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Sample records for laryngeal nerve paralysis

  1. [Recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis: current knowledge and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hartl, D M; Brasnu, D

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this report is to summarize current concepts in unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (URLNP). Important aspects of laryngeal phylogenesis, physiology and anatomy are reviewed. Recent advances in the neurophysiology of URNLP are discussed. Revised and updated principles of diagnosis and treatment are provided. Glottic configuration and prognosis vary according to the type of neural lesion (neurapraxia, axonotmesis or neurotmesis). Therapeutic indications depend on glottic configuration and prognosis. Treatment options include voice therapy, vocal fold augmentation by intrafold injection, medialization thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and laryngeal reinnervation. Each treatment option is summarized, and the results reported in the medical literature are reviewed. PMID:10739996

  2. Partial Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Paralysis or Paresis? In Search for the Accurate Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Delides, Alexander; Kokotis, Panagiotis; Maragoudakis, Pavlos

    2015-01-01

    “Partial paralysis” of the larynx is a term often used to describe a hypomobile vocal fold as is the term “paresis.” We present a case of a dysphonic patient with a mobility disorder of the vocal fold, for whom idiopathic “partial paralysis” was the diagnosis made after laryngeal electromyography, and discuss a proposition for a different implementation of the term. PMID:26236524

  3. Irregular vocal fold dynamics incited by asymmetric fluid loading in a model of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, David; Erath, Byron D.; Zanartu, Matias; Peterson, Sean D.

    2011-11-01

    Voiced speech is produced by dynamic fluid-structure interactions in the larynx. Traditionally, reduced order models of speech have relied upon simplified inviscid flow solvers to prescribe the fluid loadings that drive vocal fold motion, neglecting viscous flow effects that occur naturally in voiced speech. Viscous phenomena, such as skewing of the intraglottal jet, have the most pronounced effect on voiced speech in cases of vocal fold paralysis where one vocal fold loses some, or all, muscular control. The impact of asymmetric intraglottal flow in pathological speech is captured in a reduced order two-mass model of speech by coupling a boundary-layer estimation of the asymmetric pressures with asymmetric tissue parameters that are representative of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Nonlinear analysis identifies the emergence of irregular and chaotic vocal fold dynamics at values representative of pathological speech conditions.

  4. Laryngeal nerve damage

    MedlinePLUS

    Vocal cord paralysis ... The doctor will check to see how your vocal cords move. Abnormal movement may mean that a laryngeal ... is to change the position of the paralyzed vocal cord to improve the voice. This can be done ...

  5. Sound signature for identification of tracheal collapse and laryngeal paralysis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Seong-Chan; Lee, Hee-Chun; Chang, Hong-Hee; Lee, Hyo-Jong

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether upper airway sounds of dogs with laryngeal paralysis and tracheal collapse have distinct sound characteristics, compared with unaffected dogs. The sounds of 5 dogs with laryngeal paralysis and 5 dogs with tracheal collapse were recorded. Honking sound appeared as predominant clinical signs in dogs with tracheal collapse. Laryngeal stridors appeared as predominant clinical signs in dogs with experimentally produced laryngeal paralysis by resection of laryngeal nerve, in which two types of stridor, I and II, were recorded. All these sounds were analyzed using sound spectrogam analysis. There were significant differences in duration (sec), intensity (dB), pitch (Hz), first formant (Hz), second formant (Hz), third formant (Hz), fourth formant (Hz) of sounds between the normal bark and two types of stridor or honking sound, indicating that the sound analysis might be a useful diagnostic modality for dogs with tracheal collapse and laryngeal paralysis. PMID:15699602

  6. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  7. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  8. A Case of Associated Laryngeal Paralysis Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus without Eruption

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Keishi; Furuta, Yasushi; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with significant weakness of the left soft palate, paralysis of the left vocal cord, and left facial nerve palsy. Although the patient showed no herpetic eruption in the pharyngolaryngeal mucosa and auricle skin, reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) was confirmed by serological examination. She was diagnosed with zoster sine herpete. After treatment with antiviral drugs and corticosteroids, her neurological disorder improved completely. When we encounter a patient with associated laryngeal paralysis, we should consider the possibility of reactivation of VZV even when no typical herpetic eruption is observed. PMID:24715925

  9. A Case of Associated Laryngeal Paralysis Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus without Eruption.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keishi; Furuta, Yasushi; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with significant weakness of the left soft palate, paralysis of the left vocal cord, and left facial nerve palsy. Although the patient showed no herpetic eruption in the pharyngolaryngeal mucosa and auricle skin, reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) was confirmed by serological examination. She was diagnosed with zoster sine herpete. After treatment with antiviral drugs and corticosteroids, her neurological disorder improved completely. When we encounter a patient with associated laryngeal paralysis, we should consider the possibility of reactivation of VZV even when no typical herpetic eruption is observed. PMID:24715925

  10. Recurrent largngeal nerve paralysis: a laryngographic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, F.P.

    1983-07-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a relatively common entity, usually resulting from a pathologic process of the vagus nerve or its recurrent larynegeal branch. It is rarely caused by intralargngeal lesions. Four teen patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (RLNP) were evaluated by laryngography, computed tomography (CT), or both. In the evaluation of the paramedian cord, CT was limited in its ability to differentiate between tumor or RLNP as the cause of the fixed cord, but it yielded more information than laryngography on the structural abnormalities of the larynx and pre-epiglottic and paralaryngeal spaces. Laryngography revealed distinct features of RLNP and is the procedure of choice for evaluation of functional abnormalities of the larynx until further experience with faster CT scanners and dynamic scanning of the larynx is gained.

  11. Electrophysiological neural monitoring of the laryngeal nerves in thyroid surgery: review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Deniwar, Ahmed; Kandil, Emad; Randolph, Gregory

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is one of the most common complications of thyroid surgery. RLN injury can cause vocal cord paralysis, affecting the patient's voice and the quality of life. Injury of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) can cause cricothyroid muscle denervation affecting high vocal tones. Thus, securing the laryngeal nerves in these surgeries is of utmost importance. Visual identification of the nerves has long been the standard method for this precaution. Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) has been introduced as a novel technology to improve the protection of the laryngeal nerves and reduce the rate of RLN injury. The aim of this article is to provide a brief description of the technique and review the literature to illustrate the value of IONM. IONM can provide early identification of anatomical variations and unusual nerve routes, which carry a higher risk of injury if not detected. IONM helps in prognosticating postoperative nerve function. Moreover, by detecting nerve injury intraoperatively, it aids in staging bilateral surgeries to avoid bilateral vocal cord paralysis and tracheostomy. The article will discuss the value of continuous IONM (C-IOMN) that may prevent nerve injury by detecting EMG waveform changes indicating impending nerve injury. Herein, we are also discussing anatomy of laryngeal nerves and aspects of its injury. PMID:26425449

  12. Electrophysiological neural monitoring of the laryngeal nerves in thyroid surgery: review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Deniwar, Ahmed; Randolph, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is one of the most common complications of thyroid surgery. RLN injury can cause vocal cord paralysis, affecting the patient’s voice and the quality of life. Injury of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) can cause cricothyroid muscle denervation affecting high vocal tones. Thus, securing the laryngeal nerves in these surgeries is of utmost importance. Visual identification of the nerves has long been the standard method for this precaution. Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) has been introduced as a novel technology to improve the protection of the laryngeal nerves and reduce the rate of RLN injury. The aim of this article is to provide a brief description of the technique and review the literature to illustrate the value of IONM. IONM can provide early identification of anatomical variations and unusual nerve routes, which carry a higher risk of injury if not detected. IONM helps in prognosticating postoperative nerve function. Moreover, by detecting nerve injury intraoperatively, it aids in staging bilateral surgeries to avoid bilateral vocal cord paralysis and tracheostomy. The article will discuss the value of continuous IONM (C-IOMN) that may prevent nerve injury by detecting EMG waveform changes indicating impending nerve injury. Herein, we are also discussing anatomy of laryngeal nerves and aspects of its injury. PMID:26425449

  13. The superior laryngeal nerve injury of a famous soprano, Amelita Galli-Curci.

    PubMed

    Marchese-Ragona, R; Restivo, D A; Mylonakis, I; Ottaviano, G; Martini, A; Sataloff, R T; Staffieri, A

    2013-02-01

    The superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) has been attributed much less clinical significance than the recurrent laryngeal nerve. It has sometimes been described as the 'neglected' nerve in thyroid surgery, although injury to this nerve can cause significant disability. The external branch of the SLN is the only motor supply to the cricothyroid muscle, which increases the tension of the ipsilateral vocal fold during highfrequency phonation, particularly in women and voice professionals. Damage to this nerve can manifest as ipsilateral cricothyroid muscle paralysis, and clinical symptoms may include a hoarse, breathy voice, frequent throat clearing, vocal fatigue or diminished vocal frequency range, especially when rising pitch. SLN paralysis can be a significant issue for those whose careers depend largely on a full range of voice. The famous opera soprano, Amelita Galli-Curci, suffered SLN injury during thyroid surgery with distressing consequences. PMID:23620644

  14. Ortner's Syndrome: Secondary Laryngeal Paralysis Caused by a Great Thoracic Aorta Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zangirolami, Ana Claudia Alves; Oliveira, Frederico Vieira de; Tepedino, Miguel Soares

    2015-04-01

    Introduction?Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury caused by cardiovascular disease is a rare condition, and often it is the only prominent sign of an imminent break of an aortic artery aneurysm. Objective?To report left laryngeal paralysis caused by a great aortic arch aneurysm and to highlight the importance of an otorhinolaryngologic evaluation along with a thoracic radiologic study. Resumed Report?A 42-year-old man complained of thickness of his voice and dysphagia for 3 months, but no thoracic pain or other relevant complaints. Video laryngoscopy revealed immobility of his left vocal fold in the paramedian position. Imaging was obtained for investigation, including magnetic resonance imaging of his thorax, which showed a fusiform aneurysm in the aortic arch, leading to recurrent compression of the left laryngeal nerve. The patient was successfully treated with endovascular repair of the aneurysm. At 2-month follow-up, there was still no recovery of the laryngeal mobility. Conclusion?An aortic artery aneurysm can suddenly break, requiring emergency heart surgery, and the results can be fatal in many cases. We suggest routine exam of the vocal folds in all patients with a heart condition, and we review the literature and suggest the use of imaging to reduce the number of emergency procedures. PMID:25992177

  15. Neurobrucellosis developing unilateral oculomotor nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    I??kay, Sedat; Y?lmaz, Kutluhan; Ölmez, Akgün

    2012-11-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infectious disease that is common around the world. Its clinical course demonstrates great diversity as it can affect all organs and systems. However, the central nervous system is rarely affected in the pediatric population. Neurobrucellosis is most frequently observed with meningitis and has numerous complications, including meningocephalitis, myelitis, cranial nerve paralyses, radiculopathy, and neuropathy. Neurobrucellosis affects the second, third, sixth, seventh, and eighth cranial nerves. Involvement of the oculomotor nerves is a very rare complication in neurobrucellosis although several adult cases have been reported. In this article, we present the case of a 9-year-old girl who developed unilateral nerve paralysis as a secondary complication of neurobrucellosis and recovered without sequel after treatment. This case is notable because it is a very rare, the first within the pediatric population. Our article emphasizes that neurobrucellosis should be considered among the distinguishing diagnoses in every case that is admitted for nerve paralysis in regions where Brucella infection is endemic. PMID:22244219

  16. [Facial nerve paralysis and mandibular fracture].

    PubMed

    Salonna, I; Fanizzi, P; Quaranta, A

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe three cases of peripheral facial nerve paralysis in patients with a mandibular fracture. In two cases, in which the onset of palsy was uncertain, the facial nerve injury was contralateral to the fractured side. Topodiagnostic tests showed neural damage at the third intrapetrosal portion and at the genicular ganglion. In one of the two patients tomography revealed a fracture line through the anterio-superior wall of the external auditory canal homolateral to the facial palsy. In the third subject palsy set in immediately after the trauma and was ipsilateral to the mandibular fracture; the facial lesion was localized at the genicular ganglion. In the first two cases, functional recovery was spontaneous (40 and 0 days after the trauma respectively). In the third subject, the nerve was decompressed surgically with a complete functional recovery two months later. The functional and clinical findings of these three cases show that a contralateral facial palsy secondary to a mandibular fracture resolves spontaneously while the traumatic displacement of the mandibular condyle may determine a temporal bone fracture sometimes followed by a lesion in the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve. An event such as the latter may delay functional recovery and thus warrant surgery such as in cases of Bell's palsy. PMID:1298156

  17. Neurological Complications in Thyroid Surgery: A Surgical Point of View on Laryngeal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Varaldo, Emanuela; Ansaldo, Gian Luca; Mascherini, Matteo; Cafiero, Ferdinando; Minuto, Michele N.

    2014-01-01

    The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB) is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle) varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified, the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN) runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction, and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve, which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a low range. PMID:25076936

  18. Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Nathan; O’Donohue, Peter; French, Heath; Griffin, Aaron; Gochee, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Facial nerve paralysis because of penetrating trauma through the external auditory canal is extremely rare, with a paucity of published literature. The objective of this study is to review the literature on transtympanic facial nerve paralysis and increase physician awareness of this uncommon injury through discussion of its clinical presentation, management and prognosis. We also aim to improve patient outcomes in those that have sustained this type of injury by suggesting an optimal management plan. In this case report, we present the case of a 46-year-old white woman who sustained a unilateral facial nerve paresis because of a garfish penetrating her tympanic membrane and causing direct damage to the tympanic portion of her facial nerve. On follow-up after 12 months, her facial nerve function has largely returned to normal. Transtympanic facial nerve paralysis is a rare injury but can have a favorable prognosis if managed effectively. PMID:26090278

  19. Two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve: routine nerve exploration in total thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Say?m, Nazmi Ya?ar; Gül, Fethi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury is one of the main complications of thyroidectomy. Since variability in the course of the nerve increases the risk of injury, routine nerve exploration is recommended. In this report, we present two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve found during total thyroidectomy performed for benign pathologies. Total thyroidectomy was performed on two female patients (52 and 54 years old) with a diagnosis of multi-nodular goiter in our clinics. Nerve exploration was performed routinely and non-recurrent laryngeal nerve was noted in both patients. Patients were discharged on the first postoperative day without any complications. Recurrent laryngeal nerve exploration does not increase the risk of nerve injury and ensures safety in case of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve presence, despite its rarity. PMID:25931840

  20. Two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve: routine nerve exploration in total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Say?m, Nazmi Ya?ar; Gül, Fethi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury is one of the main complications of thyroidectomy. Since variability in the course of the nerve increases the risk of injury, routine nerve exploration is recommended. In this report, we present two cases of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve found during total thyroidectomy performed for benign pathologies. Total thyroidectomy was performed on two female patients (52 and 54 years old) with a diagnosis of multi-nodular goiter in our clinics. Nerve exploration was performed routinely and non-recurrent laryngeal nerve was noted in both patients. Patients were discharged on the first postoperative day without any complications. Recurrent laryngeal nerve exploration does not increase the risk of nerve injury and ensures safety in case of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve presence, despite its rarity. PMID:25931840

  1. Influence of Asymmetric Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Stimulation on Vibration, Acoustics, and Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Neubauer, Juergen; Sofer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Evaluate the influence of asymmetric recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) stimulation on the vibratory phase, acoustics and aerodynamics of phonation. Study Design Basic science study using an in vivo canine model. Methods The RLNs were symmetrically and asymmetrically stimulated over eight graded levels to test a range of vocal fold activation conditions from subtle paresis to paralysis. Vibratory phase, fundamental frequency (F0), subglottal pressure, and airflow were noted at phonation onset. The evaluations were repeated for three levels of symmetric superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) stimulation. Results Asymmetric laryngeal adductor activation from asymmetric left-right RLN stimulation led to a consistent pattern of vibratory phase asymmetry, with the more activated vocal fold leading in the opening phase of the glottal cycle and in mucosal wave amplitude. Vibratory amplitude asymmetry was also observed, with more lateral excursion of the glottis of the less activated side. Onset fundamental frequency was higher with asymmetric activation because the two RLNs were synergistic in decreasing F0, glottal width, and strain. Phonation onset pressure increased and airflow decreased with symmetric RLN activation. Conclusion Asymmetric laryngeal activation from RLN paresis and paralysis has consistent effects on vocal fold vibration, acoustics, and aerodynamics. This information may be useful in diagnosis and management of vocal fold paresis. PMID:24913182

  2. Recovery of laryngeal function after intraoperative injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hydman, Jonas; Svensson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) during thyroid/parathyroid surgery, despite a macroscopically intact nerve, is a challenge which highlights the sensitivity and complexity of laryngeal innervation. Furthermore, the uncertain prognosis stresses a lack of capability to diagnose the reason behind the impaired function. There is a great deal of literature considering risk factors, surgical technique and mechanisms outside the nerve affecting the incidence of RLN paresis during surgery. To be able to prognosticate recovery in cases of laryngeal dysfunction and voice changes after thyroid surgery, the surgeon would first need to define the presence, location, and type of laryngeal nerve injury. There is little data describing the events within the nerve and the neurobiological reasons for the impaired function related to potential recovery and prognosis. In addition, very little data has been presented in order to clarify any differences between the transient and permanent injury of the RLN. This review aims, from an anatomical and neurobiological perspective, to provide an update on the current understandings of surgically-induced injury to the laryngeal nerves. PMID:25713777

  3. Laryngeal elevation by selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, Aaron J.; Kolb, Ilya; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Laryngeal elevation protects the airway and assists opening of the esophagus during swallowing. The GH, thyrohyoid, and MH muscles provide a majority of this elevatory motion. This study applied functional electrical stimulation to the XII/C1 nerve complex using a nerve cuff electrode to determine the capabilities of neural stimulation to induce laryngeal elevation. Approach. Multi-contact FINE electrodes were implanted onto the XII/C1 nerve complex at locations proximal and distal to the thyrohyoid branching point in five anesthetized canines. Motion of the thyroid cartilage and the hyoid bone was recorded during stimulation of nerve cuffs and intramuscular electrodes. Main Results. Nerve stimulation induced 260% more laryngeal elevation than intramuscular stimulation (18.8 mm versus 5.2 mm, p ? 0.01), and 228% higher velocity (143.8 versus 43.9 mm s-1, p ? 0.01). While stimulation at all cuff and electrode locations elevated the larynx, only the proximal XII/C1 nerve cuff significantly elicited both thyroid-hyoid approximation and hyoid elevation. In all proximal XII/C1 nerve cuffs (n = 7), stimulation was able to obtain selectivity of greater than 75% of at least one elevatory muscle. Significance. These results support the hypothesis that an implanted neural interface system can produce increased laryngeal elevation, a significant protective mechanism of deglutition.

  4. The Role of Immediate Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Reconstruction for Thyroid Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Yumoto, Eiji; Minoda, Ryosei; Kodama, Narihiro

    2010-01-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) is one of the most serious problems in conducting surgery for thyroid cancer. Different treatments are available for the management of UVFP including intracordal injection, type I thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and laryngeal reinnervations. The effects of immediate recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) reconstruction during thyroid cancer surgery with or without UVFP before the surgery were evaluated with videostroboscopic, aerodynamic, and perceptual analyses. All subjects experienced postoperative improvements in voice quality. Particularly, aerodynamic analysis showed that the values for all patients entered normal ranges in both patients with and without UVFP before surgery. Immediate RLN reconstruction has the potential to restore a normal or near-normal voice by returning thyroarytenoid muscle tone and bulk seen with vocal fold denervation. Immediate RLN reconstruction is an efficient and effective approach to the management of RLN resection during surgery for thyroid cancer. PMID:20628531

  5. Role of Laryngeal Electromyography in Predicting Recovery After Vocal Fold Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Guha, Kuhelika; Sabarigirish, K; Singh, S K; Yadav, Arun

    2014-12-01

    Accurate prognostication of the outcome of vocal fold immobility assumes great importance in the management. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic efficacy of Laryngeal electromyography in cases of vocal fold immobility. A nonrandomized prospective study was carried out from Sep 2009 to Jun 2011. Patients were evaluated using Fiberoptic laryngoscopy and Laryngeal electromyography over a period of 24 weeks. 51 subjects participated in the study, comprised of 22 males and 29 females. All patients underwent detailed clinical examination including Fiberoptic laryngoscopy on the first visit and Laryngeal electromyography testing on the second visit. Subsequent neuromonitoring was carried out at 04, 12 and 24 weeks from date of initial recording. Outcome measures of vocal fold motion were dichotomized into persistent vocal fold immobility (unilateral or bilateral) or resolved vocal fold motion (normal). Approximately 24 weeks after onset of palsy, mobility of the paralyzed vocal cord was restored in 31 (60.78 %) of 51 cases, while 20 (39.22 %) remained immobile. Sensitivity of laryngeal electromyography was 92.53 % ; specificity 93.33 %, positive predictive value 98.77 % and negative predictive value 68.29 %. This study confirmed the utility of Laryngeal electromyography in predicting prognosis for recovery of vocal fold motion after laryngeal nerve injury. The results supported the hypothesis that Laryngeal electromyography data can be used effectively to determine a prognosis for recovery of vocal fold motion. PMID:26396950

  6. Quantification of vocal fold motion using echography: application to recurrent nerve paralysis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Mike-Ely; Lefort, Muriel; Bergeret-Cassagne, Héloïse; Hachi, Siham; Li, Ang; Russ, Gilles; Lazard, Diane; Menegaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence; Trésallet, Christophe; Frouin, Frédérique

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent nerve paralysis (RP) is one of the most frequent complications of thyroid surgery. It reduces vocal fold mobility. Nasal endoscopy, a mini-invasive procedure, is the conventional way to detect RP. We suggest a new approach based on laryngeal ultrasound and a specific data analysis was designed to help with the automated detection of RP. Ten subjects were enrolled for this feasibility study: four controls, three patients with RP and three patients without RP according to nasal endoscopy. The ultrasound protocol was based on a ten seconds B-mode acquisition in a coronal plane during normal breathing. Image processing included three steps: 1) automated detection of two consecutive closing and opening images, corresponding to extreme positions of vocal folds in the sequence of B-mode images, using principal component analysis of the image sequence; 2) positioning of three landmarks and robust tracking of these points using a multi-pyramidal refined optical flow approach; 3) estimation of quantitative parameters indicating left and right fractions of mobility, and motion symmetry. Results provided by automated image processing were compared to those obtained by an expert. Detection of extreme images was accurate; tracking of landmarks was reliable in 80% of cases. Motion symmetry indices showed similar values for controls and patients without RP. Fraction of mobility was reduced in cases of RP. Thus, our CAD system helped in the detection of RP. Laryngeal ultrasound combined with appropriate image processing helped in the diagnosis of recurrent nerve paralysis and could be proposed as a first-line method.

  7. Superior laryngeal nerve injury: effects, clinical findings, prognosis, and management options

    PubMed Central

    Orestes, Michael I.; Chhetri, Dinesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) provides motor innervation to the cricothyroid muscle. However, the functions of this muscle and the anatomic variations of the nerve that supplies it are not fully understood. SLN paresis and paralysis (SLNp) is difficult to diagnose because of a lack of consistent laryngeal findings, and its effects on the voice likely goes beyond simple pitch elevation control. Recent findings Although SLNp has traditionally been thought to lead to voice pitch limitation, recent research findings reveal multiple roles for this nerve in voice and speech. Cricothyroid muscles are the primary controls of fundamental frequency of voice. SLNp can lead to significant contraction of pitch range, vocal fold vibratory phase asymmetry, and acoustic aperiodicity, thus leading to an overall poor vocal quality. In addition, cricothyroid muscles may also play a role in pitch lowering and shifting from voiced to unvoiced sounds during speech. Summary Subtle signs, symptoms, and diagnostic findings associated with SLNp make this disorder difficult to characterize clinically. Lack of treatment methodologies to restore the dynamic action of the cricothyroid muscles poses difficulties in treating patients with this condition. A more thorough understanding of the effects of SLNp will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25136863

  8. Familial congenital laryngeal abductor paralysis: different expression in a family with one male and three females affected.

    PubMed

    Schinzel, A; Hof, E; Dangel, P; Robinson, W

    1990-11-01

    A brother and two sisters of remotely consanguineous parents had congenital laryngeal abductor paralysis and moderate mental retardation. In the two older sibs, mental deficiency could have resulted from birth asphyxia, but the youngest girl was already microcephalic at birth and had no apparent asphyxia. The mother, who was healthy and of normal intelligence, was found on laryngoscopy to have unilateral laryngeal abductor paralysis. This is the first family with both mentally retarded and nonretarded affected members with congenital laryngeal abductor paralysis. Inheritance is most likely autosomal dominant with variable expression, but autosomal recessive inheritance, with both parents carriers and the mother an affected homozygote, and X linked inheritance are also possible. PMID:2277390

  9. The central projections of the laryngeal nerves in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Pascual-Font, Arán; Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; McHanwell, Stephen; Vázquez, Teresa; Maranillo, Eva; Sañudo, Jose; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J

    2011-01-01

    The larynx serves respiratory, protective, and phonatory functions. The motor and sensory innervation to the larynx controlling these functions is provided by the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Classical studies state that the SLN innervates the cricothyroid muscle and provides sensory innervation to the supraglottic cavity, whereas the RLN supplies motor innervation to the remaining intrinsic laryngeal muscles and sensory innervation to the infraglottic cavity, but recent data suggest a more complex anatomical and functional organisation. The current neuroanatomical tracing study was undertaken to provide a comprehensive description of the central brainstem connections of the axons within the SLN and the RLN, including those neurons that innervate the larynx. The study has been carried out in 41 adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. The central projections of the laryngeal nerves were labelled following application of biotinylated dextran amines onto the SLN, the RLN or both. The most remarkable result of the study is that in the rat the RLN does not contain any afferent axons from the larynx, in contrast to the pattern observed in many other species including man. The RLN supplied only special visceromotor innervation to the intrinsic muscles of the larynx from motoneurons in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb). All the afferent axons innervating the larynx are contained within the SLN, and reach the nucleus of the solitary tract. The SLN also contained secretomotor efferents originating from motoneurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and special visceral efferent fibres from the Amb. In conclusion, the present study shows that in the rat the innervation of the larynx differs in significant ways from that described in other species. PMID:21599662

  10. The central projections of the laryngeal nerves in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Font, Arán; Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; McHanwell, Stephen; Vázquez, Teresa; Maranillo, Eva; Sañudo, Jose; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J

    2011-08-01

    The larynx serves respiratory, protective, and phonatory functions. The motor and sensory innervation to the larynx controlling these functions is provided by the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Classical studies state that the SLN innervates the cricothyroid muscle and provides sensory innervation to the supraglottic cavity, whereas the RLN supplies motor innervation to the remaining intrinsic laryngeal muscles and sensory innervation to the infraglottic cavity, but recent data suggest a more complex anatomical and functional organisation. The current neuroanatomical tracing study was undertaken to provide a comprehensive description of the central brainstem connections of the axons within the SLN and the RLN, including those neurons that innervate the larynx. The study has been carried out in 41 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The central projections of the laryngeal nerves were labelled following application of biotinylated dextran amines onto the SLN, the RLN or both. The most remarkable result of the study is that in the rat the RLN does not contain any afferent axons from the larynx, in contrast to the pattern observed in many other species including man. The RLN supplied only special visceromotor innervation to the intrinsic muscles of the larynx from motoneurons in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb). All the afferent axons innervating the larynx are contained within the SLN, and reach the nucleus of the solitary tract. The SLN also contained secretomotor efferents originating from motoneurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and special visceral efferent fibres from the Amb. In conclusion, the present study shows that in the rat the innervation of the larynx differs in significant ways from that described in other species. PMID:21599662

  11. Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Dynamic Acoustic Analysis of Tension Asymmetry in Excised Canine Larynges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Erin E.; Bulleit, Erin E.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To model tension asymmetry caused by superior laryngeal nerve paralysis (SLNP) in excised larynges and apply perturbation, nonlinear dynamic, and aerodynamic analyses. Method: SLNP was modeled in 8 excised larynges using sutures and weights to mimic cricothyroid (CT) muscle function. Weights were removed from one side to create tension…

  12. Paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes ... way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur ...

  13. Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of damage to the individual cranial nerves and their branches associated with laryngeal mask airway use is low; there have been case reports of damage to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. To the best of our knowledge we present the first reported case of inferior alveolar nerve injury associated with laryngeal mask airway use. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian man presented to our facility for elective anterior cruciate ligament repair. He had no background history of any significant medical problems. He opted for general anesthesia over a regional technique. He was induced with fentanyl and propofol and a size 4 laryngeal mask airway was inserted without any problems. His head was in a neutral position during the surgery. After surgery in the recovery room, he complained of numbness in his lower lip. He also developed extensive scabbing of the lower lip on the second day after surgery. The numbness and scabbing started improving after a week, with complete recovery after two weeks. Conclusion We report the first case of vascular occlusion and injury to the inferior alveolar nerve, causing scabbing and numbness of the lower lip, resulting from laryngeal mask airway use. This is an original case report mostly of interest for anesthetists who use the laryngeal mask airway in day-to-day practice. Excessive inflation of the laryngeal mask airway cuff could have led to this complication. Despite the low incidence of cranial nerve injury associated with the use of the laryngeal mask airway, vigilant adherence to evidence-based medicine techniques and recommendations from the manufacturer's instructions can prevent such complications. PMID:21447166

  14. The Physiologic Impact of Unilateral Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve (RLN) Lesion on Infant Oropharyngeal and Esophageal Performance.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Lammers, Andrew R; Ohlemacher, Jocelyn; Ballester, Ashley; Fraley, Luke; Gross, Andrew; German, Rebecca Z

    2015-12-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury in neonates, a complication of patent ductus arteriosus corrective surgery, leads to aspiration and swallowing complications. Severity of symptoms and prognosis for recovery are variable. We transected the RLN unilaterally in an infant mammalian animal model to characterize the degree and variability of dysphagia in a controlled experimental setting. We tested the hypotheses that (1) both airway protection and esophageal function would be compromised by lesion, (2) given our design, variability between multiple post-lesion trials would be minimal, and (3) variability among individuals would be minimal. Individuals' swallowing performance was assessed pre- and post-lesion using high speed VFSS. Aspiration was assessed using the Infant Mammalian Penetration-Aspiration Scale (IMPAS). Esophageal function was assessed using two measures devised for this study. Our results indicate that RLN lesion leads to increased frequency of aspiration, and increased esophageal dysfunction, with significant variation in these basic patterns at all levels. On average, aspiration worsened with time post-lesion. Within a single feeding sequence, the distribution of unsafe swallows varied. Individuals changed post-lesion either by increasing average IMPAS score, or by increasing variation in IMPAS score. Unilateral RLN transection resulted in dysphagia with both compromised airway protection and esophageal function. Despite consistent, experimentally controlled injury, significant variation in response to lesion remained. Aspiration following RLN lesion was due to more than unilateral vocal fold paralysis. We suggest that neurological variation underlies this pattern. PMID:26285799

  15. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Laryngeal Muscle Fiber Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses…

  16. Reorganization of laryngeal motoneurons after crush injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J; Berdugo, Gabriel; Arias, Gonzalo; McHanwell, Stephen; Sañudo, José; Vázquez, Teresa; Pascual-Font, Arán

    2013-01-01

    Motoneurons innervating laryngeal muscles are located in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb), but there is no general agreement on the somatotopic representation and even less is known on how an injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) affects this pattern. This study analyzes the normal somatotopy of those motoneurons and describes its changes over time after a crush injury to the RLN. In the control group (control group 1, n = 9 rats), the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) and thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles were injected with cholera toxin-B. In the experimental groups the left RLN of each animal was crushed with a fine tip forceps and, after several survival periods (1, 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks; minimum six rats per time), the PCA and TA muscles were injected as described above. After each surgery, the motility of the vocal folds was evaluated. Additional control experiments were performed; the second control experiment (control group 2, n = 6 rats) was performed labeling the TA and PCA immediately prior to the section of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), in order to eliminate the possibility of accidental labeling of the cricothyroid (CT) muscle by spread from the injection site. The third control group (control group 3, n = 5 rats) was included to determine if there is some sprouting from the SLN into the territories of the RLN after a crush of this last nerve. One week after the crush injury of the RLN, the PCA and TA muscles were injected immediately before the section of the SLN. The results show that a single population of neurons represents each muscle with the PCA in the most rostral position followed caudalwards by the TA. One week post-RLN injury, both the somatotopy and the number of labeled motoneurons changed, where the labeled neurons were distributed randomly; in addition, an area of topographical overlap of the two populations was observed and vocal fold mobility was lost. In the rest of the survival periods, the overlapping area is larger, but the movement of the vocal folds tends to recover. After 12 weeks of survival, the disorganization within the Amb is the largest, but the number of motoneurons is similar to control, and all animals recovered the movement of the left vocal fold. Our additional controls indicate that no tracer spread to the CT muscle occurred, and that many of the labeled motoneurons from the PCA after 1 week post-RLN injury correspond to motoneurons whose axons travel in the SLN. Therefore, it seems that after RLN injury there is a collateral sprouting and collateral innervation. Although the somatotopic organization of the Amb is lost after a crush injury of the RLN and does not recover in the times studied here, the movement of the vocal folds as well as the number of neurons that supply the TA and the PCA muscles recovered within 8 weeks, indicating that the central nervous system of the rat has a great capacity of plasticity. PMID:23444899

  17. Reorganization of laryngeal motoneurons after crush injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J; Berdugo, Gabriel; Arias, Gonzalo; McHanwell, Stephen; Sañudo, José; Vázquez, Teresa; Pascual-Font, Arán

    2013-04-01

    Motoneurons innervating laryngeal muscles are located in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb), but there is no general agreement on the somatotopic representation and even less is known on how an injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) affects this pattern. This study analyzes the normal somatotopy of those motoneurons and describes its changes over time after a crush injury to the RLN. In the control group (control group 1, n?=?9 rats), the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) and thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles were injected with cholera toxin-B. In the experimental groups the left RLN of each animal was crushed with a fine tip forceps and, after several survival periods (1, 2, 4, 8, 12?weeks; minimum six rats per time), the PCA and TA muscles were injected as described above. After each surgery, the motility of the vocal folds was evaluated. Additional control experiments were performed; the second control experiment (control group 2, n?=?6 rats) was performed labeling the TA and PCA immediately prior to the section of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), in order to eliminate the possibility of accidental labeling of the cricothyroid (CT) muscle by spread from the injection site. The third control group (control group 3, n?=?5 rats) was included to determine if there is some sprouting from the SLN into the territories of the RLN after a crush of this last nerve. One week after the crush injury of the RLN, the PCA and TA muscles were injected immediately before the section of the SLN. The results show that a single population of neurons represents each muscle with the PCA in the most rostral position followed caudalwards by the TA. One week post-RLN injury, both the somatotopy and the number of labeled motoneurons changed, where the labeled neurons were distributed randomly; in addition, an area of topographical overlap of the two populations was observed and vocal fold mobility was lost. In the rest of the survival periods, the overlapping area is larger, but the movement of the vocal folds tends to recover. After 12?weeks of survival, the disorganization within the Amb is the largest, but the number of motoneurons is similar to control, and all animals recovered the movement of the left vocal fold. Our additional controls indicate that no tracer spread to the CT muscle occurred, and that many of the labeled motoneurons from the PCA after 1?week post-RLN injury correspond to motoneurons whose axons travel in the SLN. Therefore, it seems that after RLN injury there is a collateral sprouting and collateral innervation. Although the somatotopic organization of the Amb is lost after a crush injury of the RLN and does not recover in the times studied here, the movement of the vocal folds as well as the number of neurons that supply the TA and the PCA muscles recovered within 8?weeks, indicating that the central nervous system of the rat has a great capacity of plasticity. PMID:23444899

  18. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    PubMed

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle. PMID:26143045

  19. Electrophysiological neuromonitoring of the laryngeal nerves in thyroid and parathyroid surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Deniwar, Ahmed; Bhatia, Parisha; Kandil, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is one of the most common complications of thyroid surgery. Injury to the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve is less obvious and affects the voice variably; however, it can be of great significance to professional voice users. Recent literature has led to an increase in the use of neuromonitoring as an adjunct to visual nerve identification during thyroid surgery. In our review of the literature, we discuss the application, efficacy and safety of neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery. Although intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) contributes to the prevention of laryngeal nerves injury, there was no significant difference in the incidence of RLN injury in thyroid surgery when IONM was used compared with visual identification alone. IONM use is recommended in high risk patients; however, there are no clear identification criteria for what constitutes “high risk”. There is no clear evidence that IONM decreases the risk of laryngeal nerve injury in thyroid surgery. However, continuous IONM provides a promising tool that can prevent imminent nerve traction injury by detecting decreased amplitude combined with increased latency. PMID:25992326

  20. Intra-operative recurrent laryngeal nerve stimulation during anterior cervical discectomy: a simple and effective technique.

    PubMed

    Tisdall, M M; Henn, C; Dorward, N L

    2010-02-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy is a recognised complication of anterior cervical discectomy (ACD) surgery. We report our experience of intra-operative neuromonitoring using RLN stimulation in 19 patients undergoing ACD surgery. This simple and safe technique has the potential to reduce the incidence of RLN palsy in this patient group. PMID:20158358

  1. Facial nerve paralysis in temporal bone fractures: outcomes after late decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, A; Campobasso, G; Piazza, F; Quaranta, N; Salonna, I

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this paper was to address some of the unanswered questions regarding management of facial nerve paralysis in temporal bone fractures (TBF), such as the outcomes after late facial nerve decompression surgery. The study design was a retrospective review of a consecutive clinical series. Thirteen patients who underwent late decompression surgery for facial nerve paralysis due to TBF involving the perigeniculate ganglion region were analyzed. Patients were operated on 27-90 days after trauma. A transmastoid extralabyrinthine approach was used in all cases. Facial nerve-sheath slitting was performed routinely. Normal or subnormal facial nerve function (HB 1 or HB 2) was achieved in 7/9 cases (78%) evaluated at > or = 1 year after surgery. Good functional results were also obtained in two patients operated on 3 months after trauma. Bases on the outcomes observed in the present series, in patients unable to be operated on early, presenting 1 to 3 months with >95% denervation on EnoG, facial nerve decompression may have a beneficial effect. PMID:11583403

  2. Risk factors for the development of aspiration pneumonia after unilateral arytenoid lateralization in dogs with laryngeal paralysis: 232 cases (1987-2012).

    PubMed

    Wilson, David; Monnet, Eric

    2016-01-15

    OBJECTIVE To identify risk factors for the development of aspiration pneumonia after unilateral arytenoid lateralization in dogs with laryngeal paralysis. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 232 client-owned dogs with a diagnosis of laryngeal paralysis treated with lef-tsided unilateral arytenoid lateralization. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed. Signalment, medical history, surgical complications, and outcome data were collected. Follow-up was performed via review of medical records and by telephone interview with the owner, referring veterinarian, or both. RESULTS At the 1-, 3-, and 4-year follow-up periods, aspiration pneumonia occurred in 18.6%, 31.8%, and 31.8% of dogs, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 4-year survival rates for dogs with postoperative aspiration pneumonia were 83.1%, 51.5%, and 25.8%, respectively. None of the dogs with aspiration pneumonia before surgery developed clinical signs of aspiration pneumonia after surgery. Postoperative megaesophagus (hazard ratio [HR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.56 to 3.93) and postoperative administration of opioid analgesics prior to discharge (HR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.80) were significant risk factors for the long-term development of aspiration pneumonia in this study. Perioperative metoclopramide administration did not significantly decrease the risk for development of aspiration pneumonia (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.67 to 1.37). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In the present study, aspiration pneumonia was the most commonly reported postoperative complication of unilateral lateralization in dogs treated for laryngeal paralysis; however, preexisting aspiration pneumonia was not associated with an increased risk for development of aspiration pneumonia after surgery. Megaesophagus was identified as an important risk factor for eventual development of aspiration pneumonia. Administration of an opioid analgesic may increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia in dogs treated surgically for laryngeal paralysis. PMID:26720085

  3. Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury in Thyroid Surgery: One Year Prospective Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Siddique, M A; Hossen, M; Khan, J A; Hanif, M A

    2015-07-01

    This prospective, cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Otolaryngology & Head-Neck Surgery, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh from August 2010 to July 2011. One hundred & twenty eight (128) patients with thyroid swelling who underwent surgery were purposely included. The study was designed to determine the incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during thyroid surgery. Among the 128 patients, female were predominant 78.90%, majority of the patient were in third decade, 96.87% patients were biochemically euthyroid. Total 5.46% patient had recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Among them 14.28% had transient and 85.72% had permanent injury. Injury was more in total thyroidectomy done for extensive malignancy. PMID:26329947

  4. A Preclinical Study of Laryngeal Motor-Evoked Potentials as a Marker Vagus Nerve Activation.

    PubMed

    Grimonprez, Annelies; Raedt, Robrecht; De Taeye, Leen; Larsen, Lars Emil; Delbeke, Jean; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment for refractory epilepsy and depression. Previous studies using invasive recording electrodes showed that VNS induces laryngeal motor-evoked potentials (LMEPs) through the co-activation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and subsequent contractions of the laryngeal muscles. The present study investigates the feasibility of recording LMEPs in chronically VNS-implanted rats, using a minimally-invasive technique, to assess effective current delivery to the nerve and to determine optimal VNS output currents for vagal fiber activation. Three weeks after VNS electrode implantation, signals were recorded using an electromyography (EMG) electrode in the proximity of the laryngeal muscles and a reference electrode on the skull. The VNS output current was gradually ramped up from 0.1 to 1.0 mA in 0.1 mA steps. In 13/27 rats, typical LMEPs were recorded at low VNS output currents (median 0.3 mA, IQR 0.2-0.3 mA). In 11/27 rats, significantly higher output currents were required to evoke electrophysiological responses (median 0.7 mA, IQR 0.5-0.7 mA, [Formula: see text]). The latencies of these responses deviated significantly from LMEPs ([Formula: see text]). In 3/27 rats, no electrophysiological responses to simulation were recorded. Minimally invasive LMEP recordings are feasible to assess effective current delivery to the vagus nerve. Furthermore, our results suggest that low output currents are sufficient to activate vagal fibers. PMID:26510476

  5. Identification alone versus intraoperative neuromonitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery: experience of 2034 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of intraoperative neuromonitoring in reducing the postoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy rate by a comparison between patients submitted to thyroidectomy with intraoperative neuromonitoring and with routine identification alone. Methods Between June 2007 and December 2012, 2034 consecutive patients underwent thyroidectomy by a single surgical team. We compared patients who have had neuromonitoring and patients who have undergone surgery with nerve visualization alone. Patients in which neuromonitoring was not utilized (Group A) were 993, patients in which was utilized (group B) were 1041. Results In group A 28 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries were observed (2.82%), 21 (2.11%) transient and 7 (0.7%) permanent. In group B 23 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries were observed (2.21%), in 17 cases (1.63%) transient and in 6 (0.58%) permanent. Differences were not statistically significative. Conclusions Visual nerve identification remains the gold standard of recurrent laryngeal nerve management in thyroid surgery. Neuromonitoring helps to identify the nerve, in particular in difficult cases, but it did not decrease nerve injuries compared with visualization alone. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the benefit of intraoperative neuromonitoring in thyroidectomy, especially in conditions in which the recurrent nerve is at high risk of injury. PMID:24942225

  6. Pharyngolaryngeal paralysis in a patient with pharyngeal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Masafumi; Komiyama, Sakurako; Tayama, Niro

    2015-02-01

    Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a rare disease, and its commonly reported symptoms include sore throat, dysphagia, and throat discomfort. The dysphagia in pharyngeal tuberculosis cases is not due to pharyngolaryngeal paralysis but due to odynophagia. Herein, we describe the first case of dysphagia caused by pharyngolaryngeal paralysis secondary to pharyngeal tuberculosis. An irregular mass at the right nasopharynx was detected in a 57-year-old female patient, along with dysphagia and hoarseness. She had poor right soft palate elevation, inadequate right velopharyngeal closure, poor constrictor pharyngus muscle contraction, and an immobilized right vocal cord, which collectively indicate right pharyngolaryngeal paralysis. Pathological examination and culture testing revealed pharyngeal tuberculosis. She was diagnosed with pharyngolaryngeal paralysis secondary to pharyngeal tuberculosis. The pharyngolaryngeal paralysis resolved after beginning anti-tuberculous treatment. Right pharyngolaryngeal paralysis was attributed to glossopharyngeal and vagus nerve impairment in the parapharyngeal space. Prior reports indicate that peripheral nerve paralysis, including recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis caused by tuberculous lymphadenitis, often recovers after anti-tuberculous treatment. Pharyngeal tuberculosis rarely causes dysphagia and hoarseness attributable to pharyngolaryngeal paralysis. The neuropathy may recover after anti-tuberculous treatment. Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a new potential differential diagnosis in pharyngolaryngeal paralysis. PMID:25287869

  7. [Electroneurography of the laryngeal nerves in the awake patient using electromyography of the larynx under zoom-endoscopic-control (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thumfart, W; Gschwandtner, R

    1980-11-01

    Electromyography of the larynx in the awake patient using zoom-endoscopy provides an earlier diagnosis of recurrent laryngeal nerve diseases by recording action potentials of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle. Not in every case the type of nerve lesion (neurapraxy, neurotmesis, axonotmesis) could be determined by the EMG alone. Therefore, neurography of the laryngeal nerves was investigated. With respect to the mixed innervation of the larynx by both the more sensible superior and the motoric inferior laryngeal nerve a reflex arc can be examined. The upper laryngeal nerve was stimulated transcutaneously. The afferent reflex arc leads to the ganglions of the vagus nerve and its central nuclei, its efferent motor neurons conduct reflex activity via the recurrent and upper laryngeal nerves back to the larynx. The reflex potentials can be measured out of the various larynx muscles by electromyography under endoscopic control. The importance of this method is demonstrated in cases of vocal cord palsies. PMID:7464358

  8. Protective effect of intraoperative nerve monitoring against recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during re-exploration of the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous thyroid or parathyroid surgery induces scarring or distorts anatomy, and increases the risk of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury for a reoperation. The benefit of intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) for re-exploration (a second nerve exploration) and reoperation has not been established. Methods Two hundred and ten patients were given a thyroid or parathyroid reoperation at our hospital between 2001 and 2010. Using IONM, we re-explored 56 patients who had been operated on before June 2007. The injury rate in these patients was compared with that of the 15 patients re-explored without IONM between 2001 and 2006. Results Of the 70 nerves that were re-explored using IONM, only one was incidentally injured, significantly fewer than the three injured in the 15 nerves re-explored without using IONM (1.43% vs. 20%, P = 0.0164). Conclusions IONM helped prevent RLN damage when re-exploring nerves during thyroid and parathyroid surgery. We recommend the routine use of IONM in thyroid and parathyroid reoperations. PMID:23618223

  9. [Etiology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of vocal fold paralysis].

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Hoffmann, T K; Rotter, N; Pickhard, A; Scheithauer, M O; Brosch, S

    2014-03-01

    Etiology of vocal fold paralysis is broad: e.?g. iatrogenic/traumatic, associated with neoplasms or with systemic diseases. The cause of idiopathic paralysis is unknown. The main symptom of unilateral vocal fold paralysis is hoarseness because of a remaining glottic gap during phonation. Patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis typically have no impairment of the voice but dyspnea. Examination of patients with an idopathic vocal fold paralysis is a CT of the vagal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve from skull base to neck and mediastinum. Serological tests are not obligatory. Differential diagnosis of vocal fold immobility is vocal fold paralysis/neurological causes and arthrogene causes such as arytenoid subluxation, interarytenoid adhesion and vocal fold fixation in laryngeal carcinomas. Voice therapy is a promising approach for patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis, but not all patients benefit sufficiently. Temporary vocal fold augmentation by injection medialization results in satisfactory voice quality that is comparable with a thyroplasty. Patients with bilateral vocal fold immobility show typically dyspnea requiring immediate therapy such as temporary tracheotomy or reversible laterofixation of the paralyzed vocal chord. If the paralysis persists a definitive enlargement of the glottic airway by eg. arytenoidectomy needs to be performed. PMID:24135826

  10. Anatomical and surgical considerations of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Morton, R P; Whitfield, P; Al-Ali, S

    2006-10-01

    The anatomical course of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) is variable, and a consistent approach to its preservation during thyroid surgery is needed to reduce risk of post-operative voice impairment. Despite agreement that careful dissection in the region of the superior thyroid pole is required, there is no accepted 'best' approach, nor any universal acknowledgement that location of the EBSLN is actually necessary. The popular cernea classification of EBSLN has limitations, including its decreased reliability with increased thyroid size and its irrelevance in cases of 'buried' variants. * Recent work has identified factors such as ethnicity and stature in the prevalence of EBSLN variants. Consistent approaches to the post-operative detection of EBSLN injury are needed to build an accurate picture of the incidence of surgical nerve injury. Then a standardised approach to EBSLN preservation may emerge. PMID:17014444

  11. Phrenic nerve paralysis from recurrence of stage I thymoma with myasthenia gravis 10 years after complete resection.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hironori; Takasaki, Chihiro; Okubo, Kenichi

    2015-06-01

    A 34-year-old woman underwent thymo-thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG) and was diagnosed with type B3 Masaoka stage I thymoma. Phrenic nerve paralysis developed 8 years after surgery, and a left-sided mediastinal mass was seen on a chest radiograph 10 years after surgery. Chest computed tomography revealed a tumor measuring 57 × 21 × 28 mm beside the aortic arch. Surgical resection of the tumor with partial resection of phrenic and recurrent nerve, the left upper lobe, and the pericardium was performed through a left thoracotomy. Histological examination confirmed recurrent thymoma invading the resected surrounding organs. The patient received radiation therapy postoperatively and was alive with stable symptoms of MG at the 2-year follow-up. Symptomatic relapse of thymoma is very rare and an occult recurrent thymoma should be considered in patients with unilateral phrenic nerve paralysis even after complete resection of thymoma. Detailed examination with careful follow-up should be considered. PMID:23949090

  12. A pontine primary relay for ascending projections of the superior laryngeal nerve,.

    PubMed

    Car, A; Jean, A; Roman, C

    1975-01-01

    1. In sheep anaesthetized with fluothane, electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), which contains most of the afferent fibres for swallowing, evokes potentials in the medial part of the ipsilateral thalamic VPM (nucleus ventro-postero-medialis) within about 5 msec. This region constitutes the secondary synaptic relay for the laryngeal impulses projecting to the frontal cortex concerned with swallowing. 2. SLN fibres are synaptically connected with cells of the NTS (nucleus of the tractus solitarius), 2-4 mm rostral to the obex (see Car and Jean, 1971). Coagulation of this region abolishes reflexly and cortically induced swallowing, but does not influence the thalamic or cortical responses induced by SLN stimulation. 3. SLN stimulation evokes potentials with a short latency (2 msec) in a restricted pontine area localized 5 mm from the midline and above the trigeminal motor nucleus, just in front of the central emergence of the facial nerve (i.e; about 12 mm rostral to obex). Restricted coagulation of this pontine region eliminates both the thalamic and the cortical projection of SLN. 4. Repetitive stimulation (2 V; 0.2 msec; 20-30 Hz) of this same pontine region produces rhythmic swallowing with characteristics quite similar to those of swallowing induced by SLN or bulbar stimulation. 5. Other data show that SLN fibres, or at least part of them, bifurcate after entering the brain stem (about 6 mm in front of the obex), and give a caudal branch, which reaches the bulbar swallowing centre (3 mm rostral to the obex) by running through the tractus solitarius; and a rostral branch terminating in the pons where the primary synaptic relay for the ascending laryngeal pathway is localized. PMID:1126414

  13. The effect of routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade on adequacy of recurrent laryngeal nerve stimulation during thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S D; Boden, E; Serpell, J

    2015-07-01

    Testing of the integrity of the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery has become routine practice for many surgeons to aid dissection and minimise the chance of inadvertent nerve injury. We hypothesised that routine reversal of an intermediate-acting, non-depolarising neuromuscular blocking agent would improve conditions for stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. We conducted a single-centre, randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial of patients undergoing thyroid surgery by the same surgeon. After randomisation, the participants received either neostigmine 2.5 mg with glycopyrrolate 0.4 mg or placebo, at 30 minutes after induction of anaesthesia and administration of 0.4 mg/kg of atracurium. The primary outcome was the subjective assessment by the surgeon as to whether the neuromuscular function was adequate for stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve using a neuromuscular integrity monitor (NIM). Time to NIM stimulation was 44.6 minutes in the placebo group and 41.4 minutes in the intervention group (P=0.268). Of the 21 patients who received the neuromuscular blockade reversal, 20 (95.2%) had adequate surgical conditions for NIM stimulation, compared to 9 out of 18 patients (50%) in the placebo group (P=0.002). Three of the ten patients (30%) with inadequate reversal showed no evidence of residual blockade assessed peripherally. The routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade at 30 minutes post induction appears to result in adequate surgical conditions for safe stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Return of neuromuscular function at a peripheral site does not guarantee adequate laryngeal muscle function for use of the NIM. PMID:26099761

  14. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the cricothyroid muscle in patients with suspected superior laryngeal nerve weakness.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Marco; Rubin, Adam; Cox, Paul; Landini, Fernando; Jackson-Menaldi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    In this retrospective case study, we report the apparent clinical effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in combination with voice therapy (VT) for rehabilitating dysphonia secondary to suspected superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) weakness in two female patients. Both patients failed or plateaued with traditional VT but had significant improvement with the addition of NMES of the cricothyroid muscle and SLN using a VitalStim unit. Stimulation was provided simultaneously with voice exercises based on musical phonatory tasks. Both acoustic analysis and endoscopic evaluation demonstrated important improvements after treatment. In the first patient, the major change was obtained within the primo passaggio region; specifically, a decrease in voice breaks was demonstrated. In the second patient, an improvement in voice quality (less breathiness) and vocal range were the most important findings. Additionally, each patient reported a significant improvement in their voice complaints. Neuromuscular laryngeal electrical stimulation in combination with vocal exercises might be a useful tool to improve voice quality in patients with SLN injury. PMID:24315659

  15. Morphologic evaluation of the fetal recurrent laryngeal nerve and motor units in the thyroarytenoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Ellwanger, Joel Henrique; da Costa Rosa, João Paulo; dos Santos, Iuri Pereira; da Rosa, Helen Tais; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira; Xavier, Léder Leal; de Campos, Deivis

    2013-11-01

    This study is a morphologic description of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and of the number and size of motor units (MUs) in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle bilaterally of a human fetus aged 25 weeks. A quantitative analysis of RLN and MUs is presented to investigate similarities with equivalent structures in adults. In the fetus used in our study, the morphologic organization of the RLN was similar to that commonly described in the adult RLN. Moreover, as is observed in adult TA, the TA of the analyzed fetus, particularly the right TA, showed MUs typical of muscles with great motor accuracy. These results may be used to increase our knowledge of the features of the voice in adults and newborns. PMID:24128892

  16. Surgical Anatomy of Bilateral Extralaryngeal Bifurcation of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve: Similarities and Differences Between Both Sides

    PubMed Central

    Gurleyik, Emin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) such as extralaryngeal terminal bifurcation is an important risk for its motor function. Aims: The objective is to study surgical anatomy of bilateral bifurcation of the RLNs in order to decrease risk of vocal cord palsy in patients with bifurcated nerves. Materials and Methods: Surgical anatomy including terminal bifurcation was established in 292 RLNs of 146 patients. We included patients with bilateral bifurcation of RLN in this study. Based on two anatomical landmarks (nerve-artery crossing and laryngeal entry), the cervical course of RLN was classified in four segments: Pre-arterial, arterial, post-arterial and pre-laryngeal. According to these segments, bifurcation point locations along the cervical course of RLNs were compared between both sides in bilateral cases. Results: RLNs were exposed throughout their entire courses. Seventy (48%) patients had bifurcated RLNs. We identified terminal bifurcation in 90 (31%) of 292 RLNs along the cervical course. Bilateral bifurcation was observed in 20 (28.6%) patients with bifurcated RLNs. Bifurcation points were located on arterial and post-arterial segments in 37.5% and 32.5% of cases, respectively. Pre-arterial and pre-laryngeal segments contained bifurcations in 15% of cases. Comparison of both sides indicated that bifurcation points were similar in 5 (25%) and different in 15 (75%) patients with bilateral bifurcation. Permanent nerve injury did not occur in this series. Conclusion: Bilateral bifurcation of both RLNs was observed in approximately 30% of patients with extralaryngeal bifurcation which is a common anatomical variation. Bifurcation occurred in different segments along cervical course of RLN. Bifurcation point locations differed between both sides in the majority of bilateral cases. Increasing surgeons’ awareness of this variation may lead to safely exposing bifurcated nerves and prevent the injury to extralaryngeal terminal branches of RLN. PMID:25317388

  17. Safe distance between electrotome and recurrent laryngeal nerve: an experimental canine model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kewei; Zhu, Yi; Zhou, Gang; Ye, Yingjiang; Xie, Qiwei; Yang, Xiaodong; Wang, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various energy based surgical devices (ESD) like electrotome have been widely applied in thyroid surgery. This is the first canine model to determine the safety margin of using the electrotome near the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) to prevent injury to this nerve during thyroid surgery. Methods: Eighteen healthy male dogs were divided equally into three groups according to the distance between electrotome application and the RLN: Group A (5 mm), Group B (3 mm), Group C (1 mm). The parameters of evoked electromyography (EEMG) of vocal muscles between right normal RLNs and left RLNs after electrotome application at a power of 30 W for 1 second in each group were recorded and compared. The acute microstructural morphological changes of the RLNs were observed immediately after the operation under electron microscope. Results: In Group B and Group C, after using the electrotome at a vertical distance of 3 mm or 1 mm from the left RLNs, the stimulating thresholds of left RLNs had a significant increase (P = 0.005; P = 0.002) compared with right normal RLNs, and there occurred obvious acute microstructural morphological changes under electron microscope for left RLNs. While there was no significant functional or histological changes for left RLNs after using the electrotome at a vertical distance of 5 mm from the RLN (P = 0.187) in Group A. Conclusions: When using the electrotome near the RLN at a power of 30W in thyroid surgery, a safety margin of more than 3 mm should be recommended. PMID:25785056

  18. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 ?L type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  19. Prevention and treatment of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury in thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Gao, Bo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Jianjie; Chen, Jinping; Zhang, Shu; Luo, Donglin

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To summary the experience for prevention and treatment of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury in thyroid surgery. Methods: Clinical features of 623 patients who received thyroid surgery from January 2010 to December 2012 were analyzed retrospectively, and the features of RLN injury and intraoperative as well as postoperative treatments were reviewed. Results: RLN injury occurred in 31 patients (4.98%), in which, unilateral RLN injury occurred in 27 patients and bilateral RLN injuries occurred in 4 patients (temporary injury in 28 patients and permanent injury in 3 patients). 6 patients underwent RLN anastomosis during surgery and exhibited transient hoarseness after surgery. RLN exploration and decompression was given in 1 patient and the patient got normal vocal cord motion 2 months after surgery. 1 patient with bilateral injuries received tracheotomy and CO2 laser resection of arytenoid cartilage and achieved recovery 1 year later. Conclusions: In order to prevent RLN injury, the anatomic variations of RLN should be mastered. Routine exposure of RLN can effectively prevent the injury in patients receiving the second or multiple surgeries. Early interventions for RLN injury include mainly early discovery, early exploration and early anastomosis, and the function of RLN in some patients can recover completely. Subsequent treatments mainly focus on the improvement of the voice, expansion of glottis and melioration of dyspnea. PMID:24482694

  20. Lead breakage and vocal cord paralysis following blunt neck trauma in a patient with vagal nerve stimulator.

    PubMed

    Tran, Yvan; Shah, Aashit K; Mittal, Sandeep

    2011-05-15

    Patients with medically intractable seizures who are not candidates for epilepsy surgery are left with few options. Vagal nerve stimulation therapy is often a viable alternative for these patients and can have a positive impact on quality of life. Rarely complications may occur. We report a case of mild blunt neck trauma resulting in VNS malfunction and delayed vocal cord paralysis. A systematic review of the literature on VNS malfunction, self-inflicted injuries, vagal nerve injury, and common side effects including voice changes was performed. Only a handful of relevant publications were found. Symptoms following VNS dysfunction include pain, dyspnea, and dysphonia. These symptoms are usually nonspecific, and in many cases, do not help differentiate from vagal nerve traction, lead breakage, or pulse generator malfunction. In our case, lead fracture and visible traction injury to the left vagus nerve were seen during surgical exploration. The vocal cord function completely recovered after revision of the leads. Prompt medical attention including appropriate diagnostic studies and early surgical exploration is necessary in cases of delayed vocal cord dysfunction and can help prevent long-term complications such as neuroma formation. The authors present a unique case of reversible vocal cord injury from blunt neck trauma leading to left vagus nerve damage. PMID:21397256

  1. Transient total facial nerve paralysis: an unusual complication of transoral endoscopic-assisted management of subcondylar fracture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Lee, Young Man

    2012-05-01

    Endoscopic-assisted repair of subcondylar fractures is an additional tool for management; however, there is a steep learning curve. Generally, this technique allows good visualization of the fracture site for reduction through an incision with an acceptable cosmetic result. Recently, the surgical techniques and technology as well as the indications for endoscopic facial fracture repair are in development; there are few available data in the literature regarding detail complications and recovery processes following endoscopic fracture treatment. The purpose of this article was to reveal unusual complication following endoscopic repair of subcondylar fracture in terms of radiographic, photographic, and recovering orders of the facial nerve and facial reanimations. In our case, no damage to the facial nerve was observed intraoperatively, but the patient had total facial paralysis, immediately postoperatively. At long-term follow-up, the facial nerve function was recovered well within 6 months. The authors consider that transoral endoscopic-assisted open reduction constitutes a valid alternative to a transcutaneous approach for the reduction and fixation of subcondylar fractures. It provides the benefits of open reduction and internal fixation without the permanent complications, such as facial nerve injury. PMID:22627456

  2. Framework Surgery for Treatment of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Daniero, James J.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Francis, David O.

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal framework surgery is the current gold standard treatment for unilateral vocal fold paralysis. It provides a permanent solution to glottic insufficiency caused by injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Various modifications to the original Isshiki type I laryngoplasty procedure have been described to improve voice and swallowing outcomes. The success of this procedure is highly dependent on the experience of the surgeon as it epitomizes the intersection of art and science in the field. The following article reviews the evidence, controversies, and complications related to laryngoplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis. It also provides a detailed analysis of how and when arytenoid-positioning procedures should be considered, and summarizes the literature on postoperative outcomes. PMID:24883239

  3. Evaluation of greater petrosal nerve function in patients with acute peripheral facial paralysis: comparison of soft palate electrogustometry and Schirmer's tear test.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Minoru

    2002-01-01

    We tested sensory and secretomotor function of the greater petrosal nerve (GPN) by means of electrogustometry (EGM) of the soft palate and Schirmer's tear test in 115 patients (59 males, 56 females) with acute peripheral facial paralysis. Facial paralysis was caused by Bell's palsy in 78 cases, Ramsay Hunt syndrome in 27 cases and zoster sine herpetic lesions in 10. All patients had dysfunction of the stapedial nerve. An electrogustometer was used to test taste (GPN sensory function), and elevation of the threshold by > 6 dB on the affected side was considered abnormal. Schirmer's test was used to evaluate lacrimal (GPN secretomotor) function, which was considered abnormal when tear secretion on the affected side was < 50% of secretion on the non-affected side. Of the 78 patients with Bell's palsy, 28.2% had altered taste on the soft palate (sensory dysfunction) and 10.3% had lacrimal dysfunction, indicating that EGM of the soft palate is more sensitive than Schirmer's test for identifying dysfunction of the GPN in patients with facial paralysis due to Bell's palsy. Of the total of 115 patients, 32 (28%) had taste dysfunction and 9 (28.1%) of these 32 patients also had lacrimal dysfunction. This finding indicates that facial paralysis has different effects on the sensory and secretory nerve fibers of the GPN. The results of Schirmer's test were more closely related to the severity of, and prognosis for, facial paralysis than the results of EGM. PMID:12132607

  4. [Measurement and clinical using of motor conduction latency time and motor conduction latency rate of facial nerve in health subjects and facial paralysis patients].

    PubMed

    Zhu, J C

    1991-01-01

    The motor conduction latency time (MCLT) and rate (MCLR) of facial nerve in 70 cases of health subjects and 60 cases of facial paralysis patients were measured using evoke EMG. The results showed that MCLT is below 4 ms and MCLR is above 25 m/sec in 70 cases of health subjects, while the MCLT is above 4 ms and MCLR is below 25 m/sec in 60 cases of facial paralysis patients. We have observed the difference of MCLR and MCLR on different age groups in health subjects. The results showed that MCLT is prolonged gradually and MCLR is gradual reduced after 50 years old groups. But the MCLT does not exceed 4 ms and MCLR is not slower than 25 m/sec. The results of this studies suggested that if MCLT is above 4 ms, and MCLR is below 25 m/sec, it is a index of facial nerve paralysis. PMID:2032483

  5. Intraoperative neuromonitoring of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve during robotic thyroid surgery: a preliminary prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-jin; Oh, Byung-Mo; Oh, Eun Mee; Bae, Dong Sik; Choi, June Young; Myong, Jun Pyo; Youn, Yeo-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) during robotic thyroid surgery. Methods A total of 10 patients undergoing bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) robotic thyroid surgery were enrolled. The nerve integrity monitor (NIM Response 2.0 System) was used for EBSLN monitoring. We performed voice assessments preoperatively and at 1 and 3 months postoperatively using Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10), maximal phonation time (MPT), phonation efficient index (PEI), and laryngeal electromyography (EMG). Results A total of 19 EBSLNs were at risk and 14 EBSLNs (73.7%) were identified using neuromonitoring. VHI-10 showed a change of voice over time (0.1 vs. 3.6 vs. 1.3); however, this was not statistically significant. VHI-10 scores normalized at 3 months postoperatively compared to the preoperative scores. MPT (a) (16.0 vs. 15.6 vs. 15.4), and MPT (e) (20.1 vs. 15.4 vs. 18.5) showed no significant differences preoperatively compared to the values obtained 1 and 3 months postoperatively. There was a significant change of PEI over time (4.8 vs. 1.1 vs. 4.6) (P = 0.036); however, the values normalized at 3 months postoperatively. Laryngeal EMG results showed 4 cases (21.2%) of neuropathy of EBSLNs at 1 month postoperatively, and electrodiagnostic studies revealed nearly complete recovery of the function of EBSLNs in 4 patients at 3 months postoperatively Conclusion It is suggested that neuromonitoring of EBSLNs during BABA robotic thyroid surgery is feasible and might be helpful to preserve voice quality. PMID:26576402

  6. Effect of Paralysis at the Time of ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion on Pharyngolaryngeal Morbidities. A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Ah-Young; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Hwang, Jung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular block results in the loss of muscular tone in the upper airway, which might contribute to the increased postoperative airway morbidity followed by ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) insertion. We compared the pharyngolaryngeal discomfort exerted by the PLMA according to the neuromuscular block. One hundred sixty patients undergoing surgery for breast disease or inguinal hernia were anesthetized with propofol and remifentanil by target controlled infusion. Rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg (NMBA group, n = 80) or normal saline (No-NMBA group, n = 80) was administered after the loss of consciousness, and one anesthesiologist inserted the PLMA. Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal discomfort was evaluated at postoperative 1 h. Traumatic event was recorded based on the blood trace on the surface of the PLMA cuff. Insertion time, insertion attempt number, sealing pressure, and fiberoptic brochoscopic grades were evaluated. Patients’ characteristics and the PLMA insertion condition (insertion time, successful insertion attempt number, fiberoptic bronchoscopic grade, and sealing pressure) were similar between the two groups. The PLMA can be successfully inserted in non-paralyzed patients with less postoperative pharyngolaryngeal discomfort than when a neuromuscular blocking agent is used (13.8% vs. 30.0%, P = 0.021). The incidence of traumatic events is also reduced when no neuromuscular blocking agent is used (16.3% vs. 32.5%, P = 0.026). Regardless of whether or not a surgical procedure requires muscular relaxation, there is no need to administer neuromuscular blocking agents solely for the purpose of PLMA insertion. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01035021 PMID:26252522

  7. Pelagic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Mills, A R; Passmore, R

    1988-01-23

    Three conditions that may occur after consumption of seafood--puffer fish poisoning, ciguatera, and paralytic shellfish poisoning--are caused by a group of poisons that block voltage-gated sodium channels in myelinated and non-myelinated nerves. The conditions cannot be distinguished clinically and so constitute an entity for which the name pelagic paralysis is proposed. Variations in the clinical features can be accounted for by large differences in the amount of toxin present in the seafood. PMID:2892995

  8. Similarities in the surface area/volume ratio in the fibers of the recurrent laryngeal nerve can explain the symmetry in the vocal fold mobility?

    PubMed

    de Campos, Deivis; Xavier, Léder Leal; Goulart, Guilherme Reghelin; Thomaz, Leonardo Dalla Giacomassa Rocha; Malysz, Tais; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate in this paper that although there are statistical differences for all morphometric data [axon length, axon diameter, myelinated fiber diameter and degree of the myelination (g-Ratio)] between the fibers of recurrent laryngeal nerve right and left, the surface area/volume ratio in the fibers of both nerves is exactly the same (1/1.7). Thereby, this paper presents the hypothesis that this similarity between the nerves can actually trigger a considerable synchrony in mobility of the intrinsic muscles of the larynx that control of the vocal folds. PMID:26362729

  9. Vocal Fold Paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... elastic bands of muscle tissue located in the larynx (voice box) directly above the trachea (windpipe) (see ... the electrical impulses of the nerves in the larynx, to better understand the areas of paralysis. How ...

  10. Secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Evers, S.; Engelien, A.; Karsch, V.; Hund, M.

    1998-01-01

    Besides the hereditary hyperkalaemic paralysis, a secondary form exists which often mimicks Guillain-Barre syndrome. A 62year old patient is reported on who developed severe hyperkalaemic paralysis on the basis of mild renal failure and additive spironolactone intake. Neurophysiological examinations disclosed normal muscle fibre activity but delayed nerve conduction velocities indicating that the mechanism underlying secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis is different from channelopathies. Haemodialysis led to complete recovery. Review of the medical literature showed that spironolactone intake is the most common cause of secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis. Typical symptoms are flaccid tetraplegia sparing the cranial nerves with only mild or lacking sensory impairment. Symptoms promptly resolve after haemodialysis or after glucose and insulin infusion. Only three out of 18 patients reviewed died, because of cardiopulmonary complications. Thus the prognosis of secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis is good.?? PMID:9489541

  11. Vesalius on the anatomy and function of the recurrent laryngeal nerves: medical illustration and reintroduction of a physiological demonstration from Galen.

    PubMed

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the anatomical illustrations and physiological demonstrations of sixteenth-century Flemish-born anatomist and physician Andreas Vesalius concerning the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Although Vesalius was primarily an anatomist, he also used vivisection as a pedagogical device to help his students understand the function of structures within the fabric of the body that they had previously studied in anatomical detail. Vesalius's masterwork, De humani corporis fabrica or simply the Fabrica (1543, 1555), was ostensibly an anatomy text, but Vesalius included textual and figural references to his use of vivisection to explicate the function of specific structures. Even as he began to criticize the errors in Galen's anatomical works, Vesalius nevertheless adopted some of Galen's classic physiological demonstrations, in particular the ligation (and subsequent release) of the recurrent laryngeal nerves of a pig to demonstrate their role in generating the pig's squeal. Vesalius's illustrations concerning the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the Fabrica were of two types: elegant anatomical woodcut plates-unsurpassed for their clarity, accuracy, and detail - and the distinctly inelegant historiated initial Q, depicting a throng of putti busily engaged in vivisecting a pig. Vesalius' anatomical plates were heavily plagiarized while the historiated initials, showing the rough work of an anatomist or surgeon, were largely ignored and remain little recognized today. While Vesalius' anatomical illustrations of the recurrent laryngeal nerves contained some errors, they were a dramatic departure from prior meager efforts at medical illustration and indeed far surpassed all contemporary published illustrations by others. Vesalius was also influential in reviving Galen's approach to vivisection, at least for pedagogical purposes, if not really then yet as a full-fledged investigative technique. PMID:24870272

  12. Generating Sexually Differentiated Vocal Patterns: Laryngeal Nerve and EMG Recordings from Vocalizing Male and Female African

    E-print Network

    Kelley, Darcy B.

    that the vocal organ, the larynx, of the sexes differs in physiological properties that parallel vocal each vocalization whereas the larynx faithfully translates nerve activity into sound. Thus, the CNS

  13. Combined spinal/general anesthesia with postoperative femoral nerve block for total knee replacement in a patient with familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Barker, Maria C

    2010-06-01

    Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is a rare genetic disorder in which the sodium channels in skeletal muscle cells have altered structure and function. Small elevations in serum potassium lead to inactivation of sodium channels, causing episodic weakness or paralysis. Exposure to cold, anesthesia, fasting, emotional stress, potassium ingestion, and rest after exercise can stimulate an attack. This case report describes a 65-year-old man with HYPP who was admitted for a right total knee arthroplasty. He had a history of arteriosclerotic heart disease and stenting 8 years earlier, previous inferior wall myocardial infarction with ejection fraction of 65%, anxiety, degenerative joint disease, well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a body mass index of 53.3 kg/m2. A combined spinal/general anesthetic with a femoral nerve block for postoperative pain control was chosen. Careful attention was given to monitoring and maintenance of core temperature, use of insulin and glucose to maintain normokalemia, and carbohydrate loading the night before surgery. The patient recovered from the anesthetic without complication and had pain relief for approximately 22 hours postoperatively because of the femoral nerve block. The patient was without weakness or paralysis related to HYPP in the postanesthesia care unit or throughout his hospitalization. PMID:20572404

  14. Unilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Lesion in an Animal Model of Dysphagia and Its Effect on Sucking and Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Malone, Regina; Holman, Shaina D.; Lukasik, Stacey L.; Fukuhara, Takako; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M.; Thexton, Allan J.; German, Rebecca Z.

    2013-01-01

    We tested two hypotheses relating to the sensory deficit that follows a unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) lesion in an infant animal model. We hypothesized that it would result in (1) a higher incidence of aspiration and (2) temporal changes in sucking and swallowing. We ligated the right-side SLN in six 2–3-week-old female pigs. Using videofluoroscopy, we recorded swallows in the same pre- and post-lesion infant pigs. We analyzed the incidence of aspiration and the duration and latency of suck and swallow cycles. After unilateral SLN lesioning, the incidence of silent aspiration during swallowing increased from 0.7 to 41.5 %. The durations of the suck containing the swallow, the suck immediately following the swallow, and the swallow itself were significantly longer in the post-lesion swallows, although the suck prior to the swallow was not different. The interval between the start of the suck containing a swallow and the subsequent epiglottal movement was longer in the post-lesion swallows. The number of sucks between swallows was significantly greater in post-lesion swallows compared to pre-lesion swallows. Unilateral SLN lesion increased the incidence of aspiration and changed the temporal relationships between sucking and swallowing. The longer transit time and the temporal coordinative dysfunction between suck and swallow cycles may contribute to aspiration. These results suggest that swallow dysfunction and silent aspiration are common and potentially overlooked sequelae of unilateral SLN injury. This validated animal model of aspiration has the potential for further dysphagia studies. PMID:23417250

  15. Application of Endobronchial Ultrasonography for the Preoperative Detecting Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Lymph Node Metastasis of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Rong; Li, Yin; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Lin, Shi-Yong; Luo, Guang-Yu; Li, Jian-Jun; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The preoperative detection of recurrent laryngeal nerve lymph node (RLN LN) metastasis provides important information for the treatment of esophageal cancer. We investigated the possibility of applying endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) with conventional preoperative endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and computerized tomography (CT) examination to evaluate RLN LN metastasis in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods A total of 115 patients with advanced thoracic esophageal cancer underwent EBUS examinations. Patients also underwent EUS and CT imaging as reference diagnostic methods. Positron emission tomography /computed tomography (PET/CT) was also introduced in partial patients as reference method. The preoperative evaluation of RLN LN metastasis was compared with the surgical and pathological staging in 94 patients who underwent radical surgery. Results The sensitivities of the preoperative evaluations of RLN LN metastasis by EBUS, EUS and CT were 67.6%, 32.4% and 29.4%, respectively. The sensitivity of EBUS was significantly different from that of EUS or CT, especially in the detection of right RLN LNs. In addition, according to the extra data from reference method, PET/CT was not superior to EBUS or EUS in detecting RLN LN metastasis. Among all 115 patients, 21 patients who were diagnosed with tracheal invasions by EUS or EBUS avoided radical surgery. Another 94 patients who were diagnosed as negative for tracheobronchial tree invasion by EUS and EBUS had no positive findings in radical surgery. Conclusions EBUS can enhance the preoperative sensitivity of the detection of RLN LN metastasis in cases of thoracic esophageal cancer and is a useful complementary examination to conventional preoperative EUS and CT, which can alert thoracic surgeons to the possibility of a greater range of preoperative lymph node dissection. EBUS may also indicate tracheal invasion in cases of esophageal stricture. PMID:26372339

  16. Facial paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... otherwise healthy, facial paralysis is often due to Bell palsy . This is a condition in which the facial ... speech, or occupational therapist. If facial paralysis from Bell palsy lasts for more than 6 to 12 months, ...

  17. Laryngeal reinnervation in the horse.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Ian C; Stick, John A; Derksen, Fredrik J

    2003-04-01

    Left laryngeal hemiplegia is a frustrating condition for the equine athlete and equine veterinarian. Treatment for the past 30 years has centered on the prosthetic laryngoplasty ("tie-back") with or without ventriculectomy. Laryngeal reinnervation has been used successfully in people and has been shown experimentally to benefit affected horses. This article reviews equine laryngeal reinnervation using the nerve muscle pedicle graft and describes the surgical technique, its complications, and the follow-up in 146 cases treated over the past 10 years. Also discussed is ongoing research into stimulation studies to improve the success of equine laryngeal reinnervation. PMID:12747668

  18. Field potentials evoked in the brain stem of the cat by stimulation of the carotid sinus, glossopharyngeal, aortic and superior laryngeal nerves

    PubMed Central

    Biscoe, T. J.; Sampson, S. R.

    1970-01-01

    1. In a primarily topographical study, the field potentials evoked in the brain stem of the cat by stimulation of the sinus, glossopharyngeal (IX), aortic and superior laryngeal (SLN) nerves have been recorded with glass micro-electrodes. 2. Extracellular negative potentials were evoked in the region of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius and in the lateral reticular formation (LRF) by electrical stimulation of all four nerves. There were differences in the form of these potentials amongst the nerves, particularly between sinus-IX and aortic-SLN. The potentials were identified as post-synaptic with early and late components and were sometimes preceded by an afferent volley. 3. Extracellular positive potentials were evoked in the subnucleus reticularis medialis medullae oblongatae and the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis. Intracellularly recorded hyperpolarizations recorded from six cells had the same time course as the extracellular positivity. Spontaneously active cells encountered in these regions were sometimes depressed for the duration of the positivity. 4. Each of the above field potentials was maximal in the region of Horsley—Clarke A. P. co-ordinates -10 to -13 mm. 5. At A.P. co-ordinates of -15 to -17 mm negativity showing post-tetanic potentiation was evoked, at latencies similar to the negativity in the LRF, in the commissural nucleus of Cajal, the dorsolateral reticular formation and the medial reticulo-spinal tract. 6. Negative potentials were evoked in the contralateral LRF. PMID:5499531

  19. Tick paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    Tick paralysis is a loss of muscle function that results from a tick bite . ... Hard- and soft-bodied female ticks are believed to make a poison that can cause paralysis in children. Ticks attach to the skin to feed on blood. ...

  20. Tapia's syndrome in the intensive care unit: a rare cause of combined cranial nerve palsy following intubation.

    PubMed

    Coninckx, M; Cardoen, S; Hemelsoet, D

    2015-12-01

    Tapia's syndrome is characterized by unilateral paralysis of the tongue and vocal cord, and is caused by a concurrent lesion of both the recurrent laryngeal and hypoglossal nerves. The proposed mechanism in most patients is compression or stretching of these nerves on their extracranial course due to airway manipulation under general anaesthesia. As Tapia's syndrome is a rare and possibly devastating condition, recognition of the presence of concurrent paralyses is an important step in diagnosis and treatment. We report two cases of Tapia's syndrome as a complication of intubation in the intensive care unit. PMID:26088745

  1. Intraoperative Neuromonitoring of the External Branch of the Superior Laryngeal Nerve during Thyroidectomy: The Need for Evidence-Based Data and Perioperative Technical/Technological Standardization

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Alberto; Lianos, Georgios D.; Boni, Luigi; Kim, Hoon Yub; Roukos, Dimitrios H.; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) is surgically relevant since its close anatomical proximity to the superior thyroid vessels. There is heterogeneity in the EBSLN anatomy and EBSLN damage produces changes in voice that are very heterogenous and difficult to diagnose. The reported prevalence of EBSLN injury widely ranges. EBSLN iatrogenic injury is considered the most commonly underestimated complication in endocrine surgery because vocal assessment underestimates such event and laryngoscopic postsurgical evaluation does not show standardized findings. In order to decrease the risk for EBSLN injury, multiple surgical approaches have been described so far. IONM provides multiple advantages in the EBSLN surgical approach. In this review, we discuss the current state of the art of the monitored approach to the EBSLN. In particular, we summarize, providing our additional remarks, the most relevant aspects of the standardized technique brilliantly described by the INMSG (International Neuromonitoring Study Group). In conclusion, in our opinion, there is currently the need for more prospective randomized trials investigating the electrophysiological and pathological aspects of the EBSLN for a better understanding of the role of IONM in the EBSLN surgery. PMID:25525624

  2. Intraoperative neuromonitoring of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy: the need for evidence-based data and perioperative technical/technological standardization.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Alberto; Lianos, Georgios D; Boni, Luigi; Kim, Hoon Yub; Roukos, Dimitrios H; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) is surgically relevant since its close anatomical proximity to the superior thyroid vessels. There is heterogeneity in the EBSLN anatomy and EBSLN damage produces changes in voice that are very heterogenous and difficult to diagnose. The reported prevalence of EBSLN injury widely ranges. EBSLN iatrogenic injury is considered the most commonly underestimated complication in endocrine surgery because vocal assessment underestimates such event and laryngoscopic postsurgical evaluation does not show standardized findings. In order to decrease the risk for EBSLN injury, multiple surgical approaches have been described so far. IONM provides multiple advantages in the EBSLN surgical approach. In this review, we discuss the current state of the art of the monitored approach to the EBSLN. In particular, we summarize, providing our additional remarks, the most relevant aspects of the standardized technique brilliantly described by the INMSG (International Neuromonitoring Study Group). In conclusion, in our opinion, there is currently the need for more prospective randomized trials investigating the electrophysiological and pathological aspects of the EBSLN for a better understanding of the role of IONM in the EBSLN surgery. PMID:25525624

  3. Correlation of Final Evoked Potential Amplitudes on Intraoperative Electromyography of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve With Immediate Postoperative Vocal Fold Function After Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Genther, Dane J.; Kandil, Emad H.; Noureldine, Salem I.; Tufano, Ralph P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Thyroid and parathyroid surgery are among the most common operations in the United States. Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is an infrequent but potentially detrimental complication. OBJECTIVE To correlate the final evoked potential amplitudes on intraoperative electromyography (EMG) after stimulation of the RLN with immediate postoperative vocal fold function after thyroid and parathyroid surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective observational study at a tertiary academic medical center. We included 674 patients (with 1000 nerves at risk) undergoing thyroid or parathyroid surgery from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2012. INTERVENTIONS Thyroid and parathyroid surgery. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The association of final evoked potential amplitudes on EMG after thyroid and parathyroid surgery with vocal fold function as determined by postoperative fiberoptic laryngoscopy. RESULTS Three patients experienced permanent vocal fold paresis (VFP) secondary to intraoperative RLN transection. Of the remaining 997 RLNs at risk, 22 (2.2%) in 20 patients exhibited temporary VFP on fiberoptic laryngoscopy after extubation. Eighteen patients experienced unilateral temporary VFP, and 2 experienced bilateral VFP without the need for tracheostomy or reintubation. Of the 22 RLNs, postdissection EMG amplitudes were less than 200 µV (true-positive findings) in 21 and at least 200 µV (false-negative finding) in 1. Of the 975 RLNs (97.5%) with normal function, postdissection EMG amplitudes were at least 200 µV (true-negative findings) in 967 and less than 200 µV (false-positive findings) in 8. In regard to immediate postoperative VFP, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of postdissection EMG amplitudes of less than 200 µV were 95.5%, 99.2%, 72.4%, 99.9%, and 99.1%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Intraoperative nerve monitoring of the RLN with EMG provides real-time information regarding neurophysiologic function of the RLN and can predict immediate postoperative VFP reliably when a cutoff of 200 µV is used. The high negative predictive value means that the surgeon can presume with confidence that the RLN has not been injured in the presence of a potential of at least 200 µV. This information would be useful in patients for whom bilateral thyroid surgery is being considered. PMID:24384927

  4. [The history of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques. PMID:26088742

  5. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - Isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes in which the person is unable to move or speak. ...

  6. INFANTILE PARALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    1917-01-01

    At the recent Forty-fourth Annual Meetings of the American Public Health Association, Cincinnati, Ohio, there was held a Round Table Discussion on Infantile Paralysis, in which health authorities throughout the country took part. This discussion was held under the auspices of the Section on Public Health Administration. Dr. George W. Goler, Health Officer of Rochester, N. Y., Chairman of this Section, presided. We take great pleasure in being able to reproduce for readers of the Journal what took place at this most important session. PMID:18009618

  7. Isolated laryngeal myasthenia gravis for 26 years.

    PubMed

    Renard, Dimitri; Hedayat, Amir; Gagnard, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    Laryngeal myasthenia gravis is a relatively rare variant of myasthenia gravis. A vast portion of patients with initial laryngeal myasthenia gravis develop involvement of ocular and/or extra-ocular muscles during the years after symptom onset although a minority of laryngeal myasthenia gravis patients continues to have isolated laryngeal muscle involvement for several years. We present a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodic isolated dysphonia (associated with diffuse bilateral vocal cord paresis on laryngoscopy) since the age of 32. Dysphonia became permanent since 6 months. A diagnosis of laryngeal myasthenia gravis was made based on abnormal single-fiber electromyography and spectacular response to pyridostigmine treatment. Repetitive nerve stimulation was normal and anti-acetylcholine receptor and anti-muscle specific tyrosine kinase antibodies were absent. This case shows that laryngeal myasthenia gravis can be isolated during 26 years of follow-up. We propose that even when myasthenia gravis seems unlikely as underlying mechanism of isolated dysphonia (because of lack of antibodies, normal repetitive nerve stimulation, and absence of extra-laryngeal involvement after years of follow-up), single-fiber electromyography should be performed and myasthenia gravis treatment should be tried. PMID:25454167

  8. Evaluating the timing of injection laryngoplasty for vocal fold paralysis in an attempt to avoid future type 1 thyroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether immediate (less than 3 months from time of nerve injury), early (from 3 to 6 months from time of nerve injury) or late (more than 6 months from time of nerve injury) vocal fold injection influences the long-term outcomes for patients with permanent unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Methods A total of 250 patients with documented unilateral vocal fold paralysis were identified in this retrospective chart review. 66 patients met the inclusion criteria, having undergone awake trancervical injection with gelfoam™, collagen, perlane™ or a combination. Patients with documented recovery of vocal fold mobility, or patients with less than one year of follow-up after the onset of paralysis were excluded. Patients were stratified into immediate (<3 months), early (3-6 months) and late (>6 months) groups denoting the time from suspected injury to injection. The need for open surgery as determined by a persistently immobile vocal fold with insufficient glottic closure following injection was the primary outcome. Results 1 out of 21 (4.8%) in the immediate group, 2 out of 17 (11.8%) in the early group and 20 out of 28 (71.4%) in the late group required type 1 thyroplasty procedures to restore glottic competence. There was significance when comparing late injection to both early and immediate injection (p?laryngeal framework surgery. PMID:24499514

  9. Trophic Effects of Androgen: Receptor Expression and the Survival of Laryngeal Motor Neurons after Axotomy

    E-print Network

    Kelley, Darcy B.

    Trophic Effects of Androgen: Receptor Expression and the Survival of Laryngeal Motor Neurons after with trophic actions of androgens, we have examined the laryngeal motor nucleus (N. IX­X) of Xeno- pus laevis 1 and 5 months after section of the laryngeal nerve. In situ hybridization was used to recognize cells

  10. Modified thyroplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis using an adjustable titanium implant.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wu; Sun, Guangbin; Sun, Bifeng; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Mingxing

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to describe a new titanium thyroplasty implant that can be adjusted with a screw. Six Beagle dogs were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n = 3). The titanium screw was implanted in the experimental group after the left recurrent laryngeal nerve was cut off under general anaesthesia. This procedure caused arytenoid cartilage internal shift, allowing the vocal cord to locate at the median and the glottis to close during phonation. No other operation was conducted in the control group. Each group, respectively, underwent video laryngoscopy, CT scan and histopathology before and after operation. After 4 months of follow-up, the video laryngoscopy results showed that the left arytenoid cartilage in the experimental group underwent internal adduct and shift, whereas the left vocal cords in the control group located at the paramedian position and exhibited fissure during phonation. CT scan results showed that the adjustable titanium screw was in proper position. Postoperative pathological examination showed that, in addition to early local inflammation, the laryngeal muscle may atrophy. The adjustable titanium screw requires a simple operation and can be significantly adjusted. The effect of the operation can be immediately observed without rejection. Therefore, this method is an efficient treatment for unilateral vocal cord paralysis. PMID:24728279

  11. Using Laryngeal Electromyography to Differentiate Presbylarynges from Paresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stager, Sheila V.; Bielamowicz, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Differential diagnosis of patients over 64 years of age reporting hoarseness is challenging. Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) was used to determine the status of the recurrent and superior laryngeal nerves. The authors hypothesized that individuals with hoarseness but normal LEMG would have measures similar to those of patients from…

  12. Anatomic study of human laryngeal ganglia: number and distribution.

    PubMed

    Maranillo, Eva; Vazquez, Teresa; Ibanez, Marta; Hurtado, Miguel; Pascual-Font, Aran; McHanwell, Stephen; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco; Sanudo, Jose

    2008-10-01

    We have studied 12 laryngeal nerves: six internal branches of the superior laryngeal nerve (ILN) and six recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) from three human adult larynges (two males and one female). After dissection of each individual laryngeal nerve using a surgical microscope, the nerves were preserved in 10% formalin, embedded in paraffin wax, serially sectioned transversely at a thickness of 10 microm and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. We found 2-4 ganglia associated with the ILN. At least two ganglia were always present (six out of six cases), the largest one being associated with the branch of the nerve innervating the vestibule and the smallest one associated with the branch innervating the aryepiglottic fold. Other ganglia were found associated with the branches for the glosso-epiglottic fold and vallecula (four out of six cases) and interarytenoid muscle (three out of six cases). The RLN showed from two to six ganglia, all of them located in its anterior terminal division. Two of the ganglia were located in the part of the nerve between the origin of the branches for the interarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid muscles (three out of six cases). The remaining ganglia were located close to or at the origin of the muscular branches innervating the intrinsic laryngeal muscles. The cytology of the ganglia reported suggests that they were all autonomic in nature, probably parasympathetic. PMID:18773473

  13. Practice parameter: laryngeal electromyography (an evidence-based review).

    PubMed

    Sataloff, Robert T; Mandel, Steven; Mann, Eric A; Ludlow, Christy L

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports on an evidence-based review of laryngeal electromyography (EMG) as a technique for use in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of laryngeal movement disorders, including the laryngeal dystonias, vocal fold paralysis, and other neurolaryngological disorders. The authors performed a systematic review of the medical literature from 1944 through 2001 on the clinical application of EMG to laryngeal disorders. Thirty-three of the 584 articles met the predefined inclusion criteria. The evidence demonstrated that in a double-blind treatment trial of botulinum toxin versus saline, laryngeal EMG used to guide injections into the thyroarytenoid muscle in persons with adductor spasmodic dysphonia was beneficial. A cross-over comparison between laryngeal EMG-guided injection and endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin into the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle in abductor spasmodic dysphonia found no significant difference between the two techniques and no significant treatment benefit. Based on the evidence, laryngeal EMG is possibly useful for the injection of botulinum toxin into the thyroarytenoid muscle in the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia. There were no evidence-based data sufficient to support or refute the value of laryngeal EMG for the other uses investigated, although there is extensive anecdotal literature suggesting that it is useful for each of them. There is an urgent need for evidence-based research addressing other applications in the use of laryngeal EMG for other applications. PMID:15193662

  14. Reversible electrophysiological abnormalities in acute secondary hyperkalemic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Karkal R.; Saroja, Aralikatte O.; Khanpet, Mallikarjun S.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperkalemia manifests clinically with acute neuromuscular paralysis, which can simulate Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS) and other causes of acute flaccid paralysis. Primary hyperkalemic paralysis occurs from genetic defects in the sodium channel, and secondary hyperkalemic paralysis (SHP) from diverse causes including renal dysfunction, potassium retaining drugs, Addison's disease, etc. Clinical characteristics of SHP have been addressed in a number of publications. However, electrophysiological evaluations of these patients during neuromuscular paralysis are infrequently reported and have demonstrated features of demyelination. The clinical features and electrophysiological abnormalities in secondary hyperkalemia mimic GBS, and pose diagnostic challenges. We report the findings of nerve conduction studies in a middle-aged man who was admitted with rapidly reversible acute quadriplegia resulting from secondary hyperkalemic paralysis. PMID:23349611

  15. Effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation on Denervated Laryngeal Muscle in a Large Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Jon; Perkins, Justin D; Jarvis, Jonathan C; Cercone, Marta; Maw, Martin; Hermanson, John W; Mitchell, Lisa M; Piercy, Richard J; Ducharme, Norm G

    2015-10-01

    Bilateral vocal fold paralysis (BVCP) is a life-threatening condition that follows injury to the Recurrent Laryngeal nerve (RLn) and denervation of the intrinsic laryngeal musculature. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) enables restoration and control of a wide variety of motor functions impaired by lower motor neuron lesions. Here we evaluate the effects of FES on the sole arytenoid abductor, the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle in a large animal model of RLn injury. Ten horses were instrumented with two quadripolar intramuscular electrodes in the left PCA muscle. Following a 12-week denervation period, the PCA was stimulated using a once-daily training session for 8 weeks in seven animals. Three animals were used as unstimulated controls. Denervation produced a significant increase in rheobase (P?

  16. Management of the Eye in Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chi, John J

    2016-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of the eye in facial paralysis is a critical component of surgical management. The degree of facial nerve paralysis, lacrimal secretion, corneal sensation, and lower eyelid position must be assessed accurately. Upper eyelid loading procedures are standard management of lagophthalmos. Lower eyelid tightening repositions the lower eyelid and helps maintain the aqueous tear film. Eyelid reanimation allows an aesthetic symmetry with blinking and restores protective functions vital to ocular preservation. Patients often have multiple nervous deficits, including corneal anesthesia. Other procedures include tarsorrhaphy, spring implantation, and temporalis muscle transposition; associated complications have rendered them nearly obsolete. PMID:26611698

  17. Transition of myosin heavy chain isoforms in human laryngeal abductors following denervation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Donghui; Li, Meng; Gao, Yingna; Liu, Fei; Zheng, Hongliang; Chen, Shicai

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the myofiber subtype transition of human posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle after the injury to recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). PCA muscle specimens were obtained from 38 bilateral vocal fold paralysis patients underwent arytenoidectomy. According to the duration of RLN injury, all the cases were divided into five denervation groups: 6-12 months, 1-2, 2-3, 3-6, and >6 years. The normal PCA muscles from total laryngectomy patients were chosen as controls. Immunofluorescence was adopted to detect the expression level of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-I and MHC-II in PCA muscle. Quantitative real-time PCR was also used to assess the transcriptional level of MHC subtypes (MHC-I, MHC-IIa, MHC-IIb, MHC-IIx, embryonic-MHC, and peri-natal-MHC). Immunofluorescence showed that MHC-I-positive myofibers in denervation groups were much lower than control group, respectively, while MHC-II-positive myofibers were significantly higher than control group (P < 0.05). With the extension of denervation, the number of MHC-I-positive myofibers gradually decreased, while MHC-II gradually increased and peaked in 1- to 2-year group. Transcriptional level of MHC-I, MHC-IIa, and MHC-IIb in denervation groups significantly down-regulated compared with the control (P < 0.05), respectively. However, MHC-IIx, embryonic-MHC, and peri-natal-MHC significantly up-regulated in all denervation groups, and the highest level was in 1- to 2-year denervation group. Data from the present study demonstrated that the maximum transition of MHC subtypes in human PCA muscles occurred in 1-2 years after denervation, suggesting that laryngeal reinnervation before the occurrence of irreversible transition of MHC subtypes could maintain the structural integrity of laryngeal PCA muscles. PMID:26059207

  18. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Sant'Ambrogio, F.B.; Orani, G.P.; Sant'Ambrogio, G.; Mathew, O.P. )

    1990-02-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.

  19. Left Vocal Cord Paralysis Detected by PET/CT in a Case of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oner, Ali Ozan; Boz, Adil; Surer Budak, Evrim; Kaplan Kurt, Gulnihal Hale

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient with lung cancer. The first PET/CT imaging revealed hypermetabolic mass in the left aortopulmonary region and hypermetabolic nodule in the anterior segment of the upper lobe of the left lung. After completing chemotherapy and radiotherapy against the primary mass in the left lung, the patient underwent a second PET/CT examination for evaluation of treatment response. This test demonstrated, compared with the first PET/CT, an increase in the size and metabolic activity of the primary mass in the left lung in addition to multiple, pathologic-sized, hypermetabolic metastatic lymph nodes as well as multiple metastatic sclerotic areas in bones. These findings were interpreted as progressive disease. In addition, an asymmetrical FDG uptake was noticed at the level of right vocal cord. During follow-up, a laryngoscopy was performed, which demonstrated left vocal cord paralysis with no apparent mass. Thus, we attributed the paralytic appearance of the left vocal cord to infiltration of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve by the primary mass located in the apical region of the left lung. In conclusion, the knowledge of this pitfall is important to avoid false-positive PET results. PMID:26613056

  20. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after kidney surgery.

    PubMed

    Sozzo, S; Carratù, P; Damiani, M F; Falcone, V A; Palumbo, A; Dragonieri, S; Resta, O

    2012-06-01

    A 57-year-old woman underwent an enucleoresection of her right kidney angiomyolipoma. Two weeks later she was admitted to our hospital because of dyspnea at rest with orthopnea. The chest x-ray showed the elevation of both hemidiaphragms and the measurement of the sniff transdiaphragmatic pressure confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. A diaphragm paralysis can be ascribed to several causes, i.e. trauma, compressive events, inflammations, neuropathies, or it can be idiopathic. In this case, it was very likely that the patient suffered from post-surgery neuralgic amyotrophy. To our knowledge, there are only a few reported cases of neuralgic amyotrophy, also known as Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, which affects only the phrenic nerve as a consequence of a surgery in an anatomically distant site. PMID:23193847

  1. Laryngeal Paralyses: Theoretical Considerations and Effects on Laryngeal Vibration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marshall E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical four-mass model of the larynx was developed to simulate laryngeal biomechanical behavior and used to evaluate states of asymmetric laryngeal vibration. Simulations of laryngeal paralyses were compared with data on glottal vibration in observed laryngeal function. (Author/JDD)

  2. Secondary laryngeal tuberculosis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Lodha, Jaini V; Sharma, Arpit; Virmani, Nitish; Bihani, Ameya; Dabholkar, Jyoti P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Laryngeal tuberculosis is often misdiagnosed and is a highly contagious public health problem. The changing pattern of the clinical involvement of this disease poses a diagnostic challenge. The authors report four cases of laryngeal tuberculosis encountered in a short span of one month. Materials and Methods: All the four patients who presented to us with hoarseness had underlying active lesions in the lung. In spite of that they presented with mainly laryngeal symptoms and a multitude of findings on laryngeal examination. A diagnosis could be established owing to a high index of clinical suspicion, and due consideration given to the chest findings and positive sputum examination. The patients showed an excellent response to antituberculous therapy. Results and Conclusions: This study underlines the varied nature of laryngeal tuberculosis and the importance of addressing the hoarseness of a patient at the earliest, for the prompt diagnosis of this infectious condition.

  3. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Haider; Kothari, Nikhil; Bogra, Jaishri

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare genetic disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of skeletal muscle weakness with associated hypokalemia which is precipitated by stress, cold, carbohydrate load, infection, glucose infusion, hypothermia, metabolic alkalosis, anesthesia, and steroids. We encountered one such incidence of prolonged recovery after general anesthesia, which on further evaluation revealed a case of hypokalemic paralysis. The key to successful management of such a patient was vigilant pre-operative evaluation, perioperative monitoring, and aggressive treatment of hypokalemia when it occurs. PMID:23833504

  4. Laryngeal schwannoma: a case report with emphasis on sonographic findings*

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Luis Ronan Marquez Ferreira; De Nicola, Harley; Yamasaki, Rosiane; Pedroso, José Eduardo; do Brasil, Osíris de Oliveira Camponês; Yamashita, Hélio

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors composed of Schwann cells, which normally produce the insulating myelin sheath covering peripheral, cranial and autonomic nerves. Twenty-five to forty-five percent of all schwannomas occur in the head and neck region, but location of such tumors in the larynx is rarely observed. The present report is aimed at describing a clinical case of laryngeal schwannoma, with emphasis on sonographic findings. PMID:25741079

  5. [Laryngitis in childhood].

    PubMed

    Korppi, Matti; Tapiainen, Terhi

    2015-01-01

    The most common causative agents of laryngitis are parainfluenza viruses. The diagnosis of laryngitis in children is a clinical one, typical symptoms including dry, often barking cough and inspiratory difficulty and wheezing. Typical age of occurrence is 0.5 to 3 years. In children under one year of age the structural and functional anomalies causing symptoms resembling laryngitis in connection with an infection should not be disregarded. Most patients can be nursed at home. An orally administered glucocorticoid and inhaled racemic adrenalin are effective drugs in emergency service. PMID:26237918

  6. Ascending paralysis associated with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Aasim; Benjamin, Mina; Gummelt, Kyle L.; Afzal, Sadaf; Tribble, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We present two patients with a high viral load of HIV-1 who developed symptoms of ascending paralysis leading to respiratory failure and autonomic instability. One patient had symptom improvement with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and a subsequent decrease in viral load. The other patient improved with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and did not show much improvement on HAART alone. There are several proposed mechanisms for peripheral neuropathies seen in HIV-infected patients, including a direct action of HIV on the nerve by neurotropic strains or formation of autoantibodies against nerve elements. The comparison of the response to different therapies in these two cases highlights the importance of understanding different pathophysiologies, as the treatment modality may differ. PMID:25552790

  7. [Paraglottic laryngeal abscesses].

    PubMed

    Fernández Pérez, A; Fernández-Nogueras Jiménez, F; Moreno León, J A

    2002-01-01

    We present 2 cases of laryngeal abscesses in the paraglottic space. We revise the existing literature in relation with this nowadays rare entity that requires a quick diagnosis and treatment as it is a fast life threatening disease. PMID:12402494

  8. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS: THE NEED FOR CAREFUL PATIENT SELECTION

    PubMed Central

    Kokong, DD; Adoga, AA; Bakari, A; Okundia, PO; Onakoya, PA; Nwaorgu, OGB

    2015-01-01

    Background Vocal cord paralysis is one of the challenging laryngeal clinical entities confronting the Laryngologist and indeed, the Phono-surgeon. The ability to maintain an effective balance between voice and airway function to ensure good quality of life requires expertise. This study is therefore designed to highlight our experience on surgical management of vocal cord paralysis. Method Clinical notes of all patients that met the inclusion criteria for this study on vocal cord paralysis over a ten-year period were analysed. Data was generated from patients’ case files retrieved using standard codes according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results From the 7,941 new ENT cases seen, 26 patients had vocal cord paralysis (VCP) giving a prevalence of 0.3%. The male to female ratio was 1: 4.2 with a mean age of 45.7years ± 6.3. Their ages ranged from 21–80 years. Thyroidectomy was the main causal factor in 46.2% while idiopathic causes was documented in 23.1%. Twenty-three patients (88.5%) had unilateral VCP from which 21(91.3%) were abductor paralysis. The ratio of Left: Right VCP was 3:1. All the 3 bilateral cases were abductor paralysis. Neurotropic agents only, were effective in cases of unilateral VCP. However, in those with bilateral paralysis, two had tracheostomy only, while the third had a laryngo-fissure, arytenoidoplasty and endo-laryngeal stenting in addition. All were successfully decannulated with good voice quality. Conclusion With these observations, we suggest the choice of appropriate surgical technique, timing and careful patient selection in order to preserve voice, curtail operative sequelae and achieve good quality of life (QoL) which is the overall management strategy, be borne in mind.

  9. A Case of Hypokalemic Paralysis in a Patient With Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Frederic N.; Kar, Jitesh K.; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after developing a dental abscess. He had a history of pituitary adenoma resection at the age of 13 with subsequent pan-hypopituitarism and was noncompliant with hormonal supplementation. On hospital day 3, he developed sudden onset of quadriplegia with motor strength of 0 of 5 in the upper extremities bilaterally and 1 of 5 in both lower extremities with absent deep tendon reflexes. His routine laboratory studies revealed severe hypokalemia of 1.6 mEq/dL. Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) revealed absent compound motor action potentials (CMAPs) with normal sensory potentials. Electromyography (EMG) did not reveal any abnormal insertional or spontaneous activity. He regained full strength within 36 hours following aggressive correction of the hypokalemia. Repeat NCS showed return of CMAPs in all nerves tested and EMG revealed normal motor units and normal recruitment without myotonic discharges. In patients with central DI with polyuria, hypokalemia can result in sudden paralysis. Hypokalemic paralysis remains an important differential in an acute case of paralysis and early recognition and appropriate management is key. PMID:24707338

  10. External laryngeal trauma.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, W; Hebert, A F

    2000-05-01

    External laryngeal trauma, blunt or penetrating, is a rare but potentially life-threatening injury. This is frequently seen in multiple-trauma patients and can go unrecognized in the absence of astute clinical awareness. Injuries may range from small endolaryngeal hematomas or lacerations to complete laryngotracheal separation. Proper airway management is of utmost importance and is one of the most controversial aspects of treatment of laryngeal trauma. Flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy and high resolution computed tomography scanning of the larynx has greatly enhanced the evaluation of these injuries. Treatment options range from conservative, nonsurgical observation to evaluation in the operating room. Surgical intervention may involve endoscopy, open surgical exploration, and possibly laryngeal stenting. Long-term goals are aimed at maintaining voice, airway, and swallowing ability. A systematic approach to this condition often results in predictable and acceptable outcomes. PMID:10875208

  11. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery. PMID:26195012

  12. Transient unilateral facial paralysis induced by perimesencephalic non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WEN, HUI-JUN; YANG, JIN-SHUO; LI, YONG-QIANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of a rare, transient form of unilateral facial paralysis induced by perimesencephalic non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The paralysis may have resulted from the compression of a part of the facial nerve by the flow of the hemorrhage into the cavum subarachnoidale; alternatively, the paralysis may have been caused by disorder of the blood supply of the facial nucleus, with the hemorrhage leading to brainstem vasospasm. The patient underwent hemostatic therapy, administration of a symptomatic antiemetic and dehydration. The facial nerve compression was released due to the absorption of the hemorrhage or the rapid improvement of the facial nucleus blood supply following the resolution of the vasospasm. Consequently, the facial nerve function was fully recovered, and the facial paralysis disappeared.

  13. Human laryngeal ganglia contain both sympathetic and parasympathetic cell types.

    PubMed

    Ibanez, Marta; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J; Maranillo, Eva; Vazquez, Teresa; Pascual-Font, Arán; McHanwell, Stephen; Sanudo, Jose

    2010-09-01

    The presence of ganglia associated with the laryngeal nerves is well documented. In man, these ganglia have been less well studied than in other species and, in particular, the cell types within these ganglia are less well characterized. Using a panel of antibodies to a variety of markers found in the paraganglion cells of other species, we were able to show the existence of at least two populations of cells within human laryngeal paraganglia. One population contained chromogranin and tyrosine hydroxylase representing a neurosecretory population possibly secreting dopamine. A second population of choline acetyltransferase positive cells would appear to have a putative parasympathetic function. Further work is needed to characterize these cell populations more fully before it will be possible to assign functions to these cell types but our results are consistent with the postulated functions of these ganglia as chemoreceptors, neurosecretory cells, and regulators of laryngeal mucus secretion. PMID:20821402

  14. Facial paralysis and the role of free muscle transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zuker, R M

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis can have significant functional, psychological and aesthetic concerns that alter the lives of our patients. These effects can be functional, affecting the eye, nose and mouth, or aesthetic, affecting the symmetry of the face and particularly the mimetic function of smile. Several reanimation procedures have been described to address this. In this chapter, we will outline our technique for reanimation utilizing segmental gracilis muscle transplants to the face. These are innervated either by the contralateral normal 7th nerve via a cross face nerve graft, or a different ipsilateral motor where no 7th nerve is available or would not produce the required result. The other ipsilateral motor that we have found extremely effective is the motor nerve to masseter. This can power a segmental gracilis muscle transplant and lead to excursion that is near normal. These techniques will be described in detail. PMID:26143046

  15. STUDIES ON FOWL PARALYSIS (NEUROLYMPHOMATOSIS GALLINARUM)

    PubMed Central

    Pappenheimer, Alwin M.; Dunn, Leslie C.; Cone, Vernon

    1929-01-01

    1. Fowl paralysis (neurolymphomatosis gallinarum) is a disease entity, with characteristic clinical and pathological features. 2. The disease occurs in all parts of the United States, Holland, Austria and probably South America. 3. The disease appears to be endemic in certain foci. Having once appeared, the disease tends to persist through successive years. 4. It occurs with about equal frequency in both sexes; all common breeds may be affected. 5. Symptoms appear between the 3rd and 18th months. Typical clinical cases have not been observed outside of these limits. 6. The conspicuous symptoms are (a) asymmetrical, partial and progressive paralysis of the wings and both legs, and rarely of neck muscles; (b) occasional grey discoloration of iris, with blindness. Nutrition is usually preserved. 7. The duration is variable; the outcome is usually fatal, but spontaneous recovery may rarely occur. 8. The principal pathological changes are found in the nervous system. In the peripheral nerves, the essential feature is an intense infiltration of lymphoid, plasma cells, and large mononuclears. This is accompanied by a myelin degeneration in the more advanced lesions, but the cellular infiltrations appear to precede the degenerative changes. In brain, cord and meninges, there are similar infiltrations predominantly perivascular. Infiltrations of the iris with lymphoid and plasma cells are found in the cases showing gross discoloration of the iris. Visceral lymphomata, originating usually in the ovary, are associated in a certain percentage of the cases. Evidence is presented in favor of the view that this association is not accidental, and that the lymphomata are a manifestation of the disease. 9. Infiltrations of the spinal cord and brain, rarely of the peripheral nerves, are frequently present in birds showing no clinical symptoms. These are interpreted as mild cases of the same disease. 10. No microorganisms of etiological significance have been demonstrated in the tissues or by cultural methods. PMID:19869538

  16. Candida laryngitis appearing as carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kiakojuri, Keivan; Dehghan, Mehdi; Hasanjani Roushan, Mohammad Reza; Pourdahash, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focal laryngeal candidiasis is not reported widely and is very infrequently recognized clinically. This disease is rare and may occur after pulmonary, pharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis or as part of disseminated disease. It is also secondary to inhaled steroid therapy which is usually mild and has been reported in 10-15 percent of patients taking these medications. Case Presentation: In this study, we introduced a rare case of laryngeal candidiasis in a 79-year-old immunocompromised male presented with 17 months of progressive hoarseness. In video laryngoscopy a white, vegetative mass on anterior one-third of right vocal cord mimicking laryngeal carcinoma. The histopathological examination showed laryngeal mucosal with keratosis, degenerating necrotic epithelial cell aggregates containing hyphea and candida albicans. Conclusion: In immunocompromised patients, the diagnosis of laryngeal candidiasis should be considered in any patients with laryngeal symptoms

  17. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  18. Conditions That Can Cause Paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Adjustments and Depression Basic Conditions A to Z Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Brachial Plexus Injury Brain Injury Cerebral Palsy Friedreich's ... health related issues brought on by paralysis itself. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease, is a ...

  19. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  20. [Vocal cord paralysis--analysis of a cohort of 400 patients].

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Pickhard, A; Smith, E; Hansch, K; Weber, T; Hoffmann, T K; Brosch, S

    2015-02-01

    Vocal cord paralysis has diverse etiologies. In the present study, vocal chord paralysis caused by surgery/trauma was present in more than two thirds of the cases, followed by primary malignancy-associated paralysis. Thyroidectomy was the most common cause in bilateral paresis, especially if performed in recurrent or malignant disease. Voice therapy was promising in pa-tients with unilateral paresis and hoarseness as main symptom. Persistent dysphonia due to insufficiency of the glottic closure led to an operative glottis restricting procedure in only 6% of cases. In almost half the patients with dyspnea as the main symp-tom of bilateral vocal cord paresis, temporary tracheotomy or surgical glottis widening procedures had to be performed. The group of idiopathic and traumatic paresis patients showed the best spontaneous recovery within the first 12 months in comparison to primary malignancy-associated paralysis, which showed no recovery of the recurrens nerve. PMID:24676872

  1. Intraoperative identification of the human communicating nerve during thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Hodnett, Benjamin L; Schmitt, Nicole C; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar

    2015-01-01

    The human communicating nerve (HCN) is a connection between the superior and recurrent laryngeal nerves that has been described in cadaveric studies. We report a case of an extralaryngeal variant of the HCN that was identified and stimulated intraoperatively during thyroidectomy. This appears to be the first case of intraoperative identification of this anatomic variant, of which the functional significance remains unclear. PMID:26666834

  2. Intraoperative identification of the human communicating nerve during thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hodnett, Benjamin L.; Schmitt, Nicole C.; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar

    2015-01-01

    The human communicating nerve (HCN) is a connection between the superior and recurrent laryngeal nerves that has been described in cadaveric studies. We report a case of an extralaryngeal variant of the HCN that was identified and stimulated intraoperatively during thyroidectomy. This appears to be the first case of intraoperative identification of this anatomic variant, of which the functional significance remains unclear. PMID:26666834

  3. Predictive Value of Postoperative Electrophysiologic Testing of the Facial Nerve After Cerebellopontine Angle Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Samuel H.; Digoy, G. Paul; Ptachewich, Yael; Rubin, Michael; Victor, Jonathan D.

    1998-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the ability of postoperative electroneuronography (ENoG) and electromyography (EMG) to predict clinical facial function 1 year postoperatively in patients with facial paralysis and an intact facial nerve after cerebellopontine angle surgery. The study was a prospective, nonrandomized, uncontrolled clinical trial on an outpatient basis, at a tertiary care hospital. Primary eligibility criteria include: (1) cerebellopontine angle (CPA) surgery with anatomical preservation of facial nerve, (2) complete facial nerve paralysis; and (3) 1 year follow-up. ENoG and EMG were measured at 1 and 3 months postoperatively, House-Brackmann facial nerve grade at 1 year postoperatively. The Kendall coefficient of rank correlation demonstrated that the 1 and 3 month postoperative ENoG data were significant predictors of ultimate facial nerve outcome. Tracking multiple ENoG examinations in a single patient, over time was of little predictive value. EMG was a poor predictor of facial nerve outcome. In general, patients with delayed facial nerve paralysis had better ultimate facial function than patients with immediate paralysis. Postoperative ENoG, but not EMG was a statistically significant predictor of ultimate facial nerve outcome after CPA surgery. Patients with delayed facial paralysis had better outcomes than those with immediate facial paralysis. PMID:17171049

  4. The effects of botulinum toxin injections into the cricopharyngeus muscle of patients with cricopharyngeus dysfunction associated with pharyngo-laryngeal weakness.

    PubMed

    Woisard-Bassols, Virginie; Alshehri, Sarah; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2013-03-01

    This prospective, open study was carried out in order to assess changes in the swallowing and dietary status after injection of Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) into the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) in a series of patients with cricopharyngeus (CP) muscle dysfunction associated with pharyngo-laryngeal weakness during at least 1 year follow-up after treatment. Patients who had a cricopharyngeus (CP) muscle dysfunction associated with pharyngo-laryngeal weakness and who were at risk for aspiration were included in the study. The upper border of the cricoid cartilage was identified and the CP muscle localized using a standard electromyogram (EMG). The dose of BoNT-A was determined depending on the results of EMG performed just before the injection. Outcomes were assessed by the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), the level of residue in the pyriform sinus and the National Institute of Health-Swallow Safety Scale (NIH-SSS) on a video fluoroscopic swallowing (VFSS) assessment, the patient's subjective impressions of their ability to swallow by the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI), and changes in dietary status by the Functional Oral Intake Scale. Eleven patients underwent the complete assessment of swallowing function at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. After the first set of treatment, seven patients had a good response and four did not respond. A significant decrease in the PAS score (p = 0.03), the amount of residue (p = 0.04) and the NIH-SSS score (p = 0.03) was observed 3 months after the injection in comparison with the first VFSS before the treatment. A relapse of dysphagia occurred in 3 out of the 11 treated patients; at 3 and 4 months for 2 patients with a Wallenberg syndrome, and at 11 months for a patient with cranial nerve paralysis after a surgery for a glomus tumor. Two of them underwent a second injection. One patient had a good response and remained stable for at least 1 year. The second did not respond either to the second injection or to a myotomy of the cricopharyngeal muscle. The third one is waiting for further surgery (myotomy). Therefore, at the end of the study and after a follow-up of at least 12 months, 5 patients out of the 11 enrolled had a good result. Percutaneous injection of BoNT-A into the UES can be a useful solution to improve cricopharyngeal dysfunction, despite the underlying pharyngo-laryngeal weakness. PMID:22865104

  5. Laryngeal Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, A. L.; Sarieddine, D.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a destructive autoimmune disease that affects 3% of the adult population. It is characterized by the formation of both articular and extra-articular lesions with predilection for small joints. There are ubiquitous reports on the head and neck manifestations of RA with emphasis on the larynx. The laryngeal presenting features of this systemic disease may mimic a plethora of medical conditions, inflammatory and neoplastic. The main phonatory and respiratory symptoms are often subtle and misleading. This paper represents a literature review of the laryngeal manifestations of RA with emphasis on the clinical symptoms, laryngeal findings, diagnosis, and treatment. An early diagnosis of laryngeal involvement may prevent drastic complications. PMID:23864939

  6. General Information about Laryngeal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Laryngeal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the larynx. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the larynx or to other ...

  7. Management of Advanced Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheahan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx continues to be the commonest head and neck cancer in many Western countries. The larynx plays a key role for many essential functions, including breathing, voice production, airway protection, and swallowing. The goals of laryngeal cancer treatment are thus to provide best possible oncologic control, while optimizing functional outcomes. In recent decades, the treatment paradigm for advanced laryngeal cancer has shifted from one of primary surgery (total laryngectomy) as gold standard, toward non-surgical organ-preserving treatment using radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. However, concerns have emerged regarding functional outcomes after chemoradiotherapy, as well as possible decreased overall survival in patients with laryngeal cancer. The purpose of the present review is to review surgical and non-surgical options for treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer, as well as the evidence supporting each of these. PMID:24808953

  8. Rare Presentation of Rhino-Orbital-Cerebral Zygomycosis: Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Mohebbi, Alireza; Jahandideh, Hesam; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2011-01-01

    Rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis afflicts primarily diabetics and immunocompromised individual, but can also occur in normal hosts rarely. We here presented an interesting case of facial nerve palsy and multiple cold abscesses of neck due to rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis in an otherwise healthy man. Although some reports of facial nerve paralysis in conjunction with rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis exist, no case of bilateral complete facial paralysis has been reported in the literature to date. PMID:21541223

  9. Rare presentation of rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis: bilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Mohebbi, Alireza; Jahandideh, Hesam; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2011-01-01

    Rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis afflicts primarily diabetics and immunocompromised individual, but can also occur in normal hosts rarely. We here presented an interesting case of facial nerve palsy and multiple cold abscesses of neck due to rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis in an otherwise healthy man. Although some reports of facial nerve paralysis in conjunction with rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis exist, no case of bilateral complete facial paralysis has been reported in the literature to date. PMID:21541223

  10. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ‘cross-bridging’ to promote nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges) into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ‘protect’ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26692833

  11. Toward a simulation-based tool for the treatment of vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rajat; Zheng, Xudong; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Seo, Jung Hee; Xue, Qian; Bielamowicz, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Advances in high-performance computing are enabling a new generation of software tools that employ computational modeling for surgical planning. Surgical management of laryngeal paralysis is one area where such computational tools could have a significant impact. The current paper describes a comprehensive effort to develop a software tool for planning medialization laryngoplasty where a prosthetic implant is inserted into the larynx in order to medialize the paralyzed vocal fold (VF). While this is one of the most common procedures used to restore voice in patients with VF paralysis, it has a relatively high revision rate, and the tool being developed is expected to improve surgical outcomes. This software tool models the biomechanics of airflow-induced vibration in the human larynx and incorporates sophisticated approaches for modeling the turbulent laryngeal flow, the complex dynamics of the VFs, as well as the production of voiced sound. The current paper describes the key elements of the modeling approach, presents computational results that demonstrate the utility of the approach and also describes some of the limitations and challenges. PMID:21556320

  12. Respiratory motor nerve activities during experimental seizures in cats.

    PubMed

    Terndrup, T E; Knuth, S L; Gdovin, M J; Darnall, R; Bartlett, D

    1996-03-01

    We evaluated respiratory motor nerve activities during experimental seizures induced with subcortical penicillin. The activities of the phrenic (PH), nasolabial (NL), and hypoglossal (HG) nerves and the recurrent laryngeal motor branches to the thyroarytenoid (TA) and posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscles were analyzed in 13 anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated cats. During ictal and interictal phases of seizures, nerve activities became irregular and peak integrated nerve activities increased, particularly in the case of the PH nerve. The ictal phase of seizures was associated with increased tonic activity and decreased phasic respiratory discharges, particularly in the cases of the HG, NL, and PCA nerves. During some prolonged ictal discharges, entrainment of nerve activities by cortical spiking was associated with irregular uncoordinated activation, particularly in the TA nerve. These studies help explain respiratory impairment during seizures by providing evidence of impaired coordination between activation of muscles that regulate upper airway patency and activation of the diaphragm. PMID:8964758

  13. Facial paralysis reconstruction in children and adolescents with central nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Panossian, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Facial paralysis remains a vexing problem in the treatment of posterior cranial fossa tumors in children. Fortunately, current techniques are available to reconstruct the paralyzed face in restoring balance, symmetry, and amelioration of functional sequelae. The restoration of structure and function of the paralyzed face is tantamount to proper social integration and psychosocial rehabilitation. In addition, the facial nerve is important in preventing drying of the eyes, drooling, and speech abnormalities, among other functions. The most visible evidence of facial paralysis is stark asymmetry, especially with animation. This is perhaps the most troubling aspect of facial paralysis and the one that leads to the greatest amount of psychosocial stress for the child and family members. Management strategies include early and late intervention. Early reconstructive goals focus on preservation and strengthening of intact motor end plates through native stimulatory pathways. Late reconstructive efforts are centered on surgically reconstructing permanently lost function based on each third of the face. Use of adjunct modalities such as chemical or surgical denervation and myectomies are also critical tools in restoring symmetry. Physical therapy plays a large role in both early and late facial nerve paralysis in optimizing cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:25547882

  14. Current perspectives on reflux laryngitis.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Daisuke; Nagahara, Akihito; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Hojo, Mariko; Watanabe, Sumio

    2014-12-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is an extraesophageal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the increase of GERD patients, the importance of LPR is acknowledged widely. However, the pathophysiology of LPR is not understood completely and the diagnostic criteria for LPR remain controversial. Unfortunately, a gold standard diagnostic test for reflux laryngitis is not available. Recently, an experimental animal model for reflux laryngitis was developed to investigate the pathophysiology of reflux laryngitis. An empirical trial of lifestyle modification and proton pump inhibitor therapy is a reasonable approach for LPR symptoms. Alternatives after failure with aggressive medical treatment are limited and multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring is currently the best alternative to detect nonacid reflux. Additional prospective and evidence-based research is anticipated. PMID:25491904

  15. Laryngeal dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a review and case report

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Christopher R; Vanryckeghem, Martine

    2001-01-01

    Background Laryngeal dysfunction can be a salient feature in the clinical symptomatology of speakers diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In addition to dysphonia, swallowing function is also disrupted. This paper reviews what is known about laryngeal dysfunction resulting from ALS. Results Presented is a case report of a female, diagnosed with ALS, whose initial symptoms were caused by laryngeal bulbar involvement that was characterized by dysphonia and dysphagia. Conclusions In bulbar forms of ALS, voice and/or swallowing difficulties are often the initial signs of disease. Careful examination of the muscles innervated by bulbar nerves, and tracking the rate of progressive deficit in the affected muscles, will help to solidify an accurate diagnosis. With therapy, the ability to swallow safely may still be maintained even when voice and articulation abilities are such that oral communication is inefficient. PMID:11722802

  16. Injury to the Superior Laryngeal Branch of the Vagus During Thyroidectomy: Lesson or Myth?

    PubMed Central

    Crookes, Peter F.; Recabaren, James A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To examine the historical evidence that the thyroidectomy performed on operatic soprano Amelita Galli-Curci was responsible for the abrupt termination of her career. Summary Background Data The superior laryngeal branch of the vagus nerve may be injured during thyroidectomy, producing vocal defects more subtle than those found after recurrent nerve injury. It is widely believed that Galli-Curci suffered superior laryngeal nerve injury during her thyroidectomy by Arnold Kegel, MD, in 1935, resulting in the termination of her career. Methods The authors examined contemporary press reviews after surgery, conducted interviews with colleagues and relatives of the surgeon, and compared the career of Galli-Curci with that of other singers. Results Evidence against the prevailing view is to be found in the fact that she continued to perform acceptably after surgery, her continued friendly relationship with the surgeon for years afterward, the absence of the typical effects of superior laryngeal nerve injury, and the presence of other explanations for the gradual decline in her vocal abilities (documentation of deterioration before surgery, physiologic changes in the larynx comparable to those found in most other famous sopranos who retire at about the same age or earlier, and the possible development of myxedema). Conclusions The story should no longer be perpetuated in surgical textbooks and papers. PMID:11303143

  17. Axillary Nerve Reconstruction: Anterior-Posterior Exposure With Sural Nerve Cable Graft Pull-Through Technique.

    PubMed

    Baltzer, Heather L; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2015-12-01

    Deltoid paralysis after axillary nerve injury results in limitations in shoulder function and stability. In the setting of an isolated axillary nerve injury with no clinical or electromyographic evidence of recovery that is within 6 to 9 months postinjury, the authors' preferred technique to reinnervate the deltoid is to reconstruct the axillary nerve with sural nerve grafting. Intraoperative neuromuscular electrophysiology is critical to determine the continuity of the axillary nerve before proceeding with reconstruction. The majority of the time, both an anterior and posterior incision and dissection of the axillary nerve is required to adequately delineate the zone of injury. This also ensures that both proximally and distally, uninjured axillary nerve is present before graft inset and also facilitates the ability to perform a meticulous microsurgical inset of the nerve graft posteriorly. The nerve graft must be pulled through from posterior to anterior to span the zone of injury and reconstruct the axillary nerve. Careful infraclavicular brachial plexus dissection is necessary to prevent further injury to components of the brachial plexus in the setting of a scarred bed. Patients will require postoperative therapy to prevent limitations in shoulder range of motion secondary to postoperative stiffness. This paper presents a detailed surgical technique for axillary nerve reconstruction by an anterior-posterior approach with a pull-through technique of a sural nerve cable graft. PMID:26524659

  18. Different navigation of the hypoglossal nerve in the same patient: in the light of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Sahin; Bucak, Abdulkadir; Gonul, Yücel; Guzel, Hilal; Tekin, Mustafa S

    2013-07-01

    The hypoglossal nerve appears typically between the internal carotid artery and internal jugular vein and down in the lateral groove between these 2 anatomical structures on to the right common carotid artery bifurcation. In this case report, we presented a patient that was operated on for laryngeal carcinoma, and abnormal navigation of hypoglossal nerve was observed during the neck dissection. PMID:23851881

  19. Tick paralysis cases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Remondegui, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Tick paralysis (TP) occurs worldwide and is caused by a neurotoxin secreted by engorged female ticks that affects the peripheral and central nervous system. The clinical manifestations range from mild or nonspecific symptoms to manifestations similar to Guillain-Barré syndrome, bulbar involvement, and death in 10% of the patients. The diagnosis of TP is clinical. To our knowledge, there are no formal reports of TP in humans in South America, although clusters of TP among hunting dogs in Argentina have been identified recently. In this paper, clinical features of two cases of TP occurring during 1994 in Jujuy Province, Argentina, are described. PMID:22930054

  20. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF LARYNGEAL FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we have investigated laryngeal air flows by numerically solving the corresponding Navier-Stokes equations expressed in a two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system. The glottal aperture, defined by the geometry of the vocal folds was allowed to change with the v...

  1. Influence and interactions of laryngeal adductors and cricothyroid muscles on fundamental frequency and glottal posture control

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Neubauer, Juergen; Sofer, Elazar; Berry, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles (ILMs) in controlling fundamental frequency (F0) and glottal posture remain unclear. In an in vivo canine model, three sets of intrinsic laryngeal muscles—the thyroarytenoid (TA), cricothyroid (CT), and lateral cricoarytenoid plus interarytenoid (LCA/IA) muscle complex—were independently and accurately stimulated in a graded manner using distal laryngeal nerve stimulation. Graded neuromuscular stimulation was used to independently activate these paired intrinsic laryngeal muscles over a range from threshold to maximal activation, to produce 320 distinct laryngeal phonatory postures. At phonation onset these activation conditions were evaluated in terms of their vocal fold strain, glottal width at the vocal processes, fundamental frequency (F0), subglottic pressure, and airflow. F0 ranged from 69 to 772?Hz and clustered into chest-like and falsetto-like groups. CT activation was always required to raise F0, but could also lower F0 at low TA and LCA/IA activation levels. Increasing TA activation first increased then decreased F0 in all CT and LCA/IA activation conditions. Increasing TA activation also facilitated production of high F0 at a lower onset pressure. Independent control of membranous (TA) and cartilaginous (LCA/IA) glottal closure enabled multiple pathways for F0 control via changes in glottal posture. PMID:25235003

  2. Dosimetric Predictors of Laryngeal Edema

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Adapala, Prashanth; Endres, Eugene J. C; Brack, Collin; Fiorino, Claudio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Parker, Brent

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric predictors of laryngeal edema after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 66 patients were selected who had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with grossly uninvolved larynx at the time of RT, no prior major surgical operation except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, treatment planning data available for analysis, and at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from RT performed by a single observer. Both the biologically equivalent mean dose at 2 Gy per fraction and the cumulative biologic dose-volume histogram of the larynx were extracted for each patient. Laryngeal edema was prospectively scored after treatment. Time to endpoint, moderate or worse laryngeal edema (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2+), was calculated with log rank test from the date of treatment end. Results: At a median follow-up of 17.1 months (range, 0.4- 50.0 months), the risk of Grade 2+ edema was 58.9% {+-} 7%. Mean dose to the larynx, V30, V40, V50, V60, and V70 were significantly correlated with Grade 2+ edema at univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, mean laryngeal dose (continuum, hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.15; p < 0.001), and positive neck stage at RT (N0-x vs. N +, hazard ratio, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-9.58; p = 0.008) were the only independent predictors. Further stratification showed that, to minimize the risk of Grade 2+ edema, the mean dose to the larynx has to be kept {<=}43.5 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Conclusion: Laryngeal edema is strictly correlated with various dosimetric parameters; mean dose to the larynx should be kept {<=}43.5 Gy.

  3. Bilateral Diaphragmatic Paralysis in a Patient With Critical Illness Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Hung-Chen; Lin, Meng-Chih; Liaw, Mei-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) manifests as respiratory muscle weakness, and its association with critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) was rarely reported. Here, we present a patient with BDP related to CIP, who successfully avoided tracheostomy after diagnosis and management. A 71-year-old male presented with acute respiratory failure after sepsis adequately treated. Repeated intubation occurred because of carbon dioxide retention after each extubation. After eliminating possible factors, septic shock-induced respiratory muscle weakness was suspected. Physical examination, a nerve conduction study, and chest ultrasound confirmed our impression. Pulmonary rehabilitation and reconditioning exercises were arranged, and the patient was discharged with a diagnosis of BDP. The diagnosis of BDP is usually delayed, and there are only sporadic reports on its association with polyneuropathy, especially in patients with preserved limb muscle function. Therefore, when physicians encounter patients that are difficult to wean from mechanical ventilation, CIP associated with BDP should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26252301

  4. The functional anatomy of suggested limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Deeley, Quinton; Oakley, David A; Toone, Brian; Bell, Vaughan; Walsh, Eamonn; Marquand, Andre F; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Williams, Steven C R; Mehta, Mitul A; Halligan, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Suggestions of limb paralysis in highly hypnotically suggestible subjects have been employed to successfully model conversion disorders, revealing similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb. However, previous studies differ with regard to the executive regions involved during involuntary inhibition of the affected limb. This difference may have arisen as previous studies did not control for differences in hypnosis depth between conditions and/or include subjective measures to explore the experience of suggested paralysis. In the current study we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the functional anatomy of left and right upper limb movements in eight healthy subjects selected for high hypnotic suggestibility during (i) hypnosis (NORMAL) and (ii) attempted movement following additional left upper limb paralysis suggestions (PARALYSIS). Contrast of left upper limb motor function during NORMAL relative to PARALYSIS conditions revealed greater activation of contralateral M1/S1 and ipsilateral cerebellum, consistent with the engagement of these regions in the completion of movements. By contrast, two significant observations were noted in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions. In conjunction with reports of attempts to move the paralysed limb, greater supplementary motor area (SMA) activation was observed, a finding consistent with the role of SMA in motor intention and planning. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA 24) was also significantly more active in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions - suggesting that ACC (BA 24) may be implicated in involuntary, as well as voluntary inhibition of prepotent motor responses. PMID:23351848

  5. [Facial paralysis surgery. Current concepts].

    PubMed

    Robla-Costales, David; Robla-Costales, Javier; Socolovsky, Mariano; di Masi, Gilda; Fernández, Javier; Campero, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Facial palsy is a relatively common condition, from which most cases recover spontaneously. However, each year, there are 127,000 new cases of irreversible facial paralysis. This condition causes aesthetic, functional and psychologically devastating effects in the patients who suffer it. Various reconstructive techniques have been described, but there is no consensus regarding their indication. While these techniques provide results that are not perfect, many of them give a very good aesthetic and functional result, promoting the psychological, social and labour reintegration of these patients. The aim of this article is to describe the indications for which each technique is used, their results and the ideal time when each one should be applied. PMID:25498528

  6. Peripheral nerve injuries in athletes. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lorei, M P; Hershman, E B

    1993-08-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are uncommon but serious injuries which may delay or preclude an athlete's safe return to sports. Early, accurate anatomical diagnosis is essential. Nerve lesions may be due to acute injury (e.g. from a direct blow) or chronic injury secondary to repetitive microtrauma (entrapment). Accurate diagnosis is based upon physical examination and a knowledge of the relative anatomy. Palpation, neurological testing and provocative manoeuvres are mainstays of physical diagnosis. Diagnostic suspicion can be confirmed by electrophysiological testing, including electromyography and nerve conduction studies. Proper equipment, technique and conditioning are the keys to prevention. Rest, anti-inflammatories, physical therapy and appropriate splinting are the mainstays of treatment. In the shoulder, spinal accessory nerve injury is caused by a blow to the neck and results in trapezius paralysis with sparing of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Scapular winging results from paralysis of the serratus anterior because of long thoracic nerve palsy. A lesion of the suprascapular nerve may mimic a rotator cuff tear with pain a weakness of the rotator cuff. Axillary nerve injury often follows anterior shoulder dislocation. In the elbow region, musculocutaneous nerve palsy is seen in weightlifters with weakness of the elbow flexors and dysesthesias of the lateral forearm. Pronator syndrome is a median nerve lesion occurring in the proximal forearm which is diagnosed by several provocative manoeuvres. Posterior interosseous nerve entrapment is common among tennis players and occurs at the Arcade of Froshe--it results in weakness of the wrist and metacarpophalangeal extensors. Ulnar neuritis at the elbow is common amongst baseball pitchers. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common neuropathy seen in sport and is caused by median nerve compression in the carpal tunnel. Paralysis of the ulnar nerve at the wrist is seen among bicyclists resulting in weakness of grip and numbness of the ulnar 1.5 digits. Thigh injuries include lateral femoral cutaneous nerve palsy resulting in loss of sensation over the anterior thigh without power deficit. Femoral nerve injury occurs secondary to an iliopsoas haematoma from high energy sports. A lesion of the sciatic nerve may indicate a concomitant dislocated hip. Common peroneal nerve injury may be due to a direct blow or a traction injury and results in a foot drop and numbness of the dorsum of the foot. Deep and superficial peroneal nerve palsies could be secondary to an exertional compartment syndrome. Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a compressive lesion of the posterior tibial nerve caused by repetitive dorsiflexion of the ankle--it is common among runners and mountain climbers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8378668

  7. Update on laryngeal disorders and treatment.

    PubMed

    McCarrel, Taralyn M; Woodie, J Brett

    2015-04-01

    Laryngeal disorders are relatively common in the horse, and thorough diagnostic evaluation is essential to make an accurate definitive diagnosis and selection of appropriate treatment. The value of exercising endoscopy must not be overlooked, and the recent development of dynamic (overground) endoscopy is providing new insights into dynamic laryngeal lesions. The focus of this article will be on recently described disorders and treatments or modifications to existing treatments. It summarizes the numerous investigations attempting to perfect the laryngoplasty procedure for treatment of laryngeal hemiplegia. The newly described conditions, bilateral dynamic laryngeal collapse, and dynamically flaccid epiglottis will also be discussed. PMID:25770065

  8. Laryngeal rhabdomyoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, A J; McConnell, M; Wyatt, K; Huxtable, C

    2001-12-01

    A 4-year-old spayed female Golden Retriever was presented for investigation of progressive loss of bark, continuous panting and increased upper respiratory noise. Examination of the larynx and pharynx under general anaesthesia identified a spherical 5 x 3 cm mass involving the right arytenoid cartilage. Cytological examination of fine needle aspirates from the mass suggested the tumour was a carcinoma, however histological examination in association with immunoperoxidase and histochemical staining identified the mass as a laryngeal rhabdomyoma. PMID:11837902

  9. Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, William M. Mancuso, Anthony A.; Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Werning, John W.; Amdur, Robert J.; Villaret, Douglas B.

    2007-10-01

    The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

  10. [Amyotrophic neuralgia associated with bilateral phrenic paralysis treated with non-invasive mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    García García, María Del Carmen; Hernández Borge, Jacinto; Antona Rodríguez, María José; Pires Gonçalves, Pedro; García García, Gema

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic neuralgia is an uncommon neuropathy characterized by severe unilateral shoulder pain. Isolated or concomitant involvement of other peripheral motor nerves depending on the brachial plexus such as phrenic or laryngeal nerves is unusual(1). Its etiology is unknown, yet several explanatory factors have been proposed. Phrenic nerve involvement, either unilateral or bilateral, is exceedingly rare. Diagnosis relies on anamnesis, functional and imaging investigations and electromyogram. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a past history of renal transplantation due to proliferative glomerulonephritis with subsequent transplant rejection, who was eventually diagnosed with amyotrophic neuralgia with bilateral phrenic involvement, and who required sustained non-invasive mechanical ventilation. PMID:26049960

  11. Management of acute laryngeal injury: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Larson, D L; Cohn, A M

    1976-11-01

    The approach to management of 30 cases of laryngeal trauma coming to open exploration is outlined. Eighteen patients had blunt trauma and 12 had penetrating wounds. Four cases resulted in airway compromise and all were in the blunt trauma group. Although significant granulation tissue response occurred in only eight of 30 cases, it was present in three of the four concluding with stenosis. It is demonstrated that the use of a stent, with a tissue graft, when mucosal approximation cannot be accomplished, facilitates prevention of endolaryngeal distortion and webbing and maintenance of skeletal framework integrity; its use did not predispose to granulation tissue development. A principal etiologic factor in those patients who had good airway but only a fair voice was arytenoid fixation, this despite anatomic reduction when subluxation occurred. Recurrent nerve injury was identified in only one patient. Foremost in management is suspicion and recognition of laryngeal injury in the multiple trauma patient. Once the urgent problems of hemorrhage, shock, and airway are attended to, attention must be directed to a systematic evaluation of the neck and larynx. PMID:994267

  12. Occupational risk for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Flanders, W D; Rothman, K J

    1982-01-01

    In a case-control analysis, we studied the effects of type of employment on laryngeal cancer risk using the interview data from the Third National Cancer Survey. Effects were measured relative to the risk for those employed in a group of arbitrarily defined industries and occupations with low risk. We excluded females and controlled for age, tobacco use, alcohol use, and race in the analysis. We found ratio estimates above 3.0 for workers in the railroad industry and the lumber industry; and for sheetmetal workers, grinding wheel operators, and automobile mechanics. PMID:7065314

  13. Lip Forces and Chewing Efficiency in Children with Peripheral Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Cristea, Alexandru; Dudescu, Cristian M; Hurubeanu, Lucia; Vâjâean, Cosmin; Albu, Silviu; Câmpian, Radu S

    2015-08-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis is accompanied by facial motor disorders and also, by oral dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the lip forces and chewing efficiency in a group of children with peripheral facial paralysis. The degree of peripheral facial paralysis in the study group (n?11) was assessed using the House-Brackmann scale. The control group consisted of 21 children without facial nerve impairment. To assess lip forces, acrylic vestibular plates of three sizes were used: large (LVP), medium (MVP) and small (SVP). The lip force was recorded with a force transducer coupled with the data acquisition system. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated by the ability to mix two differently colored chewing gums. The images were processed with Adobe Photoshop CS3 (Delaware Corporation, San Jose, California, United States) and the number of pixels was quantified with the Image J software (DHHS/NIH/NIMH/RSB, Maryland, United States). For statistical analysis, the following statistical analysis were used: Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression analysis, multiple logistic regression analysis, and optimal cutoff values for muscular dysfunction. There were statistically significant differences between lip forces in the following three groups: p=0.01 (LVP), p=0.01 (MVP), and p=0.008 (SVP). The cutoff values of lip forces in the study group were as follows: 7.08?N (LVP), 4.89?N (MVP), and 4.24?N (SVP). There were no statistically significant differences between the masticatory efficiency in the two groups (p=0.25). Lip forces were dependent on the degree of peripheral facial paralysis and age, but not on gender. In peripheral facial paralysis in children, a significant decrease of lip forces, but not masticatory efficiency, occurs. PMID:25974875

  14. Medialization vs. Reinnervation for Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis: A Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paniello, Randal C.; Edgar, Julia D.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Vocal fold medialization laryngoplasty (ML) and laryngeal reinnervation (LR) as treatments for unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) were compared in a multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial. Methods Previously untreated patients with UVFP were randomized to undergo either ML or LR. Voice results were compared pre-treatment and at 6 and 12 months post-treatment using perceptual ratings by untrained listeners (RUL), blinded speech pathologist GRBAS scores, and voice-related quality of life (VRQOL) scores. Other secondary data included maximum phonation time (MPT), cepstral analysis, and EMG findings. Results 24 patients from 9 sites completed the study, 12 in each group. There were no significant intergroup differences in pre-treatment variables. At 12 months, both study groups showed significant improvement in RUL, GRBAS and VRQOL scores, but no significant differences were found between the two groups. However, patient age significantly affected the LR, but not the ML, group results. The age<52 LR subgroup had significantly (p<0.05) better scores than the age>52 LR subgroup, and had better RUL and GRBAS scores than the age<52 ML subgroup. The age>52 ML subgroup results were significantly better than the age>52 LR subgroup. The secondary data generally followed the primary data, except that the MPTs for the ML patients were significantly longer than for the LR patients. Conclusion ML and LR are both effective surgical options for patients with UVFP. Laryngeal reinnervation should be considered in younger patients, while medialization laryngoplasty should be favored in older patients. PMID:21898419

  15. Hypokalemic paralysis in a professional bodybuilder.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Florian B; Domanovits, Hans; Laggner, Anton N

    2012-09-01

    Severe hypokalemia is a potentially life-threatening disorder and is associated with variable degrees of skeletal muscle weakness, even to the point of paralysis. On rare occasions, diaphragmatic paralysis from hypokalemia can lead to respiratory arrest. There may also be decreased motility of smooth muscle, manifesting with ileus or urinary retention. Rarely, severe hypokalemia may result in rhabdomyolysis. Other manifestations of severe hypokalemia include alteration of cardiac tissue excitability and conduction. Hypokalemia can produce electrocardiographic changes such as U waves, T-wave flattening, and arrhythmias, especially if the patient is taking digoxin. Common causes of hypokalemia include extrarenal potassium losses (vomiting and diarrhea) and renal potassium losses (eg, hyperaldosteronism, renal tubular acidosis, severe hyperglycemia, potassium-depleting diuretics) as well as hypokalemia due to potassium shifts (eg, insulin administration, catecholamine excess, familial periodic hypokalemic paralysis, thyrotoxic hypokalemic paralysis). Although the extent of diuretic misuse in professional bodybuilding is unknown, it may be regarded as substantial. Hence, diuretics must always be considered as a cause of hypokalemic paralysis in bodybuilders. PMID:21871759

  16. Laryngeal Sensation Before and After Clearing Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Gerlach, Terri Treman; Sutton, Lori Ellen; Dawson, Amy Elizabeth; Nietert, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose People frequently present to voice clinics with complaints of irritating laryngeal sensations. Clinicians attempt to reduce the irritating sensations and their common sequela, coughing and throat clearing, by advocating for techniques that remove the irritation with less harm to the vocal fold tissue. Despite the prevalence of patients with these complaints, it is not known if the less harmful techniques recommended by clinicians are effective at clearing irritating laryngeal sensations or that irritating laryngeal sensations are, in fact, more frequent in people with voice disorders than people without voice disorders. Method Assessments of participant reported laryngeal sensation, pre- and post- clearing task, were obtained from 22 people with and 24 people without a voice disorder. Six clearing tasks were used to preliminarily evaluate the differing effects of tasks believed to be deleterious and ameliorative. Results People with and without voice disorders reported pre-clear laryngeal sensation at a similar rate. Post-clear sensation was less likely to be completely or partially removed in people with voice disorders than in the non-voice disordered group. Hard throat clear and swallow with water were the most effective techniques at removing laryngeal sensation. Conclusions The findings provide initial evidence for some of the clinical practices common to treating patients with voice disorders and chronic clearing such as advocating for swallowing a sip of water as a replacement behavior instead of coughing or throat clearing. However, the findings raise questions about other practices such as associating irritating laryngeal sensation with a voice disorder. PMID:22717491

  17. [Solacy and non-specific chronic laryngitis].

    PubMed

    Berezin, A

    1989-01-01

    Adult subjects, without age or sex distinction, presenting a non-specific chronic laryngitis were treated with SOLACY. The posology of SOLACY administered was: 2 capsules in the morning and 2 at night for four months in a row. The subjects were seen at least twice: one consultation before the treatment and one after the 4 months of treatment. These consultations included an interview and fibroscopic test of the laryngeal mucosa (photographs were taken). The subjects were also requested to quantify the overall discomfort experienced. Ten subjects were recruited for this study. Dysphonia was significantly lower after the 4-month treatment as was the self-evaluation of the overall discomfort brought on by the different symptoms. In addition, it can be noted that SOLACY lessened coughing and laryngeal discomfort in most of the patients treated and it improved the fibroscopic test results, especially concerning the congestive aspect of the laryngeal mucosa, whether limited to vocal chords or spread throughout the entire vestibule. The treatment was tolerated perfectly well. In conclusion, SOLACY, administered in adults presenting non-specific chronic laryngitis improves the state of the laryngeal mucosa and its main symptoms (dysphonia, coughing, laryngeal discomfort). PMID:2633259

  18. Paralysie néonatal unilatérale du nerf radial

    PubMed Central

    Benemmane, Halima; Hali, Fouzia; Marnissi, Farida; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2015-01-01

    La paralysie néonatale unilatérale du nerf radial est rare, son diagnostic est essentiellement clinique, elle peut-être diagnostiquée à tort en tant que paralysie du plexus brachial. Nous rapportons un cas clinique. A l'examen clinique du nouveau-né; l'extension du poignet, du pouce et des articulations métacarpo-phalangiennes était impossible, alors qu'il y avait une conservation de la prono-supination et la flexion du poignet et des mouvements de l’épaule et du coude. Le diagnostic de la paralysie du plexus brachial était écarté cliniquement devant la mobilisation active de l’épaule et la flexion du coude. Notre patient a bénéficié de kinésithérapie pour éviter l'apparition d'attitudes vicieuses et d'amyotrophie. L'extension active du poignet était obtenue après deux mois. PMID:26587133

  19. Hypokalemic thyrotoxic periodic paralysis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Wong, Phillip

    2003-09-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare and dramatic complication of hyperthyroidism. This series summarizes the clinical and metabolic features of 10 patients who presented to the Western and Sunshine hospitals in Melbourne, Australia, between 1997 and 2002 with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP). TPP classically presents with proximal lower-limb weakness in the setting of a low potassium level and biochemical evidence of thyrotoxicosis: low thyroid-stimulating hormone levels along with elevated free thyroxine (FT(4)) or free triiodothyronine (FTL(3)). The challenge for emergency physicians is to recognize the association with thyroid disease, since features of hyperthyroidism may not be apparent on history and examination. Acute treatment with potassium supplements and long-term management is aimed at achieving an euthyroid state. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is more common in Asian populations; however, increasing immigration from Asia will lead to higher TPP prevalence in Western countries. PMID:17466146

  20. Factors associated with the improvement of vocal fold movement: an analysis of LEMG and laryngeal CT parameters.

    PubMed

    Mengsteab, Paulos Y; Kwon, Jeong-Yi; Han, Tai Ryoon; Kwon, Tack Kyun; Kim, Deok-Ho; Kim, Sang Jun

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to elucidate the relationship of laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) and computed tomographic (CT) parameters to improve the prognosis of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. 22 patients clinically suspected of having recurrent laryngeal nerve injury were examined with LEMG and CT studies. Bilateral thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles were examined and findings were interpreted by a single blind technique. Laryngeal CT image analysis of the ventricle dilation symmetry determined TA muscle atrophy. Finally, a follow-up laryngoscopic examination determined improvement of vocal fold movement. Ventricle dilation symmetry and the dichotomized TA muscle atrophy parameter significantly relate to the improvement of vocal fold movement (?(2)=4.029, P=0.039, and ?(2)=3.912, P=0.048, respectively). When the severity of vocal fold impairment was classified as severe TA muscle atrophy or none/discrete MUAP recruitment, it was found to significantly relate with the improvement of vocal fold movement (?(2)=6.712, P=.010). From this study, image analysis of the ventricle dilation symmetry to determine the severity of TA muscle atrophy shows promise for the improved prognosis of vocal fold immobility. PMID:25217204

  1. [HYPP: hyperkalemic periodic paralysis in the horse].

    PubMed

    Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M

    1999-03-15

    Hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis(HYPP) is characterized by intermittent episodes of muscular tremor, weakness, and collapse, and is probably caused by abnormal electrolyte transport in the muscle cell membrane. During an episode of HYPP, most animals are severely hyperkalaemic. HYPP is a hereditary disease and occurs only in American Quarter horses or crossbreds. Because these horses are now being imported into the Netherlands, HYPP should be included in the differential diagnosis of horses showing signs of muscle tremor, paresis, or paralysis. The present article reviews the literature on HYPP and describes a case showing typical signs of the disease. PMID:10188180

  2. [Morphological study of intra-laryngeal ganglia and their neurons in the cat].

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, T

    1993-12-01

    The distribution, number, projections and nature of ganglia and ganglionic neurons in the feline larynx were investigated morphologically. Six to eight large oval or spindle-shaped ganglia (including 50-80 ganglionic neurons per ganglion) in rostral portions of the paraglottic spaces, four to six small spindle-shaped ganglions (containing 5-25 ganglionic perikarya in each ganglion) dorsal to the posterior cricoarytenoid muscles and one to three small elliptical ganglia (having 15-25 ganglionic cells in each ganglion) around the inferior laryngeal nerves were observed in the larynx. Each ganglion was covered with a fibrous capsule and ganglionic neurons with a diameter of 25-30 microns totaled 600 to 800. Ganglionic neurons received projections from the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus, the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) and the nodose ganglion (NG) ipsilaterally. On the other hand, ganglionic neurons projected to SCG, NG, ipsilaterally and the laryngeal mucosa bilaterally with ipsilateral predominance. Ganglionic neurons showed acetylcholinesterase positive reactions, presumably parasympathetic. On immunocytochemistry, many vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-immunoreactive (ir) neurons, and a few tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-ir and substance P (SP)-ir cells were recognized in ganglions, but no calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-ir neurons were found. These VIP, TH, SP-ir neurons did not change after denervation of the ipsilateral superior and recurrent laryngeal nerves. Many VIP- and some TH-, SP-, CGRP-ir fibers were also observed around vessels and glandular cells. The present findings show that intra-laryngeal ganglionic neurons not only have an endogenic cholinergic nature, but are also involved in local sympathetic and sensory nervous systems. PMID:8295067

  3. Laryngitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby ; 2015: ... et al. Clinical practice guideline: hoarseness (dysphonia). Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2009;141(3 Suppl 2):S1-S31. ...

  4. Selective activation of the human tibial and common peroneal nerves with a flat interface nerve electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Freeberg, M.; Pinault, G. J. C.; Anderson, J.; Hoyen, H.; Tyler, D. J.; Triolo, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation has been shown effective in restoring basic lower extremity motor function in individuals with paralysis. We tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the human tibial or common peroneal nerve above the knee can selectively activate each of the most important muscles these nerves innervate for use in a neuroprosthesis to control ankle motion. Approach. During intraoperative trials involving three subjects, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the tibial and/or common peroneal nerve, proximal to the popliteal fossa. The FINE's ability to selectively recruit muscles innervated by these nerves was assessed. Data were used to estimate the potential to restore active plantarflexion or dorsiflexion while balancing inversion and eversion using a biomechanical simulation. Main results. With minimal spillover to non-targets, at least three of the four targets in the tibial nerve, including two of the three muscles constituting the triceps surae, were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. As acceptable levels of spillover increased, recruitment of the target muscles increased. Selective activation of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve was more challenging. Significance. Estimated joint moments suggest that plantarflexion sufficient for propulsion during stance phase of gait and dorsiflexion sufficient to prevent foot drop during swing can be achieved, accompanied by a small but tolerable inversion or eversion moment.

  5. Phonology Project Part II: Laryngeal Neutralization and Syllable Structure

    E-print Network

    Ananian, C. Scott

    Phonology Project Part II: Laryngeal Neutralization and Syllable Structure C. Scott Ananian Andrew Ira Nevins December 2000 Contents 1 Introduction 2 1.1 Laryngeal Neutralization Is the Syllable involved in Neutralization? 12 3.1 Linear Constraints in Klamath

  6. What's New in Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Additional resources for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers What’s new in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers research and treatment? ... to better tests for early detection and to new targeted treatments. Chemoprevention Chemoprevention is the use of ...

  7. The perceptual basis of long-distance laryngeal restrictions

    E-print Network

    Gallagher, Gillian Elizabeth Scott

    2010-01-01

    The two main arguments in this dissertation are 1. That laryngeal co-occurrence restrictions are restrictions on the perceptual strength of contrasts between roots, as opposed to restrictions on laryngeal configurations ...

  8. Short- and long-term effects of paralysis on the motor innervation of two different neonatal mouse muscles

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. C.; Hopkins, W. G.; Keynes, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    1. A study was made of short- and long-term effects of paralysis induced by type A botulinum toxin on the development of innervation of mouse muscles. The toxin was injected locally over the tensor fasciae latae (t.f.l.) and gluteus muscles at various times after birth, and the innervation was later examined by intracellular recording and by a histological technique using a reduced silver stain for axons. 2. Paralysis induced at 0-4 days of age delayed but did not prevent the eventual elimination of nearly all focal multiple innervation in gluteus muscle fibres, whereas in t.f.l. up to 50% of the fibres remained focally innervated by more than one axon for at least 120 days. There was an associated reduction in the number of muscle fibres in t.f.l. of between 50 and 70%. The biggest reduction in the number of gluteus fibres was under 40%. 3. In the t.f.l., paralysis begun at 6-9 days caused the extent of single-site polyneuronal innervation to increase above the level existing at the time of paralysis. Histologically this increase was seen to be due at least in part to the stimulation of nodal sprout growth from a limited number of nodes. 4. Motor nerve terminal sprouts were evoked by paralysis at all ages. In mice injected before 4 days of age recovery from the toxin occurred rapidly and without the formation of ectopic synapses by sprouted motor terminals; however, intrafusal motor nerves also sprouted and established a permanent ectopic innervation on surrounding extrafusal muscle fibres. 5. The following conclusions are drawn. (a) In some but not all muscles, neonatally induced paralysis can not only temporarily halt elimination of polyneuronal innervation but actually lead to an increase; it is suggested tentatively that this occurs only during the neonatal period because of the availability at that time of endoneurial pathways associated with normal polyneuronal innervation, rather than because of any special neuronal growth potential then. (b) Permanent establishment of focal polyneuronal innervation is due not to stability of presynaptic elements maintained past a critical developmental stage but is associated with substantial losses of muscle fibres, leading to a high ratio of nerve fibres to muscle fibres. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2 PMID:6216335

  9. Optic Nerve Drusen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Drusen En Español Read in Chinese What are optic nerve drusen? Optic nerve drusen are abnormal globular ...

  10. Laryngeal aspergilloma: a complication of inhaled fluticasone therapy for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Darley, David; Lowinger, David; Plit, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    Primary laryngeal aspergillosis in immunocompetent patients is rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old woman with laryngeal aspergillosis thought to be secondary to long-term inhaled fluticasone therapy. Laryngeal aspergillosis may be an underrecognized complication of inhaled corticosteroid therapy. PMID:25530858

  11. Koenig: Laryngeal Factors in Consonant Production 1211 Laura L. Koenig

    E-print Network

    Koenig: Laryngeal Factors in Consonant Production 1211 Laura L. Koenig Haskins Laboratories New of laryngeal setting and management of sub- and supraglottal pressure levels, and many of these factors that one cannot assume comparable laryngeal condi- tions across speaker groups. This, in turn, implies

  12. Diagnosing limb paresis and paralysis in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Crilly, James Patrick; Rzechorzek, Nina; Scott, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Paresis and paralysis are uncommon problems in sheep but are likely to prompt farmers to seek veterinary advice. A thorough and logical approach can aid in determining the cause of the problem and highlighting the benefit of veterinary involvement. While this may not necessarily alter the prognosis for an individual animal, it can help in formulating preventive measures and avoid the costs – both in economic and in welfare terms – of misdirected treatment. Distinguishing between central and peripheral lesions is most important, as the relative prognoses are markedly different, and this can often be achieved with minimal equipment. This article describes an approach to performing a neurological examination of the ovine trunk and limbs, the ancillary tests available and the common and important causes of paresis and paralysis in sheep.

  13. [Gao Yuchun's experience of facial paralysis treatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanjun; Cui, Linhua; Yuan, Jun; He, Li; Xie, Zhanqing; Xue, Weihua; Li, Mei; Zhang, Zhenwei; Gao, Yuchun; Kang, Suobin

    2015-05-01

    To introduce professor Gao Yuchun's clinical experience and treating characteristics of facial paralysis treated with acupuncture and moxibustion. Professor Gao pays attention to yangming when he selects acupoints for clinical syndrome, and directs acupoints selection based on syndrome differentiation in different levels of jingjin, meridians and zangfu; he praises opposing needling technique and reinforcing the deficiency and reducing the excess highly; the acupuncture manipulation is gentle,shallow and slow for reducing the healthy side and reinforcing the affected side, and through losing its excess to complement its deficiency; besides, he stresses needle retaining time and distinguishes reinforcing and reducing. Facial paralysis is treated with key factors such as acupoints selecting based on yangming, acupuncture manipulation, needle retaining time, etc. And the spleen and stomach is fine and good at transportation and transformation; the meridians is harmonious; the qi and blood is smooth. The clinical efficacy is enhanced finally. PMID:26255524

  14. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohamad R; Samuels, Stuart E; Bellile, Emily; Shalabi, Firas L; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP), composite nodal volumes (GTVN) and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC) had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance. PMID:26569309

  15. Comparison of soft tissue response in rabbits following laryngeal implantation with hydroxylapatite, silicone rubber, and Teflon.

    PubMed

    Flint, P W; Corio, R L; Cummings, C W

    1997-05-01

    This study evaluates the soft tissue response in rabbits following laryngeal implantation for medialization using hydroxylapatite prostheses, carved silicone rubber prostheses, and injectable Teflon. Sixteen rabbits underwent left recurrent laryngeal nerve section for denervation and laryngeal implantation with hydroxylapatite. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, 4 animals were painlessly sacrificed and processed for histology. Similarly, animals were implanted with carved silicone rubber prostheses or with Teflon injected through a flap in the thyroid lamina for comparison at 1, 3, and 6 months. In animals implanted with hydroxylapatite, histologic findings include limited acute inflammatory response, thin fibrous encapsulation, and osteogenesis in the region of the fenestra, with lamellar bone bridging the space between the implant and thyroid lamina. With silicone rubber prostheses, there is a limited inflammatory response and fibrous encapsulation of the implant without evidence of osteogenesis. Animals implanted with Teflon demonstrated a classic foreign body reaction with multinucleated giant cells, granuloma formation, and migration of Teflon into surrounding muscle. With respect to soft tissue response, both hydroxylapatite and silicone rubber are less reactive than Teflon. The osteogenesis observed in the presence of hydroxylapatite increases implant stability and minimizes the risk of migration. Conversely, the presence of bone growth may limit the reversibility of medialization procedures performed with hydroxylapatite. PMID:9153105

  16. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  17. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... damage to the long portion of the nerve cell) Conduction block (the impulse is blocked somewhere along the nerve pathway) Demyelination (damage and loss of the fatty insulation surrounding the nerve cell) The nerve damage or destruction may be due ...

  18. Medial Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fibromatosis Medial and lateral plantar nerve entrapment is compression of nerve branches at the inner heel (the ... nerve or surgery to free the nerve from compression may help relieve pain. Foot Problems Overview of ...

  19. Optimal selection of wavelet-packet-based features using genetic algorithm in pathological assessment of patients' speech signal with unilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Almasganj, Farshad

    2007-04-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) is one of the most severe types of neurogenic laryngeal disorder in which the patients, due to their vocal cords malfunction, are confronted by some serious problems. As the effect of such pathologies would be significantly evident in the reduced quality and feature variation of dysphonic voices, this study is designed to scrutinize the piecewise variation of some specific types of these features, known as energy and entropy, all over the frequency range of pathological speech signals. In order to do so, the wavelet-packet coefficients, in five consecutive levels of decomposition, are used to extract the energy and entropy measures at different spectral sub-bands. As the decomposition procedure leads to a set of high-dimensional feature vectors, genetic algorithm is invoked to search for a group of optimal sub-band indexes for which the extracted features result in the highest recognition rate for pathological and normal subjects' classification. The results of our simulations, using support vector machine classifier, show that the highest recognition rate, for both optimized energy and entropy measures, is achieved at the fifth level of wavelet-packet decomposition. It is also found that entropy feature, with the highest recognition rate of 100% vs. 93.62% for energy, is more prominent in discriminating patients with UVFP from normal subjects. Therefore, entropy feature, in comparison with energy, demonstrates a more efficient description of such pathological voices and provides us a valuable tool for clinical diagnosis of unilateral laryngeal paralysis. PMID:17034780

  20. Severe Acute Orthopnea: Ipilimumab-Induced Bilateral Phrenic Nerve Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jinnur, Praveen; Lim, Kaiser G

    2015-08-01

    Ipilimumab is a monoclonal antibody used in the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma. Several immune-related adverse events including potential fatal events have been reported following its use. We report a case of a 66-year-old man who presented with severe acute exertional dyspnea and orthopnea following administration of ipilimumab for metastatic melanoma. Although various peripheral neuropathy syndromes associated with ipilimumab have been reported, bilateral phrenic nerve paralysis has not been previously reported. This case also highlights the clinical features of bilateral phrenic nerve neuropathy. Pulmonologists have to be aware of these unusual immune-related respiratory adverse events in patients being treated with monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25956728

  1. [Laryngeal papillomatosis: etiology, diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Andratschke, M; Betz, C; Leunig, A

    2008-12-01

    Papillomas are rare tumors that originate from the mucosa. They may appear in the nose, paranasal sinuses, oral cavity, larynx, trachea, or the skin. Papillomas are mainly asymptomatic and are therefore mostly diagnosed coincidentally. In contrast, laryngeal papillomatosis may cause stridor, dyspnoea, and hoarseness. A viral cause of the disease seems likely, especially human papilloma virus. Mechanical irritation is also a possible reason when the nose, oral cavity, or oropharynx is affected. All papillomas, independent of their origin, may recur, and have the possibility of malignant degeneration in common. The therapy of choice is complete surgical excision. Regarding laryngeal papillomatosis, laser vaporisation or excision using the CO(2)laser is recommended. Because retreatments using conventional modalities are frequently necessary, especially in the case of laryngeal papillomatosis, adjuvant therapies are applied with the aim of reducing the recurrence rate and prolonging the interval between treatments. PMID:19034400

  2. Hyperthyroid hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a Hispanic male.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, F. J.; Lee, E. T.

    1990-01-01

    A case of hyperthyroid periodic paralysis in a Hispanic male is reported, the disorder in this race being described only once before. He presented with complete paralysis below the neck, and his admission potassium of 1.3 mEq/L is the lowest reported in the literature. Correction of the hypokalemia resolved his symptoms. Radionuclide imaging and thyroid function tests revealed the presence of hyperthyroidism which was managed medically. The pathophysiology of hyperthyroid hypokalemic periodic paralysis is discussed. PMID:2304102

  3. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a Hispanic male.

    PubMed Central

    Zumo, Lawrence A.; Terzian, Christian; Brannan, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of a Hispanic male presenting with acute onset of bilateral lower extremity weakness, without any antecedent viral or bacterial illness, dietary changes, infiltrative orbitopathy, diffuse goiter, infiltrative dermopathy, and family history of periodic paralysis, who was later found to have Graves' disease. This demonstrates a rare case of periodic paralysis as the initial presentation of hyperthyroidism. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is common in Asian and Hispanic individuals and uncommon in whites and African Americans. PMID:12069220

  4. Facial-paralysis diagnostic system based on 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairunnisaa, Aida; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yazid, Haniza; Basri, Hassrizal Hassan; Yaacob, Sazali; Chin, Lim Chee

    2015-05-01

    The diagnostic process of facial paralysis requires qualitative assessment for the classification and treatment planning. This result is inconsistent assessment that potential affect treatment planning. We developed a facial-paralysis diagnostic system based on 3D reconstruction of RGB and depth data using a standard structured-light camera - Kinect 360 - and implementation of Active Appearance Models (AAM). We also proposed a quantitative assessment for facial paralysis based on triangular model. In this paper, we report on the design and development process, including preliminary experimental results. Our preliminary experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of our quantitative assessment system to diagnose facial paralysis.

  5. Monolimb Paralysis after Laparoscopic Appendectomy Due to Conversion Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung Hyuk; Lee, Kyeong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Limb paralysis can develop for various reasons. We found a 13-year-old patient who became paralyzed in her lower extremities after laparoscopic appendectomy. Some tests, including electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance imaging, were performed to evaluate the cause of lower limb paralysis. None of the tests yielded definite abnormal findings. We subsequently decided to explore the possibility of psychological problems. The patient was treated with simultaneous rehabilitation and psychological counseling. Paralysis of the patient's lower extremity improved gradually and the patient returned to normal life. Our findings indicate that psychological problems can be related to limb paralysis without organ damage in patients who have undergone laparoscopic surgical procedures. PMID:25426280

  6. Tick paralysis in Australia caused by Ixodes holocyclus Neumann.

    PubMed

    Hall-Mendelin, S; Craig, S B; Hall, R A; O'Donoghue, P; Atwell, R B; Tulsiani, S M; Graham, G C

    2011-03-01

    Ticks are obligate haematophagous ectoparasites of various animals, including humans, and are abundant in temperate and tropical zones around the world. They are the most important vectors for the pathogens causing disease in livestock and second only to mosquitoes as vectors of pathogens causing human disease. Ticks are formidable arachnids, capable of not only transmitting the pathogens involved in some infectious diseases but also of inducing allergies and causing toxicoses and paralysis, with possible fatal outcomes for the host. This review focuses on tick paralysis, the role of the Australian paralysis tick Ixodes holocyclus, and the role of toxin molecules from this species in causing paralysis in the host. PMID:21396246

  7. Stereological characteristics of the equine accessory nerve.

    PubMed

    Matiasek, K; Gais, P; Rodenacker, K; Jütting, U; Tanck, J J; Schmahl, W

    2008-06-01

    Stereological techniques have been increasingly employed for assessment and characterization of neuromuscular diseases in humans and animals. As an adjunct to histopathology, morphometrical algorithms provide quantitative evidence of the peripheral nerve composition, thereby shedding light on its fibre characteristics and basic electrophysiological properties. In the horse, stereological investigations already have focussed on the recurrent laryngeal, deep peroneal and lateral palmar nerves (LPN). Of these, only the latter is suitable for taking biopsies in clinical settings, however, it does not contain any motor fibres and Ia-afferents. On account of its virtually mixed fibre qualities, most researchers today recommend the cervical branch of the equine accessory nerve (AN) for harvesting diagnostic samples. Thus, the present study was carried out to gain morphometrical proof of the AN composition and to obtain stereological base values in healthy individuals using state-of-the-art technology. All parameters were compared to the common peroneal nerve (CPN), known to harbour all myelinated fibre classes. As this second biopsy site is located farther distally to the neuro-axis, attention was paid to possible length-dependent features. Taken together, digital image analysis could be accurately applied on all AN samples. Stereology supported the histological and clinical evidence that the AN contains all myelinated fibre types. The huge range and scatter of fibre counts and density (3351-17,812/mm(2)) per fascicle were comparable to that measured in the equine common peroneal, deep peroneal, lateral palmar and recurrent laryngeal nerves. Similar to those, fibre diameter distribution was bimodal with slow Abeta- and Agamma-mechanoceptor afferents outnumbering large myelinated Aalpha-fibres by a factor of about 1.5. With a g-ratio at 0.55 +/- 0.001, the overall degree of myelination in the AN is highly consistent and insignificantly ranges between that of the equine common peroneal and LPNs. Apart from this subtle deviation, a statistically relevant difference between the more proximal AN and the distal CPN could not be documented. By obtaining morphometrical standard parameters and even more sophisticated distribution indices, stereology is a valuable tool for detection of subtle changes that are likely to escape from the investigators' eyes. The AN serves as a reliable source for advanced peripheral nerve research and should be accompanied by farther distal nerve probes for assessment of neuropathies that present with a proximodistal gradient. PMID:18336628

  8. Atraumatic laser treatment for laryngeal papillomatosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Pankratov, Michail M.; Wang, Zhi; Bottrill, Ian; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1994-09-01

    Ten to fifteen thousand new cases of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) are diagnosed each year in the United States. RRP is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and is characterized by recurrent, non-malignant, proliferative lesions of the larynx. Patients with RRP undergo numerous microsurgical procedures to remove laryngeal papilloma threatening airway patency and interfering with phonation. The standard surgical technique involves CO2 laser vaporization of laryngeal epithelium affected by the lesions, and requires general anesthesia. The pulsed dye laser operating at 585 nm has previously been demonstrated to be effective in clearing HPV lesions of the skin (verrucae). For treatment of RRP, the fiber- compatible pulsed dye laser radiation may be delivered under local anesthesia using a flexible intranasal laryngoscope. Potential advantages of the pulsed dye laser treatment over CO2 laser surgery include (1) reduced morbidity, especially a lower risk of laryngeal scarring; (2) lower cost; (3) reduced technical difficulty; and (4) reduced risk of viral dissemination or transmission. In vivo studies are underway to determine the effect of pulsed dye laser radiation on normal canine laryngeal tissue.

  9. Current role of stroboscopy in laryngeal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This paper summarizes recent technological advancements and insight into the role of stroboscopy in laryngeal imaging. Recent findings Videostroboscopic technology Although stroboscopy has not undergone major technological improvements, recent clarifications have been made to the application of stroboscopic principles to video-based laryngeal imaging. Also recent advances in coupling stroboscopy with high-definition video cameras provide higher spatial resolution of phonatory function. Visual stroboscopic assessment Studies indicate that interrater reliability of visual stroboscopic assessment varies depending on the laryngeal feature being rated and that only a subset of features may be needed to represent an entire assessment. High-speed videoendoscopy (HSV) judgments have been shown to be more sensitive than stroboscopy for evaluating vocal fold phase asymmetry, pointing to the potential of complementing stroboscopy with alternative imaging modalities in hybrid systems. Clinical role Stroboscopic imaging continues to play a central role in voice clinics. Although HSV may provide more detailed information about phonatory function, its eventual clinical adoption depends on how remaining practical, technical, and methodological challenges will be met. Summary Laryngeal videostroboscopy continues to be the modality of choice for imaging vocal fold vibration, but technological advancements and HSV research findings are driving increased interest in the clinical adoption of HSV to complement videostroboscopic assessment. PMID:22931908

  10. Ventricular pressures in phonating excised larynges

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Pressure in the laryngeal ventricle was measured with a beveled needle connected to a pressure transducer in excised canine larynges. Air pressures within the ventricle were obtained for different adduction levels of the true vocal folds (TVFs), false vocal folds (FVFs), and subglottal pressures (Ps). Results indicated that the air pressures in the ventricle appear to be strongly related to the motion of the FVFs rather than to the effects of TVF vibration. Both dc and ac pressures depend on FVF adduction, amplitude of motion of the FVFs, and whether the FVFs touch each other during the vibratory cycle. Mean and peak-to-peak pressures in the ventricle were as high as 65% of the mean and peak-to-peak Ps, respectively, when the FVFs vibrated with large amplitude and contact each cycle. If the glottis was not closed, a medial movement of the FVFs appeared to create a positive pressure pulse on the Ps signal due to an increase in the laryngeal flow resistance. The electroglottograph signal showed evidence of tissue contact for both the TVFs and the FVFs. The study suggests that the laryngeal ventricle acts as a relatively independent aero-acoustic chamber that depends primarily upon the motion of the FVFs. PMID:22894222

  11. Laryngeal leiomyosarcoma with coexistent tuberculous mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Yüksel Asl?er, Nesibe Gül; Do?an, Ersoy; Sar?o?lu, Sülen; ?kiz, Ahmet Ömer

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal leiomyosarcoma is an extremely rare malignancy originating from the smooth muscles of blood vessels. Herein, we present the first case of leiomyosarcoma arising from the glottic area of the larynx with coexistent tuberculous mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The patient was treated with vertical laryngectomy and anti-tuberculous medication. He has been disease-free for 24 months since initial treatment. PMID:25935064

  12. Like a Deer in the Headlights: The Paralysis of Stuckness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Nathe, Ben

    2008-01-01

    When describing how they experience moments of not-knowing, youth workers often talk about a sense of paralysis, as though their uncertainty becomes physically constraining. This chapter describes the first of five themes associated with youth workers' experiences of not knowing what to do: the paralysis of stuckness. In addition to describing and…

  13. Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis: An Underdiagnosed and Under-recognized Condition

    PubMed Central

    Kommalapati, Anuhya

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a condition characterized by the triad of acute hypokalemia without total body potassium deficit, episodic muscle paralysis, and thyrotoxicosis. We describe two cases of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis who presented to our hospital with potassium values of 1.3 MeQ/l and 1.2 MeQ/l, respectively. Surprisingly, the two patients had no documented past medical history. Based on the clinical features of high heart rate, palpitations (seen in both the patients), and exophthalmos (seen in one patient), thyrotoxic periodic paralysis was suspected. A thorough laboratory workup confirmed the diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. Beta blockers were initiated promptly, along with intravenous potassium chloride, and the patients eventually improved symptomatically. These patients were eventually diagnosed with Graves’ disease and were placed on methimazole, which prevented further attacks. Thyroid periodic paralysis (TPP) is a rare clinical manifestation of hyperthyroidism. Patients present with sudden onset paralysis associated with severe hypokalemia. The presence of paralysis and hypokalemia in a patient who has a history of hyperthyroidism should prompt the physician about thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. A high index of suspicion, prompt diagnosis, and management of the condition can prevent severe complications, such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  14. Development and validation of the Newcastle laryngeal hypersensitivity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laryngeal hypersensitivity may be an important component of the common disorders of laryngeal motor dysfunction including chronic refractory cough, pdoxical vocal fold movement (vocal cord dysfunction), muscle tension dysphonia, and globus pharyngeus. Patients with these conditions frequently report sensory disturbances, and an emerging concept of the ‘irritable larynx’ suggests common features of a sensory neuropathic dysfunction as a part of these disorders. The aim of this study was to develop a Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire for patients with laryngeal dysfunction syndromes in order to measure the laryngeal sensory disturbance occurring in these conditions. Methods The 97 participants included 82 patients referred to speech pathology for behavioural management of laryngeal dysfunction and 15 healthy controls. The participants completed a 21 item self administered questionnaire regarding symptoms of abnormal laryngeal sensation. Factor analysis was conducted to examine correlations between items. Discriminant analysis and responsiveness to change were evaluated. Results The final questionnaire comprised 14 items across three domains: obstruction, pain/thermal, and irritation. The questionnaire demonstrated significant discriminant validity with a mean difference between the patients with laryngeal disorders and healthy controls of 5.5. The clinical groups with laryngeal hypersensitivity had similar abnormal scores. Furthermore the Newcastle Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire (LHQ) showed improvement following behavioural speech pathology intervention with a mean reduction in LHQ score of 2.3. Conclusion The Newcastle Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire is a simple, non-invasive tool to measure laryngeal pesthesia in patients with laryngeal conditions such as chronic cough, pdoxical vocal fold movement (vocal cord dysfunction), muscle tension dysphonia, and globus pharyngeus. It can successfully differentiate patients from healthy controls and measure change following intervention. It is a promising tool for use in clinical research and practice. PMID:24552215

  15. Laryngeal preservation in managing advanced tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Thavakumar; Lennon, Paul; Kinsella, John; O'Neill, James Paul

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old male athlete was diagnosed with primary tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma following investigation for dyspnea, wheeze, and eventual stridor. Preoperative bronchoscopy revealed a highly vascular tumor 4?cm distal to the cricoid with no gross disease extending to the carina. Imaging revealed circumferential tracheal irregularity immediately inferior to the cricoid, with no definite cricoid invasion. Locoregional extension of disease was noted invading the thyroid and abutment of the carotid approximately 180°. Intraoperative findings identified tracheal mucosal disease extending distal to the carina and proximally at the cricothyroid joints where bilateral functional recurrent nerves were preserved. A decision made to preserve the larynx given the inability to fully resect distal tracheal disease. A 5?cm sleeve resection of the trachea was made with a cricotracheal anastomosis following suprahyoidal muscle release and laryngeal drop-down. The patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy including platinum based chemotherapy in an effort to maximise local control. PET scanning three months after therapy revealed no FDG uptake locally or distally. PMID:25878915

  16. Laryngeal Preservation in Managing Advanced Tracheal Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Thavakumar; Lennon, Paul; Kinsella, John; O'Neill, James Paul

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old male athlete was diagnosed with primary tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma following investigation for dyspnea, wheeze, and eventual stridor. Preoperative bronchoscopy revealed a highly vascular tumor 4?cm distal to the cricoid with no gross disease extending to the carina. Imaging revealed circumferential tracheal irregularity immediately inferior to the cricoid, with no definite cricoid invasion. Locoregional extension of disease was noted invading the thyroid and abutment of the carotid approximately 180°. Intraoperative findings identified tracheal mucosal disease extending distal to the carina and proximally at the cricothyroid joints where bilateral functional recurrent nerves were preserved. A decision made to preserve the larynx given the inability to fully resect distal tracheal disease. A 5?cm sleeve resection of the trachea was made with a cricotracheal anastomosis following suprahyoidal muscle release and laryngeal drop-down. The patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy including platinum based chemotherapy in an effort to maximise local control. PET scanning three months after therapy revealed no FDG uptake locally or distally. PMID:25878915

  17. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human...

  18. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human...

  19. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human...

  20. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human...

  1. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15...Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human...

  2. Non-traumatic Occulomotor Nerve Palsy: A Rare Case Report and Discussion on Etiopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Prajesh; Bansal, Vishal; Arun Kumar, K V; Mowar, Apoorva; Khare, Gagan; Singh, Sukumar

    2015-03-01

    The ghost of the past has emerged as the horror of today. The fear of weakness/loss of eyesight following extraction is a common thinking amongst the orthodox people of Indian subcontinent. Occulomotor nerve paralysis following dental extraction is a rare complication. Although these ophthalmic complications in routine practice are rare, some time they do occur and pose difficulty to explain. Occulomotor nerve palsy is amongst the rare reported cases of ocular complication. Here we report a case of spontaneous recovery of occulomotor nerve palsy in an elderly diabetic patient and brief discussion on its etiopathogenesis. PMID:25838716

  3. Syndrome of fascial incarceration of the long thoracic nerve: winged scapula?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jefferson Braga; Gerhardt, Samanta; Pacheco, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results from early intervention surgery in patients with the syndrome of fascial incarceration of the long thoracic nerve and consequent winged scapula. Methods Six patients with a syndrome of nerve trapping without specific nerve strain limitations were followed up. Results The patients achieved improvement of their symptoms 6–20 months after the procedure. The motor symptoms completely disappeared, without any persistent pain. The medial deformity of the winged scapula improved in all cases, without any residual esthetic disorders. Conclusion The approach of early surgical release seems to be a better predictor for recovery from non-traumatic paralysis of the anterior serratus muscle. PMID:26535205

  4. Transient Delayed Facial Nerve Palsy After Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Tzermpos, Fotios H.; Cocos, Alina; Kleftogiannis, Matthaios; Zarakas, Marissa; Iatrou, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy, as a complication of an inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia, is a rarely reported incident. Based on the time elapsed, from the moment of the injection to the onset of the symptoms, the paralysis could be either immediate or delayed. The purpose of this article is to report a case of delayed facial palsy as a result of inferior alveolar nerve block, which occurred 24 hours after the anesthetic administration and subsided in about 8 weeks. The pathogenesis, treatment, and results of an 8-week follow-up for a 20-year-old patient referred to a private maxillofacial clinic are presented and discussed. The patient's previous medical history was unremarkable. On clinical examination the patient exhibited generalized weakness of the left side of her face with a flat and expressionless appearance, and she was unable to close her left eye. One day before the onset of the symptoms, the patient had visited her dentist for a routine restorative procedure on the lower left first molar and an inferior alveolar block anesthesia was administered. The patient's medical history, clinical appearance, and complete examinations led to the diagnosis of delayed facial nerve palsy. Although neurologic occurrences are rare, dentists should keep in mind that certain dental procedures, such as inferior alveolar block anesthesia, could initiate facial nerve palsy. Attention should be paid during the administration of the anesthetic solution. PMID:22428971

  5. Change in obstruent laryngeal specifications in English: historical and theoretical phonology 

    E-print Network

    Spaargaren, Magdalena Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    Two traditions have arisen from an ongoing debate concerning cross-linguistic laryngeal representations in series of obstruents. The first, ‘traditional’ approach assumes universally identical laryngeal representations: ...

  6. Invasive Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Boy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qing; Lei, Wen-Ting; Fan, Guo-Run; Zhu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare in children. Usually, laryngeal SCC in children has a poor prognosis. A 9-year-old boy is reported who was diagnosed as having poorly differentiated laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma with neck metastasis. This report aims to highlight the importance of a comprehensive knowledge of differential diagnosis, putting great attention to the onset of symptoms, early application of flexible laryngoscopy, and intensive studies on similar cases. PMID:26064803

  7. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  8. Isolated sleep paralysis and fearful isolated sleep paralysis in outpatients with panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Sharpless, Brian A; McCarthy, Kevin S; Chambless, Dianne L; Milrod, Barbara L; Khalsa, Shabad-Ratan; Barber, Jacques P

    2010-12-01

    Isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) has received scant attention in clinical populations, and there has been little empirical consideration of the role of fear in ISP episodes. To facilitate research and clinical work in this area, the authors developed a reliable semistructured interview (the Fearful Isolated Sleep Paralysis Interview) to assess ISP and their proposed fearful ISP (FISP) episode criteria in 133 patients presenting for panic disorder treatment. Of these, 29.3% met lifetime ISP episode criteria, 20.3% met the authors' lifetime FISP episode criteria, and 12.8% met their recurrent FISP criteria. Both ISP and FISP were associated with minority status and comorbidity. However, only FISP was significantly associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, body mass, anxiety sensitivity, and mood and anxiety disorder symptomatology. PMID:20715166

  9. Extended Neuralgic Amyotrophy Syndrome: voice therapy in one case of vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andréa Gomes de; Pinho, Márcia Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Neuralgic Amyotrophy (NA) is a rare disturb of the peripheral nervous system that can include extreme pain, multifocal paresis and atrophy of the muscles of the upper limbs. When the nerves located outside of the brachial plexus are involved, the term Neuralgic Amyotrophy Extended (ANE) is used. Diagnosis of NA is clinical and has a series of inclusion and compatibility criteria established by the European CMT Consortium. On this study the clinical history, multidimensional vocal assessment data and the vocal techniques used in five-weeks voice therapy for one patient, professional voice, with ANE are presented. In this case, sudden and recurrent paralysis of his right vocal fold was the only manifestation of the disease. At the end of the fifth week the patient's voice was normal, the spoken and sung vocal ranges were same as before the current episode of ANE and scores of his vocal self-assessment were appropriate. PMID:24918513

  10. Comparative study of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis from idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis: An experience from India

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, J.; Goyal, G.; Bhoi, S. K.; Chandra, S.; Misra, U. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: There is paucity of reports on thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) from India. We report the patients with TPP and compare them with idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (IHPP). Materials and Methods: Patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) treated during the past 11 years were evaluated retrospectively. Their demographic parameters, family history, clinical features, precipitating factors, severity of weakness, laboratory parameters and rapidity of recovery were recorded. The demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters of TPP and IHPP were compared. Results: During the study period, we managed 52 patients with HPP; nine (17.3%) of whom had TPP and 27 (52%) had IHPP. The demographic, precipitating factors, number of attacks and severity of limb weakness were similar between the TPP and IHPP groups, except in the IHPP group, bulbar weakness was present in four and respiratory paralysis in six, needing artificial ventilation in two patients. Serum potassium was significantly lower in TPP (2.21 ± 0.49) compared with IHPP (2.67 ± 0.59, P = 0.04). Four patients with TPP had subclinical thyrotoxicosis and two had subclinical hyperthyroidism. Rebound hyperkalemia occurred in both TPP and IHPP (three versus eight patients). The recovery was faster in IHPP (26.7 ± 15.4 h) compared with TPP (34.0 ± 14.0 h), but was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: TPP constitutes 17.3% of HPP, and absence of clinical features of thyrotoxicosis and subclinical hyperthyroidism in TPP is not uncommon. Clinical features, demographic profile and rebound hyperkalemia are similar in both TPP and IHPP. The serum potassium level is significantly low in the TPP compared with the IHPP group. PMID:22919190

  11. Phrenic nerve injury due to thoracentesis for TPN effusion in a preterm newborn: consecutive two unusual complications.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ramazan; O?uz, Suna; Uras, Nurdan; Erdeve, Omer; Yilmaz, Yavuz; Ulu, Hülya; Dilmen, U?ur

    2011-01-01

    Central venous catheters ara commonly used in neonatal intensive care units as routes of parenteral nutrition. Pleural effusions caused by extravasation of parenteral alimentation fluid are a rare complication of central venous catheters in the newborn. Diaphragmatic paralysis due to phrenic nerve injury is a rare respiratory condition which may be life-threatening in infants. PMID:22233310

  12. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  13. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Felice, KJ. Focal neuropathies of the femoral, obturator, lateral femoral cutaneous and other nerves of the thigh and pelvis. In: Bromberg MB, Smith ...

  14. Laryngeal biomechanics of the singing voice.

    PubMed

    Koufman, J A; Radomski, T A; Joharji, G M; Russell, G B; Pillsbury, D C

    1996-12-01

    By transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy, patients with functional voice often demonstrate abnormal laryngeal biomechanics, commonly supraglottic contraction. Appropriately, such conditions are sometimes termed muscle tension dysphonias. Singers working at the limits of their voice may also transiently demonstrate comparable tension patterns. However, the biomechanics of normal singing, particularly for different singing styles, have not been previously well characterized. We used transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy to study 100 healthy singers to assess patterns of laryngeal tension during normal singing and to determine whether factors such as sex, occupation, and style of singing influence laryngeal muscle tension. Thirty-nine male and 61 female singers were studied; 48 were professional singers, and 52 were amateurs. Examinations of study subjects performing standardized and nonstandardized singing tasks were recorded on a laser disk and subsequently analyzed in a frame-by-frame fashion by a blinded otolaryngologist. Each vocal task was graded for muscle tension by previously established criteria, and objective muscle tension scores were computed. The muscle tension score was expressed as a percentage of frames for each task with one of the laryngeal muscle tension patterns shown. The lowest muscle tension scores were seen in female professional singers, and the highest muscle tension scores were seen in amateur female singers. Male singers (professional and amateur) had intermediate muscle tension scores. Classical singers had lower muscle tension scores than nonclassical singers, with the lowest muscle tension scores being seen in those singing choral music (41%), art song (47%), and opera (57%), and the highest being seen in those singing jazz/pop (65%), musical theater (74%), bluegrass/country and western (86%), and rock/gospel (94%). Analyzed also were the influences of vocal nodules, prior vocal training, number of performance and practice hours per week, warm-up before singing, race, smoking, and alcohol consumption. PMID:8969758

  15. Diaphragm and Laryngeal FDG Uptake With Hiccups.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Madhur K; Jain, Avani S; Panneer, Venkat; Muthukrishnan, Indirani; Simon, Shelley

    2015-11-01

    F-FDG PET/CT study is a well-established investigation in diagnosis, treatment evaluation, and follow-up of malignant tumors. It is very important to know the normal biodistribution and physiologic uptake of F-FDG to prevent it from confusing as malignant disease. This article describes unusual but physiological uptake in the laryngeal and diaphragmatic muscles in a patient presenting as metastatic adenocarcinoma with unknown primary having hiccups. PMID:26204217

  16. Paralysis recovery in humans and model systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. Reggie; Roy, Roland R.

    2002-01-01

    Considerable evidence now demonstrates that extensive functional and anatomical reorganization following spinal cord injury occurs in centers of the brain that have some input into spinal motor pools. This is very encouraging, given the accumulating evidence that new connections formed across spinal lesions may not be initially functionally useful. The second area of advancement in the field of paralysis recovery is in the development of effective interventions to counter axonal growth inhibition. A third area of significant progress is the development of robotic devices to quantify the performance level of motor tasks following spinal cord injury and to 'teach' the spinal cord to step and stand. Advances are being made with robotic devices for mice, rats and humans.

  17. [HYPP--hyperkalemic periodic paralysis in horses].

    PubMed

    Zeilmann, M

    1993-12-01

    A literature review of the clinical syndrome HYPP (Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis) affecting Quarter Horses is given. HYPP is characterized by sporadic attacks of muscle tremors, weakness and/or collapse, lasting for variable periods of time. Diagnosis is based on physical findings in association with hyperkalemia. In horses with HYPP, the regulation of ion transport through the sodium channels in the muscle cells occasionally fails, causing uncontrollable muscle twitching. Further investigations into molecular genetics reveals a mutation in the gene responsible for sodium and potassium regulation. The identification of this gene mutation is the basis for the blood test used to diagnose HYPP. HYPP is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Treatment of HYPP attacks by intravenous application of calcium gluconate, bicarbonate and glucose results in rapid recovery. Consequent dietary management and daily administration of acetazolamide effectively controls the disease. PMID:8122239

  18. Paralysie du nerf abducens droit révélant une pansinusite

    PubMed Central

    Bouzidi, Adil; Iferkhass, Said; Hansali, Zine El Abidine; Elmallaoui, Mohammed; Laktaoui, Abdelkader

    2015-01-01

    L'association entre la sinusite, en particulier, sphénoïdale et la paralysie oculomotrice a été déjà décrite dans la littérature, mais reste très rare. Nous rapportons un cas d'une patiente âgée de 14 ans sans antécédents pathologiques particuliers consultant pour une une paralysie du VI gauche survenant dans un contexte fébrile. L'examen ophtalmologiquet complété par un bilan radiologique, à révélé une pansunisite du même coté. Les auteures suggèrent que devant toute paralysie oculomotrice, et après avoir éliminé une étiologie tumorale, il faut rechercher à un foyer infectieux locorégional et le bien traite. PMID:26327958

  19. Loss of signal in recurrent nerve neuromonitoring: causes and management

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Che-Wei; Wang, Mei-Hui; Chen, Cheng-Chien; Chen, Hui-Chun; Chen, Hsiu-Ya; Yu, Jing-Yi; Chang, Pi-Ying; Lu, I-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Chu

    2015-01-01

    During recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery, laryngeal electromyography (EMG) amplitude may be correlated with the number of muscle fibers participating in the polarization and these might be correlated with the function of RLN. If RLN is severely injured during the operation, most nerve fibers do not transmit nerve impulse and substantial decrease of EMG amplitude or loss of signal (LOS) will occur. True LOS at the end of an operation often indicates a postoperative fixed vocal cord, and the surgeon should consider the optimal contralateral surgery timing in patients with planned bilateral thyroid operation to avoid the disaster of bilateral vocal cord palsy. However, LOS recovery and false LOS may occur and may lead to an unnecessary 2nd operation. Therefore, a reliable modality for intraoperative LOS evaluation and management would afford the surgeon real-time information that could help guide surgical procedure and planning. The updated causes, algorithm, and management of LOS during RLN neuromonitoring are reviewed and summarized. PMID:25713776

  20. An fMRI investigation of racial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Norton, Michael I; Mason, Malia F; Vandello, Joseph A; Biga, Andrew; Dyer, Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    We explore the existence and underlying neural mechanism of a new norm endorsed by both black and white Americans for managing interracial interactions: "racial paralysis', the tendency to opt out of decisions involving members of different races. We show that people are more willing to make choices--such as who is more intelligent, or who is more polite-between two white individuals (same-race decisions) than between a white and a black individual (cross-race decisions), a tendency which was evident more when judgments involved traits related to black stereotypes. We use functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the mechanisms underlying racial paralysis, to examine the mechanisms underlying racial paralysis, revealing greater recruitment of brain regions implicated in socially appropriate behavior (ventromedial prefrontal cortex), conflict detection (anterior cingulate cortex), deliberative processing (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), and inhibition (ventrolateral prefrontal cortex). We also discuss the impact of racial paralysis on the quality of interracial relations. PMID:22267521

  1. An fMRI investigation of racial paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Malia F.; Vandello, Joseph A.; Biga, Andrew; Dyer, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    We explore the existence and underlying neural mechanism of a new norm endorsed by both black and white Americans for managing interracial interactions: “racial paralysis’, the tendency to opt out of decisions involving members of different races. We show that people are more willing to make choices—such as who is more intelligent, or who is more polite—between two white individuals (same-race decisions) than between a white and a black individual (cross-race decisions), a tendency which was evident more when judgments involved traits related to black stereotypes. We use functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the mechanisms underlying racial paralysis, to examine the mechanisms underlying racial paralysis, revealing greater recruitment of brain regions implicated in socially appropriate behavior (ventromedial prefrontal cortex), conflict detection (anterior cingulate cortex), deliberative processing (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), and inhibition (ventrolateral prefrontal cortex). We also discuss the impact of racial paralysis on the quality of interracial relations. PMID:22267521

  2. Progress in Paralysis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Spinal Cord Stimulation Progress in Paralysis Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... 1.275 million of those cases resulted from spinal cord injury. This is five times the previous estimate. ...

  3. Electroacupuncture at Zusanli Prevents Severe Scalds-Induced Gut Ischemia and Paralysis by Activating the Cholinergic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Lei; Shi, Xian; Qi, Song; Hu, Sen; Tong, Zhangqi; Ma, Zhuhong; Qian, Yan; Litscher, Daniela; Litscher, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Severe burn injuries may result in gastrointestinal paralysis, and barrier dysfunction due to gut ischemia and lowered vagus excitability. In this study we investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA) at Zusanli (ST36) could prevent severe scalds-induced gut ischemia, paralysis, and barrier dysfunction and whether the protective role of EA at ST36 is related to the vagus nerve. 35% burn area rats were divided into six groups: (a) EAN: EA nonchannel acupoints followed by scald injury; (b) EA: EA at ST36 after scald injury; (c) VGX/EA: vagotomy (VGX) before EA at ST36 and scald injury; (d) VGX/EAN: VGX before EAN and scald injury; (e) atropine/EA: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at ST36; (f) atropine/EAN: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at nonchannel acupoints. EA at the Zusanli point significantly promoted the intestinal impelling ratio and increased the amount of mucosal blood flow after scald injury. The plasma diamine oxidase (DAO) and intestinal permeability decreased significantly after scald injury in the EA group compared with others. However, EA after atropine injection or cervical vagotomy failed to improve intestinal motility and mucosa blood flow suggesting that the mechanism of EA may be related to the activation of the cholinergic nerve pathway. PMID:26448777

  4. What Are the Key Statistics about Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... key statistics about laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers? The American Cancer Society’s most recent estimates for laryngeal cancer in the ... most likely because fewer people are smoking. The American Cancer Society estimates that about 15,520 new cases of ...

  5. Laryngeal Structure and Function in the Pediatric Larynx: Clinical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapienza, Christine M.; Ruddy, Bari Hoffman; Baker, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the normal anatomy and physiology of the pediatric larynx, followed by some examples of pediatric voice disorders that were chosen to exemplify the alterations to the laryngeal anatomy and the subsequent modifications to laryngeal function. Vocal fold nodules are primarily reviewed due to their high incidence…

  6. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  7. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  8. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  9. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  10. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design). 874.3730 Section 874.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3730 Laryngeal...

  11. Connections between the facial, vestibular and cochlear nerve bundles within the internal auditory canal

    PubMed Central

    Özdo?mu?, Ömer; Sezen, Ozan; Kubilay, Utku; Saka, Erdinç; Duman, U?ur; ?an, Tangül; Çavdar, Safiye

    2004-01-01

    The vestibular, cochlear and facial nerves have a common course in the internal auditory canal (IAC). In this study we investigated the average number of nerve fibres, the average cross-sectional areas of the nerves and nerve fibres, and the apparent connections between the facial, cochlear and vestibular nerve bundles within the IAC, using light and scanning electron microscopy. The anatomical localization of the nerves within the IAC was not straightforward. The general course showed that the nerves rotated anticlockwise in the right ear from the inner ear end towards the brainstem end and vice versa for the left ear. The average number of fibres forming vestibular, cochlear, and facial nerves was not constant during their courses within the IAC. The superior and the inferior vestibular nerves showed an increase in the number of nerve fibres from the inner ear end towards the brainstem end of the IAC, whereas the facial and the cochlear nerves showed a reduction in the number of fibres. This suggests that some of the superior and inferior vestibular nerve bundles may receive fibres from the facial and/or cochlear nerves. Scanning electron microscopic evaluations showed superior vestibular–facial and inferior vestibular–cochlear connections within the IAC, but no facial–cochlear connections were observed. Connections between the nerves of the IAC can explain the unexpected vestibular disturbances in facial paralysis or persistence of tinnitus after cochlear neurectomy in intractable tinnitus cases. The present study offers morphometric and scanning electron microscopic data on the fibre connections of the nerves of the IAC. PMID:15255963

  12. Axillary nerve injuries in contact sports: recommendations for treatment and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, G S; Apruzzese, W

    1998-11-01

    Axillary nerve injuries are some of the most common peripheral nerve injuries in athletes who participate in contact sports. Resulting deltoid muscle paralysis is secondary to nerve trauma which occurs following shoulder dislocation or a direct blow to the deltoid muscle. Compression neuropathy has been reported to occur in quadrilateral space syndrome as the axillary nerve exits this anatomic compartment. The axillary nerve is also extremely vulnerable during any operative procedure involving the inferior aspect of the shoulder, and iatrogenic injury to the axillary nerve remains a serious complication of shoulder surgery. Accurate diagnosis of axillary nerve injury is based on a careful history and physical examination as well as an understanding of the anatomy of the shoulder and the axillary nerve in particular. Inspection, palpation and neurological testing provide the bases for diagnosis. A clinically suspected axillary nerve injury should be confirmed by electrophysiological testing, including electromyography and nerve conduction studies. During the acute phase of injury, the athlete should be rested and any ligamentous or bony injury should be treated as indicated. Patients should undergo an extensive rehabilitation programme emphasising active and passive range of motion as well as strengthening of the rotator cuff, deltoid and periscapular musculature. Shoulder joint contracture should be avoided at all costs as a loss of shoulder mobility may ultimately affect functional outcome despite a return of axillary nerve function. If no axillary nerve recovery is observed by 3 to 4 months following injury, surgical exploration is indicated. Athletes who sustain injury to the axillary nerve have a variable prognosis for nerve recovery, although the return of function of the involved shoulder is typically good to excellent. We recommend that athletes who sustain axillary nerve injury may return to contact sport participation when they achieve full active range of motion of the shoulder and when shoulder strength is documented to be good to excellent by isometric or manual muscle testing. PMID:9858397

  13. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis as first sign of thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Trifanescu, RA; Danciulescu Miulescu, R; Carsote, M; Poiana, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: periodic paralysis related to hypokalemia is seldom reported in thyrotoxicosis, and it usually occurs in Asian males. Patients and methods: Two Romanian (Caucasian) young patients presented with hypokalemic paralysis. TSH, FT4, TT3 was measured by immunochemiluminescence. Case report 1. Patient O.R, aged 19, presented marked asthenia and lower limbs paralysis, following high carbohydrate meal. He declared 10 kg weight loss on hypocaloric diet and mild sweating. Biochemical data revealed moderate hypokalemia (K+=2.6 mmol/L) and thyrotoxicosis (TSH<0.03 mIU/L, FT4=30 pmol/L, TT3=315 ng/dL). Case report 2. Patient T.A., aged 18, presented 2 episodes of weakness and flaccid paralysis, with hypokalemia, precipitated by effort, without any sign of thyrotoxicosis. Biochemical data revealed severe hypokalemia (K+=1.8 mmol/L) and thyrotoxicosis (TSH<0.03 mIU/L, FT4=24 pmol/L, TT3=190 ng/dL). Treatment with intravenous potassium, thereafter methimazole and propranolol were administered in both cases, with the maintenance of normal kalemia and thyrotoxicosis’ control. Conclusion: these 2 cases of hypokalemic periodic paralysis occurring in young Caucasian teenagers with mild thyrotoxicosis underlined the importance of thyroid screening in patients with symptomatic hypokalemia, even in the absence of symptoms and signs of thyrotoxicosis. Abbreviations: THPP=Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis, BMI=body mass index, TRAb=TSH receptor antibody, ECG=electrocardiogram. PMID:23599824

  14. A Generalized Net, Description for Laryngeal Pathology Detection Excluding the Refusal from Classification Option*

    E-print Network

    Borissova, Daniela

    2 7 A Generalized Net, Description for Laryngeal Pathology Detection Excluding the Refusal from of the Petri net) model of the proc- ess of laryngeal pathology detection is described. The model is the second. Keywords: Generalized net, Laryngeal pathology detection, Model. 1. Introduction Most of the laryngeal

  15. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  16. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  17. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  18. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  19. 9 CFR 310.15 - Disposition of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... laryngeal muscle tissue. 310.15 Section 310.15 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue. (a) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue shall not be used for human food. (b) Livestock thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue may...

  20. Studies on hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. Evidence of changes in plasma Na and Cl and induction of paralysis by adrenal glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Streeten, David H. P.; Dalakos, Theodore G.; Fellerman, Herbert

    1971-01-01

    In a 19 yr old male with familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, paralysis was consistently induced by the administration of potassium chloride, corticotropin-gel, and a variety of glucocorticoids (dexamethasone, 6-methylprednisolone, triamcinolone) but not by mineralocorticoids (D-aldosterone, deoxycorticosterone) or by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-gel plus metyrapone. Induced attacks were virtually identical with spontaneous attacks, being associated, after a latent period of a few hours, with a rise in plasma K+ and HCO3- and a simultaneous fall in plasma Na+ and Cl- concentrations to an extent implying exchange of 1 K+ with 2 Na+ and 2 Cl- between extracellular and intracellular fluid. ACTH-induced paralysis was preceded by rising serum inorganic P, and associated with increased plasma glucose, blood lactate, and serum creatine phosphokinase concentrations. In normal subjects ACTH, cortisol, and triamcinolone administration failed to change plasma electrolytes or strength, while ingestion of KCl produced no weakness and smaller changes in plasma K and Na than in the patient. Since the patient and normal subjects showed the same changes in renal excretion of K after the administration of cortisol and KCl, it seems likely that paralysis in the patient resulted from abnormally slow uptake (and/or excessive loss) of K by the muscle cells, possibly caused by an abnormal “ion-exchange pump.” Normal adrenocortical function and absence of a peak in plasma 11-hydroxycorticoid (11-OHCS) concentration preceding spontaneous paralysis, indicated that spontaneous paralysis did not result from changes in cortisol secretion. Similar hyperkalemic paralysis was precipitated by ACTH-gel in a brother and first cousin of the propositus. Administration of acetazolamide and fludrocortisone reduced the rise in plasma K concentration and prevented the weakness which otherwise invariably followed KCl administration to the patient. He and two close relatives have been completely protected from severe attacks of paralysis in the past 14 months by treatment with these two medications. PMID:4322666

  1. Arytenoid Cartilage Dislocation from External Blunt Laryngeal Trauma: Evaluation and Therapy without Laryngeal Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yaoshu; Wang, Hui-e; Lin, Zhihong

    2014-01-01

    Background Intubation trauma is the most common cause of arytenoid dislocation. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnosis and treatment of arytenoid cartilage dislocation from external blunt laryngeal trauma in the absence of laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) and to explore the role of early attempted closed reduction in arytenoids cartilage reposition. Material/Methods This 15-year retrospective study recruited 12 patients with suspected arytenoid dislocation from external blunt laryngeal trauma, who were evaluated through 7 approaches: detailed personal history, voice handicap index (VHI) test, indirect laryngoscope, flexible fiberoptic laryngoscope, video strobolaryngoscope, and/or high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and, most importantly, the outcomes after attempted closed reduction under local anesthesia. They were divided into satisfied group (n=9) and dissatisfied group (n=3) based on their satisfied with voice qualities at 1 week after the last closed reduction manipulation. Results Each patient was diagnosed with arytenoid dislocation caused by external blunt laryngeal trauma. In the satisfied group, VHI scores and maximum phonation time (MPT) at 1 week after the last reduction were significantly improved compared with those before the procedure (P<0.05). Normal or improved mobility and length of the affected vocal fold were also noted immediately after the end of the last closed reduction. The median time interval between injury and clinical intervention in satisfied group was 43.44±34.13 days, much shorter than the median time of 157.67±76.07 days in the dissatisfied group (P<0.05). Conclusions Multimodality assessment protocols are essential for suspected arytenoid dislocation after external blunt laryngeal trauma. Early attempted closed reduction should be widely recommended, especially in health facilities without LEMG, mainly, because it could be helpful for early diagnosis and treatment of this disease. In addition, early closed reduction could also improve the success of arytenoid reduction. PMID:25150338

  2. Unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis after carbon ion therapy using conventional dose fractionation for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Demizu, Yusuke; Fujii, Osamu; Nagano, Fumiko; Terashima, Kazuki; Jin, Dongcun; Mima, Masayuki; Oda, Naoharu; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makiko; Ito, Kazuyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Okimoto, Tomoaki

    2015-11-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a type of radiotherapy that can deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing the dose delivered to organs at risk. Moreover, carbon ions are classified as high linear energy transfer radiation and are expected to be effective for even photon-resistant tumors. A 73-year-old man with glottic squamous cell carcinoma, T3N0M0, refused laryngectomy and received carbon ion therapy of 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) in 35 fractions. Three months after the therapy, the patient had an upper airway inflammation, and then laryngeal edema and pain occurred. Five months after the therapy, the airway stenosis was severe and computed tomography showed lack of the left arytenoid cartilage and exacerbation of laryngeal necrosis. Despite the treatment, 5 and a half months after the therapy, the laryngeal edema and necrosis had become even worse and the surrounding mucosa was edematous and pale. Six months after the therapy, pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy and reconstruction with free jejunal autograft were performed. The surgical specimen pathologically showed massive necrosis and no residual tumor. Three years after the carbon ion therapy, he is alive without recurrence. The first reported laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma case treated with carbon ion therapy resulted in an unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis. Tissue damage caused by carbon ion therapy may be difficult to repair even for radioresistant cartilage; therefore, hollow organs reinforced by cartilage, such as the larynx, may be vulnerable to carbon ion therapy. Caution should be exercised when treating tumors in or adjacent to such organs with carbon ion therapy. PMID:26355161

  3. Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Soule, Benjamin R; Simone, Nicole L

    2008-01-01

    Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis is one form of Periodic Paralysis, a rare group of disorders that can cause of sudden onset weakness. A case of a 29 year old male is presented here. The patient presented with sudden onset paralysis of his extremities. Laboratory evaluation revealed a markedly low potassium level. The patient's paralysis resolved upon repletion of his low potassium and he was discharged with no neurologic deficits. An association with thyroid disease is well established and further workup revealed Grave's disease in this patient. Although rare, Periodic Paralysis must differentiated from other causes of weakness and paralysis so that the proper treatment can be initiated quickly. PMID:18939979

  4. The Acute bee paralysis virus-Kashmir bee virus-Israeli acute paralysis virus complex.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Joachim R; Cordoni, Guido; Budge, Giles

    2010-01-01

    Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), Kashmir bee virus (KBV) and Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) are part of a complex of closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae. These viruses have a widespread prevalence in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies and a predominantly sub-clinical etiology that contrasts sharply with the extremely virulent pathology encountered at elevated titres, either artificially induced or encountered naturally. These viruses are frequently implicated in honey bee colony losses, especially when the colonies are infested with the parasitic mite Varroa destructor. Here we review the historical and recent literature of this virus complex, covering history and origins; the geographic, host and tissue distribution; pathology and transmission; genetics and variation; diagnostics, and discuss these within the context of the molecular and biological similarities and differences between the viruses. We also briefly discuss three recent developments relating specifically to IAPV, concerning its association with Colony Collapse Disorder, treatment of IAPV infection with siRNA and possible honey bee resistance to IAPV. PMID:19909972

  5. Laryngeal complications by orotracheal intubation: Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Luiz Alberto Alves; de Cavalho, Glauber Barbosa; Brito, Valeska Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Sumamry Introduction:?The injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation are common in our way and widely told by literature. Generally the pipe rank of or consequence of its permanence in the aerial ways of the patient is caused by accidents in. It has diverse types of larynx injuries, caused for multiple mechanisms. Objective:?To verify, in literature, the main causes of laryngeal complications after- orotracheal intubation and its mechanisms of injury. Revision of Literature:?The searched databases had been LILACS, BIREME and SCIELO. Were updated, books and theses had been used, delimiting itself the period enters 1953 the 2009. The keywords used for the search of articles had been: complications, injuries, larynx, intubation, endotracheal, orotracheal, granulomas, stenosis. 59 references had been selected. The used criteria of inclusion for the choice of articles had been the ones that had shown to the diverse types of injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation and its pathophysiology. Final Considerations:?This revision of literature was motivated by the comment in the practical clinic of a great number of laryngeal sequels in patients submitted to the orotracheal intubation. Of that is ahead important the knowledge, for the professionals of the area of health, the types of complications and its causes, with intention to prevent them, adopting measured of prevention of these injuries. PMID:25991942

  6. Diet, cigarettes and alcohol in laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenheim, J.L.; Graham, S.; Byers, T.E.; Marshall, J.R.; Haughey, B.P.; Swanson, M.K.; Wilkinson, G. )

    1991-03-11

    Diet and other risk factors for cancer of the larynx were examined in a case-control study among white males in Western New York, conducted in 1975-1985. Incident, pathologically-confirmed cases and age- and neighborhood-matched controls were interviewed to determine usual diet, and lifetime use of tobacco and alcohol. Because response rates were low for both cases and controls, this cannot be considered a population-based study. A strong association of risk with cigarette but not pipe and cigar smoking was found. Beer and hard liquor but not wine were associated with increased risk. After control for cigarettes, alcohol and education, the upper quartile odds ratio for fat was 2.40, while the odds ratio for high intake of carotenoids was 0.51. There was effect modification by smoking. Carotenoids were most negatively associated with risk among lighter smokers; dietary fat was most positively associated with risk among heavier smokers. Total calories, protein, and retinol were associated with increased risk; there was no relationship between laryngeal cancer and vitamins C and E or carbohydrate. This study again demonstrates the strong association between tobacco and alcohol and laryngeal cancer and also suggests that diets low in carotenoids and high fat may increase risk.

  7. Histopathological study of radionecrosis in laryngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, M.; Harwood, A.R.; Bryce, D.P.; van Nostrand, A.W.

    1982-02-01

    With modern radiotherapy techniques, clinical radionecrosis is uncommon following eradication of primary squamous cell carcinoma from the larynx. Histologic sections from 265 specimens, prepared by the technique of whole organ subserial step-sectioning were studied to determine the incidence and location of chondronecrosis and/or osteomyelitis in both irradiated and non-irradiated cases. Chondronecrosis occurred in only 1 of 41 early (pT1 - pT2) tumors but in 143 advanced tumors (pT - pT4) treated with radical radiotherapy and containing residual carcinoma, 27% had evidence of significant necrosis, compared with 24% of those not irradiated. Age, sex, tumor grade and previous laryngeal surgery did not appear to be significant factors in the development of necrosis in irradiated patients. The arytenoid cartilage was most frequently involved when chondronecrosis occurred in association with radiotherapy. Six total laryngectomy specimens (3%) were received from patients with symptoms of chondronecrosis and in whom no residual tumor was present. We conclude that although the incidence of clinical perichondritis is low, histologic chondronecrosis and/or osteomyelitis occurred in 26% of all the larynges studied. Radiotherapy appears to be a significant causative factor only in advanced supraglottic tumors.

  8. Microinvasive laser surgery for laryngeal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jinping; Tao, Zhengde; Xiao, Jianyun; Luo, Junli; Chen, Xianghui; Zhao, Suping; Betz, Christian

    2001-08-01

    Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of microinvasive Nd:YAG laser surgery in case of early stage laryngeal carcinoma as well as it's effect on the cellular immune function of the tumor-bearing hosts. Material and Method: Thirty-seven patients with glottic Tis or T1 SCC were treated by fiberoptic laryngoscopic Nd:YAG laser surgery. Both before and after therapy, serum levels of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (SIL-2R) and interleukin- 2(IL-2) as well as the NK activity were determined via double-antibody sandwich technique, tritiated thymidine- deoxyribonucleoside incorporation and iodine 125-uridine- deoxyribunocleoside release technique, respectively. Result: All 37 patients tolerated the procedure well. A 3-8 year follow up in a subgroup of 31 patients resulted in a estimated cure rate of 87.1% (27/31). The posttherapy serum levels of SIL-2R were significantly declined (p<0.001), while those of IL-2 and NK activity were significantly elevated (p<0.001) as compared with those detected pretherapeutically. Conclusion: Therapy with fiberoptic laryngoscopic Nd:YAG laser surgery is simple, safe, effective and microinvasive for the patients with early stage laryngeal carcinoma and has an immuno-enhancing effect on its host.

  9. Risk Acceptance and Expectations of Laryngeal Allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyun Kyo; Park, Jang Wan; Hwang, Jae Ha; Lee, Sam Yong; Shin, Jun Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Laryngeal allotransplantation (LA) is a technique involving transplantation of a deceased donor's larynx into a recipient, and it may be substituted for conventional laryngeal reconstruction. There are widely different views on LA, as the recipient is administered continuous, potentially life-threatening, immunosuppressive therapy for a functional or aesthetic result, which is not directly related to life extension. The purpose of this study was to analyze the difference in risk acceptance and expectations of LA between four population groups. Methods A survey was performed to examine patients' risk acceptance and expectations of LA. The survey included 287 subjects in total (general public, n=100; kidney transplant recipients, n=53; post-laryngectomy patients, n=34; doctors, n=100), using a Korean translated version of the louisville instrument for transplantation (LIFT) questionnaire. Results All four groups responded differently at various levels of their perception in risk acceptance and expectations. The kidney transplant recipients reported the highest risk acceptance and expectations, and the doctor group the lowest. Conclusions This study examined the disparate perception between specific population groups of the risks and benefits of using LA for the promotion of the quality of life. By addressing the information gaps about LA in the different populations that have been highlighted from this survey, we suggest that LA can become a more viable alternative to classical surgery with resultant improved quality of life for patients. PMID:25276642

  10. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Richard B; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Riley, D Colton; Sexton, Kevin W; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Dortch, Richard D; Nanney, Lillian B; Does, Mark D; Thayer, Wesley P

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26323827

  11. ERp57 modulates STAT3 activity in radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells and serves as a prognostic marker for laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Min Ho; Min, Joong Won; Jeon, Hong Bae; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Oh, Jeong Su; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Hwang, Sang-Gu; An, Sungkwan; Han, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Although targeting radioresistant tumor cells is essential for enhancing the efficacy of radiotherapy, the signals activated in resistant tumors are still unclear. This study shows that ERp57 contributes to radioresistance of laryngeal cancer by activating STAT3. Increased ERp57 was associated with the radioresistant phenotype of laryngeal cancer cells. Interestingly, increased interaction between ERp57 and STAT3 was observed in radioresistant cells, compared to the control cells. This physical complex is required for the activation of STAT3 in the radioresistant cells. Among STAT3-regulatory genes, Mcl-1 was predominantly regulated by ERp57. Inhibition of STAT3 activity with a chemical inhibitor or siRNA-mediated depletion of Mcl-1 sensitized radioresistant cells to irradiation, suggesting that the ERp57-STAT3-Mcl-1 axis regulates radioresistance of laryngeal cancer cells. Furthermore, we observed a positive correlation between ERp57 and phosphorylated STAT3 or Mcl-1 and in vivo interactions between ERp57 and STAT3 in human laryngeal cancer. Importantly, we also found that increased ERp57-STAT3 complex was associated with poor prognosis in human laryngeal cancer, indicating the prognostic role of ERp57-STAT3 regulation. Overall, our data suggest that ERp57-STAT3 regulation functions in radioresistance of laryngeal cancer, and targeting the ERp57-STAT3 pathway might be important for enhancing the efficacy of radiotherapy in human laryngeal cancer. PMID:25605256

  12. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ... You Know... Some cranial nerve disorders interfere with eye movement, causing double vision. Symptoms Symptoms depend on which ...

  13. Optic Nerve Imaging

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend by ... may use one of these optic nerve computer imaging techniques as part of your glaucoma examination. By ...

  14. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  15. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the hand muscles (in severe cases) Weakness of hand flexing Tests may be needed, depending on your history, symptoms, ... MRI of the neck Nerve ultrasound Nerve conduction tests Recording of the electrical activity in muscles ( EMG ) X-rays

  16. Effects of Odontobuthus Doriae Scorpion Venom on Mouse Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Vatanpour, Hossein; Jalali, Amir; G. Rowan, Edward; Rahim, Fakher

    2013-01-01

    Temporary paralysis is a rare manifestation of envenoming following the yellow Iranian scorpion, Odontobuthus doriae (O. doriae). Thus, to elucidate the underlying mechanism, we investigated the neurotoxic effect of venom in the sciatic nerve, the possible mechanism in a mice model. The neurotoxicity and temperature effects in the venom-induced neurotoxicity were examined using the mouse sciatic nerve and mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm (MHD) preparations. O .doriae venom (1 ?g/mL) caused changes in the perineural waveform associated with nerve terminal action potentials. Venom affected on both negative and positive components of the waveform which is known as a compound action potential. The timeresponse relationship of venom-induced depression of resting membrane potential (RMP) was significant (p < 0.05). No significant difference in augmentation was seen in room temperature in comparison with 37°C. In conclusion, although there was no evidence that the venom had any specific curarizing action at the neuromuscular junction, the results suggest that the venom exerts its neuromuscular transmission on the sciatic nerve through potassium and sodium ionic-currents. Furthermore, the influence of temperature on neurotoxicity was ineffective on blockade of the neuromuscular transmission in-vitro. PMID:24250682

  17. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Turgay, Cokyaman; Emine, Tekin; Ozlem, Koken; Muhammet, S. Paksu; Haydar, A. Tasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian–Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause common cold, upper and lower respiratory tract disease, but in the literature presentation with the lower respiratory tract infection and AFP has not been reported previously. In this study, pediatric case admitted with lower respiratory tract infection and AFP, who detected for HCoV 229E and OC43 co-infection by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, has been reported for the first time. PMID:26557177

  18. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Turgay, Cokyaman; Emine, Tekin; Ozlem, Koken; Muhammet, S Paksu; Haydar, A Tasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian-Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause common cold, upper and lower respiratory tract disease, but in the literature presentation with the lower respiratory tract infection and AFP has not been reported previously. In this study, pediatric case admitted with lower respiratory tract infection and AFP, who detected for HCoV 229E and OC43 co-infection by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, has been reported for the first time. PMID:26557177

  19. Hypokalemic Paralysis Complicated by Concurrent Hyperthyroidism and Chronic Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Lin, Shih-Hua; Leu, Jyh-Gang; Fang, Yu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is characterized by the presence of muscle paralysis, hypokalemia, and hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a young man with paralysis of the lower extremities, severe hypokalemia, and concurrent hyperthyroidism. TPP was suspected; therefore, treatment consisting of judicious potassium (K+) repletion and ?-blocker administration was initiated. However, urinary K+ excretion rate, as well as refractoriness to treatment, was inconsistent with TPP. Chronic alcoholism was considered as an alternative cause of hypokalemia, and serum K+ was restored through vigorous K+ repletion and the addition of K+-sparing diuretics. The presence of thyrotoxicosis and hypokalemia does not always indicate a diagnosis of TPP. Exclusion of TPP can be accomplished by immediate evaluation of urinary K+ excretion, acid-base status, and the amount of potassium chloride required to correct hypokalemia at presentation. PMID:26426670

  20. The Physics of Nerves

    E-print Network

    Heimburg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The accepted model for nerve pulse propagation in biological membranes seems insufficient. It is restricted to dissipative electrical phenomena and considers nerve pulses exclusively as a microscopic phenomenon. A simple thermodynamic model that is based on the macroscopic properties of membranes allows explaining more features of nerve pulse propagation including the phenomenon of anesthesia that has so far remained unexplained.

  1. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... A laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design) is a device intended to direct pulmonary air flow to the pharynx in the absence of the larynx, thereby permitting esophageal speech. The device is interposed between openings in the trachea and the esophagus...

  2. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... A laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design) is a device intended to direct pulmonary air flow to the pharynx in the absence of the larynx, thereby permitting esophageal speech. The device is interposed between openings in the trachea and the esophagus...

  3. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... A laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design) is a device intended to direct pulmonary air flow to the pharynx in the absence of the larynx, thereby permitting esophageal speech. The device is interposed between openings in the trachea and the esophagus...

  4. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... A laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design) is a device intended to direct pulmonary air flow to the pharynx in the absence of the larynx, thereby permitting esophageal speech. The device is interposed between openings in the trachea and the esophagus...

  5. 21 CFR 874.3730 - Laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... A laryngeal prosthesis (Taub design) is a device intended to direct pulmonary air flow to the pharynx in the absence of the larynx, thereby permitting esophageal speech. The device is interposed between openings in the trachea and the esophagus...

  6. The Laryngeal Motor Cortex: Its Organization and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Simonyan, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to learn and control the motor aspects of complex laryngeal behaviors, such as speech and song, is modulated by the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC), which is situated in the area 4 of the primary motor cortex and establishes both direct and indirect connections with laryngeal motoneurons. In contrast, the LMC in monkeys is located in the area 6 of the premotor cortex, projects only indirectly to laryngeal motoneurons and its destruction has essentially no effect on production of species-specific calls. These differences in cytoarchitectonic location and connectivity may be a result of hominid evolution that led to the LMC shift from the phylogenetically “old” to “new” motor cortex in order to fulfill its paramount function, i.e., voluntary motor control of human speech and song production. PMID:24929930

  7. LARYNGEAL ADJUSTMENTS IN STUTTERING: MODIFIED REACTION PARhDIGM*

    E-print Network

    LARYNGEAL ADJUSTMENTS IN STUTTERING: MODIFIED REACTION PARhDIGM* Hirohide Yoshioka+ and Anders UHqvist++ A GLOTTOGRAPHIC OBSERVATION USING A Abstract. An experimental paradigm for studying stuttering and dysfluent utterances. These findings suggest that stuttering is linked to a temporal disruption

  8. Mumps, Cervical Zoster, and Facial Paralysis: Coincidence or Association?

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, Kaori

    2014-01-01

    The association of mumps with peripheral facial paralysis has been suggested, but its pathogenesis remains unclear. An 8-year-old girl simultaneously developed left peripheral facial paralysis, ipsilateral cervical herpes zoster, and bilateral mumps sialadenitis. Elevated anti-mumps and anti-varicella zoster virus IgM antibodies in serological testing indicated recent infection of mumps and reactivation of VZV. Molecular studies have provided mounting evidence that the mumps virus dysregulates the host's immune system and enables the virus to proliferate in the infected host cells. This dysregulation of the immune system by mumps virus may have occurred in our patient, enabling the latent VZV infection to reactivate. PMID:24653846

  9. Fatal Dysrhythmia Following Potassium Replacement for Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Imdad; Chilimuri, Sridhar S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of fatal rebound hyperkalemia in a patient with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) treated with potassium supplementation. Although TPP is a rare hyperthyroidism-related endocrine disorder seen predominantly in men of Asian origin, the diagnosis should be considered in patients of non-Asian origins presenting with hypokalemia, muscle weakness or acute paralysis. The condition may present as a life threatening emergency and unfamiliarity with the disease could result in a fatal outcome. Immediate therapy with potassium chloride supplementation may foster a rapid recovery of muscle strength and prevent cardiac arrhythmias secondary to hypokalemia, but with a risk of rebound hyperkalemia. PMID:20411077

  10. [Laryngeal movements during wind instruments play].

    PubMed

    Mukai, S

    1989-02-01

    Historically, the concern of wind instrumentalists has been diaphragm control and embouchure. Laryngeal movement during "blow" has been overlooked or neglected by wind musicians. It has been said that musical tone has to be produced by the resonances of the player's air column by opening his larynx during blow. In the present study, fiberscopic observations of the larynx during blow revealed that musical tones were played with adducted vocal cords. Narrowed glottis appeared to control the airflow of the blow. Persons who could not make musical tone blew with open glottis. Vibrato was also made by rhythmic open and narrowing movements of the glottis. The authors concluded that the larynx regulates the airflow of the "blow". The authors postulated that the embouchure might be important as the receptor of the airflow rather than controlling the movement for "blow". PMID:2746428

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for laryngeal radionecrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, B.J.; Hudson, W.R.; Farmer, J.C. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Radionecrosis of the larynx is a debilitating disease associated with pain, dysphagia, respiratory obstruction, and, in some cases, the need for laryngectomy. Persistent poor wound healing can lead to death. A series of eight patients with advanced (grades III and IV, Chandler classification) radionecrosis of the larynx treated with adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy is presented. Signs and symptoms of radionecrosis were dramatically ameliorated in seven of eight patients, while one patient, despite subjective improvement, eventually required laryngectomy. There were no deaths. These results are compared to previous series on radionecrosis of the larynx in which hyperbaric oxygen was not used. This series indicates that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a useful and effective adjunctive treatment modality in the management of laryngeal radionecrosis.

  12. HUMAN LARYNGITIS CAUSED BY CLINOSTOMUM COMPLANATUM

    PubMed Central

    HARA, HIROTAKA; MIYAUCHI, YUJI; TAHARA, SHINSAKU; YAMASHITA, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 64-year-old Japanese man visited our outpatient department complaining of an irritable sensation in the throat, occurring two days after eating raw freshwater fish (carp sashimi) at a Japanese-style inn. During laryngeal endoscopy, a slow-moving worm (fluke) was found attached to the surface of the right aryepiglottic fold. After inhalation of 4% lidocaine, the fluke was removed using endoscopic forceps. Patient’s throat symptoms immediately improved. The worm was microscopically identified as Clinostomum complanatum. C. complanatum is a digenetic trematode that usually infects fish-eating water birds. Clinostomum infections in humans are rare, and only 21 cases have been described in Japan and Korea. C. complanatum infection is known to occur after eating raw freshwater fish, which is a secondary intermediate host. In humans, the metacercariae are released into the stomach and migrate through the esophagus before lodging in the throat. Primary therapy involves endoscopic removal of the worm. PMID:25130004

  13. Bilateral Deep Peroneal Nerve Paralysis Following Kerosene Self-Injection into External Hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Khalil; Farzaneh, Esmaeil; Abolhassani, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Along with conventional therapies, some abrogated traditional treatment had been used for hemorrhoids like local Kerosene injection especially for extremely irritated external hemorrhoids. We report a rare case of Kerosene self-injection into the hemorrhoid. Despite antibiotics therapy, extent debridement, and colostomy, the patient died after 24 hours because of heart attack. Moreover, we discuss here the case with contact or injection of hydrocarbon materials and early care action to decrease the extensions of injury and side effects. PMID:20936130

  14. Office-Based Intracordal Hyaluronate Injections Improve Quality of Life in Thoracic-Surgery-Related Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Tuan-Jen; Hsin, Li-Jen; Chung, Hsiu-Feng; Chiang, Hui-Chen; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Wong, Alice M.K.; Pei, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thoracic-surgery-related unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) may cause severe morbidity and can cause profound functional impairment and psychosocial stress in patients with pre-existing thoracic diseases. In-office intracordal hyaluronate (HA) injections have recently been applied to improve voice and quality of life in patients with vocal incompetence, but their effect on thoracic-surgery-related UVFP remains inconclusive. We therefore conducted a prospective study to clarify the effect of early HA injection on voice and quality of life in patients with thoracic-surgery-related UVFP. Patients with UVFP within 3 months after thoracic surgery who received office-based HA injection were recruited. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography, videolaryngostroboscopy, voice-related life quality (voice outcome survey), laboratory voice analysis, and health-related quality of life (SF-36) were evaluated at baseline, and at 1 month postinjection. A total of 104 consecutive patients accepted office-based HA intracordal injection during the study period, 34 of whom were treated in relation to thoracic surgery and were eligible for inclusion. Voice-related life quality, voice laboratory analysis, and most generic quality of life domains were significantly improved at 1 month after in-office HA intracordal injection. No HA-related complications were reported. Single office-based HA intracordal injection is a safe and effective treatment for thoracic-surgery-related UVFP, resulting in immediate improvements in patient quality of life, voice quality, and swallowing ability. PMID:26448034

  15. Acute Flaccid Paralysis Associated with Novel Enterovirus C105

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Liana M.; Poulter, Melinda D.; Brenton, J. Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of acute flaccid paralysis among children in the United States during summer 2014 was tentatively associated with enterovirus D68 infection. This syndrome in a child in fall 2014 was associated with enterovirus C105 infection. The presence of this virus strain in North America may pose a diagnostic challenge. PMID:26401731

  16. Immobility in Mobility: Narratives of Social Class, Education, and Paralysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nainby, Keith; Pea, John B.

    2003-01-01

    Social mobility carries with it a sense of loss. To be socially mobile is to move from one place, economically, culturally, personally, to another. One consequence of that loss, sometimes, is immobility--a paralysis brought on by the violent, forceful, uncertain rush of social mobility itself. The immobility of fear, the feeling stuck, the not…

  17. Marek's disease virus induced transient paralysis--a closer look

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s Disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by a highly cell-associated alpha herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include depression, crippling, weight loss, and transient paralysis (TP). TP is a disease of the central nervous system...

  18. A rare case of paralysis in an endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Bulent; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxicosis mostly presents with tachycardia, tremor, weight loss and other hypermetabolism signs. However, there are other unusual signs of thyrotoxicosis such as paralysis. This unusual clinical presentation may postpone prompt diagnosis and treatment. In this case report, we present a 27-years-old woman, who presented with quadriparesis at the emergency department. PMID:26101516

  19. [Management of oculo-palpebral consequences in facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Alliez, A; Malet, T; Bertrand, B; Degardin, N; Benichou, L; Bardot, J; Labbé, D

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis prognostic depends on eye lesion. In this pathology, lacrymal and palpebral functions will be modified: bad eye closure and leak of tears secretions. It can leads to corneal complications from keratitis to corneal abcedation and visual dysfonction. This chapter details different procedures and their indications to avoid this kind of complications. PMID:26321239

  20. Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis in a Hyperthyroid Black Woman

    PubMed Central

    Hackshaw, Kevin V.; Coker, Ernest

    1988-01-01

    In this case of periodic paralysis and thyrotoxicosis, investigation of the patient's family revealed other members similarly affected. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it represents the first reported instance of this familial association in the case of a black woman. PMID:3249338

  1. Secondary Sjogren's syndrome presenting with hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Dormohammadi Toosi, Taraneh; Naderi, Neda; Movassaghi, Shafieh; Seradj, Mehran Heydari; Khalvat, Ali; Shahbazi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) may develop in a large population of patients with Sjogren's syndrome (SS), but most of the subjects are asymptomatic. Here, we report a patient with known rheumatoid arthritis and symptoms of xerostomia, xerophthalmia and periodic paralysis. SS should be considered as a cause of RTA. The treatment of the underlying disorder may ameliorate the symptoms. PMID:25988057

  2. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons' Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Urrego, Diana; Troncoso, Julieta; Múnera, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1). It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans. PMID:26064916

  3. Thioredoxin and its reductase are present on synaptic vesicles, and their inhibition prevents the paralysis induced by botulinum neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pirazzini, Marco; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Zanetti, Giulia; Megighian, Aram; Scorzeto, Michele; Fillo, Silvia; Shone, Clifford C; Binz, Thomas; Rossetto, Ornella; Lista, Florigio; Montecucco, Cesare

    2014-09-25

    Botulinum neurotoxins consist of a metalloprotease linked via a conserved interchain disulfide bond to a heavy chain responsible for neurospecific binding and translocation of the enzymatic domain in the nerve terminal cytosol. The metalloprotease activity is enabled upon disulfide reduction and causes neuroparalysis by cleaving the SNARE proteins. Here, we show that the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin protein disulfide-reducing system is present on synaptic vesicles and that it is functional and responsible for the reduction of the interchain disulfide of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, C, and E. Specific inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase or thioredoxin prevent intoxication of cultured neurons in a dose-dependent manner and are also very effective inhibitors of the paralysis of the neuromuscular junction. We found that this group of inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxins is very effective in vivo. Most of them are nontoxic and are good candidates as preventive and therapeutic drugs for human botulism. PMID:25220457

  4. Neuroimaging investigation of the motor control disorder, dystonia with special emphasis on laryngeal dystonia

    E-print Network

    Makhlouf, Miriam L

    2013-01-01

    Laryngeal dystonia (LD) is the focal laryngeal form of the neurological movement disorder called dystonia, a condition that often changes in severity depending on the posture assumed and on voluntary activity of the affected ...

  5. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nerves—the cranial nerves—lead directly from the brain to various parts of the head, neck, and trunk. Some of the cranial nerves are ... cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, pass through ... to parts of the head, neck, and trunk. The nerves are named and numbered, ...

  6. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... way on both sides while crying No movement (paralysis) on the affected side of the face (from ... will be closely monitored to see if the paralysis goes away on its own. Infants with permanent ...

  7. LARYNGEAL ACTIVITY IN ICELANDIC OBSTRUENT PRODUCTION* Anders L6fqvist+ and Hirohide Yoshioka++

    E-print Network

    LARYNGEAL ACTIVITY IN ICELANDIC OBSTRUENT PRODUCTION* Anders L6fqvist+ and Hirohide Yoshioka++ Abstract. Laryngeal activity in the production of voiceless obstru- ents and obstruent clusters to be produced basically by differences in laryngeal-oral timing. During clusters of voiceless obstruents, one

  8. A decade of laryngeal dysplasia in Paisley, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jenny; White, Aileen

    2012-03-01

    Laryngeal dysplasia is a known premalignant condition. A recent consensus statement by otorhinolaryngologists and pathologists on the diagnosis and management of laryngeal dysplasia Mehanna et al. (Clin Otol 35:170-176, 2010) identified a need for retrospective data on epidemiological aspects of laryngeal dysplasia as well as responses to treatment. A retrospective search was made on the hospital pathology database for cases of laryngeal dysplasia. Searches were made under "Larynx", "Dysplasia", "Carcinoma in situ" and "Vocal Cord". The search dates were between 1998 to the present day. The returned records were checked with the pathology reports and the case notes of these patients requested for analysis. A proforma was completed for each patient with laryngeal dysplasia. These patients were then anonymised, entered into a spreadsheet and analysed. The initial search returned 937 patients. Of these patients, 505 (54%) had benign laryngeal pathology, 131 (14%) had laryngeal dysplasia and 301 (32%) had invasive cancer on biopsy. Patients who developed malignancy within 3 months of being diagnosed with laryngeal dysplasia were excluded. This left 110 patients for analysis. Of the dysplastic patients, 40 (36%) had mild dysplasia, 31 (28%) had moderate dysplasia and 39 (35%) had severe dysplasia/carcinoma in situ; 70% were male. The median age was 63 (min 21, max 90, ave 62.5); 74 (67%) were smokers or ex-smokers. Progression of dysplasia was seen in 7 (6%) patients. Malignant transformation was seen in 18 (16%) patients. The average time for malignant change was 43 months (min 4 months, max 192 months and median 15.5 months; 73 (66%) patients were treated by microlaryngeal resection, 2 (2%) were treated by vocal cord stripping, 28 (25%) were treated by endolaser therapy, and 1 (1%) patient was treated by using the microdebrider skimming blade and 6 (5%) were treated by radiotherapy. Cure of dysplasia or downgrading of severity in these treatment subgroups was 62 (85%), 2 (100%), 24 (86%), 1 (100%) and 4 (66%), respectively. Our study reiterates that laryngeal dysplasia carries a significant risk of developing malignancy. Management of this condition varies widely. Endolaser resection is becoming more frequently employed in the UK. Our study is biased heavily towards cold steel dissection. Although there is increasing practice in the UK to promote early discharge, we feel it may be safer to keep patients under surveillance for longer periods. Despite this, all patients who returned after discharge or failing to attend with invasive cancer did so with new symptoms. PMID:21739097

  9. Laryngeal Inflammation in the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scadding, Glenis K; Brock, Christine; Chouiali, Fazila; Hamid, Qutayaba

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is marked by ‘the sudden death of an infant that is unexpected by history and remains unexplained after a thorough forensic autopsy and a detailed death scene investigation’. The cause is unknown. Excessive subglottic submucosal glandular tissue and excessive sulphated mucus glycoprotein in the larynges of SIDS babies have been previously reported from our institution. We now report on laryngeal immunohistology. Methods: Larynges from 7 children who died from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) at under 16 weeks of age were examined immunohistologically and compared to those from 8 age- matched control infants who died from other causes. Results: The SIDS babies had increased inflammatory changes in the laryngeal epithelium and sub- epithelium with raised numbers of cells staining for elastase (p<0.01), EG2(a marker for activated eosinophils) (p<0.01) and CD4(p<0.05) suggesting that some SIDS deaths involve preceding inflammation. Conclusions: Although death may be sudden and unexpected it appears that, at least in some SIDS victims, there is a preceding inflammatory process in the larynx which may allow hyper-reactivity of laryngeal reflexes and consequent apnoea. This observation concurs with others in the SIDS literature and offers a field for further research and possible prevention. PMID:25594528

  10. Wood-related occupations and laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pollán, M; López-Abente, G

    1995-01-01

    A case-control study was carried out among male residents in Madrid from 1982 through 1985 to ascertain occupational risk for laryngeal cancer. The study covered 50 histologically confirmed cases, 43 hospital, and 46 population controls. Occupational history and lifetime consumption patterns for cigarettes and alcohol were obtained by interview. Risk estimates, adjusted for tobacco and alcohol consumption, were calculated using nonconditional logistic regression. The highest odds ratio (OR) corresponded to woodworkers. For them, the risk increased with duration of exposure and decreased with the number of years elapsed since leaving it. The OR for woodworkers exposed over 20 years was 5.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15 to 26.64, being even greater in the furniture workers subgroup, OR 6.67 (95% CI 1.05 to 42.57). Other occupational categories with high OR were transport drivers (OR 3.31, 95% CI 0.98 to 11.22) and bricklayers and masons (OR 2.31, 95% CI 0.85 to 6.33). Wood dust or chemical compounds used in the treatment of the wood could underlie the strongest association found. PMID:7750113

  11. Laryngeal function reconstruction with hyoid osteomuscular flap in partial laryngectomy for laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    WEI, BOJUN; SHEN, HONG; XIE, HONG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcome of using a hyoid osteomuscular flap to repair the laryngeal defect after extended vertical partial laryngectomy. A total of 26 glottic cancer patients underwent reconstruction with osteomuscular hyoid flaps following tumor resections. Ipsilateral arytenoid cartilage was resected in all cases, and the upper region of the cricoid cartilage was resected in 11 cases. Selective ipsilateral level II, III and IV neck dissections were performed in node (N)-positive patients and ipsilateral level II, and III neck dissections in N0 patients. The bone grafts were then fixed to the cricoid and contralateral thyroid cartilages. Invasion of the thyroid cartilage endochorium was present in 12 cases and lymph nodes metastases was present in 11 cases. The extubation rate of the tracheostomy tube was 100%. The glottides of all patients were almost symmetrical. Patients were followed up for 2–7 years. One patient developed local recurrence, ipsilateral regional recurrence, contralateral regional recurrence and lung metastasis, respectively. The disease-free survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 100% (20/20) and 79% (11/14), respectively. Overall, laryngeal function recovered well upon hyoid osteomuscular flap reconstruction following extended vertical partial laryngectomy, with a high extubation rate and good sound quality.

  12. Acute laryngeal trauma: a review of 77 patients.

    PubMed

    Bent, J P; Silver, J R; Porubsky, E S

    1993-09-01

    Acute laryngeal trauma is a rare injury. In the past 18 years, 77 patients with acute laryngeal trauma have been evaluated at our institution. Each patient's care was overseen by the senior author (E.S.P.). The 61 patients who were seen within 48 hours of their accident are compared with those treated after 48 hours. All patients are classified by both injury (groups 1 through 5) and treatment (types I through III). Results are reported for voice, airway, and swallowing. Our methods of evaluation and treatment are outlined, and controversial aspects of patient management are addressed. We conclude that conservative treatment of group 1 and 2 injuries is 100% effective, expeditious repair of laryngeal injuries greatly reduces poor outcome, and the type of injury can be used to roughly predict patient outcome. Further, with use of current methods of diagnosis and management, almost all patients will be decannulated (98%) with functional speech (100%) and normal deglutition (100%). PMID:8414560

  13. Knife wounds into the airspaces of the laryngeal trapezium.

    PubMed

    Stanley, R B; Crockett, D M; Persky, M

    1988-01-01

    The trapezoidal-shaped area of the neck bounded by the hyoid bone, cricoid cartilage, and medial borders of the sternocleidomastoid muscles is widely exposed to knife slash and stab injuries. Suicidal or homicidal throat slashes involving this area may produce serious horizontal laryngeal injuries, whereas homicidal stab wounds may produce serious vertical laryngeal or hypopharyngeal injuries. The extent of such injuries often cannot be predicted from the entrance wounds and presenting symptoms. Therefore special guidelines should be followed to insure the safety of selective exploration of knife wounds penetrating into the airspaces within this trapezium. In addition, repair of serious laryngeal injuries may require use of laryngoplasty or partial laryngectomy techniques rather than simple repair. PMID:3339650

  14. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  15. Fraser syndrome with laryngeal webs: Report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Farzad; Ahmadi, Aslan; Zobairy, Hosna; Bakhti, Sepideh; Hirbod, Hengameh; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and laryngeal atresia. Although laryngeal webs occur uncommonly, they are the main cause of death in the first week of life in these patients. In this paper, we report two cases of Fraser syndrome with laryngeal webs. One of them was a twelve-year-old girl, primarily diagnosed with a supraglottic laryngeal web. In the course of treatment, a second web was also identified at the level of vocal cords, which is to our knowledge the first case of Fraser syndrome with two laryngeal webs in different levels. PMID:26384833

  16. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure. PMID:26420473

  17. A rare case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis precipitated by hydrocortisone

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a rare, but serious condition characterized by acute paralytic attacks and hypokalemia in association with thyrotoxicosis. Although carbohydrate rich meals, strenuous exercise, alcohol, emotional stress are known precipitants of TPP, steroid treatment has rarely been reported to induce TPP. We report a case in which a patient with previously untreated Grave's disease developed TPP following administration of Intravenous hydrocortisone for control of severe anaphylaxis, which to best of our knowledge is very rare. PMID:25810683

  18. Laryngeal hemiplegia in draft horses. A review of 27 cases.

    PubMed

    Bohanon, T C; Beard, W L; Robertson, J T

    1990-01-01

    Case records of 27 draft horses with laryngeal hemiplegia were reviewed. Twenty-one horses were treated by ventriculectomy with or without prosthetic laryngoplasty, and 17 owners were contacted to determine the results. Fifteen horses improved after surgery and were able to perform to the owners' expectations. Performance improved significantly and hospitalization was shorter after ventriculectomy alone. Results of this study indicate that the clinical signs of exercise intolerance and excessive inspiratory noise associated with left laryngeal hemiplegia in draft horses can be treated successfully by ventriculectomy without prosthetic laryngoplasty. PMID:2264284

  19. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction?The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective?The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods?We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results?Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion?There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux. PMID:26157498

  20. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Introduction?The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective?The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods?We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results?Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion?There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux. PMID:26157498

  1. Experimental and numerical study of patterns in laryngeal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, N. E.; Artana, G.; Sciamarella, D.

    2009-05-01

    Unsteady airflow is investigated in a channel with a geometry approximating that of the human larynx. The laryngeal flow is simulated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible two-dimensional viscous fluid, and visualized using the Schlieren technique in an experimental setup consisting of a rigid replica of the larynx, with and without ventricular bands. This study shows the spontaneous formation of vortex couples in several regions of the laryngeal profile, and at different stages of the evolution of the starting glottal jet.

  2. Salvage Conservation Laryngeal Surgery After Radiation Therapy Failure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michelle Mizhi; Holsinger, F Christopher; Laccourreye, Ollivier

    2015-08-01

    Conservation laryngeal surgery (CLS) includes time-honored approaches such as the vertical partial laryngectomy and the open horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy, as well as the supracricoid partial laryngectomy and transoral laser microsurgery. Carefully selected patients can undergo transoral endoscopic or open CLS for early to intermediate stage recurrent tumors of the glottic and supraglottic larynx. Patient factors, such as comorbid pulmonary disease, are essential in selecting patients for CLS, especially after previous radiation therapy. This article reviews the preoperative indications and postoperative management of salvage CLS after radiation therapy for laryngeal cancer. PMID:26233791

  3. Critical analysis of robotic surgery for laryngeal tumours.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Francisco; Menoyo, Alicia; Abrante, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) with the Da Vinci robot has been used for the removal of laryngeal cancers with the objective to improve functional and aesthetic outcomes without worsening survival. The advantages of TORS are described in this article. However, its disadvantages, mainly high cost amongst others, do not make robotic surgery the current treatment of choice for laryngeal tumours; transoral laser surgery is superior in most cases. Major technical improvements are expected. Smaller, more ergonomic, new-generation robots better adapted to the head and neck will probably be available in the near future. PMID:24626048

  4. Apparent tick paralysis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Domenico; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Tarallo, Viviana Domenica; Ramos, Rafael Antonio do Nascimento; Stanneck, Dorothee; Baneth, Gad; de Caprariis, Donato

    2012-09-10

    Certain tick species including Ixodes holocyclus can inoculate neurotoxins that induce a rapid, ascending flaccid paralysis in animals. Rhipicephalus sanguineus, the most widespread tick of dogs, is recognized as a vector of several pathogens causing diseases in dogs and humans. A single report suggests its role as cause of paralysis in dogs. This study presents the clinical history of 14 young dogs heavily infested by R. sanguineus (intensity of infestation, 63-328) in an endemic area of southern Italy. During May to June of 2011, dogs were presented at the clinical examination with neurological signs of different degrees (e.g., hind limb ataxia, generalized lethargy, and difficulty in movements). All animals were treated with acaricides and by manual tick removal but ten of them died within a day, displaying neurological signs. The other 4 dogs recovered within 3 days with acaricidal and supportive treatment. Twelve dogs were positive by blood smear examination for Hepatozoon canis with a high parasitemia, two also for Babesia vogeli and two were negative for hemoparasites. Low-grade thrombocytopenia, hypoalbuminemia, and pancytopenia were the haematological alterations most frequently recorded. Other causes of neurological disease in dogs were excluded and the diagnosis of tick paralysis by R. sanguineus was confirmed (ex juvantibus) by early and complete recovery of 4 dogs following acaricidal treatment and tick removal. PMID:22546547

  5. Surgical treatment for thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis: case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP) is a rare, potentially life-threatening endocrine emergency. It is characterized by recurrent muscle weakness and hypokalemia. Because many THPP patients do not have obvious symptoms and signs of hyperthyroidism, misdiagnosis may occur. The published studies revealed that definitive therapy for THPP is control of hyperthyroidism by medical therapy, radioactive iodine or surgery, but the long-term post-operative follow-up result was not observed. We reported two cases of medically refractory THPP with recurrent paralysis of extremities and hypokalemia, and both were combined with thyroid nodules. Both patients were treated with total thyroidectomy; the pathology revealed that one is Graves' disease with thyroid papillary carcinoma, and the other is adenomatous goiter with papillary hyperplasia. No episode of periodic paralysis was noted and laboratory evaluation revealed normal potassium level during the post-operative follow up. Our experience suggests that total thyroidectomy by experienced surgeon is an appropriate and definite treatment for medically refractory THPP, especially in cases combined with thyroid nodules. PMID:22273473

  6. A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis with respiratory failure in an African American woman.

    PubMed

    Shields, Denise L

    2015-05-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is an acute endocrine emergency characterized by hyperthyroidism, profound muscle weakness and/or paralysis, and hypokalemia that is not due to potassium deficiency. Typically described in young males of Asian descent, it is becoming increasingly recognized outside of this demographic group and is believed to be an underrecognized cause of symptomatic hypokalemia. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis usually manifests as acute onset of symmetrical distal extremity weakness and is treated with careful potassium replacement and nonselective ?-blockers. In this case, a 43-year-old African American woman with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis had recurrent lower extremity myopathy and acute respiratory failure precipitated by noncompliance with treatment for Graves disease. PMID:25934725

  7. Laryngeal Aerodynamics Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham-Rowan, Mary; Fowler, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in laryngeal aerodynamic measures during connected speech associated with oral contraceptive (OC) use. Eight women taking an OC, and eight others not taking an OC, participated in the study. Three trials of syllable /p[subscript alpha] /repetitions were obtained using a…

  8. An OT Account of Laryngealization in Cuzco Quechua.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Steve

    Classical phonemic accounts of Cuzco (Peru) Quechua posit three distinct types of stops: plain, aspirated, and glottalized. A later analysis argued instead for a root-level feature of laryngealization governed by a small number of formal mechanisms. This latter analysis is taken one step further, showing that even greater explanatory power may be…

  9. Management of laryngeal radionecrosis: Animal and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, R.W.; Krespi, Y.P.; Einhorn, R.K.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation necrosis of the laryngeal cartilages is an uncommon complication of radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. It is a devastating process for which there is no one acceptable treatment. Medical management offers only temporary, symptomatic relief, which further necessitates surgical treatment. Surgical management may start with a tracheotomy; however, it often ends with a total laryngectomy. Physiologically, the necrotic cartilages are the source of the problem. It is a general surgical principle that nonviable tissue must be excised to promote healing. Therefore, if the affected laryngeal cartilages were removed, the larynx should heal. Total or near total removal of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages with preservation of the endolaryngeal soft tissues has not been reported in the literature. Theoretically, if the entire cartilaginous framework is removed, there would be no structural support for the airway. We have found using animal models, that submucosal resection of the laryngeal cartilages, leaving the perichondrium and endolaryngeal soft tissues intact can result in a competent airway. Animal and clinical experience will be presented.

  10. Catecholamine inputs to expiratory laryngeal motoneurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Jing; Sun, Qi-Jian; Guo, Rui-Chen; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2015-02-15

    Many respiration-related interneurons and motoneurons receive a catecholaminergic input, but the extent and distribution of this input to recurrent laryngeal motoneurons that innervate intrinsic muscles of the larynx are not clear. In the present study, we examined the catecholaminergic input to expiratory laryngeal motoneurons in the caudal nucleus ambiguus by combining intracellular labeling of single identified motoneurons, with immunohistochemistry to reveal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (catecholaminergic) terminal varicosities. Close appositions were found between the two structures, with 18?±?5 close appositions per motoneuron (n?=?7). Close appositions were more frequently observed on distal rather than proximal dendrites. Axosomatic appositions were not seen. In order to determine the source of this input, microinjections of cholera toxin B subunit (1%, 20 nl) were made into the caudal nucleus ambiguus. Retrogradely labeled neurons, located in the ipsilateral nucleus tractus solitarius and the area postrema, were tyrosine hydroxylase-positive. Our results not only demonstrate details of the extent and distribution of potential catecholamine inputs to the expiratory laryngeal motoneuron, but further indicate that the inputs, at least in part, originate from the dorsomedial medulla, providing a potential anatomical basis for previously reported catecholaminergic effects on the laryngeal adductor reflex. PMID:25224923

  11. Laryngeal obstruction caused by lymphoma in an adult dairy cow

    PubMed Central

    Lardé, Hélène; Nichols, Sylvain; Babkine, Marie; Chénier, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    A Holstein cow was presented for inspiratory dyspnea. Endoscopic evaluation revealed swollen arytenoids and a presumptive diagnosis of bilateral arytenoidal chondritis was made. A partial arytenoidectomy was performed, the right arytenoid was submitted for histopathology, and a diagnosis of laryngeal lymphoma was made. Due to the poor prognosis, the cow was euthanized. PMID:24489391

  12. Laryngeal Muscles Are Spared in the Dystrophin Deficient "mdx" Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa B.; Joseph, Gayle L.; Adkins, Tracey D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: "Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)" is caused by the loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. The disease leads to severe and progressive skeletal muscle wasting. Interestingly, the disease spares some muscles. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dystrophin deficiency on 2 intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the…

  13. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  14. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  15. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  16. [Optic nerve disc drusen].

    PubMed

    Samoil?, O; C?lug?ru, D; C?lug?ru, M; Emese, Kaucsar

    2006-01-01

    Optic nerve head drusen represents a frequent condition, with unknown pathogenesis, mostly asymptomatic. Here, we present a patient with visual impairment, who has reacted well to anti-inflammatory and vasodilator treatment. PMID:16927754

  17. [Role of surgery in modern treatment of laryngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Jovi?, Rajko M

    2013-01-01

    The strategy of organ preservation by applying chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of laryngeal carcinoma, which has been extensively used since 1990s, is now being reviewed regarding its further justification. Despite good results in other localization of head and neck cancer, it has not met the expectations in case of laryngeal cancer. One explanation is the lower participation of human papillomavirus type 16 in the etiology of laryngeal cancer. A lot of developing countries base their concept on primary surgery with subsequent radiotherapy, because the cost of operations for cancer of the larynx is much lower than in developed countries. Endoscopic surgery of T1 cancers is feasible in all environments using cold surgery thanks to modern management of anesthesia with the possibility of local application of adrenaline. Its price is 481.46 euros, and if it is performed through laryngofissure, the price is 785.46 euros. The introduction of lasers into the treatment would justify the initial investment and extend indications, and the surgery of T1 and T2 cancers with laser application should be the standard practice in all countries and regions dealing with laryngeal pathology. T2 and some T3 cancers can be treated by conservation surgery of the larynx. Most of T3 and T4 cancers are indications for total laryngectomy or near-total laryngectomy in selected cases. If it is the primary surgery, wound healing is good and complications are rare. This greatly reduces the cost of operation, which is 1910.15 euros. Surgery after radiotherapy, particularly after chemoradiotherapy, may result in complications that significantly prolong the treatment and increase its costs. Thus, the biological nature of laryngeal cancer and its specificity make this approach to the treatment of cancer available in all regions of the world. PMID:24245441

  18. Epineurial repair of an iatrogenic facial nerve neurotmesis after total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy in a dog with concurrent cranio-mandibular osteopathy.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Ignacio; Espadas, Irene; Hammond, Gawain; Pratschke, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old male entire West Highland white terrier was referred to the Small Animal Hospital at the University of Glasgow for bilateral, chronic, medically unresponsive otitis media and externa. A history of cranio-mandibular osteopathy was also reported. Bilateral total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy was performed with the aid of a pneumatic burr. Extensive bone proliferation was present bilaterally originating from the caudal mandibular ramus and tympanic bulla which incorporated the horizontal canal on each side. The right facial nerve was identified leaving the stylomastoid foramen and running in a cranial direction through a 1.5 cm diameter cuff of bone surrounding the horizontal canal and external acoustic meatus. Despite careful dissection, a facial nerve neurotmesis ensued which required microsurgical epineurial repair. Neurologic examination performed 12 h post-operatively revealed abnormalities consistent with right facial nerve paralysis. At 3 months, the facial nerve function was found to have improved significantly and was assessed to be normal four months after surgery. To the authors' knowledge, this clinical communication described the first reported clinical case where unilateral facial nerve paralysis resulting from iatrogenic facial nerve neurotmesis was successfully treated by microsurgical epineurial repair. PMID:25686402

  19. The acute treatment of nerve agent exposure.

    PubMed

    Cannard, Kevin

    2006-11-01

    Nerve agents (NA) are simple and cheap to produce but can produce casualties on a massive scale. They have already been employed by terrorist organizations and rogue states on civilians and armed forces alike. By inhibiting the enzyme acetylcholine esterase, NAs prevent the breakdown of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. This results in over-stimulation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in the autonomic and central nervous systems and at the neuromuscular junction. Increased parasympathetic stimulation produces miosis, sialorrhea, bronchospasm and bronchorrhea. Effects at the neuromuscular junction cause weakness, fasciculations, and eventually paralysis. Central effects include altered behavior and mental status, loss of consciousness, seizures, or apnea. Most deaths are due to respiratory failure. Treatment with atropine competitively blocks the parasympathetic effects. Oximes like pralidoxime salvage acetylcholine esterase by "prying off" NA, provided the attachment has not "aged" to an irreversible bond. This reverses weakness. Benzodiazepines like diazepam are effective against NA induced seizures. Mortality has been surprisingly low. If victims can survive the first 15 to 20 min of a vapor attack, they will likely live. The low mortality rate to date underscores that attacks are survivable and research reveals even simple barriers such as clothing offer substantial protection. This article reviews the properties of NAs and how to recognize the clinical features of NA intoxication, employ the needed drugs properly, and screen out anxious patients who mistakenly believe they have been exposed. PMID:16945386

  20. Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance: A 6 years study, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Alireza Emami; Ghazavi, Mohamadreza; Moghim, Sharareh; Sabaghi, Amirhosein; Fadaei, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poliomyelitis is still an endemic disease in many areas of the world including Africa and South Asia. Iran is polio free since 2001. However, due to endemicity of polio in neighboring countries of Iran, the risk of polio importation and re-emergence of wild polio virus is high. Case definition through surveillance system is a well-defined method for maintenance of polio eradication in polio free countries. Methods: In a cross-sectional survey from 2007 to 2013, we reviewed all the records of under 15 years old patients reported to Acute Flaccid Paralysis Committee (AFPC) in Isfahan province, Iran. All cases were visited by members of the AFPC. Three stool samples were collected from each reported case within 2 weeks of onset of paralysis and sent to National Polio Laboratory in Tehran, Iran, for poliovirus isolation. Data were analyzed by SSPS software (version 22). Student's t-test and Chi-square was used to compare variables. Statistical significance level was set at P < 0.05. Results: In this 6-year period 85 cases were analyzed, 54 patients were male (63.5%) and 31 were female (36.5%). The mean age of patients was 5.7 ± 3.9 years. The most common cause of paralysis among these patients was Guillian–Barré syndrome (83.5%). We did not found any poliomyelitis caused by wild polio virus. Only one case of vaccine associated poliomyelitis was reported. Conclusion: Since 1992, Iran has a routine and high percent coverage of polio vaccination program for infants (>94%), with six doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV). Accurate surveillance for poliomyelitis is essential for continuing eradication. PMID:26015925

  1. [Progressive bulbar paralysis in childhood with pyramidal signs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Boel, M; de Cock, P; Casteels-Van Daele, M; Casaer, P

    1981-12-01

    We report on a 8 year-old boy who presented with progressive bulbar paralysis. Remarkable were the presence of pyramidal signs, the visual disturbances, the peculiar gait and the intermittent progression of the disease. Our case supports the idea that spinal muscular atrophies form a group of diseases with variable expression. We can classify our patient between the juvenile form and the adult form of spinal muscular atrophy with progressive bulbar palsy. We could follow this boy for almost 4 years. He died at the age of twelve years. Post mortem examination was not permitted. PMID:7332421

  2. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2?±?43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7?±?1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures. PMID:26413963

  3. Wasp Venom Blocks Central Cholinergic Synapses to Induce Transient Paralysis in Cockroach Prey

    E-print Network

    Libersat, Frederic

    Wasp Venom Blocks Central Cholinergic Synapses to Induce Transient Paralysis in Cockroach Prey G stinging its prey, the cockroach. It stings into the first thoracic segment inducing 2 to 3 min of transient flaccid paralysis of the front legs. This facilitates a second sting in the cockroach's head

  4. A case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with reversible alternating diaphragmatic paralysis: case study.

    PubMed

    Haji, Kavi; Butler, Ernest; Royse, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation has been reported in patients with bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis due to CIDP. We report a case of CIDP that progressed to respiratory failure with normal chest radiography despite unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. This manifestation would have been missed if ultrasound was not employed. PMID:26490681

  5. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in an African male: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Belayneh, Dereje K; Kellerth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis and is rarely reported in non-Asian populations. A 26-year-old Ethiopian male who presented with recurrent flaccid tetraparesis, hypokalemia, and hyperthyroidism is reported here. Thyroid function should be routinely checked in patients with acute or recurrent hypokalemic paralysis. PMID:25767707

  6. The role of voice therapy in the treatment of dyspnea and dysphonia in a patient with a vagal nerve stimulation device.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Amanda I; Helou, Leah B; Ingle, John W; Baldwin, Maria; Rosen, Clark A

    2014-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulators (VNS) are implanted to treat medically refractory epilepsy and depression. The VNS stimulates the vagus nerve in the left neck. Laryngeal side effects are common and include dysphagia, dysphonia, and dyspnea. The current case study represents a patient with severe dyspnea and dysphonia, persisting even with VNS deactivation. The case demonstrates the use of voice and respiratory retraining therapy for the treatment of VNS-induced dysphonia and dyspnea. It also highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach, including laryngology, neurology, and speech-language pathology, in the treatment of these challenging patients. PMID:24070591

  7. Examination of paralysis in Drosophila temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affecting sodium channels; a proposed mechanism of paralysis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J C; Wyman, R J

    1990-04-01

    We have used the identified cells of the Drosophila Giant Fiber System (GFS) to study the defects induced by the temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations no action potential (nap) and paralytic (para). These mutations paralyze at elevated temperatures, reported as due to a block of action potential propagation. We found, however, that the cells of the GFS still were able to respond to stimuli at 7-10 degrees C above the temperature causing mutant paralysis. Stimulus threshold and conduction time both decrease with increasing temperature in the mutants in a manner indistinguishable from wild-type. Since action potentials can propagate efficiently in the mutants at elevated temperatures, we looked for other neural defects that might be involved in producing paralysis. We did find reduced neuronal function at sites such as electrical synapses and axonal branch points where current may be limiting. These sites had weakened following frequency, occasional failures, and increased conduction times. We believe the non-temperature-dependent defects in nap and para uncover the normally temperature-sensitive traits latent within all neurons. Increasing temperature increases the rates of channel activation and inactivation. At higher temperatures, Na+ inactivation and K+ activation encroach upon the Na(+)-activation time, reducing inward sodium current. In addition to this normal temperature-dependent effect, the mutations decrease the number of sodium channels in neurons in a non-temperature-dependent manner. These two reductions in sodium current combine to prevent spiking threshold from being reached at current limited sites. The temperature at which a sufficient number of these sites block should be the temperature of paralysis. PMID:2161909

  8. Variant Anterior Digastric Muscle Transfer for Marginal Mandibular Branch of Facial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve (MMBFN) palsy is a common consequence of head and neck surgeries. MMBFN palsy results in paralysis of muscles which depress the inferior lip. Current management of MMBFN palsy involves ruination of normal neuromuscular anatomy and physiology to restore symmetry to the mouth. The article outlines the possibility to transfer variant anterior digastric musculature to accomplish reanimation of the mouth without adversely affecting normal nonvariant anatomy. The procedure may have the additional cosmetic benefit of correcting asymmetrical muscular bulk in the submental region. PMID:25289304

  9. Risk Factors for post-Cardiac Surgery Diaphragmatic Paralysis in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akbariasbagh, Parvin; Mirzaghayan, Mohammad Reza; Akbariasbagh, Naseredin; Shariat, Mamak; Ebrahim, Bita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injured phrenic nerve secondary to cardiac surgeries is the most common cause of diaphragmatic paralysis (DP) in infants. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for DP caused by congenital heart defect corrective surgeries in pediatrics. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted in a 2-year period (2006–2008), included 451 children with congenital heart diseases admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital. The diaphragmatic function was examined via fluoroscopy, and the frequency of DP and its relevant parameters were evaluated. Results: Of the 451 patients, comprising 268 males and 183 females at an age range of 3 days to 204 months (28.2 ± 33.4 months), 25 (5.5%) infants (60% male and 40% female, age range = 15 days to 132 months, 41.2 ± 28.1 months) had DP as follows: 48% unilateral right-sided and 36% unilateral left-sided. Additionally, 68% had cyanotic congenital heart disease and 84% had DP following total correction surgery. The highest prevalence rates of DP resulting in phrenic hemiparesis were observed after arterial switch operation, Fontan procedure, and Blalock–Taussig shunt surgery, respectively. Thirteen (52%) of the 25 DP patients underwent surgical diaphragmatic plication because of severe respiratory distress and dependency on mechanical ventilation, and most of the cases of plication underwent arterial switch operation. The rate of mortality was 24% (6 patients). Conclusion: DP with a prevalence of 5.5% was one of the most common complications secondary to cardiac surgeries in the infants included in the present study. Effective factors were age, weight, cyanotic congenital heart defects, and previous cardiac surgery. Diaphragmatic plication improved prognosis in severe cases. PMID:26697086

  10. The neural correlates of movement intentions: A pilot study comparing hypnotic and simulated paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Vera U; Seitz, Jochen; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos; Höse, Annett; Abler, Birgit; Hole, Günter; Goebel, Rainer; Walter, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    The distinct feeling of wanting to act and thereby causing our own actions is crucial to our self-perception as free human agents. Disturbances of the link between intention and action occur in several disorders. Little is known, however, about the neural correlates of wanting or intending to act. To investigate these for simple voluntary movements, we used a paradigm involving hypnotic paralysis and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eight healthy women were instructed to sequentially perform left and right hand movements during a normal condition, as well as during simulated weakness, simulated paralysis and hypnotic paralysis of the right hand. Right frontopolar cortex was selectively hypoactivated for attempted right hand movement during simulated paralysis while it was active in all other conditions. Since simulated paralysis was the only condition lacking an intention to move, the activation in frontopolar cortex might be related to the intention or volition to move. PMID:26036837

  11. Bilateral Facial Paralysis Caused by Bilateral Temporal Bone Fracture: A Case Report and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Eliçora, Sultan ?evik; Dinç, Aykut Erdem; Bi?kin, Sultan; Damar, Murat; Bilgin, Ergin

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral facial paralysis caused by bilateral temporal bone fracture is a rare clinical entity, with seven cases reported in the literature to date. In this paper, we describe a 40-year-old male patient with bilateral facial paralysis and hearing loss that developed after an occupational accident. On physical examination, House-Brackmann (HB) facial paralysis of grade 6 was observed on the right side and HB grade 5 paralysis on the left. Upon temporal bone computed tomography (CT) examination, a fracture line exhibiting transverse progression was observed in both petrous temporal bones. Our patient underwent transmastoid facial decompression surgery of the right ear. The patient refused a left-side operation. Such patients require extensive monitoring in intensive care units because the presence of multiple injuries means that facial functions are often very difficult to evaluate. Therefore, delays may ensue in both diagnosis and treatment of bilateral facial paralysis. PMID:26175920

  12. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis as the presenting symptom of silent thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Debmalya; Bhattacharjee, Shakya

    2013-01-01

    Silent thyroiditis is a rare cause of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. The objective was to present a case of silent thyroiditis presenting as periodic paralysis. A 23-year-old man presented with recurrent acute flaccid predominantly proximal weakness of all four limbs. He had a similar episode 3 weeks back. On examination he was found to have hypokalemia secondary to thyrotoxicosis. Clinically there were no features of thyrotoxicosis or thyroiditis. He was initially treated with intravenous and later oral potassium supplementation and propranolol. At 8 weeks of follow-up his thyroid profile became normal and his propranolol was stopped. He had no further recurrence of paralysis. He was diagnosed as a case silent thyroiditis presenting as thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. In cases of recurrent or acute flaccid muscle paralysis, it is important to suspect thyrotoxicosis, even if asymptomatic. Definitive treatment of thyrotoxicosis prevents recurrence. PMID:23956568

  13. Voltage sensor charge loss accounts for most cases of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, E; Labrum, R; Sweeney, M G.; Sud, R; Haworth, A; Chinnery, P F.; Meola, G; Schorge, S; Kullmann, D M.; Davis, M B.; Hanna, M G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Several missense mutations of CACNA1S and SCN4A genes occur in hypokalemic periodic paralysis. These mutations affect arginine residues in the S4 voltage sensors of the channel. Approximately 20% of cases remain genetically undefined. Methods: We undertook direct automated DNA sequencing of the S4 regions of CACNA1S and SCN4A in 83 cases of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Results: We identified reported CACNA1S mutations in 64 cases. In the remaining 19 cases, mutations in SCN4A or other CACNA1S S4 segments were found in 10, including three novel changes and the first mutations in channel domains I (SCN4A) and III (CACNA1S). Conclusions: All mutations affected arginine residues, consistent with the gating pore cation leak hypothesis of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Arginine mutations in S4 segments underlie 90% of hypokalemic periodic paralysis cases. GLOSSARY HypoPP = hypokalemic periodic paralysis. PMID:19118277

  14. Focal and abnormally persistent paralysis associated with congenital paramyotonia.

    PubMed

    Magot, Armelle; David, Albert; Sternberg, Damien; Péréon, Yann

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.4) are an established cause of several clinically distinct forms of periodic paralysis and myotonia. Focal paresis has sometimes already been described. We report a case with atypical clinical manifestation comprising paramyotonia and cold-induced persistent and focal paralysis. A 27-year-old woman presented with paramyotonia congenita since her childhood. She experienced during her childhood one brief episode of generalised weakness. At the age of 27, she experienced a focal paresis lasting for several months. The known mutation p.Val1293Ile was found in the muscle sodium channel gene (SCN4A). Channel inactivation is involved in most Na(+) channelopathies. Fast inactivation is known to be responsible for the myotonia phenotype. We hypothesise that the V1293I mutation may also alter the slow inactivation in specific conditions, for example, prolonged cold exposure or prolonged and intensive exercise. This observation broadens the spectrum of clinical manifestations of this sodium channel mutation. PMID:24939454

  15. Surgery for complete vertical rectus paralysis combined with horizontal strabismus.

    PubMed

    Zou, Leilei; Liu, Rui; Liu, Yan; Lin, Jing; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To report outcomes of the simultaneous surgical correction of vertical rectus paralysis combined with moderate-to-large angle horizontal strabismus. Methods. If a preoperative forced duction test was positive, antagonist muscle weakening surgery was performed, and then augmented partial rectus muscle transposition (APRMT) + partial horizontal rectus recession-resection was performed 2 months later. If a preoperative forced duction test was negative, APRMT + partial horizontal rectus recession-resection was performed. Antagonistic muscle weakening surgery and/or conventional recession-resection of the horizontal and/or vertical muscles of the contralateral eye was performed 2 months later, as needed. Results. Ten patients with a mean age of 22.3 ± 13.0 years were included and mean follow-up was 7.1 months. The mean vertical deviation that APRMT corrected was 21.4 ± 3.7 PD (prism diopter). The absolute deviation in horizontal significantly decreased from a preoperative value of 48.5 ± 27.4 PD to a value of 3.0 ± 2.3 PD 6 months postoperatively. The movement score decreased from a value of -5 ± 0 preoperatively to a value of -2.7 ± 0.8 at 6 months postoperatively. Conclusion. For patients with complete vertical rectus paralysis combined with a moderate- to-large angle of horizontal strabismus, combined APRMT and partial horizontal rectus recession-resection is safe and effective for correcting vertical and horizontal strabismus. PMID:24883204

  16. Practical aspects in the management of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Jacob O

    2008-01-01

    Management considerations in hypokalemic periodic paralysis include accurate diagnosis, potassium dosage for acute attacks, choice of diuretic for prophylaxis, identification of triggers, creating a safe physical environment, peri-operative measures, and issues in pregnancy. A positive genetic test in the context of symptoms is the gold standard for diagnosis. Potassium chloride is the favored potassium salt given at 0.5–1.0 mEq/kg for acute attacks. The oral route is favored, but if necessary, a mannitol solvent can be used for intravenous administration. Avoidance of or potassium prophylaxis for common triggers, such as rest after exercise, high carbohydrate meals, and sodium, can prevent attacks. Chronically, acetazolamide, dichlorphenamide, or potassium-sparing diuretics decrease attack frequency and severity but are of little value acutely. Potassium, water, and a telephone should always be at a patient's bedside, regardless of the presence of weakness. Perioperatively, the patient's clinical status should be checked frequently. Firm data on the management of periodic paralysis during pregnancy is lacking. Patient support can be found at . PMID:18426576

  17. Terminal nerve and vision.

    PubMed

    Behrens, U; Wagner, H-J

    2004-09-01

    The vertebrate retina receives efferent input from different parts of the central nervous system. Efferent fibers are thought to influence retinal information processing but their functional role is not well understood. One of the best-described retinopetal fiber systems in teleost retinae belongs to the terminal nerve complex. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and molluscan cardioexcitatory tetrapeptide (FMRFamide)-containing fibers from the ganglion of the terminal nerve form a dense fiber plexus in the retina at the border of the inner nuclear and inner plexiform layer. Peptide-containing fibers surround and contact perikarya of dopaminergic interplexiform cells in teleost retina. In vitro experiments demonstrated that exogenously supplied GnRH mediates dopaminergic effects on the membrane potential and on the morphology of dendritic tips (spinules) of cone horizontal cells. These effects can be specifically blocked by GnRH-antagonists, indicating that the release of dopamine and dopamine-dependent effects on light adaptation of retinal neurons are affected by the terminal nerve complex. Recent data have shown that olfactory information has an impact on retinal physiology, but its precise role is not clear. The efferent fiber of the terminal nerve complex is one of the first retinopetal fiber systems for which the sources of the fibers, their cellular targets, and several physiological, morphological, and behavioral effects are known. The terminal nerve complex is therefore a model system for the analysis of local information processing which is influenced by a distinct fiber projection. PMID:15570588

  18. Effects of reflux laryngitis on non-nutritive swallowing in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Brisebois, Simon; Samson, Nathalie; Fortier, Pierre-Hugues; Doueik, Alexandre A; Carreau, Anne-Marie; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2014-08-15

    Reflux laryngitis in infants may be involved not only in laryngeal disorders, but also in disorders of cardiorespiratory control through its impact on laryngeal function. Our objective was to study the effect of reflux laryngitis on non-nutritive swallowing (NNS) and NNS-breathing coordination. Two groups of six newborn lambs, randomized into laryngitis and control groups, were surgically instrumented for recording states of alertness, swallowing and cardiorespiratory variables without sedation. A mild to moderate reflux laryngitis was induced in lambs from the experimental group. A significant decrease in the number of NNS bursts and apneas was observed in the laryngitis group in active sleep (p=0.03). In addition, lower heart and respiratory rates, as well as prolonged apnea duration (p<0.0001) were observed. No physiologically significant alterations in NNS-breathing coordination were observed in the laryngitis group. We conclude that a mild to moderate reflux laryngitis alters NNS burst frequency and autonomous control of cardiac activity and respiration in lambs. PMID:24893350

  19. Virological and immunological aspects in the juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, D C; Ardelean, C; Anton, G

    1999-01-01

    The juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis, a disease which in the absence of an adequate monitoring may have an invalidating character, represented for a long time a problem as regards both its treatment and its possible etiology. The use of monoclonal antibodies, as well as of molecular biology techniques, permitted to elucidate some aspects, such as the viral origin of the infection. Twenty five juvenile laryngeal papillomas, removed intra-operatively, were investigated immunohistochemically, a significant increase of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor being found. Ten samples were also analyzed with the PCR technique, for the purpose of detecting the presence of the corresponding DNA sequences of human papillomaviruses (HPV): all were positive. The HPV genotyping showed the presence of only the HPV6 and 11 genotypes. PMID:11601383

  20. Leptomeningeal metastasis from early glottic laryngeal cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    PAN, ZHENYU; YANG, GUOZI; QU, LIMEI; YUAN, TINGTING; PANG, XIAOCHUAN; WANG, YONGXIANG; SHI, WEIYAN; DONG, LIHUA

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a 53-year-old man with leptomeningeal metastasis from early glottic laryngeal cancer. The patient had been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx 9 years previously. The current symptoms included a recurring headache that had persisted for 1 month and vomiting for 1 week. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the head revealed multiple enhancing lesions in the brain and multiple line-like enhancements in the brain fold. Computed tomography scans of the head, neck, chest and abdomen showed no nodular lesions. Cytological examination of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) revealed malignant cells with a scattered distribution pattern. The patient received intra-CSF methotrexate chemotherapy concurrent with whole-brain radiotherapy, which relieved the neurological symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of cytologically-confirmed LM from early glottic laryngeal cancer. PMID:26722263

  1. Expression of human papillomavirus and prognosis of juvenile laryngeal papilloma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Tian-Yu; Tan, Le-Tian; Wang, Shu-Yi; Chen, Yu-Ying; Tian, Jie-Yan; Da, Wen-Ying; He, Ping; Zhao, Ya-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between clinical behavior and expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) in patients with juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis, in an attempt to develop an effective molecular biological method to predict prognosis. We included 37 patients with juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis in the study group and 10 cases each of juvenile vocal cord polyps and juvenile normal laryngeal mucosa as the control group. We detected HPV by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, identified the virus type, and measured HPV-DNA content using a computer-assisted, color pathological image-analysis system. Additionally, we conducted a retrospective study with regard to the patients’ clinical history to evaluate the prognosis. The data of the 2 groups were compared and statistically analyzed, including a correlation with prognosis. In the study group, 67.3% (25/37) were positive for HPV-Ag by immunocytochemistry; whereas 53.2%, 45.8%, and 25.4% were positive for HPV6b-DNA, HPV11-DNA, and HPV6b+11-DNA, respectively, by in situ hybridization. HPV was not detected in the control group. There was a significant difference between two groups (P < 0.05). Compared to HPV11-DNA-positive cases, those that were positive for HPV6b-DNA and HPV6b+11-DNA showed lower results on average, for age at first diagnosis and self-relief, number of surgeries, and interval between surgeries. Our findings suggest that immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization are useful methods to evaluate the prognosis of juvenile laryngeal papilloma (JLP) and that HPV6b-positivity can be used as an index to predict the development and outcome of JLP. PMID:26629043

  2. RNA 1 and RNA 2 Genomic Segments of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus Are Infectious and Induce Chronic Bee Paralysis Disease

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Ibrahim; Schurr, Frank; Goulet, Adeline; Cougoule, Nicolas; Ribière-Chabert, Magali; Darbon, Hervé; Thiéry, Richard; Dubois, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) causes an infectious and contagious disease of adult honeybees. Its segmented genome is composed of two major positive single-stranded RNAs, RNA 1 (3,674?nt) and RNA 2 (2,305?nt). Three minor RNAs (about 1,000?nt each) have been described earlier but they were not detected by sequencing of CBPV genome. In this study, the results of in vivo inoculation of the two purified CBPV major RNAs are presented and demonstrate that RNA 1 and RNA 2 are infectious. Honeybees inoculated with 109 RNA copies per bee developed paralysis symptoms within 6 days after inoculation. The number of CBPV RNA copies increased significantly throughout the infection. Moreover, the negative strand of CBPV RNA was detected by RT-PCR, and CBPV particles were visualized by electronic microscopy in inoculated honeybees. Taken together, these results show that CBPV RNA 1 and CBPV RNA 2 segments can induce virus replication and produce CBPV virus particles. Therefore, the three minor RNAs described in early studies are not essential for virus replication. These data are crucial for the development of a reverse genetic system for CBPV. PMID:26583154

  3. PHONATORY EFFECTS OF SUPRAGLOTTIC STRUCTURES IN EXCISED CANINE LARYNGES

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, Eileen M.; Alipour, Fariborz

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine how phonation is affected by the presence and by alteration in the position of the supraglottic structures. Method Study used three excised canine larynges. A series of pressure-flow experiments were completed first on the excised larynx with false folds and epiglottis intact, then with the epiglottis removed, and finally with the false folds removed. Aerodynamic and acoustic effects were quantified with the analysis of the pressure, flow, and audio signals. Results The results of the study indicated that (a) elevation of the epiglottis to upright position from a horizontal position decreased subglottal pressure, increased flow (decreased laryngeal resistance), and slightly decreased fundamental frequency (b) vibration of the false vocal folds induced some irregularity into the acoustic output of the larynx, (c) the presence of the epiglottis and the false vocal folds enhanced the second partial of the acoustic signal, and (d) the absence of the epiglottis and false folds increased low frequency noise (between 0 and 300 Hz). Conclusion Alteration in the position of the supraglottic structures affects laryngeal aerodynamics and acoustics, possibly due to biomechanical linkage with true vocal folds. When the supraglottic structures are present they act as resonators, enhancing the second partial and when they are absent (as in persons with supraglottic laryngectomy), low frequency noise is increased perhaps due to the loss of boundary conditions or to the presence of loose tissue. PMID:17400425

  4. Phonatory effects of supraglottic structures in excised canine larynges.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Eileen M; Alipour, Fariborz

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine how phonation is affected by the presence and by alteration in the position of the supraglottic structures. The study used three excised canine larynges. A series of pressure-flow experiments were completed first on the excised larynx with false folds and epiglottis intact, then with the epiglottis removed, and finally with the false folds removed. Aerodynamic and acoustic effects were quantified with the analysis of the pressure, flow, and audio signals. The results of the study indicated that (1) elevation of the epiglottis to upright position from a horizontal position decreased subglottal pressure, increased flow (decreased laryngeal resistance), and slightly decreased fundamental frequency; (2) vibration of the false vocal folds induced some irregularity into the acoustic output of the larynx; (3) the presence of the epiglottis and the false vocal folds enhanced the second partial of the acoustic signal; and (4) the absence of the epiglottis and false folds increased low-frequency noise (between 0 and 300 Hz). Alteration in the position of the supraglottic structures affects laryngeal aerodynamics and acoustics, possibly due to biomechanical linkage with true vocal folds. When the supraglottic structures are present they act as resonators, enhancing the second partial and when they are absent (as in persons with supraglottic laryngectomy), low-frequency noise is increased perhaps due to the loss of boundary conditions or due to the presence of loose tissue. PMID:17400425

  5. Occupational risk factors for laryngeal carcinoma: Connecticut, 1975-1980.

    PubMed

    Zagraniski, R T; Kelsey, J L; Walter, S D

    1986-07-01

    A case-control study of possible occupational risk factors for laryngeal carcinoma in white males in the New Haven, Connecticut, area included 92 cases diagnosed between 1975 and 1980 and 181 hospital controls individually matched to the cases on age, year and hospital of admission, county of residence, smoking status (current vs. ex-smoker), and type of tobacco used at the time of admission. Only cases and controls who were alive at the time of the study were included. With the effects of tobacco and alcohol controlled in a conditional linear logistic model, elevated odds ratios were found for men who had ever worked in rubber products manufacturing or transportation equipment manufacturing other than shipbuilding, and for men who had ever been machinists, bartenders, farmers, masons, or metal grinders. However, only one occupation, machinists, had a statistically significant odds ratio (2.5, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-5.2) in these multivariate analyses. Asbestos and nickel were not found to be risk factors for laryngeal carcinoma. Amount of tobacco smoked and alcohol consumed were positively associated with risk for laryngeal cancer. PMID:3717141

  6. The combined endoscopic management of congenital laryngeal web.

    PubMed

    Sztanó, B; Torkos, A; Rovó, L

    2010-02-01

    Laryngeal web in the anterior commissure is a rare congenital anomaly often leading to severe dyspnea. Endoscopic procedures based on a simple transsection in these cases may worsen the condition because vocal folds have a tendency for fibrosis and granulation tissue formation after surgical interventions. Thus the traditional treatment of choice is the demanding, externally performed laryngotracheal reconstruction generally with a rib cartilage graft and longer period of stenting. This report presents the successful endoscopic management of a congenital laryngeal web in a 2-year-old boy, who previously underwent an uneffective scar laser transsection that led to excessive glotto-subglottic refibrosis. After the CO(2)-laser transsection the authors applied Mitomycin-C and inserted a combined silicon stent by extra-endolaryngeal technique. After the removal of the stent the patient could be decannulated and his voice improved. The application of these minimally invasive endoscopic techniques was successful, hence it may be an effective alternative treatment option for laryngeal webs. PMID:20004027

  7. Vitamin D3 potentiates myelination and recovery after facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Montava, Marion; Garcia, Stéphane; Mancini, Julien; Jammes, Yves; Courageot, Joël; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre; Feron, François

    2015-10-01

    Roles of vitamin D on the immune and nervous systems are increasingly recognized. Two previous studies demonstrated that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) or cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) induced functional recovery and increased myelination in a rat model of peroneal nerve transection. The current report assessed whether cholecalciferol was efficient in repairing transected rabbit facial nerves. Animals were randomized into two groups of rabbits with an unilateral facial nerve surgery: the vitamin D group included animals receiving a weekly oral bolus of vitamin D3 (200 IU/kg/day), from day 1 post-surgery; the control group included animals receiving a weekly oral bolus of vehicle (triglycerides). Contralateral unsectioned facial nerves from all experimental animals were used as controls for the histological study. The facial functional index was measured every week while the inner diameter of myelin sheath and the G ratio were quantified at the end of the 3 month experiment. The current report indicates that cholecalciferol significantly increases functional recovery and myelination, after 12 weeks of treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the therapeutic benefit of vitamin D supplementation in an animal model of facial paralysis. It paves further the way for clinical trials based on the administration of this steroid in individuals with injured facial nerves. PMID:25261104

  8. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  9. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  10. Distribution, seasonality and risk factors for tick paralysis in Australian dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Eppleston, K R; Kelman, M; Ward, M P

    2013-09-23

    Tick paralysis is a serious and potentially fatal condition of Australian companion animals induced by the paralysis ticks, Ixodes holocyclus and Ixodes cornuatus. Limited published information is available on the distribution, seasonality and risk factors for tick paralysis mortality in dogs and cats. This study describes 3479 cases of canine and feline tick paralysis in Australia using data extracted from a real-time disease surveillance program. Risk factors for mortality were identified, and maps of the distribution of cases were generated. Cluster analysis was performed using a space-time permutation scan statistic. Tick paralysis was found to be distinctly seasonal, with most cases reported during spring. Most cases were located on the eastern coast of Australia with New South Wales and Queensland accounting for the majority of reported cases. A cluster of cases was identified on the south coast of New South Wales. Dogs were found to be at significantly higher risk (P<0.05) of death if less than 6 months of age or if a toy breed. No significant risk factors for mortality were identified for cats. Some animals receiving chemoprophylactic treatment for tick infestation experienced tick paralysis during the products' period of effectiveness. There is a high risk of tick paralysis in dogs and cats on the eastern coast of Australia during the spring months. The risk factors for mortality identified can be used by veterinarians to determine prognosis in cases of canine tick paralysis and potentially to improve the treatment of cases. Daily tick searches of pets - particularly in high risk areas and during high risk periods - are recommended since the prevention of tick paralysis via chemoprophylaxis is not 100% guaranteed across the whole population. PMID:23643358

  11. Selectivity of voluntary finger flexion during ischemic nerve block of the hand

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Karen T.; Schieber, Marc H.; McNulty, Penelope A.

    2009-01-01

    During ischemic nerve block of an extremity, the cortical representations of muscles proximal to the block are known to expand, increasing the overlap of different muscle representations. Such reorganization mimics that seen in actual amputees. We investigated whether such changes degrade voluntary control of muscles proximal to the block. Nine subjects produced brief, isometric flexion force selectively with each fingertip before, during, and after ischemic block at the wrist. We recorded the isometric force exerted at the distal phalanx of each digit, along with electromyographic (EMG) activity from intrinsic and extrinsic finger muscles. Despite paralysis of the intrinsic hand muscles, and associated decrements in the flexion forces exerted by the thumb, index, and little fingers, the selectivity of voluntary finger flexion forces and of EMG activity in the extrinsic finger muscles that generated these forces remained unchanged. Our observations indicate that during ischemic nerve block, reorganization does not eliminate or degrade motor representations of the temporarily deafferented and paralyzed fingers. PMID:18431564

  12. Segmental thoracic lipomatosis of nerve with nerve territory overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Mark A; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, B Matthew; Spinner, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    Lipomatosis of nerve (LN), or fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is a rare condition of fibrofatty enlargement of the peripheral nerves. It is associated with bony and soft tissue overgrowth in approximately one-third to two-thirds of cases. It most commonly affects the median nerve at the carpal tunnel or digital nerves in the hands and feet. The authors describe a patient with previously diagnosed hemihypertrophy of the trunk who had a history of large thoracic lipomas resected during infancy, a thoracic hump due to adipose proliferation within the thoracic paraspinal musculature, and scoliotic deformity. She had fatty infiltration in the thoracic spinal nerves on MRI, identical to findings pathognomonic of LN at better-known sites. Enlargement of the transverse processes at those levels and thickened ribs were also found. This case appears to be directly analogous to other instances of LN with overgrowth, except that this case involved axial nerves rather than the typical appendicular nerves. PMID:24506247

  13. Coblator Arytenoidectomy in the Treatment of Bilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Googe, Benjamin; Nida, Andrew; Schweinfurth, John

    2015-01-01

    A 77-year-old female with bilateral vocal cord paralysis and dependent tracheostomy status after total thyroidectomy presented to clinic for evaluation of decannulation via arytenoidectomy. Preliminary data suggests coblation versus standard CO2 laser ablation in arytenoidectomy may provide benefits in terms of decreased tissue necrosis and patient outcome. The patient elected to proceed with arytenoidectomy by coblation. The initial procedure went well but postoperative bleeding required a return trip to the operating room for hemostasis. In the coming months the patient's tracheostomy tube was gradually downsized and eventually capped. She was decannulated eight months after surgery, speaking well and without complaints. Details of the surgical procedure and outcome will be discussed. PMID:26457217

  14. Pneumothorax spontané secondaire post opératoire compliquant une paralysie récurrentielle

    PubMed Central

    Joulali, Toufik; Derkaou, Ali; Shimi, Abdelkarim; Khatouf, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Le Pneumothorax spontané est défini par un épanchement gazeux de la grande cavité pleurale en dehors de tout traumatisme ou manipulation instrumentale. Son incidence est estimée à 28/100000 pour les hommes et 6/100000 pour les femmes. Les étiologies sont dominées par la broncho-pneumopathies chroniques et obstructives. Le tableau clinique est souvent grave d'emblé nécessitant une exsufflation à l'aiguille et/ou un drainage thoracique. Les récidives sont assez fréquentes et la mortalité reste assez élevée en comparaison avec les pneumothorax post traumatique ou les pneumothorax primaires. Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente présentant en post opératoire un pneumothorax spontané sur un poumon métastatique et compliquant une paralysie récurrentielle. PMID:25419334

  15. Sodium channel mutations in paramyotonia congenita and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ptacek, L J; Gouw, L; Kwieci?ski, H; McManis, P; Mendell, J R; Barohn, R J; George, A L; Barchi, R L; Robertson, M; Leppert, M F

    1993-03-01

    Clinical and electrophysiological data have outlined a spectrum of similar yet distinct periodic paralyses, including potassium-sensitive (hyperkalemic periodic paralysis [HYPP]) and temperature-sensitive (paramyotonia congenita [PC]) forms. Recent work has revealed that these disorders result from allelic defects in the alpha-subunit of the adult, human skeletal muscle sodium channel. We report an additional mutation, a leucine-->arginine substitution in the S3 segment of domain 4 (L1433R), that results in the PC phenotype. Five other HYPP and PC families have been ascertained, and previously reported sodium channel mutations have been identified in each. Characterization of these mutations and phenotypic variations in such families will contribute to the understanding of sodium channel structure and function relationships, as well as channel malfunction in the periodic paralyses. PMID:8388676

  16. Acute muscular paralysis in an adult with subclinical Bartter's syndrome associated with gentamicin administration.

    PubMed

    Shiah, C J; Tsai, D M; Liao, S T; Siauw, C P; Lee, L S

    1994-12-01

    We report an adult case of asymptomatic Bartter's syndrome with the first presentation of hypokalemic paralysis triggered by gentamicin injection. Marked hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia associated with excessive kaliuresis and magnesiuria were found. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration were high, but blood pressure was normal. Renal biopsy revealed hypercellularity of the renin-producing cell of the juxtaglomerular apparatus. Muscular paralysis subsided after potassium chloride supplementation. Hypokalemia was corrected with potassium and magnesium supplements and the use of diclofenac. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports of muscular paralysis associated with gentamicin in Bartter's syndrome. PMID:7985672

  17. Hypokalaemic Periodic Paralysis– A Prospective Study of the Underlying Etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Jandhyala, Surya Narayana; Belle, Jayaprakash; Rau, N.R; Shetty, Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (HPP) is a rare muscular disorder characterised by episodic weakness associated with hypokalaemia. The disease can either be inherited or acquired and misdiagnosis of the disease is quite common. Most of the data available on the disease is from the western world. Studies reporting aetiological, clinical and metabolic profiles of Indian population are sparse. Hence we tried to provide insights of the disease among the Indian population. Aim To study the aetiological, clinical and metabolic profile of patients diagnosed with Hypokalaemic Periodic Paralysis (HPP). Materials and Methods This is an observational and analytical study on HPP diagnosed patients, during September 2011 to September 2014 in Kasturba Hospital, Manipal. A total of 23 patients were studied. Detailed history, clinical evaluation and metabolic workup for secondary causes of HPP were analysed. Results Of the 23 patients, 57% had primary HPP while 43% had secondary HPP. The group of patients with primary HPP comprised of 92% males and 8% females with mean age of 28 years and the mean duration of symptoms of 18 hours. The group with secondary HPP comprised of 70% males and 30% females with mean age of 38.7 years and the mean duration of symptoms of 60 hours. The secondary causes of HPP were thyrotoxicosis (50%), infective diarrhea (20%), Crohn’s disease (10%), renal tubular acidosis (RTA) Type I (10%) and Conn’s syndrome (10%). Conclusion In our study primary HPP was found to be more common than secondary HPP. Males were predominantly affected in both groups. HPP should be ruled out before starting therapy for Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS). PMID:26500936

  18. Tea and Coffee Consumption and Risk of Laryngeal Cancer: A Systematic Review Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiangbo; Long, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Background Tea and coffee are the most commonly consumed beverages in the worldwide. The relationship between tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer was still unclear. Methods Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic database (Medline and EMBASE) and reviewing the reference lists of relevant articles until Oct. 2013. Observational studies that reported RRs and 95% CIs for the link of tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer were eligible. A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model. Results A total of 2,803 cases and 503,234 controls in 10 independent studies were identified. The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR?=?1.03; 95% CI: 0.66–1.61). However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR?=?1.47; 95% CI: 1.03–2.11). A dose-response relationship between coffee intake and laryngeal carcinoma was detected; however, no evidence of dose-response link between tea consumption and laryngeal carcinoma risk was detected. Conclusions The results from this meta-analysis of observational studies demonstrate that coffee consumption would increase the laryngeal cancer risk, while tea intake was not associated with risk of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:25502726

  19. Association between tea and coffee consumption and risk of laryngeal cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Zhiguo; Wang, Zhaoyan; Jin, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Epidemiological studies evaluating the association of tea and coffee consumption and the risk of laryngeal cancer have produced inconsistent results. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between tea and coffee consumption and laryngeal cancer risk. Methods: Pertinent studies were identified by a search in PubMed, Web of Knowledge and Wan Fang Med Online. The random effect model was used based on heterogeneity test. Publication bias was estimated using Egger’s regression asymmetry test. As a result, 11 articles were included in this meta-analysis. Results: For tea consumption and laryngeal cancer, data from 8 studies including 2167 laryngeal cancer cases were used, and the pooled results suggested that highest tea consumption versus lowest level wasn’t associated with the risk of laryngeal cancer [summary RR = 0.909, 95% CI = 0.674-1.227]. Eight studies comprising 2596 laryngeal cancer cases for coffee consumption and laryngeal cancer risk were included, and no association was found (summary RR = 1.218, 95% CI = 0.915-1.622). Conclusions: Finding from this meta-analysis suggested that tea and coffee consumption weren’t associated with the risk of laryngeal cancer. Since the potential biases and confounders could not be ruled out completely in this meta-analysis, further studies are warranted to confirm this result. PMID:25664021

  20. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Left-Right Laryngeal Asymmetries Based on Computational Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.; Lotto, Andrew J.; Bunton, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Computational modeling was used to examine the consequences of 5 different laryngeal asymmetries on acoustic and perceptual measures of vocal function. Method: A kinematic vocal fold model was used to impose 5 laryngeal asymmetries: adduction, edge bulging, nodal point ratio, amplitude of vibration, and starting phase. Thirty /a/ and /?/…

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) protein expression and laryngeal cancer prognosis: a meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong-Rong; Li, Ming-Dong; Li, Te; Tan, Yun; Zhang, Min; Chen, Ji-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protein expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and its clinical significance in laryngeal cancer. Methods: A comprehensive search for the related literature published in China and other countries was conducted in a variety of databases, including MEDLINE, Embase, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, Wanfang Data and VIP Database. A total of seven case-control studies were included in the final systematic assessment. A meta-analysis software program was used to statistically analyze the raw data from each study for the calculation of the pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results: The meta-analysis indicated that, compared with normal laryngeal tissue, the MMP2 protein was highly expressed in the laryngeal cancer tissue [OR=21.67; 95% CI: 11.61-40.43; P<0.001]. Compared with highly differentiated laryngeal cancer, the MMP2 protein expression level was higher in the moderately and poorly differentiated laryngeal cancers [OR=0.25; 95% CI: 0.13-0.46; P<0.001]. Compared with laryngeal cancers without lymph node metastasis, the laryngeal cancers with lymph node metastasis exhibited a greatly elevated MMP2 protein expression [OR=0.25; 95% CI: 0.14-0.46; P<0.001]. Conclusion: High protein expression levels of MMP2 may play an important role in the tumorigenesis, progression and prognosis of laryngeal cancer. PMID:25932160

  2. An Integrated, Dynamic Jaw and Laryngeal Model Constructed From CT Data

    E-print Network

    British Columbia, University of

    in the context of its use in the construction and simulation of the biomechanical jaw and larynx model. 1, and associated muscles, which enables analysis of interactions between the jaw and laryngeal systems and other model showing maxilla, mandible, laryngeal structures, and vertebrae, along with straight-line muscles

  3. Respiratory and Laryngeal Function during Spontaneous Speaking in Teachers with Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowell, Soren Y.; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M.; Hoit, Jeannette D.; Story, Brad H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if respiratory and laryngeal function during spontaneous speaking were different for teachers with voice disorders compared with teachers without voice problems. Method: Eighteen teachers, 9 with and 9 without voice disorders, were included in this study. Respiratory function was measured with magnetometry, and laryngeal

  4. Association between XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism and laryngeal cancer susceptibility in Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Pelin; Mutlu, Murad; Yalç?n, Serap; Yaylac?, At?lay; Ünsoy, Gözde; Saylam, Güleser; Ak?n, ?stemihan; Gündüz, Ufuk; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2015-12-01

    DNA repair systems are essential for normal cell function. Genetic alterations in the DNA repair genes such as X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3), can cause a change in protein activity which results in cancer susceptibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of XRCC3 Thr241Met single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), smoking and alcohol consumption with the risk of laryngeal cancer in Turkish population. The frequencies of Thr241Met SNP were studied in 58 laryngeal cancer cases (SSC) and 67 healthy individuals. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood samples of both controls and laryngeal cancer cases. Thr241Met SNP was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. The genotype and allele frequencies of Thr241Met polymorphism were not statistically significant between the laryngeal cancer and control groups. Carrying mutant allele was not associated with the risk of laryngeal cancer. On the other hand, smoking and chronic alcohol consumption were associated with the risk of laryngeal cancer but there is no association between Thr241Met, smoking and alcohol consumption in laryngeal cancer cases. These results indicate that Thr241Met polymorphism was not associated with the development of laryngeal cancer in Turkish population. However, it should be kept in mind that the association of a polymorphism with cancer susceptibility can differ due to several factors such as cancer type, selection criteria, ethnic differences and size of the studied population. PMID:25510985

  5. Respiratory and Laryngeal Responses to an Oral Air Pressure Bleed during Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jessica E.; Stathopoulos, Elaine T.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that the respiratory and laryngeal speech subsystems would respond to an air pressure bleed, but these responses have not been empirically studied. The present study examined the nature of the responses of the respiratory and laryngeal subsystems to an air pressure bleed in order to provide information relevant to the…

  6. Evaluation of femoral nerve blockade following inguinal paravascular block of Winnie: are there still lessons to be learnt?

    PubMed

    Jochum, D; O'Neill, T; Jabbour, H; Diarra, P D; Cuignet-Pourel, E; Bouaziz, H

    2005-10-01

    Lower limb peripheral nerve blocks are used to provide surgical anaesthesia or postoperative analgesia. Anatomical texts imply that femoral and saphenous nerve blocks be evaluated by sensory testing of the skin overlying the anterior aspect of the thigh, and the medial aspect of the foot, respectively. We have mapped the distribution of anaesthesia in 25 adults following femoral nerve blockade, performed using the inguinal paravascular technique of Winnie. There was substantial interindividual variation in the area of anaesthesia. Only the skin overlying the middle third of the medial thigh was consistently blocked in 100% of patients. The distribution of anaesthesia conformed to anatomical text descriptions in 24% of cases. We conclude that demonstration of complete quadriceps paralysis confirms femoral nerve blockade. Failing that, sensory evaluation of a femoral nerve block should involve testing the skin of the middle third of the medial aspect of the thigh. The skin overlying the anteromedial aspect of the middle third of the leg should be evaluated for saphenous nerve block. PMID:16179041

  7. Sleep paralysis in medieval Persia – the Hidayat of Akhawayni (?–983 AD)

    PubMed Central

    Golzari, Samad EJ; Khodadoust, Kazem; Alakbarli, Farid; Ghabili, Kamyar; Islambulchilar, Ziba; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Khalili, Majid; Abbasnejad, Feridoon; Sheikholeslamzadeh, Niloufar; Shahabi, Nasrollah Moghaddam; Hosseini, Seyed Fazel; Ansarin, Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Among the first three manuscripts written in Persian, Akhawayni’s Hidayat al-muta’allemin fi al-tibb was the most significant work compiled in the 10th century. Along with the hundreds of chapters on hygiene, anatomy, physiology, symptoms and treatments of the diseases of various organs, there is a chapter on sleep paralysis (night-mare) prior to description and treatment of epilepsy. The present article is a review of the Akhawayni’s teachings on sleep paralysis and of descriptions and treatments of sleep paralysis by the Greek, medieval, and Renaissance scholars. Akhawayni’s descriptions along with other early writings provide insight into sleep paralysis during the Middle Ages in general and in Persia in particular. PMID:22701323

  8. A 20-year-old Chinese man with recurrent hypokalemic periodic paralysis and delayed diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Naqi, Muniba; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Pant, Shradha; Shrestha, Rajesh; Tadros, Michael; Murukutla, Srujitha; Rothman, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Periodic paralysis in the setting of hypokalemia can be the result of several underlying conditions, requiring systematic evaluation. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP), a curable cause of hypokalemic periodic paralysis, can often be the first manifestation of thyrotoxicosis. Because the signs and symptoms of thyrotoxicosis can be subtle and clouded by the clinical distress of the patient, the diagnosis of the underlying metabolic disorder can be overlooked. The authors report a case of TPP in a young Chinese man in whom the diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis was initially missed. This case illustrates the lack of awareness of TPP among many physicians, delay in the diagnosis of TPP and the importance of performing thyroid function testing in all cases of periodic paralysis. PMID:22665461

  9. The response of laryngeal afferent fibres to mechanical and chemical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Boushey, H A; Richardson, P S; Widdicombe, J G; Wise, J C

    1974-07-01

    1. We have recorded afferent activity from ;single fibres' dissected from the superior laryngeal nerve of anaesthetized cats.2. Units which responded to gentle mechanical stimulation of the larynx epithelium were chosen for study.3. Receptors with myelinated fibres were grouped according to their spontaneous activity. Group 1 fibres had little or no spontaneous activity: group 2 fibres had constant and continuous spontaneous activity.4. Group 1 fibres had a wide range of adaptation rates. Their conduction velocities lay between 3.0 and 30 m/sec. The receptors were generally stimulated by ammonia and distilled water and often by CS riot control agent, 5 and 10% CO(2), 200 ppm SO(2), and cigarette smoke. Histamine, phenyl diguanide, graphite dust, 100 ppm SO(2) and saline drops did not generally excite the fibres.5. Group 2 fibres were slowly adapting. Their conduction velocities ranged between 8.0 and 26.5 m/sec. Ammonia usually, and distilled water sometimes, excited these fibres while 5 and 10% CO(2) mixtures inhibited them. A minority of group 2 fibres were pH sensitive, inhibited by acids and stimulated by alkaline buffers. Cigarette smoke had complex actions, either excitation, inhibition or, at different times, both. Histamine, P.d.g., CS, SO(2), saline drops and dust had no action on these fibres.6. Recordings were made from one unmyelinated fibre (conduction velocity 1.9 m/sec) which responded to stroking of the epithelium with a thread and to histamine, P.d.g. and ammonia vapour applied to the epithelium.7. We consider the site, method of excitation and reflex actions of the different receptors described. PMID:4855058

  10. Evidence for differential reflex regulation of cholinergic and noncholinergic parasympathetic nerves innervating the airways.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Canning, Brendan J

    2002-04-15

    The hypothesis that cholinergic and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic parasympathetic nerves innervating the airways are subject to differential reflex regulation was addressed. Pronounced contractile and relaxant parasympathetic reflex responses could be evoked by intravenous histamine, laryngeal mucosal application of capsaicin, inhaled capsaicin, or electrical stimulation of the vagal afferent nerves projecting to the esophagus and abdominal viscera. These data suggest that activation of multiple vagal afferent nerve subtypes can initiate both cholinergic and noncholinergic parasympathetic reflexes in the airways. Conversely, hypoxia or activation of the diving response from the nose evoked only cholinergic contractile reflexes. All contractile and relaxant responses evoked by these stimuli were absent in vagotomized animals or in animals pretreated with the ganglionic blocker trimethaphan, confirming their reflex and parasympathetic nature. The data indicate that cholinergic and noncholinergic parasympathetic nerves regulating airway caliber in guinea pigs are comprised of two distinct parasympathetic pathways that are subject to differential reflex regulation. This previously unrecognized complexity of autonomic regulation of airway caliber has potentially important implications for the mechanisms of airways hyperresponsiveness. PMID:11956048

  11. Hypoglossal nerve palsy following the robotic thyroidectomy for the papillary thyroid carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Suk-Won; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoscopic surgical techniques with robotic system in the thyroid cancer have been reported to show good results and advantages; however the risk of these techniques has not been fully documented. Presentation of the case We experienced an uncommon complicated case of a 20-year-old woman with a papillary thyroid carcinoma. After the robotic thyroidectomy, she complained of the tongue deviation, speech and swallowing difficulties of hypoglossal nerve palsy. Discussion In this case, a few etiologies could be suggested for the development of hypoglossal nerve palsy. It might be associated with direct stretching or entrapment of hypoglossal nerve during tumor resection; lateral placement of the laryngoscope on the tongue base; the hyperinflation of the laryngeal mask airway; and histological disruption of the intraneural connective tissue and blood circulation. Conclusion Although the robotic surgery is a creative technique and has been known to be safe and effective, the risk of this surgery including traumatic nerve injury should be taken into account before surgery. PMID:26275736

  12. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  13. The incendiary characteristics of the laryngeal and reinforced laryngeal mask airway to CO2 laser strike--a comparison with two polyvinyl chloride tracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, J

    1994-12-01

    The incendiary characteristics of the laryngeal and reinforced laryngeal mask airway to the CO2 laser have been compared with two polyvinyl chloride tracheal tubes. Three different power densities (2.35, 4.7 and 9.8 x 10(3) watt/cm2) were used, with either oxygen or a 30% oxygen/70% nitrous oxide mixture flowing down the tube. The laryngeal mask airway (and reinforced model) was shown to be more resistant than the polyvinyl chloride tracheal tubes. The laryngeal mask tube could not be ignited at a power density of 2.25 x 10(3) watt/cm2 after five minutes, although penetration occurred in 20-30 seconds. A layer of silica ash built up at the impact site and protected the underlying tube. The laryngeal mask airway cuff was penetrated at 3 to 5 seconds. At this power density the polyvinyl chloride tube ignited in 2 to 8 seconds and the cuff was penetrated in 0.1 seconds. At the highest power density the tubes of all airways ignited within 0.2 seconds. The possibilities for improving the incendiary characteristics of the laryngeal mask airway are discussed. PMID:7892974

  14. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schneider, W

    2003-03-01

    Isolated compression of the suprascapular nerve is a rare entity, that is seldom considered in differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. Usually atrophy of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles is present, resulting in weakened abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Mostly the patients do not note the paresis, but complain about a dull and burning pain over the dorsal shoulder region. In a proximal lesion (at level of the superior transverse scapular ligament) electromyography reveals changes in both muscles, while in a distal lesion (spinoglenoidal notch) only the infraspinatus shows a pathology. From 1996 to 2001 we diagnosed an isolated suprascapular entrapment in nine patients. Seven patients were operated: The ligament was removed and the nerve was neurolysed. The average age was 36 years. All patients showed pathological findings in electrophysiological and clinical examination. Five patients had an atrophy of both scapula muscles, two showed only infraspinatus muscle atrophy (one with a ganglion in the distal course of the nerve). Six patients were followed up. All showed an improvement. Pain disappeared and all patients were able to return to work and sport activities. Electrophysiological examination one year after operation revealed normal nerve conduction velocity. The number of motor units, however, showed a reduction by half compared to the healthy side. Lesions without history of trauma are usually caused by repetitive motion or posture. Weight lifting, volley ball and tennis promote the entrapment. Rarely a lesion (either idiopathic or due to external compression) is described for patients who underwent surgery. Patients with a ganglion or a defined cause of compression should be operated, patients who present without a distinct reason for compression should firstly be treated conservatively. Physiotherapy, antiphlogistic medication and avoiding of the pain triggering motion can improve the symptoms. However, if muscle atrophy is evident, an operation is indicated from our experience. PMID:12874724

  15. Cranial Nerve II: Vision.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  16. Congenital vocal cord paralysis with possible autosomal recessive inheritance: Case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, R.; Friedman, S.; Fallet, S.

    1996-08-23

    We describe an infant with congenital vocal cord paralysis born to consanguineous parents. While autosomal dominant and X-linked inheritance have been previously reported in this condition, we conclude that the degree of parental consanguinity in this case strongly suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Although we cannot exclude X-linked inheritance, evidence from animal studies demonstrates autosomal recessive inheritance and provides a possible molecular basis for congenital vocal cord paralysis. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Anaesthetic Management of A Patient with Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, S; Korula, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Summary We report the anaesthetic management of a patient with hypokalemic periodic paralysis who underwent hepaticojejunostomy for stricture of the common bile duct. Patients with this disorder, who are apparently normal, can develop sudden paralysis as they are exposed to many of the predisposing factors, perioperatively. The complications due to this rare genetic disorder, the factors that can precipitate these problems and preventive measures are discussed. PMID:20640129

  18. Superficial radial nerve–lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve anatomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Davidovich, Eduardo R; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study focuses on an anatomic variation in which the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve (LACN) innervates the radial border of the dorsum of the hand and thumb in addition to, or replacing, the superficial radial nerve (RSN). Here, we propose a technique of nerve conduction that identifies this variation. Methods We studied nerve conduction in 200 upper limbs of two series of 50 volunteers. We sought evidence of the aforementioned variation on the dorsum of the hand and in the thumb. Results We found eight occurrences of this variation on the dorsum of the hand and 11 variants on the thumb within the two respective series of 100 upper limbs studied. Discussion The RSN–LACN anatomic variation can be studied using nerve conduction. The knowledge of this variation is particularly important for the evaluation of proximal radial nerve injury. PMID:24653956

  19. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  20. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes.

    PubMed

    Küçükali, Cem Ismail; Kürtüncü, Murat; Akçay, Halil ?brahim; Tüzün, Erdem; Öge, Ali Emre

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH) syndromes can be subclassified as primary and secondary. The main primary PNH syndromes are neuromyotonia, cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS), and Morvan's syndrome, which cause widespread symptoms and signs without the association of an evident peripheral nerve disease. Their major symptoms are muscle twitching and stiffness, which differ only in severity between neuromyotonia and CFS. Cramps, pseudomyotonia, hyperhidrosis, and some other autonomic abnormalities, as well as mild positive sensory phenomena, can be seen in several patients. Symptoms reflecting the involvement of the central nervous system occur in Morvan's syndrome. Secondary PNH syndromes are generally seen in patients with focal or diffuse diseases affecting the peripheral nervous system. The PNH-related symptoms and signs are generally found incidentally during clinical or electrodiagnostic examinations. The electrophysiological findings that are very useful in the diagnosis of PNH are myokymic and neuromyotonic discharges in needle electromyography along with some additional indicators of increased nerve fiber excitability. Based on clinicopathological and etiological associations, PNH syndromes can also be classified as immune mediated, genetic, and those caused by other miscellaneous factors. There has been an increasing awareness on the role of voltage-gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity in primary PNH pathogenesis. Then again, a long list of toxic compounds and genetic factors has also been implicated in development of PNH. The management of primary PNH syndromes comprises symptomatic treatment with anticonvulsant drugs, immune modulation if necessary, and treatment of possible associated dysimmune and/or malignant conditions. PMID:25719304

  1. Expression of cell adhesion molecules in laryngeal carcinoma – preliminary analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Piotr; Kopta, Renata; Mochocki, Marcin; Brzezi?ska-B?aszczyk, Ewa; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study Intercellular adhesion molecules present in immunocompetent cells as well as endothelium and tumour cells can regulate cell migration, angiogenesis, apoptosis, proliferation, and metastases in solid tumours. The aim of this study was to analyse the sICAM-1 (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1) and sVCAM-1 (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures, and to find their relationships with clinicomorphological characteristics in laryngeal cancer. Materials and methods The analysis included a group of 50 patients with verified squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. The control group constituted 30 healthy volunteers. The pathological assessment included pTNM, stage, histological grade, and type of invasion according to the tumour front grading. The expression of adhesion molecules was assessed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Increased expression of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 was an indicator of more aggressive laryngeal carcinomas. More advanced local changes evaluated on the pT feature were connected with a higher sVCAM-1 (p = 0.017), but not sICAM-1 level. The presence of lymph node metastases correlated with a higher expression of adhesion molecules (p = 0.012 and p = 0.003, for sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1, respectively). Tumours with more diffuse growth and infiltrating with small cell groups (< 15/hpf) was characterised by the highest level of adhesive proteins (p = 0.001 and p = 0.02 for sICAM and sVCAM, respectively). Moreover, lower levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were observed more frequently in patients who lived longer than five years after treatment. Conclusions The study indicates the importance of the sICAM and sVCAM expression as indicators of advanced changes and prognosis in patients with laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:25784838

  2. Cryptococcal laryngitis: An uncommon presentation of a common pathogen.

    PubMed

    Atiya, Y; Masege, S D

    2015-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an ubiquitous encapsulated yeast found worldwide, especially in areas with pigeons. The fungus thrives in pigeon droppings and is responsible for primary pulmonary infection, but may disseminate and cause infection of the central nervous system, skin and bone. Most cases are reported in immunocompromised hosts, most commonly those infected with HIV. However, infection has been reported in immunocompetent hosts. Primary infection of the larynx is uncommon, and to date only 12 cases have been reported. We present the first South African report of a young woman with HIV who presented with hoarseness of uncertain aetiology, which was later confirmed to be cryptococcal laryngitis. PMID:26636155

  3. Idiopathic ulcerative laryngitis causing midmembranous vocal fold granuloma.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Catherine F; Sulica, Lucian

    2013-02-01

    Idiopathic ulcerative laryngitis (IUL) is characterized by bilateral midmembranous vocal fold ulceration, which follows upper respiratory infection with cough. In contrast, granuloma of the membranous vocal fold can occur rarely following microlaryngoscopy, presumably secondary to surgical violation of deep tissue planes. We report a novel case of noniatrogenic membranous vocal fold granulation developing in a patient with IUL. Although the presence of granulation implied injury to the entire microstructure of the vibratory portion of the vocal fold, the lesion resolved with conservative management without adverse sequelae. PMID:22990885

  4. Acquired tracheoesophageal fistula status post laryngeal neoplasm resection

    PubMed Central

    Luber, Sarah; Alweis, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), albeit rare, can be a life-threatening condition that requires prompt identification and treatment. Pulmonary contamination and restriction of proper nutrition are common, unfortunate consequences of untreated TEFs and are often the causes of mortality in this population. In our patient, a history of laryngeal malignancy along with symptoms of chest pain and cough with ingestion of liquids, even without evidence of aspiration pneumonia, appropriately prompted investigation for potential TEF. Initial imaging through barium swallow identified the TEF, and the patient underwent treatment with endoclips by endoscopy with bronchoscopic assistance. PMID:25846352

  5. Raman spectroscopy for optical diagnosis of laryngeal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Seng Khoon; Zheng, Wei; Lau, David P.; Huang, Zhiwei

    2008-02-01

    In this report, the diagnostic ability of near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy for identifying the malignant tumors from normal tissues in the larynx was studied. A rapid NIR Raman system was utilized. Multivariate statistical techniques were employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms. Raman spectra in the range of 800-1,800 cm-1 differed significantly between normal and malignant tumor tissues. The diagnostic algorithms can yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 92.9% and specificity 83.3% for separating malignant tumors from normal laryngeal tissues. NIR Raman spectroscopy with multivariate statistical techniques has a potential for the non-invasive detection of malignant tumors in the larynx.

  6. Traumatic Laryngeal Fracture in a Collegiate Basketball Player

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeffery D.; Shuler, Franklin D.; Mo, Bi; Gibbs, Scott R.; Belmaggio, Tom; Giangarra, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Laryngotracheal trauma is a rare condition that accounts for less than 1% of blunt trauma. Laryngotracheal fractures are uncommon in sports, even in settings where athletes are more vulnerable, including football, basketball, and hockey. If a laryngeal injury is suspected, immediate evaluation is required to avoid a delay in the diagnosis of a potentially life-threatening injury. A collegiate basketball player sustained an unusual fracture involving the cricoid and thyroid cartilage during practice. This case illustrates the importance of rapid identification and early management of patients with blunt laryngotracheal trauma in sports. PMID:24427402

  7. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  8. Selection of muscle and nerve-cuff electrodes for neuroprostheses using customizable musculoskeletal model.

    PubMed

    Blana, Dimitra; Hincapie, Juan G; Chadwick, Edward K; Kirsch, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic systems based on functional electrical stimulation aim to restore motor function to individuals with paralysis following spinal cord injury. Identifying the optimal electrode set for the neuroprosthesis is complicated because it depends on the characteristics of the individual (such as injury level), the force capacities of the muscles, the movements the system aims to restore, and the hardware limitations (number and type of electrodes available). An electrode-selection method has been developed that uses a customized musculoskeletal model. Candidate electrode sets are created based on desired functional outcomes and the hard ware limitations of the proposed system. Inverse-dynamic simulations are performed to determine the proportion of target movements that can be accomplished with each set; the set that allows the most movements to be performed is chosen as the optimal set. The technique is demonstrated here for a system recently developed by our research group to restore whole-arm movement to individuals with high-level tetraplegia. The optimal set included selective nerve-cuff electrodes for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves; single-channel cuffs for the axillary, suprascapular, upper subscapular, and long-thoracic nerves; and muscle-based electrodes for the remaining channels. The importance of functional goals, hardware limitations, muscle and nerve anatomy, and surgical feasibility are highlighted. PMID:23881765

  9. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  10. Effect of Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides Glucose Transporter-1 on Enhancement of Radiosensitivity of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sen-Xiang; Luo, Xing-Mei; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Bao, Yang-Yang; Fan, Jun; Lu, Zhong-Jie; Liao, Xin-Biao; Huang, Ya-Ping; Wu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Qin-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Laryngeal carcinomas always resist to radiotherapy. Hypoxia is an important factor in radioresistance of laryngeal carcinoma. Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) is considered to be a possible intrinsic marker of hypoxia in malignant tumors. We speculated that the inhibition of GLUT-1 expression might improve the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma. Methods: We assessed the effect of GLUT-1 expression on radioresistance of laryngeal carcinoma and the effect of GLUT-1 expressions by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) on the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Results: After transfection of GLUT-1 AS-ODNs: MTS assay showed the survival rates of radiation groups were reduced with the prolongation of culture time (p<0.05); Cell survival rates were significantly reduced along with the increasing of radiation dose (p<0.05). There was significant difference in the expression of GLUT-1mRNA and protein in the same X-ray dose between before and after X-ray radiation (p<0.05). In vivo, the expressions of GLUT-1 mRNA and protein after 8Gy radiation plus transfection of GLUT-1 AS-ODNs were significant decreased compared to 8Gy radiation alone (p<0.001). Conclusion: Radioresistance of laryngeal carcinoma may be associated with increased expression of GLUT-1 mRNA and protein. GLUT-1 AS-ODNs may enhance the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma mainly by inhibiting the expression of GLUT-1. PMID:23983599

  11. Postextubation laryngeal edema and stridor resulting in respiratory failure in critically ill adult patients: updated review.

    PubMed

    Pluijms, Wouter A; van Mook, Walther Nka; Wittekamp, Bastiaan Hj; Bergmans, Dennis Cjj

    2015-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation is frequently complicated by laryngeal edema, which may present as postextubation stridor or respiratory difficulty or both. Ultimately, postextubation laryngeal edema may result in respiratory failure with subsequent reintubation. Risk factors for postextubation laryngeal edema include female gender, large tube size, and prolonged intubation. Although patients at low risk for postextubation respiratory insufficiency due to laryngeal edema can be identified by the cuff leak test or laryngeal ultrasound, no reliable test for the identification of high-risk patients is currently available. If applied in a timely manner, intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids can prevent postextubation laryngeal edema; however, the inability to identify high-risk patients prevents the targeted pretreatment of these patients. Therefore, the decision to start corticosteroids should be made on an individual basis and on the basis of the outcome of the cuff leak test and additional risk factors. The preferential treatment of postextubation laryngeal edema consists of intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids combined with nebulized epinephrine, although no data on the optimal treatment algorithm are available. In the presence of respiratory failure, reintubation should be performed without delay. Application of noninvasive ventilation or inhalation of a helium/oxygen mixture is not indicated since it does not improve outcome and increases the delay to intubation. PMID:26395175

  12. Using the nerve stimulator for peripheral or plexus nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Urmey, W F

    2006-06-01

    Conventional methodology for nerve location utilizes anatomical landmarks followed by invasive exploration with a needle to a suitable endpoint. An appropriate endpoint can be either anatomical in nature (e.g. transaterial technique) or functional (paresthesia or motor response to electrical stimulation). Ability to electrically stimulate a peripheral nerve or plexus depends upon many variables, including; 1) conductive area at the electrode, 2) electrical impedance, 3) electrode-to-nerve distance, 4) current flow (amperage), and 5) pulse duration. Electrode conductive area follows the equation R = rhoL/A, where R = electrical resistance, p = tissue resistivity, L = electrode-to-nerve distance, and A = electrode conductive area. Therefore resistance varies to the inverse of the electrode's conductive area. Tissue electrical impedance varies as a function of the tissue composition. In general, tissues with higher lipid content have higher impedances. Modern electrical nerve stimulators are designed to keep current constant, in spite of varying impedance. The electrode-to-nerve distance has the most influence on the ability to elicit a motor response to electrical stimulation. This is governed by Coulomb's law: E = K(Q/r2) where E = required stimulating charge, K= constant, Q = minimal required stimulating current, and r = electrode-to-nerve distance. Therefore, ability to stimulate the nerve at low amperage (e.g. < 0.5 mA), indicates an extremely close position to the nerve. Similarly, increasing current flow (amperage) increases the ability to stimulate the nerve at a distance. Increasing pulse duration increases the flow of electrons during a current pulse at any given amperage. Therefore, reducing pulse duration to very short times (e.g. 0.1 or 0.05 ms) diminishes current dispersion, requiring the needle tip to be extremely close to the nerve to elicit a motor response. The above parameters can be varied optimally to enhance successful nerve location and subsequent blockade. Unlike imaging modalities such as ultrasonography, electrical nerve stimulation depends upon nerve conduction. Similarly, percutaneous electrode guidance (PEG) makes use of the above variables to allow prelocation of the nerve by transcutaneous stimulation. PMID:16682917

  13. Facial nerve neuromas: radiologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Latack, J T; Gabrielsen, T O; Knake, J E; Kemink, J L; Graham, M D; Gebarski, S S; Yang, P J

    1983-12-01

    Eight patients who had facial nerve neuromas were examined, and the radiographic findings are reported. Thin section tomography, high resolution computed tomography, posterior fossa computed tomography, and cerebellopontine angle cisternography using Pantopaque (iophendylate) demonstrated bone erosions and soft tissue masses conforming to the course of the facial nerve. The lesions generally exhibited either a proximal or a distal pattern of nerve involvement. Radiologic imaging frequently permits a correct preoperative diagnosis and accurate definition of the extent of facial nerve neuromas, assessments that are important for proper patient management. PMID:6606188

  14. Laryngeal effects of nasal allergen provocation in singers with allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Verguts, Monique M L; Eggermont, Anita; Decoster, Wivine; de Jong, Felix I C R S; Hellings, Peter W

    2011-03-01

    In spite of our recent insight into nasobronchial interaction mechanisms in allergic airway disease, the association between allergic rhinitis and voice complaints remains obscure. To evaluate the effects of nasal allergen provocation and seasonal grass pollen exposure on subjective and objective laryngeal parameters in singers with and without allergic rhinitis, an observational case control study was conducted. Prior to the pollen season, six grass pollen allergic and six non-allergic semiprofessional singers were exposed to nebulized sham solution and grass pollen extract (HAL°) in rising concentrations. After 3 min, 60 min and 24 h, nasal and laryngeal complaints were evaluated by the use of a visual analog scale (VAS). Laryngeal parameters like voice appearance (video stroboscopic images), voice range profile and subjective (GRBAS) and objective (jitter, shimmer, H/N, DSI) voice quality were evaluated before provocation, after 60 min and 24 h. During the pollen season, the allergic singers were re-evaluated. Results showed that in allergic singers both nasal (TNS of 4.0 ± 2.4 vs. 0.0 ± 0.0, p < 0.05) and laryngeal complaints (TLS of 1.4 ± 1.1 vs. 0.0 ± 0.2, p < 0.05) were induced at 3 min after the provocation. The induced laryngeal complaints were the feeling of laryngeal irritation, secretions and globus. No change in voice quality or stroboscopy score was measured. During the pollen season, laryngeal complaints were present (TLS of 2.4 ± 2.4) in allergic singers, without evidence for objective voice and laryngeal changes. In conclusion, we here demonstrate the rapid induction of laryngeal complaints in allergic singers by nasal allergen provocation and during the pollen season. There was no subject reported or investigator measured change in voice quality. No change in stroboscopy score was measured. PMID:21072528

  15. Contribution of TIP30 to chemoresistance in laryngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M; Yin, F; Yang, L; Chen, S; Chen, R; Zhou, X; Jing, W; Fan, X; Jia, R; Wang, H; Zheng, H; Zhao, J; Guo, Y

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is one of the most common carcinomas of the head and neck. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, the survival of patients with LSCC has not improved in the past two decades. TIP30, a newly identified tumour suppressor, appears to be involved in multiple processes during tumour development. Here, we investigated the involvement of TIP30 in chemoresistance of LSCC in vitro and in vivo. We showed that TIP30 expression decreased significantly in drug-selected cells (DSCs) of laryngeal carcinoma. Suppressing TIP30 enhanced resistance capability to multiple chemotherapy drugs, cell proliferation and self-renewal in Hep2 cells. Additionally, decreased self-renewal capacity and chemotherapeutic resistance were observed in DSCs overexpressing TIP30. Furthermore, TIP30 negatively regulated tumourigenesis and chemoresistance in LSCC cells subcutaneously transplanted into nude mice. Moreover, decreased TIP30 expression contributed to chemoresistance, self-renewal and proliferation of LSCC cells via nuclearlisation of ?-catenin, a cell-cell adhesion and stem cell renewal regulator. Consistently, Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling analyses showed that decreased TIP30 expression independently predicted poor survival in patients with LSCC. Taken together, our results reveal that TIP30 has a crucial role in chemoresistance of LSCC through the AKT/glycogen synthase kinase-3?/?-catenin signalling pathway and may be a promising candidate for improving LSCC chemotherapy. PMID:25321475

  16. Automated speech analysis applied to laryngeal disease categorization.

    PubMed

    Gelzinis, A; Verikas, A; Bacauskiene, M

    2008-07-01

    The long-term goal of the work is a decision support system for diagnostics of laryngeal diseases. Colour images of vocal folds, a voice signal, and questionnaire data are the information sources to be used in the analysis. This paper is concerned with automated analysis of a voice signal applied to screening of laryngeal diseases. The effectiveness of 11 different feature sets in classification of voice recordings of the sustained phonation of the vowel sound /a/ into a healthy and two pathological classes, diffuse and nodular, is investigated. A k-NN classifier, SVM, and a committee build using various aggregation options are used for the classification. The study was made using the mixed gender database containing 312 voice recordings. The correct classification rate of 84.6% was achieved when using an SVM committee consisting of four members. The pitch and amplitude perturbation measures, cepstral energy features, autocorrelation features as well as linear prediction cosine transform coefficients were amongst the feature sets providing the best performance. In the case of two class classification, using recordings from 79 subjects representing the pathological and 69 the healthy class, the correct classification rate of 95.5% was obtained from a five member committee. Again the pitch and amplitude perturbation measures provided the best performance. PMID:18346812

  17. Functional organ preservation in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosch, Petra; Fazel, Asita

    2012-01-01

    The principles of open versus laser microsurgical approaches for partial resections of the larynx are described, oncologic as well as functional results discussed and corresponding outcomes following primary radiotherapy are opposed. Over the last decade, the endoscopic partial resection of the larynx has developed to an accepted approach in the treatment of early glottic and supraglottic carcinomas thus leading to a remarkable decline in the use of open surgery. Comparing the various surgical approaches of laryngeal partial resections, the oncological outcome of the patients, as far as survival and organ preservation are concerned, are comparable, whereas functional results of the endoscopic procedures are superior with less morbidity. The surgical procedures put together, are all superior to radiotherapy concerning organ preservation. Transoral laser microsurgery has been used successfully for vocal cord carcinomas with impaired mobility or fixation of the vocal cord, supraglottic carcinomas with infiltration of the pre- and/or paraglottic space as well as for selected hypopharyngeal carcinomas. It has been well documented that laser microsurgery achieves good oncological as well as functional results with reasonable morbidity. However, patients with those tumours have been successfully treated by open partial resections of the larynx at medical centres with appropriate expertise. The initially enthusiastic assessment of study results concerning the efficacy of various protocols of chemoradiation with the intent of organ preservation for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas are judged more cautious, today, due to recent reports of rather high rates of late toxicity complications. PMID:22558052

  18. Intraglottal geometry and velocity measurements in canine larynges

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Liran; Khosla, Sid; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2014-01-01

    Previous flow velocity measurements during phonation in canine larynges were done above the glottal exit. These studies found that vortical structures are present in the flow above the glottis at different phases of the glottal cycle. Some vortices were observed to leave the glottis during the closing phase and assumptions were proposed regarding their formation mechanism. In the current study, intraglottal velocity measurements are performed using PIV, and the intraglottal flow characteristics are determined. Results from five canine larynges show that at low subglottal pressure the glottis assumes a minimal divergence angle during closing and the flow separates at the glottal exit. Vortical structures are observed above the glottis but not inside. As the subglottal pressure is increased, the divergence angle between the folds during closing increases and the location of the flow separation moves upstream into the glottis. Entrainment flow enters the glottis to fill the void that is formed between the glottal jet and the fold. Vortical structures develop near the superior edge at medium and high subglottal pressures from the flow separation. The magnitude of their swirling strength changes as a function of the wall dynamics. PMID:24437778

  19. Radiotherapy of advanced laryngeal cancer using three small fractions daily

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, P.J.; Morgan, D.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Since 1983, the authors have treated advanced (UICC stages 3 and 4) squamous carcinomas of the larynx by primary radiotherapy, using three small fractions a day, 3-4 h interfraction interval, 5 days per week. The early patients received doses per fraction of 1.5 Gy, and a total dose of approximately 70 Gy, given as a split-course over 6 to 7 weeks. While overall tumor control and laryngeal preservation was good, a number of severe late radiation reactions were seen. The schedule was then modified, with a reduction in the fraction size to 1.1 Gy, the total dose to 60 Gy, and the overall time to 4 weeks, with omission of the mid-treatment split. Since 1986, we have treated 26 patients in this way. Acute reactions are brisk, but rapidly healing. Loco-regional control was achieved in 22 patients, only one of whom has relapsed to date, in a solitary node, salvaged by radical neck dissection. Four have died of uncontrolled loco-regional malignancy, and three of intercurrent disease while in clinical remission. No serious late morbidity has been observed in surviving patients, and vocal quality is good in the majority. These results suggest that this hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy schedule may offer an acceptable nonsurgical, voice-preserving treatment for advanced laryngeal carcinoma; it can be used in a normally working radiotherapy department.

  20. Evaluation of Voice Disorders in Patients with Active Laryngeal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Marcia Mendonça; da Silva, Fernanda dos Santos; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Guimarães, Gabriela Rodrigues; Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Braga, Frederico Pereira Bom; Braga, Mateus Pereira Bom; Reis, João Gustavo Corrêa; da Costa, Daniel César Silva; Palmeiro, Mariana Reuter; Rolla, Valéria Cavalcanti; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laryngeal tuberculosis (LTB) is the most frequent larynx granulomatous disease. In general there is lung involvement, but in an important proportion of cases you can find LTB without pulmonary disease. The lesions observed in LTB, such as ulceration and fibrosis, can interfere in the process of voice production. The involvement of the mucous lining of the vocal folds can change their flexibility and, consequently, change voice quality, and the main symptom is dysphonia present in almost 90% of cases. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality in LTB patients. Material and Method A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 24 patients. Result The most frequently affected sites were vocal folds in 87.5% patients, vestibular folds in 66.7%, epiglottis in 41.7%, arytenoid in 50%, aryepiglottic folds in 33.3%, and interarytenoid region in 33.3% patients. We found 95.8% cases of dysphonia. The voice acoustic analysis showed 58.3% cases of Jitter alterations, 83.3% of Shimmer and 70.8% of GNE. Conclusion Voice disorders found in active laryngeal tuberculosis are similar to those reported after clinical healing of the disease, suggesting that sequelae and vocal adjustments may install during the active phase of the disease, negatively impacting the process of vocal quality reestablishment. PMID:26009888

  1. Episodic weakness and vacuolar myopathy in hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Basali, Diana; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman who presented with a 20year history of gradually progressive lower extremity weakness, characterized by knee buckling with occasional falls and foot dragging. She also experienced difficulty in lifting her arms above her shoulders. The primary periodic paralyses are rare disorders caused by dysfunctional ion channels in skeletal muscle. The hypokalemic type is generally an autosomal dominant condition, due to missense mutations in the alpha subunits of the skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel genes, CACN1AS, or the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene, SCN4A. The affected patients typically present with episodic weakness. For our patient, the consumption of foods high in carbohydrates seemed to precipitate the episodes of weakness. Her family history was significant for six blood relatives, including three sons and three relatives on the paternal side, who had experienced similar symptoms. A biopsy of the left rectus femoralis muscle showed vacuolar myopathic changes in the scattered muscle fibers, accompanied by occasional degenerating and regenerating muscle fibers. There was no evidence of inflammation on the biopsy. The vacuoles were often associated with increased acid phosphatase staining. An electron microscopic examination showed that the vacuolar changes were due to T-tubule dilation, a characteristic of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Other metabolic etiologies of vacuolar myopathy, such as acid phosphatase (lysosomal) associated acid maltase deficiency (a glycogen storage disease), need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26190219

  2. Assembly of recombinant Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus capsids.

    PubMed

    Ren, Junyuan; Cone, Abigail; Willmot, Rebecca; Jones, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    The dicistrovirus Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV) has been implicated in the worldwide decline of honey bees. Studies of IAPV and many other bee viruses in pure culture are restricted by available isolates and permissive cell culture. Here we show that coupling the IAPV major structural precursor protein ORF2 to its cognate 3C-like processing enzyme results in processing of the precursor to the individual structural proteins in a number of insect cell lines following expression by a recombinant baculovirus. The efficiency of expression is influenced by the level of IAPV 3C protein and moderation of its activity is required for optimal expression. The mature IAPV structural proteins assembled into empty capsids that migrated as particles on sucrose velocity gradients and showed typical dicistrovirus like morphology when examined by electron microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies raised to recombinant capsids were configured into a diagnostic test specific for the presence of IAPV. Recombinant capsids for each of the many bee viruses within the picornavirus family may provide virus specific reagents for the on-going investigation of the causes of honeybee loss. PMID:25153716

  3. Residual Paralysis: Does it Influence Outcome After Ambulatory Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Hassan; McLean, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents are used to facilitate tracheal intubation in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery. The use of high-dose neuromuscular blocking agents to achieve muscle paralysis throughout the case carries an increased risk of residual post-operative neuromuscular blockade, which is associated with increased respiratory morbidity. Visually monitoring the train-of-four (TOF) fade is not sensitive enough to detect a TOF fade between 0.4 and 0.9. A ratio <0.9 indicates inadequate recovery. Quantitative neuromuscular transmission monitoring (e.g., acceleromyography) should be used to exclude residual neuromuscular blockade at the end of the case. Residual neuromuscular blockade needs to be reversed with neostigmine, but it’s use must be guided by TOF monitoring results since deep block cannot be reversed, and neostigmine administration after complete recovery of the TOF-ratio can induce muscle weakness. The development and use of new selectively binding reversal agents (sugammadex and calabadion) warrants reevaluation of this area of clinical practice. PMID:25530723

  4. Life-threatening hypokalemic paralysis in a young bodybuilder.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kitty K T; So, Wing-Yee; Kong, Alice P S; Ma, Ronald C W; Chow, Francis C C

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of life-threatening hypokalemia in a 28-year-old bodybuilder who presented with sudden onset bilateral lower limbs paralysis few days after his bodybuilding competition. His electrocardiogram (ECG) showed typical u-waves due to severe hypokalemia (serum potassium 1.6?mmol/L, reference range (RR) 3.5-5.0?mmol/L). He was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and was treated with potassium replacement. The patient later admitted that he had exposed himself to weight loss agents of unknown nature, purchased online, and large carbohydrate loads in preparation for the competition. He made a full recovery after a few days and discharged himself from the hospital against medical advice. The severe hypokalemia was thought to be caused by several mechanisms to be discussed in this report. With the ever rising number of new fitness centers recently, the ease of online purchasing of almost any drug, and the increasing numbers of youngsters getting into the bodybuilding arena, clinicians should be able to recognize the possible causes of sudden severe hypokalemia in these patients in order to revert the pathophysiology. PMID:24660073

  5. Life-Threatening Hypokalemic Paralysis in a Young Bodybuilder

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Kitty K. T.; So, Wing-Yee; Kong, Alice P. S.; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Chow, Francis C. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of life-threatening hypokalemia in a 28-year-old bodybuilder who presented with sudden onset bilateral lower limbs paralysis few days after his bodybuilding competition. His electrocardiogram (ECG) showed typical u-waves due to severe hypokalemia (serum potassium 1.6?mmol/L, reference range (RR) 3.5–5.0?mmol/L). He was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and was treated with potassium replacement. The patient later admitted that he had exposed himself to weight loss agents of unknown nature, purchased online, and large carbohydrate loads in preparation for the competition. He made a full recovery after a few days and discharged himself from the hospital against medical advice. The severe hypokalemia was thought to be caused by several mechanisms to be discussed in this report. With the ever rising number of new fitness centers recently, the ease of online purchasing of almost any drug, and the increasing numbers of youngsters getting into the bodybuilding arena, clinicians should be able to recognize the possible causes of sudden severe hypokalemia in these patients in order to revert the pathophysiology. PMID:24660073

  6. Size of quadriceps femoris may contribute to thyrotoxic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Wei; He, Ying; Yao, Yu; Qiu, Li; Tian, Hao-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) frequently occurs on male individuals at their third and forth decades. The major site of involvement is the proximal muscles of lower limbs. Increasing evidence has shown that the occurrence of TPP is determined by multiple factors. We hypothesized that apart from hormonal fluctuations, skeletal muscle itself may explain for the age and sex variance as well. Our study was established to explore whether the size of lower limb skeletal muscles were related to TPP. We conducted a clinical experiment including 43 patients diagnosed with TPP (Group 1) and 39 pure hyperthyroidism individuals (Group 2). Current age, body mass index (BMI), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), average girth of bilateral upper arm and thigh, physical activity level (PAL) were measured. We also adopted B mode ultrasound to quantify the muscle thickness (MT) of the major muscle involved in the disease, the quadriceps femoris (QF, including rectus femoris, RF; vastus intermedius, VI; vastus medialis, VM and vastus lateralis, VL). Patients were matched in TSH, FT4 and FT3. PAL was also statistically identical between groups. Age, BMI, thigh girth, the average of bilateral MT of QF were statistically different. After adjusting for age, BMI and girth, Group 1 still presented with larger MT of QF than Group 2, regardless of their current thyroid hormone level. There indeed exists an independent relationship between muscle thickness and TPP. PMID:26519100

  7. Pseudobulbar paralysis in the Renaissance: Cosimo I de' Medici case.

    PubMed

    Arba, F; Inzitari, D; Lippi, D

    2014-07-01

    Cosimo I de' Medici (1519-1574) was the first Grand Duke of Tuscany. He was one of the most important members of the Medici family. He was an excellent conqueror and a good politician. Moreover, he was able to attract and encourage artists, scientists and architects to promote Florence as the cultural capital of the Italian Renaissance. Historical chronicles report that he suffered from a stroke when he was 49 years old. Together with the acute manifestation of stroke, he displayed peculiar symptoms. He had gait disturbances and sphincter dysfunctions. His language became poor and hard to understand. His mood was very fluctuating and in the last years of his life he was a short-tempered man. In addition, he had a characteristic symptom, so-called pathological laughing and crying. The course of his disease was slow and stuttering. Taken together, these data seem to be one of the first reports of pseudobulbar paralysis. The disease of Cosimo I was probably due to a chronic cerebral vasculopathy, known as small vessels disease. We discuss this hypothesis regarding an ancient clinical case, with the support of current studies. PMID:24604411

  8. Extracellular Potassium Homeostasis: Insights from Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Kuo, Elizabeth; Huang, Chou-Long

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular potassium makes up only about 2% of the total body potassium store. The majority of the body potassium is distributed in the intracellular space, and of which about 80% is in skeletal muscle. Movement of potassium in and out of skeletal muscle thus plays a pivotal role in extracellular potassium homeostasis. The exchange of potassium between the extracellular space and skeletal muscle is mediated by specific membrane transporters. These include potassium uptake by Na+, K+-ATPase and release by inward rectifier K+ channels. These processes are regulated by circulating hormones, peptides, ions, and by physical activity of muscle as well as dietary potassium intake. Pharmaceutical agents, poisons and disease conditions also affect the exchange and alter extracellular potassium concentration. Here, we review extracellular potassium homeostasis focusing on factors and conditions that influence the balance of potassium movement in skeletal muscle. Recent findings that mutations of a skeletal muscle-specific inward rectifier K+ channel cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis provide interesting insights into the role of skeletal muscle in extracellular potassium homeostasis. These recent findings will be reviewed. PMID:23953801

  9. An Unusual Case of Laryngeal Paraganglioma in a Patient with Carotid Body Paraganglioma: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Serap; Senol, Serkan; Imamoglu, Hakan; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Ekinci, Afra; Yuce, Imdat; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Multiple paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare conditions. Carotid paragangliomas are most common multiple paragangliomas. Laryngeal paragangliomas are very rare neuroendocrine tumors and usually are seen as symptomatic solitary lesions. We present multimodality imaging findings of incidentally detected laryngeal paraganglioma in a woman with synchronous carotid body paraganglioma and positive family history. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of laryngeal and carotid body paragangliomas in a patient with positive family history. Radiologists should keep in mind that paragangliomas may occur in various locations as multiple tumors. PMID:26649218

  10. An Unusual Case of Laryngeal Paraganglioma in a Patient with Carotid Body Paraganglioma: Multimodality Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Serap; Senol, Serkan; Imamoglu, Hakan; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Ekinci, Afra; Yuce, Imdat; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Multiple paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare conditions. Carotid paragangliomas are most common multiple paragangliomas. Laryngeal paragangliomas are very rare neuroendocrine tumors and usually are seen as symptomatic solitary lesions. We present multimodality imaging findings of incidentally detected laryngeal paraganglioma in a woman with synchronous carotid body paraganglioma and positive family history. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of laryngeal and carotid body paragangliomas in a patient with positive family history. Radiologists should keep in mind that paragangliomas may occur in various locations as multiple tumors. PMID:26649218

  11. Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in Human Cervical and Thoracic Vagus Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Atsuko; Green, Hunter R.; Lee, Thomas D.; Hong, LongSheng; Tan, Jian; Vinters, Harry V.; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Fishbein, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation therapy (VNS) has been used for chronic heart failure (CHF), and is believed to improve imbalance of autonomic control by increasing parasympathetic activity. Although it is known that there is neural communication between the VN and the cervical sympathetic trunk, there are few data regarding the quantity and/or distribution of the sympathetic components within the VN. Objective To examine the sympathetic component within human VN and correlate these with the presence of cardiac and neurologic diseases. Methods We performed immunohistochemistry on 31 human cervical and thoracic VNs (total 104 VNs) from autopsies and we reviewed the patients’ records. We correlated the quantity of sympathetic nerve fibers within the VNs with cardiovascular and neurologic disease states. Results All 104 VNs contain TH positive (sympathetic) nerve fibers; the mean TH positive areas were 5.47% in right cervical, 3.97% in left cervical, 5.11% in right thoracic, and 4.20% in left thoracic VN. The distribution of TH positive nerve fibers varied from case to case: central, peripheral, or scattered throughout nerve bundles. No statistically significant differences in nerve morphology were seen between diseases in which VNS is considered effective (depression and CHF), and other cardiovascular diseases, or neurodegenerative disease. Conclusion Human VNs contain sympathetic nerve fibers. The sympathetic component within the VN could play a role in physiologic effects reported with VNS. The recognition of sympathetic nerve fibers in the VNs may lead to better understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of VNS. PMID:24768897

  12. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  13. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Nerve Changes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anD human services national institutes of health Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Nerve Changes “My fingers and toes ... I always wore shoes.” About nerve changes Some chemotherapy can cause nerve problems. You may have a ...

  14. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  15. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  16. Noninvasive Reactivation of Motor Descending Control after Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, Yury P; Lu, Daniel C; Modaber, Morteza; Zdunowski, Sharon; Gad, Parag; Sayenko, Dimitry G; Morikawa, Erika; Haakana, Piia; Ferguson, Adam R; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2015-12-15

    The present prognosis for the recovery of voluntary control of movement in patients diagnosed as motor complete is generally poor. Herein we introduce a novel and noninvasive stimulation strategy of painless transcutaneous electrical enabling motor control and a pharmacological enabling motor control strategy to neuromodulate the physiological state of the spinal cord. This neuromodulation enabled the spinal locomotor networks of individuals with motor complete paralysis for 2-6 years American Spinal Cord Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) to be re-engaged and trained. We showed that locomotor-like stepping could be induced without voluntary effort within a single test session using electrical stimulation and training. We also observed significant facilitation of voluntary influence on the stepping movements in the presence of stimulation over a 4-week period in each subject. Using these strategies we transformed brain-spinal neuronal networks from a dormant to a functional state sufficiently to enable recovery of voluntary movement in five out of five subjects. Pharmacological intervention combined with stimulation and training resulted in further improvement in voluntary motor control of stepping-like movements in all subjects. We also observed on-command selective activation of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles when attempting to plantarflex. At the end of 18 weeks of weekly interventions the mean changes in the amplitude of voluntarily controlled movement without stimulation was as high as occurred when combined with electrical stimulation. Additionally, spinally evoked motor potentials were readily modulated in the presence of voluntary effort, providing electrophysiological evidence of the re-establishment of functional connectivity among neural networks between the brain and the spinal cord. PMID:26077679

  17. A calcium channel mutant mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Burns, Dennis K.; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F.; Struyk, Arie F.; Schneider, Martin F.; Cannon, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is a familial skeletal muscle disorder that presents with recurrent episodes of severe weakness lasting hours to days associated with reduced serum potassium (K+). HypoPP is genetically heterogeneous, with missense mutations of a calcium channel (CaV1.1) or a sodium channel (NaV1.4) accounting for 60% and 20% of cases, respectively. The mechanistic link between CaV1.1 mutations and the ictal loss of muscle excitability during an attack of weakness in HypoPP is unknown. To address this question, we developed a mouse model for HypoPP with a targeted CaV1.1 R528H mutation. The Cav1.1 R528H mice had a HypoPP phenotype for which low K+ challenge produced a paradoxical depolarization of the resting potential, loss of muscle excitability, and weakness. A vacuolar myopathy with dilated transverse tubules and disruption of the triad junctions impaired Ca2+ release and likely contributed to the mild permanent weakness. Fibers from the CaV1.1 R528H mouse had a small anomalous inward current at the resting potential, similar to our observations in the NaV1.4 R669H HypoPP mouse model. This “gating pore current” may be a common mechanism for paradoxical depolarization and susceptibility to HypoPP arising from missense mutations in the S4 voltage sensor of either calcium or sodium channels. PMID:23187123

  18. An unusual cause of difficult weaning in a patient with newly diagnosed small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deslypere, G.; Cuppens, K.; Pat, K.; Aumann, J.; Demuynck, K.; Spaas, L.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with acute respiratory insufficiency and difficult ventilator weaning in the ICU ward, leading to diagnosis of small cell lung cancer with superior vena cava superior syndrome. Bilateral vocal cord paralysis caused his respiratory distress and weaning difficulties. Thyroidectomy and neurological problems (such as Parkinson disease and Guillain Barré syndrome) are more common causes of bilateral vocal cord paralysis. Lung cancer patients are also at risk due to mediastinal invasion. The left recurrent laryngeal nerve is more prone to paralysis because of the typical anatomy. In contrary, bilateral vocal cord paralysis is rare and doesn't result in speech problems but rather breathing difficulties. Tracheostomy is the classic therapy, but laser cordectomy and Botulinum toxin injection in the laryngeal muscles are alternatives.

  19. Primary Laryngeal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma – A Rare Entity with Deviant Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    K, Anoosha; K, Amita; Shankar S, Vijay; Geeta K, Avadhani

    2014-01-01

    Primary laryngeal neuroendocrine carcinomas are rare neoplasms. WHO classifies them under five categories of which, the moderately differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma is synonymous with atypical or malignant carcinoid tumour. We report a rare case of primary laryngeal neuroendocrine carcinoma with an unusual and misleading clinical presentation. The initial cytological diagnosis of secondary neuroendocrine carcinoma in the cervical lymph node led to the suspicion of primary neuroendocrine carcinoma in the larynx. PMID:25386445

  20. Occult Laryngeal Foreign Body Mimicking Normal Thyroid Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Izadi, Farzad; Hassannia, Fatemeh; Maleki, Mojtaba; Pousti, Behzad; Shams Koushki, Ehsan; Mirhashemi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Foreign body aspiration is common especially in children. The absence of history of choking does not rule out the diagnosis. Diagnosis required high index of suspicion. Case Presentation: Undiagnosed foreign body aspiration mostly occurs in bronchial airway rather than larynx and can cause severe complications. In this article, we report a silent laryngeal foreign body aspiration to show that careful history taking and accurate evaluation of radiography are important factors for diagnosis. Conclusions: The single most significant factor leading to detect of tracheobronchial foreign body aspiration is a high index of suspicion; this case highlights the possibility of a foreign body in the airway in patients who presents with a recent onset of chronic respiratory complaints. PMID:26543835

  1. Automatic segmentation of equine larynx for diagnosis of laryngeal hemiplegia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Md. Musfequs; Zheng, Lihong; Gao, Junbin

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an automatic segmentation method for delineation of the clinically significant contours of the equine larynx from an endoscopic image. These contours are used to diagnose the most common disease of horse larynx laryngeal hemiplegia. In this study, hierarchal structured contour map is obtained by the state-of-the-art segmentation algorithm, gPb-OWT-UCM. The conic-shaped outer boundary of equine larynx is extracted based on Pascal's theorem. Lastly, Hough Transformation method is applied to detect lines related to the edges of vocal folds. The experimental results show that the proposed approach has better performance in extracting the targeted contours of equine larynx than the results of using only the gPb-OWT-UCM method.

  2. [Laryngeal registers as shown in the voice range profile].

    PubMed

    Roubeau, Bernard; Castellengo, Michèle; Bodin, Patricia; Ragot, Maryse

    2004-01-01

    Voice range profile (VRP) is a well-known vocal test. Usually, it consists of a single diagram based on the whole voice range. When practised separately in each individual laryngeal mechanism, VRP may offer much information on both the relative development of the different mechanisms used by the subject and the extension of the common area between two consecutive mechanisms. We present the results obtained from 42 subjects of both sexes who have different singing technique levels: professional singers, student and amateur singers, as well as subjects without any experience in singing. For each mechanism, the global VRP area and the dynamic range were computed. Results are discussed in relation to sex category and vocal training of subjects. Exploring systematically VRP for each mechanism gives new and valuable information on register managing in singing practice. PMID:15375333

  3. Stabilisation of Laryngeal AL Amyloidosis with Long Term Curcumin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H.; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), smoldering myeloma (SMM), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) represent a spectrum of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs). Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL) falls within the spectrum of these diseases and has a mortality rate of more than 80% within 2 years of diagnosis. Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs. In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins. We thus administered curcumin to a patient with laryngeal amyloidosis and smoldering myeloma and found that the patient has shown a lack of progression of his disease for a period of five years. This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. We recommend further evaluation of curcumin in patients with primary AL amyloidosis. PMID:26199769

  4. Stabilisation of Laryngeal AL Amyloidosis with Long Term Curcumin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), smoldering myeloma (SMM), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) represent a spectrum of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs). Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL) falls within the spectrum of these diseases and has a mortality rate of more than 80% within 2 years of diagnosis. Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs. In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins. We thus administered curcumin to a patient with laryngeal amyloidosis and smoldering myeloma and found that the patient has shown a lack of progression of his disease for a period of five years. This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. We recommend further evaluation of curcumin in patients with primary AL amyloidosis. PMID:26199769

  5. Is the Frequency Content of the Calls in North American Treefrogs Limited by Their Larynges?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A high diversity of mating calls is found among frogs. The calls of most species, however, are simple, in comparison to those of mammals and birds. In order to determine if the mechanics of the larynx could explain the simplicity of treefrog calls, the larynges of euthanized males were activated with airflow. Laryngeal airflow, sound frequency, and sound intensity showed a positive direct relationship with the driving air pressure. While the natural calls of the studied species exhibit minimal frequency modulation, their larynges produced about an octave of frequency modulation in response to varying pulmonary pressure. Natural advertisement calls are produced near the higher extreme of frequency obtained in the laboratory and at a slightly higher intensity (6?dB). Natural calls also exhibit fewer harmonics than artificial ones, because the larynges were activated with the mouth of the animal open. The results revealed that treefrog larynges allow them to produce calls spanning a much greater range of frequencies than observed in nature; therefore, the simplicity of the calls is not due to a limited frequency range of laryngeal output. Low frequencies are produced at low intensities, however, and this could explain why treefrogs concentrate their calling at the high frequencies. PMID:25332838

  6. Laryngeal Compensation for Voice Production After CO2 Laser Cordectomy

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Zakaria; Hosny, Sameh Mohammad; Quriba, Amal Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser cordectomy is considered one of the modalities of choice for treatment of early glottic carcinoma. In addition to its comparable oncological results with radiotherapy and open surgical procedures, it preserves of laryngeal functions including voice production. The aim of this study was to detect how the larynx compensates for voice production after different types of CO2 laser cordectomy for early glottic carcinoma together with assessment of the vocal outcome in each compensation mechanism. Methods One hundred twelve patients treated with CO2 laser cordectomy were classified according to their main postoperative phonatory site. Perceptual analysis of voice samples using GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain) scale was done for 88 patients after exclusion of the voice samples of all female patients to make the study population homogenous and the samples of 18 male patients due to bad quality (4 patients) or unavailability (14 patients) of their voice samples and the results were compared with those obtained from control group that included 25 age-matched euphonic male subjects. Results Five types of laryngeal compensation were defined including: vocal fold to vocal fold, vocal fold to vocal neofold, vocal fold to vestibular fold, vestibular fold, to vestibular fold, and arytenoids hyper adduction. Characters changes of voice produced by each compensation type were found to be statistically significant except for breathiness, asthenia and strain changes in vocal fold to vocal fold compensation type. Conclusion The larynx can compensate for voice production after CO2 laser cordectomy by five different compensation mechanisms with none of them producing voice quality comparable with that of controls. PMID:26622962

  7. The laryngeal primordium and epithelial lamina. A new interpretation.

    PubMed Central

    Sañudo, J R; Domenech-Mateu, J M

    1990-01-01

    The laryngeal primordium is present in both the laryngotracheal sulcus (LTS) and the primitive pulmonary sac (PPS). Its early period of development may be subdivided into two phases. The first phase (Stage 11) is represented by what is traditionally referred to as the LTS, located directly beneath the PP4 on the ventral wall of the foregut (primary segment), and by the PPS which is situated at its caudal end. The LTS will represent the primordium of the upper or membranous infraglottic cavity region; whereas the PPS, will give rise not only to the bronchial tree, but also to the primordium of the trachea and the lower or cartilaginous region of the infraglottic cavity. The second phase (Stages 13 and 14) is distinguished by the cranial growth of the LTS above the PP4 and therefore by its absorption into the floor of the primitive pharynx in the mesobranchial area (secondary segment), which will develop into the primordium of the vestibule of the larynx. Similarly, we observed that in the development of the laryngeal cavity there are two temporally and spatially separate epithelial structures: the epithelial septum and the epithelial lamina. In this respect we differ from other authors who are of the opinion that there is a single structure (the epithelial lamina). The epithelial septum is a primary structure responsible for the final configuration of the LTS, as it contributes to the development of the lower end of the primary segment of the LTS and also to the creation of the secondary segment. The epithelial lamina is a secondary structure which appears inside the LTS as a result of pressure exerted by the mesenchyme on its lateral walls, without having any effect on the morphogenesis of the LTS. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:2081706

  8. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis associated with the use of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Mina Mecheal; Martin, Alan William; Rosenblatt, Randall Lee

    2014-04-01

    A 51-year-old woman was referred for evaluation of progressive dyspnea of 3 months- duration. She had received 3 doses of adalimumab for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis prior to the onset of her dyspnea. Her chest examination revealed absent diaphragmatic movement with inspiration. Spirometry showed a severe restrictive defect. Radiologic studies confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. Laboratory and radiologic workup excluded other possible causes of the diagnosis. Adalimumab was discontinued, and she was treated with bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation and intravenous immunoglobulin. Three months later, the diaphragmatic paralysis persisted. This is the second reported case of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis occurring in a patient who had received adalimumab. Acute neuropathies are rare side effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors. PMID:24688191

  9. ?-Synuclein in cutaneous autonomic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningshan; Gibbons, Christopher H.; Lafo, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop a cutaneous biomarker for Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Twenty patients with PD and 14 age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent examinations, autonomic testing, and skin biopsies at the distal leg, distal thigh, and proximal thigh. ?-Synuclein deposition and the density of intraepidermal, sudomotor, and pilomotor nerve fibers were measured. ?-Synuclein deposition was normalized to nerve fiber density (the ?-synuclein ratio). Results were compared with examination scores and autonomic function testing. Results: Patients with PD had a distal sensory and autonomic neuropathy characterized by loss of intraepidermal and pilomotor fibers (p < 0.05 vs controls, all sites) and morphologic changes to sudomotor nerve fibers. Patients with PD had greater ?-synuclein deposition and higher ?-synuclein ratios compared with controls within pilomotor nerves and sudomotor nerves (p < 0.01, all sites) but not sensory nerves. Higher ?-synuclein ratios correlated with Hoehn and Yahr scores (r = 0.58–0.71, p < 0.01), with sympathetic adrenergic function (r = ?0.40 to ?0.66, p < 0.01), and with parasympathetic function (r = ?0.66 to ?0.77, p > 0.01). Conclusions: We conclude that ?-synuclein deposition is increased in cutaneous sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic fibers but not sensory fibers of patients with PD. Higher ?-synuclein deposition is associated with greater autonomic dysfunction and more advanced PD. These data suggest that measures of ?-synuclein deposition in cutaneous autonomic nerves may be a useful biomarker in patients with PD. PMID:24089386

  10. Biophysical Journal Volume 65 July 1993 270-288 Theoretical Reconstruction of Myotonia and Paralysis Caused by

    E-print Network

    Corey, David P.

    Biophysical Journal Volume 65 July 1993 270-288 Theoretical Reconstruction of Myotonia potentials (myotonia) or large depolarizations and block of spike production (paralysis) when myotonia, and why paralysis will occur when a slightly larger proportion of channels fails to inactivate

  11. Isolated Ocular Motor Nerve Palsies.

    PubMed

    Kung, Nathan H; Van Stavern, Gregory P

    2015-10-01

    An isolated ocular motor nerve palsy is defined as dysfunction of a single ocular motor nerve (oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens) with no associated or localizing neurologic signs or symptoms. When occurring in patients aged 50 or older, the most common cause is microvascular ischemia, but serious etiologies such as aneurysm, malignancy, and giant cell arteritis should always be considered. In this article, the authors review the clinical approach, anatomy, and differential diagnosis of each isolated ocular motor nerve palsy and discuss the clinical characteristics, pathophysiology, and treatment of microvascular ischemia. PMID:26444399

  12. First report of Israeli acute paralysis virus in asymptomatic hives of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Reynaldi, Francisco J; Sguazza, Guillermo H; Tizzano, Marco A; Fuentealba, Nadia; Galosi, Cecilia M; Pecoraro, Marcelo R

    2011-01-01

    Honey bee mortality has recently been associated with Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), a proposed etiological agent for a new syndrome known as Colony Collapse Disorder. Bees infected with this virus show shivering wings, progress into paralysis, and finally die outside the hive. During the last years, honey bee mortality became a serious problem for Argentinean beekeepers. We herein report the preliminary results of a survey carried out to detect IAPV in samples taken from several Argentine provinces, by using a reverse transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction assay. Our data indicate the existence of high frequency of IAPV in asymptomatic hives of Argentina. PMID:21731968

  13. Avian tick paralysis caused by Ixodes brunneus in the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luttrell, M.P.; Creekmore, L.H.; Mertins, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Between 1988 and 1994, 16 definitive and 26 presumptive cases of tick paralysis were diagnosed in 10 species of birds from five southeastern states in the USA. All birds had engorged adult female Ixodes brunneus ticks on the head region and were partially paralyzed or dead. Cases occurred in the winter and early spring months, and most birds were passerines found in private yards or near feeders. All stages of I. brunneus feed exclusively on birds, and this species previously has been associated with avian tick paralysis. Little is known concerning the life cycle of this ixodid tick and its impact on wild bird populations.

  14. Periodic paralysis in quarter horses: a sodium channel mutation disseminated by selective breeding.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, J A; Spier, S J; Byrns, G; Rojas, C V; Bernoco, D; Hoffman, E P

    1992-10-01

    We recently reported on a linkage study within a Quarter Horse lineage segregating hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis (HYPP), an autosomal dominant condition showing potassium-induced attacks of skeletal muscle paralysis. HYPP co-segregated with the equine adult skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit gene, the same gene that causes human HYPP. We now describe the Phe to Leu mutation in transmembrane domain IVS3 which courses the horse disease. This represents the first application of molecular genetics to an important horse disease, and the data will provide an opportunity for control or eradication of this condition. PMID:1338908

  15. Value of Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) Endoscopy in the Early Diagnosis of Laryngeal Cancer and Precancerous Lesions

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Chronic Inflammation of Hypopharynx; Hoarseness; Macroscopic Laryngeal Lesions; Histological Confirmation of Dysplasia; Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Carcinoma of Larynx; Invasive Carcinoma of Hypo Pharynx; Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis

  16. Nanofibrous nerve conduit-enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu; Mi, Ruifa; Hoke, Ahmet; Chew, Sing Yian

    2014-05-01

    Fibre structures represent a potential class of materials for the formation of synthetic nerve conduits due to their biomimicking architecture. Although the advantages of fibres in enhancing nerve regeneration have been demonstrated, in vivo evaluation of fibre size effect on nerve regeneration remains limited. In this study, we analyzed the effects of fibre diameter of electrospun conduits on peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm critical defect gap in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. By using an electrospinning technique, fibrous conduits comprised of aligned electrospun poly (?-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibers (981?±?83 nm, Microfiber) or nanofibers (251?±?32 nm, Nanofiber) were obtained. At three months post implantation, axons regenerated across the defect gap in all animals that received fibrous conduits. In contrast, complete nerve regeneration was not observed in the control group that received empty, non-porous PCL film conduits (Film). Nanofiber conduits resulted in significantly higher total number of myelinated axons and thicker myelin sheaths compared to Microfiber and Film conduits. Retrograde labeling revealed a significant increase in number of regenerated dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in the presence of Nanofiber conduits (1.93 ± 0.71 × 10(3) vs. 0.98 ± 0.30 × 10(3) in Microfiber, p?nerve regeneration. These results could provide useful insights for future nerve guide designs. PMID:22700359

  17. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  18. Optogenetic control of nerve growth

    E-print Network

    Park, Seongjun

    Due to the limited regenerative ability of neural tissue, a diverse set of biochemical and biophysical cues for increasing nerve growth has been investigated, including neurotrophic factors, topography, and electrical ...

  19. Secular trends in the survival of patients with laryngeal carcinoma, 1995–2007

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S.D.; Liu, K.; Shariff, S.Z.; Thind, A.; Winquist, E.; Yoo, J.; Nichols, A.; Fung, K.; Hall, S.; Garg, A.X.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent reports suggest a decline over time in the survival of patients newly diagnosed with laryngeal cancer in spite of developments in treatment practices. Our study set out to determine whether the survival of patients with laryngeal cancer in Ontario has changed over time. Methods This population-based cohort study of patients diagnosed with laryngeal cancer in the province of Ontario between 1995 and 2007 used data extracted from linked provincial administrative and registry databases. Its main outcomes were overall survival, laryngectomy-free survival, and survival ratio relative to an age- and sex-matched general population. Results The 4298 patients newly diagnosed with laryngeal cancer during the period of interest were predominantly men (n = 3615, 84.1%) with glottic cancer (n = 2787, 64.8%); mean age in the group was 66 years (interquartile range: 59–74 years). Patient demographics did not significantly change over time. Overall, 5-year survival was 57.4%; laryngectomy-free survival was 45.4%. Comparing patients from three eras (1995–1998, 1999–2003, 2004–2007) and adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidity status, we observed no differences in overall survival or laryngectomy-free survival over time. The 5-year relative survival ratio for patients with laryngeal cancer compared with an age- and sex-matched group from the general population was 81.1% for glottic cancer and 44.5% for supraglottic cancer. Conclusions In patients with a new diagnosis of laryngeal cancer, overall and laryngectomy-free survival have remained unchanged since the mid-1990s. New methods to improve survival and the rate of laryngeal preservation in this patient population are needed. PMID:25908925

  20. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  1. Brush Cytology with Immunocytochemical Evaluation of VEGF Expression versus Biopsy in Clinically Precancerous Laryngeal Lesions: Can We Diagnose Laryngeal Cancer Only with Brush Cytology?

    PubMed Central

    Chatziavramidis, Angelos; Tsinaslanidou, Zinovia; Valeri, Rozalia; Konstantinidis, Iordanis; Constantinidis, Jannis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is the most common SCC of the head and neck. The high incidence of this malignancy and the low survival rate necessitate the development of novel diagnostic approaches. Aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic value of laryngeal brush cytology combined with VEGF immunocytochemistry versus histopathology of clinically precancerous lesions of the larynx. Material and Methods. Thirty patients with precancerous or suspected malignant laryngeal lesions underwent microlaryngoscopy, during which samples were taken for cytological, immunocytochemical, and histological analysis. Cytology and histology results were classified as follows: benign lesions, atypia/moderate dysplasia, and malignancy, whereas the expression of VEGF was evaluated as strong, moderate, weak, and zero expression, based on the percentage of cells stained. Results. The cytology results were in accordance with the histology results in 86.7% of the patients. The exfoliative cytology's sensitivity was estimated at 85% and its specificity at 90%. Its positive prognostic value was 94%, while its negative prognostic value was 75%. The additional immunocytochemical evaluation of VEGF expression increased all the noted parameters. Discussion. Exfoliative cytology of laryngeal lesions is a minimal-invasive, easily applicable procedure during microlaryngoscopy and reliable in terms of diagnostic value. Under certain conditions it could be held also in local anesthesia. Concurrent immunocytochemical analysis of VEGF expression further enhances its diagnostic value. PMID:26457244

  2. Self-Concept, Disposition, and Resilience of Poststroke Filipino Elderly with Residual Paralysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Tan, Eleanor Lourdes C.; Tan, Ernestine Faye S.; Tan, Justin Ryan L.; Tan, Mervyn C.; Tanciano, Daris Mae M.; Lee Say, Matthew L. Tang

    2012-01-01

    The interplay among self-concept, disposition, and resilience mirrors how the condition affects the emotional status of poststroke Filipino elderly with residual paralysis. Despite healthcare professionals' understanding of these clients' physical conditions, little is known regarding these clients' emotional health status related to stroke.…

  3. Genetic analysis of Israel Acute Paralysis Virus: distinct clusters are circulating into the United States.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Israel acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is associated with colony collapse disorder of honey bees. Nonetheless, its role in the pathogenesis of the disorder and its geographic distribution are unclear. Here, we report phylogenetic analysis of IAPV obtained from bees in the United States, Canada, Austral...

  4. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare but potentially fatal emergency: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Torres, Jeisa Y; Bravo-Llerena, Wilfredo E; Reyes-Ortiz, Luis M; Valderrábano-Wagner, Rodrigo J; Mariano-Mejías, Victor; Brunet-Rodríguez, Héctor; Lemos-Ramírez, Juan C

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a 39 year-old Asian man in whom profound lower limb paralysis, along with severe hypokalemia and electrocardiographic changes, were the presenting features of Graves' disease (GD)-related thyrotoxicosis. Rapid recognition and management of the disorder were the key factors to avoid fatal hypokalemia-induced cardiac arrhythmias and promptly restore patient's capacity to ambulate. PMID:22111475

  5. Paralysie congénitale du IV révélée par une diplopie post chirurgie de la cataracte

    PubMed Central

    El Ouafi, Aziz; Elmellaoui, Med; Lakataoui, Abdelkader

    2014-01-01

    Les causes de diplopie après une chirurgie de cataracte sont nombreuses. La paralysie congénitale du IV est peu fréquente et diagnostic difficile car elle peut rester longtemps compensée. Nous rapportons un cas qui souligne l'importance de penser, devant une diplopie, à une étiologie congénitale même à un âge avancé. PMID:25478050

  6. A 59-year-old man with acute onset of paralysis.

    PubMed

    Cassa, Richard S; Rosengart, Axel J

    2014-08-01

    Botulism is a neuroparalytic illness resulting from the action of a potent toxin produced by the organism Clostridium botulinum. It can present with a classic triad of clear mentation, bulbar palsy and symmetric descending paralysis. Treatment is symptomatic and includes a botulinum antitoxin. PMID:25054790

  7. From nerve net to nerve ring, nerve cord and brain - evolution of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Detlev; Tosches, Maria Antonietta; Marlow, Heather

    2015-12-17

    The puzzle of how complex nervous systems emerged remains unsolved. Comparative studies of neurodevelopment in cnidarians and bilaterians suggest that this process began with distinct integration centres that evolved on opposite ends of an initial nerve net. The 'apical nervous system' controlled general body physiology, and the 'blastoporal nervous system' coordinated feeding movements and locomotion. We propose that expansion, integration and fusion of these centres gave rise to the bilaterian nerve cord and brain. PMID:26675821

  8. Using endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy singular tissue plural tissues in organ-preserving surgery of laryngeal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulbakin, D. E.; Mukhamedov, M. R.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Gynter, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    Our study has demonstrated feasibility of performing larynx preservation surgeries in patients with recurrent laryngeal cancer after failure of radiotherapy. The technique of combined laryngeal reconstruction with endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy Singular tissue Plural tissues results in improvement of life quality by preserving laryngeal functions.

  9. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  10. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  11. Handy measurement for tongue motion and coordination with laryngeal elevation at swallowing.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, K; Hayashi, R; Sato, Y; Akagawa, Y

    2003-10-01

    At the oral stage of swallowing, the tongue plays a major role and proper tongue performance is necessary to form the bolus and transfer it to the pharynx. For the present study we built a prototype device for safe and handy objective estimation of tongue motion and coordination with laryngeal elevation at swallowing. The device records tongue pressure by means of two strain gauge pressure transducers aligned 20 mm apart on a brass strap placed along the palatal midline. Laryngeal vibration is recorded with piezo-electric acceleration transducers. Time differences between pressure onset at the anterior and posterior transducers and the first spike from laryngeal vibration are measured. Ten healthy subjects were asked five times to swallow 5 mL of water. Pressure onset at the anterior transducer preceded posterior pressure by 294 +/- 164 ms. Given the distance between the transducers, the tongue contracted (squeezed) at a speed of 93 +/- 60 mm s(-1). Laryngeal vibration occurred 671 +/- 175 ms after the onset of anterior pressure. There was considerable variation in these parameters between subjects. Though the data is limited, the device successfully and easily revealed certain aspects of tongue motion and coordination with laryngeal elevation. PMID:12974857

  12. The clinical relevance of Ki-67 expression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gioacchini, Federico Maria; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Rubini, Corrado; Presutti, Livio; Re, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of Ki-67 immunostaining in patients affected by laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. A systematic review was carried out in a tertiary university referral center. An appropriate string was run on PubMed to retrieve articles dealing with Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. A double cross-check was performed on citations and full-text articles by two investigators independently to review all manuscripts and perform a comprehensive quality assessment. Of 85 abstracts identified, 18 articles were included. These studies reported on 1,342 patients with histological confirmed diagnosis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Most studies showed a statistical association between Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression and at least one of the clinical and histopathological parameters considered by the authors. Overall the studies analyzed suggested that the tumoral proliferative index was statistically connected respectively with T stage (2/18), N stage (4/18), grading (6/18), disease-free survival (10/18) and overall survival (4/18). Our review strongly suggests that immunohistochemical staining of Ki-67 correlates with tumoral aggressiveness and worse prognosis in patients affected by laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Further high-quality prospective studies should be carried out to confirm our finding and determine the eventual differences between cancers of specific laryngeal subsites. PMID:24890978

  13. Tissue factor is strongly expressed in pericarcinomatous tissue in patients with laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Xiong, Sufang; Hua, Qingquan; Chen, Chen; Liao, Hua; Chen, Liu; Yao, Weiqi; Wu, Dongcheng; Tao, Zezhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to understand the relationship between tissue factor (TF) and laryngeal carcinoma. Methods: Differences in TF expression between pericarcinomatous and carcinomatous tissues were studied in patients with laryngeal carcinoma; the potential clinical significance of the observed differences is discussed. Immunohistochemical, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses were performed to assess the expression of TF at the protein and mRNA levels, and differences between pericarcinomatous and carcinomatous tissues in patients (n = 20) with laryngeal carcinoma were analyzed. Results: Expression of TF was significantly higher in pericarcinomatous tissues than in carcinomatous tissues (P < 0.01); furthermore, the intensity of TF mRNA expression was also significantly stronger in pericarcinomatous than in carcinomatous tissue (P < 0.001). Robust expression of TF was observed in pericarcinomatous tissues but not in carcinomatous tissues. Conclusion: TF may contribute to the carcinogenesis and development of laryngeal carcinoma and may provide a marker for assessment of the degree of malignancy and the progression of laryngeal carcinoma. TF may also provide a new target for therapeutics for human head and neck cancer. PMID:26722600

  14. 'The devil lay upon her and held her down'. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis described by the Dutch physician Isbrand van Diemerbroeck (1609-1674) in 1664.

    PubMed

    Kompanje, E J O

    2008-12-01

    Hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations are visual, tactile, auditory or other sensory events, usually brief but sometimes prolonged, that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep (hypnagogic) or from sleep to wakefulness (hypnopompic). Hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations are often associated with sleep paralysis. Sleep paralysis occurs immediately prior to falling asleep (hypnagogic paralysis) or upon waking (hypnopompic paralysis). In 1664, the Dutch physician Isbrand Van Diemerbroeck (1609-1674) published a collection of case histories. One history with the title 'Of the Night-Mare' describes the nightly experiences of the 50-year-old woman. This case report is subject of this article. The experiences in this case could without doubt be diagnosed as sleep paralysis accompanied by hypnagogic hallucinations. This case from 1664 should be cited as the earliest detailed account of sleep paralysis associated with hypnagogic illusions and as the first observation that sleep paralysis and hypnagogic experiences occur more often in supine position of the body. PMID:18691361

  15. Feeding Artery of Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers: Role of the Superior Thyroid Artery in Superselective Intraarterial Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Terayama, Noboru Sanada, Junichiro; Matsui, Osamu; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Kawashima, Hiroko; Yamashiro, Masashi; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Kumano, Tomoyasu; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu; Furukawa, Mitsuru

    2006-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of the superior thyroid artery in intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Thirty-nine patients with laryngeal cancer and 29 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer underwent intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of the feeding arteries confirmed by computed tomography during selective arteriography and compared the results with the extent of the tumors. In 14 of 39 laryngeal and 15 of 29 hypopharyngeal cancers, the tumor did not cross the midline (group 1). In the remaining 25 and 14 cancers, respectively, the tumor crossed the midline or located in the center (group 2). For 13 of 14 laryngeal and 7 of 15 hypopharyngeal cancers in group 1 and for 6 of 25 laryngeal cancers in group 2, the entire tumor was contrast enhanced by the ipsilateral superior thyroid and/or superior laryngeal artery. For 12 of 25 laryngeal and 1 of 14 hypopharyngeal cancers in group 2, the entire tumor was contrast enhanced by the bilateral superior thyroid artery. For the other patients, infusion via the other arterial branches such as the inferior thyroid and the lingual arteries were needed to achieve contrast enhancement of the entire tumor. Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer from the superior thyroid artery is appropriate, whereas that for hypopharyngeal cancer is less sufficient. To accomplish contrast enhancement of the entire tumor, additional intra-arterial infusion from other arteries such as the inferior thyroid artery is often necessary.

  16. Acoustic Correlates of Fatigue in Laryngeal Muscles: Findings for a Criterion-Based Prevention of Acquired Voice Pathologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Victor J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to identify acoustic correlates of laryngeal muscle fatigue in conditions of vocal effort. Method: In a previous study, a technique of electromyography (EMG) served to define physiological signs of "voice fatigue" in laryngeal muscles involved in voicing. These signs correspond to spectral changes in contraction…

  17. Expression of purinergic receptor P2Y4 in Schwann cell following nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shicai; Xia, Siwen; Sun, Yue; Li, Meng; Song, Xianmin; Li, Guojun; Zheng, Hongliang; Chen, Donghui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Emerging evidences suggested an important role of purinergic receptor P2Y4 in nerve system. The present study aims to investigate the localization and possible function of P2Y4 receptor in recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) following regeneration. Methods: Right RLN of fifty Sprague-Dawley rats was cut and immediately repaired with PLGA/chitosan nerve conduit. Immunofluorescence, real-time qPCR and Western blot were used to detect the expression alterations of P2Y4 receptor. Results: Weak immunostaining signals of P2Y4 receptor were located on the plasmalemma of Schwann cell (SC) with regular arrangement of axons in normal RLN. On the post-injury 4th day, the sprouting axons regrowed along the degenerated SCs intensively expressing P2Y4 receptor. On the post-injury 7th day, the regenerating axons existed in multicellular cords of P2Y4 receptor-positive SCs occupying the nerve gap. On the post-injury 14th day, the axons grew along the bands of P2Y4 receptor-positive SCs exhibiting the regularly parallel distribution. On the post-injury 30th day, mild immunostaining signals of P2Y4 receptor still existed on SC surface, and the regenerated axons were located inside the remodeled endoneurium tube. In accordance with immunofluorescence findings, the transcription and protein expression levels of P2Y4 were significantly increased after the injury and the peak value appeared on the post-injury 7th day, compared to control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Data from the present study suggested a potential role of P2Y4 receptors in functional modulation of SCs in the regeneration of RLN. PMID:26550244

  18. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J; Reilly, Richard B; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J; Simonyan, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder. PMID:26693398

  19. Laryngeal Neuroendocrine Carcinomas: A Retrospective Study of 14 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingying; Gao, Liming; Meng, Yunxiao; Diao, Wenwen; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Guojun; Gao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xingming

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal neuroendocrine carcinomas (LNECs) are rare and highly heterogeneous which present a wide spectrum of pathological and clinical manifestations. Fourteen patients with histologically demonstrated LNEC were collected and analyzed retrospectively. The 14 cases were classified into 3 subtypes: typical carcinoid in 2, atypical carcinoid in 5, and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma in 7. The mean survival time of the 14 patients in this study was 112.5 months (95% CI, 81.5–143.6). Surgeries were performed for 2 patients of typical carcinoid, and they were alive with no evidence of recurrence after 24 and 47 months of follow-ups. Patients in the atypical carcinoid group were treated with surgeries and postoperative radiotherapy. After 58.4 months of follow-ups (range: 9–144), 2 patients showed no evidence of disease and 1 was lost to follow-up after 72 months. The other 2 patients died of other unrelated diseases. In the small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma group, a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy was applied. The mean survival time was 79.7 months (95% CI, 37.9–121.4), and the 5-year survival rate was 53.6%. In conclusion, the clinical behaviors, treatment protocols, and prognosis are different for each subtype of LNECs. PMID:26258144

  20. microRNA and gene networks in human laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, FENGYU; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; SUN, LINLIN; LIU, GENGHE; HAN, BAIXU

    2015-01-01

    Genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) are considered to be key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. To date, considerable data have been obtained regarding genes and miRNAs in cancer; however, the regulatory mechanisms associated with the genes and miRNAs in cancer have yet to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to use the key genes and miRNAs associated with laryngeal cancer (LC) to construct three regulatory networks (differentially expressed, LC-related and global). A network topology of the development of LC, involving 10 differentially expressed miRNAs and 55 differentially expressed genes, was obtained. These genes exhibited multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors (TFs) and host genes. The key regulatory interactions were determined by comparing the similarities and differences among the three networks. The nodes and pathways in LC, as well as the association between each pair of factors within the networks, such as TFs and miRNA, miRNA and target genes and miRNA and its host gene, were discussed. The mechanisms of LC involved certain key pathways featuring self-adaptation regulation and nodes without direct predecessors or successors. The findings of the present study have further elucidated the pathogenesis of LC and are likely to be beneficial for future research into LC. PMID:26668624

  1. [Laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma--the patient's perspective].

    PubMed

    Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa; Janczewski, Grzegorz; Bruzgielewicz, Antoni

    2003-01-01

    Carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx are the most often head and neck malignancies. The make diagnosis of the disease early and established the best methods of treatment for individual patients is important just the same as a good relation between doctor and patient. The subject of the study has been patient's judgements about quality of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up procedures. 60 patients (10 women and 50 men) has been inquired with contents the same list of questions. All patients have been treated because of carcinoma of the larynx and laryngopharynx during last 5 years in the Department of Otolaryngology Medical Academy in Warsaw. The authors analysed all answers for questions. The general conclusions have been definite: the patient's knowledge about laryngeal and pharyngeal anatomy and functions is minimal, also they know not much about neoplasm disease and cigarettes and alcohol harmfulness. The patient's opinion at doctor's professional authority was good. It seems to be necessary to do much more to improve people health education especially wholesome behaviour. PMID:14524175

  2. Role of laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Beleña, José M; Ochoa, Ernesto Josué; Núñez, Mónica; Gilsanz, Carlos; Vidal, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures and the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is the most common supraglottic airway device used by the anesthesiologists to manage airway during general anesthesia. Use of LMA has some advantages when compared to endotracheal intubation, such as quick and ease of placement, a lesser requirement for neuromuscular blockade and a lower incidence of postoperative morbididy. However, the use of the LMA in laparoscopy is controversial, based on a concern about increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The ability of these devices to provide optimal ventilation during laparoscopic procedures has been also questioned. The most important parameter to secure an adequate ventilation and oxygenation for the LMA under pneumoperitoneum condition is its seal pressure of airway. A good sealing pressure, not only state correct patient ventilation, but it reduces the potential risk of aspiration due to the better seal of airway. In addition, the LMAs incorporating a gastric access, permitting a safe anesthesia based on these commented points. We did a literature search to clarify if the use of LMA in preference to intubation provides inadequate ventilation or increase the risk of aspiration in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We found evidence stating that LMA with drain channel achieves adequate ventilation for these procedures. Limited evidence was found to consider these devices completely safe against aspiration. However, we observed that the incidence of regurgitation and aspiration associated with the use of the LMA in laparoscopic surgery is very low. PMID:26649155

  3. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A.; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M.; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J.; Reilly, Richard B.; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Simonyan, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder. PMID:26693398

  4. Laryngeal oedema caused by accidental ingestion of Oil of Wintergreen.

    PubMed

    Botma, M; Colquhoun-Flannery, W; Leighton, S

    2001-05-11

    Oil of Wintergreen (methyl salicylate) is a common ingredient for liniments, ointments and essential oils used in self-treatment of musculoskeletal pain. Its pleasant smell also encourages its use to flavour confectionery. The toxic potential of this preparation is not always fully appreciated by the general public and physicians. To appreciate the danger of this oil it can be compared to aspirin tablets (325 mg dose): one teaspoon (5 ml) of Oil of Wintergreen is equivalent to approximately 7000 mg of salicylate or 21.7 adult aspirin tablets. Ingestion of as little as 4 ml in a child can be fatal. Prevention of accidental ingestion of methyl salicylate containing products can be achieved by keeping the products out of reach of children, using child resistant bottles, restricting the size of the openings of the bottles, appropriate labeling on products and reducing the salicylate content. Immediate action should be taken to treat a patient with accidental poisoning and hospitalisation is needed for monitoring and treatment. The danger of this product should be fully appreciated by both physicians and the general public. We present a case of Oil of Wintergreen poisoning with development of laryngeal oedema as a complication, general information and management issues will also be discussed. PMID:11335011

  5. Cricotracheal resection for laryngeal invasion by thyroid carcinoma: our experience.

    PubMed

    Morisod, Benoît; Monnier, Philippe; Simon, Christian; Sandu, Kishore

    2014-08-01

    Invasion of the laryngeal framework by thyroid carcinoma requires specific surgical techniques and carries a higher rate of complications that deserve to be highlighted. We reviewed our data from 1995 to 2012 and found six patients with laryngotracheal invasion by thyroid carcinoma. All underwent total thyroidectomy and single-stage cricotracheal resection, plus anterolateral neck dissection. Three had airway obstruction that necessitated prior endoscopic debulking. None of the patients needed a tracheotomy. There were four cases of papillary carcinoma, and two cases of undifferentiated carcinoma. One patient died of complications of the procedure (anastomotic dehiscence and tracheo-innominate artery fistula). Another died 2 months after the procedure from local recurrence and aspiration pneumonia. One case presented recurrence at 15 months, which was managed by re-excision and adjuvant radiotherapy; after 26 months of follow-up, he has no evidence of locoregional recurrence. The three other patients are alive without evidence of disease at 6, 18 and 41 months, respectively. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion by thyroid carcinoma is an effective procedure, but carries significant risks of complications. This could be attributed to the devascularisation of the tracheal wall due to the simultaneous neck dissection, sacrifice of the strap muscles or of a patch of oesophageal muscle layer. We advocate a sternocleidomastoid flap to cover the anastomosis. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion can be curative with good functional outcomes, even for the advanced stages of thyroid cancer. Endoscopic debulking of the airway prior to the procedure avoids tracheotomy. PMID:24129693

  6. Laryngeal spasm mimicking asthma and vitamin d deficiency.

    PubMed

    Masoero, Monica; Bellocchia, Michela; Ciuffreda, Antonio; Ricciardolo, Fabio Lm; Rolla, Giovanni; Bucca, Caterina

    2014-05-01

    We present a woman with heterozygous carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 (CPT-2) deficiency who in the last 6 months suffered from episodic dyspnea and choking. Symptoms could not be attributed to her muscular energy defect, since heterozygous CPT-2 deficiency is usually asymptomatic or causes only mild muscle fatigability. Myopathy is usually triggered by concurrent factors, either genetic (additional muscle enzymes defects) or acquired (metabolic stress). The patient was referred to our respiratory clinic for suspect bronchial asthma. Spirometry showed mild decrease in inspiratory flows. Methacholine challenge was negative. Dyspnea was triggered by hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia, which produced marked decrease in airflow rates, particularly in inspiratory flows, consistent with laryngospasm. Nutritional assessment of the patient showed low serum level of calcium and vitamin D, attributable to avoidance of milk and dairy products for lactose intolerance and to insufficient sunlight exposure. After calcium and vitamin D supplementation episodic laryngospasm disappeared and hypocapnic hyperventilation test induced very mild change in airflow rates. Calcium and vitamin D deficiency may favour laryngeal spasm mimicking asthma, particularly in subjects with underlying myopathy. PMID:24843804

  7. Laryngeal imaging with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, James A.; Kim, Ki Hean; Anderson, R. Rox

    2011-03-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: Optical coherence tomography (OCT), an imaging technology that provides crosssectional subsurface tissue structure images using backscattered light, is a promising noninvasive, imaging modality for in-vivo assessment of vocal fold layered microstructure. Polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) augments conventional OCT by detecting changes in the polarization state of reflected light. This study imaged various benign laryngeal pathologies in patients undergoing direct laryngoscopy under general anesthesia to determine whether PS-OCT would provide useful additional information about vocal fold microstructure and glottic surface pathology. Study Design:Prospective clinical trial. Methods: Eighteen patients who were undergoing microlaryngoscopy under general anesthesia for benign glottic disease were imaged bilaterally with OCT and PS-OCT (N=34 vocal folds). Intraoperative microphotography guided placement of the imaging probe. Normalappearing glottic tissue was also imaged if present. When clinically indicated, biopsy or complete removal of the lesion established histologic confirmation. Results: PS-OCT provided high quality, vertical, cross-sectional images up to 1.2mm deep that complemented microlaryngoscopy, and conventional OCT for vocal fold pathologies. Scar tissue was visualized by PS-OCT, characterized by a birefringence pattern more intense than that of normal glottic tissue. Conclusions: Combining PS-OCT with OCT during human vocal cord imaging provides useful information in characterizing vocal cord lesions, particularly scar tissue.

  8. Role of laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Beleña, José M; Ochoa, Ernesto Josué; Núñez, Mónica; Gilsanz, Carlos; Vidal, Alfonso

    2015-11-27

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures and the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is the most common supraglottic airway device used by the anesthesiologists to manage airway during general anesthesia. Use of LMA has some advantages when compared to endotracheal intubation, such as quick and ease of placement, a lesser requirement for neuromuscular blockade and a lower incidence of postoperative morbididy. However, the use of the LMA in laparoscopy is controversial, based on a concern about increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The ability of these devices to provide optimal ventilation during laparoscopic procedures has been also questioned. The most important parameter to secure an adequate ventilation and oxygenation for the LMA under pneumoperitoneum condition is its seal pressure of airway. A good sealing pressure, not only state correct patient ventilation, but it reduces the potential risk of aspiration due to the better seal of airway. In addition, the LMAs incorporating a gastric access, permitting a safe anesthesia based on these commented points. We did a literature search to clarify if the use of LMA in preference to intubation provides inadequate ventilation or increase the risk of aspiration in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We found evidence stating that LMA with drain channel achieves adequate ventilation for these procedures. Limited evidence was found to consider these devices completely safe against aspiration. However, we observed that the incidence of regurgitation and aspiration associated with the use of the LMA in laparoscopic surgery is very low. PMID:26649155

  9. Laryngeal Spasm Mimicking Asthma and Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Masoero, Monica; Bellocchia, Michela; Ciuffreda, Antonio; Ricciardolo, Fabio LM; Rolla, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We present a woman with heterozygous carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 (CPT-2) deficiency who in the last 6 months suffered from episodic dyspnea and choking. Symptoms could not be attributed to her muscular energy defect, since heterozygous CPT-2 deficiency is usually asymptomatic or causes only mild muscle fatigability. Myopathy is usually triggered by concurrent factors, either genetic (additional muscle enzymes defects) or acquired (metabolic stress). The patient was referred to our respiratory clinic for suspect bronchial asthma. Spirometry showed mild decrease in inspiratory flows. Methacholine challenge was negative. Dyspnea was triggered by hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia, which produced marked decrease in airflow rates, particularly in inspiratory flows, consistent with laryngospasm. Nutritional assessment of the patient showed low serum level of calcium and vitamin D, attributable to avoidance of milk and dairy products for lactose intolerance and to insufficient sunlight exposure. After calcium and vitamin D supplementation episodic laryngospasm disappeared and hypocapnic hyperventilation test induced very mild change in airflow rates. Calcium and vitamin D deficiency may favour laryngeal spasm mimicking asthma, particularly in subjects with underlying myopathy. PMID:24843804

  10. Evaluation of the nerve-injured patient.

    PubMed

    Novak, Christine B

    2003-04-01

    The evaluation of patients with nerve injury or nerve compression requires an accurate history and subjective report to determine the tests that are the most useful in providing the essential information. Motor and sensory evaluation is necessary inglobal mixed-nerve injuries, but in cases of nerve compression, tests of provocation give more accurate information for detecting the site of nerve compression. There is no gold standard test in the evaluation of patients with nerve injury or compression; therefore, a battery of valid and reliable sensory and motor tests provides the most complete information to formulate a treatment plan. PMID:12737348

  11. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  12. Stroboscopic Parameters Reported as Voice Outcome Measures in Patients Treated for Laryngeal Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Focht, Kendrea L.; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Bonilha, Heather Shaw

    2013-01-01

    Background A systematic review of the use of stroboscopy as a treatment outcome measure of vocal fold function in patients treated for laryngeal cancer is presented. Methods Computerized literature searches were performed. Eligible articles were admitted when stroboscopy was used to measure vocal fold function before and after treatment in patients with laryngeal cancer. Data extracted included: tumor stage and location, treatment modality, stroboscopy parameters, parameter scale, number of raters, rater reliability, methodology, and level of evidence. Results Of 520 articles retrieved, 11 studies met inclusion criteria. A total of twenty-four parameters were reported. Rating scales and rater reliability varied. Discussion Major methodological differences exist in studies using stroboscopic findings as voice outcome measures in patients’ post-cancer treatment. These differences lead to equivocal findings when assessing the utility of stroboscopy as an outcome measure. Standardized, reliable scoring and reporting systems for laryngeal stroboscopic examinations are needed. PMID:25339842

  13. Towards Computational Modeling of Phonation Using CT--Based Laryngeal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen Karimian, S. A.; Mittal, Rajat

    2008-11-01

    The oscillatory flow generated in human larynx plays a key role in the process of phonation. While much has been done to understand the main features of such flow by using idealized geometry models and simplified flow conditions, there is still little known about the 3D features of laryngeal flow. In this work, anatomically realistic models of the human larynx are used to analyze the fluid dynamics of 3D laryngeal flow using high--fidelity numerical simulations. A Cartesian--grid--based, finite--difference Navier--Stokes solver is used to carry out these simulations. Three--dimensional models of human larynx are extracted from CT images and unstructured surface grids are generated for the model geometries. The pressure driven flow is simulated for a range of Reynolds numbers. The main objective in this work is to understand more in--depth the effect of 3D geometric features of glottal airway on the laryngeal flow structure.

  14. Laryngeal reflex apnea in neonates: effects of CO2 and the complex influence of hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Xia, L.; Leiter, J.C.; Bartlett, D.

    2013-01-01

    We have examined influence of hypocapnia, mild hypercapnia and hypoxia on the durations of fictive apnea and respiratory disruption elicited by injection of 0.1 ml of water into the laryngeal lumen—the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR)—in 20 unanesthetized, decerebrate, vagotomized piglets aged 4 to 10 days that were paralyzed and ventilated with a constant frequency and tidal volume. The LCR was enhanced by hypocapnia and attenuated by hypercapnia as reported by others. The responses to laryngeal stimulation during hypoxia were varied and complex: some animals showed abbreviated responses during the tachypnea of early hypoxia, followed after 10-15 min by more prolonged apnea and respiratory disruption accompanying the reduction in ventilatory activity that commonly occurs during sustained hypoxia in neonates. We speculate that this later hypoxic enhancement of the LCR may be due to accumulation of adenosine in the brain stem. PMID:23348024

  15. Nerve injuries about the elbow.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Sanaz; McAdams, Timothy R

    2010-10-01

    The ulnar, radial, median, medial antebrachial cutaneous, and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerves are subject to traction and compression in athletes who place forceful, repetitive stresses across their elbow joint. Throwing athletes are at greatest risk, and cubital tunnel syndrome (involving the ulnar nerve) is clearly the most common neuropathy about the elbow. The anatomy and innervation pattern of the nerve involved determines the characteristic of the neuropathy syndrome. The most important parts of the work-up are the history and physical examination as electrodiagnostic testing and imaging are often not reliable. In general, active rest is the first line of treatment. Tailoring the surgery and rehabilitation protocol according to the functional requirements of that athlete's sport(s) can help optimize the operative outcomes for recalcitrant cases. PMID:20883903

  16. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jiménez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length. PMID:19330282

  17. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement by Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  18. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  19. Neuromodulation of the suprascapular nerve.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Foad; Reddy, Chandan G

    2014-01-01

    The shoulder joint is an enarthrodial or ball-and-socket joint. A complex network of anatomic structures endows the human shoulder with tremendous mobility, greater than any other joint in the body. Many pathologies can been found in those patients with chronic shoulder pain. The painful limitation of shoulder motion affects hand and arm motion as well; therefore, it significantly influences work performance and everyday activities as well as the quality of life. Therefore, the treatment of patients with chronic shoulder pain has major social and health economic implications. In this article we present a patient with a complex history of shoulder pathology including 7 surgeries that left the patient with chronic debilitating shoulder pain. She was suffering from chronic pain and limited mobility of the shoulder joint due to adhesive shoulder capsulitis. She was treated with a multimodality approach with the goals of increasing shoulder range of motion and decreasing her pain. This did not provide significant improvement. The suprascapular nerve supplies motor and sensory innervation to the shoulder, and can be easily accessible in the supraspinatus fossa. A suprascapular nerve block dramatically decreased her pain. This clinical observation along with confirmatory nerve block play an important role during the decision-making process for a trial period of electrical neuromodulation. She was followed for 3 months after the permanent implantation of a suprascapular nerve stimulator. Her pain and shoulder range of motion in all planes improved dramatically. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) of the suprascapular nerve, in addition to multimodality pain management, is one approach to the difficult task of treating adhesive capsulitis with accompanying pain and the inability to move the shoulder. We conducted a literature review on PubMed and found no case describing a similar patient to our knowledge. PMID:25415792

  20. Effects of Voice Rehabilitation After Radiation Therapy for Laryngeal Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tuomi, Lisa; Andréll, Paulin

    2014-08-01

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy for laryngeal cancer often experience voice problems. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of voice rehabilitation for laryngeal cancer patients after having undergone radiation therapy and to investigate whether differences between different tumor localizations with regard to rehabilitation outcomes exist. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine male patients irradiated for laryngeal cancer participated. Voice recordings and self-assessments of communicative dysfunction were performed 1 and 6 months after radiation therapy. Thirty-three patients were randomized to structured voice rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist and 36 to a control group. Furthermore, comparisons with 23 healthy control individuals were made. Acoustic analyses were performed for all patients, including the healthy control individuals. The Swedish version of the Self Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngeal Cancer and self-ratings of voice function were used to assess vocal and communicative function. Results: The patients who received vocal rehabilitation experienced improved self-rated vocal function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors who received voice rehabilitation had statistically significant improvements in voice quality and self-rated vocal function, whereas the control group did not. Conclusion: Voice rehabilitation for male patients with laryngeal cancer is efficacious regarding patient-reported outcome measurements. The patients experienced better voice function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors also showed an improvement in terms of acoustic voice outcomes. Rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist is recommended for laryngeal cancer patients after radiation therapy, particularly for patients with supraglottic tumors.

  1. Biological characteristics of CD133+ cancer stem cells derived from human laryngeal carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xudong; Wang, Jingyu; He, Jian; Ma, Bingjuan; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro invasive capability, clone-forming ability, resistance to anti-tumor treatments of CD133+ human laryngeal carcinoma stem cells, and characterize the related signaling pathways in these cells. Methods: Human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells were subjected to flow cytometry sorting to obtain CD133+ stem cells. Transwell chamber assay and clone-formation forming test were performed to evaluate the invasive capability and the clone-forming ability of CD133+ laryngeal carcinoma tumor stem cells, respectively. MTT assay was used to assess the resistance of CD133+ Hep-2 cells to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, respectively. Western blot and real-time PCR were applied to characterize the signaling pathways in these stem cells. Results: Our results from the transwell chamber assay indicated that the migrating capability of CD133+ Hep-2 cells was significantly higher than CD133- cells, and the invasive capability of CD133+ Hep-2 cells was also significantly elevated. Moreover, clone-formation forming test showed higher clone-forming ability for CD133+ Hep-2 cells, compared with CD133- cells. Furthermore, CD133+ Hep-2 cells displayed significant resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The Bcl-2/Bax ratio was increased, and Hedgehog, Wnt, and Bmi-l signaling pathways were all activated, in CD133+ laryngeal carcinoma stem cells, which might be involved in the self-renewal process of these stem cells. Conclusion: The invasive capability, clone-forming ability, and resistance to anti-tumor treatments are enhanced, and anti-apoptotic and proliferation-related signaling pathways are activated in CD133+ laryngeal carcinoma tumor stem cells. These findings might provide new insights into the prevention and/or treatment of laryngeal carcinoma, especially concerning target-oriented therapies. PMID:25356097

  2. Occupational exposure and laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer risk in central and eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Shangina, O.; Brennan, P.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Mates, D.; Fabianova, E.; Fletcher, T.; Mannetje, A.; Boffetta, P.; Zaridze, D.

    2006-08-15

    A multicenter case-control study was conducted during 1999-2002 in four European countries (Poland, Romania, Russia, and Slovakia) to evaluate the role of occupational exposures in risk of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer. Male cancer cases (34 hypopharyngeal, 316 laryngeal) with full data on occupational history and nonoccupational factors were compared with 728 hospital controls for occupational exposure to 73 suspected carcinogens. Occupational history was evaluated by industrial hygienists blinded to case/control status. Elevated risks for over exposure to coal dust were found for both hypopharyngeal (odds ratio (OR) = 4.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18, 14.89) and laryngeal (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.94, 3.47) cancer, with clear dose-response patterns. Inclusion of a 20-year lag in the analysis strengthened these associations. Hypopharyngeal cancer risk was also significantly associated with exposure to mild steel dust (OR = 3.04, 95% CI: 1.39, 6.64) and iron compounds and fumes (OR = 2.74, 95% CI: 1.29, 5.84), without clear dose-response relations. Laryngeal cancer was significantly associated with exposure to hard-alloys dust (OR = 2.23, 95% CI: 1.08, 4.57) and chlorinated solvents (OR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.03, 4.61), without dose-response relations. A possible link between high formaldehyde exposure and laryngeal cancer was suggested. These data indicate that occupational exposure to coal dust may play a role in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. Other possible relations need further evaluation.

  3. Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy Y. O'Meara, William; Chan, Kelvin; Della-Bianca, Cesar; Mechalakos, James G.; Zhung, Joanne; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin P.; Pfister, David G.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal carcinomas treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and June 2005, 20 laryngeal and 11 hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients underwent IMRT with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy; most patients had Stage IV disease. The prescription of the planning target volume for gross, high-risk, and low-risk subclinical disease was 70, 59.4, and 54 Gy, respectively. Acute/late toxicities were retrospectively scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria scale. The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up of the living patients was 26 months (range, 17-58 months). The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rate was 86%, 94%, 89%, 92%, and 63%, respectively. Grade 2 mucositis or higher occurred in 48% of patients, and all experienced Grade 2 or higher pharyngitis during treatment. Xerostomia continued to decrease over time from the end of RT, with none complaining of Grade 2 toxicity at this analysis. The 2-year post-treatment percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-dependency rate for those with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors was 31% and 15%, respectively. The most severe late complications were laryngeal necrosis, necrotizing fascitis, and a carotid rupture resulting in death 3 weeks after salvage laryngectomy. Conclusion: These preliminary results have shown that IMRT achieved encouraging locoregional control of locoregionally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Xerostomia improved over time. Pharyngoesophageal stricture with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy dependency remains a problem, particularly for patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma and, to a lesser extent, those with laryngeal cancer. Strategies using IMRT to limit the dose delivered to the esophagus/inferior constrictor musculature without compromising target coverage might be useful to further minimize this late complication.

  4. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  5. Peripheral nerve disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Autumn

    2013-06-01

    Neuropathies during pregnancy and the postpartum period are common and are usually due to compression around pregnancy and childbirth. The most common peripheral neuropathies are Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and lower extremity neuropathies. Although most neuropathies are usually reversible, associated disabilities or morbidities can limit functioning and require therapy. Nerve conduction study tests and imaging should only be considered if symptoms are unusual or prolonged. Some neuropathies may be associated with preeclampsia or an inherent underlying neuropathy that increases the risk of nerve injury. All neuropathies in pregnancy should be followed as some may be persistent and require follow-up. PMID:23563878

  6. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...aid in repairing the nerve (e.g., to prevent ingrowth of scar tissue) and for capping the end of the nerve to prevent the formation of neuroma (tumors). (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  11. [Ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve block].

    PubMed

    Ota, Junichi; Hara, Kaoru

    2008-05-01

    Theoretically, sciatic nerve block can be used alone or in combination with lumbar plexus block or femoral nerve block for anesthesia and/or analgesia of lower limb surgery. However, clinical use of sciatic nerve block was limited by technical difficulties in performing the block since techniques used relies only on surface anatomical landmarks. Recent advances in ultrasound technology allow direct visualization of nerves and other surrounding structures and have increased the interest in performing many kinds of peripheral nerve blocks including sciatic nerve block. Preliminary data suggest that ultrasound-guided technique can help perform the sciatic nerve block more reliably and safely. In this article we describe the anatomy of the sciatic nerve, sonographic features, and technique of three major approaches including subgluteal, anterior, and popliteal approaches. The use of this technique for postoperative analgesia is also discussed. PMID:18516885

  12. Medial and Lateral Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

  13. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  14. Ultrasound, CT and MRI Appearances of a Rare Symptomatic Laryngeal Chondrometaplasia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ryan Ka Lok; Hok Yuen, Edmond Yuen; Abdullah, Victor James; Ping Lee, Yolanda Yim; Ahuja, Anil Tejbhan

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic laryngeal chondrometaplasia is rare. To the best of our knowledge, there are only few case reports on laryngeal chondrometaplasia. The imaging appearance of this uncommon disease is even more rarely described. There are only two case reports describing its appearances in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound (US) features have not been reported so far. This case report is to show the US, CT and MRI features of this disease entity to stress the role of imaging in this disease. PMID:25901266

  15. Impaired laryngeal voice production in a patient with foreign accent syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Itoh, Kenji; Sai, Keiko; Lee, Seitetsu; Abe, Shoko; Terao, Yasuo; Mannen, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We report a Japanese-speaking monolingual woman who developed foreign accent syndrome (FAS) following an infarction in the precentral and premotor cortices (Brodmann Area 6) at and around the inferior frontal sulcus. Her speech sounded Chinese or Korean to our bilingual coauthor who speaks Chinese and Japanese. Quantitative acoustic analyses of words and sentences showed that pitch (fundamental frequency variation) and intensity variances appeared lowered and fully voiced glottal pulses were reduced. These findings suggest laryngeal dysfunction that contributes to the unusual speech production in a case of FAS. This may be caused by damage to a restricted area of the motor and premotor cortices that controls laryngeal function. PMID:24592816

  16. Cough threshold in reflux oesophagitis: influence of acid and of laryngeal and oesophageal damage

    PubMed Central

    Benini, L; Ferrari, M; Sembenini, C; Olivieri, M; Micciolo, R; Zuccali, V; Bulighin, G; Fiorino, F; Ederle, A; Cascio, V; Vantini, I

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Gastro-oesophageal reflux is often associated with cough. Patients with reflux show an enhanced tussive response to bronchial irritants, even in the absence of respiratory symptoms.?AIM—To investigate the effect of mucosal damage (either oesophageal or laryngeal) and of oesophageal acid flooding on cough threshold in reflux patients.?PATIENTS—We studied 21 patients with reflux oesophagitis and digestive symptoms. Respiratory diseases, smoking, and use of drugs influencing cough were considered exclusion criteria.?METHODS—Patients underwent pH monitoring, manometry, digestive endoscopy, laryngoscopy, and methacholine challenge. We evaluated the cough response to inhaled capsaicin (expressed as PD5, the dose producing five coughs) before therapy, after five days of omeprazole therapy, and when oesophageal and laryngeal damage had healed.?RESULTS—In all patients spirometry and methacholine challenge were normal. Thirteen patients had posterior laryngitis and eight complained of coughing. Twenty patients showed an enhanced cough response (basal PD5 0.92 (0.47) nM; mean (SEM)) which improved after five and 60 days (2.87 (0.82) and 5.88 (0.85) nM; p<0.0001). The severity of oesophagitis did not influence PD5 variation. On the contrary, the response to treatment was significantly different in patients with and without laryngitis (p=0.038). In patients with no laryngitis, the cough threshold improved after five days with no further change thereafter. In patients with laryngitis, the cough threshold improved after five days and improved further after 60 days. Proximal and distal oesophageal acid exposure did not influence PD5. Heartburn disappeared during the first five days but the decrease in cough and throat clearing were slower.?CONCLUSIONS—Patients with reflux oesophagitis have a decreased cough threshold. This is related to both laryngeal inflammation and acid flooding of the oesophagus but not to the severity of oesophagitis. Omeprazole improves not only respiratory and gastro-oesophageal symptoms but also the cough threshold.???Keywords: oesophagitis; cough; laryngitis; pathogenesis; treatment; gastro-oesophageal reflux PMID:10807885

  17. Cicatricial pemphigoid with severe gingival and laryngeal involvement in an 18-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Junu; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Stewart, Carol; Katz, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Cicatricial pemphigoid (CP), also known as mucous membrane pemphigoid, is an autoimmune vesiculobullous disease occurring mostly in elderly people and seldom occurring in individuals under the age of 20 years. It predominantly affects the mucosal surfaces, primarily the oral and conjunctival mucosa. Uncommonly, the upper aerodigestive tract is involved, which can lead to life-threatening complications. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with desquamative gingivitis and severe laryngeal webbing and stenosis, caused by cicatricial pemphigoid. Airway management necessitated a tracheostomy and additional surgical procedure. The clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic features of this disease are discussed, focusing on the oral and unique laryngeal manifestations. PMID:17376714

  18. The Assessment Methods of Laryngeal Muscle Activity in Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Khoddami, Seyyedeh Maryam; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Izadi, Farzad; Talebian Moghadam, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the methods used for the assessment of muscular tension dysphonia (MTD). The MTD is a functional voice disorder associated with abnormal laryngeal muscle activity. Various assessment methods are available in the literature to evaluate the laryngeal hyperfunction. The case history, laryngoscopy, and palpation are clinical methods for the assessment of patients with MTD. Radiography and surface electromyography (EMG) are objective methods to provide physiological information about MTD. Recent studies show that surface EMG can be an effective tool for assessing muscular tension in MTD. PMID:24319372

  19. Computed tomography of the larynx: correlation with anatomic and pathologic studies in cases of laryngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Schild, J.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Capek, V.

    1983-04-01

    Seven patients with known carcinoma of the larynx underwent computed tomography (CT) of the larynx prior to surgery. Whole-mount sections of the extirpated larynx cut in the horizontal plane were compared with the corresponding level of the preoperaive CT sections to demonstrate the validity of CT scanning in the evaluation of tumors of the larynx. The results indicate that CT scanning accurately demonstrates the anatomic location and gross size of laryngeal tumor, although early invasion of the laryngeal cartilages may be difficult to diagnose with CT. It is concluded that preoperative CT scanning of the larynx is the radiologic procedure of choice for evaluating carcinoma of the larynx.

  20. Cranial Nerves any nerve that emanates from the skull Motor = efferent

    E-print Network

    Houde, Peter

    Cranial Nerves ­ any nerve that emanates from the skull Motor = efferent somatomotor ­ to skeletal, vision, gustation, hearing, equilibrium Cranial nerves - functions nI ­ olfactory, SS nII ­ optic, SS n to tongue Cranial nerves ­ pathways from anterior cranial fossa nI ­ olfactory from anterior cranial fossa