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Sample records for laryngeal mask airway

  1. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion. PMID:25422617

  2. The laryngeal mask airway in obstetrical anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gataure, P S; Hughes, J A

    1995-02-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used extensively to provide a safe airway in spontaneously breathing patients who are not at risk from aspiration of gastric contents. The role of the LMA in the event of a failed intubation in an obstetrical patient, and its place in a failed intubation drill remains unclear. Two hundred and fifty consultant obstetric anaesthetists in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire regarding their views about using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in obstetrical anaesthesia. The LMA was available in 91.4% of obstetric units. Seventy-two per cent of anaesthetists were in favour of using the LMA to maintain oxygenation when tracheal intubation had failed and ventilation using a face mask was inadequate. Twenty-four respondents had had personal experience with the LMA in obstetrical anaesthesia, eight of whom stated that the LMA had proved to be a lifesaver. We believe that the LMA has a role in obstetrical anaesthesia when tracheal intubation has failed and ventilation using a face mask proves to be impossible, and it should be inserted before attempting cricothyroidectomy. PMID:7720155

  3. [Airway equipment and its maintenance for a non difficult adult airway management (endotracheal intubation and its alternative: face mask, laryngeal mask airway, laryngeal tube)].

    PubMed

    Francon, D; Estèbe, J P; Ecoffey, C

    2003-08-01

    The airway equipment for a non difficult adult airway management are described: endotracheal tubes with a specific discussion on how to inflate the balloon, laryngoscopes and blades, stylets and intubation guides, oral airways, face masks, laryngeal mask airways and laryngeal tubes. Cleaning and disinfections with the maintenance are also discussed for each type of airway management. PMID:12943860

  4. Laryngeal mask airway: an alternative for the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Jones, J R

    1995-10-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was invented by Dr. Archie Brain at the London Hospital, Whitechapel, in 1981. Dr. Brain's main objective for the LMA was that it would provide a better method of maintaining a patient's airway than by face mask. Also, the LMA would be less hemodynamically stressful than with insertion of an endotracheal tube. The LMA consists of a silicone rubber tube connected to a miniature silicone mask. The perimeter of the mask consists of an inflatable elliptical cuff, which forms a tip at the distal aspect of the LMA. The aperture bars in the dome of the mask lift the epiglottis away, so the lumen remains unobstructive. The LMA forms a low pressure seal around the larynx. The LMA is contraindicated in any situation where the patient is at risk for pulmonary aspiration. The LMA is not a substitute for a properly placed endotracheal tube in this situation. The American Society of Anesthesiologists' difficult airway algorithm recommends the insertion of an LMA when ventilation and/or intubation are difficult. The distal aperture of the LMA is in close approximation to the vocal cords, so a 6.0-mm internal diameter endotracheal tube can be passed over an intubating stylet or a pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscope to secure a patient's airway. PMID:7502644

  5. Comparing the Laryngeal Mask Airway, Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway and Face Mask in Children Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Beyza; Hatipoğlu, Zehra; Türktan, Mediha; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Objective We compared the effects of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), face mask and Cobra perilaryngeal airway (PLA) in the airway management of spontaneously breathing paediatric patients undergoing elective inguinal surgery. Methods In this study, 90 cases of 1–14-year-old children undergoing elective inguinal surgery were scheduled. The patients were randomly divided into three groups. Anaesthesia was provided with sevoflurane and 50%–50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. After providing an adequate depth of anaesthesia, supraglottic airway devices were inserted in the group I and II patients. The duration and number of insertion, haemodynamic parameters, plateau and peak inspiratory pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure of the patients were recorded preoperatively, after induction and at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min peroperatively. Results There were no statistical differences between the groups in terms of haemodynamic parameters (p>0.05). In group II, instrumentation success was higher and instrumentation time was shorter than group II. The positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau and peak inspiratory pressure values were statistically lower in group II (p<0.05). Conclusion We concluded that for airway safety and to avoid possible complications, LMA and Cobra PLA could be alternatives to face mask and that the Cobra PLA provided lower airway pressure and had a faster and more easy placement than LMA. PMID:27366563

  6. The use of laryngeal mask airway Supreme™ in rescue airway situation in the critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shahla; Seet, Edwin; Chan, Wing Yan

    2014-12-01

    We herein report a witnessed cardiopulmonary collapse of a patient with difficult mask ventilation and near-impossible laryngoscopy-cum-intubation in the critical care unit. The airway was successfully rescued with a laryngeal mask airway Supreme™, followed by an open, crash tracheostomy by the otolaryngologist. PMID:25630328

  7. The ProSeal laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, Joseph; Keller, Christian

    2002-12-01

    The ProSeal LMA is a major advance over the Classic LMA because of the following reasons: it allows ventilation at much higher airway pressures; it protects the lungs from aspiration and the stomach from gastric insufflation; it facilitates passage of a gastric tube and monitoring devices into the esophagus; it can be inserted like the Classic or Intubating LMA; it has its own built-in bite block; malposition is detected more readily; and, through use of techniques such as gum elastic bougie-guided insertion, correct positioning is almost guaranteed. The ProSeal can be considered a replacement device for the Classic LMA, but the Flexible LMA is still preferable for most intraoral procedures, and the Intubating LMA is still preferable whenever intubation is required. Limitations are that it is slightly more difficult to insert and requires more careful thought to use optimally. PMID:12512267

  8. Role of laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Beleña, José M; Ochoa, Ernesto Josué; Núñez, Mónica; Gilsanz, Carlos; Vidal, Alfonso

    2015-11-27

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures and the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is the most common supraglottic airway device used by the anesthesiologists to manage airway during general anesthesia. Use of LMA has some advantages when compared to endotracheal intubation, such as quick and ease of placement, a lesser requirement for neuromuscular blockade and a lower incidence of postoperative morbididy. However, the use of the LMA in laparoscopy is controversial, based on a concern about increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The ability of these devices to provide optimal ventilation during laparoscopic procedures has been also questioned. The most important parameter to secure an adequate ventilation and oxygenation for the LMA under pneumoperitoneum condition is its seal pressure of airway. A good sealing pressure, not only state correct patient ventilation, but it reduces the potential risk of aspiration due to the better seal of airway. In addition, the LMAs incorporating a gastric access, permitting a safe anesthesia based on these commented points. We did a literature search to clarify if the use of LMA in preference to intubation provides inadequate ventilation or increase the risk of aspiration in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We found evidence stating that LMA with drain channel achieves adequate ventilation for these procedures. Limited evidence was found to consider these devices completely safe against aspiration. However, we observed that the incidence of regurgitation and aspiration associated with the use of the LMA in laparoscopic surgery is very low. PMID:26649155

  9. Laryngo-tracheal ultrasonography to confirm correct endotracheal tube and laryngeal mask airway placement.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Jacek A; Cattano, Davide

    2014-12-01

    Waveform capnography was recommended as the most reliable method to confirm correct endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway placements. However, capnography may be unreliable during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and during low flow states. It may lead to an unnecessary removal of a well-placed endotracheal tube, re-intubation and interruption of chest compressions. Real-time upper airway (laryngo-tracheal) ultrasonography to confirm correct endotracheal tube placement was shown to be very useful in cadaveric models and during emergency intubation. Tracheal ultrasonography does not interrupt chest compressions and is not affected by low pulmonary flow or airway obstruction, but is limited by ultrasonography scattering and acoustic artifacts generated in air - mucosa interfaces. Sonographic upper airway assessment emerges as a rapid and easily available method to predict difficult intubation, to assess the laryngeal and hypopharyngeal size and visualize the position of the laryngeal mask airway in situ. This study demonstrates that the replacement of air with saline in endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway cuffs and the use of the contrast agents enables detection of cuffs in the airway. It also allows visualization of the surrounding structures or tissues as the ultrasound beam can be transmitted through the fluid - filled cuffs without being reflected from air - mucosal interfaces. PMID:26672974

  10. Awake intubating laryngeal mask airway placement in a morbidly obese patient with ankylosing spondylitis and unstable thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Herman, Abbey G; Mahla, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Intubating laryngeal mask airways can be used to provide continuous ventilation throughout intubation. This is a case of a morbidly obese (body mass index = 58) 65-year-old woman with T10 and T11 compression fractures. Optimal positioning for airway management was hindered by her unstable spine, minimal neck range of motion, and extreme pain with any movement. An intubating laryngeal mask airway was placed in the awake, topically anesthetized patient, and the laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube combination was left in place throughout surgery. PMID:27290947

  11. Airway Management and Endoscopic Treatment of Subglottic and Tracheal Stenosis: The Laryngeal Mask Airway Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vorasubin, Nopawan; Vira, Darshni; Jamal, Nausheen; Chhetri, Dinesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective is to present clinical outcomes of subglottic and tracheal stenosis treated by flexible bronchoscopic delivery of carbon dioxide (CO2) laser via laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Methods All consecutive, nontracheotomy dependent cases of subglottic and tracheal stenosis treated endoscopically over a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical approach consisted of radial incisions using a flexible fiber-based CO2 laser, balloon dilation, and topical application of mitomycin C. Ventilation during the procedure occurred through the LMA, and the CO2 laser fiber was delivered through the working channel of a flexible bronchoscope passed through the LMA. Number of dilations, period between dilations, and operative times were reviewed. Results Eleven patients who underwent airway intervention during the study period were identified. Average follow-up was 28 months. Etiologies of airway stenosis included intubation injury (6), idiopathic (4), or autoimmune disease (1), requiring an average of 1.3, 1.5, and 3 dilations, respectively. Average operative time was 67 minutes. Autoimmune etiology correlated with more frequent dilations. Conclusion LMA is an effective way to manage ventilation while simultaneously allowing unencumbered flexible bronchoscopic access for laser surgery, balloon dilation, and mitomycin C application for airway stenosis. Long-term success in treating stenosis is achievable using this technique. PMID:24671485

  12. Application of the laryngeal mask airway for anesthesia in three chimpanzees and one gibbon.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jacob A; Atkins, Adrienne L; Heard, Darryl J

    2010-09-01

    Three pediatric chimpanzees and one pediatric gibbon were anesthetized for routine physical examination. Anesthesia was maintained with inhalant delivered via a laryngeal mask airway (LMA). The LMA was easy to insert, provided adequate control of the airway for ventilation, and caused no tracheal stimulation. No complications were observed. As compared with a face mask, the LMA has the advantage of a more secure airway; the ability to effectively ventilate the patient; less dead space, which leads to lower rebreathing of carbon dioxide; and less exposure of personnel to waste gases. As compared with an endotracheal tube, the LMA causes less airway trauma, is easier to place, and is less stimulating to the patient. The LMA should be considered for use in fasted non-human primates presented for procedures lasting less than 60 min where high peak inspiratory pressures are not needed. PMID:20945657

  13. Use of a laryngeal mask airway in a brachycephalic dog with masticatory myositis and trismus.

    PubMed

    Reed, Frances; Iff, Isabelle

    2012-03-01

    An 8-month old, male, neutered bulldog was presented for investigation of a 2-day history of trismus. Endotracheal intubation was impossible as the dog was only able to open his mouth approximately 2 cm. A laryngeal mask airway was blindly inserted after induction of general anesthesia to maintain the patient on inhalational anesthesia and improve respiration for computed tomography and muscle biopsy. The dog recovered from anesthesia uneventfully. PMID:22942446

  14. Use of a laryngeal mask airway in a brachycephalic dog with masticatory myositis and trismus

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Frances; Iff, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    An 8-month old, male, neutered bulldog was presented for investigation of a 2-day history of trismus. Endotracheal intubation was impossible as the dog was only able to open his mouth approximately 2 cm. A laryngeal mask airway was blindly inserted after induction of general anesthesia to maintain the patient on inhalational anesthesia and improve respiration for computed tomography and muscle biopsy. The dog recovered from anesthesia uneventfully. PMID:22942446

  15. [Intubating laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Langenstein, H; Möller, F

    1998-01-01

    To improve the success of blind intubation through a laryngeal mask, Dr. A.I.J. Brain constructed the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA), marketed under the name Fastrach. The new construction allows blind intubation with highly flexible endotracheal tubes up to 8 mm ID with cuff (straight Woodbridge type), securing the airway around the intubation process and maintaining most of the characteristics of a standard laryngeal mask airway (SLMA), including contraindications. An additional contraindication is the existence of a Zenker diverticle. Up to now, eight working groups reported a success rate of blind intubation through the ILMA of more than 90% in about 1,200 patients, with a success rate of blind intubation of more than 50% for the first intubation attempt. Ten percent of the patients were difficult to intubate with the same success rate for blind intubation as in normal patients. Reduced mouth opening does not seem to hinder the use of the ILMA in spite of its increased outer diameter of 2 cm, as long as it is possible to enlarge the mouth opening to > 2 cm during anaesthesia. The new ILMA more than doubles the success of blind intubation compared to an SLMA, irrespective of a large variety of intubation difficulties. Correct judgement of endotracheal tube position is mandatory. The ILMA has the potential to be used in patients who are difficult to intubate and to substitute the SLMA in "cannot ventilate--cannot intubate" situations. The future will show if the ILMA also will improve emergency airway management by inexperienced personnel, including intubation, as has been shown for the standard laryngeal mask airway in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for ventilation only. PMID:9611362

  16. Acute unilateral submandibular gland swelling associated with the laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Suhitharan, Thangavelautham; Seevanayagam, Sathyendran; Parker, Francis Christopher; Teoh, Wendy Hui Ling

    2013-12-01

    We describe a rare complication of acute unilateral submandibular gland swelling following the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in two patients with otherwise uneventful perioperative airway management. This is likely to be a consequence of the pressure exerted by the airway cuff on the tissues within the submandibular triangle. As this complication is rarely reported, its true incidence may in fact be higher, suggesting a need for greater attention on LMA cuff pressures and degree of cuff inflation. We discuss the presenting clinical features, pathophysiology and utilisation of ultrasonographic confirmation of sialadenopathy, and review the current anaesthetic literature to raise awareness of this unusual and under-reported complication of LMA. This complication can be mitigated by incorporating routine manometric checks and limiting intracuff pressures to < 60 cmH2O, potentially avoiding LMA insertions in patients with sialolithiasis and avoiding the use of nitrous oxide. PMID:24356762

  17. The Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway Facilitates Tracheal Intubation in the Lateral Position

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Ryu; Nagata, Osamu; Sessler, Daniel I.; Ozaki, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Although the difficulty of tracheal intubation in the lateral position has not been systematically evaluated, airway loss during surgery in a laterally positioned patient may have hazardous consequences. We explored whether the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) facilitates tracheal intubation in patients with normal airway anatomy, i.e., Mallampati grade ≤ 3 and thyromental distance ≥ 5 cm, positioned in the lateral position. And we evaluated whether this technique can be used as a rescue when the airway is lost mid-case in laterally positioned patients with respect to success rate and intubation time. Anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, and vecuronium in 50 patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar disk herniation (Lateral) and 50 undergoing other surgical procedures (Supine). Patients having disk surgery (Lateral) were positioned on their right or left sides before induction of general anesthesia, and intubation was performed in that position. Patients in control group (Supine) were anesthetized in supine position, and intubation was performed in that position. Intubation was performed blindly via an ILMA in both groups. The time required for intubation and number and types of adjusting maneuvers employed were recorded. Data were compared by Mann-Whitney U, Fisher’s exact, chi-square, or unpaired t-tests, as appropriate. Data presented as mean (SD). Demographic and airway measures were similar in the two groups, except for mouth opening which was slightly wider in patients in the lateral position: 5.1 (0.9) vs. 4.6 (0.7) cm. The time required for intubation was similar in each group (≈25 s), as was intubation success (96%). We conclude that blind intubation via an ILMA offers a frequent success rate and a clinically acceptable intubation time (< one min) even in the lateral position. Summary Blind intubation via the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) offers a high success rate and a clinically acceptable intubation time even in

  18. Submental intubation with reinforced tube for intubating laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Ha, Ji-Young; Park, Hyun; Han, Dong Woo

    2005-08-31

    Submental endotracheal intubation is a simple and secure alternative to either nasoendotracheal intubation or a tracheostomy in the airway management of maxillofacial trauma. However, a submental endotracheal intubation is quite difficult to manage if adverse events such as a tube obstruction, accidental extubation, or a leaking cuff with the endotracheal tube in the submental route occur, which could endanger the patient. This paper describes the use of a LMA-FastrachTMETT in the submental endotracheal intubation of patients suffering from maxillofacial trauma. One of the patients was a 16-year-old male, and the other was a 19-year-old male. They were scheduled for an open reduction and internal fixation of the maxillofacial fracture including naso-orbital-ethmoidal (NOE) complex, and a zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture. A submental intubation with a LMA-FastrachTMETT was performed in both cases, and the operation proceeded without any difficulties. These cases show that the use of the LMA- FastrachTMETT can improve the safety and efficacy of submental endotracheal intubation. This is because the LMA- FastrachTMETT has a freely detachable connector, and is flexible enough to keep the patency despite the acute angle of airway. PMID:16127785

  19. Comparison of laryngeal mask airway use with endotracheal intubation during anesthesia of western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Cerveny, Shannon N; D'Agostino, Jennifer J; Davis, Michelle R; Payton, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    The laryngeal mask airway is an alternative to endotracheal intubation that achieves control of the airway by creating a seal around the larynx with an inflatable cuff. This study compared use of the laryngeal mask airway with endotracheal intubation in anesthetized western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Eight adult gorillas were immobilized for routine and diagnostic purposes for a total of nine anesthetic events. During each anesthetic event, gorillas were either intubated (n = 4; group A) or fitted with a laryngeal mask airway (n= 5; group B). Time required to place each airway device, physiologic parameters, and arterial blood gas were measured and compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups for time required to place airway device, heart rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, end-tidal carbon dioxide, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, or arterial pH between the two groups. Mean arterial partial pressure of oxygen was significantly greater in group B, 15 (group A: 94 +/- 44 mm Hg; group B: 408 +/- 36 mm Hg; P= 0.0025) and 45 (group A: 104 +/- 21 mm Hg; group B: 407 +/- 77 mm Hg; P = 0.0026) min after airway device placement. Mean respiratory rate was significantly greater in group A at multiple time points. Mean arterial pressure (group A: 129 +/- 16 mm Hg; group B: 60 +/- 8 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (group A: 115 +/- 21 mm Hg; group B: 36 +/- 10 mm Hg) were significantly greater in group A at the time of airway device placement. The laryngeal mask airway maintained oxygenation and ventilation effectively in all gorillas and is a useful alternative to endotracheal intubation in western lowland gorillas. PMID:23272342

  20. Anesthetic management by laryngeal mask airway in a patient with a history of difficult intubation resulting in dental injuries.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Fujii, Ryosuke; Usui, Naoko; Kagamiuchi, Hajime; Omichi, Shiro; Kotani, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Disabled patients may face respiratory problems during general anesthesia because of head and neck anomalies. We describe a case of dental treatment under general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway in a disabled patient who faced difficulty in endotracheal intubation on several occasions, 5 of which resulted in dental injuries. PMID:25849470

  1. Anesthetic Management by Laryngeal Mask Airway in a Patient With a History of Difficult Intubation Resulting in Dental Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Fujii, Ryosuke; Usui, Naoko; Kagamiuchi, Hajime; Omichi, Shiro; Kotani, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Disabled patients may face respiratory problems during general anesthesia because of head and neck anomalies. We describe a case of dental treatment under general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway in a disabled patient who faced difficulty in endotracheal intubation on several occasions, 5 of which resulted in dental injuries. PMID:25849470

  2. Assessment of Mini-dose Succinylcholine Effect on FacilitatingLaryngeal Mask Airway Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadi, Dawood; Eydi, Mahmood; Hosseinzadeh, Hamzeh; Amiri Rahimi, Maryam; EJ Golzari, Samad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) has gained wide acceptance for routine airway management and with increasing emphasis on day care surgery it is widely used. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of mini dose succinylcholine (0.1mg/kg) with semi-inflated cuff on facilitation of laryngeal mask airway insertion in order to achieve more satisfaction yet less complications . Methods: In a randomized double-blinded study, sixty ASA 1, 2 and 3 patients aged 20-60 years scheduled for urologic surgical procedures were included. Thirty patients received succinylcholine (Group S), and thirty received 0.9% sodium choride as a placebo (Group C). Results: Coughing occured in 33.3% of patients in the control group and there was no incidence in succ group (P=0.002). Head or limb movement occurred in 70% of the patients in the control group vs. 10% in succ group (P<0.001). Laryngospasm occurred in 36.6 % of the patients in the control group but there was no incidence in succ group (P=0.004). Additional propofol was required in 53% of the patients in control group vs. 10% for succ group (P=0.001). Ease of insertion and first successfull attempt of LMA were achieved in 93.3% and 90% of the patients respectively in group S (P<0.05). Myalgia and sore throat occurred in 66.7 % of patients in the group C in comparison with 33.3% in group S (P=0.06).Conclusion: The combination of propofol with mini dose succinylcholine, provided a significantly better method for LMA insertion, while reduced propofol doses were needed and number of attempts decreased. PMID:24251004

  3. [Difficult Ventilation Requiring Emergency Endotracheal Intubation during Awake Craniotomy Managed by Laryngeal Mask Airway].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Asako; Mizota, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Segawa, Hajime; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of difficult ventilation requiring emergency endotracheal intubation during awake craniotomy managed by laryngeal mask airway (LMA). A 45-year-old woman was scheduled to receive awake craniotomy for brain tumor in the frontal lobe. After anesthetic induction, airway was secured using ProSeal LMA and patient was mechanically ventilated in pressure-control mode. Patient's head was fixed with head-pins at anteflex position, and the operation started. About one hour after the start of the operation, tidal volume suddenly decreased. We immediately started manual ventilation, but the airway resistance was extremely high and we could not adequately ventilate the patient. We administered muscle relaxant for suspected laryngospasm, but ventilatory status did not improve; so we decided to conduct emergency endotracheal intubation. We tried to intubate using Airwayscope or LMA-Fastrach, but they were not effective in our case. Finally trachea was intubated using transnasal fiberoptic bronchoscopy. We discuss airway management during awake craniotomy, focusing on emergency endotracheal intubation during surgery. PMID:27188111

  4. [Cardiovascular responses during laryngeal mask airway insertion in normotensive, hypertensive and chronic renal failure patients].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, M; Igarashi, M; Tsunoda, K; Edanaga, M; Suzuki, H; Tohdoh, Y; Namiki, A

    1999-08-01

    The hemodynamic response to the insertion of the laryngeal mask airway (LM) following induction with propofol 2 mg.kg-1 was assessed and compared in normotensive (Normal), hypertensive (HT) and chronic renal failure (CRF) patients (n = 23 in each group). Before induction, in HT and CRF groups blood pressure and rate pressure products (RPP) were higher than in Normal group (P < 0.05). Although blood pressure and RPP were decreased in every patient by induction with propofol, no patients needed vasopressor drugs. The decreases of blood pressure and RPP were larger in HT and CRF groups than in Normal group (P < 0.05). There were no differences between groups in heart rate and rate of successful LM insertion. We concluded that LM insertion with propofol 2 mg.kg-1 was an effective induction method preventing the adverse circulatory responses in normotensive, hypertensive and chronic renal failure patients. PMID:10481421

  5. Effect of continuous cuff pressure regulator in general anaesthesia with laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Y-S; Choi, J-W; Jung, H-S; Kim, Y-S; Kim, D-W; Kim, J-H; Lee, J-A

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal complications (PPLC) occur during anaesthesia due to increased cuff pressure following the insertion of laryngeal mask airways. The use of a pressure regulator to prevent PPLC was evaluated in a prospective, randomized study. Sixty patients scheduled to receive general anaesthesia were randomly assigned to two equal groups of 30, either with or without the regulator. The 'just seal' cuff pressure (JSCP), cuff pressure at 5-min intervals during anaesthesia, incidence of pharyngeal sore throat (PST), dysphagia, dysphonia and other complications were evaluated at 1 and 24 h postoperatively. The combined mean ± SD JSCP of both groups was 20.3 ± 3.2 mmHg. In the group with the regulator, cuff pressure was maintained at a constant level during anaesthesia. This study demonstrated that the regulator is a simple, functional device that can reduce the incidence of PST significantly at 1 h postoperatively, following general anaesthesia. PMID:22117992

  6. Removal of Laryngeal Mask Airway in Adults Under Target-Controlled, Propofol–Fentanyl Infusion Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ren-Chih; Hung, Nan-Kai; Lu, Chueng-He; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After emergence from anesthesia, the incidence and severity of adverse airway effects caused by the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) can vary, depending on when the device was removed; nonetheless, reports differ regarding the exact optimal timing of LMA removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the rate of adverse events between 2 groups: those whose LMA was removed under general anesthesia (“deep” group) or under target-controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol (“awake” group). Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent were obtained; 124 patients were then randomly allocated into either the “awake” group or the “deep” group. Anesthesia was induced and maintained using TCI of propofol, as well as intravenous fentanyl. In the “deep” group, the LMA was removed after surgery while the patients were deeply anesthetized using a target effect-site propofol concentration of 2 μg/mL, whereas in the “awake” group, the device was removed while the patients followed verbal instructions. The incidence of the following adverse events was recorded: coughing, straining, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, clenching, breath holding, gross purposeful movement, airway obstruction, retching, vomiting, and oxygen desaturation. If any such event occurred, the LMA removal was considered a failure. Airway hyperreactivity was recorded and graded – based on the severity of cough, breath holding, and oxygen desaturation. The failure rate was higher in the “awake” group (15/61; 24.6%) than in the “deep” group (5/60; 8.3%). Airway hyperreactivity was mild (score, <3) in both groups. Removal of the LMA under deep anesthesia using a target-controlled, effect-site propofol concentration of 2 μg/mL may be safer and more successful than removal when patients are fully awake after surgery. PMID:27124034

  7. Improving patient safety after rigid bronchoscopy in adults: laryngeal mask airway versus face mask – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Nisi, Fulvio; Galzerano, Antonio; Cicchitto, Gaetano; Puma, Francesco; Peduto, Vito Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Background There are still no clear guidelines in the literature on per procedural bronchoscopic management for anesthesiologists, and few relevant datasets are available. To obtain rapid recovery from anesthesia, it is often necessary to keep patients in the recovery room for several hours until they become clinically stable. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) enables better respiratory and hemodynamic recovery than the oxygen face mask (FM) in patients undergoing rigid bronchoscopy. Methods Twenty-one patients undergoing elective bronchoscopy of the upper airway were randomized to ventilation assistance with FM or LMA after a rigid bronchoscopy procedure under general anesthesia. The primary endpoint was duration of post-surgical recovery and the secondary endpoints were postoperative hemodynamic and respiratory parameters. Assessment of the study endpoints was performed by an intensive care specialist blinded to the method of ventilation used. The statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher’s Exact test for nominal data and the Student’s t-test for continuous data. Results There was no statistically significant difference in post-procedural time between the two groups (P=0.972). The recovery parameters were significantly better in the LMA group than in the FM group, with significantly fewer desaturation, hypotensive, and bradycardic events (P<0.05). Conclusion We conclude that the LMA may be safer and more comfortable than the FM in patients undergoing rigid bronchoscopy. PMID:25995652

  8. A randomized control study comparing the pharyngolaryngeal morbidity of laryngeal mask airway versus endotracheal tube

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, A.; Jacob, Ron Mathew; Koshy, Rachel Cherian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Endotracheal tube (ETT) has been associated with various pharyngolaryngeal morbidities (PLMs) following general anesthesia (GA). Laryngeal mask airway (LMA), currently the most commonly used supraglottic airway device, has several advantageous over the ETT but has been associated with varying results of PLM. The aim of our study was to compare the PLM between them and to know whether LMA is a better alternative. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy American Society of Anesthesiologists Grades 1 and 2 women scheduled for elective mastectomy were included in the study, 85 each in either group, E Group (intubated with ETT) and L Group (using LMA) on a random basis. All patients received GA with controlled ventilation using a muscle relaxant. PLMs such as hoarseness, pain on phonation, sore throat, and difficulty in swallowing were documented by an interview done postoperatively. Peroperative parameters such as intubation attempts, trauma during airway device insertion, and intraoperative incidents were also analyzed. A sample size of 85 patients in each group was calculated in order to achieve a study power of 0.8 and alpha level was taken as 0.05. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 using Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test and Fisher's exact test were used as nonparametric tests. A two-tailed P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Patients in E Group had statistically significant increased incidence of a sore throat and voice complaints whereas L Group showed a statistically significant increase of swallowing problems. There was also a significant correlation between traumatic insertion and sore throat, pain on swallowing in the L Group, which could be due to direct trauma. Conclusions: ETT was associated with an increased incidence of voice problems and sore throat whereas LMA had an increased incidence of dysphagia and odynophagia. Use of LMA changes the pharyngolaryngeal profile to a more acceptable one. PMID:27212745

  9. Better Hemodynamic Profile of Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion Compared to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Jarineshin, Hashem; Kashani, Saeed; Vatankhah, Majid; Abdulahzade Baghaee, Alireza; Sattari, Sahar; Fekrat, Fereydoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation can cause serious cardiovascular responses in patients such as hypertension, tachycardia, and arrhythmias. Alternative airway maintenance techniques may attenuate these hemodynamic stress responses. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the immediate hemodynamic effects of the insertion of laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMA-S) and classic (LMA-C) with laryngoscopy and Endotracheal Intubation (ETT). Patients and Methods: This study was a prospective, double-blind, and randomized clinical trial conducted on 150 patients aged 18 to 50 years with ASA I (American Society of Anesthesiologists), in the general operating room of Shahid Mohammadi hospital, Hormozgan university of medical sciences, Bandar Abbas, Iran. In the ETT group, endotracheal intubation was performed using the Macintosh laryngoscope; while for the LMA-C and LMA-S groups, LMA Classic and LMA Supreme were inserted, respectively. The induction and maintenance of anesthesia were similar in all patients. The hemodynamic parameters such as heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured before (baseline) and after induction of anesthesia at 4 different time points. The statistical analysis was done and P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Participants in all groups were similar in terms of gender, age, weight, height, and Mallampati class. The mean ± SD of SBPs (105.62 ± 12.12, 112.90 ± 12.2, and 112.48 ± 15.14 mm Hg, respectively for ETT, LMA-C, and LMA-S) and DBPs (64.64 ± 10.23, 73.78 ± 9.70, and 71.20 ± 12.27 mm Hg, respectively for ETT, LMA-C, and LMA-S) were significantly lower in the ETT group compared to LMA groups 5 minutes after device insertion (P < 0.01 for SBPs and P < 0.001 for DBPs); however these values were lower than the baseline values in all groups. There were no differences in the mean SBP and DBPs between the three groups at the other time points. The mean

  10. Laryngeal mask airway without muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    KONG, MING; LI, BEIPING; TIAN, YUNPING

    2016-01-01

    The number of elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement surgeries is on the increase. These patients often suffer from comorbidity such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications, which limits the ability of medical teams to employ anesthesia. Thus, alternative methods are required. The aim of this study was to examine the advantage of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in the absence of muscle relaxant in elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement operations. Fifty patients (27 males and 23 females) undergoing femoral head replacements were selected for the study between March 2013 and May 2014. The mean value for the age in this group was 74.6±12.5 years. The patients were randomly distributed into two groups of 25. One group was designated as the treatment group and the second group as the control group. For the treatment group, LMA without muscle relaxant was used, and the control group received routine anesthesia. Variations in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and oxygen saturation (SPO2) in the two groups were monitored at different times. Clinical efficacy and muscle relaxation effects were also analyzed. For the treatment group, the HR, MAP and SPO2 measurements did not reveal any significant variation while these values in the control group demonstrated important dissimilarities. Time to recovery, time to extubation and incidence of throat pain in the treatment group were all markedly decreased as compared to those in control group. The operation time in the treatment group was not significantly different to that of control group. The satisfaction of the muscle relaxation effect in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group while the incidence of adverse reactions was not considerably different. In conclusion, the use of LMA without using muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement surgeries performed on elderly patients showed to be effective and safe. PMID:26889218

  11. Optimal flexible laryngeal mask airway size in children weighing 10 to 20 kg.

    PubMed

    Kz, Chen; Tj, Liu; Wx, Li; X, Shen

    2016-09-01

    This prospective, randomised study was conducted to assess the effect of flexible laryngeal mask airway (FLMA) size on oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP) in children at the recommended intracuff pressure. A total of 120 children undergoing elective ophthalmic surgery were randomly assigned to the size 2 FLMA group or size 2.5 FLMA group. The primary measurement was OLP at an intracuff pressure of 40 cmH2O. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of OLP <10 cmH2O, insufficient ventilation, gastric insufflation, insertion time, successful first-attempt insertion rate, fibreoptic view grade and pharyngolaryngeal adverse events. The median OLP was comparable for the size 2 and size 2.5 FLMA (18 cmH2O versus 18 cmH2O, P=0.38). However, the size 2 FLMA group had a higher incidence of OLP <10 cmH2O and insufficient ventilation (13.3% versus 0, P=0.006). In subgroup analyses based on weight, the size 2.5 FLMA had a lower occurrence of OLP <10 cmH2O and insufficient ventilation (27% versus 0, P=0.0046) in children 16-20 kg. We conclude that at a 40 cmH2O intracuff pressure, the OLP with the size 2 and size 2.5 FLMA was similar in children weighing 10-15.9 kg. However, in children weighing 16-20 kg, size 2 devices had a higher incidence of low OLP and insufficient ventilation, so a 2.5 FLMA may be preferable in this subgroup. PMID:27608342

  12. Sealing of tracheoesophageal fistula using a Y stent through fiberoptic bronchoscope during general anesthesia under laryngeal mask airway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Yang, Pingliang; Zuo, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    A 64-yr-old man was admitted because of repeated pneumonia. Both fiberoptic bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy revealed a large tracheoesophageal fistula (15 mm) in the right posterior trachea 1 cm beyond the carina. Coated nickel-titanium shape memory alloy Y shaped stent was planned to seal this fistula under general anesthesia. We took advantage of laryngeal mask airway to insert the fiberoptic bronchoscope to guide the stent placement. Our method of sealing a large tracheoesophageal fistula with LMA under total intravenous anesthesia was successful. PMID:25664132

  13. Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 2: Should bite guards be used with laryngeal mask airways in adults?

    PubMed

    Mackway-Jones, Kevin C

    2015-02-01

    A shortcut review was carried out to establish whether bite blocks should be used when a laryngeal mask airway is used in the emergency department. Eighteen papers were found using the reported searches and a further eight were found by scanning the reference lists. Ten presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. It is concluded that bite guards should be used when laryngeal mask airways are employed in the emergency department. PMID:25605264

  14. Comparison of hemodynamic and metabolic stress responses caused by endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Güleç, Handan; Çakan, Türkay; Yaman, Halil; Kilinç, Aytül Şadan; Başar, Hülya

    2012-01-01

    Background: We aimed to compare hemodynamic and endocrine alterations caused by stress response due to Proseal laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube usage in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty-three ASA I-II patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups of endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway. Standard general anaesthesia was performed in both groups with the same drugs in induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. After anaesthesia induction and 20 minutes after CO2 insufflations, venous blood samples were obtained for measuring adrenalin, noradrenalin, dopamine and cortisol levels. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were recorded at the 1st, 5th, 15th, 30th and 45th minutes after the insertion of airway devices. Results: No statistically significant differences in age, body mass index, gender, ASA physical status, and operation time were found between the groups (p > 0.05). Changes in hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were not statistically significant when compared between and within groups (p > 0.05). Although no statistically significant differences were observed between and within groups when adrenalin, noradrenalin and dopamine values were compared, serum cortisol levels after CO2 insufflation in PLMA group were significantly lower than the ETT group (p = 0.024). When serum cortisol levels were compared within groups, cortisol levels 20 minutes after CO2 insufflation were significantly higher (46.1 (9.5-175.7) and 27.0 (8.3-119.4) in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively) than cortisol levels after anaesthesia induction (11.3 (2.8-92.5) and 16.6 (4.4-45.4) in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively) in both groups (p = 0.001). Conclusion: PLMA usage is a suitable, effective and safe alternative to ETT in laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients with lower metabolic stress. PMID:23264788

  15. Comparison of endotracheal intubation, combitube, and laryngeal mask airway between inexperienced and experienced emergency medical staff: A manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi, Morteza; Hajiseyedjavadi, Houman; Seyedhosseini, Javad; Eslami, Vahid; Sheikhmotaharvahedi, Hojat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emergency Medical Service (EMS) personnel manage the airway, but only a group of them are allowed to engage in Endotracheal Intubation (ETI). Our purpose was to evaluate if the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) or Combitube can be used by inexperienced care providers. Materials and Methods: A randomized, prospective manikin study was conducted. Fifty-nine participants were randomly assigned into two groups. Experienced group included 16 paramedics, eight anesthetic-technicians, and inexperienced group included 27 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMT-B) and eight nurses. Our main outcomes were success rate and time to airway after only one attempt. Results: Airway success was 73% for ETI, 98.3% for LMA, and 100% for Combitube. LMA and Combitube were faster and had greater success than ETI (P = 0.0001). Inexperienced had no differences in time to securing LMA compared with experienced (6.05 vs. 5.4 seconds, respectively, P = 0.26). One failure in inexperienced, and no failure in experienced group occurred to secure the LMA (P = 0.59). The median time to Combitube placement in experienced and inexperienced was 5.05 vs. 5.00 seconds, P = 0.65, respectively. Inexperienced and experienced groups performed ETI in 19.15 and 17 seconds, respectively (P = 0.001). After the trial, 78% preferred Combitube, 15.3% LMA, and 6.8% ETI as the device of choice in prehospital setting. Conclusion: Time to airway was decreased and success rate increased significantly with the use of LMA and combitube compared with ETI, regardless of the experience level. This study suggests that both Combitube and LMA may be acceptable choices for management of airway in the prehospital setting for experienced and especially inexperienced EMS personnel. PMID:25625062

  16. Endotracheal tube intubation with the aid of a laryngeal mask airway, a fiberoptic bronchoscope, and a tube exchanger in a difficult airway patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joon Kyung; Kim, Hyung Gon; Kim, Jung Eun; Jang, Myung-Soo; Kang, Jong-Man

    2014-03-01

    A 28-year-old male patient with occipito-atlanto-axial instability underwent a cervical fusion with posterior technique. Post-operatively, the endotracheal tube (ETT) was removed, and the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. After transfer, an upper airway obstruction developed and reintubations with a laryngoscope were attempted but failed. We inserted a #4 proseal laryngeal mask airway (LMA) and passed a 5.0 mm ETT through the LMA with the aid of a fiberoptic bronchoscope. We passed a tube exchanger through the 5.0 mm ETT and exchanged it with a 7.5 mm ETT. This method may be a useful alternative for difficult tracheal intubations. PMID:24729847

  17. Ease of insertion of the laryngeal mask airway in pediatric surgical patients: Predictors of failure and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Asida, SM; Ahmed, SS

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is an useful alternative to endotracheal tube for airway management. The risk of life-threatening adverse respiratory events during its use is rare, but we need to know about the risk-adjusted prediction of its insertion failure requiring rescue tracheal intubation and its impact on patient outcome. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients; 6 months to 12-year-old, American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II scheduled to undergo elective surgical procedures that require general anesthesia were included in this study. LMA was inserted after induction of anesthesia. The insertion conditions, intra, and postoperative events were recorded. Our primary outcome variable was trial success from the first time. Results: We recorded 426 cases (85.2%) of first trial success with clear airway compared to 46 case (9.2%) of second trial success (P ≤ 0.001). Predictors of failure of first attempt of LMA insertion include abnormal airway anatomy (91%), body weight <16 kg and age below 5 years (44%), the use of LMA size of 1 and 1.5 (3.8%), the intraoperative lateral position (3.8%). Conclusion: The data obtained from this study support the use of the LMA as a reliable pediatric supraglottic airway device, demonstrating relatively low failure rates. Predictors of LMA failure in the pediatric surgical population should be independently considered. Trial Registration: The study is registered in the Australian and New Zealand clinical trial registry with the allocated trial number: ACTRN12614000994684. Web address of trial: http://www.ANZCTR.org.au/A CTRN12614000994684.aspx. PMID:27375384

  18. The comparison of Proseal laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries under general anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Saraswat, Namita; Kumar, Aditya; Mishra, Abhijeet; Gupta, Amrita; Saurabh, Gyan; Srivastava, Uma

    2011-01-01

    Aims to compare the efficacy of Proseal laryngeal mask airway(PLMA) and endotracheal tube (ETT) in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries under general anaesthesia. This prospective randomised study was conducted on 60 adult patients, 30 each in two groups, of ASA I-II who were posted for laparoscopic procedures under general anaesthesia. After preoxygenation, anaesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl and vecuronium. PLMA or ETT was inserted and cuff inflated. Nasogastric tube (NGT) was passed in all patients. Anaesthesia was maintained with N2 O, O2, halothane and vecuronium. Ventilation was set at 8 ml/kg and respiratory rate of 12/min. The attempts and time taken for insertion of devices, haemodynamic changes, oxygenation, ventilation and intraoperative and postoperative laryngopharyngeal morbidity (LPM) were noted. There was no failed insertion of devices. Time taken for successful passage of NGT was 9.77 s (6-16 s) and 11.5 s (8-17 s) for groups P and E, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in oxygen saturation (SpO2) or end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) between the two groups before or during peritoneal insufflation. Median (range) airway pressure at which oropharyngeal leak occurred during the leak test with PLMA was 35 (24-40) cm of H2O. There was no case of inadequate ventilation, regurgitation, or aspiration recorded. No significant difference in laryngopharyngeal morbidity was noted. A properly positionedPLMA proved to be a suitable and safe alternative to ETT for airway management in elective fasted, adult patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries. It provided equally effective pulmonary ventilation despite high airway pressures without gastric distention, regurgitation, and aspiration. PMID:21712868

  19. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway: An alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Jaya; Dubey, Kamta Prasad; Sahu, Bal Swaroop; Shah, Pratibha Jain

    2010-01-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is a supraglottic airway management device. The LMA is preferred for airway management in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures. The recently introduced ProSeal (PLMA), a modification of Classic LMA, has a gastric drainage tube placed lateral to main airway tube which allows the regurgitated gastric contents to bypass the glottis and prevents the pulmonary aspiration. This study was done to compare the efficacy of ProSeal LMA with an endotracheal tube in paediatric patients with respect to number of attempts for placement of devices, haemodynamic responses and perioperative respiratory complications. Sixty children, ASA I and II, weighing 10-20 kg between 2 and 8 years of age group of either sex undergoing elective ophthalmological and lower abdominal surgeries of 30-60 min duration, randomly divided into two groups of 30 patients each were studied. The number of attempts for endotracheal intubation was less than the placement of PLMA. Haemodynamic responses were significantly higher (P<0.05) after endotracheal intubation as compared to the placement of PLMA. There were no significant differences in mean SpO2 (%) and EtCO2 levels recorded at different time intervals between the two groups. The incidence of post-operative respiratory complications cough and bronchospasm was higher after extubation than after removal of PLMA. The incidence of soft tissue trauma was noted to be higher for PLMA after its removal. There were no incidences of aspiration and hoarseness/sore throat in either group. It is concluded that ProSeal LMA can be safely considered as a suitable and effective alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures. PMID:21224972

  20. Effect of low dose rocuronium in preventing ventilation leak for flexible laryngeal mask airway during radical mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ya-Hong; Yi, Jie; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Li

    2015-01-01

    The flexible laryngeal mask airway (FLMA) is becoming more and more popular in general anesthesia during surgery of head, neck and upper chest. But very limited information has been published about whether muscle relaxant was necessary or not for anesthesia with FLMA. To investigate whether low-dose muscle relaxant is necessary in preventing ventilation leak of FLMA in radical mastectomy, forty-eight female patients undergoing radical mastectomy were enrolled in the study. They were randomly divided into low-dose muscle relaxant (LD-MR) group and non-muscle relaxant (non-MR) group. All the included patients received total intravenous anesthesia (with propofol, fentanyl and remifentanil) and controlled mechanical ventilation with FLMA during the surgery. Patients in LD-MR group received 0.4 mg/kg rocuronium during anesthesia induction, while patients in non-MR group received equivalent volumes of physiological saline. Insertion time was shorter in LD-MR group than that in non-MR group (P < 0.05). Peak airway pressures and ventilation leak volumes at 10, 20 and 30 minutes were lower in LD-MR group than those in non-MR group (P < 0.05). No difference was found between LD-MR and non-MR group in terms of emergence time, FLMA extraction time, and maximum tidal volumes before FLMA extraction. The results show that low-dose rocuronium could reduce the ventilation leak for mechanical ventilation with FLMA during radical mastectomy without prolonging the emergence time. PMID:26550303

  1. Effect of Paralysis at the Time of ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion on Pharyngolaryngeal Morbidities. A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Ah-Young; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Hwang, Jung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular block results in the loss of muscular tone in the upper airway, which might contribute to the increased postoperative airway morbidity followed by ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) insertion. We compared the pharyngolaryngeal discomfort exerted by the PLMA according to the neuromuscular block. One hundred sixty patients undergoing surgery for breast disease or inguinal hernia were anesthetized with propofol and remifentanil by target controlled infusion. Rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg (NMBA group, n = 80) or normal saline (No-NMBA group, n = 80) was administered after the loss of consciousness, and one anesthesiologist inserted the PLMA. Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal discomfort was evaluated at postoperative 1 h. Traumatic event was recorded based on the blood trace on the surface of the PLMA cuff. Insertion time, insertion attempt number, sealing pressure, and fiberoptic brochoscopic grades were evaluated. Patients’ characteristics and the PLMA insertion condition (insertion time, successful insertion attempt number, fiberoptic bronchoscopic grade, and sealing pressure) were similar between the two groups. The PLMA can be successfully inserted in non-paralyzed patients with less postoperative pharyngolaryngeal discomfort than when a neuromuscular blocking agent is used (13.8% vs. 30.0%, P = 0.021). The incidence of traumatic events is also reduced when no neuromuscular blocking agent is used (16.3% vs. 32.5%, P = 0.026). Regardless of whether or not a surgical procedure requires muscular relaxation, there is no need to administer neuromuscular blocking agents solely for the purpose of PLMA insertion. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01035021 PMID:26252522

  2. Airway Complications during and after General Anesthesia: A Comparison, Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Using Flexible Laryngeal Mask Airways and Endotracheal Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Lian, Ying; Li, Wen Xian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Flexible laryngeal mask airways (FLMAs) have been widely used in thyroidectomy as well as cleft palate, nasal, upper chest, head and neck oncoplastic surgeries. This systematic review aims to compare the incidence of airway complications that occur during and after general anesthesia when using the FLMA and endotracheal intubation (ETT). We performed a quantitative meta-analysis of the results of randomized trials. Methods A comprehensive search of the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases was conducted using the key words "flexible laryngeal mask airway" and "endotracheal intubation". Only prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the FLMA and ETT were included. The relative risks (RRs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using a quality effects model in MetaXL 1.3 software to analyze the outcome data. Results Ten RCTs were included in this meta-analysis. There were no significant differences between the FLMA and ETT groups in the incidence of difficulty in positioning the airway [RR = 1.75, 95% CI = (0.70–4.40)]; the occurrence of sore throat at one hour and 24 hours postoperative [RR = 0.90, 95% CI = (0.13–6.18) and RR = 0.95, 95% CI = (0.81–1.13), respectively]; laryngospasms [RR = 0.58, 95% CI = (0.27–1.23)]; airway displacement [RR = 2.88, 95% CI = (0.58–14.33)]; aspiration [RR = 0.76, 95% CI = (0.06–8.88)]; or laryngotracheal soiling [RR = 0.34, 95% CI = (0.10–1.06)]. Patients treated with the FLMA had a lower incidence of hoarseness [RR = 0.31, 95% CI = (0.15–0.62)]; coughing [RR = 0.28, 95% CI = (0.15–0.51)] during recovery in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU); and oxygen desaturation [RR = 0.43, 95% CI = (0.26–0.72)] than did patients treated with ETT. However, the incidence of partial upper airway obstruction in FLMA patients was significantly greater than it was for ETT patients [RR = 4.01, 95% CI = (1.44–11.18)]. Conclusion This systematic review showed

  3. Use of laryngeal mask airway for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaojun; Mao, Songsong; Cui, Jianxiu; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Haiyu; Xie, Liang; Zhang, Dongkun; Shi, Ruiqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the safety and feasibility of the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum (PE) undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure. Methods Between July 2015 and December 2015, 30 selected patients with PE were planned to undergo a thoracoscopic Nuss procedure using LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia in the Guangdong General Hospital. The clinical data were analyzed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of this technique. Results Of the 30 selected patients, two were female, the mean age was 16.04±5.09 years and the average Haller index was 3.37±0.88. A total of 27 cases (90%) succeeded at the first attempt, one patient required conversion to an endotracheal tube (ETT) because of continuous air leak. The peripheral O2 saturation (SpO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) values, heart rate (HR), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) remained stable throughout the procedure in all cases. All of the 30 patients were successfully corrected without requiring conversion to an open surgery. Two patients experienced postoperative nausea and one reported a sore throat. Neither gastro-esophageal reflux nor in-hospital mortality occurred. Conclusions The use of LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for selected patients with PE undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure is clinically safe and technically feasible. PMID:27621860

  4. Predicted EC50 and EC95 of Remifentanil for Smooth Removal of a Laryngeal Mask Airway Under Propofol Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Go Wun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the effect-site concentration (Ce) of remifentanil in 50% of patients (EC50) and 95% of patients (EC95) for smooth laryngeal mask airway (LMA) removal in adults under propofol and remifentanil anesthesia. Materials and Methods Twenty-five patients of ASA physical status I-II and ages 18-60 years who were to undergo minor gynecological or orthopedic surgery were assessed in this study. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusion (TCI). Remifentanil was maintained at a predetermined Ce during the emergence period. The modified Dixon's up-and-down method was used to determine the remifentanil concentration, starting from 1.0 ng/mL (step size of 0.2 ng/mL). Successful removal of the LMA was regarded as absence of coughing/gagging, clenched teeth, gross purposeful movements, breath holding, laryngospasm, or desaturation to SpO2<90%. Results The mean±SD Ce of remifentanil for smooth LMA removal after propofol anesthesia was 0.83±0.16 ng/mL. Using isotonic regression with a bootstrapping approach, the estimated EC50 and EC95 of remifentanil Ce were 0.91 ng/mL [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.77-1.07 ng/mL] and 1.35 ng/mL (95% CI, 1.16-1.38 ng/mL), respectively. Conclusion Our results showed that remifentanil TCI at an established Ce is a reliable technique for achieving safe and smooth emergence without coughing, laryngospasm, or other airway reflexes. PMID:26069139

  5. Respiratory and hemodynamic outcomes following exchange extubation with laryngeal mask airway as compared to traditional awake extubation

    PubMed Central

    Suppiah, Ramanathan Kannan; Rajan, Sunil; Paul, Jerry; Kumar, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional awake extubation leads to respiratory complications and hemodynamic response which are detrimental in neurosurgery, ENT surgery and patients with comorbidities. Aims: The primary objective was to compare the respiratory complications and hemodynamic stress response between traditional awake extubation of a endotracheal tube (ETT) and that following exchange extubation of ETT by using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Settings and Design: This prospective randomized study was conducted in a Tertiary Care Centre in 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients coming for general surgery. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomized by permuted blocks into traditional awake extubation group and exchange extubation group. At the end of surgery in traditional group, awake extubation of ETT was done. In exchange group, 0.3 mg/kg propofol was administered, and the ETT was exchanged for a LMA. Awake extubation of LMA was then performed. Respiratory complications such as bucking, coughing, desaturation and the need for airway maneuvers and hemodynamic response were noted in both groups. Analysis Tools: Chi-square test, independent sample t- and paired t-tests were used as applicable. Results: Incidence of respiratory complication was 93.3% in traditional extubation while it was only 36.7% in exchange extubation group (P < 0.001). Hemodynamic response measured immediately at extubation in terms of heart rate, systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and rate pressure product were all significantly lesser in exchange group when compared to traditional extubation. Conclusion: Exchange extubation with LMA decreases respiratory complications and hemodynamic stress response when compared to traditional awake extubation. PMID:27212749

  6. The 50% and 95% effective doses of desflurane for removal of the classic laryngeal mask airway in spontaneously breathing anaesthetised adults.

    PubMed

    Hui, M T; Subash, S; Wang, C Y

    2011-04-01

    The 50% and 95% effective doses of desflurane for removal of the classic laryngeal mask airway after suction of the upper airway, in anaesthetised spontaneously breathing adult patients, are not known. To determine these, we studied 38 healthy patients, aged between 18 and 44 years. The target desflurane concentration in each individual patient was determined by the Dixon up-and-down method. When the predetermined target end-tidal desflurane concentration reached steady state, we kept a constant end-expiratory partial pressure between the alveolus and the brain for 10 min before attempting to remove the classic laryngeal mask airway after suctioning the upper airway. The initial desflurane target concentration was set at 6% and up-down desflurane increments were 0.1%. This continued until there were at least six crossover pairs. From the probit analysis, the 50% effective dose of desflurane was 5.29% (95% CI 5.132-5.379%) and the 95% effective dose was 5.55% (95% CI 5.429-6.394%). PMID:21401540

  7. Evaluation of the Effect of Tracheal Tube Orientation on Success of Intubation through Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway

    PubMed Central

    Chhatrapati, Swati; Auti, Subhhash Sadashiv; Aswar, Swapnil Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyvinyl Chloride Endotracheal Tube (PVC ETT) can be used as an alternative to Fastrach Silicone Wire-Reinforced Tube (FTST) for intubation through Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) as the latter is expensive and has low volume high pressure cuff. Aim To evaluate the effects of orientation of PVC ETT (normal curve and reverse curve) on the success of intubation through ILMA, haemodynamic response and postoperative sore throat. Materials and Methods Sixty healthy adult patients of ASA physical status I & II scheduled for elective surgery under general anaesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation were randomly divided into two groups. In Normal (N) group (n=30), the tracheal tube was inserted with its natural curve following the 90° curvature of ILMA. In Reverse (R) group (n=30), the tracheal tube was inserted with its natural curve directed opposite to the curvature of ILMA. The time taken to intubate, number of attempts, and maneuvers required for successful endotracheal intubation along with haemodynamics and oxygen saturation were noted. Postoperative sore throat was evaluated using a Verbal Analogue Scale (VAS) (0-10). Qualitative data was analysed by Chi-Square test and Fisher’s exact test. Quantitative data was analysed by unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results Placement of ILMA was successful in all patients. Total Intubation Time (mean±SD) in Group N was 12.53±1.78 seconds and in Group R was 11.97±1.33 seconds (p>0.05). Tracheal intubation through ILMA was successful in all patients. First attempt success rate in R Group (26 patients, 86.7%) was higher than N Group (22 patients, 73.3%) (p>0.05). Four patients (13.3%) in R Group and 8 patients (26.7%) in N Group required 2nd step of Chandy’s maneuver during second attempt for successful intubation. Incidence of sore throat 6 hours postoperatively was statistically significant (median value 2.00 in N Group vs. 0.00 in R Group) between two groups. Conclusion PVC ETT with

  8. End-tidal sevoflurane concentration for ProSeal(TM) versus Classic(TM) laryngeal mask airway insertion in unpremedicated anaesthetised adult females.

    PubMed

    Ghai, B; Jain, K; Bansal, D; Bhatia, N

    2016-03-01

    The optimal end-tidal sevoflurane concentration for successful ProSealTM (Teleflex, Morrisville, NC, USA) laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) versus ClassicTM (Teleflex, Morrisville, NC, USA) laryngeal mask airway (CLMA) insertion in unpremedicated anaesthetised adults is unknown. We determined end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations for successful insertion in fifty percent of anaesthetised adults. This randomised, prospective, double-blind study was conducted in the operating theatre of a government tertiary care hospital. Forty-four unpremedicated American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II women with cervical carcinoma (aged 30 to 60 years), scheduled for intracavity caesium implantation under general anaesthesia with a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) were included in the study. The participants were randomised to one of the two groups, to receive either a PLMA or CLMA. After anaesthetic induction with sevoflurane, a predetermined end-tidal sevoflurane concentration (starting at 2.5%) was sustained for 10 minutes before LMA insertion was attempted. End-tidal sevoflurane concentration was increased/decreased (step-size 0.25%) using Dixon and Massey's up-and-down method for the next patient based on the previous patient's response. Placement without clenching, movement, coughing or biting within one minute was considered successful insertion. The end-tidal sevoflurane concentration required for successful LMA insertion in fifty percent of anaesthetised adults was calculated as the mean of the crossover pairs' midpoints in each group and further confirmed by probit regression analysis. The end-tidal sevoflurane concentration (95% confidence interval) required for successful PLMA insertion in 50% of anaesthetised adults (3.15% [3.12% to 3.18%]) was significantly higher than that for CLMA insertion (2.71% [2.66% to 2.76%], P<0.001). These findings suggest that deeper anaesthesia is required for placement of a PLMA in comparison to a CLMA. PMID:27029654

  9. Learning and performance of endotracheal intubation by paramedical students: Comparison of GlideScope® and intubating laryngeal mask airway with direct laryngoscopy in manikins

    PubMed Central

    Bahathiq, Adil Omar; Abdelmontaleb, Tharwat Helmy; Newigy, Mohammed Khairt

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: GlideScope video laryngoscope (GVL) and intubating laryngeal mask airway (I-LMA) may be used to facilitate intubation and secure the airway in patients with normal and abnormal airways. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether (GVL) and (I-LMA) facilitate and improve the tracheal intubation success rate and could be learned and performed easily by paramedic students when compared with Macintosh direct laryngoscopy (DL). Methods: This study was a prospective, randomised crossover trial that included 100 paramedic students. Macintosh DL, I-LMA and GVL were tested in both normal and difficult airway scenarios. Each participant was allowed up to three intubation attempts with each device, in each scenario. The time required to perform tracheal intubation, the success rate, number of intubation attempts and of optimisation manoeuvres and the severity of dental trauma were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square, one-way ANOVA, or Kruskal-Wallis test as appropriate, followed by post hoc test. Results: GVL and I-LMA required less time to successfully perform tracheal intubation, showed a greater success rate of intubation, reduced the number of intubation attempts and optimization manoeuvres required and reduced the severity of dental trauma compared to Macintosh DL in both normal and difficult airway scenarios. Conclusion: GVL and I-LMA provide better airway management than Macintosh DL in both normal and difficult airway scenarios. PMID:27212721

  10. RETROGRADE INTUBATION VIA LARYNGEAL MASK AIRWAY IN A PAEDIATRIC PATIENT WITH FALLOT-TYPE VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECT AND CLEFT PALATE DEFORMITY.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Taner; Erbatur, Serkan

    2016-02-01

    We report the case ofa pediatric patient with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and cleft palate deformity with difficult intubation in which a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was used and converted into an endotracheal tube through retrograde intubation. The patient with TOF was scheduled for repair of the congenital bilateral cleft lip and palate. Inhalational induction with 4% sevoflurane was started. Conventional tracheal intubation was impossible because the patient had a difficult airway, and the procedure could cause severe cyanosis and respiratory distress. An LMA was inserted to maintain ventilation and anesthesia and to facilitate intubation. Retrograde intubation and a catheter mount were used to convert the LMA into a conventional endotracheal tube without difficulty. Airway management for patients with TOF and cleft palate deformity is not clear. Retrograde intubation permits replacing an LMA with an endotracheal tube. This method enables maintaining the airway until the LMA is exchanged with an endotracheal tube. This technique seems useful to facilitate difficult airway intubation in pediatric patients with TOF and cleft palate deformity. PMID:27382820

  11. Relationship Between Respiratory Dynamics and Body Mass Index in Patients Undergoing General Anesthesia with Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) and Comparison Between Lithotomy and Supine Positions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao; Huang, Shiwei; Wang, Zhaomin; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare respiratory dynamics in patients undergoing general anesthesia with a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in lithotomy and supine positions and to validate the impact of operational position on effectiveness of LMA ventilation. Material/Methods A total of 90 patients (age range, 18–65 years) who underwent general anesthesia were selected and divided into supine position (SP group) and lithotomy position groups (LP group). Vital signs and respiratory dynamic parameters of the 2 groups were measured at different time points and after implantation of an LMA. The arterial blood gas was monitored at 15 min after induction. The intraoperative changes of hemodynamic indexes and postoperative adverse reactions of LMA were recorded. The possible correlation between body mass index (BMI) and respiratory dynamic indexes was analyzed. Results With prolonged duration of the operation, the inspiratory plateau pressure (Pplat), inspiratory resistance (RI), and work of breathing (WOB) gradually increased, while chest-lung compliance (Compl) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in end-expiratory gas (PetCO2) gradually decreased (all P value <0.05). The mean airway pressure (Pmean), Pplat, and expiratory resistance (Re) in the LP group were significantly higher than in the SP group (P<0.05), while the peak inspiratory flow (FImax), peak expiratory flow (FEmax), WOB, and Compl in the LP group were significantly lower than in the SP group (P<0.05). BMI was positively correlated with peak airway pressure (PIP/Ppeak), Pplat, and airway resistance (Raw) and was negatively correlated with Compl; the differences among patients in lithotomy position were more remarkable (P<0.05). Conclusions The inspiratory plateau pressure and airway resistance increased with prolonged duration of the operation, accompanied by decreased chest-lung compliance. Peak airway pressure and airway resistance were positively correlated with BMI, and chest-lung compliance was

  12. Safety and efficacy of bronchoalveolar lavage using a laryngeal mask airway in cases of acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure with diffuse lung infiltrates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takafumi; Sato, Yoko; Fukuda, Satoshi; Katayama, Shinshu; Miyazaki, Yuya; Ozaki, Makoto; Kotani, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibre-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (FOB-BAL) is an important tool for diagnosing and selecting treatment for acutely hypoxaemic patients with diffuse lung infiltrates. However, FOB-BAL carries a risk of significant hypoxaemia and subsequent tracheal intubation during and after the procedure. The application of FOB-BAL using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in combination with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may minimize the incidence of hypoxaemia; however, the safety and efficacy of this procedure have not been investigated. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed from April to September 2013. Data regarding the recovered volume of BAL fluid, incidence of tracheal intubation within eight hours after the completion of FOB-BAL, respiratory and haemodynamic parameters and treatment modifications were collected for the evaluation. Results Ten trials of FOB-BAL using an LMA and CPAP were performed in nine patients with severe acute hypoxaemia associated with diffuse lung infiltrates. The BAL fluid recovery rate was 56%, and the procedure was completed without subsequent complications. In addition, the percutaneous arterial oxygen saturation decreased to 95.7%±3.8%, although it was never lower than 90.0% during the procedure, and no patients required intubation. Furthermore, the arterial blood pressure significantly but transiently decreased due to sedation, and the procedure yielded diagnostic information in all nine patients. Conclusion FOB-BAL using LMA and CPAP appears to be safe and effective in patients who develop severe acute hypoxaemia. PMID:25832933

  13. Assessment of suitability of i-gel and laryngeal mask airway-supreme for controlled ventilation in anesthetized paralyzed patients: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, Kusuma Srividya; Sripriya, R.; Ravishankar, M.; Hemanth Kumar, V. R.; Jaya, V.; Parthasarathy, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMA-S) has an inflatable cuff while i-gel has a noninflatable cuff made of thermoplastic elastomer. Aims: To study the efficacy of ventilation and the laryngeal seal pressures (LSPs) with either device. Our secondary objectives were to compare the ease of insertion, adequacy of positioning the device, hemodynamic response to device insertion, and any postoperative oropharyngeal morbidity. Settings and Design: A prospective, randomized, single-blinded study at Teaching Medical School in South India. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients posted for surgery under general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups - LMA-S and i-gel. After a standardized premedication and anesthesia induction sequence, the supra-glottic devices were introduced. Ease of insertion was assessed from the number of attempts taken to insert, insertion time, and any maneuvers required to insert the device. Position of the device was assessed by the ease of gastric catheter placement and the fibreoptic grading of laryngeal visualization. Efficacy of ventilation was determined from the LSP, peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), and end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2)values. Any postoperative oropharyngeal morbidity was also recorded. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive analysis was reported as a mean and standard deviation, median, and range of continuous variables. Demographics were analyzed using a unpaired t-test for parametric data and Chi-square test for nonparametric data. Respiratory and hemodynamic data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA to find statistical difference within and between the two groups. Results: LMA-S was successfully inserted in 95% of patients and i-gel in 85.5% of patients. There was a significant difference (P = 0.021) in the LSPs between the two groups (18.15 cmH2O in LMA-S and 21.28 cmH2O in the i-gel group). There was no significant difference in the PIPs, leak fraction, and the EtCO2values. Conclusion: Both devices are

  14. Effect of laryngeal mask airway placement on the optimal site and success rate of venipuncture via the right internal jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan-Qiu; Li, Xin-Bai; Zhang, Yu-Shuang; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The placement of a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) changes the relative positions of the common carotid artery (CCA) and right internal jugular vein (IJV), thereby affecting venipuncture via the right IJV. Therefore, we went on to determine the optimal site for puncturing the IJV after LMA-Supreme™ placement. In this study, forty-six patients were placed with a LMA-Supreme™ (size 3 or 4), and the right IJV was punctured at either of the three points (anterior, middle or posterior point). The CCA diameters and overlap between the right IJV and CCA were recorded before and after the LMA-Supreme™ placement. Finally, the success rates of IJV puncturing at the three aforementioned points were compared. We found that the size of the LMA-Supreme™ had no effect on patient respiration during the procedure. Overlap between the right IJV and CCA at the anterior and middle points was significantly increased after size 3 LMA-Supreme™ placements; Size 4 masks decreased the CCA diameters at the middle and posterior points, and significantly increased overlap between the right IJV and CCA at all the three points; IJV punctures performed after placement of size 3 LMA-Supreme™ had higher success rate than those performed after placement of size 4 masks, and were less likely to result in accidental arterial puncture. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that placement of size 3 LMA-Supreme™ caused little change in overlapping between the right IJV and CCA and the incidence of accidental arterial puncture; particularly for punctures performed at the posterior point. Therefore, we recommend venipuncture at the posterior point after placement of a LMA-Supreme™. PMID:26550241

  15. Comparative assessment of ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway intervention versus standard technique of endotracheal extubation for attenuation of pressor response in controlled hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raj Pal; Gulabani, Michell; Kaur, Mohandeep; Sood, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Swapping of the endotracheal tube with laryngeal mask airway (LMA) before emergence from anaesthesia is one of the methods employed for attenuation of pressor response at extubation. We decided to compare the placement of ProSeal™ LMA (PLMA) before endotracheal extubation versus conventional endotracheal extubation in controlled hypertensive patients scheduled for elective surgeries under general anaesthesia. Methods: Sixty consenting adult patients were randomly allocated to two groups of thirty each; Group E in whom extubation was performed using standard technique and Group P in whom PLMA was inserted before endotracheal extubation (Bailey manoeuvre). The primary outcome parameter was heart rate (HR). The secondary outcomes were systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure (MBP), electrocardiogram, oxygen saturation and end-tidal carbon dioxide. Two-tailed paired Student's t-test was used for comparison between the two study groups. The value of P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The patient characteristics, demographic data and surgical procedures were comparable in the two groups. A statistically significant decrease was observed in HR in Group P as compared to Group E. Secondary outcomes such as systolic, diastolic and MBP depicted a statistically insignificant difference. Conclusion: Bailey manoeuvre was not effective method to be completely relied upon during extubation when compared to standard extubation. PMID:27512160

  16. Management of Difficult Airway With Laryngeal Mask in a Child With Mucopolysaccharidosis and Mitral Regurgitation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Ferasatkish, Rasoul; Dashti, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) are a group of heredity storage diseases, transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner, associated with the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in various tissues and organs. The concerned patients have multiple concomitant hereditary anomalies. Considering the craniofacial abnormality in these patients, airway management may be difficult for anesthesiologists. In these patients, preanesthetic assessment is necessary and performed with the accurate assessment of airways, consisting of the physical exam and radiography, MRI or CT of head and neck. An anesthesiologist should set up a “difficult intubation set” with a flexible fiber-optic bronchoscope and also, it may be necessary to discuss with an ear-nose and throat (ENT) specialist if required, for unpredicted emergency situations. Case Presentation: In this case-report we presented a 2-year-old boy with known MPSs with psychomotor retardation, bilateral corneal opacities, impaired hearing and vision, inguinal hernia, severe mitral regurgitation, micrognathia, coarse facial feature, stiff and short neck and restricted mouth opening. He scheduled for left inguinal hernia repair surgery. Discussion: The patient’s difficult airway was managed successfully and the anesthesia of his surgical procedure had an uneventful course. PMID:25478534

  17. Awake intubation using fast-track laryngeal mask airway as an alternative to fiberoptic bronchoscopy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parnell, J David; Mills, Jeff

    2006-12-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pose a unique challenge to the anesthetist. The manifestations of RA may include cervical spine instability, limited range of motion, and temperomandibular joint involvement limiting mouth opening. Therefore, securing the airway while maintaining the head and neck in a neutral position is of particular concern to the anesthetist. While this is most commonly accomplished using an awake fiberoptic technique, the following case is presented as a safe and efficient initial alternative to the primary use of fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the appropriate patient population. PMID:17236388

  18. I-gel Laryngeal Mask Airway Combined with Tracheal Intubation Attenuate Systemic Stress Response in Patients Undergoing Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chaoliang; Chai, Xiaoqing; Kang, Fang; Huang, Xiang; Hou, Tao; Tang, Fei; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The adverse events induced by intubation and extubation may cause intracranial hemorrhage and increase of intracranial pressure, especially in posterior fossa surgery patients. In this study, we proposed that I-gel combined with tracheal intubation could reduce the stress response of posterior fossa surgery patients. Methods. Sixty-six posterior fossa surgery patients were randomly allocated to receive either tracheal tube intubation (Group TT) or I-gel facilitated endotracheal tube intubation (Group TI). Hemodynamic and respiratory variables, stress and inflammatory response, oxidative stress, anesthesia recovery parameters, and adverse events during emergence were compared. Results. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were lower in Group TI during intubation and extubation (P < 0.05 versus Group TT). Respiratory variables including peak airway pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension were similar intraoperative, while plasma β-endorphin, cortisol, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, malondialdehyde concentrations, and blood glucose were significantly lower in Group TI during emergence relative to Group TT. Postoperative bucking and serious hypertensions were seen in Group TT but not in Group TI. Conclusion. Utilization of I-gel combined with endotracheal tube in posterior fossa surgery patients is safe which can yield more stable hemodynamic profile during intubation and emergence and lower inflammatory and oxidative response, leading to uneventful recovery. PMID:26273146

  19. An Evaluation of Thyromental Distance-based Method or Weight-based Method in Determining the Size of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Meilin; Ding, Ming; Xu, Yajun; Yang, Xijun; Li, Lihong; Zhong, Jing; Miao, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The successful placement of Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) Supreme in adults largely depends on right selection of its size. Most anesthesiologists determine the size of LMA according to patients’ body weight, which does not always work well. An alternative method should be established to guarantee higher efficacy of ventilation through LMA Supreme placement. This controlled study was designed to compare the efficacy of LMA Supreme placement, when the size of it is determined by body weight or by thyromental distance. Eighty healthy individuals with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 to 2 scheduled for elective ambulatory surgery were randomly allocated into 2 groups: thyromental distance-based group (n = 40) and weight-based group (n = 40). Efficacy of controlled ventilation through LMA, easy of device placement, and pharyngeal sealing were evaluated between the groups. The tidal volume under 10 cm H2O pressure-controlled ventilation in thyromental distance-based group was significantly higher than that in weight-based group (523.9 ± 135.4 vs 477.1 ± 185.6; P = 0.031). The number of patients who achieved “excellent” tidal volume (>8 mL/kg) were significantly more in the thyromental distance-based group (24/40 vs 13/40; P = 0.019). Among overweight patients (body mass index >23), those who achieved “excellent” tidal volume (>8 mL/kg) under 10 cm H2O pressure-controlled ventilation were also more in thyromental distanced-based group than in weight-based group (11/24 vs 2/24; P = 0.031). The time taken for successful insertion was shorter with the thyromental distance-based group compared with the weight-based group (54.6 ± 33.6 vs 87.8 ± 98.9; P = 0.021). Oropharyngeal leak pressure was pretty close between the 2 groups (26.4 ± 5.1 vs 25.0 ± 5.7 cm H2O; P = 0.180). In terms of guaranteeing better positive pressure ventilation, facilitating device placement, and

  20. A comparison of blind and lightwand-guided tracheal intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask.

    PubMed

    Kihara, S; Watanabe, S; Taguchi, N; Suga, A; Brimacombe, J R

    2000-05-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that intubation success rates, haemodynamic changes, airway complications and postoperative pharyngolaryngeal morbidity differ between blind and lightwand-guided intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask airway. One hundred and twenty paralysed anasthetised adult patients (ASA I-II, no known or predicted difficult airways) were assigned in a random manner to one of two equal-sized groups. In the blind group, patients were intubated blindly through the intubating laryngeal mask airway. In the lightwand group, patients were intubated through the intubating laryngeal mask airway assisted by transillumination of the neck with a lightwand. A standard sequence of adjusting manoeuvres was followed if resistance occurred during intubation or if transillumination was incorrect. The number of adjusting manoeuvres, time to intubation, intubation success rates, haemodynamic changes (pre-induction, pre-intubation, postintubation), oesophageal intubation, mucosal trauma (blood detected), hypoxia (oxygen saturation < 95%) and postoperative pharyngolaryngeal morbidity (double-blinded) were documented. Overall intubation success was similar (blind, 93%; lightwand, 100%), but time to successful intubation was significantly shorter (67 vs. 46 s, p = 0. 027) and the number of adjusting manoeuvres was significantly fewer (p = 0.024) in the lightwand group. There were no significant differences in blood pressure or heart rate between the groups at any time. Oesophageal intubation occurred more frequently in the blind group (18 vs. 0%, p = 0.002). The incidence and severity of mucosal injury, sore throat and hoarseness were similar between the groups. We conclude that lightwand-guided intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask is superior to the blind technique. PMID:10792132

  1. Laryngeal amyloidosis causing hoarseness and airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gallivan, Gregory J; Gallivan, Helen K

    2010-03-01

    Amyloidosis constitutes a fraction of 1% of benign localized laryngeal tumors and may occasionally be associated with systemic disease. A chronic, insidious, progressive, recurrent disease characterized by hoarseness, dyspnea, and stridor, it is caused by extracellular deposition of insoluble, abnormal tissue injurious fibrils. Submucosal lesions occur frequently in the vestibular folds and ventricles, less commonly in the subglottis and aryepiglottic folds and least on the vocal folds. Apple green birefrigence under polarized light after Congo red staining, electron microscopic fibrillar structure, and a beta-pleated sheet structure observed by x-ray diffraction are confirmatory. Two presented cases add to the small literature review of similar patients. Case 1 was a 70-year-old man with severe hoarseness, incomplete glottic closure, ovoid concentric stenosis of the inferior glottis and subglottis, who initially was not diagnosed by several laryngologists and speech therapists. He required multiple microlaryngoscopic excisions and dilations. Because low dose radiation induces plasma cell apoptosis in other diseases, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was hypothesized to eliminate amyloidogenic plasma cells. Case 2 was a 46-year-old welder with progressive dyspnea for 2-3 years and hoarseness, voice loss, and stridor over 6-7 months. Masses caused airway obstruction of the anterior commissure, vestibular, and vocal folds, with extension to the subglottis. Two phonomicrosurgical CO(2) laser-assisted resections relieved upper airway obstruction and restored voice. Conservative surgical intervention and long-term followup are essential. Further studies are needed to determine if a radiation dose response relationship exists to control laryngeal amyloidosis. PMID:19111441

  2. Intubation Success through I-Gel® and Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway® Using Flexible Silicone Tubes: A Randomised Noninferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Neerja; Sen, Indu Mohini; Sondekoppam, Rakesh V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The study aims to test whether flexible silicone tubes (FST) improve performance and provide similar intubation success through I-Gel as compared to ILMA. Our trial is registered in CTRI and the registration number is “CTRI/2016/06/006997.” Methods. One hundred and twenty ASA status I-II patients scheduled for elective surgical procedures needing tracheal intubation were randomised to endotracheal intubation using FST through either I-Gel or ILMA. In the ILMA group (n = 60), intubation was attempted through ILMA using FST and, in the I-Gel group (n = 60), FST was inserted through I-Gel airway. Results. Successful intubation was achieved in 36.67% (95% CI 24.48%–48.86%) on first attempt through I-Gel (n = 22/60) compared to 68.33% (95% CI 56.56%–80.1%) in ILMA (n = 41/60) (p = 0.001). The overall intubation success rate was also lower with I-Gel group [58.3% (95% CI 45.82%–70.78%); n = 35] compared to ILMA [90% (95% CI 82.41%–97.59%); n = 54] (p < 0.001). The number of attempts, ease of intubation, and time to intubation were longer with I-Gel compared to ILMA. There were no differences in the other secondary outcomes. Conclusion. The first pass success rate and overall success of FST through an I-Gel airway were inferior to those of ILMA. PMID:27478436

  3. Comparison of effects of ProSeal LMA™ laryngeal mask airway cuff inflation with air, oxygen, air:oxygen mixture and oxygen:nitrous oxide mixture in adults: A randomised, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mona; Sinha, Renu; Trikha, Anjan; Ramachandran, Rashmi; Chandralekha, C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) cuff pressure increases when the air is used for the cuff inflation during oxygen: nitrous oxide (O2:N2O) anaesthesia, which may lead to various problems. We compared the effects of different gases for ProSeal LMA™ (PLMA) cuff inflation in adult patients for various parameters. Methods: A total of 120 patients were randomly allocated to four groups, according to composition of gases used to inflate the PLMA cuff to achieve 40 cmH2 O cuff pressure, air (Group A), 50% O2 :air (Group OA), 50% O2:N2O (Group ON) and 100% O2 (Group O). Cuff pressure, cuff volume and ventilator parameters were monitored intraoperatively. Pharyngolaryngeal parameters were assessed at 1, 2 and 24 h postoperatively. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA, Fisher's exact test and step-wise logistic regression. Results: Cuff pressure significantly increased at 10, 15 and 30 min in Group A, OA and O from initial pressure. Cuff pressure decreased at 5 min in Group ON (36.6 ± 3.5 cmH2 O) (P = 0.42). PLMA cuff volume increased in Group A, OA, O, but decreased in Group ON (6.16 ± 2.8 ml [P < 0.001], 4.7 ± 3.8 ml [P < 0.001], 1.4 ± 3.19 ml [P = 0.023] and − 1.7 ± 4.9 ml [P = 0.064], respectively), from basal levels. Ventilatory parameters were comparable in all four groups. There was no significant association between sore throat and cuff pressure, with odds ratio 1.002. Conclusion: Cuff inflation with 50% O2:N2O mixture provided more stable cuff pressure in comparison to air, O2 :air, 100% O2 during O2:N2O anaesthesia. Ventilatory parameters did not change with variation in PLMA cuff pressure. Post-operative sore throat had no correlation with cuff pressure. PMID:27601739

  4. Air-Q intubating laryngeal airway: A study of the second generation supraglottic airway device

    PubMed Central

    Attarde, Viren Bhaskar; Kotekar, Nalini; Shetty, Sarika M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILA) is used as a supraglottic airway device and as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. This study aims to assess the efficacy of the Air-Q ILA regarding ease of insertion, adequacy of ventilation, rate of successful intubation, haemodynamic response and airway morbidity. Methods: Sixty patients presenting for elective surgery at our Medical College Hospital were selected. Following adequate premedication, baseline vital parameters, pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded. Air-Q size 3.5 for patients 50-70 kg and size 4.5 for 70-100 kg was selected. After achieving adequate intubating conditions, Air-Q ILA was introduced. Confirming adequate ventilation, appropriate sized endotracheal tube was advanced through the Air-Q blindly to intubate the trachea. Placement of the endotracheal tube in trachea was confirmed. Results: Air-Q ILA was successfully inserted in 88.3% of patients in first attempt and 11.7% patients in second attempt. Ventilation was adequate in 100% of patients. Intubation was successful in 76.7% of patients with Air-Q ILA. 23.3% of patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy following failure with two attempts using Air-Q ILA. Post-intubation the change in heart rate was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). 10% of patients were noted to have a sore throat and 5% of patients had mild airway trauma. Conclusion: Air-Q ILA is a reliable device as a supraglottic airway ensuring adequate ventilation as well as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. It benefits the patient by avoiding the stress of direct laryngoscopy and is also superior alternative device for use in a difficult airway. PMID:27212722

  5. Laryngeal schwannoma as an acute airway presentation.

    PubMed

    Markou, Konstantinos; Dova, Stamatia; Poulios, Christos; Karkos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    A schwannoma is a neurogenic tumour arising from nerve sheaths. Between 25% and 45% of schwannomas occur in the head and neck region. Schwannomas of the larynx are extremely rare. They usually occur in women during the fourth and fifth decades of life. We present a case of a laryngeal schwannoma in a 76-year-old patient with acute stridor, hoarseness and dysphagia. Laryngeal conservation surgery was performed without the need for a tracheostomy. One year later, the patient remains symptom-free with no evidence of recurrence. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and management are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:26969364

  6. Layperson mouth-to-mask ventilation using a modified I-gel laryngeal mask after brief onsite instruction: a manikin-based feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Schälte, Gereon; Bomhard, Lilli-Theresa; Rossaint, Rolf; Coburn, Mark; Stoppe, Christian; Zoremba, Norbert; Rieg, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Objective The intention of this manikin-based trial was to evaluate whether laypersons are able to operate an I-gel laryngeal mask (I-gel) modified for mouth-to-mask ventilation after receiving brief on-site instruction. Setting Entrance hall of a university hospital and the city campus of a public technical university, using a protected manikin scenario. Methods Laypersons were handed a labelled, mouthpiece-integrated I-gel laryngeal mask and a corresponding instruction chart and were asked to follow the printed instructions. Outcome measures The overall process was analysed and evaluated according to quality and duration. Results Data from 100 participants were analysed. Overall, 79% of participants were able to effectively ventilate the manikin, 90% placed the laryngeal mask with the correct turn and direction, 19% did not position the mask deep enough and 85% believed that their inhibition threshold for performing resuscitation was lowered. A significant reduction in reluctance before and after the trial was found (p<0.0001). A total of 35% of participants had concerns about applying first aid in an emergency. Former basic life support (BLS) training significantly reduced the time of insertion (19.6 s, 95% CI 17.8 to 21.5, p=0.0004) and increased overall success (p=0.0096). Conclusions Laypersons were able to manage mouth-to-mask ventilation in the manikin with a reasonable success rate after receiving brief chart-based on-site instructions using a labelled I-gel mask. Positioning the mask deep enough and identifying whether the manikin was successfully ventilated were the main problems observed. A significant reduction in reluctance towards initialising BLS by using a modified supraglottic airway device (SAD) may lead to better acceptance of bystander resuscitation in laypersons, supporting the introduction of SADs into BLS courses and the stocking of SADs in units with public automatic external defibrillators. PMID:27173811

  7. [Successful tracheal intubation through the air-Q intubating laryngeal airway in a patient with severe pharyngeal edema].

    PubMed

    Ishio, Junichi; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nakano, Shoko; Omoto, Haruka; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Tanaka, Motoshige; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was diagnosed with severe pharyngeal edema after neck lymph node dissection for cancer of the external ear canal. He was scheduled for an emergency tracheotomy, but preoperative fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed airway and glottic obstruction due to severe pharyngeal edema. As difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation were anticipated, intubation under spontaneous ventilation was performed to avoid a "can't ventilate, can't intubate" situation. The first attempt to intubate the patient using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope with a thin Intlock resulted in failure due to hindered visualization of the glottis. Therefore, a size 3.5 air-Q intubating laryngeal airway was inserted using a bronchofiberscope to perform tracheal intubation through a laryngeal mask. Successful tracheal intubation was achieved while maintaining spontaneous ventilation. The air-Q intubating laryngeal airway can be useful in the setting of anticipated difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation, as in the case of severe pharyngeal edema. PMID:24558935

  8. Reconstructive procedures for impaired upper airway function: laryngeal respiration

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The larynx is the "bottleneck" of the human airway. For this reason, the effects of stenosing laryngeal pathologies on the vital factor respiratory gas exchange are particularly critical. Internal stabilization is a prerequisite for recovery of the laryngeal respiratory function in severe forms of inspiratory collapse (laryngomalacia). Effective laser surgery techniques have been developed to this end in recent years. Glottis-dilating surgery in cases of bilateral vocal cord motion impairment is now moving in the direction of endoscopic laser cordotomy or cordectomy, whereas arytenoidectomy and open surgical procedures are now used only rarely due to higher secondary morbidity rates. In individual cases, in particular if functional recovery is expected, temporary laterofixation of a vocal cord using an endoscopic suturing technique can be a helpful approach. Extensive laryngeal defects can be covered by means of composite grafts with mucosal lining, a supporting skeleton and their own vascularization. Autologous transplantation of the larynx, with its complex surgical and immunological problems, has become a manageable procedure. The problems of post-transplantation reinnervation and risk assessment of immunosuppression-induced recurrence of the tumor are still under consideration. Reanimation of the bilaterally paralyzed larynx by means of neurorrhaphy (neurosuture), neural grafting and, more recently, functional electrostimulation (pacemaker) represents a challenge for the coming years. In most cases of paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, a part of the muscles is maintained by synkinetic reinnervation when therapy is carried out, which however also prevents effective vocal cord movement due to simultaneous activity of agonists and antagonists. Modulation of reinnervation by means of electrostimulation and modern genetic therapy approaches justify hopes of better outcomes in the future. PMID:22073057

  9. Air-Q laryngeal airway for rescue and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Ads, Ayman; Auerbach, Frederic; Ryan, Kelly; El-Ganzouri, Abdel R

    2016-08-01

    We report the successful use of the Air-Q laryngeal airway (Air-Q LA) as a ventilatory device and a conduit for tracheal intubation to rescue the airway in a patient with difficult airway and tracheal stenosis. This is the first case report of the device to secure the airway after two episodes of hypoxemia in the operating room and intensive care unit. Consent for submission of this case report was obtained from our institution's human studies institutional review board given that the patient died a few months after his discharge from the hospital before his personal consent could be obtained and before preparation of this report. All personal identifiers that could lead to his identification have been removed from this report. A 59-year-old man was scheduled for a flexible and rigid bronchoscopy with possible laser excision of tracheal stenosis. He had a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes. Assessment of airway revealed a thyromental distance of 6.5 cm, Mallampati class II, and body weight of 110 kg. He had hoarseness and audible inspiratory/expiratory stridor with Spo2 90% breathing room air. After induction and muscle relaxation, tracheal intubation and flexible bronchoscopy were achieved without incident. The patient was then extubated and a rigid bronchoscopy was attempted but failed with Spo2 dropping to 92%; rocuronium 60 mg was given, and reintubation was accomplished with a 7.5-mm endotracheal tube. A second rigid bronchoscopy attempt failed, with Spo2 dropping to 63%. Subsequent direct laryngoscopy revealed a bloody hypopharynx. A size 4.5 Air-Q LA was placed successfully and confirmed with capnography, and Spo2 returned to 100%. The airway was suctioned through the Air-Q LA device, and the airway was secured using a fiberoptic bronchoscope to place an endotracheal tube of 7.5-mm internal diameter. The case was canceled because of edema of the upper airway from multiple attempts with rigid bronchoscopy. The patient was transported

  10. Effects of Masking Noise on Laryngeal Resistance for Breathy, Normal, and Pressed Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grillo, Elizabeth U.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini; Lee, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of masking noise on laryngeal resistance for breathy, normal, and pressed voice in vocally trained women. Method: Eighteen vocally trained women produced breathy, normal, and pressed voice across 7 fundamental frequencies during a repeated CV utterance of /pi/ under normal and…

  11. Steroids for intubated croup masking airway haemangioma.

    PubMed Central

    Kiff, K M; Mok, Q; Dunne, J; Tasker, R C

    1996-01-01

    Recently, the beneficial role of steroids for acute laryngotracheobronchitis has been more clearly defined for both intubated and unintubated patients. However, corticosteroids also improve the clinical signs of airway haemangiomata. Two patients are described who illustrate how this can be a source of diagnostic confusion. PMID:8660054

  12. Computed tomographic imaging of dogs with primary laryngeal or tracheal airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krystina; Hartman, Susan; Matheson, Jodi; O'Brien, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen dogs with clinical signs attributable to nonneoplastic obstruction of the larynx, trachea, or large bronchi underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging. In 16 of the 17 dogs, CT was performed without general anesthesia using a positioning device. Fifteen of these 16 dogs were imaged without sedation or general anesthesia. Three-dimensional (3D) internal rendering was performed on each image set based on lesion localization determined by routine image planes. Visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, video fluoroscopy, and necropsy were used for achieving the cause of the upper airway obstruction. The CT and 3D internal rendering accurately indicated the presence and cause of upper airway obstruction in all dogs. CT findings indicative of laryngeal paralysis included failure to abduct the arytenoid cartilages, narrowed rima glottis, and air-filled laryngeal ventricles. Laryngeal collapse findings depended on the grade of collapse and included everted laryngeal saccules, collapse of the cuneiform processes and corniculate processes, and narrowed rima glottis. Trachea abnormalities included hypoplasia, stenosis, or collapse syndrome. The CT findings in tracheal hypoplasia consisted of a severely narrowed lumen throughout the entire length. Tracheal stenosis was represented by a circumferential decrease in tracheal lumen size limited to one region. Tracheal collapse syndrome was diagnosed by severe asymmetric narrowing. Lobar bronchi collapse appeared in CT images as a narrowed asymmetric lumen diameter. CT imaging of unanesthetized dogs with upper airway obstruction compares favorably with traditional definitive diagnostic methods. PMID:21447037

  13. The Effects of Hyper- and Hypocapnia on Phonatory Laryngeal Airway Resistance in Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Amanda I.; Slivka, William; Atwood, Charles W., Jr.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The larynx has a dual role in the regulation of gas flow into and out of the lungs while also establishing resistance required for vocal fold vibration. This study assessed reciprocal relations between phonatory functions--specifically, phonatory laryngeal airway resistance (R[subscript law])--and respiratory homeostasis during states of…

  14. TotalTrack video intubating laryngeal mask in super-obese patients – series of cases

    PubMed Central

    Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background Super-obese patients are at increased risk of difficult mask ventilation and difficult intubation. Therefore, devices that allow for simultaneous ventilation/oxygenation during attempts to visualize the entrance to the larynx, increase patient safety. TotalTrack video intubating laryngeal mask is a new device that allows for ventilation during intubation efforts. Patients and methods Twenty-four super-obese patients (body mass index >50 kg/m2) were divided into two subgroups: intubation efforts using 1) TotalTrack and 2) Macintosh blade standard laryngoscope in induction of general anesthesia. Visualization and successful intubation was evaluated for both groups with ventilation and post-mask complications additionally evaluated for TotalTrack. Results In all cases in the TotalTrack group, the Cormack-Lehane score was 1, ventilation and intubation was successful in 11/12 patients. No hypoxia during intubation efforts was recorded. No serious complications of use of TotalTrack were observed. In the Macintosh blade laryngoscope group, all patients were intubated, but the Cormack-Lehane score was 2 in four cases, and 3 in three cases. Conclusion TotalTrack video intubating laryngeal mask is a device that allows for better visualization of the larynx compared to the standard Macintosh blade laryngoscope, it provides effective ventilation/oxygenation and intubation in super-obese patients. PMID:27042078

  15. Anesthesia management in a child with laryngeal papilloma causing near complete airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Harshad, Parate Leena; Pujari, Vinayak; Channappa, Nagaraj Mungasuvalli; Anandaswamy, Tejesh Channasandra

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, chronic disease of viral etiology affecting most commonly larynx. A 5-year-old child with stridor was posted for microlaryngoscopic excision of laryngeal papilloma. We discuss the perioperative management of case with the various ventilation strategies. In child with stridor intubation remains the safest option. It is suggested to maintain spontaneous ventilation until intubation as mask ventilation could be difficult. PMID:25558205

  16. Anesthesia management in a child with laryngeal papilloma causing near complete airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harshad, Parate Leena; Pujari, Vinayak; Channappa, Nagaraj Mungasuvalli; Anandaswamy, Tejesh Channasandra

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, chronic disease of viral etiology affecting most commonly larynx. A 5-year-old child with stridor was posted for microlaryngoscopic excision of laryngeal papilloma. We discuss the perioperative management of case with the various ventilation strategies. In child with stridor intubation remains the safest option. It is suggested to maintain spontaneous ventilation until intubation as mask ventilation could be difficult. PMID:25558205

  17. LARYNGEAL CHONDROSARCOMA: SUCCESSFUL USE OF VIDEO LARYNGOSCOPE IN ANTICIPATED DIFFICULT AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Dolinaj, Vladimir; Milošev, Sanja; Janjević, Dušanka

    2016-03-01

    Laryngeal chondrosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor, most frequently affecting cricoid cartilage. The objective of this report is to present successful video laryngoscope usage in a patient with anticipated difficult airway who refused awake fiberoptic endotracheal intubation (AFOI). A 59-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital due to difficulty breathing and swallowing. On clinical examination performed by ENT surgeon, preoperative endoscopic airway examination (PEAE) could not be performed properly due to the patient's uncooperativeness. Computed tomography revealed a spherical tumor that obstructed the subglottic area almost entirely. Due to the narrowed airway, the first choice for the anticipated difficult airway management was AFOI, which the patient refused. Consequently, we decided to perform endotracheal intubation with indirect laryngoscope using a C-MAC video laryngoscope (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). Reinforced endotracheal tube (6.0 mm internal diameter) was placed gently between the tumor mass and the posterior wall of the trachea in the first attempt. Confirmation of endotracheal intubation was done by capnography. In a patient with subglottic area chondrosarcoma refusing PEAE and AFOI, video laryngoscope is a particularly helpful device for difficult airway management when difficult airway is anticipated. PMID:27276783

  18. Laryngeal lipoma: a rare cause of acute intermittent airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Peter George; O'Connell, Janet

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 62-year-old man with a lipoma in the exceedingly rare location of the larynx, causing intermittent airway obstruction and dysphagia. The lipoma was excised endoscopically with complete resolution of symptoms. Lipomas are relatively common, accounting for 4-5% of all benign tumours in the body. They traditionally occur in areas of large depositions of subcutaneous fat, most frequently the trunk and limbs. They are recognised to occur in the head and neck but these only represent 13-15% of all lipomas. Lipomas are typically asymptomatic unless their impingement of nearby structures causes symptoms. PMID:27107059

  19. Hazard of CO₂ laser-induced airway fire in laryngeal surgery: experimental data of contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Stuermer, Konrad Johannes; Ayachi, Stefan; Gostian, Antoniu-O; Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2013-09-01

    In carbon dioxide (CO2) laser surgery of the larynx, the potentially dangerous combination of laser-induced heat in an oxygen-enriched atmosphere typically occurs when jet ventilation is used or due to an insufficiently blocked endotracheal tube. Until now, no limitations for safe oxygen concentrations or laser intervals have been established. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the factors that may contribute to an airway fire in laryngeal laser surgery. Fat, muscle and cartilage were irradiated with a CO2 laser at 2, 4, 6 and 8 W in five different oxygen concentrations with and without smoke exhaustion. The time to ignition was recorded for each different experimental setup. Fat burnt fastest, followed by cartilage and muscle. The elevation of laser energy or oxygen concentration reduced the time to inflammation of any tissue. The elevation of oxygen by 10 % increases the risk of inflammation more than the elevation of laser power by 2 W. Under smoke exhaustion, inflammation and burning occurred delayed or were even inhibited at lower oxygen concentrations. Lasing in more than 50 % oxygen is comparatively dangerous and can cause airway fire in less than 5 s, especially when laser energies of more than 5 W are applied. In equal or lower than 50 % oxygen, an irradiation interval of 5 s can be considered a comparatively safe time limit to prevent inflammation in laryngeal laser surgery. Smoke exhaustion should always be applied. PMID:23636479

  20. The Effects of Hyper- and Hypocapnia on Phonatory Laryngeal Airway Resistance in Women

    PubMed Central

    Slivka, William; Atwood, Charles W.; Verdolini Abbott, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The larynx has a dual role in the regulation of gas flow into and out of the lungs while also establishing resistance required for vocal fold vibration. This study assessed reciprocal relations between phonatory functions—specifically, phonatory laryngeal airway resistance (Rlaw)—and respiratory homeostasis during states of ventilatory gas perturbations. Method Twenty-four healthy women performed phonatory tasks while exposed to induced hypercapnia (high CO2), hypocapnia (low CO2), and normal breathing (eupnea). Effects of gas perturbations on Rlaw were investigated as were the reciprocal effects of Rlaw modulations on respiratory homeostasis. Results Rlaw remained stable despite manipulations of inspired gas concentrations. In contrast, end-tidal CO2 levels increased significantly during all phonatory tasks. Thus, for the conditions tested, Rlaw did not adjust to accommodate ventilatory needs as predicted. Rather, stable Rlaw was spontaneously accomplished at the cost of those needs. Conclusions Findings provide support for a theory of regulation wherein Rlaw may be a control parameter in phonation. Results also provide insight into the influence of phonation on respiration. The work sets the foundation for future studies on laryngeal function during phonation in individuals with lower airway disease and other patient populations. PMID:25764093

  1. Laryngitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling and irritation (inflammation) of the voice box (larynx). The problem is most often associated with hoarseness ... The voice box (larynx) is located at the top of the airway to the lungs (trachea). The larynx contains the vocal cords. When ...

  2. Electrostatic Charge Effects on Pharmaceutical Aerosol Deposition in Human Nasal–Laryngeal Airways

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua; Longest, Worth

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic charging occurs in most aerosol generation processes and can significantly influence subsequent particle deposition rates and patterns in the respiratory tract through the image and space forces. The behavior of inhaled aerosols with charge is expected to be most affected in the upper airways, where particles come in close proximity to the narrow turbinate surface, and before charge dissipation occurs as a result of high humidity. The objective of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the deposition of charged aerosols in an MRI-based nasal–laryngeal airway model. Particle sizes of 5 nm–30 µm and charge levels ranging from neutralized to ten times the saturation limit were considered. A well-validated low Reynolds number (LRN) k–ω turbulence model and a discrete Lagrangian tracking approach that accounted for electrostatic image force were employed to simulate the nasal airflow and aerosol dynamics. For ultrafine aerosols, electrostatic charge was observed to exert a discernible but insignificant effect. In contrast, remarkably enhanced depositions were observed for micrometer particles with charge, which could be one order of magnitude larger than no-charge depositions. The deposition hot spots shifted towards the anterior part of the upper airway as the charge level increased. Results of this study have important implications for evaluating nasal drug delivery devices and for assessing doses received from pollutants, which often carry a certain level of electric charges. PMID:24481172

  3. Characteristics of the turbulent laryngeal jet and its effect on airflow in the human intra-thoracic airways

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics technique is applied to understand the relative importance of the upper and intra-thoracic airways and their role in determining central airflow patterns with particular attention paid to the importance of turbulence. The geometry of the human upper respiratory tract is derived from volumetric scans of a volunteer imaged via multidetector-row computed tomography. Geometry 1 consists of a mouth piece, the mouth, the oropharynx, the larynx, and the intra-thoracic airways of up to 6 generations. Geometry 2 comprises only the intra-thoracic airways. The results show that a curved sheet-like turbulent laryngeal jet is observed only in geometry 1 with turbulence intensity in the trachea varying from 10% to 20%, whereas the turbulence in geometry 2 is negligible. The presence of turbulence is found to increase the maximum localised wall shear stress by three folds. The proper orthogonal decomposition analysis reveals that the regions of high turbulence intensity are associated with Taylor-Görtler-like vortices. We conclude that turbulence induced by the laryngeal jet could significantly affect airway flow patterns as well as tracheal wall shear stress. Thus airflow modeling, particularly subject specific evaluations, should consider upper as well as intra-thoracic airway geometry. PMID:17360247

  4. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  5. CHALLENGES OF OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA: DIFFICULT LARYNGEAL VISUALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Alanoğlu, Zekeriyya; Erkoç, Süheyla Karadağ; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yildirim; Meço, Başak Ceyda Orbey; Baytaş, Volkan; Can, Özlem Selvi; Alkiş, Neslihan

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric anesthesia is one of the high risk subspecialties of anesthesia practice. Anesthesia related complications are the sixth leading cause of maternal mortality. Difficult or failed intubation following induction of general anesthesia for CS remains the major contributory factor to anesthesia-related maternal complications. The airway management of obstetric patients is a challenging issue for several reasons. Anatomic and physiologic changes related to pregnancy may increase the difficult and failed intubation rates compared to the general surgical population. Proper evaluation of the airway anatomy and airway structures is vital to prevent airway management related catastrophes. In addition to basic airway and intubation equipment, each anesthesia department must have difficult intubation equipment cart including fiber optic laryngoscope, video laryngoscopes, and different types of laryngeal masks. It is essential that all anesthesiologists have a preconceived and well thought-out algorithm and emergency airway equipment to deal with airway emergencies during difficult or failed intubation of a parturient. PMID:27276775

  6. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  7. Recent advances and key challenges in investigations of the flow inside human oro-pharyngeal-laryngeal airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, A.; Uddin, M.; Shinneeb, A.-M.; Ball, C. G.

    2012-07-01

    The oro-pharyngeal-laryngeal human airway is a complex geometry; the flow physics within are subjected to and influenced by a variety of different factors that produce jet-like flow, re-circulating flows that are enhanced by curvature, detached and secondary flows. Simulation and experiment are the tools available to the fluid dynamics researcher. Simulation results obtained from direct and large-eddy simulation, and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and associated models of turbulence are reviewed. Experimental data obtained through the use of flow visualisation, hot-wire anemometry and particle image velocimetry are also reviewed. A comparison of data obtained from the application of these tools reveals many inconsistencies that are explored in this article. While much progress has been made to understand some of the physics of the flow in the human airway, we continue to uncover new and significant fluid dynamic behaviour. Finally, future research directions are suggested.

  8. Use of the ETView Tracheoscopic Ventilation Tube in airway management of a patient with unanticipated difficult bag-mask ventilation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Zuo, Ming-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    The management of unanticipated difficult airway is a clinical challenge to anesthesiologists. The ETView Tracheoscopic Ventilation Tube (ETView), which is capable of real-time video imaging of the airway without needing additional equipment, may provide a promising settlement for the cases. Here, we reported a successful management of unanticipated difficult bag-mask ventilation airway with the ETView. More importantly, we successfully maintained oxygenation by modifying its injection and suction port. PMID:27206419

  9. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  10. Breathing resistance and ultrafine particle deposition in nasal-laryngeal airways of a newborn, an infant, a child, and an adult.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Berlinski, Ariel; Zhou, Yue; Greenberg, Bruce; Ou, Xiawei

    2012-12-01

    As a human grows from birth to adulthood, both airway anatomy and breathing conditions vary, altering the deposition rate and pattern of inhaled aerosols. However, deposition studies have typically focused on adult subjects, results of which may not be readily extrapolated to children. This study numerically evaluated the age-related effects on the airflow and aerosol dynamics in image-based nose-throat models of a 10-day-old newborn, a 7-month-old infant, a 5-year-old child, and a 53-year-old adult. Differences in airway physiology, breathing resistance, and aerosol filtering efficiency among the four models were quantified and compared. A high-fidelity fluid-particle transport model was employed to simulate the multi-regime airflows and particle transport within the nasal-laryngeal airways. Ultrafine particles were evaluated under breathing conditions ranging from sedentary to heavy activities. Results of this study indicate that the nasal-laryngeal airways at different ages, albeit differ significantly in morphology and dimension, do not significantly affect the total deposition fractions or maximum local deposition enhancement for ultrafine aerosols. Further, the deposition partitioning in the sub-regions of interest is different among the four models. Results of this study corroborate the use of the in vivo-based diffusion parameter (D(0.5)Q(-0.28)) over the replica-based parameter in correlating nasal-laryngeal depositions of ultrafine aerosols. Improved correlations have been developed for the four age groups by implementing this in vivo-based diffusion parameter as well as the Cunningham correction factor. PMID:22660850

  11. Management of an anticipated difficult airway in Hurler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gurumurthy, T; Shailaja, S; Kishan, Shetty; Stephen, Madona

    2014-10-01

    Management of an anticipated difficult airway in Hurler syndrome. Hurler syndrome is a subtype of Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type 1. Mucopolysaccharidosis (lysosomal storage diseases) are a group of inherited disorders caused by deficiency of specific lysosomal enzyme required for a normal degradation of glycosaminoglycons (GAGs). Administration of general anaesthesia in patients who have congenital syndromes such as Hurler's is often a challenge because of progressive airway, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities that may make both the ventilation and intubation difficult. We encountered difficult mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation was not possible and finally ventilated with laryngeal mask airway in a known case of Hurler syndrome posted for umbilical hernia repair. PMID:25425785

  12. Assessment of the use of the laryngeal tube for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a manikin.

    PubMed

    Genzwuerker, H V; Finteis, T; Slabschi, D; Groeschel, J; Ellinger, K

    2001-12-01

    During 60 3-min CPR sequences, the face mask, laryngeal tube and tracheal tube were compared using an Ambu Megacode Trainer. Ten 3-min sequences each were performed for both a combination of the face mask and laryngeal tube with a bag-valve device (compression-ventilation ratio 5:1). With continuous chest compressions, ten 3-min CPR sequences each were performed for a combination of the laryngeal tube and tracheal tube with a bag-valve device and ten 3-min CPR sequences each for a combination of the laryngeal tube and tracheal tube with an automatic transport ventilator. Signs of gastric inflation occurred only with the face mask. Ventilation with the laryngeal tube was significantly better than with the face mask and comparable to the tracheal tube during ventilation with the bag-valve device and with the automatic transport ventilator. Chest compressions caused a significant decrease in tidal volumes during ventilation with the automatic transport ventilator. The findings of this study support the idea of the laryngeal tube as a new adjunct for emergency airway management, but will have to be verified during clinical practice. PMID:11738781

  13. Advances in prehospital airway management

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, PE; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts. PMID:24741499

  14. Laryngeal disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Macphail, Catriona

    2014-01-01

    The most common disease process involving the larynx is laryngeal paralysis, which occurs much more frequently in dogs than in cats. Diagnosis of laryngeal paralysis requires close attention to anesthetic plane and coordination of respiratory effort with laryngeal motion. Surgical arytenoid lateralization improves respiration and quality of life in dogs with laryngeal paralysis; however, aspiration pneumonia is a recognized complication, and generalized neuropathy can progress. Laryngeal collapse can result from any cause of chronic upper airway obstruction, but is most often associated with unaddressed brachycephalic airway syndrome. Laryngeal neoplasia, while generally uncommon, occurs more frequently in cats than in dogs. PMID:24268331

  15. Awake Craniotomy: A New Airway Approach.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Chitra; Schlichter, Rolf A; Baranov, Dimitry; Kofke, W Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Awake craniotomies have been performed regularly at the University of Pennsylvania since 2004. Varying approaches to airway management are described for this procedure, including intubation with an endotracheal tube and use of a laryngeal mask airway, simple facemask, or nasal cannula. In this case series, we describe the successful use (i.e., no need for endotracheal intubation related to inadequate gas exchange) of bilateral nasopharyngeal airways in 90 patients undergoing awake craniotomies. The use of nasopharyngeal airways can ease the transition between the asleep and awake phases of the craniotomy without the need to stimulate the airway. Our purpose was to describe our experience and report adverse events related to this technique. PMID:26579845

  16. A pillow of 8 cm height did not improve laryngeal view and alignment of airway axes but increased anesthesiologist discomfort compared to a pillow of 4 cm height during tracheal intubation in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyo Ju; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hwang, Jung Won; Lee, Hyung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background Neck flexion by head elevation using an 8 to 10 cm thick pillow and head extension has been suggested to align the laryngeal, pharyngeal and oral axis and facilitate tracheal intubation. Presently, the laryngeal view and discomfort for tracheal intubation were evaluated according to two different degrees of head elevation in adult patients. Methods This prospective randomized, controlled study included 50 adult patients aged 18 to 90 years. After induction of anesthesia, the Cormack Lehane grade was evaluated in 25 patients using a direct laryngoscope while the patient's head was elevated with a 4 cm pillow (4 cm group) and then an 8 cm pillow (8 cm group). In the other 25 patients, the grades were evaluated in the opposite sequence and tracheal intubation was performed. The success rate and anesthesiologist's discomfort score for tracheal intubation, and laryngeal, pharyngeal and oral axes were assessed. Results There were no differences in the laryngeal view and success rate for tracheal intubation between the two groups. The discomfort score during tracheal intubation was higher in the 8 cm group when the patient's head was elevated 4 cm first and then 8 cm. The alignment of laryngeal, pharyngeal and oral axes were not different between the two degrees of head elevation. Conclusions A pillow of 8 cm height did not improve laryngeal view and alignment of airway axes but increased the anesthesiologist discomfort, compared to a pillow of 4 cm height, during tracheal intubation in adult patients. PMID:27066204

  17. Insertion of six different supraglottic airway devices whilst wearing chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Castle, N; Pillay, Y; Spencer, N

    2011-11-01

    Six different supraglottic airway devices: Combitube™, laryngeal mask airway, intubating laryngeal mask airway (Fastrach™), i-gel™, Laryngeal Tube™ and Pro-Seal™ laryngeal mask airway were assessed by 58 paramedic students for speed and ease of insertion in a manikin, whilst wearing either chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment (CBRN-PPE) or a standard uniform. All devices took significantly longer to insert when wearing CBRN-PPE compared with standard uniform (p < 0.001). In standard uniform, insertion time was shorter than 45 s in 90% of attempts for all devices except the Combitube, for which 90% of attempts were completed by 53 s. Whilst wearing CBRN-PPE the i-gel was the fastest device to insert with a mean (SD (95% CI)) insertion time of 19 (8 (17-21))s, p < 0.001, with the Combitube the slowest with mean (65 (23 (59-71))s. Wearing of CBRN-PPE has a negative impact on supraglottic airway insertion time. PMID:21883122

  18. Histoplasmosis laryngeal

    PubMed Central

    Moriones Robayo, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal histoplasmosis is a fungal infection that is frequent in Colombia. Laryngeal histoplasmosis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients through the dissemination of the fungus from the lungs to other organs. Histoplasmosis isolated laryngeal (primary) is rare. If a patient presents with a history of immunosuppression by renal transplant, primary laryngeal histoplasmosis with supraglottic granulomatous inflammation that was treated with amphotericin B and Itraconazole, with complete resolution of laryngeal lesions. PMID:25767308

  19. Impact of the type of mask on the effectiveness of and adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea*

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Rafaela Garcia Santos; Piccin, Vivien Schmeling; Nascimento, Juliana Araújo; Viana, Fernanda Madeiro Leite; Genta, Pedro Rodrigues; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although CPAP was originally applied with a nasal mask, various interfaces are currently available. This study reviews theoretical concepts and questions the premise that all types of interfaces produce similar results. We revised the evidence in the literature about the impact that the type of CPAP interface has on the effectiveness of and adherence to OSA treatment. We searched the PubMed database using the search terms "CPAP", "mask", and "obstructive sleep apnea". Although we identified 91 studies, only 12 described the impact of the type of CPAP interface on treatment effectiveness (n = 6) or adherence (n = 6). Despite conflicting results, we found no consistent evidence that nasal pillows and oral masks alter OSA treatment effectiveness or adherence. In contrast, most studies showed that oronasal masks are less effective and are more often associated with lower adherence and higher CPAP abandonment than are nasal masks. We concluded that oronasal masks can compromise CPAP OSA treatment adherence and effectiveness. Further studies are needed in order to understand the exact mechanisms involved in this effect. PMID:25610507

  20. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in the World Trade Center-exposed population: the role for respiratory retraining.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Daniel; Altman, Kenneth W

    2012-09-01

    Upper airway symptoms among responders to the terrorist attack on 9/11 are progressive and multifactorial. For those symptoms that are laryngeal in origin, we are using a multidisciplinary approach that includes respiratory retraining and laryngeal desensitization through a speech pathologist trained in airway disorders. Our treatment paradigm and laryngeal hypersensitivity are discussed in this essay. PMID:22942344

  1. Laryngeal pressure receptors.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P; Sant'Ambrogio, G; Fisher, J T; Sant'Ambrogio, F B

    1984-07-01

    We studied the response characteristics of laryngeal pressure receptors in anesthetized dogs, breathing through a tracheal cannula, by recording single unit action potentials from the peripheral cut end of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. The larynx, with the rest of the upper airway, was isolated and cannulated separately for the application of distending and collapsing pressures. We identified receptors responding to either negative or positive pressure and a few responding to both. All these receptors showed a marked dynamic sensitivity and had the characteristics of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors. The majority of pressure receptors were active at zero transmural pressure and the gain of their response to pressure was higher at lower values, suggesting a role for these receptors in eupnea. Reflex alterations in breathing pattern and upper airway muscle activity during upper airway pressure changes, previously reported, are presumably mediated by the receptors described here. Moreover, these receptors may play a role in certain pathological states, such as obstructive sleep apnea, in which the upper airway is transiently subjected to large collapsing pressure. PMID:6484319

  2. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis--a rare cause of acute respiratory failure managed with nasal mask bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation.

    PubMed

    Lin, M C; Liaw, M Y; Huang, C C; Chuang, M L; Tsai, Y H

    1997-08-01

    A 68 yr old woman presented with acute respiratory failure. She was suspected of having a phrenic-diaphragmatic impairment, without evidence of an intrinsic lung disease or generalized neuromuscular disorder, after 3 weeks of prolonged mechanical ventilation. A series of studies, including fluoroscopy, phrenic nerve stimulation test and diaphragmatic electromyography, was performed before the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) was confirmed. The patient was successfully weaned from the conventional mechanical ventilator, and was placed on nasal mask bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation. A high degree of clinical suspicion of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis should always be raised in patients suffering respiratory failure without definite predisposing factors. Weaning with noninvasive nasal mask ventilation should be tried first instead of direct tracheostomy. PMID:9272940

  3. Incidence of unanticipated difficult airway in obstetric patients in a teaching institution.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weike; Edwards, Jason T; Tu, Faping; Xie, Yang; Sharma, Shiv K

    2012-01-31

    PURPOSE: Our aim was to determine the incidence of difficult intubation during pregnancy-related surgery at a high-risk, high-volume teaching institution. METHODS: Airway experience was analyzed among patients who had pregnancy-related surgery under general anesthesia from January 2001 through February 2006. A difficult airway was defined as needing three or more direct laryngoscopy (DL) attempts, use of the additional airway equipment after the DL attempts, or conversion to regional anesthesia due to inability to intubate. Airway characteristics were compared between patients with and without a difficult airway. In addition, pre- and postoperative airway evaluations were compared to identify factors closely related to changes from pregnancy. RESULTS: In a total of 30,766 operations, 2,158 (7%) were performed with general anesthesia. Among these, 1,026 (47.5%) were for emergency cesarean delivery (CD), 610 (28.3%) for nonemergency CD, and 522 (24.2%) for non-CD procedures. A total of 12 patients (0.56%) were identified as having a difficult airway. Four patients were intubated with further DL attempts; others required mask ventilation and other airway equipment. Two patients were ventilated through a laryngeal mask airway without further intubation attempts. Ten of the 12 difficult airway cases were encountered by residents during their first year of clinical anesthesia training. There were no maternal or fetal complications except one possible aspiration. CONCLUSION: Unanticipated difficult airways accounted for 0.56% of all pregnancy-related surgical patients. More than 99.9% of all obstetric patients could be intubated. A difficult airway is more likely to be encountered by anesthesia providers with <1 year of experience. Proper use of airway equipment may help secure the obstetric airway or provide adequate ventilation. Emergency CD did not add an additional level of difficulty over nonemergency CD. PMID:22290734

  4. Comparative Efficacy of the Air-Q Intubating Laryngeal Airway during General Anesthesia in Pediatric Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Eun Jin; Choi, Geun Joo; Kang, Hyun; Baek, Chong Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol; Bang, Si Ra

    2016-01-01

    Air-Q® (air-Q) is a supraglottic airway device which can be used as a guidance of intubation in pediatric as well as in adult patients. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of air-Q compared to other airway devices during general anesthesia in pediatric patients by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 10 studies including 789 patients were included in the final analysis. Compared with other supraglottic airway devices, air-Q showed no evidence for a difference in leakage pressure and insertion time. The ease of insertion was significantly lower than other supraglottic airway devices. The success rate of intubation was significantly lower than other airway devices. However, fiberoptic view was better through the air-Q than other supraglottic airway devices. Therefore, air-Q could be a safe substitute for other airway devices and may provide better fiberoptic bronchoscopic view. PMID:27419134

  5. Anesthesia airway management in a patient with upper tracheal tumor.

    PubMed

    Wendi, Chen; Zongming, Jiang; Zhonghua, Chen

    2016-08-01

    The main challenge for surgical resection of tumors located at the upper trachea is contemplate formulated plan for providing maximal surgical access to the trachea while ensuring patent airway and adequate oxygenation at the same time. In this report, we describe a patient who presented with an upper tracheal tumor located 3cm from the vocal cord and severe tracheal constriction, occluding tracheal lumen by 90%. Initial ventilation was established by implantation with a supreme laryngeal mask airway. An emergent tracheotomy and distal tracheal intubation were used to combat bleeding and subsequent airway obstruction. Eventually, tracheal tumor resection plus tracheal reconstruction via median sternotomy was successfully conducted under general anesthesia. The whole process is uneventful. PMID:27290961

  6. Diagnosis and management of laryngeal trauma in sports.

    PubMed

    Hanft, K; Posternack, C; Astor, F; Attarian, D

    1996-06-01

    The management of sports-related laryngeal trauma presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The application of basic treatment principles such as airway monitoring, thorough physical examination, and fiberoptic laryngeal examination will direct the management. Further radiologic examination or surgical intervention may be required to adequately assess and manage the injury. We review the diagnosis, treatment, and management in a case of laryngeal fracture that occurred during a National Hockey League game. PMID:8638209

  7. Laryngeal structure and function in dogs with cough.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lynelle R

    2016-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the prevalence and type of laryngeal abnormalities in dogs examined because of cough that did not have signs of upper airway disease and to compare the prevalence of those abnormalities among dogs with various respiratory tract diseases. DESIGN Prospective study. ANIMALS 138 dogs with cough that did not have signs of upper airway disease. PROCEDURES The study was conducted between July 2001 and October 2014 and included dogs examined for cough that had laryngoscopic and bronchoscopic examinations performed by 1 examiner. Laryngeal hyperemia and swelling were recorded, and laryngeal function was assessed before and after doxapram stimulation when indicated. Results were compared among dogs on the basis of cough duration (acute [< 2 weeks], subacute [2 weeks to 2 months], and chronic [> 2 months]) and disease diagnosed (inflammatory airway disease, airway collapse, lower respiratory tract infection, and eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy). RESULTS Laryngeal hyperemia was detected in 73 of 134 (54%) dogs with cough of subacute or chronic duration, and its prevalence did not vary significantly among dogs with various diseases. Thirteen dogs had laryngeal paresis, and 13 dogs had laryngeal paralysis; dysphonia (n = 2) and stridor (1) were uncommon findings in those dogs. The prevalence of laryngeal dysfunction (paresis or paralysis) did not differ significantly among diseases. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that 26 of 138 (19%) dogs examined because of cough alone had laryngeal dysfunction, which suggested that a complete laryngoscopic examination should be included in the diagnostic evaluation of dogs with cough. PMID:27379595

  8. Comparison of i-gel supraglottic airway and LMA-ProSeal™ in pediatric patients under controlled ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Saran, Sai; Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Badhe, Ashok Shankar; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Elakkumanan, Lenin Babu; Mishra, Gayatri

    2014-01-01

    Background: i-gel™ and the ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) are two supraglottic airway devices with gastric channel used for airway maintenance in anesthesia. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of i-gel compared with PLMA for airway maintenance in pediatric patients under general anesthesia with controlled ventilation. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2 patients were included in the study and randomized to either i-gel or PLMA group. After induction of anesthesia using a standardized protocol for all the patients, one of supraglottic airway devices was inserted. Insertion parameters, ease of gastric tube insertion and fiber-optic scoring of the glottis were noted. Airway parameters such as end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2), peak airway pressures and leak airway pressures were noted. Patients were observed for any complications in the first 12 h of the post-operative period. Results: Both groups were comparable in terms of ease of insertion, number of attempts and other insertion parameters. Ease of gastric tube insertion, EtCO2, airway pressures (peak and leak airway pressure) and fiber-optic view of the glottis were comparable in both groups. There were no clinically significant complications in the first 12 h of the post-operative period. Conclusion: i-gel is as effective as PLMA in pediatric patients under controlled ventilation. PMID:24803756

  9. Perinatal development of laryngeal function.

    PubMed

    Harding, R

    1984-06-01

    The resistance of the upper airway is strongly influenced by the action of opposing sets of laryngeal muscles. Expiratory airflow may be retarded by active adduction of the arytenoid cartilages or by a reduction in the activity of abductor muscles. In developing sheep the adductor muscles appear to represent the principal means by which lung recoil is opposed. This mechanism, which is most pronounced during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, is regulated by afferent traffic from the lungs. In fetal sheep the laryngeal muscles are also influenced by breathing movements and sleep states. The adductor muscles are normally tonically active during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep when rhythmical breathing movements are absent. It is possible that this activity is at least partially responsible for elevated tracheal pressures and depressed flow of tracheal fluid during fetal apnea. This hypothesis has been tested by observing the effects of fetal paralysis and recurrent laryngeal nerve section. These experiments suggest that in the fetus near term the larynx makes a major contribution to upper airway resistance and hence to the maintenance of pulmonary expansion which has been shown to influence lung development. PMID:6747226

  10. Surgeons' exposure to sevoflurane during paediatric adenoidectomy: a comparison of three airway devices.

    PubMed

    Herzog-Niescery, J; Gude, P; Gahlen, F; Seipp, H-M; Bartz, H; Botteck, N M; Bellgardt, M; Dazert, S; Weber, T P; Vogelsang, H

    2016-08-01

    Although sevoflurane is commonly used in anaesthesia, a threshold value for maximum exposure to personnel does not exist and although anaesthetists are aware of the problem, surgeons rarely focus on it. We used a photo-acoustic infrared device to measure the exposure of surgeons to sevoflurane during paediatric adenoidectomies. Sixty children were randomly allocated to laryngeal mask, cuffed tracheal tube or uncuffed tracheal tube. The average mean (maximum) sevoflurane concentrations within the surgeons' operating area were 1.05 (10.05) ppm in the laryngeal mask group, 0.33 (1.44) ppm in the cuffed tracheal tube group and 1.79 (18.02) ppm in the uncuffed tracheal tube group, (p < 0.001), laryngeal mask and cuffed tracheal tube groups vs. uncuffed tube group. The presence of sevoflurane was noticed by surgeons in 20% of cases but there were no differences between the groups (p = 0.193). Surgical and anaesthetic complications were similar in all three groups. We conclude that sevoflurane can be safely used during adenoidectomies with all three airway devices, but in order to minimise sevoflurane peak concentrations, cuffed tracheal tubes are preferred. PMID:27277674

  11. Laryngeal verruca vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Topdag, Murat; Erdogan, Selvet; Kara, Ahmet; Derin, Serhan

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal verruca vulgaris is a rare disease of the larynx that is easily misdiagnosed as other laryngeal lesions. This article reports three patients with laryngeal verruca vulgaris and discusses the differential diagnosis of laryngeal verrucous lesions to avoid over treatment. PMID:25935911

  12. Laryngeal histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hina A; Saeed, Noora; Khan, Nazoora; Hasan, Naba

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal infection, having interesting synonyms such as Cave disease, Darling's disease, Ohio Valley disease, reticuloendotheliosis, Spelunker's lung and Caver's disease. The aetiological agent is a dimorphic fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum, causing chronic granulomatous disease. The route of transmission is by inhalation of dust particles from soil contaminated by excrement of birds or bats, harbouring the small spores or microconidia, which is considered the infectious form of fungus. The spectrum of illness ranges from subclinical infection of the lung to progressive disseminated disease. The major bulk of histoplasmosis infections are asymptomatic or present with mild influenza like illness and involve immunocompetent individuals. However, the immunocompromised or immunodeficient cases have disseminated/haematogenous infections with multiple organs involved and are usually fatal unless treated immediately. Laryngeal involvement is associated with the disseminated form of the disease. Histoplasmosis of larynx is a rare entity and poses diagnostic difficulty to otolaryngologists because clinically it may be mistaken for malignancy. We report an unusual case of laryngeal histoplasmosis in a man aged 60 years who presented with provisional diagnosis of tuberculosis/malignancy. PMID:27535733

  13. Laryngeal pseudosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, A.M.; Ewing, S.; Adams, G.; Maisel, R.

    1983-06-01

    In the past laryngeal pseudosarcomas have been diagnosed as a. carcinosarcomas, b. pleomorphic or spindle cell carcinomas, or c. squamous cell carcinomas with pseudosarcomatous reactive stroma. Arguments have centered around the nature of the sarcomatous stroma. Because of this confusion there is disagreement as to the treatment and prognosis of these tumors. Seven pseudosarcomas were treated between 1969-1979, 4 were pedunculated and 3 exophytic. Treatment consisted of primary CO60 irradiation in 2 patients, surgery in 3 cases and combined therapy in 2 cases with no recurrences. Three of the 7 have died, 1 of a poorly differentiated adenosquamous carcinoma of the right main stem bronchus and the other 2 of natural causes at ages 77 and 85. From a review of the literature as well as our experience, we have reached the following conclusions. 1. Stromal cells are a malignant morphologic variant of the squamous cell and are best termed spindled cells. 2. Neck metastasis at any time is a poor prognostic sign. 3. The pattern of metastasis and survival seems to parallel laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and thus treatment should be similar for given stages.

  14. The Role of Airway and Endobronchial Ultrasound in Perioperative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Votruba, Jiri; Zemanová, Petra; Lambert, Lukas; Vesela, Michaela Michalkova

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increased use of ultrasound in evaluation of the airway and the lower parts of the respiratory system. Ultrasound examination is fast and reliable and can be performed at the bedside and does not carry the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Apart from use in diagnostics it may also provide safe guidance for invasive and semi-invasive procedures. Ultrasound examination of the oral cavity structures, epiglottis, vocal cords, and subglottic space may help in the prediction of difficult intubation. Preoperative ultrasound may diagnose vocal cord palsy or deviation or stenosis of the trachea. Ultrasonography can also be used for confirmation of endotracheal tube, double-lumen tube, or laryngeal mask placement. This can be achieved by direct examination of the tube inside the trachea or by indirect methods evaluating lung movements. Postoperative airway ultrasound may reveal laryngeal pathology or subglottic oedema. Conventional ultrasound is a reliable real-time navigational tool for emergency cricothyrotomy or percutaneous dilational tracheostomy. Endobronchial ultrasound is a combination of bronchoscopy and ultrasonography and is used for preoperative examination of lung cancer and solitary pulmonary nodules. The method is also useful for real-time navigated biopsies of such pathological structures. PMID:26788507

  15. The Role of Airway and Endobronchial Ultrasound in Perioperative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Votruba, Jiri; Zemanová, Petra; Lambert, Lukas; Vesela, Michaela Michalkova

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increased use of ultrasound in evaluation of the airway and the lower parts of the respiratory system. Ultrasound examination is fast and reliable and can be performed at the bedside and does not carry the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Apart from use in diagnostics it may also provide safe guidance for invasive and semi-invasive procedures. Ultrasound examination of the oral cavity structures, epiglottis, vocal cords, and subglottic space may help in the prediction of difficult intubation. Preoperative ultrasound may diagnose vocal cord palsy or deviation or stenosis of the trachea. Ultrasonography can also be used for confirmation of endotracheal tube, double-lumen tube, or laryngeal mask placement. This can be achieved by direct examination of the tube inside the trachea or by indirect methods evaluating lung movements. Postoperative airway ultrasound may reveal laryngeal pathology or subglottic oedema. Conventional ultrasound is a reliable real-time navigational tool for emergency cricothyrotomy or percutaneous dilational tracheostomy. Endobronchial ultrasound is a combination of bronchoscopy and ultrasonography and is used for preoperative examination of lung cancer and solitary pulmonary nodules. The method is also useful for real-time navigated biopsies of such pathological structures. PMID:26788507

  16. A pilot study to examine the effect of the Tulip oropharyngeal airway on ventilation immediately after mask ventilation following the induction of anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P N; Shaikh, A; Sabir, N M; Vaughan, D J A; Kynoch, M; Hasan, M

    2014-07-01

    The Tulip airway is an adult, disposable, single-sized oropharyngeal airway, that is connectable to an anaesthetic circuit. After a standardised induction of anaesthesia in 75 patients, the ease of insertion, intracuff pressure and intracuff volume were measured, as were the end-tidal carbon dioxide levels, airway pressures and tidal volumes over three breaths. Successful first-time insertion was achieved in 72 patients (96%, CI 88.8-99.2%) and after two attempts in 74 patients (99%, CI 92.8-100%). There was outright failure only in one patient. In 60 patients (80%, CI 72.2-90.4%), the Tulip airway provided a patent airway without additional manoeuvres, but in 14 patients, jaw thrust or head extension was necessary for airway patency. The main need for these adjuncts appeared to be an initial under-inflation of the cuff. These promising results are consistent with recent manikin studies using this device. PMID:24773326

  17. Primary laryngeal leishmaniasis: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bipin; Ghimire, Anand; Karki, Smriti; Upadhyaya, Paricha

    2009-01-01

    Laryngeal leishmaniasis is extremely rare. We report a case of primary laryngeal leishmaniasis in a 70-year-old male who was admitted with complaints of gradual progressive hoarseness of the voice, dyspnea, cough for the past 3 months and noisy breathing for the past 5 days. An X-ray of the soft tissue of the neck showed a prevertebral soft tissue mass causing narrowing of the airway at the C6-C7 vertebral level. A computerized tomography (CT) scan showed a soft tissue mass in the subglottic region causing significant narrowing of the airway. A direct laryngoscopy showed a pinkish-white, friable mass involving the subglottic region and the anterior half of the vocal cords. With the clinical suspicion of malignancy, an endoscopic biopsy was done. A histopathological examination showed diffuse mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate in subepithelium with numerous Leishmania donovani bodies in the cytoplasm of histiocytes. PMID:19136784

  18. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Sant'Ambrogio, F.B.; Orani, G.P.; Sant'Ambrogio, G.; Mathew, O.P. )

    1990-02-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.

  19. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  20. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: pathophysiology and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-07-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Primary malformations include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea, which cause an increase in negative pressure within the upper airways that can eventually lead to secondary abnormalities such as everted laryngeal saccules, everted tonsils, and laryngeal and tracheal collapse. Abnormal nasopharyngeal turbinates are also encountered, but have not been classified as primary or secondary. BAS is readily diagnosed, and quality of life is improved with appropriate medical and/or surgical management. PMID:22847322

  1. Treatment of laryngeal sarcoidosis with intralesional steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Krespi, Y P; Mitrani, M; Husain, S; Meltzer, C J

    1987-01-01

    Laryngeal sarcoidosis presents with hoarseness, cough, and dysphagia. Shortness of breath due to upper airway obstruction may occur. Indirect laryngoscopy reveals mucosal edema and erythema, granulomas, and nodules. The supraglottic larynx is the most frequently affected area. Systemic corticosteroids can be used initially; however, with persistent symptoms and/or severe airway problems, intralesional steroid injections may be more effective, as in the six patients presented. PMID:3688765

  2. Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meola, Stacy D

    2013-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome is a common finding in brachycephalic breeds. A combination of primary and secondary changes can progress to life-threatening laryngeal collapse. Early recognition of primary anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea would allow the clinician to make early recommendations for medical and surgical management, which can improve the quality of life in affected animals. PMID:24182996

  3. [An Adult Case of Difficult Intubation Caused by Late Complications of Radiotherapy for Pediatric Neck Malignancy, as well as a Later Laryngeal Elevation Surgery].

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Mari; Okada, Toshiki

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 32-year-old female who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery under general anesthesia. She had been diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma of her neck at 5 years of age, and received tumor resection and chemoradiotherapy. Afterwards, she was suffering from dysphagia as a late complication of radiotherapy. She received laryngeal elevation surgery at 24 years of age, in order to improve swallowing disturbance. With rapid induction of anesthesia, she was easily ventilated with mask and bag. However, it was difficult to visualize her vocal cord with various intubating apparatus, because of her mandible hypoplasia, small oral cavity, and laryngeal elevation. After all, we were able to intubate her trachea using Pentax Airway-scope® (AWS) with a Pediatric-type INTLOCK Blade™ (ITL-P). Radiotherapy for head and neck malignancy at childhood causes various late complications, leading to difficult intubation. Meanwhile, laryngeal elevation surgery for dysphagia anatomically makes intubation more difficult An adult who has such past history should be expected as an extremely difficult intubation case, and we must be prepared with various intubating apparatus including AWS with ITL-P. PMID:26790331

  4. Laryngeal Paralyses: Theoretical Considerations and Effects on Laryngeal Vibration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marshall E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical four-mass model of the larynx was developed to simulate laryngeal biomechanical behavior and used to evaluate states of asymmetric laryngeal vibration. Simulations of laryngeal paralyses were compared with data on glottal vibration in observed laryngeal function. (Author/JDD)

  5. Atraumatic laser treatment for laryngeal papillomatosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Pankratov, Michail M.; Wang, Zhi; Bottrill, Ian; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1994-09-01

    Ten to fifteen thousand new cases of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) are diagnosed each year in the United States. RRP is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and is characterized by recurrent, non-malignant, proliferative lesions of the larynx. Patients with RRP undergo numerous microsurgical procedures to remove laryngeal papilloma threatening airway patency and interfering with phonation. The standard surgical technique involves CO2 laser vaporization of laryngeal epithelium affected by the lesions, and requires general anesthesia. The pulsed dye laser operating at 585 nm has previously been demonstrated to be effective in clearing HPV lesions of the skin (verrucae). For treatment of RRP, the fiber- compatible pulsed dye laser radiation may be delivered under local anesthesia using a flexible intranasal laryngoscope. Potential advantages of the pulsed dye laser treatment over CO2 laser surgery include (1) reduced morbidity, especially a lower risk of laryngeal scarring; (2) lower cost; (3) reduced technical difficulty; and (4) reduced risk of viral dissemination or transmission. In vivo studies are underway to determine the effect of pulsed dye laser radiation on normal canine laryngeal tissue.

  6. Sound signature for identification of tracheal collapse and laryngeal paralysis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Seong-Chan; Lee, Hee-Chun; Chang, Hong-Hee; Lee, Hyo-Jong

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether upper airway sounds of dogs with laryngeal paralysis and tracheal collapse have distinct sound characteristics, compared with unaffected dogs. The sounds of 5 dogs with laryngeal paralysis and 5 dogs with tracheal collapse were recorded. Honking sound appeared as predominant clinical signs in dogs with tracheal collapse. Laryngeal stridors appeared as predominant clinical signs in dogs with experimentally produced laryngeal paralysis by resection of laryngeal nerve, in which two types of stridor, I and II, were recorded. All these sounds were analyzed using sound spectrogam analysis. There were significant differences in duration (sec), intensity (dB), pitch (Hz), first formant (Hz), second formant (Hz), third formant (Hz), fourth formant (Hz) of sounds between the normal bark and two types of stridor or honking sound, indicating that the sound analysis might be a useful diagnostic modality for dogs with tracheal collapse and laryngeal paralysis. PMID:15699602

  7. Hemostasis in Laryngeal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, Theodore; Allen, Jacqui

    2016-06-01

    The larynx is a highly vascularized organ supplied by the superior and inferior laryngeal arteries. Both microphonosurgery and external laryngeal surgery require excellent hemostasis. Topical agents including adrenalin and fibrin-based products as well as surgical instrumentation, such as coagulation devices or in some cases embolization, are in the surgeon's armamentarium and facilitate efficient and successful surgery. PMID:27267020

  8. Laryngeal nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Laryngeal nerve damage is injury to one or both of the nerves that are attached to the voice box. ... Injury to the laryngeal nerves is uncommon. When it does occur, it can be from: A complication of neck or chest surgery (especially thyroid, lung, ...

  9. Challenges in the Management of Laryngeal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Satish; Nilakantan, Ajith; Sood, Amit; Gupta, Atul; Gupta, Abhishek

    2016-09-01

    Laryngeal stenosis is one of the most complex and challenging problems in the field of head and neck surgery. The management involves a multidisciplinary approach with multiple complex procedures. In this study we discuss our experience of laryngeal stenosis with regards to patient characteristics, cause and management. A retrospective analysis of 35 patients of laryngeal stenosis treated at a tertiary care centre was evaluated. Inclusion criteria were all patients with laryngeal stenosis who required surgical intervention. Exclusion criteria were patients with associated tracheal stenosis and laryngeal stenosis due to cancer. Demographic data was recorded and findings relating to aetiology, characteristics of stenosis and the various aspects of therapeutic procedures performed are discussed with review of literature. Among 35 patients, 24 were males and 11 females of the age group 2-79 years. 2 (5.7 %) patients had supraglottic stenosis, 11 (31.4 %) had glottis stenosis, 16 (45.7 %) had subglottic stenosis and 6 (17.1 %) had combined multiple sites stenosis. Each patient underwent an average of 3.22 surgical procedures like microlaryngoscopy and excision with cold instrument, CO2 laser excision or open procedures like laryngofissure and excision and laryngoplasty. Montgomery t tube insertion was a common procedure in 17 patients (48.6 %). Of the total 35 patients with severe LS, 27 (77.1 %) patients were successfully decanulated. The results of glottic (100 %) and supraglottic stenosis (100 %) are excellent as compared to subglottic (68.8 %) and combined stenosis (50 %) of multiple sites. Laryngeal stenosis with airway compromise causes significant morbidity to the patients and is a difficult condition to treat in both adult and pediatric population. The need for multiple surgical procedures is common in the treatment of laryngeal stenosis with the t-tube being an important aid in the management of this condition. Trauma especially post intubation

  10. Respiratory and laryngeal function during whispering.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, E T; Hoit, J D; Hixon, T J; Watson, P J; Solomon, N P

    1991-08-01

    Established procedures for making chest wall kinematic observations (Hoit & Hixon, 1987) and pressure-flow observations (Smitheran & Hixon, 1981) were used to study respiratory and laryngeal function during whispering and speaking in 10 healthy young adults. Results indicate that whispering involves generally lower lung volumes, lower tracheal pressures, higher translaryngeal flows, lower laryngeal airway resistances, and fewer syllables per breath group when compared to speaking. The use of lower lung volumes during whispering than speaking may reflect a means of achieving different tracheal pressure targets. Reductions in the number of syllables produced per breath group may be an adjustment to the high rate of air expenditure accompanying whispering compared to speaking. Performance of the normal subjects studied in this investigation does not resemble that of individuals with speech and voice disorders characterized by low resistive loads. PMID:1956183

  11. Unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis after carbon ion therapy using conventional dose fractionation for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Demizu, Yusuke; Fujii, Osamu; Nagano, Fumiko; Terashima, Kazuki; Jin, Dongcun; Mima, Masayuki; Oda, Naoharu; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makiko; Ito, Kazuyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Okimoto, Tomoaki

    2015-11-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a type of radiotherapy that can deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing the dose delivered to organs at risk. Moreover, carbon ions are classified as high linear energy transfer radiation and are expected to be effective for even photon-resistant tumors. A 73-year-old man with glottic squamous cell carcinoma, T3N0M0, refused laryngectomy and received carbon ion therapy of 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) in 35 fractions. Three months after the therapy, the patient had an upper airway inflammation, and then laryngeal edema and pain occurred. Five months after the therapy, the airway stenosis was severe and computed tomography showed lack of the left arytenoid cartilage and exacerbation of laryngeal necrosis. Despite the treatment, 5 and a half months after the therapy, the laryngeal edema and necrosis had become even worse and the surrounding mucosa was edematous and pale. Six months after the therapy, pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy and reconstruction with free jejunal autograft were performed. The surgical specimen pathologically showed massive necrosis and no residual tumor. Three years after the carbon ion therapy, he is alive without recurrence. The first reported laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma case treated with carbon ion therapy resulted in an unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis. Tissue damage caused by carbon ion therapy may be difficult to repair even for radioresistant cartilage; therefore, hollow organs reinforced by cartilage, such as the larynx, may be vulnerable to carbon ion therapy. Caution should be exercised when treating tumors in or adjacent to such organs with carbon ion therapy. PMID:26355161

  12. Complications of upper airway surgery in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Surgery of the upper airway is performed in dogs for the correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome and laryngeal paralysis and for temporary or permanent tracheostomy. Although technically simple to perform, upper airway surgeries can lead to the development of significant postoperative complications. This article reviews complications associated with common surgical conditions of the upper airway. It involves a discussion of brachycephalic airway syndrome and associated respiratory and gastrointestinal complications. It also covers laryngeal paralysis with a focus on unilateral arytenoid lateralization and the complication of aspiration pneumonia. The condition of acquired laryngeal webbing/stenosis and potential treatment options is also discussed. Finally, tracheostomies and associated complications in dogs and cats are reviewed. PMID:21889695

  13. Laryngeal (Voice Box) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited alcohol exposure. Other risk factors for laryngeal cancer include certain viruses, such as human papilloma virus (HPV), and likely acid reflux. Vitamin A and beta-carotene may play a protective role. Signs and Symptoms ...

  14. Stages of Laryngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of laryngeal cancer include a sore throat and ear pain. These and other signs and ... hoarseness in the voice. Tests that examine the throat and neck are used to help detect (find), ...

  15. Airway sonography in live models and cadavers.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ban; Ip, Vivian; Walji, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Sonography using cadavers is beneficial in teaching and learning sonoanatomy, which is particularly important because imaging of the airway can be challenging due to the cartilaginous landmarks and air artifacts. In this exploratory study, we have attempted to compare the airway sonoanatomy of cadavers and live models. Our observations support the use of cadavers as teaching tools for learning airway sonoanatomy and practicing procedures involving airway structures, such as superior laryngeal nerve blocks, transtracheal injections, and needle cricothyroidotomy, before performance on patients in clinical situations. We believe this process will improve patient safety and enhance the competency of trainees and practitioners in rare procedures such as needle cricothyroidotomy. PMID:23716527

  16. General Information about Laryngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Laryngeal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Laryngeal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  17. Recurrent laryngeal neuropathy in a systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Sung, In Young; Park, Jin Hong; Roh, Jong-Lyel

    2008-01-01

    A 41-yr-old woman with hoarseness, multiple joint pain, and generalized myalgia was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) 7 mos before visiting our clinic. SLE-related vocal cord palsy of the left side was identified after otolaryngologic evaluation. We performed laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) on both cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles. The findings indicated left recurrent laryngeal neuropathy with ongoing processes of denervation and reinnervation. Laryngeal involvement is a rare complication of SLE, but it is of clinical significance because serious consequence such as upper-airway obstruction can occur. LEMG identified this complication and precisely defined the neuromuscular status, and this information assisted in creating a therapeutic plan. LEMG may be useful for evaluating the neuromuscular status in vocal cord palsy. PMID:17993990

  18. Supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Kumar, Anjana M

    2014-06-01

    Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) are used to keep the upper airway open to provide unobstructed ventilation. Early (first-generation) SADs rapidly replaced endotracheal intubation and face masks in > 40% of general anesthesia cases due to their versatility and ease of use. Second-generation devices have further improved efficacy and utility by incorporating design changes. Individual second-generation SADs have allowed more dependable positive-pressure ventilation, are made of disposable materials, have integrated bite blocks, are better able to act as conduits for tracheal tube placement, and have reduced risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. SADs now provide successful rescue ventilation in > 90% of patients in whom mask ventilation or tracheal intubation is found to be impossible. However, some concerns with these devices remain, including failing to adequately ventilate, causing airway damage, and increasing the likelihood of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Careful patient selection and excellent technical skills are necessary for successful use of these devices. PMID:24891199

  19. Surgical Treatment of Laryngeal Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Unilateral arytenoid lateralization is the most commonly used technique to treat laryngeal paralysis. It is important not to overabduct the arytenoid cartilage during the unilateral lateralization to minimize exposure of the rima glottides. Dogs with laryngeal paralysis treated with unilateral lateralization have a good long-term prognosis. Idiopathic polyneuropathy is the most common cause of laryngeal paralysis in dogs. PMID:26947115

  20. Brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wykes, P M

    1991-06-01

    This is a complex condition, recognized primarily in brachycephalic breeds, that results in varying degrees of upper airway obstruction. The signs consist of respiratory distress, stridor, reduced exercise tolerance, and in more severe cases, cyanosis and collapse. The inherent anatomy of the brachycephalic skull contributes to the development of these signs. Such anatomic features include: a shortened and distorted nasopharynx, stenotic nares, an elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules. The increased negative pressure created in the pharyngolaryngeal region, as a result of these obstructing structures, ultimately results in distortion and collapse of the arytenoid cartilages of the larynx. PMID:1802247

  1. Management of laryngeal radionecrosis: Animal and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, R.W.; Krespi, Y.P.; Einhorn, R.K.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation necrosis of the laryngeal cartilages is an uncommon complication of radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. It is a devastating process for which there is no one acceptable treatment. Medical management offers only temporary, symptomatic relief, which further necessitates surgical treatment. Surgical management may start with a tracheotomy; however, it often ends with a total laryngectomy. Physiologically, the necrotic cartilages are the source of the problem. It is a general surgical principle that nonviable tissue must be excised to promote healing. Therefore, if the affected laryngeal cartilages were removed, the larynx should heal. Total or near total removal of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages with preservation of the endolaryngeal soft tissues has not been reported in the literature. Theoretically, if the entire cartilaginous framework is removed, there would be no structural support for the airway. We have found using animal models, that submucosal resection of the laryngeal cartilages, leaving the perichondrium and endolaryngeal soft tissues intact can result in a competent airway. Animal and clinical experience will be presented.

  2. [Laryngeal interarytenoid neurilemmoma excised via microlaryngeal endoscopy: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Cheng, Lixin; Tang, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Laryngeal interarytenoid neurilemmomas (LIN) is a benign encapsulated tumor originating from the schwann cells lining nerve fibers. Even though LINs are extremely rare in incidence, they could present with potential threat to the airway and thus requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report two cases of LINs. Both patients underwent excision of the tumor via microlaryngeal endoscopic procedures and recovered well postoperatively without complications. No recurrence was observed postoperatively on routine follow-up after 14 months. PMID:27101688

  3. Development of Sub-optimal Airway Protocols for the International Space Station (ISS) by the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James D.; Parazynski, Scott; Kelly, Scott; Hurst, Victor, IV; Doerr, Harold K.

    2007-01-01

    Airway management techniques are necessary to establish and maintain a patent airway while treating a patient undergoing respiratory distress. There are situations where such settings are suboptimal, thus causing the caregiver to adapt to these suboptimal conditions. Such occurrences are no exception aboard the International Space Station (ISS). As a result, the NASA flight surgeon (FS) and NASA astronaut cohorts must be ready to adapt their optimal airway management techniques for suboptimal situations. Based on previous work conducted by the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST) and other investigators, the MOST had members of both the FS and astronaut cohorts evaluate two oral airway insertion techniques for the Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) to determine whether either technique is sufficient to perform in suboptimal conditions within a microgravity environment. Methods All experiments were conducted in a simulated microgravity environment provided by parabolic flight aboard DC-9 aircraft. Each participant acted as a caregiver and was directed to attempt both suboptimal ILMA insertion techniques following a preflight instruction session on the day of the flight and a demonstration of the technique by an anesthesiologist physician in the simulated microgravity environment aboard the aircraft. Results Fourteen participants conducted 46 trials of the suboptimal ILMA insertion techniques. Overall, 43 of 46 trials (94%) conducted were properly performed based on criteria developed by the MOST and other investigators. Discussion The study demonstrated the use of airway management techniques in suboptimal conditions relating to space flight. Use of these techniques will provide a crew with options for using the ILMA to manage airway issues aboard the ISS. Although it is understood that the optimal method for patient care during space flight is to have both patient and caregiver restrained, these techniques provide a needed backup should conditions not present

  4. Electrophysiological properties of laryngeal motoneurones in rats submitted to chronic intermittent hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2015-01-01

    To keep an appropriate airflow to and from the lungs under physiological conditions a precise neural co-ordination of the upper airway resistance by laryngeal motoneurones in the nucleus ambiguus is essential. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), an important component of obstructive sleep apnoea, may alter these fine mechanisms. Here, using nerve and whole cell patch clamp recordings in in situ preparations of rats we investigated the effects of CIH on the respiratory control of the upper airway resistance, on the electrophysiological properties of laryngeal motoneurones in the nucleus ambiguus, and the role of carotid body (CB) afferents to the brainstem on the underlying mechanisms of these effects. CIH rats exhibited longer pre-inspiratory and lower post-inspiratory superior laryngeal nerve activities than control rats. These changes produced exaggerated glottal abduction (before inspiration) and decreased glottal adduction during post-inspiration, indicating a reduction of upper airway resistance during these respiratory phases after CIH. CB denervation abolished these changes produced by CIH. Regarding choline acetyltransferase positive-laryngeal motoneurones, CIH increased the firing frequency of inspiratory and decreased the firing frequency of post-inspiratory laryngeal motoneurones, without changes in their intrinsic electrophysiological properties. These data show that the effects of CIH on the upper airway resistance and laryngeal motoneurones activities are driven by the integrity of CB, which afferents induce changes in the central respiratory generators in the brainstem. These neural changes in the respiratory network seem to be an adaptive process required for an appropriated pulmonary ventilation and control of upper airway resistance under intermittent episodes of hypoxia. Key points The respiratory control of the glottis by laryngeal motoneurones is characterized by inspiratory abduction and post-inspiratory adduction causing decreases and

  5. An evaluation of a novel mask in four patients with obstructive sleep apnea and overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Yarahmadi, Alireza; Nader, Nader D; Zadeii, Gino; Porhomayon, Jahan

    2013-01-01

    We present four cases of adults with obstructive sleep apnea in whom positive airway pressure therapy alone failed to provide adequate oxygenation. We have previously reported the use of dual mask for ventilatory support of a patient postoperatively (Porhomayon et al., 2013). Here, we report an evaluation of the dual mask in four patients with overlap syndromes. Application of dual mask provided adequate oxygenation with lower continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)/bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) pressure levels. PMID:23970903

  6. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  10. Laryngeal Paraganglioma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharifkashany, Shervin; Yazdani, Nasrin; Ghazavi, Hossein; Tajdini, Ardavan

    2014-01-01

    Paragangliomas in the head and neck are found typically in the region of the carotid body, jugular body, and along the 9th and 10th cranial nerves. They can occur in multicenteric forms, but generally, laryngeal paragangliomas are not found in these patients. Only two cases of laryngeal paraganglioma have been reported with a synchronous lesion elsewhere. We report an additional case of a 34-year-old female with multiple paragangliomas beginning with laryngeal involvement. PMID:25763080

  11. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  12. A systematic review of variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xing Yao; Smoll, Nicolas Roydon

    2016-01-01

    With thyroid cancer fast becoming one of the most common endocrine cancers, the frequency of thyroid surgery has increased. A common and debilitating concern with thyroid surgery is recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) paralysis leading to glottal obstruction and airway compromise. A systematic review regarding the anatomical variation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was performed to determine the position of anatomical variants of the RLN in relation to the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) as well as the prevalence of nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN). MEDLINE, Web of Science, MEDITEXT, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane, ProQuest, Pubmed, and ScienceDirect. Databases were searched using the search terms "inferior thyroid artery," "recurrent laryngeal nerve," "nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve," and "anatomical variation." The reference sections of the articles found were searched for additional reports. The references of all articles were searched to find articles missed in the database search. A total of 8,655 RLN sides were included in this study. One thousand eight hundred and thirteen (20.95%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 20.09, 2,182) showed a Type A configuration of RLN in relation to the ITA, 2,432 (28.10%; 95% CI 27.15, 29.06) showed a Type B configuration and 4,410 (50.95%; 95% CI 49.89, 52.01) showed a Type C configuration between the RLN and the ITA. The second search returned with 38,568 recurrent laryngeal sides and only 221 (0.57%; 95%CI 0.5, 0.65) NRLN documented. The RLN is most commonly found in the posterior position, relative to the ITA. The incidence of the NRLN is low, only occurring in 0.57% of people. PMID:26297484

  13. Management of the Traumatized Airway.

    PubMed

    Jain, Uday; McCunn, Maureen; Smith, Charles E; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence-based approach regarding the best practice for airway management in patients with a traumatized airway. General recommendations for the management of the traumatized airway are summarized in table 5. Airway trauma may not be readily apparent, and its evaluation requires a high level of suspicion for airway disruption and compression. For patients with facial trauma, control of the airway may be significantly impacted by edema, bleeding, inability to clear secretions, loss of bony support, and difficulty with face mask ventilation. With the airway compression from neck swelling or hematoma, intubation attempts can further compromise the airway due to expanding hematoma. For patients with airway disruption, the goal is to pass the tube across the injured area without disrupting it or to insert the airway distal to the injury using a surgical approach. If airway injury is extensive, a surgical airway distal to the site of injury may be the best initial approach. Alternatively, if orotracheal intubation is chosen, spontaneous ventilation may be maintained or RSI may be performed. RSI is a common approach. Thus, some of the patients intubated may subsequently require tracheostomy. A stable patient with limited injuries may not require intubation but should be watched carefully for at least several hours. Because of a paucity of evidence-based data, the choice between these approaches and the techniques utilized is a clinical decision depending on the patient's condition, clinical setting, injuries to airway and other organs, and available personnel, expertise, and equipment. Inability to obtain a definitive airway is always an absolute indication for an emergency cricothyroidotomy or surgical tracheostomy. PMID:26517857

  14. Thyrocricotracheal separation with bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve transsection: report of a survivor.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dongbin; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Sohn, Jin Ho

    2015-12-01

    Thyrocricotracheal separation is an extremely fatal injury that has not been reported in the literature. Although timely and proper management of this injury is paramount to preserve the patient's life, airway, and voice, its rarity has resulted in a lack of consensus regarding the best management option. We report a case of thyrocricotracheal separation with bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve transsection caused by a self-inflicted injury, which was treated with reanastomosis in conjunction with transverse laser cordotomy. The patient could achieve both decannulation and a serviceable voice and could return to a normal social life. The present case is the first report of a survivor with thyrocricotracheal separation with bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve transsection. This findings show that appropriate management of the airway is the first step to ensure a successful outcome, and a step-by-step approach to detect and manage the associated injuries is paramount in cases showing the most severe form of laryngeal trauma. PMID:25976270

  15. Chronic cough and laryngeal dysfunction improve with specific treatment of cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Nicole M; Vertigan, Anne E; Gibson, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Chronic persistent cough can be associated with laryngeal dysfunction that leads to symptoms such as dysphonia, sensory hyperresponsiveness to capsaicin, and motor dysfunction with paradoxical vocal fold movement and variable extrathoracic airflow obstruction (reduced inspiratory airflow). Successful therapy of chronic persistent cough improves symptoms and sensory hyperresponsiveness. The effects of treatment for chronic cough on laryngeal dysfunction are not known. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate effects of therapy for chronic cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Methods Adults with chronic cough (n = 24) were assessed before and after treatment for chronic persistent cough by measuring quality of life, extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness to hypertonic saline provocation, capsaicin cough reflex hypersensitivity and fibreoptic laryngoscopy to observe paradoxical vocal fold movement. Subjects with chronic cough were classified into those with (n = 14) or without (n = 10) paradoxical vocal fold movement based on direct observation at laryngoscopy. Results Following treatment there was a significant improvement in cough related quality of life and cough reflex sensitivity in both groups. Subjects with chronic cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement also had additional improvements in extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness and paradoxical vocal fold movement. The degree of improvement in cough reflex sensitivity correlated with the improvement in extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness. Conclusion Laryngeal dysfunction is common in chronic persistent cough, where it is manifest as paradoxical vocal fold movement and extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness. Successful treatment for chronic persistent cough leads to improvements in these features of laryngeal dysfunction. PMID:19292930

  16. A method for ultrasonographic visualization and injection of the superior laryngeal nerve: volunteer study and cadaver simulation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Balvindar; Tang, Raymond; Sawka, Andrew; Krebs, Claudia; Vaghadia, Himat

    2012-11-01

    Superior laryngeal nerve block is a valuable technique for provision of upper airway anesthesia. In bilateral scans of 20 volunteers, we developed a technique for ultrasonographic visualization of the superior laryngeal nerve and key anatomical structures using a hockey stick-shaped 8 to 15 MHz transducer (HST15 to 8/20 linear probe, Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada). Subsequently, we simulated superior laryngeal nerve scanning and injection in bilateral injections in 2 cadavers. Ultrasound-guided in-plane advancement of a needle toward the superior laryngeal nerve and injection of 1 mL of green dye was achieved in all 4 attempts and confirmed by a postprocedural dissection performed by an anatomist. We conclude that ultrasound-guided superior laryngeal nerve block in humans may be feasible. PMID:22822197

  17. Laryngeal reflex responses are not modulated during human voice and respiratory tasks

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez, Victor M; Schulz, Geralyn M; Bielamowicz, Steven; Ludlow, Christy L

    2007-01-01

    The laryngeal adductor response (LAR) is a protective reflex that prevents aspiration and can be elicited either by electrical stimulation of afferents in the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) or by deflection of mechanoreceptors in the laryngeal mucosa. We hypothesized that because this reflex is life-sustaining, laryngeal muscle responses to sensory stimuli would not be suppressed during volitional laryngeal tasks when compared to quiet respiration. Unilateral electrical superior laryngeal nerve stimulation was used to elicit early (R1) and late (R2) responses in the ipsilateral thyroarytenoid muscle in 10 healthy subjects. The baseline levels of muscle activity before stimulation, R1 and R2 response occurrence and the integrals of responses were measured during each task: quiet inspiration, prolonged vowels, humming, forced inhalation and effort closure. We tested whether R1 response integrals during tasks were equal to either: (1) baseline muscle activity during the task added to the response integral at rest; (2) the response integral at rest minus the baseline muscle activity during the task; or (3) the response integral at rest. R1 response occurrence was not altered by task from rest while fewer R2 responses occurred only during effort closure and humming compared to rest. Because the R1 response integrals did not change from rest, task increases in motor neuron firing did not alter the LAR. These findings demonstrate that laryngeal motor neuron responses to sensory inputs are not gated during volitional tasks confirming the robust life-sustaining protective mechanisms provided by this airway reflex. PMID:17962327

  18. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  19. Laryngeal elevation by selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, Aaron J.; Kolb, Ilya; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Laryngeal elevation protects the airway and assists opening of the esophagus during swallowing. The GH, thyrohyoid, and MH muscles provide a majority of this elevatory motion. This study applied functional electrical stimulation to the XII/C1 nerve complex using a nerve cuff electrode to determine the capabilities of neural stimulation to induce laryngeal elevation. Approach. Multi-contact FINE electrodes were implanted onto the XII/C1 nerve complex at locations proximal and distal to the thyrohyoid branching point in five anesthetized canines. Motion of the thyroid cartilage and the hyoid bone was recorded during stimulation of nerve cuffs and intramuscular electrodes. Main Results. Nerve stimulation induced 260% more laryngeal elevation than intramuscular stimulation (18.8 mm versus 5.2 mm, p ≪ 0.01), and 228% higher velocity (143.8 versus 43.9 mm s-1, p ≪ 0.01). While stimulation at all cuff and electrode locations elevated the larynx, only the proximal XII/C1 nerve cuff significantly elicited both thyroid-hyoid approximation and hyoid elevation. In all proximal XII/C1 nerve cuffs (n = 7), stimulation was able to obtain selectivity of greater than 75% of at least one elevatory muscle. Significance. These results support the hypothesis that an implanted neural interface system can produce increased laryngeal elevation, a significant protective mechanism of deglutition.

  20. Fetal lung growth in laryngeal atresia and tracheal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Scurry, J P; Adamson, T M; Cussen, L J

    1989-02-01

    Three cases of airway obstruction in fetuses born at 21, 32 and 40 weeks gestation are reported. The first had laryngeal atresia, cystic dysplastic kidneys, oligohydramnios and immense fluid-filled lungs. The second had upper tracheal agenesis, a tracheo-oesophageal fistula, a cystic dysplastic horseshoe kidney, oligohydramnios and normal-sized lungs. The third had a pin-hole mucosal tract through an otherwise atretic larynx, normal kidneys, no oligohydramnios and normal-sized lungs. Lung weight:body weight ratios, radial alveolar or radial canalicular counts and point-counting of sections of lungs in cases 1 and 2 show that laryngeal or tracheal obstruction may prevent or reduce the pulmonary hypoplasia associated with renal dysplasia, and in cases 2 and 3, that grossly enlarged, hyperplastic lungs may not be seen unless obstruction is complete. PMID:2730470

  1. LASER Treatment of Laryngeal Papillomatosis in a Young Child: Anaesthetic and Surgical Management.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Faisal; Raza, Durriya; Ikram, Mubasher

    2015-09-01

    The authors report the case of a 4-year boy who required anaesthetic and surgical care during LASER excision of laryngeal papillomatosis. He presented with hoarseness and stridor and underwent emergency tracheostomy after confirmation of laryngeal papillomas on CT scan. He required LASER treatment under general anaesthesia with a requirement of paediatric LASER-safe endotracheal tube but unfortunately, this was not available in the country. Balanced anaesthesia technique using inhalational anaesthetic, muscle relaxant and narcotic is used with modifications. After three successful surgical sessions, the airway became patent and tracheostomy was de-cannulated. The perioperative issues surrounding this process are discussed including anaesthetic induction in the patient with a compromised airway, maintenance anaesthetic techniques, methods used for ventilation during LASER surgery of the upper airway, surgical implications and hazards of LASER to the operating room personnel. PMID:26374370

  2. [Management of laryngeal cancers].

    PubMed

    Brunin, F; Rodriguez, J; Cougniot-Lescure, S; Point, D; Jaulerry, C; Brugère, J

    1995-04-01

    With 5,000 cases yearly, laryngeal carcinomas account in France for the third of squamous cell cancers of the upper digestive and respiratory tract. The crude survival rate is 50% at 5 years. Carcinomas of vocal cords are often diagnosed as early stages if dysphonia leads the patients to the ENT specialist within 2 weeks. Cure of the primary is achieved in 90% of the early stages by radiotherapy with narrow fields or partial surgery, with a 80% 5 years survival rate. Advanced tumors are often treated by total laryngectomy and postoperative radiotherapy. Supra-glottic cancers (epiglottis) are more serious. Unilateral dysphagia or upper cervical neck node often delay early diagnosis. A total laryngectomy is the commonest treatment. The 5 years survival rate of 40% is due to local and/or regional failures and metachronous cancers in head and neck, and radiotherapy remains the two major treatments. Primary prevention is based upon suppression of tobacco and reduction of alcoholic consumption, secondary prevention on resection of leucoplakia and close follow-up of patients with chronic laryngitis. PMID:7761753

  3. A case of laryngeal leiomyosarcoma and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Selçuk, Ömer Tarik; Renda, Levent; Erol, Bekir; Osma, Üstün; Eyigor, Hülya; Öztürk, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) of the larynx is a very rare malignancy that originates from blood vessel, smooth muscle or from the heterotopic mesenchymal tissue in the larynx. The histological diagnosis of LMS depends on the immunohistochemical investigation. The case is here presented of an 82-year-old man with shortness of breath and hoarseness. Indirect laryngoscopy showed a pedunculated large glottic lesion causing airway obstruction. Direct laryngoscopy was performed and biopsies were taken. From the pathological examination, the diagnosis of LMS was made. This case is presented of laryngeal LMS with the clinical, radiological, and histological findings. PMID:26981488

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of laryngeal cancer include a sore throat and ear pain. These and other signs and ... hoarseness in the voice. Tests that examine the throat and neck are used to help detect (find), ...

  5. Neonatal resuscitation 2: an evaluation of manual ventilation devices and face masks

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Davis, P; Lau, R; Dargaville, P; Doyle, L; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: The key to successful neonatal resuscitation is effective ventilation. Little evidence exists to guide clinicians in their choice of manual ventilation device or face mask. The expiratory tidal volume measured at the mask (VTE(mask)) is a good estimate of the tidal volume delivered during simulated neonatal resuscitation. Aim: To compare the efficacy of (a) the Laerdal infant resuscitator and the Neopuff infant resuscitator, used with (b) round and anatomically shaped masks in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Thirty four participants gave positive pressure ventilation to a mannequin at specified pressures with each of the four device-mask combinations. Flow, inspiratory tidal volume at the face mask (VTI(mask)), VTE(mask), and airway pressure were recorded. Leakage from the mask was calculated from VTI(mask) and VTE(mask). Results: A total of 10 780 inflations were recorded and analysed. Peak inspiratory pressure targets were achieved equally with the Laerdal and Neopuff resuscitators. Positive end expiratory pressure was delivered with the Neopuff but not the Laerdal device. Despite similar peak pressures, VTE(mask) varied widely. Mask leakage was large for each combination of device and mask. There were no differences between the masks. Conclusion: During face mask ventilation of a neonatal resuscitation mannequin, there are large leaks around the face mask. Airway pressure is a poor proxy for volume delivered during positive pressure ventilation through a mask. PMID:15871989

  6. SafAIRway: an airway training for pulmonologists performing a flexible bronchoscopy with nonanesthesiologist administered propofol sedation

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Melanie; Grande, Bastian; Kolbe, Michaela; Kriech, Sarah; Nöthiger, Christoph B.; Kohler, Malcolm; Spahn, Donat R.; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonanesthesiologist administered propofol (NAAP) sedation for flexible bronchoscopy is controversial, because there is no established airway management (AM) training for pulmonologists. The aim was to investigate the performance and acceptance of a proposed AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists performing NAAP sedation. The algorithm includes using 3 maneuvers including bag mask ventilation (BMV), laryngeal tube (LT), and needle cricothyrotomy (NCT). During training (consisting of 2 sessions with a break of 9 weeks in between), these maneuvers were demonstrated and exercised, followed by 4 consecutive attempts to succeed with each of these devices. The primary outcome was the improvement of completion time needed for a competent airway. Secondary outcomes were the trainees’ overall reactions to the training and algorithm, and the perceptions of psychological safety (PS). The 23 staff members of the Department of Pulmonology performed a total of 552 attempts at AM procedures (4 attempts at each of the 3 maneuvers in 2 sessions), and returned a total of 42 questionnaires (4 questionnaires were not returned). Median completion times of LT and NCT improved significantly between Sessions 1 and 2 (P = 0.005 and P = 0.04, respectively), whereas BMV was only marginally improved (P = 0.05). Trainees perceived training to be useful and expressed satisfaction with this training and the algorithm. The perception of PS increased after training. An AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists leads to improved technical AM skills, and is considered useful by trainees and raised their perception of PS during training. It thus represents a promising program. PMID:27281093

  7. SafAIRway: an airway training for pulmonologists performing a flexible bronchoscopy with nonanesthesiologist administered propofol sedation: A prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Melanie; Grande, Bastian; Kolbe, Michaela; Kriech, Sarah; Nöthiger, Christoph B; Kohler, Malcolm; Spahn, Donat R; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Nonanesthesiologist administered propofol (NAAP) sedation for flexible bronchoscopy is controversial, because there is no established airway management (AM) training for pulmonologists. The aim was to investigate the performance and acceptance of a proposed AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists performing NAAP sedation. The algorithm includes using 3 maneuvers including bag mask ventilation (BMV), laryngeal tube (LT), and needle cricothyrotomy (NCT). During training (consisting of 2 sessions with a break of 9 weeks in between), these maneuvers were demonstrated and exercised, followed by 4 consecutive attempts to succeed with each of these devices. The primary outcome was the improvement of completion time needed for a competent airway. Secondary outcomes were the trainees' overall reactions to the training and algorithm, and the perceptions of psychological safety (PS). The 23 staff members of the Department of Pulmonology performed a total of 552 attempts at AM procedures (4 attempts at each of the 3 maneuvers in 2 sessions), and returned a total of 42 questionnaires (4 questionnaires were not returned). Median completion times of LT and NCT improved significantly between Sessions 1 and 2 (P = 0.005 and P = 0.04, respectively), whereas BMV was only marginally improved (P = 0.05). Trainees perceived training to be useful and expressed satisfaction with this training and the algorithm. The perception of PS increased after training. An AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists leads to improved technical AM skills, and is considered useful by trainees and raised their perception of PS during training. It thus represents a promising program. PMID:27281093

  8. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  9. Influences of laryngeal afferent inputs on intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization in the cat.

    PubMed

    Shiba, K; Yoshida, K; Nakajima, Y; Konno, A

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the possible role of the laryngeal afferent inputs in the regulation of intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization. We studied the influences of airflow and/or pressure applied to the larynx on intralaryngeal muscle activity during vocalization in ketamine-anesthetized cats. Vocalization was induced by airflow applied to the upper airway, which was isolated from the lower airway, during pontine call site stimulation. When the upper airway was open to the atmosphere through the nostrils and mouth, the airflow increased not only the vocal fold adductor and tensor activities but also the duration of these activities. The adductor and tensor activities were increased suddenly at a critical subglottic pressure level equivalent to the subglottic pressure threshold for vocalization. These effects were significantly reduced by sectioning of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve or by lidocaine application to the laryngeal mucosa. Sustained pressure applied to the isolated upper airway, when the mouth and nostrils were occluded, did not affect adductor or tensor activities. These results indicate that the afferent inputs evoked by vocal fold stretching or vibration play an important role in the motor control of intralaryngeal and respiratory muscles during vocalization. PMID:9089702

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection in laryngeal diseases.

    PubMed

    Siupsinskiene, Nora; Jurgutaviciute, Vilma; Katutiene, Inga; Janciauskas, Dainius; Vaitkus, Saulius; Adamonis, Kęstutis

    2013-08-01

    Clinical studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori can be found not only in the mucosa of the stomach, but in the pharyngeal and laryngeal regions as well. The aim of this prospective case-control study was to identify H. pylori infection in the biopsy material from the larynx of the patients suffering from benign laryngeal diseases (vocal fold polyps, laryngitis) and laryngeal cancer and to investigate the possible relationships between the laryngeal H. pylori and patients' socio-demographic data and laryngopharyngeal reflux. The results of the biopsy material from 67 adult patients treated for benign laryngeal diseases and laryngeal cancer and 11 individuals of the control group revealed that H. pylori infection could be identified in more than one-third of the patients. In the majority of cases H. pylori was found in the patients with chronic laryngitis (45.5%) and laryngeal cancer (46.2%). The findings of these sub-groups significantly differed from those of the control group (9.1%) (p < 0.05). No significant relationships between H. pylori infection found in the laryngeal region and patients' demographic data, their unhealthy habits and reflux-related symptoms or signs were obtained. It could be concluded that H. pylori can colonize in the larynx of patients with benign laryngeal diseases and laryngeal cancer. To clarify the role of H. pylori as a risk factor for laryngeal diseases further research is needed. PMID:23572292

  11. Computed tomography of nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krystina; O'Brien, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening problem in cats and for which a noninvasive, sensitive method rapid diagnosis is needed. The purposes of this prospective study were to describe a computed tomography (CT) technique for nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction, CT characteristics of obstructive diseases, and comparisons between CT findings and findings from other diagnostic tests. Ten cats with clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited for the study. Four cats with no clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited as controls. All cats underwent computed tomography imaging without sedation or anesthesia, using a 16-slice helical CT scanner and a previously described transparent positional device. Three-dimensional (3D) internal volume rendering was performed on all CT image sets and 3D external volume rendering was also performed on cats with evidence of mass lesions. Confirmation of upper airway obstruction was based on visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, fine-needle aspirate, biopsy, or necropsy. Seven cats were diagnosed with intramural upper airway masses, two with laryngotracheitis, and one with laryngeal paralysis. The CT and 3D volume-rendered images identified lesions consistent with upper airway disease in all cats. In cats with mass lesions, CT accurately identified the mass and location. Findings from this study supported the use of CT imaging as an effective technique for diagnosing upper airway obstruction in nonanesthetized cats. PMID:23441677

  12. Clay Mask Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Masks can represent so many things, such as emotions (happy, sad, fearful) and power. The familiar "comedy and tragedy" masks, derived from ancient Greek theater, are just one example from mask history. Death masks from the ancient Egyptians influenced the ancient Romans into creating similar masks for their departed. Masks can represent many…

  13. Lifestyle Changes After Laryngeal or Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer affect your emotional health? Lifestyle changes after laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer You can’ ... people want to know if there are specific lifestyle changes they can make to reduce their risk ...

  14. Towards Computational Modeling of Phonation Using CT--Based Laryngeal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen Karimian, S. A.; Mittal, Rajat

    2008-11-01

    The oscillatory flow generated in human larynx plays a key role in the process of phonation. While much has been done to understand the main features of such flow by using idealized geometry models and simplified flow conditions, there is still little known about the 3D features of laryngeal flow. In this work, anatomically realistic models of the human larynx are used to analyze the fluid dynamics of 3D laryngeal flow using high--fidelity numerical simulations. A Cartesian--grid--based, finite--difference Navier--Stokes solver is used to carry out these simulations. Three--dimensional models of human larynx are extracted from CT images and unstructured surface grids are generated for the model geometries. The pressure driven flow is simulated for a range of Reynolds numbers. The main objective in this work is to understand more in--depth the effect of 3D geometric features of glottal airway on the laryngeal flow structure.

  15. Smoke Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury from the noxious products of fire combustion accounts for as much as 80 percent of fire-related deaths in the United States. Many of these deaths are preventable. Smoke Mask, Inc. (SMI), of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, is working to decrease these casualties with its line of life safety devices. The SMI personal escape hood and the Guardian Filtration System provide respiratory protection that enables people to escape from hazardous and unsafe conditions. The breathing filter technology utilized in the products is specifically designed to supply breathable air for 20 minutes. In emergencies, 20 minutes can mean the difference between life and death.

  16. Nasal mask ventilation is better than face mask ventilation in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Rana, Sandeep; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Vishal, Vindhya; Sikdar, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Face mask ventilation of the edentulous patient is often difficult as ineffective seating of the standard mask to the face prevents attainment of an adequate air seal. The efficacy of nasal ventilation in edentulous patients has been cited in case reports but has never been investigated. Material and Methods: Consecutive edentulous adult patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, during a 17-month period, were prospectively evaluated. After induction of anesthesia and administration of neuromuscular blocker, lungs were ventilated with a standard anatomical face mask of appropriate size, using a volume controlled anesthesia ventilator with tidal volume set at 10 ml/kg. In case of inadequate ventilation, the mask position was adjusted to achieve best-fit. Inspired and expired tidal volumes were measured. Thereafter, the face mask was replaced by a nasal mask and after achieving best-fit, the inspired and expired tidal volumes were recorded. The difference in expired tidal volumes and airway pressures at best-fit with the use of the two masks and number of patients with inadequate ventilation with use of the masks were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 79 edentulous patients were recruited for the study. The difference in expiratory tidal volumes with the use of the two masks at best-fit was statistically significant (P = 0.0017). Despite the best-fit mask placement, adequacy of ventilation could not be achieved in 24.1% patients during face mask ventilation, and 12.7% patients during nasal mask ventilation and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Nasal mask ventilation is more efficient than standard face mask ventilation in edentulous patients. PMID:27625477

  17. Laser applications in pediatric airway surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Nguyen, John D.; Crumley, Roger

    2003-06-01

    The smaller anatomy and limited access to instrumentation pose a challenge to the pediatric airway surgeon. The enhanced precision and ability to photocoagulate tissue while operating with the laser enhances the surgeon"s ability to successfully treat unique pediatric conditions such subglottic hemangiomas, congenital cysts, respiratory papillomatosis, and laryngeal or tracheal stenosis. Due to its shallow tissue penetration and thermal effect, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is generally considered the laser of choice for pediatric airway applications. The potential for increased scarring and damage to underlying tissue caused by the greater penetration depth and thermal effect of the Nd:YAG and KTP lasers preclude their use in this population. In this review, we will describe the specific advantages of using lasers in airway surgery, the current technology and where the current technology is deficient.

  18. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF LARYNGEAL FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we have investigated laryngeal air flows by numerically solving the corresponding Navier-Stokes equations expressed in a two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system. The glottal aperture, defined by the geometry of the vocal folds was allowed to change with the v...

  20. Laryngeal obstruction by heroin packets.

    PubMed

    Colombage, Senarath M

    2003-06-01

    A 28-year-old healthy man collapsed while being arrested by the police for alleged possession of heroin and was found dead on admission to the hospital. Autopsy revealed complete occlusion of the laryngeal opening by a cellophane bag containing 24 packets of heroin powder. PMID:12773851

  1. Mask process simulation for mask quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Nobuyasu; Goto, So; Tsunoda, Dai; Shin, So-Eun; Lee, Sukho; Shon, Jungwook; Park, Jisoong

    2015-10-01

    Demand for mask process correction (MPC) is growing facing the 14nm era. We have developed model based MPC and can generate mask contours by using this mask process model. This mask process model consists of EB (development) and etch, which employs a threshold (level set) model and a variable bias model respectively. The model calibration tool accepts both CD measurement results and SEM images. The simulation can generate mask image (contour), runs with distributed computing resources, and has scalable performance. The contour simulation shows the accuracy of the MPC correction visually and provides comprehensive information about hot spots in mask fabrication. Additionally, it is possible to improve lithography simulation quality by providing a simulated mask contour. In this paper, accuracy and computational performance of mask process simulation are shown. The focus is on the difference between the calibration methods using CDs or images.

  2. Dosimetric Predictors of Laryngeal Edema

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Adapala, Prashanth; Endres, Eugene J. C; Brack, Collin; Fiorino, Claudio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Parker, Brent

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric predictors of laryngeal edema after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 66 patients were selected who had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with grossly uninvolved larynx at the time of RT, no prior major surgical operation except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, treatment planning data available for analysis, and at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from RT performed by a single observer. Both the biologically equivalent mean dose at 2 Gy per fraction and the cumulative biologic dose-volume histogram of the larynx were extracted for each patient. Laryngeal edema was prospectively scored after treatment. Time to endpoint, moderate or worse laryngeal edema (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2+), was calculated with log rank test from the date of treatment end. Results: At a median follow-up of 17.1 months (range, 0.4- 50.0 months), the risk of Grade 2+ edema was 58.9% {+-} 7%. Mean dose to the larynx, V30, V40, V50, V60, and V70 were significantly correlated with Grade 2+ edema at univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, mean laryngeal dose (continuum, hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.15; p < 0.001), and positive neck stage at RT (N0-x vs. N +, hazard ratio, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-9.58; p = 0.008) were the only independent predictors. Further stratification showed that, to minimize the risk of Grade 2+ edema, the mean dose to the larynx has to be kept {<=}43.5 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Conclusion: Laryngeal edema is strictly correlated with various dosimetric parameters; mean dose to the larynx should be kept {<=}43.5 Gy.

  3. Use of extraglottic airways in patients undergoing ambulatory laparoscopic surgery without the need for tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Suhitharan, T.; Teoh, Wendy H.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Second generation extraglottic airway devices with gastric access and separate breathing channels have ushered in a new era where their use is increasingly prevalent in surgical patients who would have been traditionally intubated for general anesthesia. New innovations like the i-gel, which is constructed of a thermoplastic elastomer, provide an airtight seal around patient's perilaryngeal anatomy without the inflatable cuff mechanism found in the laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMAS). Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing the LMAS with the i-gel in 70 anesthetized paralyzed patients undergoing laparoscopic female sterilization. Our primary outcome measure was the oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP). We studied secondary outcomes of successful first attempt insertion rates, time and ease of the airway and gastric tube insertion, leak fractions and pharyngeal morbidity. Results: We found no difference in the OLP between LMAS and i-gel, 25.9 (4.2) versus 24.4 (4.3) s, P=0.153. Both devices had similar first attempt insertion rates (LMAS 94% vs. i-gel 91%) with similar ease and comparable times to achieve an effective airway, LMAS 14.7 (2.7) versus i-gel 16.5 (9.6) s, P=0.306, although gastric tube insertion was easier and faster for the LMAS, 7.9 (1.9) versus i-gel 14.8 (7.7) s, P<0.005. Intraoperatively, there was a significantly greater leak fraction with the i-gel of 0.06 (0.03) versus 0.04 (0.02) with the LMAS, P=0.013. Three patients (8.6%) with LMAS had mild sore throat; one patient (2.9%) had mucosal injury. No complications were documented in the i-gel group. Conclusions: Both these extraglottic airway devices offer similar OLPs, high insertion success rates at the first attempt with similar ease and insertion times (albeit longer gastric tube insertion with i-gel). Both provided effective ventilation despite a higher leak fraction with i-gel that was clinically inconsequential. PMID:24348297

  4. Masks and Other Disguises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploghoft, Debra

    Instructions for making simple masks are provided in this guide for teachers of elementary children. Directions with illustrations are given for constructing masks from paper plates, construction paper, plastic milk jugs, and papier-mache. Ideas include a clown mask, a flower mask, a top hat, a paper crown, and "Groucho" glasses. Types of masks…

  5. Progress in laryngeal framework surgery.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, N

    2000-03-01

    This paper reviews progress in laryngeal framework surgery since it was first reported about 25 years ago. The success of this type of surgery requires both a basic knowledge of the physiology of phonation, in order to make decisions about the surgical procedure, and surgical skill, in order to accomplish the intended procedure successfully. The main reason for hoarseness is imperfect closure of the glottis, but the second most important reason for hoarseness, increased stiffness of the vocal fold, cannot be corrected by mere medialization of the vocal fold. Laryngeal framework surgery is different in concept from conventional surgery, which is intended to remove the lesion. Controversial points discussed here regarding type I thyroplasty include: (i) whether the cartilage window should be removed; (ii) materials for fixation of the window; and (iii) comparison of type I thyroplasty with arytenoid adduction. A new surgical treatment for spasmodic dysphonia and its results in three patients are described briefly. Surgery for raising the vocal pitch requires further improvement. In the future, laryngeal framework surgery will have wider application in treatment of dysphonias, such as asthenic voice due to atrophy in professional singers or aging, pitch problems in females and gender identity disorder and spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:11603755

  6. Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, William M. Mancuso, Anthony A.; Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Werning, John W.; Amdur, Robert J.; Villaret, Douglas B.

    2007-10-01

    The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

  7. Medical management considerations for upper airway disease.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, G L

    1992-06-01

    The conducting airways, also commonly referred to as the upper airways, provide for the passage of air to and from the atmosphere and lungs. Anatomical components include the nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and mainstem bronchi. Clinical problems involving the conducting airways can be manifested by relatively mild clinical signs of stertorous breathing, by life-threatening dyspnea, or by chronic bouts of inspiratory stridor and cough. Concurrent disease of the lower respiratory system (ie, chronic bronchitis) as well as other organ systems (ie, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine) may significantly contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of upper airway disease. Diagnosis of the diseases of the conducting airways is primarily based on history and physical examination. The dynamic nature of some conditions, related to the phases of respiration, can make diagnosis more difficult. In addition to direct visualization, radiographic and endoscopic evaluation are often useful. Many upper airway problems, especially congenital conditions, lend themselves to surgical palliation that should be performed as early in life as possible. Medical management is often directed at treating underlying diseases and the relief of clinical signs. Historically, the use of variety of drugs have been advocated and frequently include decongestants, cough suppressants, bronchodilators, glucocorticoids, and antibiotics. However, their use may be detrimental and contraindicated. In addition, therapy for some conditions (ie, laryngeal paralysis and intrathoracic tracheal collapse) may be better directed at increasing airway muscle tone in order to stabilized airway patency. Therapeutic agents that may be useful include aspirin and digitalis. The overall objective to medical management must be to balance potential therapeutic benefit against untoward effects in order to minimize clinical signs and to improve the animal's quality of life. PMID:1643322

  8. Multifunctional laryngeal motoneurons: an intracellular study in the cat.

    PubMed

    Shiba, K; Satoh, I; Kobayashi, N; Hayashi, F

    1999-04-01

    We studied the patterns of membrane potential changes in laryngeal motoneurons (LMs) during vocalization, coughing, swallowing, sneezing, and the aspiration reflex in decerebrate paralyzed cats. LMs, identified by antidromic activation from the recurrent laryngeal nerve, were expiratory (ELMs) or inspiratory (ILMs) cells that depolarized during their respective phases in eupnea. During vocalization, most ELMs depolarized and most ILMs hyperpolarized. Some ILMs depolarized slightly during vocalization. During coughing, ELMs depolarized abruptly at the transition from the inspiratory to the expiratory phase. In one-third of ELMs, this depolarization persisted throughout the abdominal burst. In the remainder ("type A"), it was interrupted by a transient repolarization. ILMs exhibited a membrane potential trajectory opposite to that of type A ELMs during coughing. During swallowing, the membrane potential of ELMs decreased transiently at the onset of the hypoglossal burst and then depolarized strongly during the burst. ILMs hyperpolarized sharply at the onset of the burst and depolarized as hypoglossal activity ceased. During sneezing, ELMs and ILMs exhibited membrane potential changes similar to those of type A ELMs and ILMs during coughing. During the aspiration reflex, ELMs and ILMs exhibited bell-shaped hyperpolarization and depolarization trajectories, respectively. We conclude that central drives to LMs, consisting of complex combinations of excitation and inhibition, vary during vocalization and upper airway defensive reflexes. This study provides data for analysis of the neuronal networks that produce these various behaviors and analysis of network reorganization caused by changes in dynamic connections between the respiratory and nonrespiratory neuronal networks. PMID:10087084

  9. Laryngeal sarcocystosis accompanying laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Cheewaruangroj, Wichit; Nitiyanant, Prawat

    2011-09-01

    Laryngeal sarcocystosis is an uncommon zoonotic coccidian protozoal infestation of human beings. The authors reviewed the pathology of 1,063 laryngeal biopsies over the past 10 years (2000 to 2009). Only one case of laryngeal sarcocystosis accompanying laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma was identified. The overall prevalence of laryngeal sarcocystosis was 0.094%. The case was a 66-year-old man who presented with voice hoarseness for six months. Physical examination and computed tomography revealed an ulcerative exophytic mass on the right true vocal cord, suggestive of laryngeal carcinoma. He underwent a right frontolateral partial laryngectomy. Histopathology showed a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma with Sarcocystis spp in the vocalis muscle. He was followed up and enrolled in speech therapy. The authors briefly review the clinicopathologic features and pathogenesis of muscular sarcocystosis and concurrent laryngeal sarcocystosis and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:22299431

  10. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Laboratory experimental studies were carried out to investigate the factors influencing the deposition of aerosols ranging in size from 1 nm to 10 [mu]m in the human nasal, oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal airways. These experimental studies were performed in replicate upper airway physical models and in human volunteer subjects. New replicate models of the oral passage of an infant, the oral passage of an adult at two openings and the combined nasal and oral airways of an adult were constructed during the period, adding to the existing models of adult, child and infant nasal and oral airways models. Deposition studies in the adult oral and adult nasal models were performed under simulated cyclic flow conditions with 1 nm particles to compare with previously measured constant flow studies. Similar studies with inertial particles (1--10 [mu]m diameter) were performed with the adult nasal model; in both instances, results with cyclic flow were similar to constant flow results using a simple average flow rate based on inspiratory volume and time of inspiration. Human subject studies were performed with particle sizes 5--20 nm for nasal inspiration; preliminary analysis shows good agreement with model studies at several representative flow rates. Nasal inspiratory inertial deposition of 1--4 [mu]m diameter particles was measured in several adults as a function of airway dimensions; dimensional changes of the valve area by decongestion did not produce concomitant deposition changes.

  11. Influence of Baclofen on Laryngeal and Spinal Motor Drive During Cough in the Anesthetized Cat

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Daniel; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The antitussive properties of (±) baclofen on laryngeal muscle activities have not been determined. The hypothesis of this study was that administration of (±) baclofen would suppress upper airway muscle motor activity in a dose-dependent manner during cough. Study Design This is a prospective, preclinical, hypothesis-driven, paired design. Methods Electromyograms of the parasternal, rectus abdominis, thyroarytenoid, posterior cricoarytenoid, and thyrohyoid were measured, along with esophageal pressure. Cough was elicited by mechanical stimulation of the lumen of the intrathoracic trachea in spontaneously breathing cats. Results Baclofen (±) (3–10 µg kg−1 i.a.) induced decreases in the electromyogram amplitude of the rectus abdominis motor drive during coughing, the inspiratory and active expiratory (E1) phases of cough, and cough number per epoch. There was no effect of (±) baclofen on the EMG amplitudes of any of the laryngeal muscles, the parasternal, or the duration of the passive expiratory (E2) phase. Conclusions Results from the present study indicate differential control mechanisms for laryngeal and inspiratory motor drive during cough, providing evidence of a control system regulating laryngeal activity and inspiratory spinal drive that is divergent from the control of expiratory spinal motoneurons. PMID:23670824

  12. Shuttle mask floorplanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Tian, Ruiqi; Wong, Martin D.; Reich, Alfred J.

    2003-12-01

    A shuttle mask has different chips on the same mask. The chips are not electrically connected. Alliance and foundry customers can utilize shuttle masks to share the rising cost of mask and wafer manufacturing. This paper studies the shuttle mask floorplan problem, which is formulated as a rectangle-packing problem with constraints of final die sawing strategy and die-to-die mask inspection. For our formulation, we offer a "merging" method that reduces the problem to an unconstrained slicing floorplan problem. Excellent results are obtained from the experiment with real industry data. We also study a "general" method and discuss the reason why it does not work very well.

  13. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. PMID:27173595

  14. [Laryngeal and larynx-associated reflexes].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Miller, S; Jungheim, M; Schroeter, S

    2016-06-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex and the pharyngoglottal closure reflex protect the trachea and lower respiratory tract against the entrance of foreign material. The laryngeal expiration reflex and the cough reflex serve to propel foreign material, which has penetrated in the cranial direction. The inspiration reflex, the sniff reflex, and the swallowing reflex are further larynx-associated reflexes. In patients with dysphagia the laryngeal adductor reflex can be clinically tested with air pulses. The water swallow test serves to show the integrity of the cough reflex. The sniff reflex is useful to test the abduction function of the vocal folds. Future studies should address laryngeal reflexes more specifically, both for a better understanding of these life-supporting mechanisms and to improve diagnostic procedures in patients with impaired laryngeal function. PMID:27240793

  15. INFLUENCE OF HYGROSCOPIC GROWTH UPON THE DEPOSITION OF BRONCHODILATOR AEROSOLS IN UPPER HUMAN AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of hygroscopic growth upon the behavior of two bronchodilator drugs in upper airways is studied with an aerosol deposition model. The latter accounts for laryngeal jet impaction and turbulent flow instabilities caused by the larynx in computing particle deposition e...

  16. Occupational risk for laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, W.D.; Rothman, K.J.

    1982-04-01

    In a case-control analysis, we studied the effects of type of employment on laryngeal cancer risk using the interview data from the Third National Cancer Survey. Effects were measured relative to the risk for those employed in a group of arbitrarily defined industries and occupations with low risk. We excluded females and controlled for age, tobacco use, alcohol use, and race in the analysis. We found ratio estimates above 3.0 for workers in the railroad industry and the lumber industry; and for sheetmetal workers, grinding wheel operators, and automobile mechanics.

  17. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  18. Mask degradation monitoring with aerial mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Wen-Jui; Fu, Yung-Ying; Lu, Shih-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sian; Lin, Jeffrey; Wu, Clare; Lifschitz, Sivan; Tam, Aviram

    2013-06-01

    As design rule continues to shrink, microlithography is becoming more challenging and the photomasks need to comply with high scanner laser energy, low CDU, and ever more aggressive RETs. This give rise to numerous challenges in the semiconductor wafer fabrication plants. Some of these challenges being contamination (mainly haze and particles), mask pattern degradation (MoSi oxidation, chrome migration, etc.) and pellicle degradation. Fabs are constantly working to establish an efficient methodology to manage these challenges mainly using mask inspection, wafer inspection, SEM review and CD SEMs. Aerial technology offers a unique opportunity to address the above mask related challenges using one tool. The Applied Materials Aera3TM system has the inherent ability to inspect for defects (haze, particles, etc.), and track mask degradation (e.g. CDU). This paper focuses on haze monitoring, which is still a significant challenge in semiconductor manufacturing, and mask degradation effects that are starting to emerge as the next challenge for high volume semiconductor manufacturers. The paper describes Aerial inspector (Aera3) early haze methodology and mask degradation tracking related to high volume manufacturing. These will be demonstrated on memory products. At the end of the paper we take a brief look on subsequent work currently conducted on the more general issue of photo mask degradation monitoring by means of an Aerial inspector.

  19. A case series of skin necrosis following use of non invasive ventilation pressure masks.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Z; Venus, M; Kisku, W; Rayatt, S S

    2013-02-01

    Two cases of nasal skin necrosis secondary to pressure from the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) face masks are presented. Both developed skin necrosis as a result of wearing these masks over the nasal bridge. These cases highlight the need for clinical vigilance in application of CPAP masks, the need for monitoring the skin of the nose during CPAP use and the possible need for modifications in design to help prevent this serious complication. PMID:22432901

  20. Management of bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis after thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sanapala, Anitha; Nagaraju, Male; Rao, Lella Nageswara; Nalluri, Koteswar

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is rare for benign thyroid lesions (0.2%). After extubation-stridor, respiratory distress, aphonia occurs due to the closure of the glottic aperture necessitating immediate intervention and emergency intubation or tracheostomy. Intra-operative identification and preservation of the RLN minimizes the risk of injury. It is customary to expect RLN problems after thyroid surgery especially if malignancy, big thyroid, distorted anatomical problems and difficult airway that can lead to intubation trauma. Soon after extubating, it is essential to the anesthetist to check the vocal cord movements on phonation and oropharyngeal reflexes competency. But this case is specially mentioned to convey the message that in spite of absence of above mentioned predisposing factors for complications and good recovery profile specific to thyroid, there can be unanticipated airway compromise that if not attended to immediately may cost patient's life. This is a case of postextubation stridor following subtotal thyroidectomy due to bilateral RLN damage and its management. PMID:26417137

  1. Cricotracheal resection for laryngeal invasion by thyroid carcinoma: our experience.

    PubMed

    Morisod, Benoît; Monnier, Philippe; Simon, Christian; Sandu, Kishore

    2014-08-01

    Invasion of the laryngeal framework by thyroid carcinoma requires specific surgical techniques and carries a higher rate of complications that deserve to be highlighted. We reviewed our data from 1995 to 2012 and found six patients with laryngotracheal invasion by thyroid carcinoma. All underwent total thyroidectomy and single-stage cricotracheal resection, plus anterolateral neck dissection. Three had airway obstruction that necessitated prior endoscopic debulking. None of the patients needed a tracheotomy. There were four cases of papillary carcinoma, and two cases of undifferentiated carcinoma. One patient died of complications of the procedure (anastomotic dehiscence and tracheo-innominate artery fistula). Another died 2 months after the procedure from local recurrence and aspiration pneumonia. One case presented recurrence at 15 months, which was managed by re-excision and adjuvant radiotherapy; after 26 months of follow-up, he has no evidence of locoregional recurrence. The three other patients are alive without evidence of disease at 6, 18 and 41 months, respectively. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion by thyroid carcinoma is an effective procedure, but carries significant risks of complications. This could be attributed to the devascularisation of the tracheal wall due to the simultaneous neck dissection, sacrifice of the strap muscles or of a patch of oesophageal muscle layer. We advocate a sternocleidomastoid flap to cover the anastomosis. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion can be curative with good functional outcomes, even for the advanced stages of thyroid cancer. Endoscopic debulking of the airway prior to the procedure avoids tracheotomy. PMID:24129693

  2. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient's risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  3. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient’s risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  4. Mask industry assessment: 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert V.; Hector, Scott D.

    2004-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of mask technologists from semiconductor manufacturers, merchant mask suppliers, and makers of equipment for mask fabrication. This year's assessment is the third in the current series of annual reports and is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the mask industry. This report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results may be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey builds upon the 2003 survey to provide an ongoing database using the same questions as a baseline with only a few minor changes or additions. Questions are grouped into categories: general business profile information, data processing, yields and yield loss mechanisms, delivery times, returns and services. Within each category are a many questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers whose revenue represents approximately 85% of the global mask market.

  5. 2013 mask industry survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive survey was sent to merchant and captive mask shops to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. 2013 marks the 12th consecutive year for this process. Historical topics including general mask profile, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, maintenance, and returns were included and new topics were added. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. While each year's survey includes minor updates based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics, the bulk of the survey and reporting structure have remained relatively constant. A series of improvements is being phased in beginning in 2013 to add value to a wider audience, while at the same time retaining the historical content required for trend analyses of the traditional metrics. Additions in 2013 include topics such as top challenges, future concerns, and additional details in key aspects of mask masking, such as the number of masks per mask set per ground rule, minimum mask resolution shipped, and yield by ground rule. These expansions beyond the historical topics are aimed at identifying common issues, gaps, and needs. They will also provide a better understanding of real-life mask requirements and capabilities for comparison to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

  6. Upper airway obstruction in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chatzoudis, D; Kelly, T J; Lancaster, J; Jones, T M

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of recurrent airway obstruction episodes resulting from laryngeal hypermobility in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A 44-year-old woman, with known Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, presented with recent onset of episodes of upper airway obstruction due to hypermobility of her larynx. A suitable conservative management strategy proved elusive and the patient finally underwent a thyrohyoidopexy. The patient remains symptom free nine months after the procedure. This is the first report of spontaneous life threatening upper airway obstruction due to hypermobility of the suprahyoid suspensory soft tissues in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. PMID:26263828

  7. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  8. Treatment Options by Stage (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  9. Chondrosarcoma of the Laryngeal Thyroid Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Righi, Stefano; Boffano, Paolo; Pateras, Dimitrios; Chiodo, Domenico; Zanardi, Fabio; Patetta, Roberta

    2015-09-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the larynx is a rare tumor, accounting for 0.07% to 2% of all laryngeal cancers. Nevertheless, it represents the most frequent nonepithelial neoplasm of the laryngeal region.Laryngeal chondrosarcomas are usually characterized by slow growth and low metastatic potential.The exact etiopathogenesis of chondrosarcoma is still debated. Diagnosis can be difficult given the slow rate of growth and nonspecific patient symptoms at presentation.Because of its rarity, literature about laryngeal chondrosarcoma is mainly made up of case reports and small case series.Therefore, it is important to add any information regarding this pathology.The aim of this article was to present and discuss a new case of chondrosarcoma located in the thyroid cartilage in a 63-year-old woman. PMID:26267570

  10. Laryngeal Reflexes: Physiology, Technique and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the current level of knowledge and techniques available for the study of laryngeal reflexes. Overall, the larynx is under constant control of several systems (including respiration, swallowing and cough) as well as sensory-motor reflex responses involving glossopharyngeal, pharyngeal, laryngeal and tracheobronchial sensory receptors. Techniques for the clinical assessment of these reflexes are emerging and need to be examined for sensitivity and specificity in identifying laryngeal sensory disorders. Quantitative assessment methods for the diagnosis of sensory reductions as well as sensory hypersensitivity may account for laryngeal disorders such as chronic cough, paradoxical vocal fold disorder and muscular tension dysphonia. The development of accurate assessment techniques could improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these disorders. PMID:26241237

  11. Two Cases of the Laryngeal Cystic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Takeshi; Wada, Ryo; Homma, Hirotomo; Kidokoro, Yoshinobu; Yanai, Aya; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    We experienced two rare cases with laryngeal cystic lesions (laryngocele and laryngeal cyst). In the first case, the laryngocele case was removed by laryngomicrosurgery using an oral approach under general anesthesia. In the second case, the magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dumbbell-type cyst with mucus widely extending from the laryngeal lumen to the neck through the thyroid cartilage. The patient had undergone chemotherapy for renal carcinoma with multiple lung and bone metastases. Therefore, we performed only fine needle aspiration rather than aggressive surgery for extirpation of the cyst using an external approach. This fine needle aspiration could improve the quality of life by decreasing both the left laryngeal swelling and the resulting pain, which were the chief complaints. PMID:27162605

  12. Pentax Airway Scope® vs Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in adult patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoshijima, H; Kuratani, N; Hirabayashi, Y; Takeuchi, R; Shiga, T; Masaki, E

    2014-08-01

    The Pentax Airway Scope(®) is a single-use optical videolaryngoscope designed to assist with difficult tracheal intubation. We systematically reviewed the efficacy of the Pentax Airway Scope with that of a conventional laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in adults with 'normal' and 'difficult' airways. We included 17 randomised controlled trials with a total of 1801 participants. We used the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects model to calculate pooled relative risk or weighted mean differences. The relative risk (95% CI) of a Cormack-Lehane grade-1 laryngeal view was 2.40 (1.76-2.49) with the Pentax Airway Scope compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope, p < 0.00001. We found no other differences between the two laryngoscopes. Despite a superior laryngeal view, the Pentax Airway Scope provides little clinical benefit over the conventional laryngoscope. PMID:24820205

  13. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  14. Laryngitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015: ... et al. Clinical practice guideline: hoarseness (dysphonia). Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2009;141(3 Suppl 2):S1-S31. ...

  15. Intralesional Cidofovir application in recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Pudszuhn, Annett; Welzel, Cornelia; Bloching, Marc; Neumann, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis is a benign disease of the larynx often leading to organic and functional restrictions. The therapeutic treatment of choice in larynx-obstructing papillomatosis is at present surgical laser ablation. The effectiveness of adjuvant intralesional injection of the virustaticum Cidofovir has been investigated recently in a variety of therapeutic models. The present case study deals with the treatment of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis by means of surgical laser ablation of the laryngeal papillomas with adjuvant local injection of the virustaticum Cidofovir (dose of 5 mg/1 ml). Within the period from October 2001 to August 2004, ten patients aged between 5- and 70 years were treated with intralesional injections of Cidofovir. Papillomatosis was confirmed histologically in all cases, and the virus types were defined in part. Each of the patients underwent clinical-phoniatric examinations and was photographed for documentation. After 2-7 treatments with surgical laser papilloma ablation and intralesional Cidofovir injections, all patients showed a definite papilloma reduction, while in six cases complete remission was achieved. During the follow-up period of 8-30 months, not a single recurrence of the laryngeal papillomatosis occurred. In the majority of patients, a clear improvement in the voice was achieved. There were no local or systemic side effects caused by the virustaticum. Intralesional injection of Cidofovir is an adjuvant, but not a curative therapeutic option in recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Remission of previously frequently recurrent laryngeal papillomas can be achieved, but recurrence after longer treatment-free intervals is also possible. PMID:17058091

  16. Mask industry assessment: 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2003-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was initiated in 2002 with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition.1 This paper presents the results of the second annual survey which is an enhanced version of the inaugural survey building upon its strengths and improving the weak points. The original survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. The assessment is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the critical mask industry. An objective is to create a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. As subsequent years are added, historical profiles can also be created. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers representing approximately 80% of the global mask market (using revenue as the measure) and making this the most comprehensive mask industry survey ever. The participating companies are: Compugraphics, Dai Nippon Printing, Dupont Photomask, Hoya, IBM, Infineon, Intel, Taiwan Mask Company, Toppan, and TSMC. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry.

  17. Aberrant laryngeal location of Onchocerca lupi in a dog.

    PubMed

    Alho, Ana Margarida; Cruz, Luís; Coelho, Ana; Martinho, Filipe; Mansinho, Mário; Annoscia, Giada; Lia, Riccardo P; Giannelli, Alessio; Otranto, Domenico; de Carvalho, Luís Madeira

    2016-06-01

    Onchocerca lupi (Spirurida, Onchocercidae) is an emerging vector-borne helminth that causes nodular lesions associated with acute or chronic ocular disease in dogs and cats. Since its first description in dogs in 1991, this zoonotic filarioid has been increasingly reported in Europe and the United States. An 8-year-old outdoor mixed-breed female dog from the Algarve (southern Portugal) was presented with a history of severe dyspnoea. Cervical and thoracic radiographs revealed a slight reduction in the diameter of the cervical trachea and a moderate increase in radiopacity of the laryngeal soft tissue. An exploratory laryngoscopy was performed, revealing filiform worms associated with stenosis of the thyroid cartilage and a purulent necrotic tissue in the larynx lumen. A single sessile nodule, protruding from the dorsal wall of the laryngeal lumen caused a severe reduction of the glottis and tracheal diameter. Fragments of the worms were morphologically and molecularly identified as O. lupi. Histological examination of the nodule showed a granulomatous reaction with sections of coiled gravid female nematodes. Following laryngoscopy, a tracheostomy tube was inserted to relieve dyspnoea and ivermectin (300 μg/kg, once a week, for 8 weeks) combined with prednisolone was prescribed. The dog showed a complete recovery. Although O. lupi has been isolated in human patients from the spinal cord, this is the first report of an aberrant migration of O. lupi in a dog. The veterinary medical community should pay attention to aberrant location of O. lupi and consider onchocercosis as a differential diagnosis for airway obstruction in dogs. PMID:26732654

  18. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Erica Y.; Scalzitti, Nicholas J.; Dion, Gregory R.; Bowe, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  19. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Erica Y; Scalzitti, Nicholas J; Dion, Gregory R; Bowe, Sarah N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  20. Object Substitution Masking: When Does Mask Preview Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Stephen Wee Hun; Chua, Fook K.

    2008-01-01

    When a target is enclosed by a 4-dot mask that persists after the target disappears, target identification is worse than it is when the mask terminates with the target. This masking effect is attributed to object substitution masking (OSM). Previewing the mask, however, attenuates OSM. This study investigated specific conditions under which mask…

  1. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    PubMed

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  2. Larynx during exercise: the unexplored bottleneck of the airways.

    PubMed

    Røksund, Ola Drange; Heimdal, John-Helge; Olofsson, Jan; Maat, Robert Christiaan; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Exercise-induced shortness of breath is not uncommon in otherwise healthy young people. Based on the presenting symptoms alone, it is challenging to distinguish exercise-induced asthma (EIA) from exercise-induced obstruction of central airways, sometimes leading to diagnostic errors and inadequate treatment. Central airway obstruction usually presents with exercise-induced inspiratory symptoms (EIIS) during ongoing exercise. EIIS tends to peak towards the end of an exercise session or immediately after its completion, contradicting symptoms of EIA typically peaking 3-15 min after the exercise has stopped. EIIS is usually associated with some form of laryngeal obstruction. Transnasal flexible laryngoscopy performed continuously throughout an incremental exercise test from rest to exhaustion or to intolerable symptoms is usually diagnostic, and also provides information that is important for further handling and treatment. Reflecting the complex anatomy and functional features of the larynx, exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) appears to be a heterogeneous condition. Contradicting previous beliefs, recent literature suggests that laryngeal adduction in a majority of cases starts in supraglottic structures and that vocal cord adduction (VCD) most often occurs as a secondary phenomenon. However, EILO is poorly understood and more and better research is needed to unravel causal mechanisms. The evidence base for treatment of EILO is weak. Speech therapy, psychotherapy, biofeedback, muscle training, anticholinergic aerosols have all been applied, as has laser supraglottoplasty. Randomized controlled trials with well-defined and verifiable inclusion and success criteria are required to establish evidence-based treatment schemes. PMID:25033930

  3. Extralaryngeal division of the recurrent laryngeal nerve: a new description for the inferior laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Bulent; Tunali, Selcuk; Ozan, Hasan

    2008-05-01

    Extralaryngeal division of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was contradictory in the literature. We aimed to investigate extralaryngeal division of the nerve, and also propose a new description for the inferior laryngeal nerve. Sixty specimens (120 sides) were examined for this project, including 41 men and 19 women cadavers between the ages of 40 and 89 years at death. In one right side, terminal segment of the nerve gave off many small branches surrounding the inferior thyroid artery then reaching the larynx, trachea, thyroid gland and esophagus. In eight sides, terminal segment of the nerve had no extralaryngeal division and entered the larynx as a single trunk. In 110 sides, the nerve had extralaryngeal division. One hundred and three nerves had two laryngeal and one to three extralaryngeal branches. Two types were described in this group. In type I (66 nerves), both branches arose from the same level of nerve. Type I had two subtypes: type Ia, the origin of the branches was just below the inferior constrictor muscle; type Ib, the origin of the branches was 15-35 mm below the muscle. In type II (37 nerves), the laryngeal branches arose just 3-5 mm above the extralaryngeal branches. We observed that the laryngeal and extralaryngeal branches arose generally from the same point of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The inferior laryngeal nerve is thus very short, or even nonexistent. Therefore, we suggest that if the term "superior laryngeal nerve" is a given, standard, and accepted term, then the term "inferior laryngeal nerve" should also be accepted instead of the term "recurrent laryngeal nerve." PMID:18292961

  4. Mask industry assessment: 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Hector, Scott

    2005-11-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of mask technologists from semiconductor manufacturers, merchant mask suppliers, and makers of equipment for mask fabrication. This year's assessment is the fourth in the current series of annual reports and is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the mask industry. This report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results may be used to guide future investments on critical path issues. This year's survey contains all of the 2004 survey questions to provide an ongoing database. Additional questions were added to the survey covering operating cost factors and equipment utilization. Questions are grouped into categories: general business profile information, data processing, yields and yield loss mechanisms, delivery times, returns and services, operating cost factors and equipment utilization. Within each category are a many questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. This assessment includes inputs from eight major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers whose revenue represents approximately 85% of the global mask market. This participation rate is reduced by one captive from 2004. Note: Toppan, DuPont Photomasks Inc and AMTC (new) were consolidated into one input therefore the 2004 and 2005 surveys are basically equivalent.

  5. Comparison of Five 2nd-Generation Supraglottic Airway Devices for Airway Management Performed by Novice Military Operators

    PubMed Central

    Henlin, Tomas; Sotak, Michal; Kovaricek, Petr; Tyll, Tomas; Balcarek, Lukas; Michalek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Five different second-generation supraglottic airway devices, ProSeal LMA, Supreme LMA, i-gel, SLIPA, and Laryngeal Tube Suction-D, were studied. Operators were inexperienced users with a military background, combat lifesavers, nurses, and physicians. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded study. Devices were inserted in the operating room in low light conditions after induction of general anesthesia. Primary outcome was successful insertion on the first attempt while secondary aims were insertion time, number of attempts, oropharyngeal seal pressure, ease of insertion, fibre optic position of device, efficacy of ventilation, and intraoperative trauma or regurgitation of gastric contents. Results. In total, 505 patients were studied. First-attempt insertion success rate was higher in the Supreme LMA (96%), i-gel (87.9%), and ProSeal LMA (85.9%) groups than in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D (80.6%) and SLIPA (69.4%) groups. Insertion time was shortest in the Supreme LMA (70.4 ± 32.5 s) and i-gel (74.4 ± 41.1 s) groups (p < 0.001). Oropharyngeal seal pressures were higher in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D and ProSeal LMA groups than in other three devices. Conclusions. Most study parameters for the Supreme LMA and i-gel were found to be superior to the other three tested supraglottic airway devices when inserted by novice military operators. PMID:26495289

  6. What's New in Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional resources for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers What’s new in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers research and treatment? ... to better tests for early detection and to new targeted treatments. Chemoprevention Chemoprevention is the use of ...

  7. What Are the Key Statistics about Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers? What are the key statistics about laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers? The American Cancer ... 000 cancers will start in the hypopharynx. Survival statistics for these cancers are discussed in “ Survival rates ...

  8. Mask industry assessment: 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Marmillion, Patricia

    2006-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the fifth in the current series of annual reports. With continued industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 survey. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns and Services, Operating Cost Factors, and Equipment Utilization. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  9. Mask industry assessment: 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2009-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the eighth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 through 2008 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This in combination with the past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  10. Mask industry assessment: 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Yun, Henry

    2008-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the seventh in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 through 2007 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  11. Mask Industry Assessment: 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelden, Gilbert; Marmillion, Patricia; Hughes, Greg

    2007-10-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name the cost and cycle time of mask technology and mask supply as top critical issues. A survey was created with support from SEMATECH and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey is designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This year's assessment is the sixth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. The report will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey is basically the same as the 2005 and 2006 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns and Services, Operating Cost Factors, and Equipment Utilization. Within each category is a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  12. Mask industry assessment: 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2002-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was created with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. This assessment can be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of our critical mask industry. It should serve as a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry.

  13. Mask and pattern characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routh, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of the mask and pattern facility to include information on equipment accuracy, limitations, and pattern making capabilities is discussed. An insight is provided into potential areas of pattern applications, the sequence of mask making, as well as possible inputs and outputs available to the user.

  14. Mini Metal Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project used with kindergarten and first-grade students that focused on traditional African masks as part of a unit on the culture of West Africa. Discusses how the students created their clay masks. Includes lists of learning objectives and art materials. (CMK)

  15. Enhancement in Informational Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Xiang; Richards, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to detect a tone added to a random masker improves when a preview of the masker is provided. In 2 experiments, the authors explored the role that perceptual organization plays in this release from masking. Method: Detection thresholds were measured in informational masking studies. The maskers were drawn at random prior to…

  16. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  17. An unusual cause of hoarseness and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Truong, Phat; Dickerson, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and thyroid disease suggest locally invasive thyroid malignancy. In contrast, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by benign multinodular goiters or ectopic thyroid tissue accounts for only 1% of cases. This article describes an unusual case of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy secondary to a benign ectopic retrosternal thyroid tissue mass. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with progressive voice weakness and hoarseness. PMID:27467296

  18. Central nervous system integration of sensorimotor signals in oral and pharyngeal structures: oropharyngeal kinematics response to recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Ohlemacher, Jocelyn; Lammers, Andrew R; Gross, Andrew; Ballester, Ashley; Fraley, Luke; German, Rebecca Z

    2016-03-01

    Safe, efficient liquid feeding in infant mammals requires the central coordination of oropharyngeal structures innervated by multiple cranial and spinal nerves. The importance of laryngeal sensation and central sensorimotor integration in this system is poorly understood. Recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion (RLN) results in increased aspiration, though the mechanism for this is unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of unilateral RLN lesion on the motor coordination of infant liquid feeding. We hypothesized that 1) RLN lesion results in modified swallow kinematics, 2) postlesion oropharyngeal kinematics of unsafe swallows differ from those of safe swallows, and 3) nonswallowing phases of the feeding cycle show changed kinematics postlesion. We implanted radio opaque markers in infant pigs and filmed them pre- and postlesion with high-speed videofluoroscopy. Markers locations were digitized, and swallows were assessed for airway protection. RLN lesion resulted in modified kinematics of the tongue relative to the epiglottis in safe swallows. In lesioned animals, safe swallow kinematics differed from unsafe swallows. Unsafe swallow postlesion kinematics resembled prelesion safe swallows. The movement of the tongue was reduced in oral transport postlesion. Between different regions of the tongue, response to lesion was similar, and relative timing within the tongue was unchanged. RLN lesion has a pervasive effect on infant feeding kinematics, related to the efficiency of airway protection. The timing of tongue and hyolaryngeal kinematics in swallows is a crucial locus for swallow disruption. Laryngeal sensation is essential for the central coordination in feeding of oropharyngeal structures receiving motor inputs from different cranial nerves. PMID:26679618

  19. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Mohamad R.; Samuels, Stuart E.; Bellile, Emily; Shalabi, Firas L.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP), composite nodal volumes (GTVN) and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC) had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance. PMID:26569309

  20. Laryngeal aspergilloma: a complication of inhaled fluticasone therapy for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Darley, David; Lowinger, David; Plit, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    Primary laryngeal aspergillosis in immunocompetent patients is rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old woman with laryngeal aspergillosis thought to be secondary to long-term inhaled fluticasone therapy. Laryngeal aspergillosis may be an underrecognized complication of inhaled corticosteroid therapy. PMID:25530858

  1. A forensic autopsy case of death from laryngeal stenosis due to a late complication of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hideto; Tanifuji, Takanobu; Hasegawa, Iwao; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2016-05-01

    Irradiation is one of the standard modalities of treatment for neck cancer; however, it occasionally causes severe late complications. Here, we report an autopsy case of a death from laryngeal stenosis due to a late complication of radiotherapy. A man in his 70s who underwent radiotherapy for laryngeal cancer 6months before death was found dead in his home. Complete regression of the cancer was obtained after treatment, and signs suggestive of cancer recurrence were not evident before his death. Postmortem computed tomography showed severe narrowing of the upper airway due to glottic tissue swelling. The autopsy revealed an edematous epiglottis and supraglottic-glottic tissue with an ulcerative lesion, which severely narrowed the upper airway. Histopathological findings showed edema, hyalinization, and a proliferation of granulation tissue at the affected site. Neither a gross recurrence of cancer or finding suggestive of infection was observed in the specimen. This case is instructive to forensic pathologists regarding noting a radiotherapy complication as one of the possible causes of sudden death when the decedent previously underwent radiotherapy for neck cancer, and stresses the importance of detailed history taking and careful examination of the neck organs. PMID:27161915

  2. Effectiveness of applying continuous positive airway pressure in a patient with paradoxical vocal fold movement after endotracheal extubation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Song, Keu La Me; Ko, Dong Chan; Pin, Jung Woo; Ryu, Kyong Ho; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Paradoxical vocal fold movement (PVFM) is an uncommon upper airway disorder defined as paradoxical adduction of the vocal folds during inspiration. The etiology and treatment of PVFM are unclear. The physician should manage this condition because of the possibility of near complete airway obstruction in severe case of PVFM. We report a case of successful airway management in a patient with PVFM by applying continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In this case, PVFM was detected after removing an endotracheal tube from a 67-year-old male who underwent excision of a laryngeal mass. The patient recovered without complications in 1 day with support by CPAP. PMID:26885309

  3. Effectiveness of applying continuous positive airway pressure in a patient with paradoxical vocal fold movement after endotracheal extubation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yeun Hee; Song, Keu La Me; Ko, Dong Chan; Pin, Jung Woo; Ryu, Kyong Ho; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2016-02-01

    Paradoxical vocal fold movement (PVFM) is an uncommon upper airway disorder defined as paradoxical adduction of the vocal folds during inspiration. The etiology and treatment of PVFM are unclear. The physician should manage this condition because of the possibility of near complete airway obstruction in severe case of PVFM. We report a case of successful airway management in a patient with PVFM by applying continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In this case, PVFM was detected after removing an endotracheal tube from a 67-year-old male who underwent excision of a laryngeal mass. The patient recovered without complications in 1 day with support by CPAP. PMID:26885309

  4. Hibernoma larynx with large multinodular goitre: unusual airway challenge.

    PubMed

    Iftikhar, Haissan; Siddiqui, Moghira Iqbaluddin

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of progressively increasing neck swelling, dysphagia and hoarseness of voice. CT scan revealed multi-nodular goitre and also showed a lesion in the supraglottis. It also showed another lesion in the supraglottis. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of thyroid revealed follicular cells. Routine flexible laryngoscopy was performed to evaluate vocal cord function; however, we found a smooth well-defined lesion just above the glottis, obstructing the direct view of the vocal cords, and an endangered airway. A provisional diagnosis of a laryngeal cyst was made. With all necessary precautions intubation was performed with a bougie and a reinforced endotracheal tube was inserted. Total thyroidectomy was performed first. With direct suspension laryngoscopy an attempt was made to deliver the laryngeal lesion, however, the lesion could not be removed. A suprahyoid lateral pharyngotomy was performed to deliver the lesion. Histopathology of the lesion revealed hibernoma. PMID:26250369

  5. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  6. Neurological Complications in Thyroid Surgery: A Surgical Point of View on Laryngeal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Varaldo, Emanuela; Ansaldo, Gian Luca; Mascherini, Matteo; Cafiero, Ferdinando; Minuto, Michele N.

    2014-01-01

    The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB) is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle) varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified, the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN) runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction, and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve, which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a low range. PMID

  7. 2012 Mask Industry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Litt, Lloyd C.

    2012-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to semiconductor industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. 2012 marks the 11th consecutive year for the mask industry survey. This year's survey and reporting structure are similar to those of the previous years with minor modifications based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics. Categories include general mask information, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, and maintenance and returns. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. Results, initial observations, and key comparisons between the 2011 and 2012 survey responses are shown here, including multiple indications of a shift towards the manufacturing of higher end photomasks.

  8. [The review of transoral laser microsurgery in laryngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Wang, Jihua; Xiao, Xuping

    2016-02-01

    Transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) has developed more than 40 years in the treatment of laryngeal cancer. TLM is especially important in the minimally invasive surgery of laryngeal carcinoma. Compared with the traditional open surgery, it is a major breakthrough, which has the significant advantages such as safety, effectiveness, low rate of local recurrence and high rate of larynx preservation. Not only can cure early laryngeal cancer, but also more and more the use of TLM in advanced supraglottic and glottic laryngeal cancer were reported. This article will review the characteristics, indications, superiority, surgical options and efficacy of the TLM in laryngeal carcinomas. PMID:27373106

  9. [Diagnosis and therapy of laryngitis gastrica].

    PubMed

    Pahn, J; Schlottmann, A; Witt, G; Wilke, W

    2000-07-01

    We treated 64 patients with the diagnosis of laryngitis gastrica with Antra (Omeprazol) in doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg. To determine the success of the therapy, pH monitoring of the esophagus and hypopharynx, the voice status and measurement of vocal penetrating capacity were used. The results prove that a 20-mg dose of Antra is suitable for the therapy of laryngitis gastrica with a high rate of success. Problems which arose during the investigation, consequent changes of the original concept of the project as well as new aspects and questions which resulted from this are discussed with respect to further investigation. PMID:10955230

  10. Laryngeal Leishmaniasis with Extra-pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Swati; Khatiwada, Saurav; Sehrawat, Priyanka; Nischal, Neeraj; Jorwal, Pankaj; Soneja, Manish; Sharma, M C; Sharma, S K; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Anup

    2015-09-01

    Clinical presentations of Leishmania infection include visceral (most common form), cutaneous, mucocutaneous, mucosal and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. Mucosal form of leishmaniasis mostly involves oral and nasal mucosa. Rarely, laryngeal and pharyngeal mucosa may also be involved. Its concomitant presence with tuberculosis (TB), a disease rampant in India, is uncommon. Here we are reporting a case of isolated laryngeal leishmaniasis associated with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), with approach to diagnosis and treatment in a tropical resource-limited setting. PMID:27608871