarcoidosis presents with hoarseness, cough, and dysphagia. Shortness of breath due to upper airway obstruction may occur. Indirect laryngoscopy reveals mucosal edema and erythema, granulomas, and nodules. The supraglottic larynx is the most frequently affected area. Systemic corticosteroids can be used initially; however, with persistent symptoms and/or severe airway problems, intralesional steroid injections may be more effective, as in the six patients presented. PMID:3688765

  2. Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meola, Stacy D

    2013-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome is a common finding in brachycephalic breeds. A combination of primary and secondary changes can progress to life-threatening laryngeal collapse. Early recognition of primary anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea would allow the clinician to make early recommendations for medical and surgical management, which can improve the quality of life in affected animals. PMID:24182996

  3. [An Adult Case of Difficult Intubation Caused by Late Complications of Radiotherapy for Pediatric Neck Malignancy, as well as a Later Laryngeal Elevation Surgery].

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Mari; Okada, Toshiki

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 32-year-old female who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery under general anesthesia. She had been diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma of her neck at 5 years of age, and received tumor resection and chemoradiotherapy. Afterwards, she was suffering from dysphagia as a late complication of radiotherapy. She received laryngeal elevation surgery at 24 years of age, in order to improve swallowing disturbance. With rapid induction of anesthesia, she was easily ventilated with mask and bag. However, it was difficult to visualize her vocal cord with various intubating apparatus, because of her mandible hypoplasia, small oral cavity, and laryngeal elevation. After all, we were able to intubate her trachea using Pentax Airway-scope® (AWS) with a Pediatric-type INTLOCK Blade™ (ITL-P). Radiotherapy for head and neck malignancy at childhood causes various late complications, leading to difficult intubation. Meanwhile, laryngeal elevation surgery for dysphagia anatomically makes intubation more difficult An adult who has such past history should be expected as an extremely difficult intubation case, and we must be prepared with various intubating apparatus including AWS with ITL-P. PMID:26790331

  4. Laryngeal Paralyses: Theoretical Considerations and Effects on Laryngeal Vibration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marshall E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical four-mass model of the larynx was developed to simulate laryngeal biomechanical behavior and used to evaluate states of asymmetric laryngeal vibration. Simulations of laryngeal paralyses were compared with data on glottal vibration in observed laryngeal function. (Author/JDD)

  5. Atraumatic laser treatment for laryngeal papillomatosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Pankratov, Michail M.; Wang, Zhi; Bottrill, Ian; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1994-09-01

    Ten to fifteen thousand new cases of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) are diagnosed each year in the United States. RRP is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and is characterized by recurrent, non-malignant, proliferative lesions of the larynx. Patients with RRP undergo numerous microsurgical procedures to remove laryngeal papilloma threatening airway patency and interfering with phonation. The standard surgical technique involves CO2 laser vaporization of laryngeal epithelium affected by the lesions, and requires general anesthesia. The pulsed dye laser operating at 585 nm has previously been demonstrated to be effective in clearing HPV lesions of the skin (verrucae). For treatment of RRP, the fiber- compatible pulsed dye laser radiation may be delivered under local anesthesia using a flexible intranasal laryngoscope. Potential advantages of the pulsed dye laser treatment over CO2 laser surgery include (1) reduced morbidity, especially a lower risk of laryngeal scarring; (2) lower cost; (3) reduced technical difficulty; and (4) reduced risk of viral dissemination or transmission. In vivo studies are underway to determine the effect of pulsed dye laser radiation on normal canine laryngeal tissue.

  6. Sound signature for identification of tracheal collapse and laryngeal paralysis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Seong-Chan; Lee, Hee-Chun; Chang, Hong-Hee; Lee, Hyo-Jong

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether upper airway sounds of dogs with laryngeal paralysis and tracheal collapse have distinct sound characteristics, compared with unaffected dogs. The sounds of 5 dogs with laryngeal paralysis and 5 dogs with tracheal collapse were recorded. Honking sound appeared as predominant clinical signs in dogs with tracheal collapse. Laryngeal stridors appeared as predominant clinical signs in dogs with experimentally produced laryngeal paralysis by resection of laryngeal nerve, in which two types of stridor, I and II, were recorded. All these sounds were analyzed using sound spectrogam analysis. There were significant differences in duration (sec), intensity (dB), pitch (Hz), first formant (Hz), second formant (Hz), third formant (Hz), fourth formant (Hz) of sounds between the normal bark and two types of stridor or honking sound, indicating that the sound analysis might be a useful diagnostic modality for dogs with tracheal collapse and laryngeal paralysis. PMID:15699602

  7. Hemostasis in Laryngeal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, Theodore; Allen, Jacqui

    2016-06-01

    The larynx is a highly vascularized organ supplied by the superior and inferior laryngeal arteries. Both microphonosurgery and external laryngeal surgery require excellent hemostasis. Topical agents including adrenalin and fibrin-based products as well as surgical instrumentation, such as coagulation devices or in some cases embolization, are in the surgeon's armamentarium and facilitate efficient and successful surgery. PMID:27267020

  8. Laryngeal nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Laryngeal nerve damage is injury to one or both of the nerves that are attached to the voice box. ... Injury to the laryngeal nerves is uncommon. When it does occur, it can be from: A complication of neck or chest surgery (especially thyroid, lung, ...

  9. Challenges in the Management of Laryngeal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Satish; Nilakantan, Ajith; Sood, Amit; Gupta, Atul; Gupta, Abhishek

    2016-09-01

    Laryngeal stenosis is one of the most complex and challenging problems in the field of head and neck surgery. The management involves a multidisciplinary approach with multiple complex procedures. In this study we discuss our experience of laryngeal stenosis with regards to patient characteristics, cause and management. A retrospective analysis of 35 patients of laryngeal stenosis treated at a tertiary care centre was evaluated. Inclusion criteria were all patients with laryngeal stenosis who required surgical intervention. Exclusion criteria were patients with associated tracheal stenosis and laryngeal stenosis due to cancer. Demographic data was recorded and findings relating to aetiology, characteristics of stenosis and the various aspects of therapeutic procedures performed are discussed with review of literature. Among 35 patients, 24 were males and 11 females of the age group 2-79 years. 2 (5.7 %) patients had supraglottic stenosis, 11 (31.4 %) had glottis stenosis, 16 (45.7 %) had subglottic stenosis and 6 (17.1 %) had combined multiple sites stenosis. Each patient underwent an average of 3.22 surgical procedures like microlaryngoscopy and excision with cold instrument, CO2 laser excision or open procedures like laryngofissure and excision and laryngoplasty. Montgomery t tube insertion was a common procedure in 17 patients (48.6 %). Of the total 35 patients with severe LS, 27 (77.1 %) patients were successfully decanulated. The results of glottic (100 %) and supraglottic stenosis (100 %) are excellent as compared to subglottic (68.8 %) and combined stenosis (50 %) of multiple sites. Laryngeal stenosis with airway compromise causes significant morbidity to the patients and is a difficult condition to treat in both adult and pediatric population. The need for multiple surgical procedures is common in the treatment of laryngeal stenosis with the t-tube being an important aid in the management of this condition. Trauma especially post intubation

  10. Respiratory and laryngeal function during whispering.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, E T; Hoit, J D; Hixon, T J; Watson, P J; Solomon, N P

    1991-08-01

    Established procedures for making chest wall kinematic observations (Hoit & Hixon, 1987) and pressure-flow observations (Smitheran & Hixon, 1981) were used to study respiratory and laryngeal function during whispering and speaking in 10 healthy young adults. Results indicate that whispering involves generally lower lung volumes, lower tracheal pressures, higher translaryngeal flows, lower laryngeal airway resistances, and fewer syllables per breath group when compared to speaking. The use of lower lung volumes during whispering than speaking may reflect a means of achieving different tracheal pressure targets. Reductions in the number of syllables produced per breath group may be an adjustment to the high rate of air expenditure accompanying whispering compared to speaking. Performance of the normal subjects studied in this investigation does not resemble that of individuals with speech and voice disorders characterized by low resistive loads. PMID:1956183

  11. Unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis after carbon ion therapy using conventional dose fractionation for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Demizu, Yusuke; Fujii, Osamu; Nagano, Fumiko; Terashima, Kazuki; Jin, Dongcun; Mima, Masayuki; Oda, Naoharu; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makiko; Ito, Kazuyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Okimoto, Tomoaki

    2015-11-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a type of radiotherapy that can deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing the dose delivered to organs at risk. Moreover, carbon ions are classified as high linear energy transfer radiation and are expected to be effective for even photon-resistant tumors. A 73-year-old man with glottic squamous cell carcinoma, T3N0M0, refused laryngectomy and received carbon ion therapy of 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) in 35 fractions. Three months after the therapy, the patient had an upper airway inflammation, and then laryngeal edema and pain occurred. Five months after the therapy, the airway stenosis was severe and computed tomography showed lack of the left arytenoid cartilage and exacerbation of laryngeal necrosis. Despite the treatment, 5 and a half months after the therapy, the laryngeal edema and necrosis had become even worse and the surrounding mucosa was edematous and pale. Six months after the therapy, pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy and reconstruction with free jejunal autograft were performed. The surgical specimen pathologically showed massive necrosis and no residual tumor. Three years after the carbon ion therapy, he is alive without recurrence. The first reported laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma case treated with carbon ion therapy resulted in an unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis. Tissue damage caused by carbon ion therapy may be difficult to repair even for radioresistant cartilage; therefore, hollow organs reinforced by cartilage, such as the larynx, may be vulnerable to carbon ion therapy. Caution should be exercised when treating tumors in or adjacent to such organs with carbon ion therapy. PMID:26355161

  12. Complications of upper airway surgery in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Surgery of the upper airway is performed in dogs for the correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome and laryngeal paralysis and for temporary or permanent tracheostomy. Although technically simple to perform, upper airway surgeries can lead to the development of significant postoperative complications. This article reviews complications associated with common surgical conditions of the upper airway. It involves a discussion of brachycephalic airway syndrome and associated respiratory and gastrointestinal complications. It also covers laryngeal paralysis with a focus on unilateral arytenoid lateralization and the complication of aspiration pneumonia. The condition of acquired laryngeal webbing/stenosis and potential treatment options is also discussed. Finally, tracheostomies and associated complications in dogs and cats are reviewed. PMID:21889695

  13. Stages of Laryngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of laryngeal cancer include a sore throat and ear pain. These and other signs and ... hoarseness in the voice. Tests that examine the throat and neck are used to help detect (find), ...

  14. Laryngeal (Voice Box) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited alcohol exposure. Other risk factors for laryngeal cancer include certain viruses, such as human papilloma virus (HPV), and likely acid reflux. Vitamin A and beta-carotene may play a protective role. Signs and Symptoms ...

  15. Airway sonography in live models and cadavers.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ban; Ip, Vivian; Walji, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Sonography using cadavers is beneficial in teaching and learning sonoanatomy, which is particularly important because imaging of the airway can be challenging due to the cartilaginous landmarks and air artifacts. In this exploratory study, we have attempted to compare the airway sonoanatomy of cadavers and live models. Our observations support the use of cadavers as teaching tools for learning airway sonoanatomy and practicing procedures involving airway structures, such as superior laryngeal nerve blocks, transtracheal injections, and needle cricothyroidotomy, before performance on patients in clinical situations. We believe this process will improve patient safety and enhance the competency of trainees and practitioners in rare procedures such as needle cricothyroidotomy. PMID:23716527

  16. General Information about Laryngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Laryngeal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Laryngeal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  17. Recurrent laryngeal neuropathy in a systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Sung, In Young; Park, Jin Hong; Roh, Jong-Lyel

    2008-01-01

    A 41-yr-old woman with hoarseness, multiple joint pain, and generalized myalgia was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) 7 mos before visiting our clinic. SLE-related vocal cord palsy of the left side was identified after otolaryngologic evaluation. We performed laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) on both cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles. The findings indicated left recurrent laryngeal neuropathy with ongoing processes of denervation and reinnervation. Laryngeal involvement is a rare complication of SLE, but it is of clinical significance because serious consequence such as upper-airway obstruction can occur. LEMG identified this complication and precisely defined the neuromuscular status, and this information assisted in creating a therapeutic plan. LEMG may be useful for evaluating the neuromuscular status in vocal cord palsy. PMID:17993990

  18. Supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Kumar, Anjana M

    2014-06-01

    Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) are used to keep the upper airway open to provide unobstructed ventilation. Early (first-generation) SADs rapidly replaced endotracheal intubation and face masks in > 40% of general anesthesia cases due to their versatility and ease of use. Second-generation devices have further improved efficacy and utility by incorporating design changes. Individual second-generation SADs have allowed more dependable positive-pressure ventilation, are made of disposable materials, have integrated bite blocks, are better able to act as conduits for tracheal tube placement, and have reduced risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. SADs now provide successful rescue ventilation in > 90% of patients in whom mask ventilation or tracheal intubation is found to be impossible. However, some concerns with these devices remain, including failing to adequately ventilate, causing airway damage, and increasing the likelihood of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Careful patient selection and excellent technical skills are necessary for successful use of these devices. PMID:24891199

  19. Surgical Treatment of Laryngeal Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Unilateral arytenoid lateralization is the most commonly used technique to treat laryngeal paralysis. It is important not to overabduct the arytenoid cartilage during the unilateral lateralization to minimize exposure of the rima glottides. Dogs with laryngeal paralysis treated with unilateral lateralization have a good long-term prognosis. Idiopathic polyneuropathy is the most common cause of laryngeal paralysis in dogs. PMID:26947115

  20. Brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wykes, P M

    1991-06-01

    This is a complex condition, recognized primarily in brachycephalic breeds, that results in varying degrees of upper airway obstruction. The signs consist of respiratory distress, stridor, reduced exercise tolerance, and in more severe cases, cyanosis and collapse. The inherent anatomy of the brachycephalic skull contributes to the development of these signs. Such anatomic features include: a shortened and distorted nasopharynx, stenotic nares, an elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules. The increased negative pressure created in the pharyngolaryngeal region, as a result of these obstructing structures, ultimately results in distortion and collapse of the arytenoid cartilages of the larynx. PMID:1802247

  1. Management of laryngeal radionecrosis: Animal and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, R.W.; Krespi, Y.P.; Einhorn, R.K.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation necrosis of the laryngeal cartilages is an uncommon complication of radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. It is a devastating process for which there is no one acceptable treatment. Medical management offers only temporary, symptomatic relief, which further necessitates surgical treatment. Surgical management may start with a tracheotomy; however, it often ends with a total laryngectomy. Physiologically, the necrotic cartilages are the source of the problem. It is a general surgical principle that nonviable tissue must be excised to promote healing. Therefore, if the affected laryngeal cartilages were removed, the larynx should heal. Total or near total removal of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages with preservation of the endolaryngeal soft tissues has not been reported in the literature. Theoretically, if the entire cartilaginous framework is removed, there would be no structural support for the airway. We have found using animal models, that submucosal resection of the laryngeal cartilages, leaving the perichondrium and endolaryngeal soft tissues intact can result in a competent airway. Animal and clinical experience will be presented.

  2. [Laryngeal interarytenoid neurilemmoma excised via microlaryngeal endoscopy: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Cheng, Lixin; Tang, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Laryngeal interarytenoid neurilemmomas (LIN) is a benign encapsulated tumor originating from the schwann cells lining nerve fibers. Even though LINs are extremely rare in incidence, they could present with potential threat to the airway and thus requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report two cases of LINs. Both patients underwent excision of the tumor via microlaryngeal endoscopic procedures and recovered well postoperatively without complications. No recurrence was observed postoperatively on routine follow-up after 14 months. PMID:27101688

  3. Development of Sub-optimal Airway Protocols for the International Space Station (ISS) by the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James D.; Parazynski, Scott; Kelly, Scott; Hurst, Victor, IV; Doerr, Harold K.

    2007-01-01

    Airway management techniques are necessary to establish and maintain a patent airway while treating a patient undergoing respiratory distress. There are situations where such settings are suboptimal, thus causing the caregiver to adapt to these suboptimal conditions. Such occurrences are no exception aboard the International Space Station (ISS). As a result, the NASA flight surgeon (FS) and NASA astronaut cohorts must be ready to adapt their optimal airway management techniques for suboptimal situations. Based on previous work conducted by the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST) and other investigators, the MOST had members of both the FS and astronaut cohorts evaluate two oral airway insertion techniques for the Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) to determine whether either technique is sufficient to perform in suboptimal conditions within a microgravity environment. Methods All experiments were conducted in a simulated microgravity environment provided by parabolic flight aboard DC-9 aircraft. Each participant acted as a caregiver and was directed to attempt both suboptimal ILMA insertion techniques following a preflight instruction session on the day of the flight and a demonstration of the technique by an anesthesiologist physician in the simulated microgravity environment aboard the aircraft. Results Fourteen participants conducted 46 trials of the suboptimal ILMA insertion techniques. Overall, 43 of 46 trials (94%) conducted were properly performed based on criteria developed by the MOST and other investigators. Discussion The study demonstrated the use of airway management techniques in suboptimal conditions relating to space flight. Use of these techniques will provide a crew with options for using the ILMA to manage airway issues aboard the ISS. Although it is understood that the optimal method for patient care during space flight is to have both patient and caregiver restrained, these techniques provide a needed backup should conditions not present

  4. Electrophysiological properties of laryngeal motoneurones in rats submitted to chronic intermittent hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2015-01-01

    To keep an appropriate airflow to and from the lungs under physiological conditions a precise neural co-ordination of the upper airway resistance by laryngeal motoneurones in the nucleus ambiguus is essential. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), an important component of obstructive sleep apnoea, may alter these fine mechanisms. Here, using nerve and whole cell patch clamp recordings in in situ preparations of rats we investigated the effects of CIH on the respiratory control of the upper airway resistance, on the electrophysiological properties of laryngeal motoneurones in the nucleus ambiguus, and the role of carotid body (CB) afferents to the brainstem on the underlying mechanisms of these effects. CIH rats exhibited longer pre-inspiratory and lower post-inspiratory superior laryngeal nerve activities than control rats. These changes produced exaggerated glottal abduction (before inspiration) and decreased glottal adduction during post-inspiration, indicating a reduction of upper airway resistance during these respiratory phases after CIH. CB denervation abolished these changes produced by CIH. Regarding choline acetyltransferase positive-laryngeal motoneurones, CIH increased the firing frequency of inspiratory and decreased the firing frequency of post-inspiratory laryngeal motoneurones, without changes in their intrinsic electrophysiological properties. These data show that the effects of CIH on the upper airway resistance and laryngeal motoneurones activities are driven by the integrity of CB, which afferents induce changes in the central respiratory generators in the brainstem. These neural changes in the respiratory network seem to be an adaptive process required for an appropriated pulmonary ventilation and control of upper airway resistance under intermittent episodes of hypoxia. Key points The respiratory control of the glottis by laryngeal motoneurones is characterized by inspiratory abduction and post-inspiratory adduction causing decreases and

  5. An evaluation of a novel mask in four patients with obstructive sleep apnea and overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Yarahmadi, Alireza; Nader, Nader D; Zadeii, Gino; Porhomayon, Jahan

    2013-01-01

    We present four cases of adults with obstructive sleep apnea in whom positive airway pressure therapy alone failed to provide adequate oxygenation. We have previously reported the use of dual mask for ventilatory support of a patient postoperatively (Porhomayon et al., 2013). Here, we report an evaluation of the dual mask in four patients with overlap syndromes. Application of dual mask provided adequate oxygenation with lower continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)/bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) pressure levels. PMID:23970903

  6. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  10. Laryngeal Paraganglioma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharifkashany, Shervin; Yazdani, Nasrin; Ghazavi, Hossein; Tajdini, Ardavan

    2014-01-01

    Paragangliomas in the head and neck are found typically in the region of the carotid body, jugular body, and along the 9th and 10th cranial nerves. They can occur in multicenteric forms, but generally, laryngeal paragangliomas are not found in these patients. Only two cases of laryngeal paraganglioma have been reported with a synchronous lesion elsewhere. We report an additional case of a 34-year-old female with multiple paragangliomas beginning with laryngeal involvement. PMID:25763080

  11. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  12. A systematic review of variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xing Yao; Smoll, Nicolas Roydon

    2016-01-01

    With thyroid cancer fast becoming one of the most common endocrine cancers, the frequency of thyroid surgery has increased. A common and debilitating concern with thyroid surgery is recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) paralysis leading to glottal obstruction and airway compromise. A systematic review regarding the anatomical variation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was performed to determine the position of anatomical variants of the RLN in relation to the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) as well as the prevalence of nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN). MEDLINE, Web of Science, MEDITEXT, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane, ProQuest, Pubmed, and ScienceDirect. Databases were searched using the search terms "inferior thyroid artery," "recurrent laryngeal nerve," "nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve," and "anatomical variation." The reference sections of the articles found were searched for additional reports. The references of all articles were searched to find articles missed in the database search. A total of 8,655 RLN sides were included in this study. One thousand eight hundred and thirteen (20.95%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 20.09, 2,182) showed a Type A configuration of RLN in relation to the ITA, 2,432 (28.10%; 95% CI 27.15, 29.06) showed a Type B configuration and 4,410 (50.95%; 95% CI 49.89, 52.01) showed a Type C configuration between the RLN and the ITA. The second search returned with 38,568 recurrent laryngeal sides and only 221 (0.57%; 95%CI 0.5, 0.65) NRLN documented. The RLN is most commonly found in the posterior position, relative to the ITA. The incidence of the NRLN is low, only occurring in 0.57% of people. PMID:26297484

  13. Management of the Traumatized Airway.

    PubMed

    Jain, Uday; McCunn, Maureen; Smith, Charles E; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence-based approach regarding the best practice for airway management in patients with a traumatized airway. General recommendations for the management of the traumatized airway are summarized in table 5. Airway trauma may not be readily apparent, and its evaluation requires a high level of suspicion for airway disruption and compression. For patients with facial trauma, control of the airway may be significantly impacted by edema, bleeding, inability to clear secretions, loss of bony support, and difficulty with face mask ventilation. With the airway compression from neck swelling or hematoma, intubation attempts can further compromise the airway due to expanding hematoma. For patients with airway disruption, the goal is to pass the tube across the injured area without disrupting it or to insert the airway distal to the injury using a surgical approach. If airway injury is extensive, a surgical airway distal to the site of injury may be the best initial approach. Alternatively, if orotracheal intubation is chosen, spontaneous ventilation may be maintained or RSI may be performed. RSI is a common approach. Thus, some of the patients intubated may subsequently require tracheostomy. A stable patient with limited injuries may not require intubation but should be watched carefully for at least several hours. Because of a paucity of evidence-based data, the choice between these approaches and the techniques utilized is a clinical decision depending on the patient's condition, clinical setting, injuries to airway and other organs, and available personnel, expertise, and equipment. Inability to obtain a definitive airway is always an absolute indication for an emergency cricothyroidotomy or surgical tracheostomy. PMID:26517857

  14. Thyrocricotracheal separation with bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve transsection: report of a survivor.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dongbin; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Sohn, Jin Ho

    2015-12-01

    Thyrocricotracheal separation is an extremely fatal injury that has not been reported in the literature. Although timely and proper management of this injury is paramount to preserve the patient's life, airway, and voice, its rarity has resulted in a lack of consensus regarding the best management option. We report a case of thyrocricotracheal separation with bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve transsection caused by a self-inflicted injury, which was treated with reanastomosis in conjunction with transverse laser cordotomy. The patient could achieve both decannulation and a serviceable voice and could return to a normal social life. The present case is the first report of a survivor with thyrocricotracheal separation with bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve transsection. This findings show that appropriate management of the airway is the first step to ensure a successful outcome, and a step-by-step approach to detect and manage the associated injuries is paramount in cases showing the most severe form of laryngeal trauma. PMID:25976270

  15. Chronic cough and laryngeal dysfunction improve with specific treatment of cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Nicole M; Vertigan, Anne E; Gibson, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Chronic persistent cough can be associated with laryngeal dysfunction that leads to symptoms such as dysphonia, sensory hyperresponsiveness to capsaicin, and motor dysfunction with paradoxical vocal fold movement and variable extrathoracic airflow obstruction (reduced inspiratory airflow). Successful therapy of chronic persistent cough improves symptoms and sensory hyperresponsiveness. The effects of treatment for chronic cough on laryngeal dysfunction are not known. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate effects of therapy for chronic cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Methods Adults with chronic cough (n = 24) were assessed before and after treatment for chronic persistent cough by measuring quality of life, extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness to hypertonic saline provocation, capsaicin cough reflex hypersensitivity and fibreoptic laryngoscopy to observe paradoxical vocal fold movement. Subjects with chronic cough were classified into those with (n = 14) or without (n = 10) paradoxical vocal fold movement based on direct observation at laryngoscopy. Results Following treatment there was a significant improvement in cough related quality of life and cough reflex sensitivity in both groups. Subjects with chronic cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement also had additional improvements in extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness and paradoxical vocal fold movement. The degree of improvement in cough reflex sensitivity correlated with the improvement in extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness. Conclusion Laryngeal dysfunction is common in chronic persistent cough, where it is manifest as paradoxical vocal fold movement and extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness. Successful treatment for chronic persistent cough leads to improvements in these features of laryngeal dysfunction. PMID:19292930

  16. A method for ultrasonographic visualization and injection of the superior laryngeal nerve: volunteer study and cadaver simulation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Balvindar; Tang, Raymond; Sawka, Andrew; Krebs, Claudia; Vaghadia, Himat

    2012-11-01

    Superior laryngeal nerve block is a valuable technique for provision of upper airway anesthesia. In bilateral scans of 20 volunteers, we developed a technique for ultrasonographic visualization of the superior laryngeal nerve and key anatomical structures using a hockey stick-shaped 8 to 15 MHz transducer (HST15 to 8/20 linear probe, Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada). Subsequently, we simulated superior laryngeal nerve scanning and injection in bilateral injections in 2 cadavers. Ultrasound-guided in-plane advancement of a needle toward the superior laryngeal nerve and injection of 1 mL of green dye was achieved in all 4 attempts and confirmed by a postprocedural dissection performed by an anatomist. We conclude that ultrasound-guided superior laryngeal nerve block in humans may be feasible. PMID:22822197

  17. Laryngeal reflex responses are not modulated during human voice and respiratory tasks

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez, Victor M; Schulz, Geralyn M; Bielamowicz, Steven; Ludlow, Christy L

    2007-01-01

    The laryngeal adductor response (LAR) is a protective reflex that prevents aspiration and can be elicited either by electrical stimulation of afferents in the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) or by deflection of mechanoreceptors in the laryngeal mucosa. We hypothesized that because this reflex is life-sustaining, laryngeal muscle responses to sensory stimuli would not be suppressed during volitional laryngeal tasks when compared to quiet respiration. Unilateral electrical superior laryngeal nerve stimulation was used to elicit early (R1) and late (R2) responses in the ipsilateral thyroarytenoid muscle in 10 healthy subjects. The baseline levels of muscle activity before stimulation, R1 and R2 response occurrence and the integrals of responses were measured during each task: quiet inspiration, prolonged vowels, humming, forced inhalation and effort closure. We tested whether R1 response integrals during tasks were equal to either: (1) baseline muscle activity during the task added to the response integral at rest; (2) the response integral at rest minus the baseline muscle activity during the task; or (3) the response integral at rest. R1 response occurrence was not altered by task from rest while fewer R2 responses occurred only during effort closure and humming compared to rest. Because the R1 response integrals did not change from rest, task increases in motor neuron firing did not alter the LAR. These findings demonstrate that laryngeal motor neuron responses to sensory inputs are not gated during volitional tasks confirming the robust life-sustaining protective mechanisms provided by this airway reflex. PMID:17962327

  18. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  19. Laryngeal elevation by selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, Aaron J.; Kolb, Ilya; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Laryngeal elevation protects the airway and assists opening of the esophagus during swallowing. The GH, thyrohyoid, and MH muscles provide a majority of this elevatory motion. This study applied functional electrical stimulation to the XII/C1 nerve complex using a nerve cuff electrode to determine the capabilities of neural stimulation to induce laryngeal elevation. Approach. Multi-contact FINE electrodes were implanted onto the XII/C1 nerve complex at locations proximal and distal to the thyrohyoid branching point in five anesthetized canines. Motion of the thyroid cartilage and the hyoid bone was recorded during stimulation of nerve cuffs and intramuscular electrodes. Main Results. Nerve stimulation induced 260% more laryngeal elevation than intramuscular stimulation (18.8 mm versus 5.2 mm, p ≪ 0.01), and 228% higher velocity (143.8 versus 43.9 mm s-1, p ≪ 0.01). While stimulation at all cuff and electrode locations elevated the larynx, only the proximal XII/C1 nerve cuff significantly elicited both thyroid-hyoid approximation and hyoid elevation. In all proximal XII/C1 nerve cuffs (n = 7), stimulation was able to obtain selectivity of greater than 75% of at least one elevatory muscle. Significance. These results support the hypothesis that an implanted neural interface system can produce increased laryngeal elevation, a significant protective mechanism of deglutition.

  20. Fetal lung growth in laryngeal atresia and tracheal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Scurry, J P; Adamson, T M; Cussen, L J

    1989-02-01

    Three cases of airway obstruction in fetuses born at 21, 32 and 40 weeks gestation are reported. The first had laryngeal atresia, cystic dysplastic kidneys, oligohydramnios and immense fluid-filled lungs. The second had upper tracheal agenesis, a tracheo-oesophageal fistula, a cystic dysplastic horseshoe kidney, oligohydramnios and normal-sized lungs. The third had a pin-hole mucosal tract through an otherwise atretic larynx, normal kidneys, no oligohydramnios and normal-sized lungs. Lung weight:body weight ratios, radial alveolar or radial canalicular counts and point-counting of sections of lungs in cases 1 and 2 show that laryngeal or tracheal obstruction may prevent or reduce the pulmonary hypoplasia associated with renal dysplasia, and in cases 2 and 3, that grossly enlarged, hyperplastic lungs may not be seen unless obstruction is complete. PMID:2730470

  1. LASER Treatment of Laryngeal Papillomatosis in a Young Child: Anaesthetic and Surgical Management.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Faisal; Raza, Durriya; Ikram, Mubasher

    2015-09-01

    The authors report the case of a 4-year boy who required anaesthetic and surgical care during LASER excision of laryngeal papillomatosis. He presented with hoarseness and stridor and underwent emergency tracheostomy after confirmation of laryngeal papillomas on CT scan. He required LASER treatment under general anaesthesia with a requirement of paediatric LASER-safe endotracheal tube but unfortunately, this was not available in the country. Balanced anaesthesia technique using inhalational anaesthetic, muscle relaxant and narcotic is used with modifications. After three successful surgical sessions, the airway became patent and tracheostomy was de-cannulated. The perioperative issues surrounding this process are discussed including anaesthetic induction in the patient with a compromised airway, maintenance anaesthetic techniques, methods used for ventilation during LASER surgery of the upper airway, surgical implications and hazards of LASER to the operating room personnel. PMID:26374370

  2. [Management of laryngeal cancers].

    PubMed

    Brunin, F; Rodriguez, J; Cougniot-Lescure, S; Point, D; Jaulerry, C; Brugère, J

    1995-04-01

    With 5,000 cases yearly, laryngeal carcinomas account in France for the third of squamous cell cancers of the upper digestive and respiratory tract. The crude survival rate is 50% at 5 years. Carcinomas of vocal cords are often diagnosed as early stages if dysphonia leads the patients to the ENT specialist within 2 weeks. Cure of the primary is achieved in 90% of the early stages by radiotherapy with narrow fields or partial surgery, with a 80% 5 years survival rate. Advanced tumors are often treated by total laryngectomy and postoperative radiotherapy. Supra-glottic cancers (epiglottis) are more serious. Unilateral dysphagia or upper cervical neck node often delay early diagnosis. A total laryngectomy is the commonest treatment. The 5 years survival rate of 40% is due to local and/or regional failures and metachronous cancers in head and neck, and radiotherapy remains the two major treatments. Primary prevention is based upon suppression of tobacco and reduction of alcoholic consumption, secondary prevention on resection of leucoplakia and close follow-up of patients with chronic laryngitis. PMID:7761753

  3. A case of laryngeal leiomyosarcoma and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Selçuk, Ömer Tarik; Renda, Levent; Erol, Bekir; Osma, Üstün; Eyigor, Hülya; Öztürk, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) of the larynx is a very rare malignancy that originates from blood vessel, smooth muscle or from the heterotopic mesenchymal tissue in the larynx. The histological diagnosis of LMS depends on the immunohistochemical investigation. The case is here presented of an 82-year-old man with shortness of breath and hoarseness. Indirect laryngoscopy showed a pedunculated large glottic lesion causing airway obstruction. Direct laryngoscopy was performed and biopsies were taken. From the pathological examination, the diagnosis of LMS was made. This case is presented of laryngeal LMS with the clinical, radiological, and histological findings. PMID:26981488

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of laryngeal cancer include a sore throat and ear pain. These and other signs and ... hoarseness in the voice. Tests that examine the throat and neck are used to help detect (find), ...

  5. Neonatal resuscitation 2: an evaluation of manual ventilation devices and face masks

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Davis, P; Lau, R; Dargaville, P; Doyle, L; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: The key to successful neonatal resuscitation is effective ventilation. Little evidence exists to guide clinicians in their choice of manual ventilation device or face mask. The expiratory tidal volume measured at the mask (VTE(mask)) is a good estimate of the tidal volume delivered during simulated neonatal resuscitation. Aim: To compare the efficacy of (a) the Laerdal infant resuscitator and the Neopuff infant resuscitator, used with (b) round and anatomically shaped masks in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Thirty four participants gave positive pressure ventilation to a mannequin at specified pressures with each of the four device-mask combinations. Flow, inspiratory tidal volume at the face mask (VTI(mask)), VTE(mask), and airway pressure were recorded. Leakage from the mask was calculated from VTI(mask) and VTE(mask). Results: A total of 10 780 inflations were recorded and analysed. Peak inspiratory pressure targets were achieved equally with the Laerdal and Neopuff resuscitators. Positive end expiratory pressure was delivered with the Neopuff but not the Laerdal device. Despite similar peak pressures, VTE(mask) varied widely. Mask leakage was large for each combination of device and mask. There were no differences between the masks. Conclusion: During face mask ventilation of a neonatal resuscitation mannequin, there are large leaks around the face mask. Airway pressure is a poor proxy for volume delivered during positive pressure ventilation through a mask. PMID:15871989

  6. SafAIRway: an airway training for pulmonologists performing a flexible bronchoscopy with nonanesthesiologist administered propofol sedation: A prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Melanie; Grande, Bastian; Kolbe, Michaela; Kriech, Sarah; Nöthiger, Christoph B; Kohler, Malcolm; Spahn, Donat R; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Nonanesthesiologist administered propofol (NAAP) sedation for flexible bronchoscopy is controversial, because there is no established airway management (AM) training for pulmonologists. The aim was to investigate the performance and acceptance of a proposed AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists performing NAAP sedation. The algorithm includes using 3 maneuvers including bag mask ventilation (BMV), laryngeal tube (LT), and needle cricothyrotomy (NCT). During training (consisting of 2 sessions with a break of 9 weeks in between), these maneuvers were demonstrated and exercised, followed by 4 consecutive attempts to succeed with each of these devices. The primary outcome was the improvement of completion time needed for a competent airway. Secondary outcomes were the trainees' overall reactions to the training and algorithm, and the perceptions of psychological safety (PS). The 23 staff members of the Department of Pulmonology performed a total of 552 attempts at AM procedures (4 attempts at each of the 3 maneuvers in 2 sessions), and returned a total of 42 questionnaires (4 questionnaires were not returned). Median completion times of LT and NCT improved significantly between Sessions 1 and 2 (P = 0.005 and P = 0.04, respectively), whereas BMV was only marginally improved (P = 0.05). Trainees perceived training to be useful and expressed satisfaction with this training and the algorithm. The perception of PS increased after training. An AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists leads to improved technical AM skills, and is considered useful by trainees and raised their perception of PS during training. It thus represents a promising program. PMID:27281093

  7. SafAIRway: an airway training for pulmonologists performing a flexible bronchoscopy with nonanesthesiologist administered propofol sedation

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Melanie; Grande, Bastian; Kolbe, Michaela; Kriech, Sarah; Nöthiger, Christoph B.; Kohler, Malcolm; Spahn, Donat R.; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonanesthesiologist administered propofol (NAAP) sedation for flexible bronchoscopy is controversial, because there is no established airway management (AM) training for pulmonologists. The aim was to investigate the performance and acceptance of a proposed AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists performing NAAP sedation. The algorithm includes using 3 maneuvers including bag mask ventilation (BMV), laryngeal tube (LT), and needle cricothyrotomy (NCT). During training (consisting of 2 sessions with a break of 9 weeks in between), these maneuvers were demonstrated and exercised, followed by 4 consecutive attempts to succeed with each of these devices. The primary outcome was the improvement of completion time needed for a competent airway. Secondary outcomes were the trainees’ overall reactions to the training and algorithm, and the perceptions of psychological safety (PS). The 23 staff members of the Department of Pulmonology performed a total of 552 attempts at AM procedures (4 attempts at each of the 3 maneuvers in 2 sessions), and returned a total of 42 questionnaires (4 questionnaires were not returned). Median completion times of LT and NCT improved significantly between Sessions 1 and 2 (P = 0.005 and P = 0.04, respectively), whereas BMV was only marginally improved (P = 0.05). Trainees perceived training to be useful and expressed satisfaction with this training and the algorithm. The perception of PS increased after training. An AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists leads to improved technical AM skills, and is considered useful by trainees and raised their perception of PS during training. It thus represents a promising program. PMID:27281093

  8. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  9. Influences of laryngeal afferent inputs on intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization in the cat.

    PubMed

    Shiba, K; Yoshida, K; Nakajima, Y; Konno, A

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the possible role of the laryngeal afferent inputs in the regulation of intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization. We studied the influences of airflow and/or pressure applied to the larynx on intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization in ketamine-anesthetized cats. Vocalization was induced by airflow applied to the upper airway, which was isolated from the lower airway, during pontine call site stimulation. When the upper airway was open to the atmosphere through the nostrils and mouth, the airflow increased not only the vocal fold adductor and tensor activities but also the duration of these activities. The adductor and tensor activities were increased suddenly at a critical subglottic pressure level equivalent to the subglottic pressure threshold for vocalization. These effects were significantly reduced by sectioning of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve or by lidocaine application to the laryngeal mucosa. Sustained pressure applied to the isolated upper airway, when the mouth and nostrils were occluded, did not affect adductor or tensor activities. These results indicate that the afferent inputs evoked by vocal fold stretching or vibration play an important role in the motor control of intralaryngeal and respiratory muscles during vocalization. PMID:9089702

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection in laryngeal diseases.

    PubMed

    Siupsinskiene, Nora; Jurgutaviciute, Vilma; Katutiene, Inga; Janciauskas, Dainius; Vaitkus, Saulius; Adamonis, Kęstutis

    2013-08-01

    Clinical studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori can be found not only in the mucosa of the stomach, but in the pharyngeal and laryngeal regions as well. The aim of this prospective case-control study was to identify H. pylori infection in the biopsy material from the larynx of the patients suffering from benign laryngeal diseases (vocal fold polyps, laryngitis) and laryngeal cancer and to investigate the possible relationships between the laryngeal H. pylori and patients' socio-demographic data and laryngopharyngeal reflux. The results of the biopsy material from 67 adult patients treated for benign laryngeal diseases and laryngeal cancer and 11 individuals of the control group revealed that H. pylori infection could be identified in more than one-third of the patients. In the majority of cases H. pylori was found in the patients with chronic laryngitis (45.5%) and laryngeal cancer (46.2%). The findings of these sub-groups significantly differed from those of the control group (9.1%) (p < 0.05). No significant relationships between H. pylori infection found in the laryngeal region and patients' demographic data, their unhealthy habits and reflux-related symptoms or signs were obtained. It could be concluded that H. pylori can colonize in the larynx of patients with benign laryngeal diseases and laryngeal cancer. To clarify the role of H. pylori as a risk factor for laryngeal diseases further research is needed. PMID:23572292

  11. Computed tomography of nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krystina; O'Brien, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening problem in cats and for which a noninvasive, sensitive method rapid diagnosis is needed. The purposes of this prospective study were to describe a computed tomography (CT) technique for nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction, CT characteristics of obstructive diseases, and comparisons between CT findings and findings from other diagnostic tests. Ten cats with clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited for the study. Four cats with no clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited as controls. All cats underwent computed tomography imaging without sedation or anesthesia, using a 16-slice helical CT scanner and a previously described transparent positional device. Three-dimensional (3D) internal volume rendering was performed on all CT image sets and 3D external volume rendering was also performed on cats with evidence of mass lesions. Confirmation of upper airway obstruction was based on visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, fine-needle aspirate, biopsy, or necropsy. Seven cats were diagnosed with intramural upper airway masses, two with laryngotracheitis, and one with laryngeal paralysis. The CT and 3D volume-rendered images identified lesions consistent with upper airway disease in all cats. In cats with mass lesions, CT accurately identified the mass and location. Findings from this study supported the use of CT imaging as an effective technique for diagnosing upper airway obstruction in nonanesthetized cats. PMID:23441677

  12. Clay Mask Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Masks can represent so many things, such as emotions (happy, sad, fearful) and power. The familiar "comedy and tragedy" masks, derived from ancient Greek theater, are just one example from mask history. Death masks from the ancient Egyptians influenced the ancient Romans into creating similar masks for their departed. Masks can represent many…

  13. Lifestyle Changes After Laryngeal or Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer affect your emotional health? Lifestyle changes after laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer You can’ ... people want to know if there are specific lifestyle changes they can make to reduce their risk ...

  14. Towards Computational Modeling of Phonation Using CT--Based Laryngeal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen Karimian, S. A.; Mittal, Rajat

    2008-11-01

    The oscillatory flow generated in human larynx plays a key role in the process of phonation. While much has been done to understand the main features of such flow by using idealized geometry models and simplified flow conditions, there is still little known about the 3D features of laryngeal flow. In this work, anatomically realistic models of the human larynx are used to analyze the fluid dynamics of 3D laryngeal flow using high--fidelity numerical simulations. A Cartesian--grid--based, finite--difference Navier--Stokes solver is used to carry out these simulations. Three--dimensional models of human larynx are extracted from CT images and unstructured surface grids are generated for the model geometries. The pressure driven flow is simulated for a range of Reynolds numbers. The main objective in this work is to understand more in--depth the effect of 3D geometric features of glottal airway on the laryngeal flow structure.

  15. Smoke Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury from the noxious products of fire combustion accounts for as much as 80 percent of fire-related deaths in the United States. Many of these deaths are preventable. Smoke Mask, Inc. (SMI), of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, is working to decrease these casualties with its line of life safety devices. The SMI personal escape hood and the Guardian Filtration System provide respiratory protection that enables people to escape from hazardous and unsafe conditions. The breathing filter technology utilized in the products is specifically designed to supply breathable air for 20 minutes. In emergencies, 20 minutes can mean the difference between life and death.

  16. Nasal mask ventilation is better than face mask ventilation in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Rana, Sandeep; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Vishal, Vindhya; Sikdar, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Face mask ventilation of the edentulous patient is often difficult as ineffective seating of the standard mask to the face prevents attainment of an adequate air seal. The efficacy of nasal ventilation in edentulous patients has been cited in case reports but has never been investigated. Material and Methods: Consecutive edentulous adult patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, during a 17-month period, were prospectively evaluated. After induction of anesthesia and administration of neuromuscular blocker, lungs were ventilated with a standard anatomical face mask of appropriate size, using a volume controlled anesthesia ventilator with tidal volume set at 10 ml/kg. In case of inadequate ventilation, the mask position was adjusted to achieve best-fit. Inspired and expired tidal volumes were measured. Thereafter, the face mask was replaced by a nasal mask and after achieving best-fit, the inspired and expired tidal volumes were recorded. The difference in expired tidal volumes and airway pressures at best-fit with the use of the two masks and number of patients with inadequate ventilation with use of the masks were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 79 edentulous patients were recruited for the study. The difference in expiratory tidal volumes with the use of the two masks at best-fit was statistically significant (P = 0.0017). Despite the best-fit mask placement, adequacy of ventilation could not be achieved in 24.1% patients during face mask ventilation, and 12.7% patients during nasal mask ventilation and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Nasal mask ventilation is more efficient than standard face mask ventilation in edentulous patients. PMID:27625477

  17. Laser applications in pediatric airway surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Nguyen, John D.; Crumley, Roger

    2003-06-01

    The smaller anatomy and limited access to instrumentation pose a challenge to the pediatric airway surgeon. The enhanced precision and ability to photocoagulate tissue while operating with the laser enhances the surgeon"s ability to successfully treat unique pediatric conditions such subglottic hemangiomas, congenital cysts, respiratory papillomatosis, and laryngeal or tracheal stenosis. Due to its shallow tissue penetration and thermal effect, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is generally considered the laser of choice for pediatric airway applications. The potential for increased scarring and damage to underlying tissue caused by the greater penetration depth and thermal effect of the Nd:YAG and KTP lasers preclude their use in this population. In this review, we will describe the specific advantages of using lasers in airway surgery, the current technology and where the current technology is deficient.

  18. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  19. Laryngeal obstruction by heroin packets.

    PubMed

    Colombage, Senarath M

    2003-06-01

    A 28-year-old healthy man collapsed while being arrested by the police for alleged possession of heroin and was found dead on admission to the hospital. Autopsy revealed complete occlusion of the laryngeal opening by a cellophane bag containing 24 packets of heroin powder. PMID:12773851

  20. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF LARYNGEAL FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we have investigated laryngeal air flows by numerically solving the corresponding Navier-Stokes equations expressed in a two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system. The glottal aperture, defined by the geometry of the vocal folds was allowed to change with the v...

  1. Mask process simulation for mask quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Nobuyasu; Goto, So; Tsunoda, Dai; Shin, So-Eun; Lee, Sukho; Shon, Jungwook; Park, Jisoong

    2015-10-01

    Demand for mask process correction (MPC) is growing facing the 14nm era. We have developed model based MPC and can generate mask contours by using this mask process model. This mask process model consists of EB (development) and etch, which employs a threshold (level set) model and a variable bias model respectively. The model calibration tool accepts both CD measurement results and SEM images. The simulation can generate mask image (contour), runs with distributed computing resources, and has scalable performance. The contour simulation shows the accuracy of the MPC correction visually and provides comprehensive information about hot spots in mask fabrication. Additionally, it is possible to improve lithography simulation quality by providing a simulated mask contour. In this paper, accuracy and computational performance of mask process simulation are shown. The focus is on the difference between the calibration methods using CDs or images.

  2. Dosimetric Predictors of Laryngeal Edema

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Adapala, Prashanth; Endres, Eugene J. C; Brack, Collin; Fiorino, Claudio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Parker, Brent

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric predictors of laryngeal edema after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 66 patients were selected who had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with grossly uninvolved larynx at the time of RT, no prior major surgical operation except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, treatment planning data available for analysis, and at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from RT performed by a single observer. Both the biologically equivalent mean dose at 2 Gy per fraction and the cumulative biologic dose-volume histogram of the larynx were extracted for each patient. Laryngeal edema was prospectively scored after treatment. Time to endpoint, moderate or worse laryngeal edema (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2+), was calculated with log rank test from the date of treatment end. Results: At a median follow-up of 17.1 months (range, 0.4- 50.0 months), the risk of Grade 2+ edema was 58.9% {+-} 7%. Mean dose to the larynx, V30, V40, V50, V60, and V70 were significantly correlated with Grade 2+ edema at univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, mean laryngeal dose (continuum, hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.15; p < 0.001), and positive neck stage at RT (N0-x vs. N +, hazard ratio, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-9.58; p = 0.008) were the only independent predictors. Further stratification showed that, to minimize the risk of Grade 2+ edema, the mean dose to the larynx has to be kept {<=}43.5 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Conclusion: Laryngeal edema is strictly correlated with various dosimetric parameters; mean dose to the larynx should be kept {<=}43.5 Gy.

  3. Use of extraglottic airways in patients undergoing ambulatory laparoscopic surgery without the need for tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Suhitharan, T.; Teoh, Wendy H.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Second generation extraglottic airway devices with gastric access and separate breathing channels have ushered in a new era where their use is increasingly prevalent in surgical patients who would have been traditionally intubated for general anesthesia. New innovations like the i-gel, which is constructed of a thermoplastic elastomer, provide an airtight seal around patient's perilaryngeal anatomy without the inflatable cuff mechanism found in the laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMAS). Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing the LMAS with the i-gel in 70 anesthetized paralyzed patients undergoing laparoscopic female sterilization. Our primary outcome measure was the oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP). We studied secondary outcomes of successful first attempt insertion rates, time and ease of the airway and gastric tube insertion, leak fractions and pharyngeal morbidity. Results: We found no difference in the OLP between LMAS and i-gel, 25.9 (4.2) versus 24.4 (4.3) s, P=0.153. Both devices had similar first attempt insertion rates (LMAS 94% vs. i-gel 91%) with similar ease and comparable times to achieve an effective airway, LMAS 14.7 (2.7) versus i-gel 16.5 (9.6) s, P=0.306, although gastric tube insertion was easier and faster for the LMAS, 7.9 (1.9) versus i-gel 14.8 (7.7) s, P<0.005. Intraoperatively, there was a significantly greater leak fraction with the i-gel of 0.06 (0.03) versus 0.04 (0.02) with the LMAS, P=0.013. Three patients (8.6%) with LMAS had mild sore throat; one patient (2.9%) had mucosal injury. No complications were documented in the i-gel group. Conclusions: Both these extraglottic airway devices offer similar OLPs, high insertion success rates at the first attempt with similar ease and insertion times (albeit longer gastric tube insertion with i-gel). Both provided effective ventilation despite a higher leak fraction with i-gel that was clinically inconsequential. PMID:24348297

  4. Masks and Other Disguises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploghoft, Debra

    Instructions for making simple masks are provided in this guide for teachers of elementary children. Directions with illustrations are given for constructing masks from paper plates, construction paper, plastic milk jugs, and papier-mache. Ideas include a clown mask, a flower mask, a top hat, a paper crown, and "Groucho" glasses. Types of masks…

  5. Progress in laryngeal framework surgery.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, N

    2000-03-01

    This paper reviews progress in laryngeal framework surgery since it was first reported about 25 years ago. The success of this type of surgery requires both a basic knowledge of the physiology of phonation, in order to make decisions about the surgical procedure, and surgical skill, in order to accomplish the intended procedure successfully. The main reason for hoarseness is imperfect closure of the glottis, but the second most important reason for hoarseness, increased stiffness of the vocal fold, cannot be corrected by mere medialization of the vocal fold. Laryngeal framework surgery is different in concept from conventional surgery, which is intended to remove the lesion. Controversial points discussed here regarding type I thyroplasty include: (i) whether the cartilage window should be removed; (ii) materials for fixation of the window; and (iii) comparison of type I thyroplasty with arytenoid adduction. A new surgical treatment for spasmodic dysphonia and its results in three patients are described briefly. Surgery for raising the vocal pitch requires further improvement. In the future, laryngeal framework surgery will have wider application in treatment of dysphonias, such as asthenic voice due to atrophy in professional singers or aging, pitch problems in females and gender identity disorder and spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:11603755

  6. Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, William M. Mancuso, Anthony A.; Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Werning, John W.; Amdur, Robert J.; Villaret, Douglas B.

    2007-10-01

    The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

  7. Medical management considerations for upper airway disease.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, G L

    1992-06-01

    The conducting airways, also commonly referred to as the upper airways, provide for the passage of air to and from the atmosphere and lungs. Anatomical components include the nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and mainstem bronchi. Clinical problems involving the conducting airways can be manifested by relatively mild clinical signs of stertorous breathing, by life-threatening dyspnea, or by chronic bouts of inspiratory stridor and cough. Concurrent disease of the lower respiratory system (ie, chronic bronchitis) as well as other organ systems (ie, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine) may significantly contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of upper airway disease. Diagnosis of the diseases of the conducting airways is primarily based on history and physical examination. The dynamic nature of some conditions, related to the phases of respiration, can make diagnosis more difficult. In addition to direct visualization, radiographic and endoscopic evaluation are often useful. Many upper airway problems, especially congenital conditions, lend themselves to surgical palliation that should be performed as early in life as possible. Medical management is often directed at treating underlying diseases and the relief of clinical signs. Historically, the use of variety of drugs have been advocated and frequently include decongestants, cough suppressants, bronchodilators, glucocorticoids, and antibiotics. However, their use may be detrimental and contraindicated. In addition, therapy for some conditions (ie, laryngeal paralysis and intrathoracic tracheal collapse) may be better directed at increasing airway muscle tone in order to stabilized airway patency. Therapeutic agents that may be useful include aspirin and digitalis. The overall objective to medical management must be to balance potential therapeutic benefit against untoward effects in order to minimize clinical signs and to improve the animal's quality of life. PMID:1643322

  8. Multifunctional laryngeal motoneurons: an intracellular study in the cat.

    PubMed

    Shiba, K; Satoh, I; Kobayashi, N; Hayashi, F

    1999-04-01

    We studied the patterns of membrane potential changes in laryngeal motoneurons (LMs) during vocalization, coughing, swallowing, sneezing, and the aspiration reflex in decerebrate paralyzed cats. LMs, identified by antidromic activation from the recurrent laryngeal nerve, were expiratory (ELMs) or inspiratory (ILMs) cells that depolarized during their respective phases in eupnea. During vocalization, most ELMs depolarized and most ILMs hyperpolarized. Some ILMs depolarized slightly during vocalization. During coughing, ELMs depolarized abruptly at the transition from the inspiratory to the expiratory phase. In one-third of ELMs, this depolarization persisted throughout the abdominal burst. In the remainder ("type A"), it was interrupted by a transient repolarization. ILMs exhibited a membrane potential trajectory opposite to that of type A ELMs during coughing. During swallowing, the membrane potential of ELMs decreased transiently at the onset of the hypoglossal burst and then depolarized strongly during the burst. ILMs hyperpolarized sharply at the onset of the burst and depolarized as hypoglossal activity ceased. During sneezing, ELMs and ILMs exhibited membrane potential changes similar to those of type A ELMs and ILMs during coughing. During the aspiration reflex, ELMs and ILMs exhibited bell-shaped hyperpolarization and depolarization trajectories, respectively. We conclude that central drives to LMs, consisting of complex combinations of excitation and inhibition, vary during vocalization and upper airway defensive reflexes. This study provides data for analysis of the neuronal networks that produce these various behaviors and analysis of network reorganization caused by changes in dynamic connections between the respiratory and nonrespiratory neuronal networks. PMID:10087084

  9. Laryngeal sarcocystosis accompanying laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Cheewaruangroj, Wichit; Nitiyanant, Prawat

    2011-09-01

    Laryngeal sarcocystosis is an uncommon zoonotic coccidian protozoal infestation of human beings. The authors reviewed the pathology of 1,063 laryngeal biopsies over the past 10 years (2000 to 2009). Only one case of laryngeal sarcocystosis accompanying laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma was identified. The overall prevalence of laryngeal sarcocystosis was 0.094%. The case was a 66-year-old man who presented with voice hoarseness for six months. Physical examination and computed tomography revealed an ulcerative exophytic mass on the right true vocal cord, suggestive of laryngeal carcinoma. He underwent a right frontolateral partial laryngectomy. Histopathology showed a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma with Sarcocystis spp in the vocalis muscle. He was followed up and enrolled in speech therapy. The authors briefly review the clinicopathologic features and pathogenesis of muscular sarcocystosis and concurrent laryngeal sarcocystosis and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:22299431

  10. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Laboratory experimental studies were carried out to investigate the factors influencing the deposition of aerosols ranging in size from 1 nm to 10 [mu]m in the human nasal, oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal airways. These experimental studies were performed in replicate upper airway physical models and in human volunteer subjects. New replicate models of the oral passage of an infant, the oral passage of an adult at two openings and the combined nasal and oral airways of an adult were constructed during the period, adding to the existing models of adult, child and infant nasal and oral airways models. Deposition studies in the adult oral and adult nasal models were performed under simulated cyclic flow conditions with 1 nm particles to compare with previously measured constant flow studies. Similar studies with inertial particles (1--10 [mu]m diameter) were performed with the adult nasal model; in both instances, results with cyclic flow were similar to constant flow results using a simple average flow rate based on inspiratory volume and time of inspiration. Human subject studies were performed with particle sizes 5--20 nm for nasal inspiration; preliminary analysis shows good agreement with model studies at several representative flow rates. Nasal inspiratory inertial deposition of 1--4 [mu]m diameter particles was measured in several adults as a function of airway dimensions; dimensional changes of the valve area by decongestion did not produce concomitant deposition changes.

  11. Influence of Baclofen on Laryngeal and Spinal Motor Drive During Cough in the Anesthetized Cat

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Daniel; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The antitussive properties of (±) baclofen on laryngeal muscle activities have not been determined. The hypothesis of this study was that administration of (±) baclofen would suppress upper airway muscle motor activity in a dose-dependent manner during cough. Study Design This is a prospective, preclinical, hypothesis-driven, paired design. Methods Electromyograms of the parasternal, rectus abdominis, thyroarytenoid, posterior cricoarytenoid, and thyrohyoid were measured, along with esophageal pressure. Cough was elicited by mechanical stimulation of the lumen of the intrathoracic trachea in spontaneously breathing cats. Results Baclofen (±) (3–10 µg kg−1 i.a.) induced decreases in the electromyogram amplitude of the rectus abdominis motor drive during coughing, the inspiratory and active expiratory (E1) phases of cough, and cough number per epoch. There was no effect of (±) baclofen on the EMG amplitudes of any of the laryngeal muscles, the parasternal, or the duration of the passive expiratory (E2) phase. Conclusions Results from the present study indicate differential control mechanisms for laryngeal and inspiratory motor drive during cough, providing evidence of a control system regulating laryngeal activity and inspiratory spinal drive that is divergent from the control of expiratory spinal motoneurons. PMID:23670824

  12. Shuttle mask floorplanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Tian, Ruiqi; Wong, Martin D.; Reich, Alfred J.

    2003-12-01

    A shuttle mask has different chips on the same mask. The chips are not electrically connected. Alliance and foundry customers can utilize shuttle masks to share the rising cost of mask and wafer manufacturing. This paper studies the shuttle mask floorplan problem, which is formulated as a rectangle-packing problem with constraints of final die sawing strategy and die-to-die mask inspection. For our formulation, we offer a "merging" method that reduces the problem to an unconstrained slicing floorplan problem. Excellent results are obtained from the experiment with real industry data. We also study a "general" method and discuss the reason why it does not work very well.

  13. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. PMID:27173595

  14. [Laryngeal and larynx-associated reflexes].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Miller, S; Jungheim, M; Schroeter, S

    2016-06-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex and the pharyngoglottal closure reflex protect the trachea and lower respiratory tract against the entrance of foreign material. The laryngeal expiration reflex and the cough reflex serve to propel foreign material, which has penetrated in the cranial direction. The inspiration reflex, the sniff reflex, and the swallowing reflex are further larynx-associated reflexes. In patients with dysphagia the laryngeal adductor reflex can be clinically tested with air pulses. The water swallow test serves to show the integrity of the cough reflex. The sniff reflex is useful to test the abduction function of the vocal folds. Future studies should address laryngeal reflexes more specifically, both for a better understanding of these life-supporting mechanisms and to improve diagnostic procedures in patients with impaired laryngeal function. PMID:27240793

  15. INFLUENCE OF HYGROSCOPIC GROWTH UPON THE DEPOSITION OF BRONCHODILATOR AEROSOLS IN UPPER HUMAN AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of hygroscopic growth upon the behavior of two bronchodilator drugs in upper airways is studied with an aerosol deposition model. The latter accounts for laryngeal jet impaction and turbulent flow instabilities caused by the larynx in computing particle deposition e...

  16. Occupational risk for laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, W.D.; Rothman, K.J.

    1982-04-01

    In a case-control analysis, we studied the effects of type of employment on laryngeal cancer risk using the interview data from the Third National Cancer Survey. Effects were measured relative to the risk for those employed in a group of arbitrarily defined industries and occupations with low risk. We excluded females and controlled for age, tobacco use, alcohol use, and race in the analysis. We found ratio estimates above 3.0 for workers in the railroad industry and the lumber industry; and for sheetmetal workers, grinding wheel operators, and automobile mechanics.

  17. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  18. Mask degradation monitoring with aerial mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Wen-Jui; Fu, Yung-Ying; Lu, Shih-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sian; Lin, Jeffrey; Wu, Clare; Lifschitz, Sivan; Tam, Aviram

    2013-06-01

    As design rule continues to shrink, microlithography is becoming more challenging and the photomasks need to comply with high scanner laser energy, low CDU, and ever more aggressive RETs. This give rise to numerous challenges in the semiconductor wafer fabrication plants. Some of these challenges being contamination (mainly haze and particles), mask pattern degradation (MoSi oxidation, chrome migration, etc.) and pellicle degradation. Fabs are constantly working to establish an efficient methodology to manage these challenges mainly using mask inspection, wafer inspection, SEM review and CD SEMs. Aerial technology offers a unique opportunity to address the above mask related challenges using one tool. The Applied Materials Aera3TM system has the inherent ability to inspect for defects (haze, particles, etc.), and track mask degradation (e.g. CDU). This paper focuses on haze monitoring, which is still a significant challenge in semiconductor manufacturing, and mask degradation effects that are starting to emerge as the next challenge for high volume semiconductor manufacturers. The paper describes Aerial inspector (Aera3) early haze methodology and mask degradation tracking related to high volume manufacturing. These will be demonstrated on memory products. At the end of the paper we take a brief look on subsequent work currently conducted on the more general issue of photo mask degradation monitoring by means of an Aerial inspector.

  19. A case series of skin necrosis following use of non invasive ventilation pressure masks.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Z; Venus, M; Kisku, W; Rayatt, S S

    2013-02-01

    Two cases of nasal skin necrosis secondary to pressure from the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) face masks are presented. Both developed skin necrosis as a result of wearing these masks over the nasal bridge. These cases highlight the need for clinical vigilance in application of CPAP masks, the need for monitoring the skin of the nose during CPAP use and the possible need for modifications in design to help prevent this serious complication. PMID:22432901

  20. Cricotracheal resection for laryngeal invasion by thyroid carcinoma: our experience.

    PubMed

    Morisod, Benoît; Monnier, Philippe; Simon, Christian; Sandu, Kishore

    2014-08-01

    Invasion of the laryngeal framework by thyroid carcinoma requires specific surgical techniques and carries a higher rate of complications that deserve to be highlighted. We reviewed our data from 1995 to 2012 and found six patients with laryngotracheal invasion by thyroid carcinoma. All underwent total thyroidectomy and single-stage cricotracheal resection, plus anterolateral neck dissection. Three had airway obstruction that necessitated prior endoscopic debulking. None of the patients needed a tracheotomy. There were four cases of papillary carcinoma, and two cases of undifferentiated carcinoma. One patient died of complications of the procedure (anastomotic dehiscence and tracheo-innominate artery fistula). Another died 2 months after the procedure from local recurrence and aspiration pneumonia. One case presented recurrence at 15 months, which was managed by re-excision and adjuvant radiotherapy; after 26 months of follow-up, he has no evidence of locoregional recurrence. The three other patients are alive without evidence of disease at 6, 18 and 41 months, respectively. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion by thyroid carcinoma is an effective procedure, but carries significant risks of complications. This could be attributed to the devascularisation of the tracheal wall due to the simultaneous neck dissection, sacrifice of the strap muscles or of a patch of oesophageal muscle layer. We advocate a sternocleidomastoid flap to cover the anastomosis. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion can be curative with good functional outcomes, even for the advanced stages of thyroid cancer. Endoscopic debulking of the airway prior to the procedure avoids tracheotomy. PMID:24129693

  1. Management of bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis after thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sanapala, Anitha; Nagaraju, Male; Rao, Lella Nageswara; Nalluri, Koteswar

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is rare for benign thyroid lesions (0.2%). After extubation-stridor, respiratory distress, aphonia occurs due to the closure of the glottic aperture necessitating immediate intervention and emergency intubation or tracheostomy. Intra-operative identification and preservation of the RLN minimizes the risk of injury. It is customary to expect RLN problems after thyroid surgery especially if malignancy, big thyroid, distorted anatomical problems and difficult airway that can lead to intubation trauma. Soon after extubating, it is essential to the anesthetist to check the vocal cord movements on phonation and oropharyngeal reflexes competency. But this case is specially mentioned to convey the message that in spite of absence of above mentioned predisposing factors for complications and good recovery profile specific to thyroid, there can be unanticipated airway compromise that if not attended to immediately may cost patient's life. This is a case of postextubation stridor following subtotal thyroidectomy due to bilateral RLN damage and its management. PMID:26417137

  2. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient’s risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  3. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient's risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  4. 2013 mask industry survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive survey was sent to merchant and captive mask shops to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. 2013 marks the 12th consecutive year for this process. Historical topics including general mask profile, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, maintenance, and returns were included and new topics were added. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. While each year's survey includes minor updates based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics, the bulk of the survey and reporting structure have remained relatively constant. A series of improvements is being phased in beginning in 2013 to add value to a wider audience, while at the same time retaining the historical content required for trend analyses of the traditional metrics. Additions in 2013 include topics such as top challenges, future concerns, and additional details in key aspects of mask masking, such as the number of masks per mask set per ground rule, minimum mask resolution shipped, and yield by ground rule. These expansions beyond the historical topics are aimed at identifying common issues, gaps, and needs. They will also provide a better understanding of real-life mask requirements and capabilities for comparison to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

  5. Mask industry assessment: 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert V.; Hector, Scott D.

    2004-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of mask technologists from semiconductor manufacturers, merchant mask suppliers, and makers of equipment for mask fabrication. This year's assessment is the third in the current series of annual reports and is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the mask industry. This report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results may be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey builds upon the 2003 survey to provide an ongoing database using the same questions as a baseline with only a few minor changes or additions. Questions are grouped into categories: general business profile information, data processing, yields and yield loss mechanisms, delivery times, returns and services. Within each category are a many questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers whose revenue represents approximately 85% of the global mask market.

  6. Upper airway obstruction in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chatzoudis, D; Kelly, T J; Lancaster, J; Jones, T M

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of recurrent airway obstruction episodes resulting from laryngeal hypermobility in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A 44-year-old woman, with known Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, presented with recent onset of episodes of upper airway obstruction due to hypermobility of her larynx. A suitable conservative management strategy proved elusive and the patient finally underwent a thyrohyoidopexy. The patient remains symptom free nine months after the procedure. This is the first report of spontaneous life threatening upper airway obstruction due to hypermobility of the suprahyoid suspensory soft tissues in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. PMID:26263828

  7. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  8. Laryngeal Reflexes: Physiology, Technique and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the current level of knowledge and techniques available for the study of laryngeal reflexes. Overall, the larynx is under constant control of several systems (including respiration, swallowing and cough) as well as sensory-motor reflex responses involving glossopharyngeal, pharyngeal, laryngeal and tracheobronchial sensory receptors. Techniques for the clinical assessment of these reflexes are emerging and need to be examined for sensitivity and specificity in identifying laryngeal sensory disorders. Quantitative assessment methods for the diagnosis of sensory reductions as well as sensory hypersensitivity may account for laryngeal disorders such as chronic cough, paradoxical vocal fold disorder and muscular tension dysphonia. The development of accurate assessment techniques could improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these disorders. PMID:26241237

  9. Chondrosarcoma of the Laryngeal Thyroid Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Righi, Stefano; Boffano, Paolo; Pateras, Dimitrios; Chiodo, Domenico; Zanardi, Fabio; Patetta, Roberta

    2015-09-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the larynx is a rare tumor, accounting for 0.07% to 2% of all laryngeal cancers. Nevertheless, it represents the most frequent nonepithelial neoplasm of the laryngeal region.Laryngeal chondrosarcomas are usually characterized by slow growth and low metastatic potential.The exact etiopathogenesis of chondrosarcoma is still debated. Diagnosis can be difficult given the slow rate of growth and nonspecific patient symptoms at presentation.Because of its rarity, literature about laryngeal chondrosarcoma is mainly made up of case reports and small case series.Therefore, it is important to add any information regarding this pathology.The aim of this article was to present and discuss a new case of chondrosarcoma located in the thyroid cartilage in a 63-year-old woman. PMID:26267570

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  11. Two Cases of the Laryngeal Cystic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Takeshi; Wada, Ryo; Homma, Hirotomo; Kidokoro, Yoshinobu; Yanai, Aya; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    We experienced two rare cases with laryngeal cystic lesions (laryngocele and laryngeal cyst). In the first case, the laryngocele case was removed by laryngomicrosurgery using an oral approach under general anesthesia. In the second case, the magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dumbbell-type cyst with mucus widely extending from the laryngeal lumen to the neck through the thyroid cartilage. The patient had undergone chemotherapy for renal carcinoma with multiple lung and bone metastases. Therefore, we performed only fine needle aspiration rather than aggressive surgery for extirpation of the cyst using an external approach. This fine needle aspiration could improve the quality of life by decreasing both the left laryngeal swelling and the resulting pain, which were the chief complaints. PMID:27162605

  12. Pentax Airway Scope® vs Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in adult patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoshijima, H; Kuratani, N; Hirabayashi, Y; Takeuchi, R; Shiga, T; Masaki, E

    2014-08-01

    The Pentax Airway Scope(®) is a single-use optical videolaryngoscope designed to assist with difficult tracheal intubation. We systematically reviewed the efficacy of the Pentax Airway Scope with that of a conventional laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in adults with 'normal' and 'difficult' airways. We included 17 randomised controlled trials with a total of 1801 participants. We used the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects model to calculate pooled relative risk or weighted mean differences. The relative risk (95% CI) of a Cormack-Lehane grade-1 laryngeal view was 2.40 (1.76-2.49) with the Pentax Airway Scope compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope, p < 0.00001. We found no other differences between the two laryngoscopes. Despite a superior laryngeal view, the Pentax Airway Scope provides little clinical benefit over the conventional laryngoscope. PMID:24820205

  13. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  14. Laryngitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015: ... et al. Clinical practice guideline: hoarseness (dysphonia). Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2009;141(3 Suppl 2):S1-S31. ...

  15. Intralesional Cidofovir application in recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Pudszuhn, Annett; Welzel, Cornelia; Bloching, Marc; Neumann, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis is a benign disease of the larynx often leading to organic and functional restrictions. The therapeutic treatment of choice in larynx-obstructing papillomatosis is at present surgical laser ablation. The effectiveness of adjuvant intralesional injection of the virustaticum Cidofovir has been investigated recently in a variety of therapeutic models. The present case study deals with the treatment of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis by means of surgical laser ablation of the laryngeal papillomas with adjuvant local injection of the virustaticum Cidofovir (dose of 5 mg/1 ml). Within the period from October 2001 to August 2004, ten patients aged between 5- and 70 years were treated with intralesional injections of Cidofovir. Papillomatosis was confirmed histologically in all cases, and the virus types were defined in part. Each of the patients underwent clinical-phoniatric examinations and was photographed for documentation. After 2-7 treatments with surgical laser papilloma ablation and intralesional Cidofovir injections, all patients showed a definite papilloma reduction, while in six cases complete remission was achieved. During the follow-up period of 8-30 months, not a single recurrence of the laryngeal papillomatosis occurred. In the majority of patients, a clear improvement in the voice was achieved. There were no local or systemic side effects caused by the virustaticum. Intralesional injection of Cidofovir is an adjuvant, but not a curative therapeutic option in recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Remission of previously frequently recurrent laryngeal papillomas can be achieved, but recurrence after longer treatment-free intervals is also possible. PMID:17058091

  16. Mask industry assessment: 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2003-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was initiated in 2002 with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition.1 This paper presents the results of the second annual survey which is an enhanced version of the inaugural survey building upon its strengths and improving the weak points. The original survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. The assessment is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the critical mask industry. An objective is to create a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. As subsequent years are added, historical profiles can also be created. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers representing approximately 80% of the global mask market (using revenue as the measure) and making this the most comprehensive mask industry survey ever. The participating companies are: Compugraphics, Dai Nippon Printing, Dupont Photomask, Hoya, IBM, Infineon, Intel, Taiwan Mask Company, Toppan, and TSMC. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry.

  17. Aberrant laryngeal location of Onchocerca lupi in a dog.

    PubMed

    Alho, Ana Margarida; Cruz, Luís; Coelho, Ana; Martinho, Filipe; Mansinho, Mário; Annoscia, Giada; Lia, Riccardo P; Giannelli, Alessio; Otranto, Domenico; de Carvalho, Luís Madeira

    2016-06-01

    Onchocerca lupi (Spirurida, Onchocercidae) is an emerging vector-borne helminth that causes nodular lesions associated with acute or chronic ocular disease in dogs and cats. Since its first description in dogs in 1991, this zoonotic filarioid has been increasingly reported in Europe and the United States. An 8-year-old outdoor mixed-breed female dog from the Algarve (southern Portugal) was presented with a history of severe dyspnoea. Cervical and thoracic radiographs revealed a slight reduction in the diameter of the cervical trachea and a moderate increase in radiopacity of the laryngeal soft tissue. An exploratory laryngoscopy was performed, revealing filiform worms associated with stenosis of the thyroid cartilage and a purulent necrotic tissue in the larynx lumen. A single sessile nodule, protruding from the dorsal wall of the laryngeal lumen caused a severe reduction of the glottis and tracheal diameter. Fragments of the worms were morphologically and molecularly identified as O. lupi. Histological examination of the nodule showed a granulomatous reaction with sections of coiled gravid female nematodes. Following laryngoscopy, a tracheostomy tube was inserted to relieve dyspnoea and ivermectin (300 μg/kg, once a week, for 8 weeks) combined with prednisolone was prescribed. The dog showed a complete recovery. Although O. lupi has been isolated in human patients from the spinal cord, this is the first report of an aberrant migration of O. lupi in a dog. The veterinary medical community should pay attention to aberrant location of O. lupi and consider onchocercosis as a differential diagnosis for airway obstruction in dogs. PMID:26732654

  18. Object Substitution Masking: When Does Mask Preview Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Stephen Wee Hun; Chua, Fook K.

    2008-01-01

    When a target is enclosed by a 4-dot mask that persists after the target disappears, target identification is worse than it is when the mask terminates with the target. This masking effect is attributed to object substitution masking (OSM). Previewing the mask, however, attenuates OSM. This study investigated specific conditions under which mask…

  19. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Erica Y; Scalzitti, Nicholas J; Dion, Gregory R; Bowe, Sarah N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  20. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Erica Y.; Scalzitti, Nicholas J.; Dion, Gregory R.; Bowe, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  1. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    PubMed

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  2. Larynx during exercise: the unexplored bottleneck of the airways.

    PubMed

    Røksund, Ola Drange; Heimdal, John-Helge; Olofsson, Jan; Maat, Robert Christiaan; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Exercise-induced shortness of breath is not uncommon in otherwise healthy young people. Based on the presenting symptoms alone, it is challenging to distinguish exercise-induced asthma (EIA) from exercise-induced obstruction of central airways, sometimes leading to diagnostic errors and inadequate treatment. Central airway obstruction usually presents with exercise-induced inspiratory symptoms (EIIS) during ongoing exercise. EIIS tends to peak towards the end of an exercise session or immediately after its completion, contradicting symptoms of EIA typically peaking 3-15 min after the exercise has stopped. EIIS is usually associated with some form of laryngeal obstruction. Transnasal flexible laryngoscopy performed continuously throughout an incremental exercise test from rest to exhaustion or to intolerable symptoms is usually diagnostic, and also provides information that is important for further handling and treatment. Reflecting the complex anatomy and functional features of the larynx, exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) appears to be a heterogeneous condition. Contradicting previous beliefs, recent literature suggests that laryngeal adduction in a majority of cases starts in supraglottic structures and that vocal cord adduction (VCD) most often occurs as a secondary phenomenon. However, EILO is poorly understood and more and better research is needed to unravel causal mechanisms. The evidence base for treatment of EILO is weak. Speech therapy, psychotherapy, biofeedback, muscle training, anticholinergic aerosols have all been applied, as has laser supraglottoplasty. Randomized controlled trials with well-defined and verifiable inclusion and success criteria are required to establish evidence-based treatment schemes. PMID:25033930

  3. Extralaryngeal division of the recurrent laryngeal nerve: a new description for the inferior laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Bulent; Tunali, Selcuk; Ozan, Hasan

    2008-05-01

    Extralaryngeal division of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was contradictory in the literature. We aimed to investigate extralaryngeal division of the nerve, and also propose a new description for the inferior laryngeal nerve. Sixty specimens (120 sides) were examined for this project, including 41 men and 19 women cadavers between the ages of 40 and 89 years at death. In one right side, terminal segment of the nerve gave off many small branches surrounding the inferior thyroid artery then reaching the larynx, trachea, thyroid gland and esophagus. In eight sides, terminal segment of the nerve had no extralaryngeal division and entered the larynx as a single trunk. In 110 sides, the nerve had extralaryngeal division. One hundred and three nerves had two laryngeal and one to three extralaryngeal branches. Two types were described in this group. In type I (66 nerves), both branches arose from the same level of nerve. Type I had two subtypes: type Ia, the origin of the branches was just below the inferior constrictor muscle; type Ib, the origin of the branches was 15-35 mm below the muscle. In type II (37 nerves), the laryngeal branches arose just 3-5 mm above the extralaryngeal branches. We observed that the laryngeal and extralaryngeal branches arose generally from the same point of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The inferior laryngeal nerve is thus very short, or even nonexistent. Therefore, we suggest that if the term "superior laryngeal nerve" is a given, standard, and accepted term, then the term "inferior laryngeal nerve" should also be accepted instead of the term "recurrent laryngeal nerve." PMID:18292961

  4. Mask industry assessment: 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Hector, Scott

    2005-11-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of mask technologists from semiconductor manufacturers, merchant mask suppliers, and makers of equipment for mask fabrication. This year's assessment is the fourth in the current series of annual reports and is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the mask industry. This report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results may be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey contains all of the 2004 survey questions to provide an ongoing database. Additional questions were added to the survey covering operating cost factors and equipment utilization. Questions are grouped into categories: general business profile information, data processing, yields and yield loss mechanisms, delivery times, returns and services, operating cost factors and equipment utilization. Within each category are a many questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. This assessment includes inputs from eight major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers whose revenue represents approximately 85% of the global mask market. This participation rate is reduced by one captive from 2004. Note: Toppan, DuPont Photomasks Inc and AMTC (new) were consolidated into one input therefore the 2004 and 2005 surveys are basically equivalent.

  5. Comparison of Five 2nd-Generation Supraglottic Airway Devices for Airway Management Performed by Novice Military Operators

    PubMed Central

    Henlin, Tomas; Sotak, Michal; Kovaricek, Petr; Tyll, Tomas; Balcarek, Lukas; Michalek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Five different second-generation supraglottic airway devices, ProSeal LMA, Supreme LMA, i-gel, SLIPA, and Laryngeal Tube Suction-D, were studied. Operators were inexperienced users with a military background, combat lifesavers, nurses, and physicians. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded study. Devices were inserted in the operating room in low light conditions after induction of general anesthesia. Primary outcome was successful insertion on the first attempt while secondary aims were insertion time, number of attempts, oropharyngeal seal pressure, ease of insertion, fibre optic position of device, efficacy of ventilation, and intraoperative trauma or regurgitation of gastric contents. Results. In total, 505 patients were studied. First-attempt insertion success rate was higher in the Supreme LMA (96%), i-gel (87.9%), and ProSeal LMA (85.9%) groups than in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D (80.6%) and SLIPA (69.4%) groups. Insertion time was shortest in the Supreme LMA (70.4 ± 32.5 s) and i-gel (74.4 ± 41.1 s) groups (p < 0.001). Oropharyngeal seal pressures were higher in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D and ProSeal LMA groups than in other three devices. Conclusions. Most study parameters for the Supreme LMA and i-gel were found to be superior to the other three tested supraglottic airway devices when inserted by novice military operators. PMID:26495289

  6. What Are the Key Statistics about Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers? What are the key statistics about laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers? The American Cancer ... 000 cancers will start in the hypopharynx. Survival statistics for these cancers are discussed in “ Survival rates ...

  7. What's New in Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional resources for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers What’s new in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers research and treatment? ... to better tests for early detection and to new targeted treatments. Chemoprevention Chemoprevention is the use of ...

  8. Mask and pattern characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routh, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of the mask and pattern facility to include information on equipment accuracy, limitations, and pattern making capabilities is discussed. An insight is provided into potential areas of pattern applications, the sequence of mask making, as well as possible inputs and outputs available to the user.

  9. Mini Metal Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project used with kindergarten and first-grade students that focused on traditional African masks as part of a unit on the culture of West Africa. Discusses how the students created their clay masks. Includes lists of learning objectives and art materials. (CMK)

  10. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  11. Enhancement in Informational Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Xiang; Richards, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to detect a tone added to a random masker improves when a preview of the masker is provided. In 2 experiments, the authors explored the role that perceptual organization plays in this release from masking. Method: Detection thresholds were measured in informational masking studies. The maskers were drawn at random prior to…

  12. Mask industry assessment: 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Marmillion, Patricia

    2006-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the fifth in the current series of annual reports. With continued industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 survey. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns and Services, Operating Cost Factors, and Equipment Utilization. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  13. Mask industry assessment: 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2009-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the eighth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 through 2008 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This in combination with the past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  14. Mask industry assessment: 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2008-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the seventh in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 through 2007 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  15. Mask Industry Assessment: 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Marmillion, Patricia; Hughes, Greg

    2007-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the sixth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 and 2006 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns and Services, Operating Cost Factors, and Equipment Utilization. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  16. Mask industry assessment: 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2002-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This assessment can be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of our critical mask industry. It should serve as a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  17. An unusual cause of hoarseness and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Truong, Phat; Dickerson, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and thyroid disease suggest locally invasive thyroid malignancy. In contrast, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by benign multinodular goiters or ectopic thyroid tissue accounts for only 1% of cases. This article describes an unusual case of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy secondary to a benign ectopic retrosternal thyroid tissue mass. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with progressive voice weakness and hoarseness. PMID:27467296

  18. Central nervous system integration of sensorimotor signals in oral and pharyngeal structures: oropharyngeal kinematics response to recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Ohlemacher, Jocelyn; Lammers, Andrew R; Gross, Andrew; Ballester, Ashley; Fraley, Luke; German, Rebecca Z

    2016-03-01

    Safe, efficient liquid feeding in infant mammals requires the central coordination of oropharyngeal structures innervated by multiple cranial and spinal nerves. The importance of laryngeal sensation and central sensorimotor integration in this system is poorly understood. Recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion (RLN) results in increased aspiration, though the mechanism for this is unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of unilateral RLN lesion on the motor coordination of infant liquid feeding. We hypothesized that 1) RLN lesion results in modified swallow kinematics, 2) postlesion oropharyngeal kinematics of unsafe swallows differ from those of safe swallows, and 3) nonswallowing phases of the feeding cycle show changed kinematics postlesion. We implanted radio opaque markers in infant pigs and filmed them pre- and postlesion with high-speed videofluoroscopy. Markers locations were digitized, and swallows were assessed for airway protection. RLN lesion resulted in modified kinematics of the tongue relative to the epiglottis in safe swallows. In lesioned animals, safe swallow kinematics differed from unsafe swallows. Unsafe swallow postlesion kinematics resembled prelesion safe swallows. The movement of the tongue was reduced in oral transport postlesion. Between different regions of the tongue, response to lesion was similar, and relative timing within the tongue was unchanged. RLN lesion has a pervasive effect on infant feeding kinematics, related to the efficiency of airway protection. The timing of tongue and hyolaryngeal kinematics in swallows is a crucial locus for swallow disruption. Laryngeal sensation is essential for the central coordination in feeding of oropharyngeal structures receiving motor inputs from different cranial nerves. PMID:26679618

  19. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Mohamad R.; Samuels, Stuart E.; Bellile, Emily; Shalabi, Firas L.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP), composite nodal volumes (GTVN) and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC) had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance. PMID:26569309

  20. Laryngeal aspergilloma: a complication of inhaled fluticasone therapy for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Darley, David; Lowinger, David; Plit, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    Primary laryngeal aspergillosis in immunocompetent patients is rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old woman with laryngeal aspergillosis thought to be secondary to long-term inhaled fluticasone therapy. Laryngeal aspergillosis may be an underrecognized complication of inhaled corticosteroid therapy. PMID:25530858

  1. A forensic autopsy case of death from laryngeal stenosis due to a late complication of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hideto; Tanifuji, Takanobu; Hasegawa, Iwao; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2016-05-01

    Irradiation is one of the standard modalities of treatment for neck cancer; however, it occasionally causes severe late complications. Here, we report an autopsy case of a death from laryngeal stenosis due to a late complication of radiotherapy. A man in his 70s who underwent radiotherapy for laryngeal cancer 6months before death was found dead in his home. Complete regression of the cancer was obtained after treatment, and signs suggestive of cancer recurrence were not evident before his death. Postmortem computed tomography showed severe narrowing of the upper airway due to glottic tissue swelling. The autopsy revealed an edematous epiglottis and supraglottic-glottic tissue with an ulcerative lesion, which severely narrowed the upper airway. Histopathological findings showed edema, hyalinization, and a proliferation of granulation tissue at the affected site. Neither a gross recurrence of cancer or finding suggestive of infection was observed in the specimen. This case is instructive to forensic pathologists regarding noting a radiotherapy complication as one of the possible causes of sudden death when the decedent previously underwent radiotherapy for neck cancer, and stresses the importance of detailed history taking and careful examination of the neck organs. PMID:27161915

  2. Hibernoma larynx with large multinodular goitre: unusual airway challenge.

    PubMed

    Iftikhar, Haissan; Siddiqui, Moghira Iqbaluddin

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of progressively increasing neck swelling, dysphagia and hoarseness of voice. CT scan revealed multi-nodular goitre and also showed a lesion in the supraglottis. It also showed another lesion in the supraglottis. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of thyroid revealed follicular cells. Routine flexible laryngoscopy was performed to evaluate vocal cord function; however, we found a smooth well-defined lesion just above the glottis, obstructing the direct view of the vocal cords, and an endangered airway. A provisional diagnosis of a laryngeal cyst was made. With all necessary precautions intubation was performed with a bougie and a reinforced endotracheal tube was inserted. Total thyroidectomy was performed first. With direct suspension laryngoscopy an attempt was made to deliver the laryngeal lesion, however, the lesion could not be removed. A suprahyoid lateral pharyngotomy was performed to deliver the lesion. Histopathology of the lesion revealed hibernoma. PMID:26250369

  3. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  4. Effectiveness of applying continuous positive airway pressure in a patient with paradoxical vocal fold movement after endotracheal extubation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yeun Hee; Song, Keu La Me; Ko, Dong Chan; Pin, Jung Woo; Ryu, Kyong Ho; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2016-02-01

    Paradoxical vocal fold movement (PVFM) is an uncommon upper airway disorder defined as paradoxical adduction of the vocal folds during inspiration. The etiology and treatment of PVFM are unclear. The physician should manage this condition because of the possibility of near complete airway obstruction in severe case of PVFM. We report a case of successful airway management in a patient with PVFM by applying continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In this case, PVFM was detected after removing an endotracheal tube from a 67-year-old male who underwent excision of a laryngeal mass. The patient recovered without complications in 1 day with support by CPAP. PMID:26885309

  5. Effectiveness of applying continuous positive airway pressure in a patient with paradoxical vocal fold movement after endotracheal extubation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Song, Keu La Me; Ko, Dong Chan; Pin, Jung Woo; Ryu, Kyong Ho; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Paradoxical vocal fold movement (PVFM) is an uncommon upper airway disorder defined as paradoxical adduction of the vocal folds during inspiration. The etiology and treatment of PVFM are unclear. The physician should manage this condition because of the possibility of near complete airway obstruction in severe case of PVFM. We report a case of successful airway management in a patient with PVFM by applying continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In this case, PVFM was detected after removing an endotracheal tube from a 67-year-old male who underwent excision of a laryngeal mass. The patient recovered without complications in 1 day with support by CPAP. PMID:26885309

  6. Neurological Complications in Thyroid Surgery: A Surgical Point of View on Laryngeal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Varaldo, Emanuela; Ansaldo, Gian Luca; Mascherini, Matteo; Cafiero, Ferdinando; Minuto, Michele N.

    2014-01-01

    The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB) is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle) varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified, the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN) runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction, and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve, which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a low range. PMID

  7. 2012 Mask Industry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Litt, Lloyd C.

    2012-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to semiconductor industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. 2012 marks the 11th consecutive year for the mask industry survey. This year's survey and reporting structure are similar to those of the previous years with minor modifications based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics. Categories include general mask information, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, and maintenance and returns. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. Results, initial observations, and key comparisons between the 2011 and 2012 survey responses are shown here, including multiple indications of a shift towards the manufacturing of higher end photomasks.

  8. [The review of transoral laser microsurgery in laryngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Wang, Jihua; Xiao, Xuping

    2016-02-01

    Transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) has developed more than 40 years in the treatment of laryngeal cancer. TLM is especially important in the minimally invasive surgery of laryngeal carcinoma. Compared with the traditional open surgery, it is a major breakthrough, which has the significant advantages such as safety, effectiveness, low rate of local recurrence and high rate of larynx preservation. Not only can cure early laryngeal cancer, but also more and more the use of TLM in advanced supraglottic and glottic laryngeal cancer were reported. This article will review the characteristics, indications, superiority, surgical options and efficacy of the TLM in laryngeal carcinomas. PMID:27373106

  9. [Diagnosis and therapy of laryngitis gastrica].

    PubMed

    Pahn, J; Schlottmann, A; Witt, G; Wilke, W

    2000-07-01

    We treated 64 patients with the diagnosis of laryngitis gastrica with Antra (Omeprazol) in doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg. To determine the success of the therapy, pH monitoring of the esophagus and hypopharynx, the voice status and measurement of vocal penetrating capacity were used. The results prove that a 20-mg dose of Antra is suitable for the therapy of laryngitis gastrica with a high rate of success. Problems which arose during the investigation, consequent changes of the original concept of the project as well as new aspects and questions which resulted from this are discussed with respect to further investigation. PMID:10955230

  10. Laryngeal Leishmaniasis with Extra-pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Swati; Khatiwada, Saurav; Sehrawat, Priyanka; Nischal, Neeraj; Jorwal, Pankaj; Soneja, Manish; Sharma, M C; Sharma, S K; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Anup

    2015-09-01

    Clinical presentations of Leishmania infection include visceral (most common form), cutaneous, mucocutaneous, mucosal and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. Mucosal form of leishmaniasis mostly involves oral and nasal mucosa. Rarely, laryngeal and pharyngeal mucosa may also be involved. Its concomitant presence with tuberculosis (TB), a disease rampant in India, is uncommon. Here we are reporting a case of isolated laryngeal leishmaniasis associated with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), with approach to diagnosis and treatment in a tropical resource-limited setting. PMID:27608871

  11. Masked Photocathode for Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-01-21

    In this research note, we propose a scheme to insert a photocathode inside a photoinjector for generating high brightness electron beam. Instead of mounting the photocathode onto the electrode, a masked electrode with small hole is used to shield the photocathode from the accelerating vacuum chamber. Using such a masked photocathode will make the replacement of photocathode material very simple by rotating the photocathode behind the mask into the hole. This will significantly increase the usage lifetime of a photocathode. Furthermore, this also helps reduce the dark current or secondary electron emission from the photocathode. The hole on the mask also provides a transverse cut-off to the Gaussian laser profile which can be beneficial from the beam dynamics point of view.

  12. Protective Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mask to protect the physically impaired from injuries to the face and head has been developed by Langley Research Center. It is made of composite materials, usually graphite or boron fibers woven into a matrix. Weighs less than three ounces.

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma of the respiratory tract following laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Lie, E S; Engh, V; Boysen, M; Clausen, O P; Kvernvold, H; Stenersen, T C; Winther, F O

    1994-03-01

    With the object to disclose an association between laryngeal papillomatosis and laryngeal carcinoma, we reviewed 102 patients with laryngeal papillomatosis treated between 1950 and 1979. Seven cases of laryngeal carcinomas were recorded and 1 patient with spread of papilloma to the bronchial tree developed a bronchial carcinoma. The time between onset of papilloma and diagnosis of carcinoma was 4-55 years (mean 24 years). For laryngeal carcinoma the ratio of observed to expected cases was 88. Of the 8 patients developing respiratory tract carcinoma, 2 had received treatment with radiation and 2 had been treated with Bleomycin. Four of these 8 patients were known smokers. This study shows that papillomatosis is more often associated with laryngeal carcinoma than previously reported. It appears, however, that laryngeal papillomas alone seldom induce carcinomas. Apart from irradiation and smoking, Bleomycin could be an important co-factor. PMID:7515551

  14. EUVL Mask Blank Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Mirkarimi, P; Stearns, D G; Sweeney, D; Chapman, H N; Clift, M; Hector, S; Yi, M

    2002-05-22

    EUV mask blanks are fabricated by depositing a reflective Mo/Si multilayer film onto super-polished substrates. Small defects in this thin film coating can significantly alter the reflected field and introduce defects in the printed image. Ideally one would want to produce defect-free mask blanks; however, this may be very difficult to achieve in practice. One practical way to increase the yield of mask blanks is to effectively repair multilayer defects, and to this effect they present two complementary defect repair strategies for use on multilayer-coated EUVL mask blanks. A defect is any area on the mask which causes unwanted variations in EUV dose in the aerial image obtained in a printing tool, and defect repair is correspondingly defined as any strategy that renders a defect unprintable during exposure. The term defect mitigation can be adopted to describe any strategy which renders a critical defect non-critical when printed, and in this regard a non-critical defect is one that does not adversely affect device function. Defects in the patterned absorber layer consist of regions where metal, typically chrome, is unintentionally added or removed from the pattern leading to errors in the reflected field. There currently exists a mature technology based on ion beam milling and ion beam assisted deposition for repairing defects in the absorber layer of transmission lithography masks, and it is reasonable to expect that this technology will be extended to the repair of absorber defects in EUVL masks. However, techniques designed for the repair of absorber layers can not be directly applied to the repair of defects in the mask blank, and in particular the multilayer film. In this paper they present for the first time a new technique for the repair of amplitude defects as well as recent results on the repair of phase defects.

  15. New mask technology challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2001-09-01

    Mask technology development has accelerated dramatically in recent years from the glacial pace of the last three decades to the rapid and sometimes simultaneous introductions of new wavelengths and mask-based resolution enhancement techniques. The nature of the semiconductor business has also become one driven by time-to-market as an overwhelming factor in capturing market share and profit. These are among the factors that have created enormous stress on the mask industry to produce masks with enhanced capabilities, such as phase-shifting attenuators, sub-resolution assist bars, and optical proximity correction (OPC) features, while maintaining or reducing cost and cycle time. The mask can no longer be considered a commodity item that is purchased form the lowest-cost supplier. Instead, it must now be promoted as an integral part of the technical and business case for a total lithographic solution. Improving partnership between designer, mask-maker, and wafer lithographer will be the harbinger of success in finding a profitable balance of capability, cost, and cycle time. Likewise for equipment infrastructure development, stronger partnership on the international level is necessary to control development cost and mitigate schedule and technical risks.

  16. Mask Industry Assessment: 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Chan, David Y.

    2010-09-01

    A survey created supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the ninth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was basically the same as the 2005 through 2009 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  17. Mask Industry Assessment: 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. David

    2011-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the tenth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report has been used as one of the baselines to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It continues to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was essentially the same as the 2005 through 2010 surveys. Questions are grouped into following categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  18. Neurotrophin expression and laryngeal muscle pathophysiology following recurrent laryngeal nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    WANG, BAOXIN; YUAN, JUNJIE; XU, JIAFENG; XIE, JIN; WANG, GUOLIANG; DONG, PIN

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal palsy often occurs as a result of recurrent laryngeal or vagal nerve injury during oncological surgery of the head and neck, affecting quality of life and increasing economic burden. Reinnervation following recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is difficult despite development of techniques, such as neural anastomosis, nerve grafting and creation of a laryngeal muscle pedicle. In the present study, due to the limited availability of human nerve tissue for research, a rat model was used to investigate neurotrophin expression and laryngeal muscle pathophysiology in RLN injury. Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent right RLN transection with the excision of a 5-mm segment. Vocal fold movements, vocalization, histology and immunostaining were evaluated at different time-points (3, 6, 10 and 16 weeks). Although vocalization was restored, movement of the vocal fold failed to return to normal levels following RLN injury. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor differed in the thyroarytenoid (TA) and posterior cricoarytenoid muscles. The number of axons did not increase to baseline levels over time. Furthermore, normal muscle function was unlikely with spontaneous reinnervation. During regeneration following RLN injury, differences in the expression levels of neurotrophic factors may have resulted in preferential reinnervation of the TA muscles. Data from the present study indicated that neurotrophic factors may be applied for restoring the function of the laryngeal nerve following recurrent injury. PMID:26677138

  19. Masks: The Artist in Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Whether masks are made from cardboard, papier-mache, metal, wood, leather, fabric, clay or any combination of these materials, they bring out the artist in people. Young children like to wear masks when they play to pretend they were another person or animal. Masks let them fantasize and be creative. The author's students made masks representing…

  20. Cranial nerve injuries with supraglottic airway devices: a systematic review of published case reports and series.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatarajan, V; Van Wijk, R M; Rajbhoj, A

    2015-03-01

    Cranial nerve injuries are unusual complications of supraglottic airway use. Branches of the trigeminal, glossopharyngeal, vagus and the hypoglossal nerve may all be injured. We performed a systematic review of published case reports and case series of cranial nerve injury from the use of supraglottic airway devices. Lingual nerve injury was the most commonly reported (22 patients), followed by recurrent laryngeal (17 patients), hypoglossal (11 patients), glossopharyngeal (three patients), inferior alveolar (two patients) and infra-orbital (one patient). Injury is generally thought to result from pressure neuropraxia. Contributing factors may include: an inappropriate size or misplacement of the device; patient position; overinflation of the device cuff; and poor technique. Injuries other than to the recurrent laryngeal nerve are usually mild and self-limiting. Understanding the diverse presentation of cranial nerve injuries helps to distinguish them from other complications and assists in their management. PMID:25376257

  1. Upper airway test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An upper airway biopsy is obtained by using a flexible scope called a bronchoscope. The scope is passed down through ... may be performed when an abnormality of the upper airway is suspected. It may also be performed as ...

  2. Influence of lung volume dependence of upper airway resistance during continuous negative airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Marc, I

    1994-08-01

    To quantify the contribution of lung volume dependence of upper airway (UA) on continuous negative airway pressure (CNAP)-induced increase in upper airway resistance, we compared the changes in supralaryngeal resistance during an isolated decrease in lung volume and during CNAP in eight normal awake subjects. Inspiratory supralaryngeal resistance was measured at isoflow during four trials, during two CNAP trials where the pressure in a nasal mask was progressively decreased in 3- to 5-cmH2O steps and during two continuous positive extrathoracic pressure (CPEP) trials where the pressure around the chest (in an iron lung) was increased in similar steps. The CNAP and CPEP trials were done in random order. During the CPEP trial, the neck was covered by a rigid collar to prevent compression by the cervical seal of the iron lung. In each subject, resistance progressively increased during the experiments. The increase was linearily correlated with the pressure increase in the iron lung and with the square of the mask pressure during CNAP. There was a highly significant correlation between the rate of rise in resistance between CNAP and CPEP: the steeper the increase in resistance with decreasing lung volume, the steeper the increase in resistance with decreasing airway pressure. Lung volume dependence in UA resistance can account for 61% of the CNAP-induced increase in resistance. We conclude that in normal awake subjects the changes in supralaryngeal resistance induced by CNAP can partly be explained by the lung volume dependence of this resistance. PMID:8002537

  3. A comparative study on the usefulness of the Glidescope or Macintosh laryngoscope when intubating normal airways

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Guen Seok; Lee, Eun-Ha; Lim, Chae Seong

    2011-01-01

    Background The Glidescope Videolaryngoscope (GVL) is a newly developed video laryngoscope. It offers a significantly improved laryngeal view and facilitates endotracheal intubation in difficult airways, but it is controversial in that it offers an improved laryngeal view in normal airways as well. And the price of GVL is expensive. We hypothesized that intubation carried out by fully experienced anesthesiologists using the GVL with appropriate pre-anesthetic preparations offers an improved laryngeal view and shortened intubation time in normal airways. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the GVL with the Macintosh laryngoscope in normal airways and to determine whether GVL can substitute the Macintosh laryngoscope. Methods This study included 60 patients with an ASA physical status of class 1 or 2 requiring tracheal intubation for elective surgery. All patients were randomly allocated into two groups, GVL (group G) or Macintosh (group M). ADS (airway difficulty score) was recorded before induction of anesthesia. The anesthesiologist scored vocal cord visualization using the percentage of glottic opening (POGO) visible and the subjective ease of intubation on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The time required to intubate was recorded by an assistant. Results There was a significant increase in POGO when using the GVL (P < 0.05). However, there was no difference in the time required for a successful tracheal intubation using the GVL compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope. The VAS score on the ease of intubation was significantly lower for the GVL than for the Macintosh laryngoscope (P < 0.05). Conclusions GVL could be a first-line tool in normal airways. PMID:21716906

  4. Fabrication technique for a custom face mask for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Prehn, Ronald S; Colquitt, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The development of the positive airway pressure custom mask (TAP-PAP CM) has changed the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. The TAP-PAP CM is used in continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) and is fabricated from the impression of the face. This mask is then connected to a post screwed into the mechanism of the TAP3 (Thornton Anterior Positioner) oral appliance. This strapless CPAP face mask features an efficient and stable CPAP interface with mandibular stabilization (Hybrid Therapy). A technique with a 2-stage polyvinyl siloxane face impression is described that offers improvements over the established single-stage face impression. This 2-stage impression technique eliminates problems inherent in the single-stage face impression, including voids, compressed tissue, inadequate borders, and a rushed experience due to the setting time of the single stage. The result is a custom mask with an improved seal to the CPAP device. PMID:26774315

  5. Ventricular pressures in phonating excised larynges

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Pressure in the laryngeal ventricle was measured with a beveled needle connected to a pressure transducer in excised canine larynges. Air pressures within the ventricle were obtained for different adduction levels of the true vocal folds (TVFs), false vocal folds (FVFs), and subglottal pressures (Ps). Results indicated that the air pressures in the ventricle appear to be strongly related to the motion of the FVFs rather than to the effects of TVF vibration. Both dc and ac pressures depend on FVF adduction, amplitude of motion of the FVFs, and whether the FVFs touch each other during the vibratory cycle. Mean and peak-to-peak pressures in the ventricle were as high as 65% of the mean and peak-to-peak Ps, respectively, when the FVFs vibrated with large amplitude and contact each cycle. If the glottis was not closed, a medial movement of the FVFs appeared to create a positive pressure pulse on the Ps signal due to an increase in the laryngeal flow resistance. The electroglottograph signal showed evidence of tissue contact for both the TVFs and the FVFs. The study suggests that the laryngeal ventricle acts as a relatively independent aero-acoustic chamber that depends primarily upon the motion of the FVFs. PMID:22894222

  6. Epidemiological evidence indicates asbestos causes laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.H.; Handley, M.A.; Wood, R. )

    1990-06-01

    A variety of opinions have been expressed in the literature concerning asbestos and laryngeal cancer. This paper presents an analysis of epidemiological studies based on criteria that prioritized the most heavily exposed cohorts. Emphasis was given to the six cohorts or subcohorts with lung cancer relative risk estimates of 2 or more. The two groups of workers with the highest lung cancer relative risk estimates (4.06 and 3.28) both gave strong support for a causal association of asbestos and laryngeal cancer, with relative risk estimates of 1.91 (90% confidence limits 1.00 to 3.34) and 3.75 (90% confidence limits 1.01 to 9.68), respectively. Confounding with cigarette smoking or alcohol consumption does not explain the findings. Case-control studies gave mixed results, but generally supported the hypothesis. It was concluded that asbestos is a probable cause of laryngeal cancer in view of the reasonable consistency of the studies, the strength of the association in key studies, the evidence for dose-response relationships, and the biological plausibility for asbestos being a cause of laryngeal cancer. 48 references.

  7. A genetic view of laryngeal cancer heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    de Miguel-Luken, María José; Chaves-Conde, Manuel; Carnero, Amancio

    2016-05-01

    During the recent decades significant improvements in the understanding of laryngeal molecular biology allowed a better characterization of the tumor. However, despite increased molecular knowledge and clinical efforts, survival of patients with laryngeal cancer remains the same as 30 years ago. Although this result may not make major conclusions as preservation approaches were not broadly used until the time of database collection, it seems to be clear that there is still window for improvement. Although the cornerstone for laryngeal cancer eradication is to implement smoking cessation programs, survival progresses will be hopefully seen in the future. Introducing molecular biomarkers as predictive factors to determine which patients will benefit of preservation treatments may become one of the next steps to improve survival. Furthermore, the development of new therapeutic modalities joint to biomarkers to selectively apply such new therapy in these patients may help to define new modalities with improved survival. New inhibitors against Notch pathway, EGFR, VRK1 or DNA damage repair may become gold standard if we are able to identify patients that may benefit from them, either on survival or functional larynx preservation. It is the moment for an inflexion point on the way laryngeal cancer is clinically managed. PMID:26940775

  8. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS). Five case report.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Halil; Ekiz, Ali; Acar, Deniz Kanber; Aydiner, Burchan; Kaya, Basak; Sezer, Salim

    2015-03-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is an extremely rare life-threatening condition. Laryngeal atresia appears to be the most frequent cause. Generally the diagnosis is made with severely enlarged and highly echogenic lungs and additional ultrasound findings. The prognosis of the affected infants is often poor. Five cases are reported here that were diagnosed in a tertiary center between 2008 and 2014. PMID:25745665

  10. A Series of Congenital High Airway Obstruction Syndrome – Classic Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Amit Kumar; Alam, Shah; Mittal, Kartik; Thakkar, Hemangini

    2016-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a very rare entity with very poor prognosis in which upper airway is intrinsically obstructed, the most common reason being laryngeal atresia. In summary prenatal early diagnosis of patients with CHAOS is necessary so that perinatal management can be undertaken successfully or elective termination of pregnancy can be undertaken. The fetoscopic approach may be a life saving modality in a subset of CHAOS patients. Involving a multidisciplinary team comprising of paediatricians, radiologists, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists increases the efficiency of management. PMID:27134966

  11. Overview of Mask Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Bryan J.; Jindal, Vibhu; Lin, C. C.; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Kwon, Hyuk Joo; Ma, Hsing-Chien; Goldstein, Michael; Chan, Yau-Wai; Goodwin, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the successor to optical lithography and will enable advanced patterning in semiconductor manufacturing processes down to the 8 nm half pitch technology node and beyond. However, before EUV can successfully be inserted into high volume manufacturing a few challenges must be overcome. Central among these remaining challenges is the requirement to produce "defect free" EUV masks. Mask blank defects have been one of the top challenges in the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. To determine defect sources and devise mitigation solutions, detailed characterization of defects is critical. However, small defects pose challenges in metrology scale-up. SEMATECH has a comprehensive metrology strategy to address any defect larger than a 20 nm core size to obtain solutions for defect-free EUV mask blanks. SEMATECH's Mask Blank Development Center has been working since 2003 to develop the technology to support defect free EUV mask blanks. Since 2003, EUV mask blank defects have been reduced from 10000 of size greater than 100 nm to about a few tens at size 70 nm. Unfortunately, today's state of the art defect levels are still about 10 to 100 times higher than needed. Closing this gap requires progress in the various processes associated with glass substrate creation and multilayer deposition. That process development improvement in turn relies upon the availability of metrology equipment that can resolve and chemically characterize defects as small as 30 nm. The current defect reduction efforts at SEMATECH have intensively included a focus on inspection and characterization. The facility boasts nearly 100M of metrology hardware, including an FEI Titan TEM, Lasertec M1350 and M7360 tools, an actinic inspection tool, AFM, SPM, and scanning auger capabilities. The newly established Auger tool at SEMATECH can run a standard 6-inch mask blank and is already providing important information on sub-100 nm defects on EUV

  12. Epidemiological review of laryngeal cancer: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bobdey, Saurabh; Jain, Aanchal; Balasubramanium, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laryngeal cancer is one of the 10 leading causes of cancer in Indian men. The association of laryngeal cancer and tobacco smoking is well-established, but the peculiarities such as wide variation of disease distribution and survival, role of tobacco chewing, indoor air pollution, and dietary factors in laryngeal cancer causation needs to be understood. In this study, we review the descriptive and observational epidemiology of laryngeal cancer in India. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and Web of science electronic database was searched from January 1995 to December 2013, using the using keywords “laryngeal cancer, laryngeal cancer outcome, epidemiology, etiological factor and their corresponding Mesh terms were used in combination like OR, AND.” Two authors independently selected studies published in English and conducted in India. A total of 15 studies were found to be relevant and eligible for this review. Results: In India, laryngeal cancer contributes to approximately 3-6% of all cancers in men. The age-adjusted incidence rate of cancer larynx in males varies widely among registries, highest is 8.18 per 100,000 in Kamprup Urban District and the lowest is 1.26 per 100,000 in Nagaland. The 5-year survival for laryngeal cancer in India is approximately 28%. Indian studies show tobacco, alcohol, long-term exposure to indoor air pollution, spicy food, and nonvegetarian diet as risk factors for laryngeal cancer. Conclusion: There is wide regional variation in the incidence of laryngeal cancer in India. Survival rates of laryngeal carcinoma are much lower as compared to other Asian countries. Studies conducted in India to identify important risk factors of laryngeal cancer are very limited, especially on diet and indoor air pollution. Hence, more research is required for identifying the etiological factors and development of scientifically sound laryngeal cancer prevention programs. PMID:26855523

  13. Development and validation of the Newcastle laryngeal hypersensitivity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laryngeal hypersensitivity may be an important component of the common disorders of laryngeal motor dysfunction including chronic refractory cough, pdoxical vocal fold movement (vocal cord dysfunction), muscle tension dysphonia, and globus pharyngeus. Patients with these conditions frequently report sensory disturbances, and an emerging concept of the ‘irritable larynx’ suggests common features of a sensory neuropathic dysfunction as a part of these disorders. The aim of this study was to develop a Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire for patients with laryngeal dysfunction syndromes in order to measure the laryngeal sensory disturbance occurring in these conditions. Methods The 97 participants included 82 patients referred to speech pathology for behavioural management of laryngeal dysfunction and 15 healthy controls. The participants completed a 21 item self administered questionnaire regarding symptoms of abnormal laryngeal sensation. Factor analysis was conducted to examine correlations between items. Discriminant analysis and responsiveness to change were evaluated. Results The final questionnaire comprised 14 items across three domains: obstruction, pain/thermal, and irritation. The questionnaire demonstrated significant discriminant validity with a mean difference between the patients with laryngeal disorders and healthy controls of 5.5. The clinical groups with laryngeal hypersensitivity had similar abnormal scores. Furthermore the Newcastle Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire (LHQ) showed improvement following behavioural speech pathology intervention with a mean reduction in LHQ score of 2.3. Conclusion The Newcastle Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire is a simple, non-invasive tool to measure laryngeal pesthesia in patients with laryngeal conditions such as chronic cough, pdoxical vocal fold movement (vocal cord dysfunction), muscle tension dysphonia, and globus pharyngeus. It can successfully differentiate patients from

  14. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction temperature and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  15. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction time, breakthroughs, and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocol Optimization for Delineation of Gross Tumor Volume in Hypopharyngeal and Laryngeal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Verduijn, Gerda M.; Bartels, Lambertus W. Ph.D.; Pameijer, Frank A.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To optimize the use of MRI for delineation of gross tumor volume for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors. Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance images (T1 weighted and T2 weighted) of a healthy volunteer were acquired using a 1.5 T and 3.0 T MR scanner. Various receiver coils were investigated that were compatible with the immobilization mask needed for reliable coregistration with computed tomography data. For the optimal receiver coil, the influence of resolution, slice thickness, and strength of magnetic field on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was studied. Feasibility of the definitive protocol was tested on patients with hypopharyngeal (n = 19) and laryngeal (n = 42) carcinoma. Results: Large differences in SNR were obtained for the various coils. The SNR values obtained using surface coils that were compatible with the immobilization mask were three times higher than those obtained using a standard head-and-neck coil and five times higher than those obtained using a body coil. High-resolution images (0.4 x 0.4 x 4 mm{sup 3}) showed superior anatomic detail and resulted in a 4-min scan time. Image quality at 3.0 T was not significantly better compared with 1.5 T. In 3 patients the MR study could not be performed; for 5 patients images were severely deteriorated by motion artefacts. High-quality MR images were obtained in 53 patients. Conclusions: High-resolution MR images of the hypopharynx and larynx can be obtained in the majority of patients using surface receiver coils in combination with the radiotherapy mask. These MR images can be successfully used for tumor delineation in radiotherapy.

  17. The Physiologically Difficult Airway.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C

    2015-12-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  18. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod M.; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  19. TRP channels and temperature in airway disease—clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Millqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Temperatures above and below what is generally regarded as “comfortable” for the human being have long been known to induce various airway symptoms, especially in combination with exercise in cold climate with temperatures below 0°C, which is naturally since exercise is followed by enhanced ventilation and thus greater amounts of inhaled cold air. The aim was to highlight the knowledge we have today on symptoms from the airways (here also including the eyes) arisen from various temperatures; the mechanisms, the pathophysiology and their clinical significance. The most common eye and airway conditions related to temperature changes are dry eye disease, rhinitis, laryngeal dysfunction, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic cough. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are probably involved in all temperature induced airway symptoms but via different pathways, which are now beginning to be mapped out. In asthma, the most persuasive hypothesis today is that cold-induced asthmatic bronchoconstriction is induced by dehydration of the airway mucosa, from which it follows that provocations with osmotic stimuli like hypertonic saline and mannitol can be used as a surrogate for exercise provocation as well as dry air inhalation. In chronic unexplained cough there seems to be a direct influence of cold air on the TRP ion channels followed by coughing and increased cough sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin. Revelations in the last decades of the ability of several airway TRP ion channels to sense and react to ambient air temperature have opened new windows for the understanding of the pathogenesis in a diversity of airway reactions appearing in many common respiratory diseases. PMID:27227021

  20. TRP channels and temperature in airway disease-clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Millqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Temperatures above and below what is generally regarded as "comfortable" for the human being have long been known to induce various airway symptoms, especially in combination with exercise in cold climate with temperatures below 0°C, which is naturally since exercise is followed by enhanced ventilation and thus greater amounts of inhaled cold air. The aim was to highlight the knowledge we have today on symptoms from the airways (here also including the eyes) arisen from various temperatures; the mechanisms, the pathophysiology and their clinical significance. The most common eye and airway conditions related to temperature changes are dry eye disease, rhinitis, laryngeal dysfunction, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic cough. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are probably involved in all temperature induced airway symptoms but via different pathways, which are now beginning to be mapped out. In asthma, the most persuasive hypothesis today is that cold-induced asthmatic bronchoconstriction is induced by dehydration of the airway mucosa, from which it follows that provocations with osmotic stimuli like hypertonic saline and mannitol can be used as a surrogate for exercise provocation as well as dry air inhalation. In chronic unexplained cough there seems to be a direct influence of cold air on the TRP ion channels followed by coughing and increased cough sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin. Revelations in the last decades of the ability of several airway TRP ion channels to sense and react to ambient air temperature have opened new windows for the understanding of the pathogenesis in a diversity of airway reactions appearing in many common respiratory diseases. PMID:27227021

  1. Recovery of laryngeal function after intraoperative injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hydman, Jonas; Svensson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) during thyroid/parathyroid surgery, despite a macroscopically intact nerve, is a challenge which highlights the sensitivity and complexity of laryngeal innervation. Furthermore, the uncertain prognosis stresses a lack of capability to diagnose the reason behind the impaired function. There is a great deal of literature considering risk factors, surgical technique and mechanisms outside the nerve affecting the incidence of RLN paresis during surgery. To be able to prognosticate recovery in cases of laryngeal dysfunction and voice changes after thyroid surgery, the surgeon would first need to define the presence, location, and type of laryngeal nerve injury. There is little data describing the events within the nerve and the neurobiological reasons for the impaired function related to potential recovery and prognosis. In addition, very little data has been presented in order to clarify any differences between the transient and permanent injury of the RLN. This review aims, from an anatomical and neurobiological perspective, to provide an update on the current understandings of surgically-induced injury to the laryngeal nerves. PMID:25713777

  2. Masked mycotoxins: A review

    PubMed Central

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders. PMID:23047235

  3. Apodized Phase Mask Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Among the optical instruments proposed to detect and characterize exoplanets, phase masks coronagraphs offer very small inner working angles. Designed for off-axis telescopes, their performance is greatly reduced when used with centrally obstructed apertures such as those of the Palomar telescope, the very large telescope, or the James Webb space telescope. However, a clear circular aperture is not the only pupil shape for which a phase mask coronagraph can work properly. In fact, for a given centrally obstructed aperture, we show that it is possible to compute optimal apodizers that help achieve stellar extinction levels similar to those obtained in the ideal case of an off-axis telescope. Trade-offs exist between these levels, the transmission of the apodizer, and the area covered by the Lyot stop. We detail the Fourier optics formalism that makes these optimizations possible, as well as a few examples of shaped pupils. Some are designed for a four-quadrants phase mask, and some others for a vortex phase mask. We also offer a comparison with a coronagraph solely composed of a shaped pupil.

  4. Assessment of laryngeal dysfunctions of dysarthric speakers.

    PubMed

    Surabhi, V; Vijayalakshmi, P; Steffina, Lily; Jayanthan, Ra V

    2009-01-01

    Dysarthria is a neuromotor impairment of speech that affects one or more of the speech sub-systems. It is reflected in the acoustic characteristics of the phonemes as deviations from their healthy counterparts. In the current work, the deviations associated with laryngeal dysfunctions are analysed in order to assess and quantify parameters that will help evaluate dysarthria. Perturbation measures, pitch period statistics and Pitch Variation Index (PVI) are computed for the assessment of laryngeal dysfunctions of dysarthric speakers. The assessments were performed on the Nemours database of dysarthric speech and compared with normal speakers available in the TIMIT speech corpus. The results were correlated with Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment (FDA) scores. The analysis resulted in a technique to predict the degree of severity of dysarthria and illustrate the multi-causal nature of the disorder. PMID:19965223

  5. [One case of laryngeal pleomorphic adenoma].

    PubMed

    An, Huiqin; Bu, Guiqing; Guo, Mingli

    2013-05-01

    A male patient, 55 years old, suffered from intermittent sound,voice depression and shortness of breath for one year,and from dysphagia for 3-4 months. Through fiber laryngoscopy,we could see tumor in the left posterior aryepiglottic fold. The tumor's surface was smooth. A portion of the tumor protruded to the laryngeal cavity and the aryepiglottic fold external,it also covered most of the glottis. Bilateral vocal cord were smooth and had good mobility. Throat CT demonstrated an irregular soft tissue mass on the left side of the aryepiglottic fold in supraglottic area with obscure normal boundary from adjacent structure. The left side of pyriform sinus became shallow without obvious bone destruction. The pathological report showed pleomorphic adenoma. The diagnosis was laryngeal pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:23898619

  6. Applications of robotics for laryngeal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hillel, Alexander T.; Kapoor, Ankur; Simaan, Nabil; Taylor, Russell H.; Flint, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The author presents the clinical application of robotics to laryngeal surgery in terms of enhancement of surgical precision and performance of other minimally invasive procedures not feasible with current instrumentation. Presented in this article are comparisons of human arm with robotic arm in terms of degrees of freedom and discussion of surgeries and outcomes with use of the robotic arm. Robotic equipment for laryngeal surgery has the potential to overcome many of the limitations of endolaryngeal procedures by improving optics, increasing instrument degrees of freedom, and modulating tremor. Outside of laryngology, a multi-armed robotic system would have utility in microvascular procedures at the base of the skull, sinus surgery, and single port gastrointestinal and thoracic access surgery. PMID:18570959

  7. Organ preservation surgery for laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sharad; Carney, Andrew Simon

    2009-01-01

    The principles of management of the laryngeal cancer have evolved over the recent past with emphasis on organ preservation. These developments have paralleled technological advancements as well as refinement in the surgical technique. The surgeons are able to maintain physiological functions of larynx namely speech, respiration and swallowing without compromising the loco-regional control of cancer in comparison to the more radical treatment modalities. A large number of organ preservation surgeries are available to the surgeon; however, careful assessment of the stage of the cancer and selection of the patient is paramount to a successful outcome. A comprehensive review of various organ preservation techniques in vogue for the management of laryngeal cancer is presented. PMID:19442314

  8. Competing for Consciousness: Prolonged Mask Exposure Reduces Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    In object substitution masking (OSM) a sparse, temporally trailing 4-dot mask impairs target identification, even though it has different contours from, and does not spatially overlap with the target. Here, we demonstrate a previously unknown characteristic of OSM: Observers show reduced masking at prolonged (e.g., 640 ms) relative to intermediate…

  9. Laryngeal biomechanics of the singing voice.

    PubMed

    Koufman, J A; Radomski, T A; Joharji, G M; Russell, G B; Pillsbury, D C

    1996-12-01

    By transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy, patients with functional voice often demonstrate abnormal laryngeal biomechanics, commonly supraglottic contraction. Appropriately, such conditions are sometimes termed muscle tension dysphonias. Singers working at the limits of their voice may also transiently demonstrate comparable tension patterns. However, the biomechanics of normal singing, particularly for different singing styles, have not been previously well characterized. We used transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy to study 100 healthy singers to assess patterns of laryngeal tension during normal singing and to determine whether factors such as sex, occupation, and style of singing influence laryngeal muscle tension. Thirty-nine male and 61 female singers were studied; 48 were professional singers, and 52 were amateurs. Examinations of study subjects performing standardized and nonstandardized singing tasks were recorded on a laser disk and subsequently analyzed in a frame-by-frame fashion by a blinded otolaryngologist. Each vocal task was graded for muscle tension by previously established criteria, and objective muscle tension scores were computed. The muscle tension score was expressed as a percentage of frames for each task with one of the laryngeal muscle tension patterns shown. The lowest muscle tension scores were seen in female professional singers, and the highest muscle tension scores were seen in amateur female singers. Male singers (professional and amateur) had intermediate muscle tension scores. Classical singers had lower muscle tension scores than nonclassical singers, with the lowest muscle tension scores being seen in those singing choral music (41%), art song (47%), and opera (57%), and the highest being seen in those singing jazz/pop (65%), musical theater (74%), bluegrass/country and western (86%), and rock/gospel (94%). Analyzed also were the influences of vocal nodules, prior vocal training, number of performance and practice hours per week

  10. Diaphragm and Laryngeal FDG Uptake With Hiccups.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Madhur K; Jain, Avani S; Panneer, Venkat; Muthukrishnan, Indirani; Simon, Shelley

    2015-11-01

    F-FDG PET/CT study is a well-established investigation in diagnosis, treatment evaluation, and follow-up of malignant tumors. It is very important to know the normal biodistribution and physiologic uptake of F-FDG to prevent it from confusing as malignant disease. This article describes unusual but physiological uptake in the laryngeal and diaphragmatic muscles in a patient presenting as metastatic adenocarcinoma with unknown primary having hiccups. PMID:26204217

  11. Erythromycin in acute laryngitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Schalén, L; Eliasson, I; Kamme, C; Schalén, C

    1993-03-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis and Hemophilus influenzae are isolated from the nasopharynx in 50% to 55% and 8% to 15%, respectively, of cases of acute laryngitis in adults. This finding indicates that these organisms, M catarrhalis in particular, are in some way involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder. In the present double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, the effect of erythromycin ethylsuccinate (0.5 g twice a day for 5 days) on the elimination of nasopharyngeal pathogens and reduction of clinical signs of upper respiratory tract infection, as well as on subjective complaints, was evaluated in 106 adults with acute laryngitis. The bacterial isolation rates at presentation were M catarrhalis 50%, H influenzae 18%, and Streptococcus pneumoniae 4%. In the 99 patients who completed the study, the elimination of M catarrhalis after 1 week was better in the erythromycin group (25 of 30 cases) than in the placebo group (6 of 19 cases; p < or = .00038). The elimination of H influenzae was unaffected by erythromycin. Otolaryngologic examination did not reveal any significant group differences regarding laryngitis, pharyngitis, or rhinitis. Voice quality was improved after 1 week, irrespective of treatment. However, as compared to the placebo group, the erythromycin group reported fewer voice complaints after 1 week and fewer coughing complaints after 2 weeks. As acute laryngitis in adults is self-limiting, and subjective symptoms are spontaneously reduced after 1 week in most cases, antibiotic treatment does not seem warranted as a general policy. However, erythromycin may be justified in patients who are professionally dependent on voice function. PMID:8457123

  12. Undifferentiated Laryngeal Carcinoma with Pagetoid Spread.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, Sulen; Dogan, Ersoy; Sahin, Yasemin; Uzun, Evren; Bekis, Recep; Ada, Emel; Sagol, Ozgul; Akman, Fadime

    2016-06-01

    Pagetoid spread, is used to define intraepithelial spread of cancer cells, when a massive carcinoma is identified beneath the basal membrane. There are only few reports of pagetoid spread at the head and neck region. Herein a 74 year old male patient with bilateral transglottic laryngeal high grade malignant epithelial tumor with pagetoid spread is presented. The tumor was located at the submucosa and there was spread of the CK7 and CK19 positive tumor cells into the non neoplastic mucosa, which was CK5/6 positive, sparing the basement membrane, creating a typical pagetoid pattern. Radiographic and positron emission tomography scan examination of the patient was unremarkable at presentation other than the laryngeal and neck lesions; but extensive systemic metastasis developed at 6 months following operation. To the best of our knowledge no epithelial malignancy with pagetoid spread was described at the larynx. Pagetoid spread may be a hallmark of very aggressive behavior in laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:26292650

  13. Integrated Multipoint-Laser Endoscopic Airway Measurements by Transoral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Neitsch, Marie; Horn, Iris-Susanne; Hofer, Mathias; Dietz, Andreas; Fischer, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Optical and technical characteristics usually do not allow objective endoscopic distance measurements. So far no standardized method for endoscopic distance measurement is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of transoral airway measurements with a multipoint-laser endoscope. Methods. The semirigid endoscope includes a multipoint laser measurement system that projects 49 laser points (wavelength 639 nm, power < 5 mW) into the optical axis of the endoscopic view. Distances, areas, and depths can be measured in real-time. Transoral endoscopic airway measurements were performed on nine human cadavers, which were correlated with CT measurements. Results. The preliminary experiment showed an optimum distance between the endoscope tip and the object of 5 to 6 cm. There was a mean measurement error of 3.26% ± 2.53%. A Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.95 (p = 0.01) was calculated for the laryngeal measurements and of 0.93 (p < 0.01) for the tracheal measurements compared to the CT. Using the Bland-Altman-Plot, the 95% limits of agreement for the laryngeal measurements were satisfactory: −0.76 and 0.93. Conclusions. Integrated multipoint-laser endoscopic measurement is a promising technical supplement, with potential use in diagnostic endoscopy and transoral endoscopic surgery in daily practice. PMID:27022612

  14. Effects of aging and levodopa on the laryngeal adductor reflex in rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Xu, Zengrui; Butler, Susan G.; Leng, Iris; Zhang, Tan; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an essential role in sensorimotor function, and declines with age. Previously, we found the laryngeal adductor reflex (LAR) was increased in excitation by a dopamine receptor antagonist. If this airway-protective reflex is similarly affected by aging, it will interfere with volitional control in older adults. The current study tested whether the LAR was affected by aging, and whether such deficits were reversed by levodopa administration in aging rats. We recorded thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle activity at rest and during elicitation of LAR responses by stimulation of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (iSLN) in 6-, 18- and 30-month-old rats under alpha-chloralose anesthesia. Using paired stimuli at different inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs), LAR central conditioning, resting muscle activity, and reflex latency and amplitudes were quantified. Numbers of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) were measured using tyrosine hydroxylase staining. We found: (1) increased resting TA muscle activity and LAR amplitude occurred with fewer dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc in 18- and 30-month-old rats; (2) decreases in LAR latency and increases in amplitude correlated with reduced numbers of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc; (3) test responses were greater at 1000 ms ISI in 18-month-old rats compared with 6-month-old rats; and (4) levodopa administration further increased response latency but did not alter muscle activity, response amplitude, or central conditioning. In conclusion, increases in laryngeal muscle activity levels and re-flex amplitudes accompanied age reductions in dopaminergic neurons but were not reversed with levodopa administration. PMID:22824541

  15. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  16. Mask Blank Defect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M A; Sommargren, G E

    2000-02-04

    Mask blanks are the substrates that hold the master patterns for integrated circuits. Integrated circuits are semiconductor devices, such as microprocessors (mPs), dynamic random access memory (DRAMs), and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that are central to the computer, communication, and electronics industries. These devices are fabricated using a set of master patterns that are sequentially imaged onto light-sensitive coated silicon wafers and processed to form thin layers of insulating and conductive materials on top of the wafer. These materials form electrical paths and transistors that control the flow of electricity through the device. For the past forty years the semiconductor industry has made phenomenal improvements in device functionality, compactness, speed, power, and cost. This progress is principally due to the exponential decrease in the minimum feature size of integrated circuits, which has been reduced by a factor of {radical}2 every three years. Since 1992 the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has coordinated the efforts of producing a technology roadmap for semiconductors. In the latest document, ''The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors: 1999'', future technology nodes (minimum feature sizes) and targeted dates were specified and are summarized in Table 1. Lithography is the imaging technology for producing a de-magnified image of the mask on the wafer. A typical de-magnification factor is 4. Mask blank defects as small as one-eighth the equivalent minimum feature size are printable and may cause device failure. Defects might be the result of the surface preparation, such as polishing, or contamination due to handling or the environment. Table 2 shows the maximum tolerable defect sizes on the mask blank for each technology node. This downward trend puts a tremendous burden on mask fabrication, particularly in the area of defect detection and reduction. A new infrastructure for mask inspection will be

  17. Fatal laryngeal oedema in an adult from an air rifle injury, and related ballistics.

    PubMed

    Radojevic, Nemanja; Cukic, Dragana; Curovic, Ivana; Golubovic, Mileta

    2015-01-01

    Air guns (air pistols and rifles) are already recognized as being potentially lethal. The diabolo pellet has a calibre of .177 (4.5 mm), a 1250 fps velocity, is high energetic, and is most commonly used in such weapons. In the presented case, the victim sustained an air rifle injury to the neck. The pellet passed through the thyroid cartilage, subsequently causing the extensive laryngeal swelling with haematoma around the pellet channel which fatally obstructed the airway. It is estimated microscopically that at least a number of hours must have passed from the injury to the time of death. For this case, a shooting distance was estimated by using experimental shooting values compared to physics formulas for accelerated motion. The case under question has confirmed an applicable legal approach that can be utilized by countries to classify air rifles as being as harmful as other firearms, especially those with high muzzle velocities. PMID:24644223

  18. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated. PMID:9390960

  19. [Supraglottic airway devices in emergency medicine : impact of gastric drainage].

    PubMed

    Mann, V; Mann, S T; Alejandre-Lafont, E; Röhrig, R; Weigand, M A; Müller, M

    2013-04-01

    This case report describes a life-saving use of a supraglottic airway device (LT-D™-Larynxtubus, VBM Medizintechnik, Sulz, Germany) in an out-of-hospital emergency patient suffering from severe traumatic brain injury. Mechanical ventilation with the laryngeal tube was complicated by repeated airway obstructions and pronounced gastric distension with air as a consequence of oropharyngeal leakage. In this situation pulmonary ventilation of the patient was compromised so that emergency endotracheal intubation became necessary in the resuscitation area with vital indications. In this context the status of supraglottic airway devices in emergency medicine is discussed as well as the reasons for the gastric distension. Besides the immediate drastic consequences of gastric distension with respect to pulmonary ventilation, potential deleterious non-pulmonary consequences of this complication are highlighted. The clinical relevance of the described complications as well as the associated possibility of an optimized position control necessitate the recommendation only to use second generation supraglottic airway devices with integrated gastric access in (out-of-hospital) emergency medicine. PMID:23494024

  20. Palliative Airway Stenting Performed Under Radiological Guidance and Local Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Profili, Stefano; Manca, Antonio; Feo, Claudio F. Padua, Guglielmo; Ortu, Riccardo; Canalis, Giulio C.; Meloni, Giovanni B.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the effectiveness of airway stenting performed exclusively under radiological guidance for the palliation of malignant tracheobronchial strictures. Methods. We report our experience in 16 patients with malignant tracheobronchial stricture treated by insertion of 20 Ultraflex self-expandable metal stents performed under fluoroscopic guidance only. Three patients presented dysphagia grade IV due to esophageal malignant infiltration; they therefore underwent combined airway and esophageal stenting. All the procedures were performed under conscious sedation in the radiological room; average procedure time was around 10 min, but the airway impediment never lasted more than 40 sec. Results. We obtained an overall technical success in 16 cases (100%) and clinical success in 14 patients (88%). All prostheses were successfully placed without procedural complications. Rapid clinical improvement with symptom relief and normalization of respiratory function was obtained in 14 cases. Two patients died within 48 hr from causes unrelated to stent placement. Two cases (13%) of migration were observed; they were successfully treated with another stent. Tumor overgrowth developed in other 2 patients (13%); however, no further treatment was possible because of extensive laryngeal infiltration. Conclusions. Tracheobronchial recanalization with self-expandable metal stents is a safe and effective palliative treatment for malignant strictures. Airway stenting performed exclusively under fluoroscopic view was rapid and well tolerated.

  1. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    During the report period significant progress on the quantitative understanding of regional upper airway deposition of airborne particle has been realized. Replicate models of the human upper airways obtained from post-mortem casting of the nasal, oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal and upper tracheal regions and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the same regions of adults and children have been employed to determine the overall and local deposition characteristics of aerosols in the ultrafine (1--100 {mu}m diameter) and fine (0.8--12 {mu}m diameter) region. Studies have been carried out for both nasal and oral breathing during inspiratory and expiratory flow at constant flow rates representative of rest and states of exercise. The results of these investigations indicate that particles in the size range of unattached'' radon progeny (1--3 nm) are deposited in both the nasal and oral passages with high efficiency (60--80%) for both inspiration and expiration, with the nasal deposition being somewhat greater (5--10%) than oral deposition. The effect of flow rate on upper airway deposition for both pathways is not great; data analysis indicates that the deposition for all flow rates from 4--50 liters/minute can be grouped by plotting deposition vs Q-{sup 1/8}, where Q is flow rate, a far weaker dependency than observed for inertial deposition. Diffusional transport is the primary mechanism of deposition, and size dependence can be accounted for by plotting, deposition percent vs D{sup n} where D is particle diffusion coefficient and n ranges from 0.5--0.66. 2 refs.

  2. Conquering the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Gandy, William E

    2008-01-01

    Every medic should practice regularly for the inevitable difficult airway case. Practice should include review of the causes of difficult airways, as well as skill practice. Having a preassembled airway kit can make your response to an unexpected difficult situation easier. Of all the devices mentioned, the bougie is the airway practitioner's best friend. Using the BURP technique, if not contraindicated, together with the bougie will enable you to intubate many difficult patients with confidence. Remember, "If your patient cannot breathe, nothing else matters. PMID:18251307

  3. Cartilage invasion patterns in laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Serrano, Manuel; Iglesias Moreno, María Cruz; Gimeno Hernández, Jesús; Ortega Medina, Luis; Martín Villares, Cristina; Poch Broto, Joaquín

    2016-07-01

    The cartilaginous invasion determines the T and is one of the most common sources of mistake in tumor staging. Also it is of great importance when planning any therapeutic alternative. In the latest revision of the TNM classification a clear distinction is made between infiltration of cartilage without going through it, considered a T3 recently and that would be a T4 according to the previous classification, and those going through the cartilage, classified as T4a. While this classification makes the difference in depth of infiltration, it does not emphasize the extent of invasion. This paper provides a detailed description of the laryngeal cartilage tumor infiltration by whole organ serial section in which the invasion is considered both horizontal (transcartilaginous) and vertical (extent of invasion) and establishing patterns of three-dimensional infiltration of the cartilage. This is a cross-sectional study of prevalence. 275 records of patients treated for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma between 1995 and 2000 were reviewed. The pathological processing of laryngectomy surgical specimens was performed following the method of whole organ serial section described by G. F. Tucker. The following patterns of cartilaginous infiltration were defined: (1) transcartilaginous infiltration; (2a) partial focal infiltration of the cartilage: infiltration not going through the cartilage but occupying one third or less of its extent; (2b) partial extensive infiltration of the cartilage: infiltration occupying two thirds or more of its length and (3) no cartilage infiltration: tumor in contact with the cartilage (paraglottic space) but without affecting it. 161 patients met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent tumor location was supraglottic (58 cases) followed by glottic (47). 109 patients (67.7 %) were treated with total laryngectomy. Partial surgical techniques were performed in the remaining cases. TNM tumor staging was performed according to the results of

  4. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, A.L.; Kroop, D.C.; McGee, M.K.; Lenkszus, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  5. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, Alan L.; Kroop, David C.; McGee, Marilyn K.; Lenkszus, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  6. Wavelength dependent mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen; Butt, Shahid; Burnham, Jay; Faure, Tom; Hibbs, Michael; Rankin, Jed; Thibault, David; Watts, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    For years there has been a mismatch between the photomask inspection wavelength and the usage conditions. While the non-actinic inspection has been a source for concern, there has been essentially no evidence that a defect "escaped" the mask production process due to the inspection mismatch. This paper will describe the discovery of one such defect, as well as the diagnostic and inspection techniques used to identify the location, analyze the composition, and determine the source of the printed wafer defect. Conventional mask inspection techniques revealed no defects, however an actinic Aerial Image Metrology System (AIMS) revealed a 1.5 mm region on the mask with up to 59% transmission reduction at 193 nm. Further diagnostics demonstrated a strong wavelength dependence which accounted for the near invisibility of the defect at I line (365 nm) or even DUV (248 nm) wavelengths, which had 0% and 5% respective transmission reductions. Using some creative imaging techniques via AIMS tool and modeling, the defect was deduced to have a three dimensional Gaussian absorption character, with total width approximately 1.5 mm. Several non-destructive diagnostic techniques were developed to determine the composition and location of the defect within the substrate. These results will be described in addition to identifying methods for ensuring product quality in the absence of actinic inspection.

  7. Mask strategy at International SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2002-08-01

    International SEMATECH (ISMT) is a consortium consisting of 13 leading semiconductor manufacturers from around the globe. Its objective is to develop the infrastructure necessary for its member companies to realize the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) through efficiencies of shared development resources and knowledge. The largest area of effort is lithography, recognized as a crucial enabler for microelectronics technology progress. Within the Lithography Division, most of the efforts center on mask-related issues. The development strategy at International SEMATCH will be presented and the interlock of lithography projects clarified. Because of the limited size of the mask production equipment market, the business case is weak for aggressive investment commensurate with the pace of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. With masks becoming the overwhelming component of lithography cost, new ways of reducing or eliminating mask costs are being explored. Will mask technology survive without a strong business case? Will the mask industry limit the growth of the semiconductor industry? Are advanced masks worth their escalating cost? An analysis of mask cost from the perspective of mask value imparted to the user is presented with examples and generic formulas for the reader to apply independently. A key part to the success for both International SEMATECH and the industry globally will be partnerships on both the local level between mask-maker and mask-user, and the macro level where global collaborations will be necessary to resolve technology development cost challenges.

  8. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  9. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  10. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  11. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  12. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  13. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Laryngeal Muscle Fiber Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses…

  14. Laryngeal Structure and Function in the Pediatric Larynx: Clinical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapienza, Christine M.; Ruddy, Bari Hoffman; Baker, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the normal anatomy and physiology of the pediatric larynx, followed by some examples of pediatric voice disorders that were chosen to exemplify the alterations to the laryngeal anatomy and the subsequent modifications to laryngeal function. Vocal fold nodules are primarily reviewed due to their high incidence…

  15. Using Laryngeal Electromyography to Differentiate Presbylarynges from Paresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stager, Sheila V.; Bielamowicz, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Differential diagnosis of patients over 64 years of age reporting hoarseness is challenging. Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) was used to determine the status of the recurrent and superior laryngeal nerves. The authors hypothesized that individuals with hoarseness but normal LEMG would have measures similar to those of patients from…

  16. Description of Laryngeal Pathologies in Children Evaluated by Otolaryngologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobres, Rachel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Data were collected on 731 patients (age birth to 18) at a children's hospital otolaryngology clinic. Most frequent laryngeal pathologies were subglottic stenosis, vocal nodules, laryngomalacia, and vocal fold paralysis. Laryngeal pathologies were more common to males than females, were most common in the youngest patients, and were distributed…

  17. Central nervous system control of the laryngeal muscles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2005-01-01

    Laryngeal muscle control may vary for different functions such as: voice for speech communication, emotional expression during laughter and cry, breathing, swallowing, and cough. This review discusses the control of the human laryngeal muscles for some of these different functions. Sensori-motor aspects of laryngeal control have been studied by eliciting various laryngeal reflexes. The role of audition in learning and monitoring ongoing voice production for speech is well known; while the role of somatosensory feedback is less well understood. Reflexive control systems involving central pattern generators may contribute to swallowing, breathing and cough with greater cortical control during volitional tasks such as voice production for speech. Volitional control is much less well understood for each of these functions and likely involves the integration of cortical and subcortical circuits. The new frontier is the study of the central control of the laryngeal musculature for voice, swallowing and breathing and how volitional and reflexive control systems may interact in humans. PMID:15927543

  18. Paralaryngeal Abscess with Laryngeal Hemiplegia and Fistulation in a Horse

    PubMed Central

    Barber, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A three year old Thoroughbred filly was examined because of bilateral nasal discharge and external swelling of the left laryngeal area. Endoscopy revealed an enlarged left arytenoid cartilage, left laryngeal hemiplegia and drainage of purulent material into the lumen of the larynx. Radiographs showed a large fluid and gas filled cavity overlying the caudal larynx and cranial trachea. Surgical drainage and debridement of the abscess led to complete healing by secondary intention. Laryngeal ventriculectomy was performed as a treatment for left laryngeal hemiplegia, but a grave prognosis for respiratory soundness was given due to the extensive laryngeal fibrosis. The etiology of the Staphylococcus aureus abscess is unknown but may have originated from oral trauma to the larynx. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:7337917

  19. Compliance Measurements of the Upper Airway in Pediatric Down Syndrome Sleep Apnea Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Dhananjay Radhakrishnan; Mylavarapu, Goutham; McConnell, Keith; Fleck, Robert J; Shott, Sally R; Amin, Raouf S; Gutmark, Ephraim J

    2016-04-01

    Compliance of soft tissue and muscle supporting the upper airway are two of several factors contributing to pharyngeal airway collapse. We present a novel, minimally invasive method of estimating regional variations in pharyngeal elasticity. Magnetic resonance images for pediatric sleep apnea patients with Down syndrome [9.5 ± 4.3 years (mean age ± standard deviation)] were analyzed to segment airways corresponding to baseline (no mask pressure) and two positive pressures. A three dimensional map was created to evaluate axial and circumferential variation in radial displacements of the airway, dilated by the positive pressures. The displacements were then normalized with respect to the appropriate transmural pressure and radius of an equivalent circle to obtain a measure of airway compliance. The resulting elasticity maps indicated the least and most compliant regions of the pharynx. Airway stiffness of the most compliant region [403 ± 204 (mean ± standard deviation) Pa] decreased with severity of obstructive sleep apnea. The non-linear response of the airway wall to continuous positive airway pressure was patient specific and varied between anatomical locations. We identified two distinct elasticity phenotypes. Patient phenotyping based on airway elasticity can potentially assist clinical practitioners in decision making on the treatments needed to improve airway patency. PMID:26215306

  20. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: management.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of primary and secondary abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Several of these abnormalities can be addressed medically and/or surgically to improve quality of life. This article reviews potential complications, anesthetic considerations, recovery strategies, and outcomes associated with medical and surgical management of BAS. PMID:22935992

  1. Simvastatin Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Franzi, Lisa; Last, Jerold; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Statin use has been linked to improved lung health in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We hypothesize that statins inhibit allergic airway inflammation and reduce airway hyperreactivity via a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Objectives: To determine whether simvastatin attenuates airway inflammation and improves lung physiology by mevalonate pathway inhibition. Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin over 4 weeks and exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol over 2 weeks. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Measurements and Main Results: Simvastatin reduced total lung lavage leukocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages (P < 0.05) in the ovalbumin-exposed mice. Cotreatment with mevalonate, in addition to simvastatin, reversed the antiinflammatory effects seen with simvastatin alone (P < 0.05). Lung lavage IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were all reduced by treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.05). Simvastatin treatment before methacholine bronchial challenge increased lung compliance and reduced airway hyperreactivity (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Simvastatin attenuates allergic airway inflammation, inhibits key helper T cell type 1 and 2 chemokines, and improves lung physiology in a mouse model of asthma. The mevalonate pathway appears to modulate allergic airway inflammation, while the beneficial effects of simvastatin on lung compliance and airway hyperreactivity may be independent of the mevalonate pathway. Simvastatin and similar agents that modulate the mevalonate pathway may prove to be treatments for inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma. PMID:19608720

  2. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  3. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  4. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  5. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  6. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  7. Laryngeal cancer mortality trends in European countries.

    PubMed

    Chatenoud, Liliane; Garavello, Werner; Pagan, Eleonora; Bertuccio, Paola; Gallus, Silvano; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; Bosetti, Cristina

    2016-02-15

    After a steady increase between the 1950s and the 1970s, laryngeal cancer mortality has been levelling off since the early 1980s in men from most western and southern European countries and since the early 1990s in central and eastern Europe. To update trends in laryngeal cancer mortality, we analyzed data provided by the World Health Organization over the last two decades for 34 European countries and the European Union (EU) as a whole. For major European countries, we also identified significant changes in trends between 1980 and 2012 using joinpoint regression analysis. Male mortality in the EU was approximately constant between 1980 and 1991 (annual percent change, APC=-0.5%) and declined by 3.3% per year in 1991-2012. EU age-standardized (world population) rates were 4.7/100,000 in 1990-91 and 2.5/100,000 in 2010-2011. Rates declined in most European countries, particularly over the last two decades. In 2010-11, the highest male rates were in Hungary, the Republic of Moldova, and Romania (over 6/100,000), and the lowest ones in Finland, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland (below 1/100,000). In EU women, mortality was stable around 0.29/100,000 between 1980 and 1994 and slightly decreased thereafter (APC=-1.3%; 0.23/100,000 in 2000-01). We also considered male incidence trends for nine European countries or cancer registration areas. In most of them, declines were observed over recent decades. Laryngeal cancer mortality thus showed favourable trends over the last few decades in most Europe, following favourable changes in tobacco and, mostly for Mediterranean countries, alcohol consumption. PMID:26335030

  8. Trauma-induced schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve after thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, William P; Brody, Robert M; LiVolsi, Virginia A; Wang, Amber R; Mirza, Natasha A

    2016-06-01

    Laryngeal schwannomas are rare, benign tumors, most often arising from the superior laryngeal nerve. We describe a case of a 68-year-old female with a laryngeal schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve after traumatic injury. We postulate that trauma to the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy or thyroplasty incited growth of a nerve sheath tumor. This is the first reported case of a trauma-induced schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and second case of a recurrent laryngeal nerve schwannoma. Although rare, this case demonstrates that these tumors should be considered during workup of vocal cord paresis after surgery or failed thyroplasty. Laryngoscope, 126:1408-1410, 2016. PMID:26421595

  9. Mask industry assessment trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Hector, Scott; Marmillion, Pat; Lercel, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. In 2002, a survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of mask technologists from semiconductor manufacturers, merchant mask suppliers, and makers of mask equipment. The 2005 survey was the fourth in the current series of annual surveys. The survey data can be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the mask industry. The results may be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. Questions are grouped into categories: general business profile information, data processing, yields and yield loss mechanisms, delivery times, returns and services, operating cost factors, and equipment utilization. Because the questions covering operating cost factors and equipment utilization were just added to the survey, no trend analysis is possible. Within each category are many questions that together create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. The assessment participation has changed from year to year. The 2005 survey, for example, includes inputs from eight major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers whose revenue represents approximately 85% of the global mask market.

  10. Autofluorescence spectroscopic imaging for laryngeal cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Lin; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2008-02-01

    Autofluorescence imaging has shown a high sensitivity for early diagnosis and detection of cancer and precancer in humans, however, this diagnostic technique has a limitation with high false positive rates resulting in a low diagnostic specificity. In this study, we develop an endoscope-based autofluorescence imaging system in combination with spectroscopy measurement system for tissue diagnostics and characterization in the head and neck. The results show that combining the spectroscopy and imaging techniques can improve both the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for discriminating laryngeal carcinoma from normal tissue.

  11. Laryngeal schwannoma: excision via a laryngofissure approach

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Antonia; Anwar, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas are peripheral nerve neurogenic tumours and although not common, laryngeal schwannomas can provide a unique challenge in diagnostic and treatment management. There are limited reports in the literature on approaches to management. A 73-year-old lady presented to the otolaryngology department after a MRI scan demonstrated an incidental right supraglottic mass. Further investigations included CT scanning and microlaryngoscopy, which only confirmed the presence of the mass with no histology diagnosis. Excision was undertaken by a laryngofissure approach and tracheostomy. Histology confirmed a benign ancient schwannoma. PMID:26034238

  12. Laryngeal actinomycosis in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheylan; Jaworek, Aaron J; Patel, Vatsal; Duckworth, Lizette Vila; Sawhney, Raja; Chheda, Neil N

    2014-11-01

    Actinomycosis of the larynx represents an unusual presentation for a common bacterium comprising the oral and oropharyngeal florae. There are few cases reported in the literature of laryngeal actinomycosis occurring primarily in the immunocompromised population. Here, we present a case in a 74-year-old man that occurred in the setting of neutropenia as a result of chemotherapy. Once the diagnosis was made with biopsy of the larynx, the infection was resolved after a prolonged course of penicillin-based therapy. PMID:24930374

  13. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  14. Relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and airway diseases: the airway reflux paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Galván, Adalberto; Hart, Simon P; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-04-01

    Our understanding of the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and respiratory disease has recently undergone important changes. The previous paradigm of airway reflux as synonymous with the classic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) causing heartburn has been overturned. Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a highly significant association of the acid, liquid, and gaseous reflux of GORD with conditions such as laryngeal diseases, chronic rhinosinusitis, treatment resistant asthma, COPD and even idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, it has become clear from studies on cough hypersensitivity syndrome that much reflux of importance in the airways has been missed, since it is either non- or weakly acid and gaseous in composition. The evidence for such a relationship relies on the clinical history pointing to symptom associations with known precipitants of reflux. The tools for the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal reflux, in contrast to the oesophageal reflux of GORD, lack sensitivity and reproducibility. Unfortunately, methodology for detecting such reflux is only just becoming available and much additional work is required to properly delineate its role. PMID:21459504

  15. Neonatal resuscitation 3: manometer use in a model of face mask ventilation

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Davis, P; Lau, R; Dargaville, P; Doyle, L; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Adequate ventilation is the key to successful neonatal resuscitation. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) is initiated with manual ventilation devices via face masks. These devices may be used with a manometer to measure airway pressures delivered. The expiratory tidal volume measured at the mask (VTE(mask)) is a good estimate of the tidal volume delivered during simulated neonatal resuscitation. Aim: To assess the effect of viewing a manometer on the peak inspiratory pressures used, the volume delivered, and leakage from the face mask during PPV with two manual ventilation devices in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Participants gave PPV to a modified resuscitation mannequin using a Laerdal infant resuscitator and a Neopuff infant resuscitator at specified pressures ensuring adequate chest wall excursion. Each participant gave PPV to the mannequin with each device twice, viewing the manometer on one occasion and unable to see the manometer on the other. Data from participants were averaged for each device used with the manometer and without the manometer separately. Results: A total of 7767 inflations delivered by the 18 participants were recorded and analysed. Peak inspiratory pressures delivered were lower with the Laerdal device. There were no differences in leakage from the face mask or volumes delivered. Whether or not the manometer was visible made no difference to any measured variable. Conclusions: Viewing a manometer during PPV in this model of neonatal resuscitation does not affect the airway pressure or tidal volumes delivered or the degree of leakage from the face mask. PMID:15871988

  16. Masks of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Edward

    2011-11-01

    Preface; Introducing the masks; Part I. Worlds in the Making: 1. The magic Universe; 2. The mythic Universe; 3. The geometric Universe; 4. The medieval Universe; 5. The infinite Universe; 6. The mechanistic Universe; Part II. The Heart Divine: 7. Dance of the atoms and waves; 8. Fabric of space and time; 9. Nearer to the heart's desire; 10. The cosmic tide; 11. Do dreams ever come true?; Part III. The Cloud of Unknowing: 12. The witch universe; 13. The spear of Archytas; 14. All that is made; 15. The cloud of unknowing; 16. Learned ignorance.

  17. Mask fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2000-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks and reticles useful for projection lithography systems. An absorber layer is conventionally patterned using a pattern and etch process. Following the step of patterning, the entire surface of the remaining top patterning photoresist layer as well as that portion of an underlying protective photoresist layer where absorber material has been etched away is exposed to UV radiation. The UV-exposed regions of the protective photoresist layer and the top patterning photoresist layer are then removed by solution development, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plasma etch and strip and chances for damaging the surface of the substrate or coatings.

  18. Expression of taste receptors in Solitary Chemosensory Cells of rodent airways

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chemical irritation of airway mucosa elicits a variety of reflex responses such as coughing, apnea, and laryngeal closure. Inhaled irritants can activate either chemosensitive free nerve endings, laryngeal taste buds or solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs). The SCC population lies in the nasal respiratory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, and larynx, as well as deeper in the airway. The objective of this study is to map the distribution of SCCs within the airways and to determine the elements of the chemosensory transduction cascade expressed in these SCCs. Methods We utilized a combination of immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques (rtPCR and in situ hybridization) on rats and transgenic mice where the Tas1R3 or TRPM5 promoter drives expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Results Epithelial SCCs specialized for chemoreception are distributed throughout much of the respiratory tree of rodents. These cells express elements of the taste transduction cascade, including Tas1R and Tas2R receptor molecules, α-gustducin, PLCβ2 and TrpM5. The Tas2R bitter taste receptors are present throughout the entire respiratory tract. In contrast, the Tas1R sweet/umami taste receptors are expressed by numerous SCCs in the nasal cavity, but decrease in prevalence in the trachea, and are absent in the lower airways. Conclusions Elements of the taste transduction cascade including taste receptors are expressed by SCCs distributed throughout the airways. In the nasal cavity, SCCs, expressing Tas1R and Tas2R taste receptors, mediate detection of irritants and foreign substances which trigger trigeminally-mediated protective airway reflexes. Lower in the respiratory tract, similar chemosensory cells are not related to the trigeminal nerve but may still trigger local epithelial responses to irritants. In total, SCCs should be considered chemoreceptor cells that help in preventing damage to the respiratory tract caused by inhaled irritants and pathogens. PMID:21232137

  19. Evaluation of airway blocks versus general anaesthesia for diagnostic direct laryngoscopy and biopsy for carcinoma larynx.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Vandana; Sharma, Gunjan

    2012-02-01

    A prospective randomised study of 100 patients divided into two groups was done to compare the effects of regional airway nerve blocks versus general anaesthesia to evaluate intra-operative haemodynamic changes and compare the level of postoperative analgesia and sedation in both the groups. In group I whole airway block including bilateral superior laryngeal nerve block with bilateral glossopharyngeal block and recurrent laryngeal nerve block was given and in group II general anaesthesia was given. The mean duration was 27 +/- 5 minutes in all cases, all patients were of ASA grade 3 or 4. Baseline and pre-operative values of pulse and blood pressure were noted and were recorded at 0, 5, 7, 9, 10 and 15 minutes. Postoperative sedation and VAS scores were recorded at 0, 5, 15 and 30 minutes initially and then hourly. The present study showed significant haemodyanamic changes in group II with significant rise in mean arterial pressure and pulse rate during peri-operative period. Whereas in group I there was a stability in mean arterial pressure and pulse rate peri-operatively. The postoperative analgesia was significantly higher in group I and lasted longer as compared to group II and patients were less agitated and calm as assessed by the sedation score, in group II most of the patients required postoperative nebulisation as compared to group I where no patient needed nebulisation. In conclusion we suggest that regional airway block for anaesthesia in the short procedures of upper airways and also in cases of predicting difficult airway cases for securing the safe airway can be very useful alternate to general anaesthesia. PMID:23029839

  20. How to use a self-inflating bag and face mask.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and key points This article aims to help nurses to open and maintain an adult's airway while providing breaths using a self-inflating bag and face mask. Maintaining a patient's airway is vital in the management of acute, life-threatening illnesses and injuries. ▶ The nurse should address airway compromise immediately since it is a major factor in acute deterioration and may develop rapidly. ▶ The nurse should perform the head tilt and chin lift manoeuvre, or the jaw thrust manoeuvre for patients with suspected cervical spine injury, to maintain airway opening. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. What you have gained from this article. 2. How this article will influence your practice. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26938418

  1. Diet, cigarettes and alcohol in laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenheim, J.L.; Graham, S.; Byers, T.E.; Marshall, J.R.; Haughey, B.P.; Swanson, M.K.; Wilkinson, G. )

    1991-03-11

    Diet and other risk factors for cancer of the larynx were examined in a case-control study among white males in Western New York, conducted in 1975-1985. Incident, pathologically-confirmed cases and age- and neighborhood-matched controls were interviewed to determine usual diet, and lifetime use of tobacco and alcohol. Because response rates were low for both cases and controls, this cannot be considered a population-based study. A strong association of risk with cigarette but not pipe and cigar smoking was found. Beer and hard liquor but not wine were associated with increased risk. After control for cigarettes, alcohol and education, the upper quartile odds ratio for fat was 2.40, while the odds ratio for high intake of carotenoids was 0.51. There was effect modification by smoking. Carotenoids were most negatively associated with risk among lighter smokers; dietary fat was most positively associated with risk among heavier smokers. Total calories, protein, and retinol were associated with increased risk; there was no relationship between laryngeal cancer and vitamins C and E or carbohydrate. This study again demonstrates the strong association between tobacco and alcohol and laryngeal cancer and also suggests that diets low in carotenoids and high fat may increase risk.

  2. Laryngeal complications by orotracheal intubation: Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Luiz Alberto Alves; de Cavalho, Glauber Barbosa; Brito, Valeska Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Sumamry Introduction: The injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation are common in our way and widely told by literature. Generally the pipe rank of or consequence of its permanence in the aerial ways of the patient is caused by accidents in. It has diverse types of larynx injuries, caused for multiple mechanisms. Objective: To verify, in literature, the main causes of laryngeal complications after- orotracheal intubation and its mechanisms of injury. Revision of Literature: The searched databases had been LILACS, BIREME and SCIELO. Were updated, books and theses had been used, delimiting itself the period enters 1953 the 2009. The keywords used for the search of articles had been: complications, injuries, larynx, intubation, endotracheal, orotracheal, granulomas, stenosis. 59 references had been selected. The used criteria of inclusion for the choice of articles had been the ones that had shown to the diverse types of injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation and its pathophysiology. Final Considerations: This revision of literature was motivated by the comment in the practical clinic of a great number of laryngeal sequels in patients submitted to the orotracheal intubation. Of that is ahead important the knowledge, for the professionals of the area of health, the types of complications and its causes, with intention to prevent them, adopting measured of prevention of these injuries. PMID:25991942

  3. Histopathological study of radionecrosis in laryngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, M.; Harwood, A.R.; Bryce, D.P.; van Nostrand, A.W.

    1982-02-01

    With modern radiotherapy techniques, clinical radionecrosis is uncommon following eradication of primary squamous cell carcinoma from the larynx. Histologic sections from 265 specimens, prepared by the technique of whole organ subserial step-sectioning were studied to determine the incidence and location of chondronecrosis and/or osteomyelitis in both irradiated and non-irradiated cases. Chondronecrosis occurred in only 1 of 41 early (pT1 - pT2) tumors but in 143 advanced tumors (pT - pT4) treated with radical radiotherapy and containing residual carcinoma, 27% had evidence of significant necrosis, compared with 24% of those not irradiated. Age, sex, tumor grade and previous laryngeal surgery did not appear to be significant factors in the development of necrosis in irradiated patients. The arytenoid cartilage was most frequently involved when chondronecrosis occurred in association with radiotherapy. Six total laryngectomy specimens (3%) were received from patients with symptoms of chondronecrosis and in whom no residual tumor was present. We conclude that although the incidence of clinical perichondritis is low, histologic chondronecrosis and/or osteomyelitis occurred in 26% of all the larynges studied. Radiotherapy appears to be a significant causative factor only in advanced supraglottic tumors.

  4. Effect of inhaled steroids on laryngeal microflora.

    PubMed

    Turan, Mahfuz; Ekin, Selami; Ucler, Rıfkı; Arısoy, Ahmet; Bayram, Yasemin; Yalınkılıç, Abdulaziz; Bozan, Nazım; Garca, Mehmet Fatih; Çankaya, Hakan

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions As is known, this study is the first study to evaluate the effect of inhaled steroids on laryngeal microflora. The data support that ICS usage causes changes in the larynx microflora. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the alteration in larynx microbial flora of the patients treated with ICS comparing the culture results of a control group. In addition, laryngeal microflora was compared to the smears obtained from the vallecula and pharynx. Materials and methods The study included 39 patients (mean age = 45.56 ± 12.76 years) who had been using a corticosteroid inhaler and control group consisting of 27 persons (mean age = 43.07 ± 13.23 years). Culture samples were obtained from the pharynx, larynx, and vallecula in the patient and control groups, and they were evaluated in the microbiology laboratory. Obtained culture results were named by the same microbiologist according to the basic microorganism classification method. Results Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), Streptococcus viridians (VGS) and candida albicans were detected to grow significantly more in the patient group in all three anatomic localizations compared to the control group. Neisseria spp, basillus spp, and Non-viridans alpha-hemolytic streptococcus were detected to grow significantly more in the control group in all three anatomic localizations compared to the patient group. PMID:26901427

  5. A Masked Photocathode in Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-12-14

    In this paper, we propose a masked photocathode inside the photoinjector for generating high brightness election beam. Instead of mounting the photocathode onto an electrode, an electrode with small hole is used as a mask to shield the photocathode from the accelerating vacuum chamber. Using such a masked photocathode will make the replacement of photocathode material easy by rotating the photocathode behind the electrode into the hole. Furthermore, this helps reduce the dark current or secondary electron emission from the photocathode material. The masked photocathode also provides transverse cut-off to a Gaussian laser beam that reduces electron beam emittance growth from nonlinear space-charge effects.

  6. Current status of NGL masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David M.

    2000-07-01

    The manufacture of Next Generation Lithography reticles presents many challenges. Extremely small critical dimension and image placement error budgets; novel substrates including membranes and multi-layer reflective coatings; and inspection, detection and repair of subresolution defects will force revolutionary change in the infrastructure of mask technology. This paper surveys current NGL mask designs, structures, materials and manufacturing capabilities. Results from mask fabrication, physical modeling, error budget analysis and extensive experience in building X-Ray membrane masks are presented to develop process learning plans to meet future product specifications.

  7. Optical inspection of NGL masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettibone, Donald W.; Stokowski, Stanley E.

    2004-12-01

    For the last five years KLA-Tencor and our joint venture partners have pursued a research program studying the ability of optical inspection tools to meet the inspection needs of possible NGL lithographies. The NGL technologies that we have studied include SCALPEL, PREVAIL, EUV lithography, and Step and Flash Imprint Lithography. We will discuss the sensitivity of the inspection tools and mask design factors that affect tool sensitivity. Most of the work has been directed towards EUV mask inspection and how to optimize the mask to facilitate inspection. Our partners have succeeded in making high contrast EUV masks ranging in contrast from 70% to 98%. Die to die and die to database inspection of EUV masks have been achieved with a sensitivity that is comparable to what can be achieved with conventional photomasks, approximately 80nm defect sensitivity. We have inspected SCALPEL masks successfully. We have found a limitation of optical inspection when applied to PREVAIL stencil masks. We have run inspections on SFIL masks in die to die, reflected light, in an effort to provide feedback to improve the masks. We have used a UV inspection system to inspect both unpatterned EUV substrates (no coatings) and blanks (with EUV multilayer coatings). These inspection results have proven useful in driving down the substrate and blank defect levels.

  8. The effect of facial hair and sex on the dispersal of bacteria below a masked subject.

    PubMed

    McLure, H A; Mannam, M; Talboys, C A; Azadian, B S; Yentis, S M

    2000-02-01

    Surgical face masks prevent the dispersal of bacteria from the upper airway to surfaces immediately in front of and below the face during talking. However, mask wiggling has been reported to increase dermabrasion and bacterial contamination of surfaces immediately below the face. Facial hair and recent shaving may alter the quantity of particles shed by dermabrasion when the mask is wiggled. We investigated the effect of mask wiggling in 10 bearded and 10 clean-shaven male subjects, and 10 female subjects. Wiggling the mask significantly increased the degree of bacterial shedding onto agar plates 15 cm below the lips in bearded males (p = 0.03) and females (p = 0.03), but not in clean-shaven males. At rest without mask wiggling the bearded subjects shed significantly more bacteria than clean-shaven males (p = 0.01) or females (p = 0.001). To reduce the risks of contamination of the sterile field when face masks are worn females and bearded males should avoid wiggling the face mask. Bearded males may also consider removing their beards. PMID:10651682

  9. The Physiologic Impact of Unilateral Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve (RLN) Lesion on Infant Oropharyngeal and Esophageal Performance.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Lammers, Andrew R; Ohlemacher, Jocelyn; Ballester, Ashley; Fraley, Luke; Gross, Andrew; German, Rebecca Z

    2015-12-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury in neonates, a complication of patent ductus arteriosus corrective surgery, leads to aspiration and swallowing complications. Severity of symptoms and prognosis for recovery are variable. We transected the RLN unilaterally in an infant mammalian animal model to characterize the degree and variability of dysphagia in a controlled experimental setting. We tested the hypotheses that (1) both airway protection and esophageal function would be compromised by lesion, (2) given our design, variability between multiple post-lesion trials would be minimal, and (3) variability among individuals would be minimal. Individuals' swallowing performance was assessed pre- and post-lesion using high speed VFSS. Aspiration was assessed using the Infant Mammalian Penetration-Aspiration Scale (IMPAS). Esophageal function was assessed using two measures devised for this study. Our results indicate that RLN lesion leads to increased frequency of aspiration, and increased esophageal dysfunction, with significant variation in these basic patterns at all levels. On average, aspiration worsened with time post-lesion. Within a single feeding sequence, the distribution of unsafe swallows varied. Individuals changed post-lesion either by increasing average IMPAS score, or by increasing variation in IMPAS score. Unilateral RLN transection resulted in dysphagia with both compromised airway protection and esophageal function. Despite consistent, experimentally controlled injury, significant variation in response to lesion remained. Aspiration following RLN lesion was due to more than unilateral vocal fold paralysis. We suggest that neurological variation underlies this pattern. PMID:26285799

  10. Properties of postganglionic sympathetic fibers isolated from the right recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Szulczyk, P

    1995-08-01

    The pattern of response of 45 single postganglionic sympathetic axons dissected from the right recurrent laryngeal nerve was examined in chloralose-anesthetized cats. Both vagoaortic nerves were cut, and both sinus nerves were left intact. Each neuron, based on the presence of cardiac and respiratory rhythmicities in its resting activity and reaction to systemic hypoxia (10% O2 in N2 for 2 min), was classified into one of three classes. Class I neurons (n = 29, 64%) were activated during systemic hypoxia and had a pronounced cardiac and inspiration-related rhythmicity in their resting activity. Class II neurons (n = 12,27%) were inhibited during systemic hypoxia, and their cardiac and respiratory rhythmicities were either negligible or totally absent. Class III neurons (n = 4,9%), similarly to class I, had a pronounced cardiac and inspiratory rhythmicity but were not affected by systemic hypoxia. The systemic hypoxia was always accompanied by an increase in blood pressure. We conclude that class I and possibly class III neurons innervate the arteries of upper airways. We also discuss the possibility that class II neurons are responsible for regulating the smooth muscles of upper airways. PMID:7592223

  11. Airway dysfunction in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Elite competitive swimmers are particularly affected by airway disorders that are probably related to regular and intense training sessions in a chlorinated environment. Upper and lower airway respiratory symptoms, rhinitis, airway hyper-responsiveness, and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are highly prevalent in these athletes, but their influence on athletic performance is still unclear. The authors reviewed the main upper and lower respiratory ailments observed in competitive swimmers who train in indoor swimming pools, their pathophysiology, clinical significance and possible effects on performance. Issues regarding the screening of these disorders, their management and preventive measures are addressed. PMID:22247299

  12. Meteorological conditions along airways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W R

    1927-01-01

    This report is an attempt to show the kind of meteorological information that is needed, and is in part available, for the purpose of determining operating conditions along airways. In general, the same factors affect these operating conditions along all airways though in varying degree, depending upon their topographic, geographic, and other characteristics; but in order to bring out as clearly as possible the nature of the data available, a specific example is taken, that of the Chicago-Dallas airway on which regular flying begins this year (1926).

  13. Cervical spine movement during laryngoscopy using the Airway Scope compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Y; Fujita, A; Seo, N; Sugimoto, H

    2007-10-01

    The Airway Scope is a new rigid laryngoscope. This intubation device provides a non-line-of sight view of the glottis. A non-line-of sight view is expected to cause less movement of the cervical spine during laryngeal visualisation. We compared the degree of cervical spine movement during laryngoscopy with the Airway Scope and conventional direct laryngoscope. Twenty patients requiring general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation were studied. Movements of the cervical spine were measured using radiography in the same patient during laryngoscopy with the Airway Scope and a Macintosh laryngoscope. Cervical spine movement during laryngoscopy with the Airway Scope was 37%, 37% and 68% less than that with the Macintosh laryngoscope at the C0/C1, C1/C2 and C3/C4 motion segments, respectively (p < 0.05). The movement of the atlanto-occipital distance using the Airway Scope was 42% less than that during laryngoscopy using the Macintosh laryngoscope (p < 0.05). Laryngoscopy using the Airway Scope involves less movement of the cervical spine compared to conventional laryngoscopy using the Macintosh laryngoscope. PMID:17845658

  14. Laryngeal Chondrosarcoma as a Rare Cause of Subglottic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kökoğlu, Kerem; Canöz, Özlem; Doğan, Serap; Gülmez, Emrah; Yüce, İmdat; Çağlı, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal chondrosarcoma (CS) is a very rare entity. It is usually seen in 50–80-year olds. It is developed from cricoid cartilage largely. Patients have laryngeal CS complaint of respiratuvar distress, dysphonia, and dysphagia generally. A submucous mass is usually seen in physical examination with an intact mucosa. Distant metastasis is rare in CSs. Main treatment is surgical excision. An 82-year-old patient who has respiratuvar distress is presented in this paper and laryngeal CS is reviewed in the light of the literature. PMID:25197601

  15. The implementation of Mask-Ed: reflections of academic participants.

    PubMed

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Cooper, Simon; Happell, Brenda

    2014-09-01

    This paper profiles the findings from a study that explored the perspectives and experiences of nurse educators who implemented a novel simulation approach termed Mask-Ed. The technique involves the educator wearing a silicone mask and or body parts and transforming into a character. The premise of this approach is that the masked educator has domain specific knowledge related to the simulation scenario and can transmit this to learners in a way that is engaging, realistic, spontaneous and humanistic. Nurse educators charged with the responsibility of implementing Mask-Ed in three universities were invited to participate in the study by attending an introductory workshop, implementing the technique and then journaling their experiences, insights and perspectives over a 12 month period. The journal entries were then thematically analysed. Key themes were categorised under the headings of Preparation, Implementation and Impact; Reflexivity and Responsiveness; Student Engagement and Ownership; and Teaching and Learning. Mask-Ed is a simulation approach which allows students to interact with the 'characters' in humanistic ways that promote person-centred care and therapeutic communication. This simulation approach holds previously untapped potential for a range of learning experiences, however, to be effective, adequate resourcing, training, preparation and practice is required. PMID:24906681

  16. What Is Being Masked in Object Substitution Masking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Cole, Geoff; Skarratt, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Object substitution masking (OSM) is said to occur when a perceptual object is hypothesized that is mismatched by subsequent sensory evidence, leading to a new hypothesized object being substituted for the first. For example, when a brief target is accompanied by a longer lasting display of nonoverlapping mask elements, reporting of target…

  17. Real-Time 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Pharyngeal Airway in Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Chul; Lebel, R. Marc; Wu, Ziyue; Davidson Ward, Sally L.; Khoo, Michael C.K.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of real-time 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with simultaneous recording of physiological signals for identifying sites of airway obstruction during natural sleep in pediatric patients with sleep-disordered breathing. Methods Experiments were performed using a three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) gradient echo sequence with prospective undersampling based on golden-angle radial spokes, and L1-norm regularized iterative self-consistent parallel imaging (L1-SPIRiT) reconstruction. This technique was demonstrated in three healthy adult volunteers and five pediatric patients with sleep-disordered breathing. External airway occlusion was used to induce partial collapse of the upper airway on inspiration and test the effectiveness of the proposed imaging method. Apneic events were identified using information available from synchronized recording of mask pressure and respiratory effort. Results Acceptable image quality was obtained in seven of eight subjects. Temporary airway collapse induced via inspiratory loading was successfully imaged in all three volunteers, with average airway volume reductions of 63.3%, 52.5%, and 33.7%. Central apneic events and associated airway narrowing/closure were identified in two pediatric patients. During central apneic events, airway obstruction was observed in the retropalatal region in one pediatric patient. Conclusion Real-time 3D MRI of the pharyngeal airway with synchronized recording of physiological signals is feasible and may provide valuable information about the sites and nature of airway narrowing/collapse during natural sleep. PMID:23788203

  18. SEMATECH EUVL mask program status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Henry; Goodwin, Frank; Huh, Sungmin; Orvek, Kevin; Cha, Brian; Rastegar, Abbas; Kearney, Patrick

    2009-04-01

    As we approach the 22nm half-pitch (hp) technology node, the industry is rapidly running out of patterning options. Of the several lithography techniques highlighted in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), the leading contender for the 22nm hp insertion is extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). Despite recent advances with EUV resist and improvements in source power, achieving defect free EUV mask blank and enabling the EUV mask infrastructure still remain critical issues. To meet the desired EUV high volume manufacturing (HVM) insertion target date of 2013, these obstacles must be resolved on a timely bases. Many of the EUV mask related challenges remain in the pre-competitive stage and a collaborative industry based consortia, such as SEMATECH can play an important role to enable the EUVL landscape. SEMATECH based in Albany, NY is an international consortium representing several of the largest manufacturers in the semiconductor market. Full members include Intel, Samsung, AMD, IBM, Panasonic, HP, TI, UMC, CNSE (College of Nanoscience and Engineering), and Fuller Road Management. Within the SEMATECH lithography division a major thrust is centered on enabling the EUVL ecosystem from mask development, EUV resist development and addressing EUV manufacturability concerns. An important area of focus for the SEMATECH mask program has been the Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC). At the MBDC key issues in EUV blank development such as defect reduction and inspection capabilities are actively pursued together with research partners, key suppliers and member companies. In addition the mask program continues a successful track record of working with the mask community to manage and fund critical mask tools programs. This paper will highlight recent status of mask projects and longer term strategic direction at the MBDC. It is important that mask technology be ready to support pilot line development HVM by 2013. In several areas progress has been

  19. Masked Proportional Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David

    2004-01-01

    Masked proportional routing is an improved procedure for choosing links between adjacent nodes of a network for the purpose of transporting an entity from a source node ("A") to a destination node ("B"). The entity could be, for example, a physical object to be shipped, in which case the nodes would represent waypoints and the links would represent roads or other paths between waypoints. For another example, the entity could be a message or packet of data to be transmitted from A to B, in which case the nodes could be computer-controlled switching stations and the links could be communication channels between the stations. In yet another example, an entity could represent a workpiece while links and nodes could represent, respectively, manufacturing processes and stages in the progress of the workpiece towards a finished product. More generally, the nodes could represent states of an entity and the links could represent allowed transitions of the entity. The purpose of masked proportional routing and of related prior routing procedures is to schedule transitions of entities from their initial states ("A") to their final states ("B") in such a manner as to minimize a cost or to attain some other measure of optimality or efficiency. Masked proportional routing follows a distributed (in the sense of decentralized) approach to probabilistically or deterministically choosing the links. It was developed to satisfy a need for a routing procedure that 1. Does not always choose the same link(s), even for two instances characterized by identical estimated values of associated cost functions; 2. Enables a graceful transition from one set of links to another set of links as the circumstances of operation of the network change over time; 3. Is preferably amenable to separate optimization of different portions of the network; 4. Is preferably usable in a network in which some of the routing decisions are made by one or more other procedure(s); 5. Preferably does not cause an

  20. Laryngeal Adductor Function in Experimental Models of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Paniello, Randal C.; Rich, Jason T.; Debnath, Nick L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Most patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis experience some degree of spontaneous reinnervation, which depends upon the type and severity of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury. After partial recovery, the paretic vocal fold may or may not adduct adequately to allow glottic closure, which in turn affects phonatory and swallowing outcomes. This process was studied in a series of canine laryngeal nerve injury models. Study Design Animal (canine) experiments. Methods Maximum stimulable laryngeal adductor pressure (LAP) was measured pre-treatment (baseline) and at 6 months following experimental RLN injuries (total n=59). The 9 study groups were designed to simulate a range of severities of RLN injury. Results The greatest LAP recovery, at 108% of original baseline, was seen in a 50% transection model; the least recovery was seen when the RLN underwent complete transection with repair, at 56% with precise alignment and 50% with alignment reversed. Intermediate models (partial RLN injuries) gave intermediate results. Crush models recovered 105% of LAP, while a half-transection, half-crush injury recovered 72% and cautery injuries recovered 61%. Controls (complete transection without repair) had no measurable recovery. Conclusions The injured RLN has a strong tendency to recover. Restoration of adductor strength, as determined by the LAP, was predictably related to the severity of RLN injury. The model RLN injuries studied provide a range of expected outcomes that can be used for future experiments exploring interventions that may improve post-injury adductor function. PMID:25283381

  1. Combining Simultaneous with Temporal Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Herzog, Michael H.; Francis, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous and temporal masking are two frequently used techniques in psychology and vision science. Although there are many studies and theories related to each masking technique, there are no systematic investigations of their mutual relationship, even though both techniques are often applied together. Here, the authors show that temporal…

  2. Masked Repetition Priming Using Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Philip J.; Fiorentino, Robert; Poeppel, David

    2008-01-01

    Masked priming is used in psycholinguistic studies to assess questions about lexical access and representation. We present two masked priming experiments using MEG. If the MEG signal elicited by words reflects specific aspects of lexical retrieval, then one expects to identify specific neural correlates of retrieval that are sensitive to priming.…

  3. Mask industry assessment trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Marmillion, Patricia; Hughes, Greg

    2008-04-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. This year's survey data were presented in detail at BACUS and the detailed trend analysis presented at EMLC. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the sixth in the current series of annual reports. With continued industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 and 2006 surveys. Questions are grouped into eight categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss, Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns and Services, Operating Cost Factors, and Equipment Utilization. Within each category is a multitude of questions that creates a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. Note: the questions covering operating cost factors and equipment utilization were added to the survey only in 2005; therefore, meaningful trend analysis is not available.

  4. Mask industry assessment trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. This year's survey data were presented in detail at BACUS and the detailed trend analysis presented at EMLC. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the seventh in the current series of annual reports. With continued industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the surveys in 2005 through 2007. Questions are grouped into seven categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss, Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. (Examples are given below). Within each category is a multitude of questions that creates a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  5. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  6. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  7. Effective EUVL mask cleaning technology solutions for mask manufacturing and in-fab mask maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Uwe; Dress, Peter; Waehler, Tobias; Singh, Sherjang; Jonckheere, Rik; Baudemprez, Bart

    2011-03-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is considered the leading lithography technology choice for semiconductor devices at 16nm HP node and beyond. However, before EUV Lithography can enter into High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) of advanced semiconductor devices, the ability to guarantee mask integrity at point-of-exposure must be established. Highly efficient, damage free mask cleaning plays a critical role during the mask manufacturing cycle and throughout the life of the mask, where the absence of a pellicle to protect the EUV mask increases the risk of contamination during storage, handling and use. In this paper, we will present effective EUVL mask cleaning technology solutions for mask manufacturing and in-fab mask maintenance, which employs an intelligent, holistic approach to maximize Mean Time Between Cleans (MBTC) and extend the useful life span of the reticle. The data presented will demonstrate the protection of the capping and absorber layers, preservation of pattern integrity as well as optical and mechanical properties to avoid unpredictable CD-linewidth and overlay shifts. Experiments were performed on EUV blanks and pattern masks using various process conditions. Conditions showing high particle removal efficiency (PRE) and minimum surface layer impact were then selected for durability studies. Surface layer impact was evaluated over multiple cleaning cycles by means of UV reflectivity metrology XPS analysis and wafer prints. Experimental results were compared to computational models. Mask life time predictions where made using the same computational models. The paper will provide a generic overview of the cleaning sequence which yielded best results, but will also provide recommendations for an efficient in-fab mask maintenance scheme, addressing handling, storage, cleaning and inspection.

  8. The Laryngeal Motor Cortex: Its Organization and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Simonyan, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to learn and control the motor aspects of complex laryngeal behaviors, such as speech and song, is modulated by the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC), which is situated in the area 4 of the primary motor cortex and establishes both direct and indirect connections with laryngeal motoneurons. In contrast, the LMC in monkeys is located in the area 6 of the premotor cortex, projects only indirectly to laryngeal motoneurons and its destruction has essentially no effect on production of species-specific calls. These differences in cytoarchitectonic location and connectivity may be a result of hominid evolution that led to the LMC shift from the phylogenetically “old” to “new” motor cortex in order to fulfill its paramount function, i.e., voluntary motor control of human speech and song production. PMID:24929930

  9. Sonographically guided superior laryngeal nerve block during awake fiberoptic intubation.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Andrew; Tang, Raymond; Vaghadia, Himat

    2015-04-15

    We report 5 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided superior laryngeal nerve block before awake intubation and general anesthesia. We used a 8- to 15-MHz hockey stick-shaped ultrasound transducer (HST15-8/20 linear probe, Ultrasonix) to visualize the superior laryngeal nerve. A 3.8-cm 25-G needle was inserted in real time and directed toward the superior laryngeal nerve followed by circumferential placement of local anesthetic. All 5 patients tolerated subsequent awake fiberoptic intubation with either minimal or no sedation. Sonographically guided superior laryngeal nerve block may be useful in patients where identification of landmarks in the neck is difficult as a result of patient anatomy. PMID:25867195

  10. Airway Preparation Techniques for the Cervical Spine-Injured Football Player

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Richard; Luchies, Carl; Bazuin, Doug; Farrell, Robert N.

    1995-01-01

    Athletic health care professionals have been concerned about how to optimize the emergency care the cervical spine-injured football player receives on the field. Much of the discussion has centered on how to best expose and prepare the airway for rescue breathing in the quickest and safest manner possible. This study compared the time required and the extraneous motion induced at the cervical spine during three traditional and one new airway exposure and preparation technique. Twelve subjects wearing football helmets and shoulder pads were exposed to multiple trials of airway exposure via face mask repositioning using a manual screwdriver, power screwdriver, and the Trainer's Angel cutting device. Subjects also underwent airway preparation using the pocket mask insertion technique. Cervical spine motion was measured in two dimensions using an optoelectronic motion analysis system. Time and qualitative assessment were obtained through videotape analysis. Significant differences were found between the techniques with respect to time and cervical spine motion. The pocket mask allowed quicker activation of rescue breathing than the other three traditional techniques. There was no significant difference in the amount of extraneous motion induced at the cervical spine between the pocket mask, manual screwdriver, and power screwdriver techniques. The Trainer's Angel induced significantly more motion than the other three techniques in each of the four motions measured. Changes in traditional protocols used to treat cervical spine-injured football players on the field are recommended based on these data. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2. PMID:16558339

  11. Pharyngolaryngeal location of Kaposi's sarcoma with airway obstruction in an HIV-negative patient.

    PubMed

    Torretta, Sara; Gaffuri, Michele; Recalcati, Sebastiano; Marzano, Angelo Valerio; Cantarella, Giovanna; Iofrida, Elisabetta; Pignataro, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8)-associated angioproliferative disorder, and its occurrence may be favored by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and iatrogenic immunosuppression. It has also been postulated that a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin can pave the way to its development. KS generally involves mucosal and cutaneous sites, including the head and neck. An oropharyngeal location is quite common, but laryngeal involvement with possible upper airway obstruction and respiratory distress requiring tracheotomy is rare, and no hypopharyngeal locations have yet been reported. We describe the case of a 68-year-old male patient who developed KS after immunosuppressive treatment for pemphigus vulgaris, an autoimmune bullous disease presenting with blisters and erosions on the skin and the oral mucosa. KS was initially localized to the oral cavity and oropharynx, but subsequent involvement of the laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tract led to acute airway obstruction and the need for tracheotomy. This unique case of pharyngolaryngeal KS suggests that clinicians faced with purple nodular lesions should consider a differential diagnosis of KS in immunocompromised patients, even if they are HIV negative, and should carefully manage the patency of the upper airways. PMID:24362871

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for laryngeal radionecrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, B.J.; Hudson, W.R.; Farmer, J.C. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Radionecrosis of the larynx is a debilitating disease associated with pain, dysphagia, respiratory obstruction, and, in some cases, the need for laryngectomy. Persistent poor wound healing can lead to death. A series of eight patients with advanced (grades III and IV, Chandler classification) radionecrosis of the larynx treated with adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy is presented. Signs and symptoms of radionecrosis were dramatically ameliorated in seven of eight patients, while one patient, despite subjective improvement, eventually required laryngectomy. There were no deaths. These results are compared to previous series on radionecrosis of the larynx in which hyperbaric oxygen was not used. This series indicates that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a useful and effective adjunctive treatment modality in the management of laryngeal radionecrosis.

  13. Human laryngitis caused by Clinostomum complanatum.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hirotaka; Miyauchi, Yuji; Tahara, Shinsaku; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    A 64-year-old Japanese man visited our outpatient department complaining of an irritable sensation in the throat, occurring two days after eating raw freshwater fish (carp sashimi) at a Japanese-style inn. During laryngeal endoscopy, a slow-moving worm (fluke) was found attached to the surface of the right aryepiglottic fold. After inhalation of 4% lidocaine, the fluke was removed using endoscopic forceps. Patient's throat symptoms immediately improved. The worm was microscopically identified as Clinostomum complanatum. C. complanatum is a digenetic trematode that usually infects fish-eating water birds. Clinostomum infections in humans are rare, and only 21 cases have been described in Japan and Korea. C. complanatum infection is known to occur after eating raw freshwater fish, which is a secondary intermediate host. In humans, the metacercariae are released into the stomach and migrate through the esophagus before lodging in the throat. Primary therapy involves endoscopic removal of the worm. PMID:25130004

  14. [Intubation treatment of acute laryngeal obstruction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingguang; Liu, Shibo; Li, Huilian

    2015-11-01

    Acute laryngeal obstruction is one of the most common diseases in Department of ENT, and it can cause suffocation without prompt treatment. Methods by using Nasopharyngofiberoscope guided tracheal intubation treatment of a case of acute laryngeal obstruction patients in a timely manner. This method is well tolerated, less trauma, high success rate, in the shortest time to improve the patient's ventilation, for the next step of the treatment to win the time. PMID:26911075

  15. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers.

    PubMed

    Dziegielewski, Peter T; Kang, Stephen Y; Ozer, Enver

    2015-12-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is increasingly used in laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer surgery. Ablative procedures described in these anatomical sites include: (i) supraglottic laryngectomy, (ii) total laryngectomy, (iii) glottic cordectomy, and (iv) partial pharyngectomy. TORS supraglottic laryngectomy remains the most commonly performed of these procedures. Initial oncologic and functional outcomes with these procedures are promising and comparable to other treatment options. As robotic instrumentation technology advances a rise in TORS laryngeal/hypopharyngeal surgery is anticipated. PMID:26266762

  16. Alterations in the laryngeal mucosa after exposure to asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Kambic, V; Radsel, Z; Gale, N

    1989-01-01

    The laryngeal mucosa of 195 workers in an asbestos cement factory (Salonit Anhovo, Yugoslavia) and in a control group was examined. The factory manufactures asbestos cement products containing about 13% of asbestos (8% amosite, 12% crocidolite, and 80% chrysotile) of different provenance. Alterations in the laryngeal mucosa were more frequent in the factory workers than in the control group. The changes, mostly consistent with chronic laryngitis, were closely related to the degree of workplace pollution and less so to the duration of employment Ten workers exhibiting the most severe clinical changes underwent biopsy, the results of which showed histomorphological changes characteristic of hyperplastic chronic laryngitis. Four tissue specimens were examined also by scanning electron microscopy and in three of them asbestos fibres were found on the epithelial surface. No case of laryngeal carcinoma was identified. On the basis of our results it is thought that asbestos related changes of the larynx should receive more attention and that the use of the term "laryngeal asbestosis" is justified. The clinical picture is non-specific but in view of their frequency such changes should be considered a consequence of exposure to asbestos. Images PMID:2489023

  17. Epidemiology of laryngeal carcinoma in Germany, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Peller, Maximilian; Katalinic, Alexander; Wollenberg, Barbara; Teudt, Ingo U; Meyer, Jens-E

    2016-06-01

    Constituting 25-30 % of all head and neck cancer cases, laryngeal carcinoma is the most prevalent entity. Major risk factors of laryngeal cancer are smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. This study presents the recent developments in the incidence of laryngeal cancer from 1998 to 2011 in Germany. Laryngeal carcinoma was identified using International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD10) from German population-based cancer registries. The incidence was provided by the Robert Koch Institute, and the mortality data were derived from German death statistics for further evaluation. Both descriptive and analytical analyses were conducted. From 1998 to 2011, a total of 14,847 laryngeal carcinoma cases were reported, in 13,195 men and 1652 women. Glottic carcinoma represented the main entity, constituting 69 % of male cases and 50 % of female cases. For men, a decline in incidence was observed starting in 2006. The incidence rate for women remained stable for the period of observation. The incidence of laryngeal cancer resembles the development of smoking behaviour in Germany. To maintain the positive trend of the male population and to reduce the incidence in women, it is crucial to continue and to improve the prevention of smoking campaigns in Germany. PMID:26879991

  18. Laryngeal paralysis-polyneuropathy complex in young Rottweilers.

    PubMed

    Mahony, O M; Knowles, K E; Braund, K G; Averill, D R; Frimberger, A E

    1998-01-01

    Five Rottweiler puppies from 3 unrelated litters developed inspiratory stridor at 11-13 weeks of age. Physical examination disclosed tetraparesis in all dogs, and bilateral lenticular cataracts in 4 dogs. Laryngeal examination under light anesthesia showed laryngeal paralysis in all dogs. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed denervation potentials in the distal appendicular muscles of 4 dogs tested and in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of 2 dogs tested. Motor nerve conduction velocity was slightly low in 1 dog. Neurogenic muscular atrophy was found in distal appendicular muscles (n = 3) and intrinsic laryngeal muscles (n = 2), and degenerative changes were found in peripheral nerves (n = 3) and recurrent laryngeal nerves (n = 2). No abnormalities were detected in the spinal cord, spinal nerve roots, or ganglia of 3 dogs autopsied. The clinical, electrophysiologic, and histopathologic findings support a diagnosis of polyneuropathy and resemble the finding reported in young Dalmatians. Young dogs with laryngeal paralysis should be evaluated neurologically to rule out a more generalized polyneuropathy. The condition is suspected to be hereditary in nature and the prognosis is poor. PMID:9773408

  19. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  20. Bringing mask repair to the next level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinger, K.; Wolff, K.; Steigerwald, H.; Auth, N.; Spies, P.; Oster, J.; Schneider, H.; Budach, M.; Hofmann, T.; Waiblinger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Mask repair is an essential step in the mask manufacturing process as the extension of 193nm technology and the insertion of EUV are drivers for mask complexity and cost. The ability to repair all types of defects on all mask blank materials is crucial for the economic success of a mask shop operation. In the future mask repair is facing several challenges. The mask minimum features sizes are shrinking and require a higher resolution repair tool. At the same time mask blanks with different new mask materials are introduced to optimize optical performance and long term durability. For EUV masks new classes of defects like multilayer and phase defects are entering the stage. In order to achieve a high yield, mask repair has to cover etch and deposition capabilities and must not damage the mask. These challenges require sophisticated technologies to bring mask repair to the next level. For high end masks ion-beam based and e-based repair technologies are the obvious choice when it comes to the repair of small features. Both technologies have their pro and cons. The scope of this paper is to review and compare the performance of ion-beam based mask repair to e-beam based mask repair. We will analyze the limits of both technologies theoretically and experimentally and show mask repair related performance data. Based on this data, we will give an outlook to future mask repair tools.

  1. Sensitivity of coded mask telescopes.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2008-05-20

    Simple formulas are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask x-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but these are strictly applicable only if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask, or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given that allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimization of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels. PMID:18493279

  2. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y

    1998-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed.

  3. Management of airway complications of burns in children.

    PubMed

    Vivori, E; Cudmore, R E

    1977-12-01

    Children who have been exposed to smoke in a confined space or who have soot or burns, however minimal, on the face should be admitted to hospital. Respiratory distress may be delayed, but if it is progressive the patient should be curarised, intubated, and mechanically ventilated. Unless ventilation continues for 48 hours, followed by 24 hours' spontaneous respiration against a positive airway pressure, stridor and pulmonary oedema may recur. An endotracheal tube small enough to allow a leak between it and the oedematous mucosa must be passed to prevent laryngeal damage and subsequent subglottic stenosis. High humidity of inspired gases keeps secretions fluid and the endotracheal tube patent. A high oxygen concentration compensates for deficient oxygen uptake and transport caused by pulmonary lesions and the presence of poisonous compounds interfering with oxygen transport. Dexamethasone to minimise cerebral oedema and antibiotics to reduce the incidence of chest infections should be given. PMID:589269

  4. Laryngeal obstruction in congenital plasminogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Cohen, Shlomo; Cymberknoh, Malena Cohen; Gross, Menachem; Hirshoren, Nir; Shoseyov, David

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 congenital plasminogen deficiency (CPD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease which causes formation of fibrin pseudomembranes that affect multiple systems/organs: the eyes, respiratory system, urinary and genital systems, gastrointestinal system, and the central nervous system. We present a rare manifestation of the disease-severe upper airway obstruction due to a rapidly growing mass in the supraglottic region-6 months after dental treatment under general anesthesia. The management of such a manifestation has not been discussed in the current literature. Due to deterioration in his clinical status, the patient eventually underwent both a tracheotomy in order to bypass the obstruction, and excision of the supraglottic mass. Within a few days the mass recurred with complete obstruction of the upper airway. PMID:22328462

  5. Effects of a Mask on Breathing Impairment During a Fencing Assault: A Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Passali, Desiderio; Cambi, Jacopo; Salerni, Lorenzo; Stortini, Giancarlo; Bellussi, Luisa Maria; Passali, Francesco Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fencers often complain of progressive difficulty in breathing during matches, which is generally attributed to restricted air, light and heat circulation from wearing a mask. Physiologically, the nasal structure generates airflow resistance that can reach -50% of the total respiratory resistance. Objectives: This study aims to investigate the presence of nasal obstruction in fencers and the relationship with the use of mask. Materials and Methods: An observational study on 40 fencers (18 males, 22 females) was conducted. Fencers perform a usual assault, wearing the mask and standardized physical exercises (running, sprints and obstacles) without the mask. ENT examination with a nasal flexible fiberscope, Anterior Active Rhinomanometry (AAR) and Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow (PNIF) measurement before and after physical activity with or without the mask was recorded. Results: Before physical exercise, the total nasal airway resistance mean value for AAR was 0.33 ± 0.17 Pa/cm3/s at 150 Pa. After a match with the mask, the mean value was 0.28 ± 0.16 Pa/cm3/s. After normal physical exercises without mask, the mean value was 0.24 ± 0.15 Pa/cm3/s. Using t tests, statistically significant difference between nasal resistance before and after physical activity (P < 0.05) was observed, but no significant difference in nasal resistance between the basal value and that taken after a match wearing the masks (P = 0.1265). PNIF values significantly increase with exercise (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our study shows that wearing the mask causes increased breathing impairment in fencers, when compared with similar physical activity without the mask. PMID:26448845

  6. Hg-Mask Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Veiga, C. H.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assus, P.; Colas, F.

    In order to optimize the occulting process of a Lyot coronagraph and to provide a high dynamic range imaging, a new kind of occulting disk has been developed at the National Observatory of Rio de Janeiro. A mercury (Hg) drop glued onto an optical window by molecular cohesion and compressed by a pellicle film is used as the occulting disk. The minimum of the superficial tension potential function provides an optical precision (lambda/100) of the toric free surface of the mercury. This process provides a size control for the adaptation to the seeing conditions and to the apparent diameter of a resolved object, and in the case of adaptive optics, to the Airy diameter fraction needed. The occultation is a three dimensional process near the focal plane on the toric free surface that provides an apodization of the occultation. The Hg-Mask coronagraph has been projected for astrometric observations of faint satellites near to Jovian planets and works since 2000 at the 1.6 m telescope of the Pico dos Dias Observatory (OPD - Brazil).

  7. Increased airway reactivity in a neonatal mouse model of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Martin, Richard J.; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a primary form of respiratory support used in the intensive care of preterm infants, but its long-term effects on airway (AW) function are unknown. Methods We developed a neonatal mouse model of CPAP treatment to determine whether it modifies later AW reactivity. Un-anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice were fitted with a mask to deliver CPAP (6cmH2O, 3hrs/day) for 7 consecutive days starting at postnatal day 1. Airway reactivity to methacholine was assessed using the in vitro living lung slice preparation. Results One week of CPAP increased AW responsiveness to methacholine in male, but not female mice, compared to untreated control animals. The AW hyper-reactivity of male mice persisted for 2 weeks (at P21) after CPAP treatment ended. 4 days of CPAP, however, did not significantly increase AW reactivity. Females also exhibited AW hyper-reactivity at P21, suggesting a delayed response to early (7 days) CPAP treatment. The effects of 7 days of CPAP on hyper-reactivity to methacholine were unique to smaller AWs whereas larger ones were relatively unaffected. Conclusion These data may be important to our understanding of the potential long-term consequences of neonatal CPAP therapy used in the intensive care of preterm infants. PMID:25950451

  8. Dental implant removal to facilitate suspension laryngoscopy and laser treatment of an obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    Hume-Smith, H; Fowler, A; Vaz, F; Suaris, P

    2010-01-01

    A 29-year-old patient presented with dysphonia, dysphagia and a progressive history of stridor over 6 weeks. His past medical history included childhood nasolabial rhabdomyosarcoma treated by surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This had resulted in marked abnormalities of the facial skeleton, limited neck extension and restricted mouth opening of 1 cm, in part due to dental implants. After careful discussion and planning within a multidisciplinary team, the airway was optimised by temporary removal of the dental implants. This enabled a suspension laryngoscope to be passed, permitting carbon dioxide laser treatment to an obstruction at the laryngeal inlet and eliminating the need for a tracheostomy. PMID:19849679

  9. Upper Airway Injury in Dogs Secondary to Trauma: 10 Dogs (2000-2011).

    PubMed

    Basdani, Eleni; Papazoglou, Lysimachos G; Patsikas, Michail N; Kazakos, Georgios M; Adamama-Moraitou, Katerina K; Tsokataridis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Ten dogs that presented with trauma-induced upper airway rupture or stenosis were reviewed. Tracheal rupture was seen in seven dogs, tracheal stenosis in one dog, and laryngeal rupture in two dogs. Clinical abnormalities included respiratory distress in five dogs, subcutaneous emphysema in eight, air leakage through the cervical wound in seven, stridor in three dogs, pneumomediastinum in four and pneumothorax in one dog. Reconstruction with simple interrupted sutures was performed in four dogs, tracheal resection and end-to-end anastomosis in five dogs, and one dog was euthanized intraoperatively. Complications were seen in three dogs including aspiration pneumonia in one and vocalization alterations in two dogs. PMID:27487354

  10. Serotonin in the solitary tract nucleus shortens the laryngeal chemoreflex in anaesthetized neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, William T; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J C

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Failure to terminate apnoea and arouse is likely to contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Serotonin is deficient in the brainstems of babies who died of SIDS. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that serotonin in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) would shorten reflex apnoea. What is the main finding and its importance? Serotonin microinjected into the NTS shortened the apnoea and respiratory inhibition associated with the laryngeal chemoreflex. Moreover, this effect was achieved through a 5-HT3 receptor. This is a new insight that is likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of SIDS. The laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR), an airway-protective reflex that causes apnoea and bradycardia, has long been suspected as an initiating event in the sudden infant death syndrome. Serotonin (5-HT) and 5-HT receptors may be deficient in the brainstems of babies who die of sudden infant death syndrome, and 5-HT seems to be important in terminating apnoeas directly or in causing arousals or as part of the process of autoresuscitation. We hypothesized that 5-HT in the brainstem would limit the duration of the LCR. We studied anaesthetized rat pups between 7 and 21 days of age and made microinjections into the cisterna magna or into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Focal, bilateral microinjections of 5-HT into the caudal NTS significantly shortened the LCR. The 5-HT1a receptor antagonist, WAY 100635, did not affect the LCR consistently, nor did a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, alter the duration of the LCR. The 5-HT3 specific agonist, 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-biguanide, microinjected bilaterally into the caudal NTS significantly shortened the LCR. Thus, endogenous 5-HT released within the NTS may curtail the respiratory depression that is part of the LCR, and serotonergic shortening of the LCR may be attributed to activation of 5-HT3 receptors within the NTS. 5-HT3 receptors are expressed presynaptically on C

  11. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways. Progress report, March 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Laboratory experimental studies were carried out to investigate the factors influencing the deposition of aerosols ranging in size from 1 nm to 10 {mu}m in the human nasal, oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal airways. These experimental studies were performed in replicate upper airway physical models and in human volunteer subjects. New replicate models of the oral passage of an infant, the oral passage of an adult at two openings and the combined nasal and oral airways of an adult were constructed during the period, adding to the existing models of adult, child and infant nasal and oral airways models. Deposition studies in the adult oral and adult nasal models were performed under simulated cyclic flow conditions with 1 nm particles to compare with previously measured constant flow studies. Similar studies with inertial particles (1--10 {mu}m diameter) were performed with the adult nasal model; in both instances, results with cyclic flow were similar to constant flow results using a simple average flow rate based on inspiratory volume and time of inspiration. Human subject studies were performed with particle sizes 5--20 nm for nasal inspiration; preliminary analysis shows good agreement with model studies at several representative flow rates. Nasal inspiratory inertial deposition of 1--4 {mu}m diameter particles was measured in several adults as a function of airway dimensions; dimensional changes of the valve area by decongestion did not produce concomitant deposition changes.

  12. Application of dual mask for postoperative respiratory support in obstructive sleep apnea patient.

    PubMed

    Porhomayon, Jahan; Zadeii, Gino; Nader, Nader D; Bancroft, George R; Yarahamadi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    In some conditions continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) therapy alone fails to provide satisfactory oxygenation. In these situations oxygen (O2) is often being added to CPAP/BIPAP mask or hose. Central sleep apnea and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are often present along with other chronic conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure, pulmonary fibrosis, neuromuscular disorders, chronic narcotic use, or central hypoventilation syndrome. Any of these conditions may lead to the need for supplemental O2 administration during the titration process. Maximization of comfort, by delivering O2 directly via a nasal cannula through the mask, will provide better oxygenation and ultimately treat the patient with lower CPAP/BIPAP pressure. PMID:23662212

  13. Mask materials for powder blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, Henk; Jansen, Henri V.; Berenschot, J. W.; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

    2000-06-01

    Powder blasting, or abrasive jet machining (AJM), is a technique in which a particle jet is directed towards a target for mechanical material removal. It is a fast, cheap and accurate directional etch technique for brittle materials such as glass, silicon and ceramics. The particle jet (which expands to about 1 cm in diameter) can be optimized for etching, while the mask defines the small and complex structures. The quality of the mask influences the performance of powder blasting. In this study we tested and compared several mask types and added a new one: electroplated copper. The latter combines a highly resistant mask material for powder blasting with the high-resolution capabilities of lithography, which makes it possible to obtain an accurate pattern transfer and small feature sizes (<50 µm).

  14. Mask technology for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujak, M.; Burkhart, Scott C.; Cerjan, Charles J.; Kearney, Patrick A.; Moore, Craig E.; Prisbrey, Shon T.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Tong, William M.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Walton, Christopher C.; Warrick, Abbie L.; Weber, Frank J.; Wedowski, Marco; Wilhelmsen, Karl C.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Jeong, Sungho; Cardinale, Gregory F.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Stivers, Alan R.; Tejnil, Edita; Yan, Pei-yang; Hector, Scott D.; Nguyen, Khanh B.

    1999-04-01

    Extreme UV Lithography (EUVL) is one of the leading candidates for the next generation lithography, which will decrease critical feature size to below 100 nm within 5 years. EUVL uses 10-14 nm light as envisioned by the EUV Limited Liability Company, a consortium formed by Intel and supported by Motorola and AMD to perform R and D work at three national laboratories. Much work has already taken place, with the first prototypical cameras operational at 13.4 nm using low energy laser plasma EUV light sources to investigate issues including the source, camera, electro- mechanical and system issues, photoresists, and of course the masks. EUV lithograph masks are fundamentally different than conventional photolithographic masks as they are reflective instead of transmissive. EUV light at 13.4 nm is rapidly absorbed by most materials, thus all light transmission within the EUVL system from source to silicon wafer, including EUV reflected from the mask, is performed by multilayer mirrors in vacuum.

  15. Identification of key target genes and pathways in laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Du, Jintao; Liu, Jun; Wen, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen the key genes associated with laryngeal carcinoma and to investigate the molecular mechanism of laryngeal carcinoma progression. The gene expression profile of GSE10935 [Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) accession number], including 12 specimens from laryngeal papillomas and 12 specimens from normal laryngeal epithelia controls, was downloaded from the GEO database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in laryngeal papillomas compared with normal controls using Limma package in R language, followed by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and pathway enrichment analysis. Furthermore, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed using Cytoscape software and modules were analyzed using MCODE plugin from the PPI network. Furthermore, significant biological pathway regions (sub-pathway) were identified by using iSubpathwayMiner analysis. A total of 67 DEGs were identified, including 27 up-regulated genes and 40 down-regulated genes and they were involved in different GO terms and pathways. PPI network analysis revealed that Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family member 1 (RASSF1) was a hub protein. The sub-pathway analysis identified 9 significantly enriched sub-pathways, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and nitrogen metabolism. Genes such as phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), carbonic anhydrase II (CA2), and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA12) whose node degrees were >10 were identified in the disease risk sub-pathway. Genes in the sub-pathway, such as RASSF1, PGK1, CA2 and CA12 were presumed to serve critical roles in laryngeal carcinoma. The present study identified DEGs and their sub-pathways in the disease, which may serve as potential targets for treatment of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:27446427

  16. Dietary consumption patterns and laryngeal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Vlastarakos, Petros V; Vassileiou, Andrianna; Delicha, Evie; Kikidis, Dimitrios; Protopapas, Dimosthenis; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the effect of diet on laryngeal carcinogenesis. Our study population was made up of 140 participants-70 patients with laryngeal cancer (LC) and 70 controls with a non-neoplastic condition that was unrelated to diet, smoking, or alcohol. A food-frequency questionnaire determined the mean consumption of 113 different items during the 3 years prior to symptom onset. Total energy intake and cooking mode were also noted. The relative risk, odds ratio (OR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated by multiple logistic regression analysis. We found that the total energy intake was significantly higher in the LC group (p < 0.001), and that the difference remained statistically significant after logistic regression analysis (p < 0.001; OR: 118.70). Notably, meat consumption was higher in the LC group (p < 0.001), and the difference remained significant after logistic regression analysis (p = 0.029; OR: 1.16). LC patients also consumed significantly more fried food (p = 0.036); this difference also remained significant in the logistic regression model (p = 0.026; OR: 5.45). The LC group also consumed significantly more seafood (p = 0.012); the difference persisted after logistic regression analysis (p = 0.009; OR: 2.48), with the consumption of shrimp proving detrimental (p = 0.049; OR: 2.18). Finally, the intake of zinc was significantly higher in the LC group before and after logistic regression analysis (p = 0.034 and p = 0.011; OR: 30.15, respectively). Cereal consumption (including pastas) was also higher among the LC patients (p = 0.043), with logistic regression analysis showing that their negative effect was possibly associated with the sauces and dressings that traditionally accompany pasta dishes (p = 0.006; OR: 4.78). Conversely, a higher consumption of dairy products was found in controls (p < 0.05); logistic regression analysis showed that calcium appeared to be protective at the micronutrient level (p < 0

  17. [Monitoring of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury using an electromyographic endotracheal tube in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Anesthetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Martín Jaramago, J; Tamarit Conejeros, M; Escudero Torrella, M; Solaz Roldán, C

    2013-12-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury remains one of the main complications in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. When this injury is bilateral, an acute upper airway obstruction may occur, leading to a potentially life-threatening situation for the patient. The visual identification of the nerve during surgery is the best way to preserve its integrity. However identification of the nerves by means of electromyographic stimuli through electrodes attached to endotracheal tubes could help in decreasing nerve injury. In these cases the experience and role of the anesthetist is essential to correctly place the electromyographic endotracheal tube and ensure that the electrodes are in touch with the vocal cords during the surgery. Moreover, the results of the electromyography can be affected by the neuromuscular blocking agents. Therefore, the choice and dose must be adapted, in order to ensure a suitable anesthetic depth, and adequate response. PMID:23886448

  18. Cosmic Masks Still Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, David L.; Puerari, Ivânio; Frogel, Jay A.; Eskridge, Paul B.; Stockton, Alan; Fuchs, Burkhard

    The Hubble classification scheme of galaxies is based on their optical appearance or `masks'. As one goes from early to late type spirals, both barred and unbarred, the optical appearance will be dominated more and more by the young Population I, i.e., blue stars and dust. Atlases reveal the rich variety of responses of the Population I component of gas and dust (the mask) to the underlying, older, stellar population. However, the gaseous Population I component, may only constitute 5 percent of the dynamical mass of the galaxy. Masks of negligible mass may conceal the human face - and that of galaxy. In the near-infrared, the morphology of older star-dominated disk indicates a simple classification scheme: the dominant Fourier m-mode in the dust penetrated regime, and the associated pitch angle. A ubiquity of low m=1 and m=2 modes is confirmed. On the basis of deprojected H (1.65 μm) and K' (2.1μm) images, we propose that the evolved stellar disks may be grouped into three principal dust penetrated archetypes: those with tightly wound stellar arms characterised by pitch angles at K' of ~ 10^° (the α class), an intermediate group with pitch angles of ~ 25^° (the β class) and thirdly, those with open spirals demarcated by pitch angles at K' of ~ 40^° (the γ bin). Flat or falling rotation curves give rise to the tightly wound α class; rising rotation curves are associated with the open γ class. The observed dust penetrated classes are inextricably related to the rate of shear in the stellar disk, as determined by A/ω. Here A is the first Oort constant andω denotes the angular velocity. There is no correlation between our dust penetrated classes and optical Hubble binning; the Hubble tuning fork does not constrain the morphology of the old stellar Population II disks. NGC 3223 and NGC 7083 (both SbI-II and almost the same absolute blue magnitude) have identical Hubble types and identical luminosity classes; the dust penetrated disk of NGC 3223 has tightly

  19. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?).

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient's level of consciousness and hemodynamic compensation, compounding an already critical situation. What to do when endotracheal intubation fails and blood is trickling down the airways in an unconscious patient or when a conscious patient has to sit up to breathe? Which surgical airway in critical airway? Comparative studies among the various methods of emergency surgical airway would be unethical; furthermore, operator's training and experience is relevant for indications and performance. PMID:23248494

  20. Visual Masking During Pursuit Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    Visual masking occurs when one stimulus interferes with the perception of another stimulus. Investigates which matters more for visual masking--that the target and masking stimuli are flashed on the same part of the retina, or, that the target and mask appear in the same place. (Author/RK)

  1. [Occupational risks for laryngeal cancer: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Sartor, Sergio Guerra; Eluf-Neto, José; Travier, Noemie; Wünsch Filho, Victor; Arcuri, Arline Sydneia Abel; Kowalski, Luís Paulo; Boffetta, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    The most solidly established risk factors for laryngeal cancer are tobacco and alcohol. As for occupational factors, the only established carcinogen is exposure to strong inorganic acid mists. However, asbestos, pesticides, paints, gasoline, diesel engine emissions, dusts, and other factors have been reported in the literature as occupational agents that increase the risk of laryngeal cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to investigate occupational risk factors for laryngeal cancer. Detailed data on smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational history were collected for 122 laryngeal cancers and 187 controls matched by frequency (according to sex and age). Laryngeal cancer was associated with exposure to respirable free crystalline silica (OR = 1.83; 95%CI: 1.00-3.36), soot (from coal, coke, fuel oil, or wood) (odds ratio - OR = 1.78; 95% confidence interval - 95%CI: 1.03-3.03), fumes (OR = 2.55; 95%CI: 1.14-5.67), and live animals (OR = 1.80; 95%CI: 1.02-3.19). PMID:17546338

  2. [Evidence-Based Review of Laryngeal Cancer Surgery].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S

    2016-04-01

    Surgical treatment of laryngeal cancer has been established for decades. In addition to total laryngectomy, which was first performed in 1873, a large number of organ preservation surgical techniques, like open partial laryngectomy, transoral laser microsurgery and transoral robotic surgery, have been developed. Studies on laryngeal cancer surgery are mainly retrospective case series and cohort studies. The evolution of chemoradiation protocols and their analysis in prospective randomized trials have led to an increasing acceptance of non-surgical treatment procedures. In addition to an improvement of prognosis, in recent years the preservation of function and maintenance of life quality after primary therapy of laryngeal cancer has increasingly become the focus of therapy planning. Significant late toxicity after chemoradiation has been identified as an important issue. This leads to a reassessment of surgical concepts and initiation of studies on laryngeal cancer surgery which was additionally stimulated by the advent of transoral robotic surgery in the U.S.. Improving the evidence base in laryngeal cancer surgery by successful establishment of surgical trials should be the future goal. PMID:27128401

  3. State of the Art Laryngeal Imaging: Research and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Deliyski, Dimitar D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review This paper provides a review of the latest advances in videostroboscopy, videokymography and high-speed videoendoscopy, and outlines the development of new laryngeal imaging modalities based on optical coherence tomography, laser depth-kymography, and magnetic resonance imaging, published in the past 2 years. Recent Findings Videostroboscopy and Videokymography Image quality has improved and several image processing and measurement techniques have been published. High-speed videoendoscopy Significant progress has been made through increased sensitivity and frame rates of the cameras, and the development of facilitative playbacks, phonovibrography and several image segmentation and measurement methods. Clinical evidence was presented through applications in phonosurgery, comparisons with videostroboscopy, normative data, and better understanding of voice production. Optical coherence tomography Latest developments allow for the capture of dynamic high resolution cross-sectional images of the vibrating vocal fold mucosa during phonation. Depth-kymography New laser technique allowing recording of the vertical movements of the vocal folds during phonation in calibrated spatial values. Laryngeal magnetic resonance New methods allow high-resolution imaging of laryngeal tissue microstructure, or measuring of dynamic laryngeal structures during phonation. Summary The endoscopic laryngeal imaging techniques have made significant advances increasing their clinical value, while techniques providing new types of potentially clinically-relevant information have emerged. PMID:20463479

  4. Epithelial hyperplasia, airways

    Cancer.gov

    Number of respiratory epithelial cells is increased diffusely or focally. Frequently luminal protrusions are observed, sometimes forming papillae. Mucous (goblet) cell metaplastic hyperplasia is a variant, in which the respiratory epithelium of conducting airways is replaced by mucous cells either as a single or a pseudostratified layer.

  5. Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Dynamic Acoustic Analysis of Tension Asymmetry in Excised Canine Larynges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Erin E.; Bulleit, Erin E.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To model tension asymmetry caused by superior laryngeal nerve paralysis (SLNP) in excised larynges and apply perturbation, nonlinear dynamic, and aerodynamic analyses. Method: SLNP was modeled in 8 excised larynges using sutures and weights to mimic cricothyroid (CT) muscle function. Weights were removed from one side to create tension…

  6. Exolaryngoscopy: a new technique for laryngeal surgery.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, C; Fasanella, L; Ricci Maccarini, A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the use of a telescope with a high definition endoscopic video system as an alternative to the operating microscope in endoscopic laryngeal surgery. The system is economic, and allows optimal vision and improved surgeon comfort and ease. In exolaryngoscopy, the optic vitom is positioned in place of the microscope. An extracorporeal optical system (exoscope) is positioned 25 cm from the surgical field. Under exoscopic control, it is possible to use the same series of instruments using a long handle through the laryngoscope. The CO2 laser may also be used by fixing it coaxially to the optical system, and it is possible to use a classic set of microinstruments for phonosurgery. Endoscopic study with auto-fluorescence (NBI; narrow band imaging) can be easily used to visualize both precancerous and cancerous lesions. We treated 12 patients with benign and malign pathologies of the vocal cords; in all cases, the predicted result was reached, and the optic vitom showed its potential advantages in ease and comfort of the surgeon. PMID:23326013

  7. Laryngeal transplantation in minipigs: early immunological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Birchall, M A; Ayling, S M; Harley, R; Murison, P J; Burt, R; Mitchard, L; Jones, A; Macchiarini, P; Stokes, C R; Bailey, M

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent tissue-engineering advances, there is no effective way of replacing all the functions of the larynx in those requiring laryngectomy. A recent clinical transplant was a success. Using quantitative immunofluorescence targeted at immunologically relevant molecules, we have studied the early (48 h and 1 week) immunological responses within larynxes transplantated between seven pairs of National Institutes of Health (NIH) minipigs fully homozygous at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus. There were only small changes in expression of some molecules (relative to interindividual variation) and these were clearest in samples from the subglottic region, where the areas of co-expression of CD25+CD45RC-CD8- and of CD163+CD172+MHC-II- increased at 1 week after transplant. In one case, infiltration by recipient T cells was analysed by T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ spectratype analysis; this suggested that changes in the T cell repertoire occur in the donor subglottis mucosal tissues from day 0 to day 7, but that the donor and recipient mucosal Vβ repertoires remain distinct. The observed lack of strong immunological responses to the trauma of surgery and ischaemia provides encouraging evidence to support clinical trials of laryngeal transplantation, and a basis on which to interpret future studies involving mismatches. PMID:22288599

  8. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry. PMID:27238174

  9. Generating mask inspection rules for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen; Broadbent, Bill; Dayal, Aditya; Gallagher, Emily; Hsiang, ChingYun; Redding, Vincent

    2005-11-01

    Semiconductor product designs are necessarily constrained by both the wafer and mask lithographic capabilities. When mask image sizes approach the exposure wavelength, optical and resist effects distort the printed images. Applying optical proximity correction (OPC) to design features on the mask compensates for diffraction effects. However, aggressive OPC introduces even smaller minimum features, adds notches and bulges, introduces sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) and generally creates a more challenging mask design with respect to data handling, printing and inspection. Mask defect inspection is a critical part of the mask process, ensuring that the mask pattern matches the intended design. However, the inspection itself imposes constraints on mask patterns that can be inspected with high defect sensitivity but low nuisance defect counts. These additional restrictions are undesirable since they can reduce the effectiveness of the OPC. IBM and KLA-Tencor have developed a test mask methodology to investigate the inspectability limits of the 576 and 516 mask inspection systems. The test mask design contains a variety of rules or features that currently impose inspectability limits on the inspection tools, in a range of sizes. The design also incorporates many features essential for obtaining valid results, such as a user-friendly layout, multiple pattern orientations, and background patterns. The mask was built and inspected in IBM Burlington's mask house. Preliminary inspection results will be presented; they underscore the importance of understanding both the inspection tool and the mask process when restricting mask design rules.

  10. Rewritable photochromic focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Bianco, Andrea; Bortoletto, Fabio; Conconi, Paolo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Gallazzi, Maria C.; Giro, Enrico; Lucotti, Andrea; Pernechele, Claudio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    The application of organic photochromic materials in astronomy is opening new possibilities which we are investigating in order to design innovative devices for future instrumentation. The photochromic property of transparent/opaque transition (although in a limited wavelength range) and the changes in intrinsic refractive index have led our studies to application in astronomic spectrographs, both as focal plane mask (for MOS application) and as dispersive elements (volume phase holographic gratings, VPHG), respectively. In both cases the possibility to write and erase devices with suitable irradiation has revealed a new perspective for non-disposable and fully customizable items for spectroscopy. Pursuing this goal we have synthesized a series of novel photochromic materials belonging to the diarylethenes. They fulfill the requirements of thermal stability and fatigue resistance necessary to build functional devices. Prototypes of high contrast focal plane mask working in the H-alpha spectral region have been manufactured and characterized both in laboratory and with the AFOSC camera at Asiago telescope (1.8 m). A custom writing robot (ARATRO) which, taking imaging frames and with the aid of interactive mask design software and ad hoc control electronics, is able to write MOS masks, has been constructed. The design of the MOS masks allow the fitting in the AFOSC slit wheel. The overall set-up is ready for the sky tests.

  11. Factors Associated with Clinical and Topographical Features of Laryngeal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Reis, João Gustavo Corrêa; Reis, Clarissa Souza Mota; da Costa, Daniel César Silva; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira; Oliveira, Raquel de Vasconcellos Carvalhaes; Rolla, Valéria Cavalcanti; Conceição-Silva, Fátima; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Laryngeal tuberculosis (LTB) is the most frequent granulomatous disease of the larynx and represents less than 2% of extrapulmonary TB cases. There are no pathognomonic clinical and endoscopic features of this disease and studies on LTB that can assist in its diagnostic characterization are lacking. Objective To identify factors associated with clinical and topographical features of LTB. Method a retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from the medical records of 36 patients with confirmed LTB diagnosis. Results Dysphonia and cough were the main symptoms presented by patients and the true vocal folds the most frequently affected site. The average of the duration of the disease evolution was significantly higher in patients with dysphonia than in patients without this symptom. We observed association between dysphonia and true vocal fold lesions and between odynophagia and lesions in the epiglottis, arytenoids and aryepiglottic folds. Odynophagia was more frequent in individuals with lesions in four or more laryngeal sites. Weight loss equal or above 10% of the body weight was more frequent in patients with odynophagia as first symptom and in patients with ulcerated lesion. Dyspnea on exertion was more frequent in individuals with more extensive laryngeal lesions. The percentage of smokers with lesions in four or more laryngeal sites was greater than that found in non-smokers. Laryngeal tissue fragment bacilloscopy and culture examinations were less positive than sputum ones. Conclusions Smoking appears to be associated with the development of more extensive LTB lesions, and LTB with dyspnea on exertion and odynophagia with consequent impairment of nutritional status. We emphasize the need for histopathologic confirmation, once positive sputum bacteriological examinations seem not to necessarily reflect laryngeal involvement. PMID:27077734

  12. Emergent airway management in a case of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Uma R.; Read, Selina; Desai, Vimal; Budde, Arne O.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), or Stone man syndrome, is rare and one of the most disabling genetic conditions of the connective tissue due to progressive extraskeletal ossification. It usually presents in the first decade of life as painful inflammatory swellings, either spontaneously or in response to trauma, which later ossify and lead to severe disability. Progressive spinal deformity including thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis leads to thoracic insufficiency syndrome, increasing the risk for pneumonia and right sided heart failure. We present the airway management in a 22-year-old male, diagnosed with FOP with severe disability, who required urgent airway intervention as a result of respiratory failure from pnuemonia. Tracheostomy triggers ossification and consequent airway obstruction at the tracheostomy site and laryngoscopy triggers temporomandibular joint ankylosis. Therefore, awake fiber-optic endotracheal intubation is recommended in these patients. Use of an airway endoscopy mask enabled us to simultaneously maintain non-invasive ventilation and intubate the patient in a situation where tracheostomy needed to be avoided. PMID:25425787

  13. Fraser syndrome with laryngeal webs: Report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Farzad; Ahmadi, Aslan; Zobairy, Hosna; Bakhti, Sepideh; Hirbod, Hengameh; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and laryngeal atresia. Although laryngeal webs occur uncommonly, they are the main cause of death in the first week of life in these patients. In this paper, we report two cases of Fraser syndrome with laryngeal webs. One of them was a twelve-year-old girl, primarily diagnosed with a supraglottic laryngeal web. In the course of treatment, a second web was also identified at the level of vocal cords, which is to our knowledge the first case of Fraser syndrome with two laryngeal webs in different levels. PMID:26384833

  14. Experimental and numerical study of patterns in laryngeal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, N. E.; Artana, G.; Sciamarella, D.

    2009-05-01

    Unsteady airflow is investigated in a channel with a geometry approximating that of the human larynx. The laryngeal flow is simulated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible two-dimensional viscous fluid, and visualized using the Schlieren technique in an experimental setup consisting of a rigid replica of the larynx, with and without ventricular bands. This study shows the spontaneous formation of vortex couples in several regions of the laryngeal profile, and at different stages of the evolution of the starting glottal jet.

  15. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux. PMID:26157498

  16. Laryngeal carcinoma presenting as polymyositis: A paraneoplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ritesh; Rathaur, Bhanu Pratap; Chaudhari, Tejendra Sukdeo; Shukla, Rakesh; Malhotra, Kiran Preet

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal carcinoma is rarely associated with paraneoplastic syndrome. Inflammatory myopathy presenting as paraneoplastic event is commonly associated with carcinomas of ovary, lung, pancreas, stomach, colorectal, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We report a case of elderly male, who presented with proximal muscle weakness and found to be associated with laryngeal carcinoma. Diagnosis of polymyositis (PM) was confirmed based on clinical features, laboratory test, and muscle biopsy. Exclusion of other commonly associated malignancies was done. This patient improved gradually after 6 months of immunosuppressive therapy and management of underlying cancer. PMID:27011653

  17. Critical analysis of robotic surgery for laryngeal tumours.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Francisco; Menoyo, Alicia; Abrante, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) with the Da Vinci robot has been used for the removal of laryngeal cancers with the objective to improve functional and aesthetic outcomes without worsening survival. The advantages of TORS are described in this article. However, its disadvantages, mainly high cost amongst others, do not make robotic surgery the current treatment of choice for laryngeal tumours; transoral laser surgery is superior in most cases. Major technical improvements are expected. Smaller, more ergonomic, new-generation robots better adapted to the head and neck will probably be available in the near future. PMID:24626048

  18. Coatings on reflective mask substrates

    DOEpatents

    Tong, William Man-Wai; Taylor, John S.; Hector, Scott D.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Stivers, Alan R.; Kofron, Patrick G.; Thompson, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

  19. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  20. Airway Management of the Patient with Maxillofacial Trauma: Review of the Literature and Suggested Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Michal; Bahouth, Hany; Leiser, Yoav; Abu El-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    According to the Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations for managing patients with life-threatening injuries, securing the airway is the first task of a primary caregiver. Airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma is complex and crucial because it can dictate a patient's survival. Securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma is often extremely difficult because the trauma involves the patient's airway and their breathing is compromised. In these patients, mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation are anticipated to be difficult. Additionally, some of these patients may not yet have been cleared of a cervical spine injury, and all are regarded as having a full stomach and having an increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The requirements of the intended maxillofacial operation may often preclude the use of an oral intubation tube, and alternative methods for securing the airway should be considered before the start of the surgery. In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with maxillofacial trauma, cooperation between maxillofacial surgeons, anesthesiologists, and trauma specialists is needed. In this review, we discuss the complexity and difficulties of securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma and present our approach for airway management of such patients. PMID:26161411

  1. Multidimensional voice analysis of reflux laryngitis patients.

    PubMed

    Pribuisienë, Rûta; Uloza, Virgilijus; Saferis, Viktoras

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze and quantify the voice characteristics of reflux laryngitis (RL) patients and to determine the most important voice tests and voice-quality parameters in the functional diagnostics of RL. The voices of 83 RL patients and 31 persons in the control group were evaluated. Vocal function was assessed using a multidimensional set of video laryngostroboscopic, perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic and subjective measurements according to the protocol elaborated by the Committee on Phoniatrics of the European Laryngological Society. The mean values of the hoarseness visual analogue scale assessment and voice handicap index were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the group of RL patients as compared to the controls. Objective voice assessment revealed a significant increase in mean values of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy (NNE), along with a significant decrease in pitch range, maximum frequency, phonetogram area (S) and maximum phonation time (MPT) in RL patients, both in the male and female subgroups. According to the results of discriminant analysis, the NNE, MPT, S and intensity range were determined as an optimum set for functional diagnostics of RL. The derived function (equation) makes it possible to assign the person to the group of RL patients with an accuracy of 86.7%. The sensitivity and specificity of eight voice parameters were found to be higher than 50%. The results of the present study demonstrate a reduction of phonation capabilities and voice quality in RL patients. Multidimensional voice evaluation makes it possible to detect significant differences in mean values of perceptual, subjective and objective voice quality parameters between RL patients and controls groups. Therefore, multidimensional voice analysis is an important tool in the functional diagnostics of RL. PMID:15004705

  2. Informational masking and musical training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Fligor, Brian J.; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between musical training and informational masking was studied for 24 young adult listeners with normal hearing. The listeners were divided into two groups based on musical training. In one group, the listeners had little or no musical training; the other group was comprised of highly trained, currently active musicians. The hypothesis was that musicians may be less susceptible to informational masking, which is thought to reflect central, rather than peripheral, limitations on the processing of sound. Masked thresholds were measured in two conditions, similar to those used by Kidd et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 3475-3480 (1994)]. In both conditions the signal was comprised of a series of repeated tone bursts at 1 kHz. The masker was comprised of a series of multitone bursts, gated with the signal. In one condition the frequencies of the masker were selected randomly for each burst; in the other condition the masker frequencies were selected randomly for the first burst of each interval and then remained constant throughout the interval. The difference in thresholds between the two conditions was taken as a measure of informational masking. Frequency selectivity, using the notched-noise method, was also estimated in the two groups. The results showed no difference in frequency selectivity between the two groups, but showed a large and significant difference in the amount of informational masking between musically trained and untrained listeners. This informational masking task, which requires no knowledge specific to musical training (such as note or interval names) and is generally not susceptible to systematic short- or medium-term training effects, may provide a basis for further studies of analytic listening abilities in different populations.

  3. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2003-12-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener's task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model's interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed changes

  4. Self-masking subtraction tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, D.P.; Yester, M.V.; Barnes, G.T.; Lakshminarayanan, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    The authors tested the image quality and dose savings of self-masking subtraction tomosynthesis (SST), which combines digital tomosynthesis with subtraction of a blurred self-mask. High-quality images of the inner ear of a head phantom were obtained at moderate dose savings. Although they were taken with linear motion, they did not exhibit the streaking due to off-fulcrum objects that is characteristic of conventional linear tomography. SST could reduce patient dose by a factor of at least 12 in examinations of the inner ear, and the mechanical aspects can be implemented with moderate modifications of existing instrumentation.

  5. Numerical Study of Turbulent Laryngeal Jet in the MDCT-based Human Lung Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2006-11-01

    The geometry of the human upper respiratory tract is constructed from x-ray-based multidetector computed tomography (MDCT: Sensation 64) images using in house developed segmentation software. The geometry consists of a mouth piece, the mouth, the oropharynx, the larynx, and up to 6 generations of the intra-thoracic airway tree. We applied a custom-developed Characteristic-Galerkin finite element method, which solves the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, to study the effect of turbulence on air flow structures in the MDCT-based lung model. In order to gather sufficient data for analysis of turbulence statistics, a constant flow rate of about 320 ml/s at the peak inspiratory phase is imposed at the terminal branches to draw air into the upper respiratory tract. The flow rate yields an average speed of about 2 m/s and a Reynolds number of 1,700 in the trachea. The characteristics of mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy are analyzed. A curved sheet-like high-speed laryngeal jet with high turbulence intensity is formed in the trachea. Some peak frequencies associated with the jet flow are detected. Their association with turbulent coherent structures is examined. The work is sponsored by NIH Grants R01-EB-005823 and R01-HL-064368.

  6. Functional electrical stimulation of intrinsic laryngeal muscles under varying loads in exercising horses.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Jon; Regner, Abby; Jarvis, Jonathan C; Priest, David; Sanders, Ira; Soderholm, Leo V; Mitchell, Lisa M; Ducharme, Norm G

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral vocal fold paralysis (BVCP) is a life threatening condition and appears to be a good candidate for therapy using functional electrical stimulation (FES). Developing a working FES system has been technically difficult due to the inaccessible location and small size of the sole arytenoid abductor, the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle. A naturally-occurring disease in horses shares many functional and etiological features with BVCP. In this study, the feasibility of FES for equine vocal fold paralysis was explored by testing arytenoid abduction evoked by electrical stimulation of the PCA muscle. Rheobase and chronaxie were determined for innervated PCA muscle. We then tested the hypothesis that direct muscle stimulation can maintain airway patency during strenuous exercise in horses with induced transient conduction block of the laryngeal motor nerve. Six adult horses were instrumented with a single bipolar intra-muscular electrode in the left PCA muscle. Rheobase and chronaxie were within the normal range for innervated muscle at 0.55±0.38 v and 0.38±0.19 ms respectively. Intramuscular stimulation of the PCA muscle significantly improved arytenoid abduction at all levels of exercise intensity and there was no significant difference between the level of abduction achieved with stimulation and control values under moderate loads. The equine larynx may provide a useful model for the study of bilateral fold paralysis. PMID:21904620

  7. Medium term endoscopic assessment of the surgical outcome following laryngeal saccule resection in brachycephalic dogs.

    PubMed

    Cantatore, M; Gobbetti, M; Romussi, S; Brambilla, G; Giudice, C; Grieco, V; Stefanello, D

    2012-05-19

    Laryngeal saccule eversion has been widely reported as an important component of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS). The authors hypothesised that saccules affected by acute histological changes in patients showing marked improvement following palate and nares surgery might spontaneously return to normal; moreover, spontaneous resolution of the eversion in patients with fibrotic saccules and/or without clinical improvement following BAOS surgery might be impossible and, on the contrary, the persistence of turbulent airflow and associated ongoing inflammation might lead to aberrant tissue proliferation after resection. In order to demonstrate our hypotheses, the authors decided to perform a unilateral sacculectomy and to postpone and assess the need for the execution of the contralateral saccule resection according to the findings of a second-look laryngoscopy. Ten dogs were enrolled. None of the saccules left in situ underwent spontaneous resolution of the eversion. In one dog, after sacculectomy, proliferation of a soft tissue lesion endoscopically similar to a newly formed saccule occurred. The results of the present study suggest that spontaneous resolution of saccule eversion is uncommon, even after the correction of the primary abnormalities (palate, nares). Resection of the saccules can relieve ventral rima glottidis obstruction; however, secondary intention healing might occasionally result in the recurrence of the obstruction. PMID:22472536

  8. Upper Airway Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Verbraecken, Johan A.; De Backer, Wilfried A.

    2009-01-01

    This review discusses the pathophysiological aspects of sleep-disordered breathing, with focus on upper airway mechanics in obstructive and central sleep apnoea, Cheyne-Stokes respiration and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to substantial pathology, i.e. increased upper airway collapsibility, control of breathing instability, increased work of breathing, disturbed ventilatory system mechanics and neurohormonal changes. Concepts are changing. Although sleep apnoea is considered more and more to be an increased loop gain disorder, the central type of apnoea is now considered as an obstructive event, because it causes pharyngeal narrowing, associated with prolonged expiration. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious circle. Knowledge of common patterns of sleep-disordered breathing may help to identify these patients and guide therapy. PMID:19478479

  9. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Fletcher, E C

    1998-07-01

    Many clinicians are familiar with the clinical symptoms and signs of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In its most blatant form, OSA is complete airway obstruction with repetitive, prolonged pauses in breathing, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation; followed by arousal with resumption of breathing. Daytime symptoms of this disorder include excessive daytime somnolence, intellectual dysfunction, and cardiovascular effects such as systemic hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, and stroke. It has been recently recognized that increased pharyngeal resistance with incomplete obstruction can lead to a constellation of symptoms identical to OSA called "upper airway resistance syndrome" (UARS). The typical findings of UARS on sleep study are: (1) repetitive arousals from EEG sleep coinciding with a (2) waxing and waning of the respiratory airflow pattern and (3) increased respiratory effort as measured by esophageal pressure monitoring. There may be few, if any, obvious apneas or hypopneas with desaturation, but snoring may be a very prominent finding. Treatment with nasal positive airway pressure (NCPAP) eliminates the symptoms and confirms the diagnosis. Herein we describe two typical cases of UARS. PMID:9676067

  10. Airway closure in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Dutrieue, Brigitte; Verbanck, Sylvia; Darquenne, Chantal; Prisk, G Kim

    2005-08-25

    Recent single breath washout (SBW) studies in microgravity and on the ground have suggested an important effect of airway closure on gas mixing in the human lung, reflected particularly in the phase III slope of vital capacity SBW and bolus tests. In order to explore this effect, we designed a SBW in which subjects inspired 2-l from residual volume (RV) starting with a 150 ml bolus of He and SF6. In an attempt to vary the pattern of airways closure configuration before the test, the experiments were conducted in 1G and in microgravity during parabolic flight allowing the pre-test expiration to RV to be either in microgravity or at 1.8 G, with the actual test gas inhalation performed entirely in microgravity. Contrary to our expectations, the measured phase III slope and phase IV height and volume obtained from seven subjects in microgravity were essentially identical irrespective of the gravity level during the pre-test expiration to RV. The results suggest that airway closure configuration at RV before the test inspiration has no apparent impact on phases III and IV generation. PMID:15979418

  11. Nordic rattle: the hoarse vocalization and the inflatable laryngeal air sac of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus)

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Roland; Gebler, Alban; Fritsch, Guido; Nygrén, Kaarlo; Weissengruber, Gerald E

    2007-01-01

    Laryngeal air sacs have evolved convergently in diverse mammalian lineages including insectivores, bats, rodents, pinnipeds, ungulates and primates, but their precise function has remained elusive. Among cervids, the vocal tract of reindeer has evolved an unpaired inflatable ventrorostral laryngeal air sac. This air sac is not present at birth but emerges during ontogenetic development. It protrudes from the laryngeal vestibulum via a short duct between the epiglottis and the thyroid cartilage. In the female the growth of the air sac stops at the age of 2–3 years, whereas in males it continues to grow up to the age of about 6 years, leading to a pronounced sexual dimorphism of the air sac. In adult females it is of moderate size (about 100 cm3), whereas in adult males it is large (3000–4000 cm3) and becomes asymmetric extending either to the left or to the right side of the neck. In both adult females and males the ventral air sac walls touch the integument. In the adult male the air sac is laterally covered by the mandibular portion of the sternocephalic muscle and the skin. Both sexes of reindeer have a double stylohyoid muscle and a thyroepiglottic muscle. Possibly these muscles assist in inflation of the air sac. Head-and-neck specimens were subjected to macroscopic anatomical dissection, computer tomographic analysis and skeletonization. In addition, isolated larynges were studied for comparison. Acoustic recordings were made during an autumn round-up of semi-domestic reindeer in Finland and in a small zoo herd. Male reindeer adopt a specific posture when emitting their serial hoarse rutting calls. Head and neck are kept low and the throat region is extended. In the ventral neck region, roughly corresponding to the position of the large air sac, there is a mane of longer hairs. Neck swelling and mane spreading during vocalization may act as an optical signal to other males and females. The air sac, as a side branch of the vocal tract, can be considered as

  12. Gravity effects on upper airway area and lung volumes during parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, M; Fodil, R; Isabey, D; Lofaso, F; Touchard, D; Harf, A; Louis, B

    1998-05-01

    We measured upper airway caliber and lung volumes in six normal subjects in the sitting and supine positions during 20-s periods in normogravity, hypergravity [1.8 + head-to-foot acceleration (Gz)], and microgravity ( approximately 0 Gz) induced by parabolic flights. Airway caliber and lung volumes were inferred by the acoustic reflection method and inductance plethysmography, respectively. In subjects in the sitting position, an increase in gravity from 0 to 1. 8 +Gz was associated with increases in the calibers of the retrobasitongue and palatopharyngeal regions (+20 and +30%, respectively) and with a concomitant 0.5-liter increase in end-expiratory lung volume (functional residual capacity, FRC). In subjects in the supine position, no changes in the areas of these regions were observed, despite significant decreases in FRC from microgravity to normogravity (-0.6 liter) and from microgravity to hypergravity (-0.5 liter). Laryngeal narrowing also occurred in both positions (about -15%) when gravity increased from 0 to 1.8 +Gz. We concluded that variation in lung volume is insufficient to explain all upper airway caliber variation but that direct gravity effects on tissues surrounding the upper airway should be taken into account. PMID:9572811

  13. Applying the laser beam for reconstruction of the upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Wojtowicz, Piotr; Dudziec, Katarzyna; Oledzka, Iwona

    2000-11-01

    The authors present their own experience in restoration of the upper airway using a different source of high power laser. There are many patients with a stricture of the upper airway. One of the most common cause insufficiency of this is nosal polyps. Surgical treatment of polyps till now is not sufficiently effective. For this reason we work out a Nd:YAG laser applying technique that let us to reduce a hospitalization time with elongation of an asymptotic period of our patients. Nd:YAG energy we apply for conchoplasty benefiting of its profound coagulation as a distinctive role. This type of laser is very useful in removing of granulation tissue from different areas of the upper airway. Other applications of Nd:YAG laser in our hands is very useful for: coagulation of vessels in Kisselbach area, especially in Rendou-Osler's diseases, resection of the nosal Septo-turbinate adhesions, treatment of hemangiomas and small papillomas in nasal cavity, diminishing of the hypertrophied mucosa in the nasopharyngeal space as well as, reduction of the uvula and soft palate in OSAS patients. In our department we use a Nd:YAG for treatment of precancerous and early stages of cancer and for a palliation procedures in an advanced cancer infiltration in mouth, pharynx and laryngeal region. For treatment removing of cicatrix tissue in a larynx and trachea we use to use a Holm: YAG laser their very superficial penetration of tissues is used for a coagulation of small vessels too let us to resect it without bleeding from a bony and mucosa tissue, as a fragments maxillary sinus wall, nosal septum crest or spine with resection of the posterior pole of a turbinate. Both laser are conveyed by fiberoptic, to reach a pathological changes in many plans, places for this reason we are able to continuously work on a new its applications.

  14. Multiple-mask chemical etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, D. L.

    1969-01-01

    Multiple masking techniques use lateral etching to reduce the total area of the high etch-rate oxide exposed to the chemical etchant. One method uses a short-term etch to remove the top layer from the silicon oxide surface, another acts before the top layer is grown.

  15. Management of the artificial airway.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Gomaa, Dina; Rodriquez, Dario

    2014-06-01

    Management of the artificial airway includes securing the tube to prevent dislodgement or migration as well as removal of secretions. Preventive measures include adequate humidification and appropriate airway suctioning. Monitoring airway patency and removing obstruction are potentially life-saving components of airway management. Cuff pressure management is important for preventing aspiration and mucosal damage as well as assuring adequate ventilation. A number of new monitoring techniques have been introduced, and automated cuff pressure control is becoming more common. The respiratory therapist should be adept with all these devices and understand the appropriate application and management. PMID:24891202

  16. Laryngeal Aerodynamics Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham-Rowan, Mary; Fowler, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in laryngeal aerodynamic measures during connected speech associated with oral contraceptive (OC) use. Eight women taking an OC, and eight others not taking an OC, participated in the study. Three trials of syllable /p[subscript alpha] /repetitions were obtained using a…

  17. Diode Laser for Laryngeal Surgery: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Helena Hotz; Neri, Larissa; Fussuma, Carina Yuri; Imamura, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The diode laser has been frequently used in the management of laryngeal disorders. The portability and functional diversity of this tool make it a reasonable alternative to conventional lasers. However, whether diode laser has been applied in transoral laser microsurgery, the ideal parameters, outcomes, and adverse effects remain unclear. Objective The main objective of this systematic review is to provide a reliable evaluation of the use of diode laser in laryngeal diseases, trying to clarify its ideal parameters in the larynx, as well as its outcomes and complications. Data Synthesis We included eleven studies in the final analysis. From the included articles, we collected data on patient and lesion characteristics, treatment (diode laser's parameters used in surgery), and outcomes related to the laser surgery performed. Only two studies were prospective and there were no randomized controlled trials. Most of the evidence suggests that the diode laser can be a useful tool for treatment of different pathologies in the larynx. In this sense, the parameters must be set depending on the goal (vaporization, section, or coagulation) and the clinical problem. Conclusion: The literature lacks studies on the ideal parameters of the diode laser in laryngeal surgery. The available data indicate that diode laser is a useful tool that should be considered in laryngeal surgeries. Thus, large, well-designed studies correlated with diode compared with other lasers are needed to better estimate its effects. PMID:27096024

  18. The Icatibant Outcome Survey: treatment of laryngeal angioedema attacks

    PubMed Central

    Aberer, Werner; Bouillet, Laurence; Caballero, Teresa; Maurer, Marcus; Fabien, Vincent; Zanichelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize the management and outcomes of life-threatening laryngeal attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) treated with icatibant in the observational Icatibant Outcome Survey (NCT01034969) registry. Methods This retrospective analysis was based on data from patients with HAE type I/II who received healthcare professional-administered or self-administered icatibant to treat laryngeal attacks between September 2008 and May 2013. Results Twenty centers in seven countries contributed data. Overall, 42 patients with HAE experienced 67 icatibant-treated laryngeal attacks. Icatibant was self-administered for 62.3% of attacks (healthcare professional-administered, 37.7%). One icatibant injection was used for 87.9% of attacks, with rescue or concomitant medication used for 9.0%. The median time to treatment was 2.0 h (n=31 attacks) and the median time to resolution was 6.0 h (n=35 attacks). Conclusions This analysis describes successful use of icatibant for the treatment of laryngeal HAE attacks in a real-world setting. PMID:27116379

  19. Laryngeal Muscles Are Spared in the Dystrophin Deficient "mdx" Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa B.; Joseph, Gayle L.; Adkins, Tracey D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: "Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)" is caused by the loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. The disease leads to severe and progressive skeletal muscle wasting. Interestingly, the disease spares some muscles. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dystrophin deficiency on 2 intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the…

  20. Photocoagulation therapy for laryngeal dysplasia using angiolytic lasers.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yo; Suzuki, Ryo; Kawai, Yoshitaka; Hiwatashi, Nao; Kitamura, Morimasa; Tateya, Ichiro; Hirano, Shigeru

    2016-05-01

    In the management of laryngeal pre-cancerous lesions such as dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (CIS), it is important that lesion regression occur without any complications. As a minimally invasive treatment option, photocoagulation therapy using angiolytic lasers has been attracting attention. Therapeutic effects have been reported for this type of treatment, however, vocal function after treatment has not been well discussed. In this retrospective case series, we examined the therapeutic effects of photocoagulation therapy on laryngeal dysplasia and the impact on vocal function. Twenty-four patients with laryngeal dysplasia or CIS were treated with photocoagulation therapy using angiolytic lasers. Two patients were treated under general anesthesia, the remaining 22 patients were treated with topical anesthesia. Before and after treatment the extent of the lesion and vocal function was evaluated by endoscopic examination and acoustic and aerodynamic analyses, respectively. More than 50 % disease regression was observed in 20 of 24 patients. Acoustic and aerodynamic analyses revealed improvement in pitch perturbation quotient with no impairment in other parameters. Photocoagulation therapy using angiolytic lasers has proven to be feasible and safe for the treatment of laryngeal dysplasia. PMID:26742908

  1. Refinements in modeling the passive properties of laryngeal soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Eric J; Titze, Ingo R

    2007-07-01

    The nonlinear viscoelastic passive properties of three canine intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the lateral cricoarytenoid (LCA), the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA), and the interarytenoid (IA), were fit to the parameters of a modified Kelvin model. These properties were compared with those of the thyroarytenoid (TA) and cricothyroid (CT) muscles, as well as previously unpublished viscoelastic characteristics of the human vocal ligament. Passive parameters of the modified Kelvin model were summarized for the vocal ligament, mucosa, and all five laryngeal muscles. Results suggest that the LCA, PCA, and IA muscles are functionally different from the TA and CT muscles in their load-bearing capacity. Furthermore, the LCA, PCA, and IA have a much larger stress-strain hysteresis effect than has been previously reported for the TA and CT or the vocal ligament. The variation in this effect suggests that the connective tissue within the TA and CT muscles is somehow similar to the vocal ligament but different from the LCA, PCA, or IA muscles. Further demonstrating the potential significance of grouping tissues in the laryngeal system by functional groups in the laryngeal system was the unique finding that, over their working elongation range, the LCA and PCA were nearly as exponentially stiff as the vocal ligament. This paper was written in conjunction with an online technical report (http://www.ncvs.org/ncvs/library/tech) in which comprehensive muscle data and sensitivity analysis, as well as downloadable data files and computer scripts, are made available. PMID:17412782

  2. Quantitative PCR analysis of laryngeal muscle fiber types

    PubMed Central

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses have shown changes in laryngeal muscle fiber MyHC isoform with denervation. RNA analyses in this setting have not been performed, and understanding RNA levels will allow interventions better designed to reverse processes such as denervation in the future. Total RNA was extracted from bilateral rat thyroarytenoid (TA), posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA), and cricothyroid (CT) muscles in rats. Primers were designed using published MyHC isoform sequences. SYBR Green real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (SYBR-RT-PCR) was used for quantification. The electropherogram showed a clear separation of total RNA to 28S and 18S subunits. Melting curves illustrated single peaks for all type MyHC primers. All MyHC isoforms were identified in all muscles with various degrees of expression. Quantitative PCR is a sensitive method to detect MyHC isoforms in laryngeal muscle. Isoform expression using mRNA analysis was similar to previous analyses but showed some important differences. This technique can be used to quantitatively assess response to interventions targeted to maintain muscle bulk after denervation. PMID:20430402

  3. Laryngeal obstruction caused by lymphoma in an adult dairy cow

    PubMed Central

    Lardé, Hélène; Nichols, Sylvain; Babkine, Marie; Chénier, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    A Holstein cow was presented for inspiratory dyspnea. Endoscopic evaluation revealed swollen arytenoids and a presumptive diagnosis of bilateral arytenoidal chondritis was made. A partial arytenoidectomy was performed, the right arytenoid was submitted for histopathology, and a diagnosis of laryngeal lymphoma was made. Due to the poor prognosis, the cow was euthanized. PMID:24489391

  4. A bony connection signals laryngeal echolocation in bats.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Nina; McErlain, David D; Holdsworth, David W; Eger, Judith L; Chhem, Rethy K; Mason, Matthew J; Brain, Kirsty L; Faure, Paul A; Fenton, M Brock

    2010-02-18

    Echolocation is an active form of orientation in which animals emit sounds and then listen to reflected echoes of those sounds to form images of their surroundings in their brains. Although echolocation is usually associated with bats, it is not characteristic of all bats. Most echolocating bats produce signals in the larynx, but within one family of mainly non-echolocating species (Pteropodidae), a few species use echolocation sounds produced by tongue clicks. Here we demonstrate, using data obtained from micro-computed tomography scans of 26 species (n = 35 fluid-preserved bats), that proximal articulation of the stylohyal bone (part of the mammalian hyoid apparatus) with the tympanic bone always distinguishes laryngeally echolocating bats from all other bats (that is, non-echolocating pteropodids and those that echolocate with tongue clicks). In laryngeally echolocating bats, the proximal end of the stylohyal bone directly articulates with the tympanic bone and is often fused with it. Previous research on the morphology of the stylohyal bone in the oldest known fossil bat (Onychonycteris finneyi) suggested that it did not echolocate, but our findings suggest that O. finneyi may have used laryngeal echolocation because its stylohyal bones may have articulated with its tympanic bones. The present findings reopen basic questions about the timing and the origin of flight and echolocation in the early evolution of bats. Our data also provide an independent anatomical character by which to distinguish laryngeally echolocating bats from other bats. PMID:20098413

  5. Observation of the laryngeal movements for throat singing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Ken-Ichi; Konishi, Tomoko; Murano, Emi Z.; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Kumada, Masanobu; Kondo, Kazumasa; Niimi, Seiji

    2002-11-01

    Throat singing is a traditional singing style of people who live around the Altai Mountains. Khoomei in Tyva and Khoomij in Mongolia are representative styles of throat singing. The laryngeal voices of throat singing is classified into (i) a drone voice which is the basic laryngeal voice in throat singing and used as drone and (ii) a kargyraa voice which is very low pitched with the range outside the modal register. In throat singing, the special features of the laryngeal movements are observed by using simultaneous recording of high-speed digital images, EGG, and sound wave forms. In the drone voice, the ventricular folds (VTFs) vibrate in the same frequency as the vocal folds (VFs) but in opposite phases. In the kargyraa voice, the VTFs can be assumed to close once for every two periods of closure of the VFs, and this closing blocks airflow and contributes to the generation of the subharmonic tone of kargyraa. Results show that in throat singing the VTFs vibrate and contribute to producing the laryngeal voice, which generates the special timbre and whistle-like overtone.

  6. Spasmodic Dysphonia: a Laryngeal Control Disorder Specific to Speech

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2016-01-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a rare neurological disorder that emerges in middle age, is usually sporadic, and affects intrinsic laryngeal muscle control only during speech. Spasmodic bursts in particular laryngeal muscles disrupt voluntary control during vowel sounds in adductor SD and interfere with voice onset after voiceless consonants in abductor SD. Little is known about its origins; it is classified as a focal dystonia secondary to an unknown neurobiological mechanism that produces a chronic abnormality of laryngeal motor neuron regulation during speech. It develops primarily in females and does not interfere with breathing, crying, laughter, and shouting. Recent postmortem studies have implicated the accumulation of clusters in the parenchyma and perivascular regions with inflammatory changes in the brainstem in one to two cases. A few cases with single mutations in THAP1, a gene involved in transcription regulation, suggest that a weak genetic predisposition may contribute to mechanisms causing a nonprogressive abnormality in laryngeal motor neuron control for speech but not for vocal emotional expression. Research is needed to address the basic cellular and proteomic mechanisms that produce this disorder to provide intervention that could target the pathogenesis of the disorder rather than only providing temporary symptom relief. PMID:21248101

  7. An OT Account of Laryngealization in Cuzco Quechua.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Steve

    Classical phonemic accounts of Cuzco (Peru) Quechua posit three distinct types of stops: plain, aspirated, and glottalized. A later analysis argued instead for a root-level feature of laryngealization governed by a small number of formal mechanisms. This latter analysis is taken one step further, showing that even greater explanatory power may be…

  8. Impossible laryngeal intubation in an infant with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Suzanne; Westbrook, Andrew; Bourke, Margaret; Lyons, Barry; Russell, John

    2004-03-01

    Congenital webbing of the vocal cords is rare, and is usually incompatible with life. We report a case of an infant with Fraser syndrome who required a surgical airway because of a severe stenosis of her airway secondary to a glottic web. The decision process leading to tracheostomy in this neonate is described. The pertinent features of Fraser syndrome in relation to airway management are discussed. PMID:14996270

  9. "The Mask Who Wasn't There": Visual Masking Effect with the Perceptual Absence of the Mask

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Amandine Eve; Riou, Benoit; Muller, Dominique; Dabic, Stéphanie; Versace, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Does a visual mask need to be perceptually present to disrupt processing? In the present research, we proposed to explore the link between perceptual and memory mechanisms by demonstrating that a typical sensory phenomenon (visual masking) can be replicated at a memory level. Experiment 1 highlighted an interference effect of a visual mask on the…

  10. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  11. Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Metastases From Atypical Laryngeal Carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kui-Rong; Jia, Yuan-Jing; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Wang, Qin-Ying; Bao, Yang-Yang; Feng, Zhi-Ying; Yao, Hong-Tian; Fan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoids is approximately 20%. However, the pathogenesis and natural history of, and prognostic factors for, the condition remain poorly understood. We reported a 54-year-old female presented with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Laryngoscopy revealed a 0.5 × 1.5-cm reddish mass on the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis. Under general anesthesia, a biopsy sample was obtained via suspension laryngoscopy. Routine pathology revealed atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Immunohistochemical staining of the sections of primary tumor was positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, P53, and CD56. GLUT-1, p-Akt, and PI3K were negative. The Ki-67 index was 15%. Supraglottic laryngectomy and selective right-neck dissection were performed. After 6 months, the patient complained of pain in the right wall of the chest; multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules were evident at that site and in the abdomen. An abdominal nodule was biopsied and pathology revealed that the atypical metastatic carcinoid had metastasized to both cutaneous and subcutaneous areas of the abdomen. Chemotherapy was then prescribed. Currently, the intrathecal drug delivery system remains in place. No local recurrence has been detected. Furthermore, we systematically reviewed clinical manifestations of the disease, pathogenesis, prognostic factors, and treatment. The metastasis rate (cutaneous and subcutaneous) was approximately 12.2%. Thirty patients (62.5%) with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases exhibited contemporaneous lymph node invasion. The 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 44.0%, 22.0%, and 13.0%, respectively. The prognosis of patients with atypical laryngeal carcinoids was poor. Relevant prognostic factors included the level of p53, human papilloma virus status, certain hypoxic markers, and distant metastasis. No

  12. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  14. Association between UGT1A1 Polymorphism and Risk of Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huangfu, Hui; Pan, Hong; Wang, Binquan; Wen, Shuxin; Han, Rui; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal cancer is one of the largest subgroups of head and neck cancers. In addition to smoking and alcohol consumption, genetic polymorphisms are also risk factors for the development of laryngeal cancer. However, the exact relation between genetic variants and pathogenesis of laryngeal cancer has remained elusive. The aim of this study was to examine UGT1A1*6 (rs4148323 A/G) polymorphisms in 103 patients with laryngeal cancer and 220 controls using the high resolution melting curve (HRM) technique and to explore the association between UGT1A1*6 (rs4148323 A/G) polymorphisms and laryngeal cancer. The results showed an association between the rs4148323 G allele and increased risk of laryngeal cancer. While there was no statistically significant difference between rs4148323 genotype frequencies and different histological grades or different clinical stages of laryngeal cancer, stratification analysis indicated smoking or alcohol consumption and rs4148323 G allele combined to increase the risk of laryngeal cancer. In conclusion, the rs4148323 G allele is associated with the high UGT1A1 enzyme activity, and might increase the risk of laryngeal cancer. Furthermore, smoking or alcohol consumption and the rs4148323 G allele act synergistically to increase the risk of laryngeal cancer. PMID:26751466

  15. Method for mask repair using defect compensation

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Donald W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

  16. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  1. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... operating in the frequency bands governed under this part. Applicable Emission Masks Frequency band(MHz) Mask for equipment with Audio low passfilter Mask for equipment without audio low pass filter Below 25... the output power (P in watts) of the transmitter as follows: (1) On any frequency removed from...

  2. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operating under this part. Applicable Emission Masks Frequency band (MHz) Mask for equipmentwith audio low pass filter Mask for equipmentwithout audio low pass filter Below 25 1 A or B A or C 25-50 B C 72-76 B... watts) of the transmitter as follows: (1) On any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by...

  3. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... operating in the frequency bands governed under this part. Applicable Emission Masks Frequency band(MHz) Mask for equipment with Audio low passfilter Mask for equipment without audio low pass filter Below 25... the output power (P in watts) of the transmitter as follows: (1) On any frequency removed from...

  4. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operating under this part. Applicable Emission Masks Frequency band (MHz) Mask for equipmentwith audio low pass filter Mask for equipmentwithout audio low pass filter Below 25 1 A or B A or C 25-50 B C 72-76 B... watts) of the transmitter as follows: (1) On any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  10. Masks: Escape to/from Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavett, Hyman

    1981-01-01

    Explains the significance of masks in ethnographic and cultural research and suggests 24 activities intended for use by social studies classroom teachers as they teach about masks. Activities include projecting slides onto students' bodies and faces, directing students to create masks from old clothing and rags, cutting faces from magazines, and…

  11. Mask qualification strategies in a wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehnert, Carmen; Kunowski, Angela

    2007-02-01

    Having consistent high quality photo masks is one of the key factors in lithography in the wafer fab. Combined with stable exposure- and resist processes, it ensures yield increases in production and fast learning cycles for technology development and design evaluation. Preventive controlling of incoming masks and quality monitoring while using the mask in production is essential for the fab to avoid yield loss or technical problems caused by mask issues, which eventually result in delivery problems to the customer. In this paper an overview of the procedures used for mask qualification and production release, for both logic and DRAM, at Infineon Dresden is presented. Incoming qualification procedures, such as specification checks, incoming inspection, and inline litho process window evaluation, are described here. Pinching and electrical tests, including compatibility tests for mask copies for high volume products on optimized litho processes, are also explained. To avoid mask degradation over lifetime, re-inspection checks are done for re-qualification while using the mask in production. The necessity of mask incoming inspection and re-qualification, due to the repeater printing from either the processing defects of the original mask or degrading defects of being used in the fab (i.e. haze, ESD, and moving particles, etc.), is demonstrated. The need and impact of tight mask specifications, such as CD uniformity signatures and corresponding electrical results, are shown with examples of mask-wafer CD correlation.

  12. Object Substitution Masking Induced by Illusory Masks: Evidence for Higher Object-Level Locus of Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Nobuyuki; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    A briefly presented target can be rendered invisible by a lingering sparse mask that does not even touch it. This form of visual backward masking, called object substitution masking, is thought to occur at the object level of processing. However, it remains unclear whether object-level interference alone produces substitution masking because…

  13. Performance of GFIS mask repair system for various mask materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Fumio; Kozakai, Tomokazu; Matsuda, Osamu; Yasaka, Anto; Yoshikawa, Shingo; Kanno, Koichi; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Naoya

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a new focused ion beam (FIB) technology using a gas field ion source (GFIS) for mask repair. Meanwhile, since current high-end photomasks do not have high durability in exposure nor cleaning, some new photomask materials are proposed. In 2012, we reported that our GFIS system had repaired a representative new material "A6L2". It is currently expected to extend the application range of GFIS technology for various new materials and various defect shapes. In this study, we repaired a single bridge, a triple bridge and a missing hole on a phase shift mask (PSM) of "A6L2", and also repaired single bridges on a binary mask of molybdenum silicide (MoSi) material "W4G" and a PSM of high transmittance material "SDC1". The etching selectivity between those new materials and quartz were over 4:1. There were no significant differences of pattern shapes on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images between repair and non-repair regions. All the critical dimensions (CD) at repair regions were less than +/-3% of those at normal ones on an aerial image metrology system (AIMS). Those results demonstrated that GFIS technology is a reliable solution of repairing new material photomasks that are candidates for 1X nm generation.

  14. Respiratory failure due to upper airway obstruction in children: use of the helmet as bridge interface.

    PubMed

    Racca, F; Cutrera, R; Robba, C; Caldarelli, V; Paglietti, M; De Angelis, M C; Sekhon, M S; Gualino, J; Bella, C; Passoni, N; Ranieri, V M

    2015-02-01

    Upper airway obstruction (UAO) can cause severe respiratory distress in young children by increasing inspiratory muscle load and decreasing alveolar ventilation, ultimately resulting in hypercapnia and hypoxemia which have long term negative cardiovascular effects. Although non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves gas exchange in these patients, use of conventional interfaces (nasal mask, nasal pillow and facial mask) may cause significant discomfort and lead to CPAP intolerance. We report five cases of children affected by UAO who experienced CPAP intolerance via application of conventional interfaces. Alternatively, we acutely applied helmet-CPAP which resulted in improved breathing pattern and gas exchange. Thereafter, patients received training with respect to a nasal CPAP interface, allowing successful long term treatment. In conclusion, these five clinical cases demonstrate that helmet-CPAP can be used acutely in children with UAO if compliance to conventional modalities is problematic, allowing for sufficient time to achieve compliance to nasal-CPAP. PMID:24918190

  15. Mask blank defect printability comparison using optical and SEM mask and wafer inspection and bright field actinic mask imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangat, Pawitter; Verduijn, Erik; Wood, Obert R.; Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2015-07-01

    Despite significant enhancements in defect detection using optical and e-beam methodology, the smaller length scales and increasing challenges of future technology nodes motivate ongoing research into the need and associated cost of actinic inspection for EUV masks. This paper reports an extensive study of two EUV patterned masks, wherein the mask blank defectivity was characterized using optical (mask and wafer) methods and bright-field mask imaging (using the SHARP actinic microscope) of previously identified blank defects. We find that the bright field actinic imaging tool microscope captures and images many defects that are not seen by the automated optical inspection of patterned masks and printed wafers. In addition, actinic review reveals the impact of multilayer damage and depicts the printability profile which can be used as an added metric to define the patterned mask repair and defect compensation strategies.

  16. Particle Deposition During Airway Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Cheng-Feng; Halpern, David; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Inhaled aerosol particles deposit in the lung and may be from environmental, toxic, or medical therapy sources. While much research focuses on inspiratory deposition, primarily at airway bifurcations due to inertial impaction, there are other mechanisms that allow the particles to reach the airway surface, such as gravitational settling and diffusion depending on particle size. We introduce a new mechanism not previously studied, i.e. aerosol deposition from airway closure. The airways are lined with a liquid layer. Due to the surface tension driven instability, a liquid plug can form from this layer which blocks the airway. This process of airway closure tends to occur toward the end of expiration. In this study, the efficiency of the impaction of the particles during airway closure will be investigated. The particles will be released from the upstream of the airway and convected by the air flow and deposited onto the closing liquid layer. We solve the governing equations using a finite volume approach in conjunction with a sharp interface method for the interfaces. Once the velocity field of the gas flow is obtained, the path of the particles will be calculated and the efficiency of the deposition can be estimated. We acknowledge support from the National Institutes of Health grant number NIH HL85156.

  17. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  18. Aperture masking behind AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael J.

    2012-07-01

    Sparse Aperture-Mask Interferometry (SAM or NRM) behind Adaptive Optics (AO) has now come of age, with more than a dozen astronomy papers published from several 5-10m class telescopes around the world. I will describe the reasons behind its success in achieving relatively high contrasts ( 1000:1 at lambda/ D) and repeatable binary astronomy at the diffraction limit, even when used behind laser-guide star adaptive optics. Placed within the context of AO calibration, the information in an image can be split into pupil-plane phase, Fourier amplitude and closure-phase. It is the closure-phase observable, or its generalisation to Kernel phase, that is immune to pupil-plane phase errors at first and second-order and has been the reason for the technique's success. I will outline the limitations of the technique and the prospects for aperture-masking and related techniques in the future.

  19. Expiratory-modulated laryngeal motoneurons exhibit a hyperpolarization preceding depolarization during superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in the in vivo adult rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Tara G; Sun, Qi-Jian; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2012-03-22

    Swallowing requires the sequential activation of tongue, pharyngeal and esophageal muscles to propel the food bolus towards the stomach. Aspiration during swallow is prevented by adduction of the vocal cords during the oropharyngeal phase. Expiratory-modulated laryngeal motoneurons (ELM) exhibit a burst of action potentials during swallows elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN). Here we sought to investigate changes in membrane potential in ELM during superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in the anaesthetised, in vivo adult rat preparation. Intracellular recordings of ELM in the caudal nucleus ambiguus (identified by antidromic activation from the recurrent laryngeal nerve) demonstrated that ELM bursting activity following SLN stimulation is associated with a depolarization that is preceded by a small hyperpolarization. During spontaneous ELM bursts, the preceding hyperpolarization separated the bursting activity from its usual post-inspiratory activity. These findings demonstrate that the in vivo adult rat preparation is suitable for the study of swallow-related activity in laryngeal motoneurons. PMID:22326041

  20. Improving vision by pupil masking.

    PubMed

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-07-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  1. Improving vision by pupil masking

    PubMed Central

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  2. Enlargement of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad space in pigs increases upper airway resistance.

    PubMed

    Winter, W C; Gampper, T; Gay, S B; Suratt, P M

    1995-09-01

    Because the upper airway is partially enclosed in a rigid boundary, enlargement of soft tissue structures within this boundary could narrow the airway. The purpose of this study was to determine whether enlargement of the soft tissue space in the region of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad would increase pharyngeal resistance and narrow the retropalateal upper airway. In five young male anesthetized pigs, we inserted balloon occlusion catheters in the lateral pharyngeal fat pad under computerized tomographic scan guidance. We measured pharyngeal resistance with a pharyngeal catheter and a tightly fitting face mask before and after inflation of the balloons. We also measured pharyngeal airway cross-sectional area before and after inflation of the balloons. In all pigs, balloon inflation significantly increased pharyngeal resistance and significantly decreased the area of the retropalateal airway. We conclude that enlargement of the soft tissue space in the region of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad increases pharyngeal resistance and narrows the retropalateal airway in anesthetized pigs. PMID:8567510

  3. Mask pattern generator employing EPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Masaki; Wakamiya, Wataru; Endo, Nobuhiro

    2003-08-01

    Mask cost is one of crucial issues in device fabrication, especially in SoC (System on a Chip) with small-volume production. The cost mainly depends on productivity of mask manufacturing tools such as mask writers and defect inspection tools. EPL (Electron Projection Lithography) has been developing as a high-throughput electron beam exposure technology that will succeed optical lithography. The application of EPL technology to mask writing will result in high productivity and contribute to decrease the mask cost. The concept of a mask pattern generator employing EPL technology is proposed in this paper. It is very similar to EPL technology used for pattern printing on a wafer. The mask patterns on the glass substrate are exposed by projecting the basic circuit patterns formed on the mother EPL mask. One example of the mother EPL mask is a stencil type made with 200-mm Si wafer. The basic circuit patterns are IP patterns and logical primitive patterns such as cell libraries (AND, OR, Inverter, Flip-Flop and etc.) to express the SoC device patterns. Since the SoC patterns are exposed with its collective units such as IP and logical primitive patterns by using this method, the high throughput will be expected comparing with conventional mask E-beam writers. In this paper, the mask pattern generator with the EPL technology is proposed. The concept, its advantages and issues to be solved are discussed.

  4. Process capability of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Kosuke; Iida nee Sakurai, Noriko; Kamo, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Hayashi, Naoya

    2015-10-01

    With shrinking pattern size at 0.33NA EUV lithography systems, mask 3D effects are expected to become stronger, such as horizontal/vertical shadowing, best focus shifts through pitch and pattern shift through focus. Etched multilayer EUV mask structures have been proposed in order to reduce mask 3D effects. It is estimated that etched multilayer type mask is also effective in reducing mask 3D effects at 0.33NA with lithographic simulation, and it is experimentally demonstrated with NXE3300 EUV Lithography system. We obtained cross-sectional TEM image of etched multilayer EUV mask pattern. It is observed that patterned multilayer width differs from pattern physical width. This means that effective reflecting width of etched multilayer pattern is smaller than pattern width measured by CD-SEM. In this work, we evaluate mask durability against both chemical and physical cleaning process to check the feasibility of etched multilayer EUV mask patterning against mask cleaning for 0.33NA EUV extension. As a result, effective width can be controlled by suitable cleaning chemicals because sidewall film works as a passivation film. And line and space pattern collapse is not detected by DUV mask pattern inspection tool after mask physical cleaning that includes both megasonic and binary spray steps with sufficient particle removal efficiency.

  5. Cortical correlate of pattern backward masking.

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, G; Vogels, R; Orban, G A

    1995-01-01

    The perception of a briefly presented shape is strongly impaired when it is followed by another pattern, a phenomenon called backward masking. We found that the vast majority of a sample of shape-selective neurons in the macaque inferior temporal cortex respond selectively to backward-masked shapes, although these shapes could not be discriminated by human and monkey subjects. However, this selective response was brief, since it was either interrupted by the mask or overridden by a response to the mask itself. We show that reliable discrimination of briefly presented shapes by single neurons depends on the temporal integration of the response. Presentation of the mask, however, reduces the number of spikes available for integration, explaining backward masking. These results also provide direct neurophysiological evidence for the "interruption theory" of backward masking. PMID:7777553

  6. History and future of mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ken L.

    1996-12-01

    The history of the mask industry has three main periods, which I call the Classical Period, the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance, by analogy with those periods in the history of Western Europe. During the Classical Period, people developed 1X masks and the technology to make them. In the Dark Ages, people exploited the equipment developed during the Classical Period to make 5X reduction reticle, ending the nobility of mask making. In today's Renaissance of mask making, a proliferation of mask types is requiring a rebirth of innovation and creativity. The Renaissance resembles the Classical Period: masks are once again strategic, and technological capability is once again the driver. Meanwhile, the mask industry is carrying forward the productivity and efficiency gains it achieved during the Dark Ages. We must create a new business and economic model to support these changes in the characteristics of the marketplace.

  7. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... as follows: (1) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas mask. A gas mask which consists of a full facepiece.... (2) Chin-style gas mask. A gas mask which consists of a full facepiece, a canister which is usually attached to the facepiece, and associated connections. (3) Escape gas mask. A gas mask designed for...

  8. Identification of the motor laryngeal nerves - a new electrical stimulation technique.

    PubMed

    Spahn, J G; Bizal, J; Ferguson, S; Lingeman, R E

    1981-11-01

    Head and neck surgeons are familiar with the technique of identifying motor nerves in the head and neck region by using electrical stimulation especially in the identification of the facial and the spinal accessory nerves. The identification of the motor laryngeal nerves by electrical stimulation intra-operatively has been described; but, the difficulty of visualization of intrinsic laryngeal muscle movement has prevented the wide spread use of this technique. This paper will introduce a simple, safe and reliable method to allow the surgeon to recognize true vocal cord movement while stimulating the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The movement of a two inch 27 gauge needle placed through the cricothyroid membrane into the ipsilateral true vocal cord permits identification of intrinsic laryngeal muscle movement during electrical stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. This method has been successfully used in confirming conductivity of the laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery, Zenker's diverticulum surgery, cricotracheal trauma and recurrent nerve neurectomy for spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:7300536

  9. Fabrication and commercialization of scalpel masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novembre, Anthony E.; Peabody, Milton L., Jr.; Blakey, Myrtle I.; Farrow, Reginald C.; Kasica, Richard J.; Liddle, James A.; Saunders, Thomas E.; Tennant, Donald M.

    1998-09-01

    SCALPEL masks have been fabricated for use in the Proof-of- Lithography system and to demonstrate the feasibility of having them produced by a commercial blank manufacturer and optical mask shops. Masks blanks are formed from 100 mm diameter silicon wafers. A 100-150 nm thick SiNx layer is LPCVD deposited onto the wafers followed by magnetron sputter deposition of a thin Cr/W metal layer which is used as the scatterer layer for the mask>the mask is supported by an underlying network of struts which are arranged to be compatible with the step and scan writing strategy of the exposure tool and to provide robustness to the mask. Crystallographic wet etching of the silicon wafer forms membranes and struts. To date over 300 mask blanks have been formed and yield data as a function of the thickness of the silicon nitride membrane has been quantified. Recent developments in the mask blank formation process include the production of blanks by MCNC who serve as a commercial source of SCALPEL mask blanks. They have successfully delivered 36 blanks that exhibit equivalent properties to those produced at Lucent. Mask patterning has been performed at the commercial optical mask shops of PHOTRONICS and DUPONT. In this investigation a MEBES exposure system has been used to write patterns. The resist used is ZEP-520 and development and pattern transfer processes are performed in the STEAG-Hammatech spray/spin processing tool. Metrology is performed using a KMS 310 RT optical microscope. Pattern placement accuracy is measured on the LMS 2020 system without modification. The masks are inspected for defects using the optical based KLA 300 series inspection system in a die to die mode and in transmission. Results to date suggest feasibility of producing SCALPEL masks by a commercial blank supplier and by merchant optical mask shops.

  10. Comparative Study of Manufacturing Techniques for Coronagraphic Binary Pupil Masks: Masks on Substrates and Free-Standing Masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, Keigo; Haze, Kanae; Kotani, Takayuki; Abe, Lyu

    2012-12-01

    We present a comparative study of the manufacture of binary pupil masks for coronagraphic observations of exoplanets. A checkerboard mask design, a type of binary pupil mask design, was adopted, and identical patterns of the same size were used for all masks in order that we could compare the differences resulting from the different manufacturing methods. The masks on substrates had aluminum checkerboard patterns with thicknesses of 0.1/0.2/0.4/0.8/1.6μm, constructed on substrates of BK7 glass, silicon, and germanium using photolithography and chemical processes. Free-standing masks made of copper and nickel with thicknesses of 2/5/10/20μm were also realized using photolithography and chemical processes, which included careful release from the substrate used as an intermediate step in the manufacture. Coronagraphic experiments using a visible laser were carried out for all masks on BK7 glass substrate and the free-standing masks. The average contrasts were 8.4 × 10-8, 1.2 × 10-7, and 1.2 × 10-7 for the masks on BK7 substrates, the free-standing copper masks, and the free-standing nickel masks, respectively. No significant correlation was concluded between the contrast and the mask properties. The high-contrast masks have the potential to cover the needs of coronagraphs for both ground-based and space-borne telescopes over a wide wavelength range. Especially, their application to the infrared space telescope, SPICA, is appropriate.

  11. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  12. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  13. Airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness.

    PubMed

    Gauld, Leanne Maree

    2009-05-01

    Impaired airway clearance leads to recurrent chest infections and respiratory deterioration in neuromuscular weakness. It is frequently the cause of death. Cough is the major mechanism of airway clearance. Cough has several components, and assessment tools are available to measure the different components of cough. These include measuring peak cough flow, respiratory muscle strength, and inspiratory capacity. Each is useful in assessing the ability to generate an effective cough, and can be used to guide when techniques of assisting airway clearance may be effective for the individual and which are most effective. Techniques to assist airway clearance include augmenting inspiration by air stacking, augmenting expiration by assisting the cough, and augmenting both inspiration and expiration with the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator or by direct suctioning via a tracheostomy. Physiotherapists are invaluable in assisting airway clearance, and in teaching patients and their families how to use these techniques. Use of the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator has gained popularity in recent times, but several simpler, more economical methods are available to assist airway clearance that can be used effectively alone or in combination. This review examines the literature available on the assessment and management of impaired airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness. PMID:19379290

  14. Effects of upper airway pressure on abdominal muscle activity in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Plowman, L; Lauff, D C; McNamara, F; Berthon-Jones, M; Sullivan, C E

    1991-12-01

    We have examined arousal and abdominal muscle electromyogram (EMGabd) responses to upper airway pressure stimuli during physiological sleep in four dogs with permanent side-hole tracheal stomata. The dogs were trained to sleep with a tightly fitting snout mask, hermetically sealed in place, while breathing through a cuffed endotracheal tube inserted through the tracheostomy. Sleep stage was determined by behavioral and electroencephalographic criteria. EMGabd activity was measured using bipolar fine-wire electrodes inserted into the abdominal muscle layers. Static increases or decreases in upper airway pressure (+/- 6 cmH2O), when applied at the snout mask or larynx (upper trachea), caused an immediate decrease in EMGabd on the first two to three breaths; EMGabd usually returned to control levels within the 1-min test interval. In contrast, oscillatory pressure waves at 30 Hz and +/- 3 cmH2O amplitude (or -2 to -8 cmH2O amplitude) produced an immediate and sustained reduction in IMGabd in all sleep states. Inhibition of EMGabd could be maintained over many minutes when the oscillatory pressure stimulus was pulsed by using a cycle of 0.5 s on and 0.5 s off. Oscillatory upper airway pressures were also found to be powerful arousal-promoting stimuli, producing arousal in 94% of tests in drowsiness and 66% of tests in slowwave sleep. The results demonstrate the presence of breath-by-breath upper airway control of abdominal muscle activity. PMID:1778951

  15. Particle Contamination Control Technology in Electron Beam Mask Writing System for Next-Generation Mask Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeno, Kiminobu; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Ooki, Kenji; Tojo, Toru; Hirano, Ryoichi; Yoshitake, Shusuke; Toriumi, Masaki; Sekine, Akihiko; Takigawa, Tadahiko; Shinoda, Toshiki; Noguchi, Shigeru

    2002-09-01

    An in-situ measurement system for particles in an electron beam (EB) writer is developed to improve mask yield management. The system has satisfied the required installation specifications for a mask blank inspection system for the EB writer, and the results of an experiment using the system prove that particles added from the mask handling system in our EB writer satisfy the total particle count specification (<1.25 counts/cycle for 6 inch mask). The investigation of particle increase after repeated mask movement has been carried out in each segmented mask handling route. It has been clarified that the segmentation test using this system is helpful for investigation of the origin of particle production on a mask. Effective application of information such as particle position and size obtained by this system will be very useful for improving mask yield management in the mask fabrication process in terms of pattern inspection and repair system.

  16. Effects of reflux laryngitis on non-nutritive swallowing in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Brisebois, Simon; Samson, Nathalie; Fortier, Pierre-Hugues; Doueik, Alexandre A; Carreau, Anne-Marie; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2014-08-15

    Reflux laryngitis in infants may be involved not only in laryngeal disorders, but also in disorders of cardiorespiratory control through its impact on laryngeal function. Our objective was to study the effect of reflux laryngitis on non-nutritive swallowing (NNS) and NNS-breathing coordination. Two groups of six newborn lambs, randomized into laryngitis and control groups, were surgically instrumented for recording states of alertness, swallowing and cardiorespiratory variables without sedation. A mild to moderate reflux laryngitis was induced in lambs from the experimental group. A significant decrease in the number of NNS bursts and apneas was observed in the laryngitis group in active sleep (p=0.03). In addition, lower heart and respiratory rates, as well as prolonged apnea duration (p<0.0001) were observed. No physiologically significant alterations in NNS-breathing coordination were observed in the laryngitis group. We conclude that a mild to moderate reflux laryngitis alters NNS burst frequency and autonomous control of cardiac activity and respiration in lambs. PMID:24893350

  17. Innovative Application of a Microlaryngeal Surgery Tube for difficult Airway Management in a Case of Down’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akhilesh; Bannerjee, Neerja Gaur; Sood, Rajesh; Dass, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    An 11-year-old male child, known case of down’s syndrome with congenital oesophageal stricture was posted for oesophageal dilatation. Preoperative airway assessment revealed a high arched palate, receding mandible and Mallampati Score of 2. During surgery, after loss of consciousness which was described as loss of eyelash reflex and adequate jaw relaxation, direct laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation was attempted with a cuffed endotracheal tube number 5.0mm ID (internal diameter). The endotracheal tube could not be negotiated smoothly, so 5.0mm ID uncuffed endotracheal tube was used which passed through easily, but on auscultation revealed a significant leak. Later, intubation via a Micro Laryngeal Surgery (MLS) cuffed tube 4.0mm ID was attempted. The MLS tube advanced smoothly and there was no associated leak on positive pressure ventilation. Thus by innovative thinking and avant-garde reasoning, a definitive airway device could be positioned with no other suitable alternative at hand. PMID:27190925

  18. Innovative Application of a Microlaryngeal Surgery Tube for difficult Airway Management in a Case of Down's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gulabani, Michell; Gupta, Akhilesh; Bannerjee, Neerja Gaur; Sood, Rajesh; Dass, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    An 11-year-old male child, known case of down's syndrome with congenital oesophageal stricture was posted for oesophageal dilatation. Preoperative airway assessment revealed a high arched palate, receding mandible and Mallampati Score of 2. During surgery, after loss of consciousness which was described as loss of eyelash reflex and adequate jaw relaxation, direct laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation was attempted with a cuffed endotracheal tube number 5.0mm ID (internal diameter). The endotracheal tube could not be negotiated smoothly, so 5.0mm ID uncuffed endotracheal tube was used which passed through easily, but on auscultation revealed a significant leak. Later, intubation via a Micro Laryngeal Surgery (MLS) cuffed tube 4.0mm ID was attempted. The MLS tube advanced smoothly and there was no associated leak on positive pressure ventilation. Thus by innovative thinking and avant-garde reasoning, a definitive airway device could be positioned with no other suitable alternative at hand. PMID:27190925

  19. [Jejunal perforation as initial metastatic manifestation of laryngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Claros González, I; Santonja Garriga, J L; Rubio Barbón, S; Santamaría Girón, L; Triviño López, A; Velasco Alvarez, A

    1994-01-01

    A case of acute abdominal pain due to jejunal perforation in a patient with dissemination of laryngeal carcinoma is presented. Six jejunal intramural nodes of squamous cell carcinoma, one of them perforated, were observed at laparotomy. At the same time, a lesion suspicious of local recurrence in the tracheostomy orifice was observed. The patient died in the postoperative period. The rarity of intestinal perforation as an initial manifestation of metastatical dissemination of a laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma as well as its poor prognosis are discussed. The hematogenous spread is proposed in our case. Finally the inclusion of metastases in the differential diagnosis in a clinical episode of intestinal perforation in patients with a history of neoplasm is emphasized. PMID:8186002

  20. Swallowing and speech therapy after definitive treatment for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Samlan, Robin A; Webster, Kimberly T

    2002-10-01

    As the trend in laryngeal cancer treatment shifts towards organ-conservation surgeries and organ-preservation protocols, patients will more often retain anatomy vital to communication and swallowing. Despite a conservative approach, results of treatment may have debilitating effects. Rehabilitation efforts are directed towards a return to functional, if not normal, status. Although there are predictable trends in voice and swallowing disorders of patients with laryngeal cancer, posttreatment dysphonia and dysphagia are diverse in presentation. Considering the significant diversity of this population, speech pathologists should work closely with otolaryngologists to determine the most appropriate treatment for each patient. As this article demonstrates, voice and swallowing therapy are necessary components of the rehabilitation process following treatment for head and neck cancers. As always, treatment is tailored to the specific individual and based on information obtained during a thorough evaluation by a speech pathologist. Fortunately, with the help of voice and swallowing therapy, many patients return to functional communication and oral feeding. PMID:12587251