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Sample records for laryngeal nerve paralysis

  1. [Esophagomediastinal fistula and recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease].

    PubMed

    Rosanowski, F; Tigges, M; Eysholdt, U

    1995-08-01

    The case of a female patient 21 years old at the time of diagnosis is reported. The patient suffered from stage IV Hodgkin's disease of the nodular sclerotic type with head and neck manifestations in cervical lymph nodes and in the esophagus. After radiotherapy; she suffered from an esophageal/mediastinal fistula and unilateral paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Fifteen years later, there are no signs of recurrent tumor growth or a secondary neoplasm. Dysphonia was ameliorated by speech therapy, and surgery was not necessary. PMID:7575906

  2. Surgical Treatment of Laryngeal Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Unilateral arytenoid lateralization is the most commonly used technique to treat laryngeal paralysis. It is important not to overabduct the arytenoid cartilage during the unilateral lateralization to minimize exposure of the rima glottides. Dogs with laryngeal paralysis treated with unilateral lateralization have a good long-term prognosis. Idiopathic polyneuropathy is the most common cause of laryngeal paralysis in dogs. PMID:26947115

  3. Strobokymographic and videostroboscopic analysis of vocal fold motion in unilateral superior laryngeal nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Abie H; Sung, Myung-Whun; Berke, Gerald S; Chhetri, Dinesh K

    2007-02-01

    The clinical diagnosis of superior laryngeal nerve paralysis (SLNp) is infrequently made, because of the heterogeneity of clinical presentations and laryngoscopic findings. Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) can provide the definitive diagnosis of this abnormality. With increasing use of LEMG in clinical practice, this condition is now more frequently appreciated by otolaryngologists. A characteristic, but infrequently reported, videostroboscopic vocal fold motion termed Gegenschlagen ("dashing-against-each-other") has previously been described to occur in unilateral SLNp. We encountered such motion in a clinical case, which we subsequently verified as unilateral SLNp by means of LEMG. This characteristic glottic motion was then verified in an in vivo canine model of phonation after unilateral SLNp. Videostrobokymography was performed to generate kymograms that illustrated this vocal fold motion clearly. Kymograms of both human and canine subjects with SLNp demonstrated an undulating motion of the horizontally shifting glottic space as the medial edges of the vocal folds chased each other 90 degrees out of phase. As one vocal fold mucosal edge was opening, the other was closing, and this repeated motion appeared as vocal folds chasing or dashing against each other. Although not uniformly seen in all cases, this vocal fold motion appears to be unique to SLNp. PMID:17388230

  4. Irregular vocal fold dynamics incited by asymmetric fluid loading in a model of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, David; Erath, Byron D.; Zanartu, Matias; Peterson, Sean D.

    2011-11-01

    Voiced speech is produced by dynamic fluid-structure interactions in the larynx. Traditionally, reduced order models of speech have relied upon simplified inviscid flow solvers to prescribe the fluid loadings that drive vocal fold motion, neglecting viscous flow effects that occur naturally in voiced speech. Viscous phenomena, such as skewing of the intraglottal jet, have the most pronounced effect on voiced speech in cases of vocal fold paralysis where one vocal fold loses some, or all, muscular control. The impact of asymmetric intraglottal flow in pathological speech is captured in a reduced order two-mass model of speech by coupling a boundary-layer estimation of the asymmetric pressures with asymmetric tissue parameters that are representative of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Nonlinear analysis identifies the emergence of irregular and chaotic vocal fold dynamics at values representative of pathological speech conditions.

  5. Laryngeal nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Laryngeal nerve damage is injury to one or both of the nerves that are attached to the voice box. ... Injury to the laryngeal nerves is uncommon. When it does occur, it can be from: A complication of neck or chest surgery (especially thyroid, lung, ...

  6. Laryngeal paralysis-polyneuropathy complex in young Rottweilers.

    PubMed

    Mahony, O M; Knowles, K E; Braund, K G; Averill, D R; Frimberger, A E

    1998-01-01

    Five Rottweiler puppies from 3 unrelated litters developed inspiratory stridor at 11-13 weeks of age. Physical examination disclosed tetraparesis in all dogs, and bilateral lenticular cataracts in 4 dogs. Laryngeal examination under light anesthesia showed laryngeal paralysis in all dogs. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed denervation potentials in the distal appendicular muscles of 4 dogs tested and in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of 2 dogs tested. Motor nerve conduction velocity was slightly low in 1 dog. Neurogenic muscular atrophy was found in distal appendicular muscles (n = 3) and intrinsic laryngeal muscles (n = 2), and degenerative changes were found in peripheral nerves (n = 3) and recurrent laryngeal nerves (n = 2). No abnormalities were detected in the spinal cord, spinal nerve roots, or ganglia of 3 dogs autopsied. The clinical, electrophysiologic, and histopathologic findings support a diagnosis of polyneuropathy and resemble the finding reported in young Dalmatians. Young dogs with laryngeal paralysis should be evaluated neurologically to rule out a more generalized polyneuropathy. The condition is suspected to be hereditary in nature and the prognosis is poor. PMID:9773408

  7. Sound signature for identification of tracheal collapse and laryngeal paralysis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Seong-Chan; Lee, Hee-Chun; Chang, Hong-Hee; Lee, Hyo-Jong

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether upper airway sounds of dogs with laryngeal paralysis and tracheal collapse have distinct sound characteristics, compared with unaffected dogs. The sounds of 5 dogs with laryngeal paralysis and 5 dogs with tracheal collapse were recorded. Honking sound appeared as predominant clinical signs in dogs with tracheal collapse. Laryngeal stridors appeared as predominant clinical signs in dogs with experimentally produced laryngeal paralysis by resection of laryngeal nerve, in which two types of stridor, I and II, were recorded. All these sounds were analyzed using sound spectrogam analysis. There were significant differences in duration (sec), intensity (dB), pitch (Hz), first formant (Hz), second formant (Hz), third formant (Hz), fourth formant (Hz) of sounds between the normal bark and two types of stridor or honking sound, indicating that the sound analysis might be a useful diagnostic modality for dogs with tracheal collapse and laryngeal paralysis. PMID:15699602

  8. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  9. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  10. A systematic review of variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xing Yao; Smoll, Nicolas Roydon

    2016-01-01

    With thyroid cancer fast becoming one of the most common endocrine cancers, the frequency of thyroid surgery has increased. A common and debilitating concern with thyroid surgery is recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) paralysis leading to glottal obstruction and airway compromise. A systematic review regarding the anatomical variation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was performed to determine the position of anatomical variants of the RLN in relation to the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) as well as the prevalence of nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN). MEDLINE, Web of Science, MEDITEXT, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane, ProQuest, Pubmed, and ScienceDirect. Databases were searched using the search terms "inferior thyroid artery," "recurrent laryngeal nerve," "nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve," and "anatomical variation." The reference sections of the articles found were searched for additional reports. The references of all articles were searched to find articles missed in the database search. A total of 8,655 RLN sides were included in this study. One thousand eight hundred and thirteen (20.95%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 20.09, 2,182) showed a Type A configuration of RLN in relation to the ITA, 2,432 (28.10%; 95% CI 27.15, 29.06) showed a Type B configuration and 4,410 (50.95%; 95% CI 49.89, 52.01) showed a Type C configuration between the RLN and the ITA. The second search returned with 38,568 recurrent laryngeal sides and only 221 (0.57%; 95%CI 0.5, 0.65) NRLN documented. The RLN is most commonly found in the posterior position, relative to the ITA. The incidence of the NRLN is low, only occurring in 0.57% of people. PMID:26297484

  11. Electrophysiological neural monitoring of the laryngeal nerves in thyroid surgery: review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Deniwar, Ahmed; Randolph, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is one of the most common complications of thyroid surgery. RLN injury can cause vocal cord paralysis, affecting the patient’s voice and the quality of life. Injury of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) can cause cricothyroid muscle denervation affecting high vocal tones. Thus, securing the laryngeal nerves in these surgeries is of utmost importance. Visual identification of the nerves has long been the standard method for this precaution. Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) has been introduced as a novel technology to improve the protection of the laryngeal nerves and reduce the rate of RLN injury. The aim of this article is to provide a brief description of the technique and review the literature to illustrate the value of IONM. IONM can provide early identification of anatomical variations and unusual nerve routes, which carry a higher risk of injury if not detected. IONM helps in prognosticating postoperative nerve function. Moreover, by detecting nerve injury intraoperatively, it aids in staging bilateral surgeries to avoid bilateral vocal cord paralysis and tracheostomy. The article will discuss the value of continuous IONM (C-IOMN) that may prevent nerve injury by detecting EMG waveform changes indicating impending nerve injury. Herein, we are also discussing anatomy of laryngeal nerves and aspects of its injury. PMID:26425449

  12. Extralaryngeal division of the recurrent laryngeal nerve: a new description for the inferior laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Bulent; Tunali, Selcuk; Ozan, Hasan

    2008-05-01

    Extralaryngeal division of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was contradictory in the literature. We aimed to investigate extralaryngeal division of the nerve, and also propose a new description for the inferior laryngeal nerve. Sixty specimens (120 sides) were examined for this project, including 41 men and 19 women cadavers between the ages of 40 and 89 years at death. In one right side, terminal segment of the nerve gave off many small branches surrounding the inferior thyroid artery then reaching the larynx, trachea, thyroid gland and esophagus. In eight sides, terminal segment of the nerve had no extralaryngeal division and entered the larynx as a single trunk. In 110 sides, the nerve had extralaryngeal division. One hundred and three nerves had two laryngeal and one to three extralaryngeal branches. Two types were described in this group. In type I (66 nerves), both branches arose from the same level of nerve. Type I had two subtypes: type Ia, the origin of the branches was just below the inferior constrictor muscle; type Ib, the origin of the branches was 15-35 mm below the muscle. In type II (37 nerves), the laryngeal branches arose just 3-5 mm above the extralaryngeal branches. We observed that the laryngeal and extralaryngeal branches arose generally from the same point of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The inferior laryngeal nerve is thus very short, or even nonexistent. Therefore, we suggest that if the term "superior laryngeal nerve" is a given, standard, and accepted term, then the term "inferior laryngeal nerve" should also be accepted instead of the term "recurrent laryngeal nerve." PMID:18292961

  13. Recurrent largngeal nerve paralysis: a laryngographic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, F.P.

    1983-07-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a relatively common entity, usually resulting from a pathologic process of the vagus nerve or its recurrent larynegeal branch. It is rarely caused by intralargngeal lesions. Four teen patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (RLNP) were evaluated by laryngography, computed tomography (CT), or both. In the evaluation of the paramedian cord, CT was limited in its ability to differentiate between tumor or RLNP as the cause of the fixed cord, but it yielded more information than laryngography on the structural abnormalities of the larynx and pre-epiglottic and paralaryngeal spaces. Laryngography revealed distinct features of RLNP and is the procedure of choice for evaluation of functional abnormalities of the larynx until further experience with faster CT scanners and dynamic scanning of the larynx is gained.

  14. Ulnar nerve paralysis after forearm bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Huyer, Rodrigo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Paralysis or nerve injury associated with fractures of forearm bones fracture is rare and is more common in exposed fractures with large soft-tissue injuries. Ulnar nerve paralysis is a rare condition associated with closed fractures of the forearm. In most cases, the cause of paralysis is nerve contusion, which evolves with neuropraxia. However, nerve lacerations and entrapment at the fracture site always need to be borne in mind. This becomes more important when neuropraxia appears or worsens after reduction of a closed fracture of the forearm has been completed. The importance of diagnosing this injury and differentiating its features lies in the fact that, depending on the type of lesion, different types of management will be chosen. PMID:27517030

  15. An unusual cause of hoarseness and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Truong, Phat; Dickerson, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and thyroid disease suggest locally invasive thyroid malignancy. In contrast, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by benign multinodular goiters or ectopic thyroid tissue accounts for only 1% of cases. This article describes an unusual case of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy secondary to a benign ectopic retrosternal thyroid tissue mass. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with progressive voice weakness and hoarseness. PMID:27467296

  16. Laryngeal Adductor Function in Experimental Models of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Paniello, Randal C.; Rich, Jason T.; Debnath, Nick L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Most patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis experience some degree of spontaneous reinnervation, which depends upon the type and severity of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury. After partial recovery, the paretic vocal fold may or may not adduct adequately to allow glottic closure, which in turn affects phonatory and swallowing outcomes. This process was studied in a series of canine laryngeal nerve injury models. Study Design Animal (canine) experiments. Methods Maximum stimulable laryngeal adductor pressure (LAP) was measured pre-treatment (baseline) and at 6 months following experimental RLN injuries (total n=59). The 9 study groups were designed to simulate a range of severities of RLN injury. Results The greatest LAP recovery, at 108% of original baseline, was seen in a 50% transection model; the least recovery was seen when the RLN underwent complete transection with repair, at 56% with precise alignment and 50% with alignment reversed. Intermediate models (partial RLN injuries) gave intermediate results. Crush models recovered 105% of LAP, while a half-transection, half-crush injury recovered 72% and cautery injuries recovered 61%. Controls (complete transection without repair) had no measurable recovery. Conclusions The injured RLN has a strong tendency to recover. Restoration of adductor strength, as determined by the LAP, was predictably related to the severity of RLN injury. The model RLN injuries studied provide a range of expected outcomes that can be used for future experiments exploring interventions that may improve post-injury adductor function. PMID:25283381

  17. Neurobrucellosis developing unilateral oculomotor nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Işıkay, Sedat; Yılmaz, Kutluhan; Ölmez, Akgün

    2012-11-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infectious disease that is common around the world. Its clinical course demonstrates great diversity as it can affect all organs and systems. However, the central nervous system is rarely affected in the pediatric population. Neurobrucellosis is most frequently observed with meningitis and has numerous complications, including meningocephalitis, myelitis, cranial nerve paralyses, radiculopathy, and neuropathy. Neurobrucellosis affects the second, third, sixth, seventh, and eighth cranial nerves. Involvement of the oculomotor nerves is a very rare complication in neurobrucellosis although several adult cases have been reported. In this article, we present the case of a 9-year-old girl who developed unilateral nerve paralysis as a secondary complication of neurobrucellosis and recovered without sequel after treatment. This case is notable because it is a very rare, the first within the pediatric population. Our article emphasizes that neurobrucellosis should be considered among the distinguishing diagnoses in every case that is admitted for nerve paralysis in regions where Brucella infection is endemic. PMID:22244219

  18. Autonomic neuropathy resulting in recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in an HIV patient with Hodgkin lymphoma receiving vinblastine and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cherif, S; Danino, S; Yoganathan, K

    2015-03-01

    Hoarseness of voice due to vocal cord paresis as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy has been well recognised. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy is commonly caused by compression due to tumour or lymph nodes or by surgical damage. Vinca alkaloids are well known to cause peripheral neuropathy. However, vinca alkaloids causing recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy has been reported rarely in children. We report a case of an adult patient with HIV who developed hoarseness of voice due to vocal cord paralysis during vinblastine treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. Mediastinal and hilar lymph node enlargement in such patients may distract clinicians from considering alternative causes of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, with potential ensuing severe or even life-threatening stridor. PMID:24828552

  19. Neurological Complications in Thyroid Surgery: A Surgical Point of View on Laryngeal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Varaldo, Emanuela; Ansaldo, Gian Luca; Mascherini, Matteo; Cafiero, Ferdinando; Minuto, Michele N.

    2014-01-01

    The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB) is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle) varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified, the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN) runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction, and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve, which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a low range. PMID

  20. Influence of Asymmetric Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Stimulation on Vibration, Acoustics, and Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Neubauer, Juergen; Sofer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Evaluate the influence of asymmetric recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) stimulation on the vibratory phase, acoustics and aerodynamics of phonation. Study Design Basic science study using an in vivo canine model. Methods The RLNs were symmetrically and asymmetrically stimulated over eight graded levels to test a range of vocal fold activation conditions from subtle paresis to paralysis. Vibratory phase, fundamental frequency (F0), subglottal pressure, and airflow were noted at phonation onset. The evaluations were repeated for three levels of symmetric superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) stimulation. Results Asymmetric laryngeal adductor activation from asymmetric left-right RLN stimulation led to a consistent pattern of vibratory phase asymmetry, with the more activated vocal fold leading in the opening phase of the glottal cycle and in mucosal wave amplitude. Vibratory amplitude asymmetry was also observed, with more lateral excursion of the glottis of the less activated side. Onset fundamental frequency was higher with asymmetric activation because the two RLNs were synergistic in decreasing F0, glottal width, and strain. Phonation onset pressure increased and airflow decreased with symmetric RLN activation. Conclusion Asymmetric laryngeal activation from RLN paresis and paralysis has consistent effects on vocal fold vibration, acoustics, and aerodynamics. This information may be useful in diagnosis and management of vocal fold paresis. PMID:24913182

  1. Trauma-induced schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve after thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, William P; Brody, Robert M; LiVolsi, Virginia A; Wang, Amber R; Mirza, Natasha A

    2016-06-01

    Laryngeal schwannomas are rare, benign tumors, most often arising from the superior laryngeal nerve. We describe a case of a 68-year-old female with a laryngeal schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve after traumatic injury. We postulate that trauma to the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy or thyroplasty incited growth of a nerve sheath tumor. This is the first reported case of a trauma-induced schwannoma of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and second case of a recurrent laryngeal nerve schwannoma. Although rare, this case demonstrates that these tumors should be considered during workup of vocal cord paresis after surgery or failed thyroplasty. Laryngoscope, 126:1408-1410, 2016. PMID:26421595

  2. Sonographically guided superior laryngeal nerve block during awake fiberoptic intubation.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Andrew; Tang, Raymond; Vaghadia, Himat

    2015-04-15

    We report 5 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided superior laryngeal nerve block before awake intubation and general anesthesia. We used a 8- to 15-MHz hockey stick-shaped ultrasound transducer (HST15-8/20 linear probe, Ultrasonix) to visualize the superior laryngeal nerve. A 3.8-cm 25-G needle was inserted in real time and directed toward the superior laryngeal nerve followed by circumferential placement of local anesthetic. All 5 patients tolerated subsequent awake fiberoptic intubation with either minimal or no sedation. Sonographically guided superior laryngeal nerve block may be useful in patients where identification of landmarks in the neck is difficult as a result of patient anatomy. PMID:25867195

  3. Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Nathan; O’Donohue, Peter; French, Heath; Griffin, Aaron; Gochee, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Facial nerve paralysis because of penetrating trauma through the external auditory canal is extremely rare, with a paucity of published literature. The objective of this study is to review the literature on transtympanic facial nerve paralysis and increase physician awareness of this uncommon injury through discussion of its clinical presentation, management and prognosis. We also aim to improve patient outcomes in those that have sustained this type of injury by suggesting an optimal management plan. In this case report, we present the case of a 46-year-old white woman who sustained a unilateral facial nerve paresis because of a garfish penetrating her tympanic membrane and causing direct damage to the tympanic portion of her facial nerve. On follow-up after 12 months, her facial nerve function has largely returned to normal. Transtympanic facial nerve paralysis is a rare injury but can have a favorable prognosis if managed effectively. PMID:26090278

  4. Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is due to strokes or injuries such as spinal cord injury or a broken neck. Other causes of paralysis include Nerve diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Autoimmune diseases ... used to be a cause of paralysis, but polio no longer occurs in the U.S.

  5. Total Endoscopic Thyroidectomy with Intraoperative Laryngeal Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bin; Zhang, Bin; Zeng, Qing-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of laryngeal nerve (LN) monitoring (LNM) during total endoscopic thyroidectomy via breast approach, with emphasis on the identification rates for RLN and EBSLN and the incidence of RLN paralysis. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study included 280 patients who underwent endoscopic thyroidectomy with or without LNM. RLN and EBSLN were identified using endoscopic magnification in the control group, while they were localized additionally by LNM in the LNM group. Demographic parameters and surgical outcomes were analyzed by statistical methods. Patients in the control group were also stratified by the side of thyroidectomy to determine difference in left and right RLN injury rates. Results. All procedures were successfully conducted without permanent LN damage. The identification rates for RLN and EBSLN were high in the LNM group compared to those of the control group, and the risk difference (RD) of temporary RLN injury between two groups was 6.3%. The risk of damage was slightly higher for the left RLN than for the right RLN in the control group, which was performed by a right-hand surgeon. Conclusion. The joint application of LNM and endoscopic magnified view endows total endoscopic thyroidectomy with ease, safety, and efficiency. PMID:27413372

  6. Neurotrophin expression and laryngeal muscle pathophysiology following recurrent laryngeal nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    WANG, BAOXIN; YUAN, JUNJIE; XU, JIAFENG; XIE, JIN; WANG, GUOLIANG; DONG, PIN

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal palsy often occurs as a result of recurrent laryngeal or vagal nerve injury during oncological surgery of the head and neck, affecting quality of life and increasing economic burden. Reinnervation following recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is difficult despite development of techniques, such as neural anastomosis, nerve grafting and creation of a laryngeal muscle pedicle. In the present study, due to the limited availability of human nerve tissue for research, a rat model was used to investigate neurotrophin expression and laryngeal muscle pathophysiology in RLN injury. Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent right RLN transection with the excision of a 5-mm segment. Vocal fold movements, vocalization, histology and immunostaining were evaluated at different time-points (3, 6, 10 and 16 weeks). Although vocalization was restored, movement of the vocal fold failed to return to normal levels following RLN injury. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor differed in the thyroarytenoid (TA) and posterior cricoarytenoid muscles. The number of axons did not increase to baseline levels over time. Furthermore, normal muscle function was unlikely with spontaneous reinnervation. During regeneration following RLN injury, differences in the expression levels of neurotrophic factors may have resulted in preferential reinnervation of the TA muscles. Data from the present study indicated that neurotrophic factors may be applied for restoring the function of the laryngeal nerve following recurrent injury. PMID:26677138

  7. Recovery of laryngeal function after intraoperative injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hydman, Jonas; Svensson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) during thyroid/parathyroid surgery, despite a macroscopically intact nerve, is a challenge which highlights the sensitivity and complexity of laryngeal innervation. Furthermore, the uncertain prognosis stresses a lack of capability to diagnose the reason behind the impaired function. There is a great deal of literature considering risk factors, surgical technique and mechanisms outside the nerve affecting the incidence of RLN paresis during surgery. To be able to prognosticate recovery in cases of laryngeal dysfunction and voice changes after thyroid surgery, the surgeon would first need to define the presence, location, and type of laryngeal nerve injury. There is little data describing the events within the nerve and the neurobiological reasons for the impaired function related to potential recovery and prognosis. In addition, very little data has been presented in order to clarify any differences between the transient and permanent injury of the RLN. This review aims, from an anatomical and neurobiological perspective, to provide an update on the current understandings of surgically-induced injury to the laryngeal nerves. PMID:25713777

  8. Laryngeal elevation by selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, Aaron J.; Kolb, Ilya; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Laryngeal elevation protects the airway and assists opening of the esophagus during swallowing. The GH, thyrohyoid, and MH muscles provide a majority of this elevatory motion. This study applied functional electrical stimulation to the XII/C1 nerve complex using a nerve cuff electrode to determine the capabilities of neural stimulation to induce laryngeal elevation. Approach. Multi-contact FINE electrodes were implanted onto the XII/C1 nerve complex at locations proximal and distal to the thyrohyoid branching point in five anesthetized canines. Motion of the thyroid cartilage and the hyoid bone was recorded during stimulation of nerve cuffs and intramuscular electrodes. Main Results. Nerve stimulation induced 260% more laryngeal elevation than intramuscular stimulation (18.8 mm versus 5.2 mm, p ≪ 0.01), and 228% higher velocity (143.8 versus 43.9 mm s-1, p ≪ 0.01). While stimulation at all cuff and electrode locations elevated the larynx, only the proximal XII/C1 nerve cuff significantly elicited both thyroid-hyoid approximation and hyoid elevation. In all proximal XII/C1 nerve cuffs (n = 7), stimulation was able to obtain selectivity of greater than 75% of at least one elevatory muscle. Significance. These results support the hypothesis that an implanted neural interface system can produce increased laryngeal elevation, a significant protective mechanism of deglutition.

  9. Laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Cortese, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Schreiber, A; Callegari, I; Moglia, A; Alfonsi, E; Pareyson, D

    2016-07-01

    Lower cranial and phrenic nerve involvement is exceptional in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Here we report the occurrence of reversible laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with HNPP. The patient recalled several episodes of reversible weakness and numbness of his feet and hands since the age of 30 years. His medical history was uneventful, apart from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). At age 44, following severe weight loss, he presented with progressive dysphonia and hoarseness. EMG of cricoarytenoid and thyroarytenoid muscles and laryngeal fibroscopy confirmed vocal cord paralysis. These speech disturbances gradually regressed. Two years later, he reported rapidly worsening dyspnea. Electroneurography showed increased distal latency of the right phrenic nerve and diaphragm ultrasonography documented reduced right hemi-diaphragm excursion. Six months later and after optimization of CODP treatment, his respiratory function had improved and both phrenic nerve conduction and diaphragm excursion were completely restored. We hypothesize that chronic cough and nerve stretching in the context of CODP, together with severe weight loss, may have triggered the nerve paralysis in this patient. Our report highlights the need for optimal management of comorbidities such as CODP as well as careful control of weight in HNPP patients to avoid potentially harmful complications. PMID:27241821

  10. Identification of the motor laryngeal nerves - a new electrical stimulation technique.

    PubMed

    Spahn, J G; Bizal, J; Ferguson, S; Lingeman, R E

    1981-11-01

    Head and neck surgeons are familiar with the technique of identifying motor nerves in the head and neck region by using electrical stimulation especially in the identification of the facial and the spinal accessory nerves. The identification of the motor laryngeal nerves by electrical stimulation intra-operatively has been described; but, the difficulty of visualization of intrinsic laryngeal muscle movement has prevented the wide spread use of this technique. This paper will introduce a simple, safe and reliable method to allow the surgeon to recognize true vocal cord movement while stimulating the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The movement of a two inch 27 gauge needle placed through the cricothyroid membrane into the ipsilateral true vocal cord permits identification of intrinsic laryngeal muscle movement during electrical stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. This method has been successfully used in confirming conductivity of the laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery, Zenker's diverticulum surgery, cricotracheal trauma and recurrent nerve neurectomy for spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:7300536

  11. A case of isolated abducens nerve paralysis in maxillofacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Elif Seda; Keskin, Ekrem; Atik, Bekir; Koçer, Abdülkadir

    2015-01-01

    Nervus abducens is a pure motor nerve located in the pons. It retracts the eyeball laterally by stimulating rectus lateralis muscle. In case of their paralysis, diplopia and restriction in the eye movements while looking sideways, are seen. Since the same signs are seen due to the muscle entrapment in blowout fractures, its differential diagnosis has importance in terms of the treatment protocol and avoiding unnecessary operations. In this article, we present a 22-year-old male patient who was referred to our department due to the prediagnosis of blowout fracture following maxillofacial trauma. However, he was diagnosed with abducens nerve paralysis after the consultations and analysis and his restriction of movement was resolved via systemic steroid treatment instead of unnecessary operation. PMID:26981484

  12. A case of isolated abducens nerve paralysis in maxillofacial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Elif Seda; Keskin, Ekrem; Atik, Bekir; Koçer, Abdülkadir

    2015-01-01

    Nervus abducens is a pure motor nerve located in the pons. It retracts the eyeball laterally by stimulating rectus lateralis muscle. In case of their paralysis, diplopia and restriction in the eye movements while looking sideways, are seen. Since the same signs are seen due to the muscle entrapment in blowout fractures, its differential diagnosis has importance in terms of the treatment protocol and avoiding unnecessary operations. In this article, we present a 22-year-old male patient who was referred to our department due to the prediagnosis of blowout fracture following maxillofacial trauma. However, he was diagnosed with abducens nerve paralysis after the consultations and analysis and his restriction of movement was resolved via systemic steroid treatment instead of unnecessary operation. PMID:26981484

  13. Quantification of vocal fold motion using echography: application to recurrent nerve paralysis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Mike-Ely; Lefort, Muriel; Bergeret-Cassagne, Héloïse; Hachi, Siham; Li, Ang; Russ, Gilles; Lazard, Diane; Menegaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence; Trésallet, Christophe; Frouin, Frédérique

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent nerve paralysis (RP) is one of the most frequent complications of thyroid surgery. It reduces vocal fold mobility. Nasal endoscopy, a mini-invasive procedure, is the conventional way to detect RP. We suggest a new approach based on laryngeal ultrasound and a specific data analysis was designed to help with the automated detection of RP. Ten subjects were enrolled for this feasibility study: four controls, three patients with RP and three patients without RP according to nasal endoscopy. The ultrasound protocol was based on a ten seconds B-mode acquisition in a coronal plane during normal breathing. Image processing included three steps: 1) automated detection of two consecutive closing and opening images, corresponding to extreme positions of vocal folds in the sequence of B-mode images, using principal component analysis of the image sequence; 2) positioning of three landmarks and robust tracking of these points using a multi-pyramidal refined optical flow approach; 3) estimation of quantitative parameters indicating left and right fractions of mobility, and motion symmetry. Results provided by automated image processing were compared to those obtained by an expert. Detection of extreme images was accurate; tracking of landmarks was reliable in 80% of cases. Motion symmetry indices showed similar values for controls and patients without RP. Fraction of mobility was reduced in cases of RP. Thus, our CAD system helped in the detection of RP. Laryngeal ultrasound combined with appropriate image processing helped in the diagnosis of recurrent nerve paralysis and could be proposed as a first-line method.

  14. Update in Facial Nerve Paralysis: Tissue engineering and new technologies

    PubMed Central

    Langhals, Nicholas B.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Ray, Amrita; Brenner, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To present recent advances in treatment of facial paralysis, emphasizing emerging technologies. This review will summarize the current state of the art in the management of facial paralysis and discuss advances in nerve regeneration, facial reanimation, and use of novel biomaterials. The review includes surgical innovations in re-innervation and reanimation as well as progress with bioelectrical interfaces. Recent Findings The past decade has witnessed major advances in understanding of nerve injury and approaches for management. Key innovations include strategies to accelerate nerve regeneration, provide tissue-engineered constructs that may replace nonfunctional nerves, approaches to influence axonal guidance, limiting of donor-site morbidity, and optimization of functional outcomes. Approaches to muscle transfer continue to evolve, and new technologies allow for electrical nerve stimulation and use of artificial tissues. Summary The fields of biomedical engineering and facial reanimation increasingly intersect, with innovative surgical approaches complementing a growing array of tissue engineering tools. The goal of treatment remains the predictable restoration of natural facial movement, with acceptable morbidity and long-term stability. Advances in bioelectrical interfaces and nanotechnology hold promise for widening the window for successful treatment intervention and for restoring both lost neural inputs and muscle function. PMID:24979369

  15. Outcomes of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following congenital heart surgery: A contemporary experience

    PubMed Central

    Alfares, Fahad A.; Hynes, Conor F.; Ansari, Ghedak; Chounoune, Reginald; Ramadan, Manelle; Shaughnessy, Conner; Reilly, Brian K.; Zurakowski, David; Jonas, Richard A.; Nath, Dilip S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve can lead to significant morbidity during congenital cardiac surgery. The objective is to expand on the limited understanding of the severity and recovery of this iatrogenic condition. Design A six-year retrospective review of all congenital heart operations at a single institution from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013 was performed. All patients with documented vocal cord paralysis on laryngoscopic examination comprised the study cohort. Evaluation of time to vocal cord recovery and need for further surgical intervention was the primary focus. Results The incidence of post-operative vocal cord paralysis was 1.1% (32 out of 3036 patients; 95% confidence interval: 0.7–1.5%). The majority were left-sided injuries (71%). Overall rate of recovery was 61% with a median time of 10 months in those who recovered, and a total follow up of 46 months. Due to feeding complications, 45% of patients required gastrostomy tube after the injury, and these patients were found to have longer duration of post-operative days of intubation (median 10 vs. 5 days, p = 0.03), ICU length of stay (50 vs. 8 days, p = 0.002), and hospital length of stay (92 vs. 41 days, p = 0.01). No pre-operative variables were identified as predictive of recovery or need for gastrostomy placement. Conclusion Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury is a serious complication of congenital heart surgery that impacts post-operative morbidity, in some cases leading to a need for further intervention, in particular, gastrostomy tube placement. A prospective, multi-center study is needed to fully evaluate factors that influence severity and time to recovery. PMID:26778899

  16. Fiber components of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gacek, R R; Lyon, M J

    1976-01-01

    Experimental neuroanatomical methods were employed in 21 adult cats to determine 1) the number and size of myelinated motor and sensory fibers in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and 2) the fiber components originating in the nucleus ambiguus (NA) and retrofacial nucleus (RFN) of the brain stem. Intracranial transection of the X and XI cranial nerves and selective destruction of the NA or RFN were the experimental lesions inflicted in order to obtain the following results. About 55% (312) of the right RLN (565 fibers) is composed of myelinated motor nerve fibers which measure 4 mu - 9 mu in diameter. Nine percent come from the RFN and are smaller (4-6 mu) than the 46% which emanate from the NA and measure 6-9 mu in diameter. The remaining 45% of the RLN is made up of sensory neurons which can be divided into three groups. 1) The largest numerical group (32%) is very small in caliber (1-3 mu) and supplies extralaryngeal regions (trachea, esophagus). 2) The intermediate size fiber group (4-9 mu) comprises 11% of the RLN and probably supplies the subglottic mucosa. 3) The smallest group (2%) of sensory fibers is the largest in diameter (10-15 mu) and may represent either the innervation of muscle spindles or afferents from the superior laryngeal nerve coursing down into the chest. PMID:949153

  17. Three variations of the laryngeal nerve in the same patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A non-recurrent course is a rare anatomic variation of the inferior laryngeal nerve (ILN). Bilateral extra-laryngeal bifurcation of the ILN seldom occurs before its laryngeal entry. Anastomosis between the ILN and cervical sympathetic chain is another rare anatomic feature. The prevalence of extra-laryngeal branching of the non-recurrent nerve is unknown. We present an example of triple anatomic variations of ILNs in the same patient, and also two anatomic variations in the same nerve. Case presentation A 56-year-old Caucasian man with a large toxic multi-nodular goiter was surgically treated with total thyroidectomy. Both his right and left ILNs were identified, fully exposed and preserved along their cervical courses. We discovered many variations during bilateral exploration of the two ILNs. His right ILN was non-recurrent. This non-recurrent ILN showed a terminal division before laryngeal entry. The left nerve had a usual course as a recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) at his tracheaesophageal groove. We also discovered bifurcation of his RLN beginning at a neurovascular (RLN and inferior thyroid artery) crossing point. Anterior and posterior branches of both nerves entered his larynx separately. The sympathetic inferior laryngeal anastomotic branch (SILAB) between the posterior branch of his left ILN and the cervical sympathetic chain was established in the distal part of the nerve before laryngeal entry. Conclusion A non-recurrent nerve and extra-laryngeal branching of the ILN are two different variations. The coincidence of a right non-recurrent ILN and bilateral bifurcation of both nerves is a very interesting feature. SILAB is a rare additional finding as a third anatomic variation in the same patient. Extra-laryngeal terminal division of a non-recurrent ILN is an extremely unusual anatomic finding. Two anatomic variations have occurred in the same nerve, like "the variation of the variation". PMID:21722360

  18. 3D reconstruction and heat map of porcine recurrent laryngeal nerve anatomy: branching and spatial location.

    PubMed

    Mason, Nena Lundgreen; Christiansen, Marc; Wisco, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy is a common post-operative complication of many head and neck surgeries. Theoretically, the best treatment to restore partial function to a damaged recurrent laryngeal nerve would be reinnervation of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle via anastomosis of the recurrent laryngeal and phrenic nerves. The pig is an excellent model of human laryngeal anatomy and physiology but a more thorough knowledge of porcine laryngeal anatomy is necessary before the pig can be used to improve existing surgical strategies, and develop new ones. This study first identifies the three most common recurrent laryngeal nerve branching patterns in the pig. Secondly, this study presents three-dimensional renderings of the porcine larynx onto which the recurrent laryngeal nerve patterns are accurately mapped. Lastly, heat maps are presented to display the spatial variability of recurrent laryngeal nerve trunks and primary branches on each side of 15 subjects (28 specimens). We intend for this study to be useful to groups using a porcine model to study posterior cricoarytenoid muscle reinnervation techniques. PMID:27086418

  19. Surgical treatment of posterior interosseous nerve paralysis in a tennis player☆

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Kenjiro; Tsukamoto, Yoshitane; Oi, Takanori; Takagi, Yohei; Tanaka, Juichi; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) paralysis in a tennis player. The PIN, a 2 cm section from a bifurcation point of the radial nerve, presented increased stiffness in the surgical findings and treated with free sural nerve grafting after excision of the degenerative portion of the PIN. We speculate that PIN paralysis associated with hourglass-like constriction can be caused and exacerbated by repetitive forearm pronation and supination in playing tennis. PMID:25104896

  20. Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Dynamic Acoustic Analysis of Tension Asymmetry in Excised Canine Larynges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Erin E.; Bulleit, Erin E.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To model tension asymmetry caused by superior laryngeal nerve paralysis (SLNP) in excised larynges and apply perturbation, nonlinear dynamic, and aerodynamic analyses. Method: SLNP was modeled in 8 excised larynges using sutures and weights to mimic cricothyroid (CT) muscle function. Weights were removed from one side to create tension…

  1. Tuberculous Otitis Media Leading to Sequentialib Bilateral Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nitin; Dass, Arjun; Goel, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is an uncommon, insidious, and frequently misdiagnosed form of tuberculosis (TB). In particular, TOM is usually secondary to direct transmission from adjacent organs, while the primary form has been rarely reported. The main aim of treatment is to start the patient on an antitubercular regime and early surgical intervention to decompress the facial nerve if involved. Case Report: The case report of a twenty year-old male with bilateral tuberculous otitis media, who presented himself with fever followed by sequential bilateral facial nerve paralysis, bilateral profound hearing loss, and abdominal tuberculosis leading to intestinal perforation, is presented. To the best available knowledge and after researching literature, no such case depicting the extensive otological complications of tuberculosis has been reported till date. Conclusion: Tuberculosis of the ear is a rare entity and in most cases the clinical features resemble that of chronic otitis media. The diagnosis is often delayed due to varied clinical presentations and this can lead to irreversible complications. Early diagnosis is essential for prompt administration of antitubercular therapy and to prevent complications. PMID:26082906

  2. Overview of pediatric peripheral facial nerve paralysis: analysis of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Özkale, Yasemin; Erol, İlknur; Saygı, Semra; Yılmaz, İsmail

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis in children might be an alarming sign of serious disease such as malignancy, systemic disease, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, middle ear surgery, and hypertension. The cases of 40 consecutive children and adolescents who were diagnosed with peripheral facial nerve paralysis at Baskent University Adana Hospital Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology Unit between January 2010 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. We determined that the most common cause was Bell palsy, followed by infection, tumor lesion, and suspected chemotherapy toxicity. We noted that younger patients had generally poorer outcome than older patients regardless of disease etiology. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis has been reported in many countries in America and Europe; however, knowledge about its clinical features, microbiology, neuroimaging, and treatment in Turkey is incomplete. The present study demonstrated that Bell palsy and infection were the most common etiologies of peripheral facial nerve paralysis. PMID:24810082

  3. Changes in neurotrophic factors of adult rat laryngeal muscles during nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Morato, Ignacio; Sharma, Sansar; Pitman, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) leads to the loss of ipsilateral laryngeal fold movement, with dysphonia, and occasionally dysphagia. Functional movement of the vocal folds is never restored due to misrouting of regenerating axons to agonist and antagonist laryngeal muscles. Changes of neurotrophic factor expression within denervated muscles occur after nerve injury and may influence nerve regeneration, axon guidance and muscle reinnervation. This study investigates the expression of certain neurotrophic factors in the laryngeal muscles during the course of axonal regeneration using RT-PCR. The timing of neurotrophic factor expression was correlated to the reinnervation of the laryngeal muscles by motor axons. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Netrin-1 (NTN-1) increased their expression levels in laryngeal muscles after nerve section and during regeneration of RLN. The upregulation of trophic factors returned to control levels following regeneration of RLN. The expression levels of the neurotrophic factors were correlated with the innervation of regenerating axons into the denervated muscles. The results suggest that certain neurotrophic factor expression is strongly correlated to the reinnervation pattern of the regenerating RLN. These factors may be involved in guidance and neuromuscular junction formation during nerve regeneration. In the future, their manipulation may enhance the selective reinnervation of the larynx. PMID:27421227

  4. Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes ... way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur ...

  5. The Physiologic Impact of Unilateral Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve (RLN) Lesion on Infant Oropharyngeal and Esophageal Performance.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Lammers, Andrew R; Ohlemacher, Jocelyn; Ballester, Ashley; Fraley, Luke; Gross, Andrew; German, Rebecca Z

    2015-12-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury in neonates, a complication of patent ductus arteriosus corrective surgery, leads to aspiration and swallowing complications. Severity of symptoms and prognosis for recovery are variable. We transected the RLN unilaterally in an infant mammalian animal model to characterize the degree and variability of dysphagia in a controlled experimental setting. We tested the hypotheses that (1) both airway protection and esophageal function would be compromised by lesion, (2) given our design, variability between multiple post-lesion trials would be minimal, and (3) variability among individuals would be minimal. Individuals' swallowing performance was assessed pre- and post-lesion using high speed VFSS. Aspiration was assessed using the Infant Mammalian Penetration-Aspiration Scale (IMPAS). Esophageal function was assessed using two measures devised for this study. Our results indicate that RLN lesion leads to increased frequency of aspiration, and increased esophageal dysfunction, with significant variation in these basic patterns at all levels. On average, aspiration worsened with time post-lesion. Within a single feeding sequence, the distribution of unsafe swallows varied. Individuals changed post-lesion either by increasing average IMPAS score, or by increasing variation in IMPAS score. Unilateral RLN transection resulted in dysphagia with both compromised airway protection and esophageal function. Despite consistent, experimentally controlled injury, significant variation in response to lesion remained. Aspiration following RLN lesion was due to more than unilateral vocal fold paralysis. We suggest that neurological variation underlies this pattern. PMID:26285799

  6. Sarcoidosis Presenting as Bilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis due to Bilateral Vagal Nerve Involvement.

    PubMed

    Yamasue, Mari; Nureki, Shin-Ichi; Ushijima, Ryoichi; Mukai, Yutaka; Goto, Akihiko; Kadota, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a rare case of sarcoidosis presenting as bilateral vocal cord paralysis due to bilateral vagal nerve involvement. A 72-year-old woman with uveitis of the left eye complained of hoarseness and aspiration due to bilateral vocal cord paralysis. An endobronchial needle aspiration biopsy specimen of the mediastinal lymph nodes showed non-caseating epithelioid cell granuloma. Total protein and cell concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were increased. We diagnosed her to have sarcoidosis with bilateral vagal nerve involvement. Corticosteroid therapy improved her symptoms of hoarseness and aspiration. Sarcoidosis should therefore be taken into consideration as a potential cause of bilateral vocal cord paralysis. PMID:27150886

  7. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Laryngeal Muscle Fiber Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses…

  8. Management of bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis after thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sanapala, Anitha; Nagaraju, Male; Rao, Lella Nageswara; Nalluri, Koteswar

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is rare for benign thyroid lesions (0.2%). After extubation-stridor, respiratory distress, aphonia occurs due to the closure of the glottic aperture necessitating immediate intervention and emergency intubation or tracheostomy. Intra-operative identification and preservation of the RLN minimizes the risk of injury. It is customary to expect RLN problems after thyroid surgery especially if malignancy, big thyroid, distorted anatomical problems and difficult airway that can lead to intubation trauma. Soon after extubating, it is essential to the anesthetist to check the vocal cord movements on phonation and oropharyngeal reflexes competency. But this case is specially mentioned to convey the message that in spite of absence of above mentioned predisposing factors for complications and good recovery profile specific to thyroid, there can be unanticipated airway compromise that if not attended to immediately may cost patient's life. This is a case of postextubation stridor following subtotal thyroidectomy due to bilateral RLN damage and its management. PMID:26417137

  9. Expiratory-modulated laryngeal motoneurons exhibit a hyperpolarization preceding depolarization during superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in the in vivo adult rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Tara G; Sun, Qi-Jian; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2012-03-22

    Swallowing requires the sequential activation of tongue, pharyngeal and esophageal muscles to propel the food bolus towards the stomach. Aspiration during swallow is prevented by adduction of the vocal cords during the oropharyngeal phase. Expiratory-modulated laryngeal motoneurons (ELM) exhibit a burst of action potentials during swallows elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN). Here we sought to investigate changes in membrane potential in ELM during superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in the anaesthetised, in vivo adult rat preparation. Intracellular recordings of ELM in the caudal nucleus ambiguus (identified by antidromic activation from the recurrent laryngeal nerve) demonstrated that ELM bursting activity following SLN stimulation is associated with a depolarization that is preceded by a small hyperpolarization. During spontaneous ELM bursts, the preceding hyperpolarization separated the bursting activity from its usual post-inspiratory activity. These findings demonstrate that the in vivo adult rat preparation is suitable for the study of swallow-related activity in laryngeal motoneurons. PMID:22326041

  10. Losing your voice: etiologies and imaging features of vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Vachha, Behroze; Cunnane, Mary Beth; Mallur, Pavan; Moonis, Gul

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic compromise of vocal fold function exists along a continuum encompassing vocal cord hypomobility (paresis) to vocal fold immobility (paralysis) with varying degrees and patterns of reinnervation. Vocal fold paralysis (VFP) may result from injury to the vagus or the recurrent laryngeal nerves anywhere along their course from the brainstem to the larynx. In this article, we review the anatomy of the vagus and recurrent laryngeal nerves and examine the various etiologies of VFP. Selected cases are presented with discussion of key imaging features of VFP including radiologic findings specific to central vagal neuropathy and peripheral recurrent nerve paralysis. PMID:23814687

  11. Losing Your Voice: Etiologies and Imaging Features of Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Vachha, Behroze; Cunnane, Mary Beth; Mallur, Pavan; Moonis, Gul

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenic compromise of vocal fold function exists along a continuum encompassing vocal cord hypomobility (paresis) to vocal fold immobility (paralysis) with varying degrees and patterns of reinnervation. Vocal fold paralysis (VFP) may result from injury to the vagus or the recurrent laryngeal nerves anywhere along their course from the brainstem to the larynx. In this article, we review the anatomy of the vagus and recurrent laryngeal nerves and examine the various etiologies of VFP. Selected cases are presented with discussion of key imaging features of VFP including radiologic findings specific to central vagal neuropathy and peripheral recurrent nerve paralysis. PMID:23814687

  12. A method for ultrasonographic visualization and injection of the superior laryngeal nerve: volunteer study and cadaver simulation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Balvindar; Tang, Raymond; Sawka, Andrew; Krebs, Claudia; Vaghadia, Himat

    2012-11-01

    Superior laryngeal nerve block is a valuable technique for provision of upper airway anesthesia. In bilateral scans of 20 volunteers, we developed a technique for ultrasonographic visualization of the superior laryngeal nerve and key anatomical structures using a hockey stick-shaped 8 to 15 MHz transducer (HST15 to 8/20 linear probe, Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada). Subsequently, we simulated superior laryngeal nerve scanning and injection in bilateral injections in 2 cadavers. Ultrasound-guided in-plane advancement of a needle toward the superior laryngeal nerve and injection of 1 mL of green dye was achieved in all 4 attempts and confirmed by a postprocedural dissection performed by an anatomist. We conclude that ultrasound-guided superior laryngeal nerve block in humans may be feasible. PMID:22822197

  13. Anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in Chinese patients: a prospective study of 2,404 patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Tanglei; Qiu, Weihua; Yang, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) shows some anatomical variations that can potentially compromise the safety of thyroid surgery. The purpose of this prospective study was to identify the anatomical variations of the RLN in Chinese patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Between January 2007 and December 2013, 2,404 Chinese patients were hospitalized for thyroid surgery with dissecting of the RLN unilaterally or bilaterally. The patients consisted of 510 men and 1,894 women, with a median age of 45.0 years. Overall 3,275 RLNs, including 1,576 left- and 1,699 right-side nerves, were dissected. The anatomical variations were identified in 690 RLNs, including 305 left- and 385 right-side nerves. We identified as many as seven RLN anatomical variations in Chinese patients. These findings indicate that anatomical variations of the RLN are common, and the identification of these anatomical variations of the RLN can help to minimize the risk of post-operative RLN paralysis. PMID:27146369

  14. Facial Nerve Paralysis in Patients With Chronic Ear Infections: Surgical Outcomes and Radiologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical features, radiologic findings, and treatment outcomes in patients of facial nerve paralysis with chronic ear infections. And we also aimed to evaluate for radiologic sensitivities on facial canal, labyrinth and cranial fossa dehiscences in middle ear cholesteatomas. Methods A total of 13 patients were enrolled in this study. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for clinical features, radiologic findings, surgical findings, and recovery course. In addition, retrospective review of temporal bone computed tomography (CT) and operative records in 254 middle ear cholesteatoma patients were also performed. Results Of the 13 patients, eight had cholesteatomas in the middle ear, while two patients exhibited external auditory canal cholesteatomas. Chronic suppurative otitis media, petrous apex cholesteatoma and tuberculous otitis media were also observed in some patients. The prevalence of facial paralysis in middle ear cholesteatoma patients was 3.5%. The most common involved site of the facial nerve was the tympanic segment. Labyrinthine fistulas and destruction of cranial bases were more frequently observed in facial paralysis patients than nonfacial paralysis patients. The radiologic sensitivity for facial canal dehiscence was 91%. The surgical outcomes for facial paralysis were relatively satisfactory in all patients except in two patients who had petrous apex cholesteatoma and requiring conservative management. Conclusion Facial paralyses associated with chronic ear infections were observed in more advanced lesions and the surgical outcomes for facial paralysis were relatively satisfactory. Facial canal dehiscences can be anticipated preoperatively with high resolution CTs. PMID:26330915

  15. Thyrocricotracheal separation with bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve transsection: report of a survivor.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dongbin; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Sohn, Jin Ho

    2015-12-01

    Thyrocricotracheal separation is an extremely fatal injury that has not been reported in the literature. Although timely and proper management of this injury is paramount to preserve the patient's life, airway, and voice, its rarity has resulted in a lack of consensus regarding the best management option. We report a case of thyrocricotracheal separation with bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve transsection caused by a self-inflicted injury, which was treated with reanastomosis in conjunction with transverse laser cordotomy. The patient could achieve both decannulation and a serviceable voice and could return to a normal social life. The present case is the first report of a survivor with thyrocricotracheal separation with bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve transsection. This findings show that appropriate management of the airway is the first step to ensure a successful outcome, and a step-by-step approach to detect and manage the associated injuries is paramount in cases showing the most severe form of laryngeal trauma. PMID:25976270

  16. [Regeneration and repair of peripheral nerves: clinical implications in facial paralysis surgery].

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, B; Vidal, A

    2000-01-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are one of the most frequent causes of chronic incapacity. Upper or lower limb palsies due to brachial or lumbar plexus injuries, facial paralysis and nerve lesions caused by systemic diseases are one of the major goals of plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, the poor results obtained in repaired peripheral nerves during the Second World War lead to a pessimist vision of peripheral nerve repair. Nevertheless, a well understanding of microsurgical principles in reconstruction and molecular biology of nerve regeneration have improved the clinical results. Thus, although the results obtained are quite far from perfect, these procedures give to patients a hope in the recuperation of their lesions and then on function. Technical aspects in nerve repair are well established; the next step is to manipulate the biology. In this article we will comment the biological processes which appear in peripheral nerve regeneration, we will establish the main concepts on peripheral nerve repair applied in facial paralysis cases and, finally, we will proportionate some ideas about how clinical practice could be affected by manipulation of the peripheral nerve biology. PMID:11002897

  17. A rare case of Reidel thyroiditis with associated vocal cord paralysis: CT and MR imaging features.

    PubMed

    Ng, S A; Corcuera-Solano, I; Gurudutt, V V; Som, P M

    2011-12-01

    Reidel thyroiditis is extremely rare and not only involves the thyroid gland but usually extends to neighboring structures in the neck. A rare complication of this disease is entrapment of the recurrent laryngeal nerve causing a vocal cord paralysis. In fact, to our knowledge, this is likely the only benign thyroid disease to cause such a paralysis. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman with Reidel thyroiditis and a recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. The CT and MR imaging features are presented as well as a brief review of this disease. PMID:21454406

  18. An uncommon case of dyspnea with unilateral laryngeal paralysis in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Lerat, Justine; Lacoste, Marie; Prechoux, Jean-Marc; Aubry, Karine; Nadalon, Sylvie; Ly, Kim Heang; Bessede, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    A 61-year-old man with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and normal BMI complained of dyspnea. Nasofibroscopy revealed a global and major oedema of the glottis and supraglottis and also a paralysis of the left vocal fold. CT-scan pointed out a spontaneous hyperdensity of the left arytenoid cartilage. A tracheostomy was performed. Clinical examination revealed large hands and macroglossy with high IGF1 rate. MRI confirmed a supracentimetric pituitary adenoma. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a case of acute respiratory distress due to unilateral larynx paralysis leading to acromegaly diagnosis. This is due to submucosal hypertrophy and vocal cord immobility. PMID:26142980

  19. Role of the Internal Superior Laryngeal Nerve in the Motor Responses of Vocal Cords and the Related Voice Acoustic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Seifpanahi, Sadegh; Izadi, Farzad; Jamshidi, Ali-Ashraf; Torabinezhad, Farhad; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Mohammadi, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repeated efforts by researchers to impose voice changes by laryngeal surface electrical stimulation (SES) have come to no avail. This present pre-experimental study employed a novel method for SES application so as to evoke the motor potential of the internal superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN) and create voice changes. Methods: Thirty-two normal individuals (22 females and 10 males) participated in this study. The subjects were selected from the students of Iran University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Two monopolar active electrodes were placed on the thyrohyoid space at the location of the ISLN entrance to the larynx and 1 dispersive electrode was positioned on the back of the neck. A current with special programmed parameters was applied to stimulate the ISLN via the active electrodes and simultaneously the resultant acoustic changes were evaluated. All the means of the acoustic parameters during SES and rest periods were compared using the paired t-test. Results: The findings indicated significant changes (P=0.00) in most of the acoustic parameters during SES presentation compared to them at rest. The mean of fundamental frequency standard deviation (SD F0) at rest was 1.54 (SD=0.55) versus 4.15 (SD=3.00) for the SES period. The other investigated parameters comprised fundamental frequency (F0), minimum F0, jitter, shimmer, harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR), mean intensity, and minimum intensity. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated significant changes in most of the important acoustic features, suggesting that the stimulation of the ISLN via SES could induce motor changes in the vocal folds. The clinical applicability of the method utilized in the current study in patients with vocal fold paralysis requires further research. PMID:27582586

  20. Quantitative analysis of the anatomy of the epineurium of the canine recurrent laryngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    BARKMEIER, JULIE M.; LUSCHEI, ERICH S.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the amount of epineurium surrounding the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) compared with a limb nerve, that to flexor hallicus longus (NFHL). Nerve samples were obtained from 10 adult dogs and studied using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy to measure the relative proportion of epineurium and the relative proportions of adipose and collagenous tissue comprising the epineurium in both nerves. Significantly greater relative epineurial cross-sectional areas and adipose content were found in the RLN than in the NFHL. Based on observations on noncranial peripheral nerves, the findings indicate that the RLN is better protected against deformational forces associated with compression than stretching forces. The RLN may not be structured well for successful reinnervation after injury. The patterns observed for adipose tissue in RLN epineurial tissue appeared unique compared with those previously reported in peripheral nerves. The primary role associated with adipose tissue is to ‘package’ the nerve for protection. The RLN is considered to be a vital nerve in the body, as are other cranial nerves. The large proportions of adipose tissue in the epineurium may relate to the importance of protecting this nerve from injury. PMID:10697291

  1. [Treatment of facial nerve paralysis using static suspension methods].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Roncević, R; Colić, M; Stojicić, M; Rasulić, L

    2003-01-01

    After the injury of facial nerve, facial muscles are subjected to complex series of biochemical and histological changes, which lead to muscular atrophy if reinnervation is not restored. Facial palsy is very difficult to manage completely. Regardless this fact, the plan of correction has to be directed towards the following: restoration of normal function, normal facial appearance at rest, symmetry in voluntary movements as well as symmetry in involuntary and emotional movements. Static suspension methods were used in our study. All patients had unilateral complete facial nerve palsy but one female patient who experienced the palsy of frontal branch of n.facialis. This method was successfully used to lift the eyebrow, the lid and to improve lagophthalmus on the paralytic side, then the angle and paralytic part of the lip, to reinforce buccal wall of oral cavity as well as to reconstruct new nasolabial fold. The results were satisfactory and permanent. PMID:14619718

  2. Diaphragmatic paralysis evaluated by phrenic nerve stimulation during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, R.G.K.; Labib, K.B.

    1984-10-01

    Stimulation of the phrenic nerve by supplying an electrical impulse to the neck during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound (sonoscopy) of the diaphragm allows more precise functional evaluation than fluoroscopy and/or sonoscopy alone. This is especially true of patients who are unable to cooperate because the are on a ventilator, unconscious, or very young. The authors cite cases in which diaphragmatic paralysis was diagnosed by conventional methods but stimulation of the phrenic nerve demonstrated good diaphragmatic motion, leading to a change in prognosis in some cases and a change in therapy in others.

  3. Identification alone versus intraoperative neuromonitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery: experience of 2034 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of intraoperative neuromonitoring in reducing the postoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy rate by a comparison between patients submitted to thyroidectomy with intraoperative neuromonitoring and with routine identification alone. Methods Between June 2007 and December 2012, 2034 consecutive patients underwent thyroidectomy by a single surgical team. We compared patients who have had neuromonitoring and patients who have undergone surgery with nerve visualization alone. Patients in which neuromonitoring was not utilized (Group A) were 993, patients in which was utilized (group B) were 1041. Results In group A 28 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries were observed (2.82%), 21 (2.11%) transient and 7 (0.7%) permanent. In group B 23 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries were observed (2.21%), in 17 cases (1.63%) transient and in 6 (0.58%) permanent. Differences were not statistically significative. Conclusions Visual nerve identification remains the gold standard of recurrent laryngeal nerve management in thyroid surgery. Neuromonitoring helps to identify the nerve, in particular in difficult cases, but it did not decrease nerve injuries compared with visualization alone. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the benefit of intraoperative neuromonitoring in thyroidectomy, especially in conditions in which the recurrent nerve is at high risk of injury. PMID:24942225

  4. Identifying the Non-recurrent Laryngeal Nerve: Preventing a Major Risk of Morbidity During Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Aghasi, Mohammad Reza; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2013-01-01

    Non-recurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN) is a rare anomaly which is reported in 0.3%-0.8% of people on the right side and in 0.004% (extremely rare) on the left side. Damage to this nerve during the surgical procedure may lead to severe iatrogenic morbidity and should therefore be prevented from being damaged. The best way to avoid this damage to the nerve is to identify the nerve with a systematic diligent dissection based on usual anatomical landmarks and awareness about the possibility of their existence. Hereby, we are going to present a 26-year-old woman, a case of NRLN on the right side which was identified during thyroidectomy. The nervous anomaly was accompanied with vascular abnormality which was confirmed by computerized tomography (CT) angiography, post-operatively. PMID:23543847

  5. [Bilateral phrenic nerve paralysis, dysautonomia and restrictive cardiomyopathy in a case of POEMS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Delalande, S; Stojkovic, T; Rose, C; Millaire, A; Hurtevent, J F; Vermersch, P

    2002-07-01

    We report a case of POEMS syndrome (Polyneuropathy, Organomegaly, Endocrinopathy, M protein and Skin changes) with unusual clinical features. A 62-year-old woman presented a severe polyneuropathy with dysphonia and vegetative symptoms, including bradycardia and sphincterial disorders. The clinical examination showed facial hyperpigmentation, cachexia, anasarca and splenomegaly. She also presented restrictive cardiomyopathy and endocrine disturbances. Nerve conduction studies revealed a severe demyelinating sensorimotor neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed an elevated protein level. We detected a biclonal gammapathy (Ig G and Ig A with lambda light chain) and lytic pelvic bone lesions. Later, she developed a severe ventilatory failure due to a bilateral phrenic nerve paralysis leading to a mechanical ventilation. Steroids followed by localized radiotherapy partially improved the respiratory status and stabilized the neuropathy. Phrenic nerve paralysis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, vegetative symptoms and cranial nerve palsy are exceptional in POEMS syndrome. Moreover, this case emphasizes the importance of radiological investigations since the discover of plasmocytoma may improve the prognosis of POEMS syndrome. PMID:12486906

  6. Exclusive real-time monitoring during recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection in conventional monitored thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Li; Wu, Che-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Shen; Wang, Tie; Chen, Peng; Xin, Jing-Wei; Li, Shi-Jie; Zhang, Da-Qi; Zhang, Guang; Fu, Yan-Tao; Zhao, Li-Na; Zhou, Le; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Sun, Hui

    2016-03-01

    During conventional intermittent intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) in thyroidectomy, recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is detected by an electromyographic (EMG) loss of signal (LOS) after the nerve dissection. Exclusive continuous monitoring during the phase of RLN dissection may be helpful in detecting adverse EMG changes earlier. A total of 208 RLNs at risk were enrolled in this study. Standardized IONM procedures were followed. We continuously stimulated the RLN at the lower exposed end with a stimulator to exclusively monitor the real-time quantitative EMG change during RLN dissection. Once the amplitude decreased by more than 50% of the initial signal, the surgical maneuver was paused and the RLN was retested every minute for 10 minutes to determine amplitude recovery before restarting the dissection. The procedure was feasible in all patients. No LOS was encountered in this study. Nineteen RLNs had an amplitude reduction of more than 50%. Eighteen nerves showed gradual amplitude recovery (16 nerves had a traction injury and two nerves had a compression injury). After 10 minutes, the recovery was complete (i.e., >90%) in eight nerves, 70-90% in seven nerves, and 50-70% in three nerves. Among these 18 nerves, only one nerve developed temporary vocal palsy because it was exposed to unavoidable repeated nerve traction after restarting the dissection. Another nerve showed no gradual recovery from thermal injury, and developed temporary vocal palsy. The temporary and permanent palsy rates were 1% and 0%, respectively. During intermittent IONM, exclusive real-time monitoring of the RLN during dissection is an effective procedure to detect an adverse EMG change, and prevent severe RLN injuries that cause LOS. PMID:27106003

  7. Protective effect of intraoperative nerve monitoring against recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during re-exploration of the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous thyroid or parathyroid surgery induces scarring or distorts anatomy, and increases the risk of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury for a reoperation. The benefit of intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) for re-exploration (a second nerve exploration) and reoperation has not been established. Methods Two hundred and ten patients were given a thyroid or parathyroid reoperation at our hospital between 2001 and 2010. Using IONM, we re-explored 56 patients who had been operated on before June 2007. The injury rate in these patients was compared with that of the 15 patients re-explored without IONM between 2001 and 2006. Results Of the 70 nerves that were re-explored using IONM, only one was incidentally injured, significantly fewer than the three injured in the 15 nerves re-explored without using IONM (1.43% vs. 20%, P = 0.0164). Conclusions IONM helped prevent RLN damage when re-exploring nerves during thyroid and parathyroid surgery. We recommend the routine use of IONM in thyroid and parathyroid reoperations. PMID:23618223

  8. Morphology and Functional Anatomy of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve with Extralaryngeal Terminal Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), such as an extralaryngeal terminal bifurcation (ETB), threaten the safety of thyroid surgery. Besides the morphology of the nerve branches, intraoperative evaluation of their functional anatomy may be useful to preserve motor activity. We exposed 67 RLNs in 36 patients. The main trunk, bifurcation point, and terminal branches of bifid nerves were macroscopically determined and exposed during thyroid surgery. The functional anatomy of the nerve branches was evaluated by intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM). Forty-six RLNs with an ETB were intraoperatively exposed. The bifurcation point was located along the prearterial, arterial, and postarterial segments in 11%, 39%, and 50% of bifid RLNs, respectively. Motor activity was determined in all anterior branches. The functional anatomy of terminal branches detected motor activity in 4 (8.7%) posterior branches of 46 bifid RLNs. The motor activity in posterior branches created a wave amplitude at 25–69% of that in the corresponding anterior branches. The functional anatomy of bifid RLNs demonstrated that anterior branches always contained motor fibres while posterior branches seldom contained motor fibres. The motor activity of the posterior branch was weaker than that of the anterior branch. IONM may help to differentiate between motor and sensory functions of nerve branches. The morphology and functional anatomy of all nerve branches must be preserved to ensure a safer surgery. PMID:27493803

  9. Cross-innervation of the thyroarytenoid muscle by a branch from the external division of the superior laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Nasri, S; Beizai, P; Ye, M; Sercarz, J A; Kim, Y M; Berke, G S

    1997-07-01

    The neuroanatomy of the larynx was explored in seven dogs to assess whether there is motor innervation to the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle from the external division of the superior laryngeal nerve (ExSLN). In 3 animals, such innervation was identified. Electrical stimulation of microelectrodes applied to the ExSLN resulted in contraction of the TA muscle, indicating that this nerve is motor in function. This was confirmed by electromyographic recordings from the TA muscle. Videolaryngostroboscopy revealed improvement in vocal fold vibration following stimulation of the ExSLN compared to without it. Previously, the TA muscle was thought to be innervated solely by the recurrent laryngeal nerve. This additional pathway from the ExSLN to the TA muscle may have important clinical implications in the treatment of neurologic laryngeal disorders such as adductor spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:9228862

  10. Recognition and Surgical Techniques for Management of Nonrecurrent Laryngeal Nerve during Carotid Endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Juan Carlos; Jabori, Sinan; Gelabert, Hugh A; Moore, Wesley S; Quinones-Baldrich, William J; O'Connell, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    The presence of a nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN) during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) may significantly limit the exposure of the surgical field during this operation. Although its reported incidence is rare, NRLN typically overlies the carotid bifurcation and failure to recognize this anatomic variation increases the risk of NRLN injury. A retrospective chart review of all patients who underwent CEA for hemodynamically significant extracranial carotid stenosis between January 2005 and December 2014 was performed. All patients with NRLN encountered intraoperatively were identified. Clinical outcomes, surgical techniques, and complications were reviewed and reported. Four left-sided NRLN were identified and 4 were right sided. No cranial nerve deficits or injuries occurred after CEA in patients where NRLN was encountered. Two distinct surgical techniques were used to manage patients with NRLN and they are discussed in detail. PMID:26965812

  11. Preoperative diagnosis and intraoperative protection of nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve: A review of 5 cases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Ping; He, Liang; Dong, Wenwu

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN) is a risk factor for nerve injury during thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy. It is usually associated with abnormal vasculature that can be identified by several imaging methods. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the preoperative diagnosis and intraoperative protection of NRLN. Material/Methods Of the 7169 patients who underwent thyroid surgery at our hospital between August 2008 and January 2013, 5 patients with NRLN were identified. Preoperative chest X-rays, neck ultrasonography (US), and computed tomography (CT) findings were reviewed. NRLNs were carefully and systematically searched for in surgery. Results Preoperative CT predicted NRLN in all 5 cases (100% accuracy). The detection rate of NRLN by CT was 0.4% (5/1170). NRLNs were confirmed in surgery. All of them were right-sided NRLN with type IIA variant. The CT scans clearly revealed the vascular anomalies. The review of US images suggested that vascular anomalies could be identified on the images in 1 patient. No postoperative complications occurred in any patient. Conclusions The preoperative CT scan was a reliable and effective method for identifying abnormal vasculature to indirectly predict NRLN. Combining the CT and US findings with adequate surgical technique may help to reduce the risk of nerve damage, in addition to preventing nerve palsy. PMID:24518037

  12. Nonrecurrent inferior laryngeal nerves and anatomical findings during thyroid surgery: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kumiko; Toriumi, Yasuo; Kamio, Makiko; Nogi, Hiroko; Shioya, Hisashi; Takeyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    A nonrecurrent inferior laryngeal nerve (NRILN) is found more frequently on the right side than on the left, and it is closely associated with an aberrant right subclavian artery. The presence of the aberrant right subclavian artery on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan suggests NRILN; however, different types of branching locations and pathways exist. Here, we report three NRILN cases with different pathways where the vagus nerve arises more medial than usual and a review of the literature. Case 1: A 30-year-old Japanese female presented with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Preoperative CT scan revealed an aberrant right subclavian artery, and an operation was performed under suspicion of NRILN. During the operation, the vagus nerve was found to arise more medially than usual and two NRILNs originated from it at the level of the cricoid cartilage and at a more caudal position; the two NRILNs were preserved. Case 2: A 33-year-old Japanese female with a thyroid nodule of increased size underwent surgery. Preoperative CT scan revealed an aberrant right subclavian artery, which suggested NRILN. During the operation, the vagus nerve was identified to run more medially than usual and NRILN was found to originate at the level of the cricoid cartilage; NRILN was preserved. Case 3: A 78-year-old Japanese female underwent an operation with a diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Preoperative CT scan showed an aberrant right subclavian artery. During the operation, NRILN was found to originate from the vagus nerve at the level of the lower pole of the thyroid gland, and the vagus nerve ran medial to the common carotid artery at the caudal level. PMID:27188389

  13. The effect of routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade on adequacy of recurrent laryngeal nerve stimulation during thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S D; Boden, E; Serpell, J

    2015-07-01

    Testing of the integrity of the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery has become routine practice for many surgeons to aid dissection and minimise the chance of inadvertent nerve injury. We hypothesised that routine reversal of an intermediate-acting, non-depolarising neuromuscular blocking agent would improve conditions for stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. We conducted a single-centre, randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial of patients undergoing thyroid surgery by the same surgeon. After randomisation, the participants received either neostigmine 2.5 mg with glycopyrrolate 0.4 mg or placebo, at 30 minutes after induction of anaesthesia and administration of 0.4 mg/kg of atracurium. The primary outcome was the subjective assessment by the surgeon as to whether the neuromuscular function was adequate for stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve using a neuromuscular integrity monitor (NIM). Time to NIM stimulation was 44.6 minutes in the placebo group and 41.4 minutes in the intervention group (P=0.268). Of the 21 patients who received the neuromuscular blockade reversal, 20 (95.2%) had adequate surgical conditions for NIM stimulation, compared to 9 out of 18 patients (50%) in the placebo group (P=0.002). Three of the ten patients (30%) with inadequate reversal showed no evidence of residual blockade assessed peripherally. The routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade at 30 minutes post induction appears to result in adequate surgical conditions for safe stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Return of neuromuscular function at a peripheral site does not guarantee adequate laryngeal muscle function for use of the NIM. PMID:26099761

  14. Creating eye closure in patients with facial nerve paralysis using an implantable solenoid actuator.

    PubMed

    Hasmat, Shaheen; Lovell, Nigel H; Eviston, Timothy; Ekmejian, Rafael; Suaning, Gregg J; Clark, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes the use of an implantable solenoid actuator to create a more natural eyelid closure over current lid loading therapies in patients with facial nerve paralysis (FNP). The actuator works by moving a magnet when a solenoid is activated. This is used to tension a sling applied to the upper eyelid which closes the eye. The sling design has been described elsewhere and creating eye closure using it requires a force of 627 (± 128) mN over a movement of approximately 6 mm. The actuator described here was able to successfully achieve these parameters and repeatedly perform eyelid closure in a cadaveric rabbit model. Device limitations and future improvements have also been identified and discussed. PMID:26736520

  15. Properties of postganglionic sympathetic fibers isolated from the right recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Szulczyk, P

    1995-08-01

    The pattern of response of 45 single postganglionic sympathetic axons dissected from the right recurrent laryngeal nerve was examined in chloralose-anesthetized cats. Both vagoaortic nerves were cut, and both sinus nerves were left intact. Each neuron, based on the presence of cardiac and respiratory rhythmicities in its resting activity and reaction to systemic hypoxia (10% O2 in N2 for 2 min), was classified into one of three classes. Class I neurons (n = 29, 64%) were activated during systemic hypoxia and had a pronounced cardiac and inspiration-related rhythmicity in their resting activity. Class II neurons (n = 12,27%) were inhibited during systemic hypoxia, and their cardiac and respiratory rhythmicities were either negligible or totally absent. Class III neurons (n = 4,9%), similarly to class I, had a pronounced cardiac and inspiratory rhythmicity but were not affected by systemic hypoxia. The systemic hypoxia was always accompanied by an increase in blood pressure. We conclude that class I and possibly class III neurons innervate the arteries of upper airways. We also discuss the possibility that class II neurons are responsible for regulating the smooth muscles of upper airways. PMID:7592223

  16. Intraoperative neuromonitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in robotic thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Dong Sik; Kim, Su-jin

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the technical feasibility and efficacy of intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) to aid its identification and preservation during robotic thyroidectomy (RoT). IONM of the RLN was evaluated in 30 consecutive patients undergoing RoT. All patients underwent an indirect laryngoscope examination to objectively assess vocal cord function. Their Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) was measured to subjectively assess vocal cord function preoperatively and at postoperative months 1 and 3. Of the 56 RLNs at risk in 30 patients undergoing RoT, all were visualized and identified by IONM. The IONM sensitivity for postoperative permanent RLN palsy was 100%, with a positive predictive value of 100%. The mean VHI-10 scores preoperatively and at postoperative months 1 and 3 were 0.20±0.66, 3.47±5.04, and 1.53±2.47, respectively (P<0.001). IONM of the RLN during RoT is technically feasible and effective for identifying this nerve. PMID:25238177

  17. Laryngeal disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Macphail, Catriona

    2014-01-01

    The most common disease process involving the larynx is laryngeal paralysis, which occurs much more frequently in dogs than in cats. Diagnosis of laryngeal paralysis requires close attention to anesthetic plane and coordination of respiratory effort with laryngeal motion. Surgical arytenoid lateralization improves respiration and quality of life in dogs with laryngeal paralysis; however, aspiration pneumonia is a recognized complication, and generalized neuropathy can progress. Laryngeal collapse can result from any cause of chronic upper airway obstruction, but is most often associated with unaddressed brachycephalic airway syndrome. Laryngeal neoplasia, while generally uncommon, occurs more frequently in cats than in dogs. PMID:24268331

  18. Central nervous system integration of sensorimotor signals in oral and pharyngeal structures: oropharyngeal kinematics response to recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Ohlemacher, Jocelyn; Lammers, Andrew R; Gross, Andrew; Ballester, Ashley; Fraley, Luke; German, Rebecca Z

    2016-03-01

    Safe, efficient liquid feeding in infant mammals requires the central coordination of oropharyngeal structures innervated by multiple cranial and spinal nerves. The importance of laryngeal sensation and central sensorimotor integration in this system is poorly understood. Recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion (RLN) results in increased aspiration, though the mechanism for this is unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of unilateral RLN lesion on the motor coordination of infant liquid feeding. We hypothesized that 1) RLN lesion results in modified swallow kinematics, 2) postlesion oropharyngeal kinematics of unsafe swallows differ from those of safe swallows, and 3) nonswallowing phases of the feeding cycle show changed kinematics postlesion. We implanted radio opaque markers in infant pigs and filmed them pre- and postlesion with high-speed videofluoroscopy. Markers locations were digitized, and swallows were assessed for airway protection. RLN lesion resulted in modified kinematics of the tongue relative to the epiglottis in safe swallows. In lesioned animals, safe swallow kinematics differed from unsafe swallows. Unsafe swallow postlesion kinematics resembled prelesion safe swallows. The movement of the tongue was reduced in oral transport postlesion. Between different regions of the tongue, response to lesion was similar, and relative timing within the tongue was unchanged. RLN lesion has a pervasive effect on infant feeding kinematics, related to the efficiency of airway protection. The timing of tongue and hyolaryngeal kinematics in swallows is a crucial locus for swallow disruption. Laryngeal sensation is essential for the central coordination in feeding of oropharyngeal structures receiving motor inputs from different cranial nerves. PMID:26679618

  19. [Monitoring of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury using an electromyographic endotracheal tube in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Anesthetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Martín Jaramago, J; Tamarit Conejeros, M; Escudero Torrella, M; Solaz Roldán, C

    2013-12-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury remains one of the main complications in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. When this injury is bilateral, an acute upper airway obstruction may occur, leading to a potentially life-threatening situation for the patient. The visual identification of the nerve during surgery is the best way to preserve its integrity. However identification of the nerves by means of electromyographic stimuli through electrodes attached to endotracheal tubes could help in decreasing nerve injury. In these cases the experience and role of the anesthetist is essential to correctly place the electromyographic endotracheal tube and ensure that the electrodes are in touch with the vocal cords during the surgery. Moreover, the results of the electromyography can be affected by the neuromuscular blocking agents. Therefore, the choice and dose must be adapted, in order to ensure a suitable anesthetic depth, and adequate response. PMID:23886448

  20. [Cause and treatment of unilateral vocal cord paralysis].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongyue; Li, Keyong

    2016-03-01

    Unilateral vocal cord paralysis(UVCP) is defined as affected side vocal cord emerges immobility or motion weakening and abnormal tension due to unilateral intrinsic laryngeal muscles suffering from disorder about motor nerve. The patients usually present with hoarse voice, disability of high pitch, cough, aspiration, or a combination of these symptoms. There are increasing therapeutics researches and case analyses regarding UVCP in recent years. Thus this review summarized the progression about its causes and treatment methods. PMID:27382698

  1. Migration and Differentiation of Neural Progenitor Cells after Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Avulsion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wan; Xu, Wen

    2014-01-01

    To investigate migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from the ependymal layer to the nucleus ambiguus (NA) after recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) avulsion. All of the animals received a CM-DiI injection in the left lateral ventricle. Forty-five adult rats were subjected to a left RLN avulsion injury, and nine rats were used as controls. 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected intraperitoneally. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed in the brain stems at different time points after RLN injury. After RLN avulsion, the CM-DiI+ NPCs from the ependymal layer migrated to the lesioned NA. CM-DiI+/GFAP+ astrocytes, CM-DiI+/DCX+ neuroblasts and CM-DiI+/NeuN+ neurons were observed in the migratory stream. However, the ipsilateral NA included only CM-DiI+ astrocytes, not newborn neurons. After RLN avulsion, the NPCs in the ependymal layer of the 4th ventricle or central canal attempt to restore the damaged NA. We first confirm that the migratory stream includes both neurons and glia differentiated from the NPCs. However, only differentiated astrocytes are successfully incorporated into the NA. The presence of both cell types in the migratory process may play a role in repairing RLN injuries. PMID:25202908

  2. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  3. Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following reoperative anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Erwood, Matthew S; Hadley, Mark N; Gordon, Amber S; Carroll, William R; Agee, Bonita S; Walters, Beverly C

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is one of the most frequent complications of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures. The frequency of RLN is reported as 1%-11% in the literature. (4 , 15) The rate of palsy after reoperative ACDF surgery is not well defined. This meta-analysis was performed to review the current medical evidence on RLN injury after ACDF surgery and to determine a relative rate of RLN injury after reoperative ACDF. METHODS MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar searches were performed using several key words and phrases related to ACDF surgery. Included studies were written in English, addressed revisionary ACDF surgery, and studied outcomes of RLN injury. Statistical analysis was then performed using a random-effects model to calculate a pooled rate of RLN injury. The heterogeneity of the studies was assessed using Cochran's Q statistic and I(2) statistic, and a funnel plot was constructed to evaluate publication bias. RESULTS The search initially identified 345 articles on this topic. Eight clinical articles that met all inclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. A total of 238 patients were found to have undergone reoperative ACDF. Thirty-three of those patients experienced an RLN injury. This analysis identified a rate of RLN injury in the literature after reoperative ACDF of 14.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8%-19.1%). CONCLUSIONS The rate of RLN palsy of 14.1% was greater than any published rate of RLN injury after primary ACDF operations, suggesting that there is a greater risk of hoarseness and dysphagia with reoperative ACDF surgeries than with primary procedures as reported in these studies. PMID:27015129

  4. Chylothorax and Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury Associated with Robotic Video-Assisted Mediastinal Lymph Node Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Sarkaria, Inderpal S.; Finley, David J.; Bains, Manjit S.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.; Rizk, Nabil P.; Huang, James; Downey, Robert J.; Rusch, Valerie W.; Jones, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Although the technical aspects of robotic video-assisted thoracic surgery (RVATS) for lung resections may be advantageous, compared with standard thoracoscopy, complications of chylothorax and recurrent laryngeal nerve injury (RLNI) associated with mediastinal lymph node dissection (MLND) may be significant. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent RVATS anatomic lung resection for suspected or confirmed cancer and experienced RLNI or chylothorax were identified and reviewed from a prospectively maintained database. Complications were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results From July 28, 2010, to December 20, 2013, 251 patients underwent RVATS segmentectomy, lobectomy, or bilobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection (MLND). Eleven patients (4.4%) experienced MLND-related complications and composed the study group; 81.8% were right-sided resections, and median lymph node counts in right station IV and station VII were 9 (range, 1–23) and 5.5 (range, 1–10); 72.7% of cases were performed for early-stage I and II lung cancers. Chylothorax (6/251 [2.4%]) and RLNI (6/251 [2.4%]) were significantly more common in the RVATS group than in the open thoracotomy and standard VATS groups. Complications requiring procedural intervention (Grade 3) are as follows: 4 cases of RLNI in patients undergoing percutaneous vocal cord medialization and 3 cases of chylothorax in patients undergoing image-guided thoracic duct embolization or maceration. No operative interventions were required. Conclusions RVATS MLND may be associated with increased rates of chylothorax and RLNI. Attention must be paid to identifying potential technical pitfalls with RVATS lung resections, adjusting surgical techniques accordingly, and minimizing patient morbidity. PMID:26165562

  5. Analysis of the Istanbul Forensic Medicine Institute expert decisions on recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries due to thyroidectomy between 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, M. Arif; Koç, Okay; Ekiz, Feza; Ağaçhan, A. Feran; Göret, Nuri Emrah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the approach of Forensic Medicine Institution for recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries. In addition, parameters that were taken into consideration by Forensic Medicine Institution in the differentiation of complication and malpractice were evaluated. Material and Methods: The files of 38 patients, with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following thyroidectomy, that were referred to Istanbul Forensic Medicine Institute with request of expert opinion between 2008–2012 were retrospectively investigated. Data regarding expert decisions, age, gender, diagnosis, hospital type, preoperative vocal cord examination, intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM), identification of nerve injury during operation, repair of nerve during operation, and type of injury were assessed. Results: Surgeons were found to be faulty in all files with bilateral nerve injury, however, one-sided injury files were considered as a medical complication. Twenty-one (55.2%) patients were female, and 17 (44.8%) were male, with a mean age of 35,8 in women, and 34,1 in men. None of these patients had undergone preoperative vocal cord assessment. The recurrent laryngeal nerve was intraoperatively identified in 21 (55.2%) patients, while it was not seen in 17 (44.8%) patients. IONM was not applied in any patients. There was no attempt for nerve repair during any operation. Nineteen patients had unilateral, and 19 patients had bilateral nerve damage. Conclusion: Bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries are considered as malpractice, when imaging or pathology reports fail to state a cause for difficulty in nerve identification. PMID:26985157

  6. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shahien, Radi; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2011-01-01

    We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24- year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy. PMID:21386953

  7. Framework Surgery for Treatment of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Daniero, James J.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Francis, David O.

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal framework surgery is the current gold standard treatment for unilateral vocal fold paralysis. It provides a permanent solution to glottic insufficiency caused by injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Various modifications to the original Isshiki type I laryngoplasty procedure have been described to improve voice and swallowing outcomes. The success of this procedure is highly dependent on the experience of the surgeon as it epitomizes the intersection of art and science in the field. The following article reviews the evidence, controversies, and complications related to laryngoplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis. It also provides a detailed analysis of how and when arytenoid-positioning procedures should be considered, and summarizes the literature on postoperative outcomes. PMID:24883239

  8. Intraoperative neuromonitoring of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve during robotic thyroid surgery: a preliminary prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-jin; Oh, Byung-Mo; Oh, Eun Mee; Bae, Dong Sik; Choi, June Young; Myong, Jun Pyo; Youn, Yeo-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) during robotic thyroid surgery. Methods A total of 10 patients undergoing bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) robotic thyroid surgery were enrolled. The nerve integrity monitor (NIM Response 2.0 System) was used for EBSLN monitoring. We performed voice assessments preoperatively and at 1 and 3 months postoperatively using Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10), maximal phonation time (MPT), phonation efficient index (PEI), and laryngeal electromyography (EMG). Results A total of 19 EBSLNs were at risk and 14 EBSLNs (73.7%) were identified using neuromonitoring. VHI-10 showed a change of voice over time (0.1 vs. 3.6 vs. 1.3); however, this was not statistically significant. VHI-10 scores normalized at 3 months postoperatively compared to the preoperative scores. MPT (a) (16.0 vs. 15.6 vs. 15.4), and MPT (e) (20.1 vs. 15.4 vs. 18.5) showed no significant differences preoperatively compared to the values obtained 1 and 3 months postoperatively. There was a significant change of PEI over time (4.8 vs. 1.1 vs. 4.6) (P = 0.036); however, the values normalized at 3 months postoperatively. Laryngeal EMG results showed 4 cases (21.2%) of neuropathy of EBSLNs at 1 month postoperatively, and electrodiagnostic studies revealed nearly complete recovery of the function of EBSLNs in 4 patients at 3 months postoperatively Conclusion It is suggested that neuromonitoring of EBSLNs during BABA robotic thyroid surgery is feasible and might be helpful to preserve voice quality. PMID:26576402

  9. Recurrent vocal fold paralysis and parsonage-turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Marcus Vinicius; Joffily, Lucia; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2013-01-01

    Background. Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), is an acute brachial plexus neuritis that typically presents with unilateral shoulder pain and amyotrophy but also can affect other peripheral nerves, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Idiopathic vocal fold paralysis (VFP) represents approximately 12% of the VFP cases and recurrence is extremely rare. Methods and Results. We report a man with isolated recurrent unilateral right VFP and a diagnosis of NA years before. Conclusions. We emphasize that shoulder pain and amyotrophy should be inquired in any patient suffering from inexplicable dysphonia, and Parsonage-Turner syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic VFP. PMID:24288639

  10. Effect of Paralysis at the Time of ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion on Pharyngolaryngeal Morbidities. A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Ah-Young; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Hwang, Jung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular block results in the loss of muscular tone in the upper airway, which might contribute to the increased postoperative airway morbidity followed by ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) insertion. We compared the pharyngolaryngeal discomfort exerted by the PLMA according to the neuromuscular block. One hundred sixty patients undergoing surgery for breast disease or inguinal hernia were anesthetized with propofol and remifentanil by target controlled infusion. Rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg (NMBA group, n = 80) or normal saline (No-NMBA group, n = 80) was administered after the loss of consciousness, and one anesthesiologist inserted the PLMA. Postoperative pharyngolaryngeal discomfort was evaluated at postoperative 1 h. Traumatic event was recorded based on the blood trace on the surface of the PLMA cuff. Insertion time, insertion attempt number, sealing pressure, and fiberoptic brochoscopic grades were evaluated. Patients’ characteristics and the PLMA insertion condition (insertion time, successful insertion attempt number, fiberoptic bronchoscopic grade, and sealing pressure) were similar between the two groups. The PLMA can be successfully inserted in non-paralyzed patients with less postoperative pharyngolaryngeal discomfort than when a neuromuscular blocking agent is used (13.8% vs. 30.0%, P = 0.021). The incidence of traumatic events is also reduced when no neuromuscular blocking agent is used (16.3% vs. 32.5%, P = 0.026). Regardless of whether or not a surgical procedure requires muscular relaxation, there is no need to administer neuromuscular blocking agents solely for the purpose of PLMA insertion. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01035021 PMID:26252522

  11. Perinatal development of laryngeal function.

    PubMed

    Harding, R

    1984-06-01

    The resistance of the upper airway is strongly influenced by the action of opposing sets of laryngeal muscles. Expiratory airflow may be retarded by active adduction of the arytenoid cartilages or by a reduction in the activity of abductor muscles. In developing sheep the adductor muscles appear to represent the principal means by which lung recoil is opposed. This mechanism, which is most pronounced during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, is regulated by afferent traffic from the lungs. In fetal sheep the laryngeal muscles are also influenced by breathing movements and sleep states. The adductor muscles are normally tonically active during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep when rhythmical breathing movements are absent. It is possible that this activity is at least partially responsible for elevated tracheal pressures and depressed flow of tracheal fluid during fetal apnea. This hypothesis has been tested by observing the effects of fetal paralysis and recurrent laryngeal nerve section. These experiments suggest that in the fetus near term the larynx makes a major contribution to upper airway resistance and hence to the maintenance of pulmonary expansion which has been shown to influence lung development. PMID:6747226

  12. Successful nasal intubation with a laryngeal nerve monitoring tube using bronchoscopy in a patient with plunging goiter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The appropriate positioning of nerve integrity monitoring during thyroid surgery is of relevance. In this case report we describe our experience with accurate placement of a nerve integrity monitoring endotracheal tube, obtained by fiberoptic control, in a patient with expected difficult airway management. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old obese woman scheduled for elective total thyroidectomy due to plunging intrathoracic goiter. The preoperative indirect laryngoscopy pointed out a massive bombè of the hypopharyngeal wall to the right and right vocal cord paralysis. The epiglottis was oedematous and the glottis could not be identified. On physical examination, the tongue was large and a Mallampati’s score of 3 was determined. Hence, due to an expected difficult airway management, a nasal intubation with an electromyographic nerve integrity monitoring endotracheal tube trough fiberoptic bronchoscopy was successfully performed. Conclusion Our experience suggests that nasal intubation can be safely performed by using a nerve integrity monitoring tube with the help of fiberoptic bronchoscopy. PMID:24229430

  13. Initial assessment of facial nerve paralysis based on motion analysis using an optical flow method.

    PubMed

    Samsudin, Wan Syahirah W; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, Amirozi; Salleh, Hasriah

    2016-01-01

    An initial assessment method that can classify as well as categorize the severity of paralysis into one of six levels according to the House-Brackmann (HB) system based on facial landmarks motion using an Optical Flow (OF) algorithm is proposed. The desired landmarks were obtained from the video recordings of 5 normal and 3 Bell's Palsy subjects and tracked using the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) method. A new scoring system based on the motion analysis using area measurement is proposed. This scoring system uses the individual scores from the facial exercises and grades the paralysis based on the HB system. The proposed method has obtained promising results and may play a pivotal role towards improved rehabilitation programs for patients. PMID:26578273

  14. Superior laryngeal neuralgia: carotidynia or just another pain in the neck?

    PubMed

    O'Neill, B P; Aronson, A E; Pearson, B W; Nauss, L A

    1982-01-01

    A clinical pain syndrome similar to "carotidynia" developed in a patient several years after undergoing carotid endarterectomy. The pain was reversed by superior laryngeal nerve block, followed by superior larnygeal neurectomy. A diagnosis of superior laryngeal neuralgia was suggested by several characteristic features: (1) pain along the anterior cervical triangle, with extension to the ipsilateral ear and eye, (2) hoarseness, and (3) paralysis of the ipsilateral cricothyroid muscle on laryngoscopy. Carotidynia usually refers to neck pain arising from the carotid artery in the neck and is often viewed as a migraine variant. Our observations suggest that carotidynia may not be a migraine variant and that "carotidynia" may not be an accurate term for all pains in the anterior cervical triangle. We suggest that evaluation of neck pain include speech pathology and otolaryngologic consultations (including laryngoscopy) if any voice disorder is reported or noted. Since the superior laryngeal nerve is the neural structure most contiguous to the bifurcation of the carotid artery, the superior laryngeal nerve may have become entrapped in a fibrotic process that developed after carotid endarterectomy. Such pain may be a rare complication of carotid endarterectomy. When other causes have been excluded and pain continues, a superior laryngeal nerve block should be considered. PMID:17152738

  15. [Acoustic study of sustained vowels made by patients with recurrent nerve paralysis after thyroidectomy].

    PubMed

    Fauth, C; Vaxelaire, B; Rodier, J F; Volkmar, P P; Sock, R

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the consequences of thyroid surgery on the voice of patients suffering from recurrent paralysis. The consequences of the surgery are evaluated using a corpus of sustained vowels in order to identify the various disruptions that this procedure may produce. This research also looks for possible compensatory and/or readjustment strategies that can be used by a patient alone and with the help of speech therapy. Acoustic measurements considered are fundamental frequency (F0), Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio (HNR), and vowel space area. This is a longitudinal study, as all patients are recorded once a month during three months after surgery. Results reveal a modification of all parameters in the early recording stages. However, time and speech therapy contribute to obtaining expected values of the measured parameters, and thus to improvement of vocal quality. PMID:23074822

  16. Ganglion causing paralysis of the suprascapular nerve. Diagnosis by MRI and ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Takagishi, K; Maeda, K; Ikeda, T; Itoman, M; Yamamoto, M

    1991-08-01

    A 26-year-old man had a right infraspinatus muscle weakness and aching of the shoulder due to suprascapular nerve entrapment confirmed by electromyography. MRI revealed a well-defined area of increased signal intensity over the suprascapular notch. An ultrasonogram showed a homogeneous hypoechogenic area at the base of the scapular spine. A diagnosis was made of a ganglion compressing the inferior branch of the suprascapular nerve. After removal of several ganglia, the patient had immediate pain relief, and normal electromyographic findings were obtained 5 months postoperatively. PMID:1882686

  17. Vesalius on the anatomy and function of the recurrent laryngeal nerves: medical illustration and reintroduction of a physiological demonstration from Galen.

    PubMed

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the anatomical illustrations and physiological demonstrations of sixteenth-century Flemish-born anatomist and physician Andreas Vesalius concerning the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Although Vesalius was primarily an anatomist, he also used vivisection as a pedagogical device to help his students understand the function of structures within the fabric of the body that they had previously studied in anatomical detail. Vesalius's masterwork, De humani corporis fabrica or simply the Fabrica (1543, 1555), was ostensibly an anatomy text, but Vesalius included textual and figural references to his use of vivisection to explicate the function of specific structures. Even as he began to criticize the errors in Galen's anatomical works, Vesalius nevertheless adopted some of Galen's classic physiological demonstrations, in particular the ligation (and subsequent release) of the recurrent laryngeal nerves of a pig to demonstrate their role in generating the pig's squeal. Vesalius's illustrations concerning the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the Fabrica were of two types: elegant anatomical woodcut plates-unsurpassed for their clarity, accuracy, and detail - and the distinctly inelegant historiated initial Q, depicting a throng of putti busily engaged in vivisecting a pig. Vesalius' anatomical plates were heavily plagiarized while the historiated initials, showing the rough work of an anatomist or surgeon, were largely ignored and remain little recognized today. While Vesalius' anatomical illustrations of the recurrent laryngeal nerves contained some errors, they were a dramatic departure from prior meager efforts at medical illustration and indeed far surpassed all contemporary published illustrations by others. Vesalius was also influential in reviving Galen's approach to vivisection, at least for pedagogical purposes, if not really then yet as a full-fledged investigative technique. PMID:24870272

  18. Identifying a Safe Range of Stimulation Current for Intraoperative Neuromonitoring of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve: Results from a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Zhou, Gang; Yang, Yang; Gao, Zhi-Dong; Guo, Peng; Shen, Zhan-Long; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Qi-Wei; Ye, Ying-Jiang; Jiang, Ke-Wei; Wang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) has been widely applied during thyroid surgery. However, the safe range of stimulation intensity for IONM remains undetermined. Methods: Total thyroidectomies were performed on twenty dogs, and their RLNs were stimulated with a current of 5–20 mA (step-wise in 5 mA increments) for 1 min. The evoked electromyography (EMG) of vocal muscles before and after supramaximal stimulation were recorded and compared. Acute microstructural morphological changes in the RLNs were observed immediately postoperatively under an electron microscope. Results: The average stimulating threshold for RLNs stimulated with 15 mA and 20 mA showed no significant changes compared to the unstimulated RLNs (15 mA group: 0.320 ± 0.123 mA vs. 0.315 ± 0.097 mA, P = 0.847; 20 mA group: 0.305 ± 0.101 mA vs. 0.300 ± 0.103 mA, P = 0.758). Similar outcomes were shown in average evoked EMG amplitude (15 mA group: 1,026 ± 268 μV vs. 1,021 ± 273 μV, P = 0.834; 20 mA group: 1,162 ± 275 μV vs. 1,200 ± 258 μV, P = 0.148). However, obvious acute microstructural morphological changes were observed in the nerves that were stimulated with 20 mA. Conclusions: A stimulation intensity less than 15 mA might be safe for IONM of the RLN. PMID:27453233

  19. Application of Endobronchial Ultrasonography for the Preoperative Detecting Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Lymph Node Metastasis of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Rong; Li, Yin; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Lin, Shi-Yong; Luo, Guang-Yu; Li, Jian-Jun; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The preoperative detection of recurrent laryngeal nerve lymph node (RLN LN) metastasis provides important information for the treatment of esophageal cancer. We investigated the possibility of applying endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) with conventional preoperative endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and computerized tomography (CT) examination to evaluate RLN LN metastasis in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods A total of 115 patients with advanced thoracic esophageal cancer underwent EBUS examinations. Patients also underwent EUS and CT imaging as reference diagnostic methods. Positron emission tomography /computed tomography (PET/CT) was also introduced in partial patients as reference method. The preoperative evaluation of RLN LN metastasis was compared with the surgical and pathological staging in 94 patients who underwent radical surgery. Results The sensitivities of the preoperative evaluations of RLN LN metastasis by EBUS, EUS and CT were 67.6%, 32.4% and 29.4%, respectively. The sensitivity of EBUS was significantly different from that of EUS or CT, especially in the detection of right RLN LNs. In addition, according to the extra data from reference method, PET/CT was not superior to EBUS or EUS in detecting RLN LN metastasis. Among all 115 patients, 21 patients who were diagnosed with tracheal invasions by EUS or EBUS avoided radical surgery. Another 94 patients who were diagnosed as negative for tracheobronchial tree invasion by EUS and EBUS had no positive findings in radical surgery. Conclusions EBUS can enhance the preoperative sensitivity of the detection of RLN LN metastasis in cases of thoracic esophageal cancer and is a useful complementary examination to conventional preoperative EUS and CT, which can alert thoracic surgeons to the possibility of a greater range of preoperative lymph node dissection. EBUS may also indicate tracheal invasion in cases of esophageal stricture. PMID:26372339

  20. Central orexin inhibits reflex swallowing elicited by the superior laryngeal nerve via caudal brainstem in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Motoi; Mizutani, Satoshi; Fujita, Masako; Mitoh, Yoshihiro; Shimatani, Yuichi; Matsuo, Ryuji

    2014-05-10

    We examined the effects of orexins on the reflex swallowing using anesthetized rats. Orexins were administered into the fourth ventricle. Swallowing was induced by repeated electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) and was identified by the electromyogram lead penetrated the mylohyoid muscle through bipolar electrodes. The frequency of swallowing during the electrical stimulation of the SLN decreased after the administration of orexin-A in a dose-dependent manner. The latency of the first swallowing tended to be extended after the administration of orexin-A. The administration of orexin-B did not affect swallowing frequency. Pre-administration of SB334867, an orexin-1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the degree of inhibition of swallowing frequency induced by the administration of orexin-A. To identify the effective site of orexin-A, the effect of a microinjection of orexin-A into the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) was evaluated. Orexin-A was injected into one of the lateral DVC, the intermediate DVC, or the medial DVC. Microinjection of orexin-A into the medial DVC but not the other two sites decreased swallowing frequency. Pre-injection of SB334867 into the medial DVC disrupted the inhibitory response induced by fourth ventricular administration of orexin-A. The electrical lesion of the commissural part of the NTS, but not ablation of the AP, abolished the inhibition of reflex swallowing induced by fourth ventricular administration of orexin-A. These results suggest that orexin-A inhibits reflex swallowing via orexin-1 receptors situated in the commissural part of the NTS and/or its vicinity. PMID:24637063

  1. Laryngeal Paraganglioma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharifkashany, Shervin; Yazdani, Nasrin; Ghazavi, Hossein; Tajdini, Ardavan

    2014-01-01

    Paragangliomas in the head and neck are found typically in the region of the carotid body, jugular body, and along the 9th and 10th cranial nerves. They can occur in multicenteric forms, but generally, laryngeal paragangliomas are not found in these patients. Only two cases of laryngeal paraganglioma have been reported with a synchronous lesion elsewhere. We report an additional case of a 34-year-old female with multiple paragangliomas beginning with laryngeal involvement. PMID:25763080

  2. Quantitative PCR analysis of laryngeal muscle fiber types

    PubMed Central

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses have shown changes in laryngeal muscle fiber MyHC isoform with denervation. RNA analyses in this setting have not been performed, and understanding RNA levels will allow interventions better designed to reverse processes such as denervation in the future. Total RNA was extracted from bilateral rat thyroarytenoid (TA), posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA), and cricothyroid (CT) muscles in rats. Primers were designed using published MyHC isoform sequences. SYBR Green real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (SYBR-RT-PCR) was used for quantification. The electropherogram showed a clear separation of total RNA to 28S and 18S subunits. Melting curves illustrated single peaks for all type MyHC primers. All MyHC isoforms were identified in all muscles with various degrees of expression. Quantitative PCR is a sensitive method to detect MyHC isoforms in laryngeal muscle. Isoform expression using mRNA analysis was similar to previous analyses but showed some important differences. This technique can be used to quantitatively assess response to interventions targeted to maintain muscle bulk after denervation. PMID:20430402

  3. Functional regeneration of the transected recurrent laryngeal nerve using a collagen scaffold loaded with laminin and laminin-binding BDNF and GDNF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Jiafeng; Li, Yu; Dong, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury remains a challenge due to the lack of effective treatments. In this study, we established a new drug delivery system consisting of a tube of Heal-All Oral Cavity Repair Membrane loaded with laminin and neurotrophic factors and tested its ability to promote functional recovery following RLN injury. We created recombinant fusion proteins consisting of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) fused to laminin-binding domains (LBDs) in order to prevent neurotrophin diffusion. LBD-BDNF, LBD-GDNF, and laminin were injected into a collagen tube that was fitted to the ends of the transected RLN in rats. Functional recovery was assessed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after injury. Although vocal fold movement was not restored until 12 weeks after injury, animals treated with the collagen tube loaded with laminin, LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF showed improved recovery in vocalisation, arytenoid cartilage angles, compound muscle action potentials and regenerated fibre area compared to animals treated by autologous nerve grafting (p < 0.05). These results demonstrate the drug delivery system induced nerve regeneration following RLN transection that was superior to that induced by autologus nerve grafting. It may have potential applications in nerve regeneration of RLN transection injury. PMID:27558932

  4. Functional regeneration of the transected recurrent laryngeal nerve using a collagen scaffold loaded with laminin and laminin-binding BDNF and GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Jiafeng; Li, Yu; Dong, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury remains a challenge due to the lack of effective treatments. In this study, we established a new drug delivery system consisting of a tube of Heal-All Oral Cavity Repair Membrane loaded with laminin and neurotrophic factors and tested its ability to promote functional recovery following RLN injury. We created recombinant fusion proteins consisting of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) fused to laminin-binding domains (LBDs) in order to prevent neurotrophin diffusion. LBD-BDNF, LBD-GDNF, and laminin were injected into a collagen tube that was fitted to the ends of the transected RLN in rats. Functional recovery was assessed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after injury. Although vocal fold movement was not restored until 12 weeks after injury, animals treated with the collagen tube loaded with laminin, LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF showed improved recovery in vocalisation, arytenoid cartilage angles, compound muscle action potentials and regenerated fibre area compared to animals treated by autologous nerve grafting (p < 0.05). These results demonstrate the drug delivery system induced nerve regeneration following RLN transection that was superior to that induced by autologus nerve grafting. It may have potential applications in nerve regeneration of RLN transection injury. PMID:27558932

  5. Histoplasmosis laryngeal

    PubMed Central

    Moriones Robayo, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal histoplasmosis is a fungal infection that is frequent in Colombia. Laryngeal histoplasmosis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients through the dissemination of the fungus from the lungs to other organs. Histoplasmosis isolated laryngeal (primary) is rare. If a patient presents with a history of immunosuppression by renal transplant, primary laryngeal histoplasmosis with supraglottic granulomatous inflammation that was treated with amphotericin B and Itraconazole, with complete resolution of laryngeal lesions. PMID:25767308

  6. Facial paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... otherwise healthy, facial paralysis is often due to Bell palsy . This is a condition in which the facial ... speech, or occupational therapist. If facial paralysis from Bell palsy lasts for more than 6 to 12 months, ...

  7. Potential of laryngeal muscle regeneration using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dirja, Bayu Tirta; Yoshie, Susumu; Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may be a new potential cell source for laryngeal muscle regeneration in the treatment of vocal fold atrophy after recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objectives Unilateral vocal fold paralysis can lead to degeneration, atrophy, and loss of force of the thyroarytenoid muscle. At present, there are some treatments such as thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and vocal fold injection. However, such treatments cannot restore reduced mass of the thyroarytenoid muscle. iPS cells have been recognized as supplying a potential resource for cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of iPS cells for the regeneration of laryngeal muscle through the evaluation of both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods Skeletal muscle cells were generated from tdTomato-labeled iPS cells using embryoid body formation. Differentiation into skeletal muscle cells was analyzed by gene expression and immunocytochemistry. The tdTomato-labeled iPS cell-derived skeletal muscle cells were transplanted into the left atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle. To evaluate the engraftment of these cells after transplantation, immunohistochemistry was performed. Results The tdTomato-labeled iPS cells were successfully differentiated into skeletal muscle cells through an in vitro experiment. These cells survived in the atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle after transplantation. PMID:26824385

  8. Description of Laryngeal Pathologies in Children Evaluated by Otolaryngologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobres, Rachel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Data were collected on 731 patients (age birth to 18) at a children's hospital otolaryngology clinic. Most frequent laryngeal pathologies were subglottic stenosis, vocal nodules, laryngomalacia, and vocal fold paralysis. Laryngeal pathologies were more common to males than females, were most common in the youngest patients, and were distributed…

  9. Hypokalaemic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S K; Sachdev, A

    1999-04-01

    Hypokalaemic paralysis is a relatively uncommon but potentially life-threatening clinical syndrome. If recognised and treated appropriately, patients recover without any clinical sequellae. The syndrome of hypokalaemic paralysis represents a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised clinically by hypokalaemia and acute systemic weakness. Most cases are due to familial or primary hypokalaemic periodic paralysis; sporadic cases are associated with numerous other conditions including barium poisoning, hyperthyroidism, renal disorders, certain endocrinopathies and gastrointestinal potassium losses. The age of onset, race, family history, medications, and underlying disease states can help in identifying the cause of hypokalaemic paralysis. Initial therapy of the patient with hypokalaemic paralysis includes potassium replacement and search for underlying aetiology. Further management depends on the aetiology of hypokalaemia, severity of symptoms, and duration of disease. This review presents the differential diagnosis for hypokalaemic paralysis and discusses management of the syndrome. PMID:10715756

  10. Voice quality following laryngeal reinnervation by ansa hypoglossi transfer.

    PubMed

    Crumley, R L; Izdebski, K

    1986-06-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury resulting in chronic unilateral vocal fold paralysis has been treated traditionally by implantation of various materials into the paralyzed vocal fold. Although the usage of these techniques, especially Teflon-glycerin paste injection, has been clinically established, they do not restore full functionality to the larynx (abduction, adduction, and vibratory synchronization of the vocal folds). Restoration of these functions, necessary for improved phonation, has been achieved at least on an experimental basis by reinnervation techniques previously described. This study demonstrates excellent human voice quality following reinnervation of the vocal folds in two cases using ansa hypoglossi-recurrent laryngeal nerve anastomosis. Although the reinnervated vocal fold neither abducted nor adducted, it presented itself in the midline for precise apposition with the nonparalyzed cord. Voice data were analyzed within a single subject experimental design at the following intervals; preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, midterm, and long-term (3 and 6 years). The data was analyzed by subjective and objective means, including acoustics and electroglottography. Patient selection, surgical techniques, results, and implications are reviewed. PMID:3713403

  11. Reconstructive procedures for impaired upper airway function: laryngeal respiration

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The larynx is the "bottleneck" of the human airway. For this reason, the effects of stenosing laryngeal pathologies on the vital factor respiratory gas exchange are particularly critical. Internal stabilization is a prerequisite for recovery of the laryngeal respiratory function in severe forms of inspiratory collapse (laryngomalacia). Effective laser surgery techniques have been developed to this end in recent years. Glottis-dilating surgery in cases of bilateral vocal cord motion impairment is now moving in the direction of endoscopic laser cordotomy or cordectomy, whereas arytenoidectomy and open surgical procedures are now used only rarely due to higher secondary morbidity rates. In individual cases, in particular if functional recovery is expected, temporary laterofixation of a vocal cord using an endoscopic suturing technique can be a helpful approach. Extensive laryngeal defects can be covered by means of composite grafts with mucosal lining, a supporting skeleton and their own vascularization. Autologous transplantation of the larynx, with its complex surgical and immunological problems, has become a manageable procedure. The problems of post-transplantation reinnervation and risk assessment of immunosuppression-induced recurrence of the tumor are still under consideration. Reanimation of the bilaterally paralyzed larynx by means of neurorrhaphy (neurosuture), neural grafting and, more recently, functional electrostimulation (pacemaker) represents a challenge for the coming years. In most cases of paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, a part of the muscles is maintained by synkinetic reinnervation when therapy is carried out, which however also prevents effective vocal cord movement due to simultaneous activity of agonists and antagonists. Modulation of reinnervation by means of electrostimulation and modern genetic therapy approaches justify hopes of better outcomes in the future. PMID:22073057

  12. Intraoperative neuromonitoring of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy: the need for evidence-based data and perioperative technical/technological standardization.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Alberto; Lianos, Georgios D; Boni, Luigi; Kim, Hoon Yub; Roukos, Dimitrios H; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) is surgically relevant since its close anatomical proximity to the superior thyroid vessels. There is heterogeneity in the EBSLN anatomy and EBSLN damage produces changes in voice that are very heterogenous and difficult to diagnose. The reported prevalence of EBSLN injury widely ranges. EBSLN iatrogenic injury is considered the most commonly underestimated complication in endocrine surgery because vocal assessment underestimates such event and laryngoscopic postsurgical evaluation does not show standardized findings. In order to decrease the risk for EBSLN injury, multiple surgical approaches have been described so far. IONM provides multiple advantages in the EBSLN surgical approach. In this review, we discuss the current state of the art of the monitored approach to the EBSLN. In particular, we summarize, providing our additional remarks, the most relevant aspects of the standardized technique brilliantly described by the INMSG (International Neuromonitoring Study Group). In conclusion, in our opinion, there is currently the need for more prospective randomized trials investigating the electrophysiological and pathological aspects of the EBSLN for a better understanding of the role of IONM in the EBSLN surgery. PMID:25525624

  13. [Tongue paralysis of neoplastic origin].

    PubMed

    Marco, M; Dalmau, J; Aguilar, M

    1989-10-01

    Tongue paralysis are often underestimated, particularly when isolated or having a chronic course. Sometimes, its early recognition may lead to the diagnosis of a tumor process, favorably modifying its course. We have retrospectively analyzed 13 cases of tongue paralysis of neoplastic etiology. In a woman, the paralysis was due to a lesion of the corticobulbar pathway whereas in the remaining 12, the alteration occurred in the hypoglossal nerve, particularly at extrabulbar intracranial and cranial base tract (10 cases). The clinical picture was due to the primary tumor in 9 patients, and due to bone or leptomeningeal metastases in the remaining four cases. In five cases, the lesion of the XII cranial nerve was essential for the diagnosis of the neoplasm or the neoplastic recurrence and in four cases, it was the only affected cranial nerve. PMID:2637769

  14. A New Rerouting Technique for the Extensor Pollicis Longus in Palliative Treatment for Wrist and Finger Extension Paralysis Resulting From Radial Nerve and C5C6C7 Root Injury.

    PubMed

    Laravine, Jennifer; Cambon-Binder, Adeline; Belkheyar, Zoubir

    2016-03-01

    Wrist and finger extension paralysis is a consequence of an injury to the radial nerve or the C5C6C7 roots. Despite these 2 different levels of lesions, palliative treatment for this type of paralysis depends on the same tendon transfers. A large majority of the patients are able to compensate for a deficiency of the extension of the wrist and fingers. However, a deficiency in the opening of the first web space, which could be responsible for transfers to the abductor pollicis longus, the extensor pollicis brevis, and the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), frequently exists. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a new EPL rerouting technique outside of Lister's tubercle. Another aim was to verify whether this technique allows a better opening of the thumb-index pinch in this type of paralysis. In the first part, we performed an anatomic study comparing the EPL rerouting technique and the frequently used technique for wrist and finger extension paralyses. In the second part, we present 2 clinical cases in which this new technique will be practiced. Preliminary results during this study favor the EPL rerouting technique. This is a simple and reproducible technique that allows for good opening of the first web space in the treatment of wrist and finger extension paralysis. PMID:26709570

  15. Todd's Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... don't know what causes Todd's paralysis. Current theories propose biological processes in the brain that involve ... All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the ...

  16. The Effect of Bilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Lesion on Swallowing – A Novel Method to Quantitate Aspirated Volume and Pharyngeal Threshold in Videofluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    DING, Peng; FUNG, George Shiu-Kai; LIN, Ming De; HOLMAN, Shaina D.; GERMAN, Rebecca Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of bilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) lesion on swallowing threshold volume and the occurrence of aspiration, using a novel measurement technique for videofluorscopic swallowing studies (VFSS). Methods and Materials We used a novel radiographic phantom to assess volume of the milk containing barium from fluoroscopy. The custom made phantom was firstly calibrated by comparing image intensity of the phantom with known cylinder depths. Secondly, known volume pouches of milk in a pig cadaver were compared to volumes calculated with the phantom. Using these standards, we calculated the volume of milk in the valleculae, esophagus and larynx, for 205 feeding sequences from four infant pigs feeding before and after had bilateral SLN lesions. Swallow safety was assessed using the IMPAS scale. Results The log-linear correlation between image intensity values from the phantom filled with barium milk and the known phantom cylinder depths was strong (R2>0.95), as was the calculated volumes of the barium milk pouches. The threshold volume of bolus in the valleculae during feeding was significantly larger after bilateral SLN lesion than in control swallows (p<0.001). The IMPAS score increased in the lesioned swallows relative to the controls (p<0.001). Conclusion Bilateral SLN lesion dramatically increased the aspiration incidence and the threshold volume of bolus in valleculae. The use of this phantom permits quantification of the aspirated volume of fluid. The custom made phantom and calibration allow for more accurate 3D volume estimation from 2D x-ray in VFSS. PMID:25270532

  17. Institutional Paralysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1975-01-01

    Institutional paralysis of higher education is the result of the disjunction between faculty and administration; the disjunction between substantive planning and bugetary decision-making; the disjunction between departmental structures and functional areas of university concern; and the disjunction between the theory of direct democracy and its…

  18. Laryngeal structure and function in dogs with cough.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lynelle R

    2016-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the prevalence and type of laryngeal abnormalities in dogs examined because of cough that did not have signs of upper airway disease and to compare the prevalence of those abnormalities among dogs with various respiratory tract diseases. DESIGN Prospective study. ANIMALS 138 dogs with cough that did not have signs of upper airway disease. PROCEDURES The study was conducted between July 2001 and October 2014 and included dogs examined for cough that had laryngoscopic and bronchoscopic examinations performed by 1 examiner. Laryngeal hyperemia and swelling were recorded, and laryngeal function was assessed before and after doxapram stimulation when indicated. Results were compared among dogs on the basis of cough duration (acute [< 2 weeks], subacute [2 weeks to 2 months], and chronic [> 2 months]) and disease diagnosed (inflammatory airway disease, airway collapse, lower respiratory tract infection, and eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy). RESULTS Laryngeal hyperemia was detected in 73 of 134 (54%) dogs with cough of subacute or chronic duration, and its prevalence did not vary significantly among dogs with various diseases. Thirteen dogs had laryngeal paresis, and 13 dogs had laryngeal paralysis; dysphonia (n = 2) and stridor (1) were uncommon findings in those dogs. The prevalence of laryngeal dysfunction (paresis or paralysis) did not differ significantly among diseases. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that 26 of 138 (19%) dogs examined because of cough alone had laryngeal dysfunction, which suggested that a complete laryngoscopic examination should be included in the diagnostic evaluation of dogs with cough. PMID:27379595

  19. Vocal Fold Paralysis: Improved Adductor Recovery by Vincristine Blockade of Posterior Cricoarytenoid

    PubMed Central

    Paniello, Randal C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS A new treatment for acute unilateral vocal fold paralysis was proposed, in which a drug is injected into the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA) shortly after nerve injury, before the degree of natural recovery is known, to prevent antagonistic synkinetic reinnervation. This concept was tested in a series of canine experiments using vincristine as the blocking agent. STUDY DESIGN Animal experiments. METHODS Laryngeal adductor function was measured at baseline and at 6 months following experimental recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injuries, including complete transection, crush injury, and cautery. In the treatment animals, the PCA was injected with vincristine at the time of RLN injury. RESULTS Adductor function in the vincristine-treated hemilarynges was significantly improved compared with injury-matched noninjected controls (total n=43). Transection/repair controls recovered 56.1% of original adductor strength, vincristine-treated hemilarynges recovered to 73.1% (p=0.002). Cautery injuries also improved with vincristine block (60.7% vs 88.7%, p=0.031). Crush injuries recovered well even without vincristine (104.8% vs 111.2%, p=0.35). CONCLUSIONS These findings support a new paradigm of early, pre-emptive blockade of the antagonist muscle (PCA) to improve ultimate net adductor strength, which could potentially improve functional recovery in many UVFP patients and avoid the need for medialization procedures. Possible clinical aspects of this new approach are discussed. PMID:25267697

  20. [The history of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques. PMID:26088742

  1. Functional electrical stimulation of intrinsic laryngeal muscles under varying loads in exercising horses.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Jon; Regner, Abby; Jarvis, Jonathan C; Priest, David; Sanders, Ira; Soderholm, Leo V; Mitchell, Lisa M; Ducharme, Norm G

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral vocal fold paralysis (BVCP) is a life threatening condition and appears to be a good candidate for therapy using functional electrical stimulation (FES). Developing a working FES system has been technically difficult due to the inaccessible location and small size of the sole arytenoid abductor, the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle. A naturally-occurring disease in horses shares many functional and etiological features with BVCP. In this study, the feasibility of FES for equine vocal fold paralysis was explored by testing arytenoid abduction evoked by electrical stimulation of the PCA muscle. Rheobase and chronaxie were determined for innervated PCA muscle. We then tested the hypothesis that direct muscle stimulation can maintain airway patency during strenuous exercise in horses with induced transient conduction block of the laryngeal motor nerve. Six adult horses were instrumented with a single bipolar intra-muscular electrode in the left PCA muscle. Rheobase and chronaxie were within the normal range for innervated muscle at 0.55±0.38 v and 0.38±0.19 ms respectively. Intramuscular stimulation of the PCA muscle significantly improved arytenoid abduction at all levels of exercise intensity and there was no significant difference between the level of abduction achieved with stimulation and control values under moderate loads. The equine larynx may provide a useful model for the study of bilateral fold paralysis. PMID:21904620

  2. INFANTILE PARALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    1917-01-01

    At the recent Forty-fourth Annual Meetings of the American Public Health Association, Cincinnati, Ohio, there was held a Round Table Discussion on Infantile Paralysis, in which health authorities throughout the country took part. This discussion was held under the auspices of the Section on Public Health Administration. Dr. George W. Goler, Health Officer of Rochester, N. Y., Chairman of this Section, presided. We take great pleasure in being able to reproduce for readers of the Journal what took place at this most important session. PMID:18009618

  3. Using Laryngeal Electromyography to Differentiate Presbylarynges from Paresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stager, Sheila V.; Bielamowicz, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Differential diagnosis of patients over 64 years of age reporting hoarseness is challenging. Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) was used to determine the status of the recurrent and superior laryngeal nerves. The authors hypothesized that individuals with hoarseness but normal LEMG would have measures similar to those of patients from…

  4. Laryngeal verruca vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Topdag, Murat; Erdogan, Selvet; Kara, Ahmet; Derin, Serhan

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal verruca vulgaris is a rare disease of the larynx that is easily misdiagnosed as other laryngeal lesions. This article reports three patients with laryngeal verruca vulgaris and discusses the differential diagnosis of laryngeal verrucous lesions to avoid over treatment. PMID:25935911

  5. Laryngeal pressure receptors.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P; Sant'Ambrogio, G; Fisher, J T; Sant'Ambrogio, F B

    1984-07-01

    We studied the response characteristics of laryngeal pressure receptors in anesthetized dogs, breathing through a tracheal cannula, by recording single unit action potentials from the peripheral cut end of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. The larynx, with the rest of the upper airway, was isolated and cannulated separately for the application of distending and collapsing pressures. We identified receptors responding to either negative or positive pressure and a few responding to both. All these receptors showed a marked dynamic sensitivity and had the characteristics of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors. The majority of pressure receptors were active at zero transmural pressure and the gain of their response to pressure was higher at lower values, suggesting a role for these receptors in eupnea. Reflex alterations in breathing pattern and upper airway muscle activity during upper airway pressure changes, previously reported, are presumably mediated by the receptors described here. Moreover, these receptors may play a role in certain pathological states, such as obstructive sleep apnea, in which the upper airway is transiently subjected to large collapsing pressure. PMID:6484319

  6. Laryngeal histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hina A; Saeed, Noora; Khan, Nazoora; Hasan, Naba

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal infection, having interesting synonyms such as Cave disease, Darling's disease, Ohio Valley disease, reticuloendotheliosis, Spelunker's lung and Caver's disease. The aetiological agent is a dimorphic fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum, causing chronic granulomatous disease. The route of transmission is by inhalation of dust particles from soil contaminated by excrement of birds or bats, harbouring the small spores or microconidia, which is considered the infectious form of fungus. The spectrum of illness ranges from subclinical infection of the lung to progressive disseminated disease. The major bulk of histoplasmosis infections are asymptomatic or present with mild influenza like illness and involve immunocompetent individuals. However, the immunocompromised or immunodeficient cases have disseminated/haematogenous infections with multiple organs involved and are usually fatal unless treated immediately. Laryngeal involvement is associated with the disseminated form of the disease. Histoplasmosis of larynx is a rare entity and poses diagnostic difficulty to otolaryngologists because clinically it may be mistaken for malignancy. We report an unusual case of laryngeal histoplasmosis in a man aged 60 years who presented with provisional diagnosis of tuberculosis/malignancy. PMID:27535733

  7. Laryngeal pseudosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, A.M.; Ewing, S.; Adams, G.; Maisel, R.

    1983-06-01

    In the past laryngeal pseudosarcomas have been diagnosed as a. carcinosarcomas, b. pleomorphic or spindle cell carcinomas, or c. squamous cell carcinomas with pseudosarcomatous reactive stroma. Arguments have centered around the nature of the sarcomatous stroma. Because of this confusion there is disagreement as to the treatment and prognosis of these tumors. Seven pseudosarcomas were treated between 1969-1979, 4 were pedunculated and 3 exophytic. Treatment consisted of primary CO60 irradiation in 2 patients, surgery in 3 cases and combined therapy in 2 cases with no recurrences. Three of the 7 have died, 1 of a poorly differentiated adenosquamous carcinoma of the right main stem bronchus and the other 2 of natural causes at ages 77 and 85. From a review of the literature as well as our experience, we have reached the following conclusions. 1. Stromal cells are a malignant morphologic variant of the squamous cell and are best termed spindled cells. 2. Neck metastasis at any time is a poor prognostic sign. 3. The pattern of metastasis and survival seems to parallel laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and thus treatment should be similar for given stages.

  8. Modified thyroplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis using an adjustable titanium implant.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wu; Sun, Guangbin; Sun, Bifeng; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Mingxing

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to describe a new titanium thyroplasty implant that can be adjusted with a screw. Six Beagle dogs were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n = 3). The titanium screw was implanted in the experimental group after the left recurrent laryngeal nerve was cut off under general anaesthesia. This procedure caused arytenoid cartilage internal shift, allowing the vocal cord to locate at the median and the glottis to close during phonation. No other operation was conducted in the control group. Each group, respectively, underwent video laryngoscopy, CT scan and histopathology before and after operation. After 4 months of follow-up, the video laryngoscopy results showed that the left arytenoid cartilage in the experimental group underwent internal adduct and shift, whereas the left vocal cords in the control group located at the paramedian position and exhibited fissure during phonation. CT scan results showed that the adjustable titanium screw was in proper position. Postoperative pathological examination showed that, in addition to early local inflammation, the laryngeal muscle may atrophy. The adjustable titanium screw requires a simple operation and can be significantly adjusted. The effect of the operation can be immediately observed without rejection. Therefore, this method is an efficient treatment for unilateral vocal cord paralysis. PMID:24728279

  9. Evaluating the timing of injection laryngoplasty for vocal fold paralysis in an attempt to avoid future type 1 thyroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether immediate (less than 3 months from time of nerve injury), early (from 3 to 6 months from time of nerve injury) or late (more than 6 months from time of nerve injury) vocal fold injection influences the long-term outcomes for patients with permanent unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Methods A total of 250 patients with documented unilateral vocal fold paralysis were identified in this retrospective chart review. 66 patients met the inclusion criteria, having undergone awake trancervical injection with gelfoam™, collagen, perlane™ or a combination. Patients with documented recovery of vocal fold mobility, or patients with less than one year of follow-up after the onset of paralysis were excluded. Patients were stratified into immediate (<3 months), early (3-6 months) and late (>6 months) groups denoting the time from suspected injury to injection. The need for open surgery as determined by a persistently immobile vocal fold with insufficient glottic closure following injection was the primary outcome. Results 1 out of 21 (4.8%) in the immediate group, 2 out of 17 (11.8%) in the early group and 20 out of 28 (71.4%) in the late group required type 1 thyroplasty procedures to restore glottic competence. There was significance when comparing late injection to both early and immediate injection (p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences were seen when comparing the number of injections needed to restore glottic competence. Conclusions This 10-year longitudinal assessment revealed that early medialization of a permanent paralyzed, abducted vocal fold with a temporary material appears to diminish the likelihood of requiring permanent laryngeal framework surgery. PMID:24499514

  10. Living with Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are available to answer your questions. Call toll-free 1-800-539-7309 Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm ... are people living with or impacted by paralysis. Free services and downloads > Paralysis Resource Guide Our free ...

  11. Reversible electrophysiological abnormalities in hypokalemic paralysis: Case report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Sharma, C M; Nath, Kunal; Parekh, Jigar

    2014-01-01

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude declines during a paralytic attack in patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP). However, serial motor nerve conduction studies in hypokalemic paralysis have not been commonly reported. We report two cases with hypokalemic paralysis, who had severely reduced CMAPs in all motor nerves at presentation during the episode of quadriparesis. However, the amplitude of CMAPs increased and reached normal levels, as the serum potassium concentration and motor power returned to normal state. PMID:24753672

  12. Laryngeal schwannoma as an acute airway presentation.

    PubMed

    Markou, Konstantinos; Dova, Stamatia; Poulios, Christos; Karkos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    A schwannoma is a neurogenic tumour arising from nerve sheaths. Between 25% and 45% of schwannomas occur in the head and neck region. Schwannomas of the larynx are extremely rare. They usually occur in women during the fourth and fifth decades of life. We present a case of a laryngeal schwannoma in a 76-year-old patient with acute stridor, hoarseness and dysphagia. Laryngeal conservation surgery was performed without the need for a tracheostomy. One year later, the patient remains symptom-free with no evidence of recurrence. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and management are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:26969364

  13. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Rojith Karanode; Chandran, Suresh Rama; Thirumalnesan, Geetha; Doraisamy, Nedumaran

    2011-07-01

    This article aims at highlighting the importance of suspecting thyrotoxicosis in cases of recurrent periodic flaccid paralysis; especially in Asian men to facilitate early diagnosis of the former condition. A case report of a 28 year old male patient with recurrent periodic flaccid paralysis has been presented. Hypokalemia secondary to thyrotoxicosis was diagnosed as the cause of the paralysis. The patient was given oral potassium intervention over 24 hours. The patient showed complete recovery after the medical intervention and was discharged after 24 hours with no residual paralysis. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a complication of thyrotoxicosis, more common amongst males in Asia. It presents as acute flaccid paralysis in a case of hyperthyroidism with associated hypokalemia. The features of thyrotoxicosis may be subtle or absent. Thus, in cases of recurrent or acute flaccid muscle paralysis, it is important to consider thyrotoxicosis as one of the possible causes, and take measures accordingly. PMID:21966655

  14. Periocular Reconstruction in Patients with Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shannon S; Joseph, Andrew W; Douglas, Raymond S; Massry, Guy G

    2016-04-01

    Facial paralysis can result in serious ocular consequences. All patients with orbicularis oculi weakness in the setting of facial nerve injury should undergo a thorough ophthalmologic evaluation. The main goal of management in these patients is to protect the ocular surface and preserve visual function. Patients with expected recovery of facial nerve function may only require temporary and conservative measures to protect the ocular surface. Patients with prolonged or unlikely recovery of facial nerve function benefit from surgical rehabilitation of the periorbital complex. Current reconstructive procedures are most commonly intended to improve coverage of the eye but cannot restore blink. PMID:27040589

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evidence of Varicella Zoster Virus Polyneuropathy: Involvement of the Glossopharyngeal and Vagus Nerves Associated With Ramsay Hunt Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gunbey, Hediye Pinar; Kutlar, Gokhan; Aslan, Kerim; Sayit, Asli Tanrivermis; Incesu, Lutfi

    2016-05-01

    The involvement of lower cranial nerve palsies is less frequent in Ramsay Hunt syndrome caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV). The authors report 1 of extremely rare patients of radiologically proven polyneuropathy of VZV infection with magnetic resonance imaging findings of VII, IX, and X cranial nerve involvement is a 62-year-old female patient, who initially presented with Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Varicella zoster virus infection should be considered even in patients who show unilateral palsy of the lower cranial nerves associated with laryngeal paralysis. Thin-section T2W and T1W images with a contrast agent should be added to the imaging protocol to show the subtle involvement. PMID:27092925

  16. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Sant'Ambrogio, F.B.; Orani, G.P.; Sant'Ambrogio, G.; Mathew, O.P. )

    1990-02-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.

  17. Isolated sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Neena S; Parkar, Shubhangi R; Tambe, Ravindra

    2005-10-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a cardinal symptom of narcolepsy. However, little is available in the literature about isolated sleep paralysis. This report discusses the case of a patient with isolated sleep paralysis who progressed from mild to severe SP over 8 years. He also restarted drinking alcohol to be able to fall asleep and allay his anxiety symptoms. The patient was taught relaxation techniques and he showed complete remission of the symptoms of SP on follow up after 8 months. PMID:20711316

  18. Improvement of hind-limb paralysis following traumatic spinal cord injury in rats by grafting normal human keratinocytes: new cell-therapy strategy for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hajime; Takenaga, Mitsuko; Ohta, Yuki; Tomioka, Miyuki; Watabe, Yu-Ichi; Aihara, Masaki; Kumagai, Norio

    2011-12-01

    Somatic (adult) stem cells are thought to have pluripotency, just as do embryotic stem (ES) cells. We investigated the possibility that grafted epithelial keratinocytes could induce spinal cord regeneration in an animal model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Normal human keratinocytes were cultured by the routine technique, and normal human dermal fibroblasts were cultured by a similar method as a control group. SCI model was prepared by dropping a 10-g weight onto the exposed spinal cord of rats from a height of 25 mm, and 8 days later, the cultured cells were grafted into the injury site. Motor function was significantly improved in the cultured-keratinocyte-grafted group compared with that in the fibroblast-grafted group. After functional observation, human nestin- and nuclei-positive cells were found at the grafted spinal cord. Grafted cultured keratinocytes induced in vitro morphological changes in the neural induction medium. These results indicated one possibility that some of the grafted cultured keratinocytes survived and could have contributed to neural regeneration. On the other hand, it should be noted that the grafted cultured keratinocytes secreted a large amount of enzymes and/or growth factors. Therefore, another possibility is that the grafted-keratinocyte-derived factors could induce survived cell growth and endogenous neural differentiation of spinal-nerve-derived stem cells surrounding the injured spinal cord, leading to functional recovery. Epithelial stem cell therapy may be applied clinically in the near future to treat SCI. PMID:21842261

  19. Perceptual Ratings of Vocal Characteristics and Voicing Features in Untreated Patients with Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leydon, Ciara; Bielamowicz, Steven; Stager, Sheila V.

    2005-01-01

    This study used visual analog scales to obtain perceptual ratings of features of voice production in subjects with unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP), including clarity of laryngeal articulation, consistency of loudness across the utterance and the voiced/voiceless distinction. Recordings of repeated /i/, /isi/, and /izi/ from subjects…

  20. Laryngeal Paralyses: Theoretical Considerations and Effects on Laryngeal Vibration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marshall E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical four-mass model of the larynx was developed to simulate laryngeal biomechanical behavior and used to evaluate states of asymmetric laryngeal vibration. Simulations of laryngeal paralyses were compared with data on glottal vibration in observed laryngeal function. (Author/JDD)

  1. Hemostasis in Laryngeal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, Theodore; Allen, Jacqui

    2016-06-01

    The larynx is a highly vascularized organ supplied by the superior and inferior laryngeal arteries. Both microphonosurgery and external laryngeal surgery require excellent hemostasis. Topical agents including adrenalin and fibrin-based products as well as surgical instrumentation, such as coagulation devices or in some cases embolization, are in the surgeon's armamentarium and facilitate efficient and successful surgery. PMID:27267020

  2. Bulbar Paralysis and Facial Paralysis due to Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Liu, Shixin; Liu, Bailong; Liu, Bin; Guo, Liang; Wang, Xu; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Shuo; Dong, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Skull-base metastasis (SBM) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is extremely rare, and multiple cranial nerve paralysis due to SBM from HCC is also rare. We report a case of bulbar and facial paralysis due to SBM from HCC. A 46-year-old Chinese man presented with a hepatic right lobe lesion that was detected during a routine physical examination. After several failed attempts to treat the primary tumor and bone metastases, neurological examination revealed left VII, IX, X, and XI cranial nerve paralysis. Computed tomography of the skull base subsequently revealed a large mass that had destroyed the left occipital and temporal bones and invaded the adjacent structure. After radiotherapy (27 Gy, 9 fractions), the patient experienced relief from his pain, and the cranial nerve dysfunction regressed. However, the patient ultimately died, due to the tumor's progression. Radiotherapy is usually the best option to relieve pain and achieve regression of cranial nerve dysfunction in cases of SBM from HCC, although early treatment is needed to achieve optimal outcomes. The present case helps expand our understanding regarding this rare metastatic pathway and indicates that improved awareness of SBM in clinical practice can help facilitate timely and appropriate treatment. PMID:26825921

  3. Stats About Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of advocacy to collectively combat the drivers of inequality and eradicate the obstacles to freedom faced by ... impact of paralysis across the nation, from a health, societal, and financial perspective, we are creating a ...

  4. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from sleep. It is not associated with another sleep disorder. ... Sleep paralysis can be a symptom of narcolepsy . But if you do not have other symptoms of narcolepsy, there is usually no need to have sleep studies done.

  5. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be due to this condition include: Kidney stones (a side effect of acetazolamide) Irregular heartbeat during ... 2016:chap 99. Read More Breathing difficulty Carbohydrates Kidney stones Potassium test Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Weakness Update Date ...

  6. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high levels of thyroid hormone in their blood ( hyperthyroidism , thyrotoxicosis). Causes This is a rare condition that ... include a family history of periodic paralysis and hyperthyroidism. Symptoms Symptoms involve attacks of muscle weakness or ...

  7. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from sleep. It is not associated with another sleep disorder. Symptoms Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Sleep Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  8. Neurologic Melioidosis: Case Report of a Rare Cause of Acute Flaccid Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Erik W; Mackay, Mark T; Ryan, Monique M

    2016-03-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis is associated with inflammation, infection, or tumors in the spinal cord or peripheral nerves. Melioidosis (Burkholderia pseudomallei infection) can rarely cause this presentation. We describe a case of spinal melioidosis in a 4-year-old boy presenting with flaccid paralysis, and review the literature on this rare disease. PMID:26778096

  9. Laryngeal (Voice Box) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited alcohol exposure. Other risk factors for laryngeal cancer include certain viruses, such as human papilloma virus (HPV), and likely acid reflux. Vitamin A and beta-carotene may play a protective role. Signs and Symptoms ...

  10. Stages of Laryngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of laryngeal cancer include a sore throat and ear pain. These and other signs and ... hoarseness in the voice. Tests that examine the throat and neck are used to help detect (find), ...

  11. Abdominal muscle paralysis associated with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Gottschau, P; Trojaborg, W

    1991-10-01

    We describe a 77-year-old women with cutaneous herpes zoster in the area of the right T9-T11 dermatomes complicated by abdominal muscle paralysis. Four months after onset of paralysis, stimulation of appropriate intercostal nerves failed to evoke responses from the corresponding segments of the rectus abdominis muscle. Three months later EMG of these muscle segments revealed profuse denervation activity and spontaneous long-lasting burst of high frequency discharges. Magnetic stimulation applied transcranially and peripherally at T10 evoked responses from the left, but not from the right paralytic rectus abdominis muscle. Electric stimulation of right T10 elicited a markedly delayed, prolonged and polyphasic response in the transverse abdominis muscle and EMG revealed polyphasia and increased motor unit potential duration in muscle segments underlying herpes zoster eruption. One and a half years after onset, the paralysis of the rectus abdominis muscle was still present. A survey of the literature concerning this rare type of zoster paralysis is presented. PMID:1837649

  12. General Information about Laryngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Laryngeal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Laryngeal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. Clinical and neurophysiological features of tick paralysis.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, P J; Morris, J G; Johnston, H M; Yiannikas, C; Malik, R; Russell, R; Ouvrier, R A

    1997-11-01

    The clinical and neurophysiological findings in six Australian children with generalized tick paralysis are described. Paralysis is usually caused by the mature female of the species Ixodes holocyclus. It most frequently occurs in the spring and summer months but can be seen at any time of year. Children aged 1-5 years are most commonly affected. The tick is usually found in the scalp, often behind the ear. The typical presentation is a prodrome followed by the development of an unsteady gait, and then ascending, symmetrical, flaccid paralysis. Early cranial nerve involvement is a feature, particularly the presence of both internal and external ophthalmoplegia. In contrast to the experience with North American ticks, worsening of paralysis in the 24-48 h following tick removal is common and the child must be carefully observed over this period. Death from respiratory failure was relatively common in the first half of the century and tick paralysis remains a potentially fatal condition. Respiratory support may be required for > 1 week but full recovery occurs. This is slow with several weeks passing before the child can walk unaided. Anti-toxin has a role in the treatment of seriously ill children but there is a high incidence of acute allergy and serum sickness. Neurophysiological studies reveal low-amplitude compound muscle action potentials with normal motor conduction velocities, normal sensory studies and normal response to repetitive stimulation. The biochemical structure of the toxin of I. holocyclus has not been fully characterized but there are many clinical, neurophysiological and experimental similarities to botulinum toxin. PMID:9397015

  14. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, J.E.; Arguelles, D.J.; Rams, H. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is reported in a Hispanic man with an unusual recurrence six weeks after radioactive iodine treatment. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis has now been well characterized in the literature: it occurs primarily in Orientals with an overwhelming male preponderance and a higher association of specific HLA antigens. Clinical manifestations include onset after high carbohydrate ingestion or heavy exertion, with progressive symmetric weakness leading to flaccid paralysis of the extremities and other muscle groups, lasting several hours. If hypokalemia is present, potassium administration may help abort the attack. Although propranolol can be efficacious in preventing further episodes, the only definitive treatment is establishing a euthyroid state. The pathophysiology is still controversial, but reflects altered potassium and calcium dynamics as well as certain morphologic characteristics within the muscle unit itself.

  15. Clinical analysis of cervical radiculopathy causing deltoid paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han; Park, Jong-Beom; Hwang, Jin-Yeun; Song, Kyung-Jin

    2003-10-01

    In general, deltoid paralysis develops in patients with cervical disc herniation (CDH) or cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) at the level of C4/5, resulting in compression of the C5 nerve root. Therefore, little attention has been paid to CDH or CSR at other levels as the possible cause of deltoid paralysis. In addition, the surgical outcomes for deltoid paralysis have not been fully described. Fourteen patients with single-level CDH or CSR, who had undergone anterior cervical decompression and fusion for deltoid paralysis, were included in this study. The severity of deltoid paralysis was classified into five grades according to manual motor power test, and the severity of radiculopathy was recorded on a visual analog scale (zero to ten points). The degree of improvement in both the severity of deltoid paralysis and radiculopathy following surgery was evaluated. Of 14 patients, one had C3/4 CDH, four had C4/5 CDH, three had C4/5 CSR, one had C5/6 CDH, and five had C5/6 CSR. Both deltoid paralysis and radiculopathy improved significantly with surgery (2.57+/-0.51 grades vs 4.14+/-0.66, P=0.001, and 7.64+/-1.65 points vs 3.21+/-0.58, P=0.001, respectively). In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that deltoid paralysis can develop due to CDH or CSR not only C4/5, but also at the levels of C3/4 and C5/6, and that surgical decompression significantly improves the degree of deltoid paralysis due to cervical radiculopathy. PMID:12734743

  16. Bilateral laryngeal paralysis in a dog secondary to laryngeal osseous metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Skelding, Alicia Marie; Kisiel, Agatha; Essman, Stephanie; Rutland, Bronwyn E.

    2016-01-01

    A 7-year-old spayed female Lurcher was evaluated for a chronic history of increased upper respiratory noise. Advanced imaging including digital radiography and pre- and post-contrast computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the presence of an ill-defined soft tissue mineralized mass of the ventral larynx. Histopathology demonstrated pleocellular myositis and fasciitis with osseous metaplasia. PMID:26834266

  17. Laryngeal schwannoma: excision via a laryngofissure approach

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Antonia; Anwar, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas are peripheral nerve neurogenic tumours and although not common, laryngeal schwannomas can provide a unique challenge in diagnostic and treatment management. There are limited reports in the literature on approaches to management. A 73-year-old lady presented to the otolaryngology department after a MRI scan demonstrated an incidental right supraglottic mass. Further investigations included CT scanning and microlaryngoscopy, which only confirmed the presence of the mass with no histology diagnosis. Excision was undertaken by a laryngofissure approach and tracheostomy. Histology confirmed a benign ancient schwannoma. PMID:26034238

  18. Sleep paralysis and hallucinosis.

    PubMed

    Stores, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Background: Sleep paralysis is one of the many conditions of which visual hallucinations can be a part but has received relatively little attention. It can be associated with other dramatic symptoms of a psychotic nature likely to cause diagnostic uncertainty. Methods and results: These points are illustrated by the case of a young man with a severe bipolar affective disorder who independently developed terrifying visual, auditory and somatic hallucinatory episodes at sleep onset, associated with a sense of evil influence and presence. The episodes were not obviously related to his psychiatric disorder. Past diagnoses included nightmares and night terrors. Review provided no convincing evidence of various other sleep disorders nor physical conditions in which hallucinatory experiences can occur. A diagnosis of predormital isolated sleep paralysis was made and appropriate treatment recommended. Conclusions: Sleep paralysis, common in the general population, can be associated with dramatic auxiliary symptoms suggestive of a psychotic state. Less common forms are either part of the narcolepsy syndrome or (rarely) they are familial in type. Interestingly, sleep paralysis (especially breathing difficulty) features prominently in the folklore of various countries. PMID:11568409

  19. The Price of Paralysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thweatt, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    There are situations in which people feel that it is perfectly acceptable to take no action at all, given a certain set of circumstances. Not only is this a generally unacceptable approach to problem solving, but this type of paralysis can have far reaching and unintended consequences. Since childhood, one has at times held out hope that if he/she…

  20. Isolated Paralysis of the Adductor Pollicis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, F.; Bisicchia, S.; Farsetti, P.; Ippolito, E.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of isolated paralysis of the right adductor pollicis in a 30-year-old woman. Electromyographic study showed involvement of the deep motor branch of the ulnar nerve. A ganglion and an anomalous muscle were both ruled out clinically and by MRI as a possible cause of the paralysis. At surgical exploration, we found a fibrous band joining the pisiform and the hook of the hamate bone that compressed the deep motor branch of the ulnar nerve. The fibrous band was excised, and a neurolysis of the motor branch of the ulnar nerve was performed. At followup, eight months later, the patient had fully recovered strength of the adductor muscle. PMID:21991410

  1. [Surgical Therapy of Acquired Unilateral Diaphragmatic Paralysis: Indication and Results].

    PubMed

    Wiesemann, S; Haager, B; Passlick, B

    2016-09-01

    Unilateral elevation of the diaphragm may be due to various causes and requires further elucidation when the aetiology is unknown. Elevation of the diaphragm is often caused by diaphragmatic paralysis, either due to damage to the phrenic nerve or to the phrenic muscle. Patients typically complain of increased respiratory distress when lying down, bending or swimming. Basic diagnostic testing consists of a chest X-ray, as well as spirometry and computer tomography of the neck and chest. In many cases, no cause can be identified for the diaphragmatic paralysis. In symptomatic patients, diaphragm plication leads to fixation and thus to a reduction in the paradoxal respiratory movement of the paralysed diaphragm. In a large majority of studies, this results in significant and lasting improvement in vital capacity and respiratory distress. Spontaneous recovery of diaphragm paralysis is possible, even after several months, so a waiting period of at least 6 months should elapse before diaphragmatic plication is performed, if the clinical situation allows. The procedure can be performed minimally invasively, with low morbidity and mortality. When cutting the phrenic nerve, a nerve suture is recommended, if possible, or otherwise diaphragm plication during the procedure, especially in the case of pneumonectomy. This review provides an overview of the causes, pathophysiology, symptoms, diagnosis, therapy and results of diaphragmatic plication in acquired, unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis in adults, and suggests an algorithm for diagnostic testing and therapy. PMID:27607888

  2. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS: THE NEED FOR CAREFUL PATIENT SELECTION

    PubMed Central

    Kokong, DD; Adoga, AA; Bakari, A; Okundia, PO; Onakoya, PA; Nwaorgu, OGB

    2015-01-01

    Background Vocal cord paralysis is one of the challenging laryngeal clinical entities confronting the Laryngologist and indeed, the Phono-surgeon. The ability to maintain an effective balance between voice and airway function to ensure good quality of life requires expertise. This study is therefore designed to highlight our experience on surgical management of vocal cord paralysis. Method Clinical notes of all patients that met the inclusion criteria for this study on vocal cord paralysis over a ten-year period were analysed. Data was generated from patients’ case files retrieved using standard codes according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results From the 7,941 new ENT cases seen, 26 patients had vocal cord paralysis (VCP) giving a prevalence of 0.3%. The male to female ratio was 1: 4.2 with a mean age of 45.7years ± 6.3. Their ages ranged from 21–80 years. Thyroidectomy was the main causal factor in 46.2% while idiopathic causes was documented in 23.1%. Twenty-three patients (88.5%) had unilateral VCP from which 21(91.3%) were abductor paralysis. The ratio of Left: Right VCP was 3:1. All the 3 bilateral cases were abductor paralysis. Neurotropic agents only, were effective in cases of unilateral VCP. However, in those with bilateral paralysis, two had tracheostomy only, while the third had a laryngo-fissure, arytenoidoplasty and endo-laryngeal stenting in addition. All were successfully decannulated with good voice quality. Conclusion With these observations, we suggest the choice of appropriate surgical technique, timing and careful patient selection in order to preserve voice, curtail operative sequelae and achieve good quality of life (QoL) which is the overall management strategy, be borne in mind. PMID:26709328

  3. Laryngeal reflex responses are not modulated during human voice and respiratory tasks

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez, Victor M; Schulz, Geralyn M; Bielamowicz, Steven; Ludlow, Christy L

    2007-01-01

    The laryngeal adductor response (LAR) is a protective reflex that prevents aspiration and can be elicited either by electrical stimulation of afferents in the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) or by deflection of mechanoreceptors in the laryngeal mucosa. We hypothesized that because this reflex is life-sustaining, laryngeal muscle responses to sensory stimuli would not be suppressed during volitional laryngeal tasks when compared to quiet respiration. Unilateral electrical superior laryngeal nerve stimulation was used to elicit early (R1) and late (R2) responses in the ipsilateral thyroarytenoid muscle in 10 healthy subjects. The baseline levels of muscle activity before stimulation, R1 and R2 response occurrence and the integrals of responses were measured during each task: quiet inspiration, prolonged vowels, humming, forced inhalation and effort closure. We tested whether R1 response integrals during tasks were equal to either: (1) baseline muscle activity during the task added to the response integral at rest; (2) the response integral at rest minus the baseline muscle activity during the task; or (3) the response integral at rest. R1 response occurrence was not altered by task from rest while fewer R2 responses occurred only during effort closure and humming compared to rest. Because the R1 response integrals did not change from rest, task increases in motor neuron firing did not alter the LAR. These findings demonstrate that laryngeal motor neuron responses to sensory inputs are not gated during volitional tasks confirming the robust life-sustaining protective mechanisms provided by this airway reflex. PMID:17962327

  4. Visual Experiences during Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitham, Emma M.; Fitzgibbon, Sean P.; Lewis, Trent W.; Pope, Kenneth J.; DeLosAngeles, Dylan; Clark, C. Richard; Lillie, Peter; Hardy, Andrew; Gandevia, Simon C.; Willoughby, John O.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Paralyzed human volunteers (n = 6) participated in several studies the primary one of which required full neuromuscular paralysis while awake. After the primary experiment, while still paralyzed and awake, subjects undertook studies of humor and of attempted eye-movement. The attempted eye-movements tested a central, intentional component to one’s internal visual model and are the subject of this report. Methods: Subjects reclined in a supportive chair and were ventilated after paralysis (cisatracurium, 20 mg intravenously). In illumination, subjects were requested to focus alternately on the faces of investigators standing on the left and the right within peripheral vision. In darkness, subjects were instructed to look away from a point source of light. Subjects were to report their experiences after reversal of paralysis. Results: During attempted eye-movement in illumination, one subject had an illusion of environmental movement but four subjects perceived faces as clearly as if they were in central vision. In darkness, four subjects reported movement of the target light in the direction of attempted eye-movements and three could control the movement of the light at will. Conclusion: The hypothesis that internal visual models receive intended ocular-movement-information directly from oculomotor centers is strengthened by this evidence. PMID:22162967

  5. Muscle paralysis in thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Fraz Anwar; Sheikh, Aisha

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a condition characterised by muscle paralysis due to hypokalaemia usually secondary to thyrotoxicosis. We report a case of a 31-year-old man with no known comorbidities who presented to a tertiary healthcare unit with a 1-month history of difficulty in breathing, palpitations, weight loss and hoarseness of voice. On examination, his thyroid gland was palpable and fine hand tremors were present. An initial provisional diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was made. Three months after initial presentation, the patient presented in emergency with severe muscle pain and inability to stand. Laboratory results revealed hypokalaemia. All the symptoms reverted over the next few hours on administration of intravenous potassium. A diagnosis of TTP was established. After initial presentation, the patient was treated with carbimazole and propranolol. Once he was euthyroid, radioactive iodine ablation therapy (15 mCi) was carried out as definitive therapy, after which the patient's symptoms resolved; he is currently doing fine on levothyroxine replacement and there has been no recurrence of muscle paralysis. PMID:26025973

  6. Sudden flaccid paralysis.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohammad; Peshin, Rohit; Ellis, Oliver; Grover, Karan

    2015-01-01

    Periodic thyrotoxic paralysis is a genetic condition, rare in the West and in Caucasians. Thyrotoxicosis, especially in western hospitals, is an easily overlooked cause of sudden-onset paralysis. We present a case of a 40-year-old man who awoke one morning unable to stand. He had bilateral lower limb flaccid weakness of 0/5 with reduced reflexes and equivocal plantars; upper limbs were 3/5 with reduced tone and reflexes. ECG sinus rhythm was at a rate of 88/min. PR interval was decreased and QT interval increased. Bloods showed potassium of 1.8 mEq/L (normal range 3.5-5), free T4 of 29.2 pmol/L (normal range 6.5-17) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of <0.01 mIU/L (normal range 0.35-4.94). Random urinary potassium was 8.8 mEq/L (normal range 12.5-62.5). The patient was admitted initially to intensive therapy unit and given intravenous potassium. His symptoms resolved within 24 h. He was diagnosed with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. He was discharged on carbimazole and propanolol, and follow-up was arranged in the endocrinology clinic. PMID:25566931

  7. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  8. [Intubating laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Langenstein, H; Möller, F

    1998-01-01

    To improve the success of blind intubation through a laryngeal mask, Dr. A.I.J. Brain constructed the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA), marketed under the name Fastrach. The new construction allows blind intubation with highly flexible endotracheal tubes up to 8 mm ID with cuff (straight Woodbridge type), securing the airway around the intubation process and maintaining most of the characteristics of a standard laryngeal mask airway (SLMA), including contraindications. An additional contraindication is the existence of a Zenker diverticle. Up to now, eight working groups reported a success rate of blind intubation through the ILMA of more than 90% in about 1,200 patients, with a success rate of blind intubation of more than 50% for the first intubation attempt. Ten percent of the patients were difficult to intubate with the same success rate for blind intubation as in normal patients. Reduced mouth opening does not seem to hinder the use of the ILMA in spite of its increased outer diameter of 2 cm, as long as it is possible to enlarge the mouth opening to > 2 cm during anaesthesia. The new ILMA more than doubles the success of blind intubation compared to an SLMA, irrespective of a large variety of intubation difficulties. Correct judgement of endotracheal tube position is mandatory. The ILMA has the potential to be used in patients who are difficult to intubate and to substitute the SLMA in "cannot ventilate--cannot intubate" situations. The future will show if the ILMA also will improve emergency airway management by inexperienced personnel, including intubation, as has been shown for the standard laryngeal mask airway in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for ventilation only. PMID:9611362

  9. [Laryngeal interarytenoid neurilemmoma excised via microlaryngeal endoscopy: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Cheng, Lixin; Tang, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Laryngeal interarytenoid neurilemmomas (LIN) is a benign encapsulated tumor originating from the schwann cells lining nerve fibers. Even though LINs are extremely rare in incidence, they could present with potential threat to the airway and thus requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report two cases of LINs. Both patients underwent excision of the tumor via microlaryngeal endoscopic procedures and recovered well postoperatively without complications. No recurrence was observed postoperatively on routine follow-up after 14 months. PMID:27101688

  10. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  11. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  12. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery. PMID:26195012

  13. A Paralysis of Social Policy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Joel

    1992-01-01

    Reviews paralysis of U.S. social policy. Notes that, although federal government has implemented new social programs, programs either are provided on condition of willingness to work or are modest in scope. Linking paralysis with literature on government ineffectuality, traces origins of ineffectuality of political/economic policies of past 20…

  14. A case of hypokalemic paralysis in a patient with neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Frederic N; Kar, Jitesh K; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-04-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after developing a dental abscess. He had a history of pituitary adenoma resection at the age of 13 with subsequent pan-hypopituitarism and was noncompliant with hormonal supplementation. On hospital day 3, he developed sudden onset of quadriplegia with motor strength of 0 of 5 in the upper extremities bilaterally and 1 of 5 in both lower extremities with absent deep tendon reflexes. His routine laboratory studies revealed severe hypokalemia of 1.6 mEq/dL. Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) revealed absent compound motor action potentials (CMAPs) with normal sensory potentials. Electromyography (EMG) did not reveal any abnormal insertional or spontaneous activity. He regained full strength within 36 hours following aggressive correction of the hypokalemia. Repeat NCS showed return of CMAPs in all nerves tested and EMG revealed normal motor units and normal recruitment without myotonic discharges. In patients with central DI with polyuria, hypokalemia can result in sudden paralysis. Hypokalemic paralysis remains an important differential in an acute case of paralysis and early recognition and appropriate management is key. PMID:24707338

  15. Posttraumatic Cholesteatoma Complicated by a Facial Paralysis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chihani, M.; Aljalil, A.; Touati, M.; Bouaity, B.; Ammar, H.

    2012-01-01

    The posttraumatic cholesteatoma is a rare complication of different types of the temporal bone damage. Its diagnosis is often done after several years of evolution, sometimes even at the stage of complications. A case of posttraumatic cholesteatoma is presented that was revealed by a facial nerve paralysis 23 years after a crash of the external auditory canal underlining the importance of the otoscopic and radiological regular monitoring of the patients with a traumatism of the temporal bone. PMID:22953104

  16. Facial Nerve Laceration and its Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shafaiee, Yousef; Shahbazzadegan, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Facial paralysis is a devastating condition with profound functional, aesthetic and psychosocial consequences. Tumors within or outside the skull, Bell’s palsy and trauma are the most common causes of facial paralysis in adults. Case Presentation Our patient was a 35-year-old man with deep laceration wounds. The patient was taken to the operating room and the nerves were repaired. We observed gradual improvement of muscle performance except branches of the frontal nerve. Conclusions Complete rupture of the facial nerve is challenging and the treatment is surgery, which requires careful planning.

  17. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  18. Studies on immunological paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Howard, J. G.; Zola, H.; Christie, G. H.; Courtenay, Barbara M.

    1971-01-01

    Type 3 pneumococcal polysaccharide (SIII) with average molecular weight 220,000 was depolymerized by heating aqueous solutions under pressure. The immunogenicity and tolerogenicity of fractions with molecular weights of 121,000, 31,000 and 4000 were compared with the native antigen by means of direct splenic PFC and serum haemagglutinin assays. Fall in molecular weight was accompanied by progressive reduction in both immunizing and tolerance-inducing properties. The 4000 molecular weight preparation (ten glucuronosidoglucose units) was feebly immunogenic and non-tolerogenic, although known to contain intact determinants. Depolymerization was also correlated with loss of antibody-neutralizing activity. Paralysis with SIII involves `high-zone' tolerance in the B lymphocyte population. The proposition is discussed that immunogenicity is here a necessary characteristic of the inducing antigen. PMID:4398137

  19. [Management of laryngeal cancers].

    PubMed

    Brunin, F; Rodriguez, J; Cougniot-Lescure, S; Point, D; Jaulerry, C; Brugère, J

    1995-04-01

    With 5,000 cases yearly, laryngeal carcinomas account in France for the third of squamous cell cancers of the upper digestive and respiratory tract. The crude survival rate is 50% at 5 years. Carcinomas of vocal cords are often diagnosed as early stages if dysphonia leads the patients to the ENT specialist within 2 weeks. Cure of the primary is achieved in 90% of the early stages by radiotherapy with narrow fields or partial surgery, with a 80% 5 years survival rate. Advanced tumors are often treated by total laryngectomy and postoperative radiotherapy. Supra-glottic cancers (epiglottis) are more serious. Unilateral dysphagia or upper cervical neck node often delay early diagnosis. A total laryngectomy is the commonest treatment. The 5 years survival rate of 40% is due to local and/or regional failures and metachronous cancers in head and neck, and radiotherapy remains the two major treatments. Primary prevention is based upon suppression of tobacco and reduction of alcoholic consumption, secondary prevention on resection of leucoplakia and close follow-up of patients with chronic laryngitis. PMID:7761753

  20. Role of perineural invasion as a prognostic factor in laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    MESOLELLA, MASSIMO; IORIO, BRIGIDA; MISSO, GABRIELLA; LUCE, AMALIA; CIMMINO, MARIANO; IENGO, MAURIZIO; LANDI, MARIO; SPERLONGANO, PASQUALE; CARAGLIA, MICHELE; RICCIARDIELLO, FILIPPO

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of laryngeal cancer cells in the perineural space is a parameter associated with a negative prognosis, high loco-regional recurrence and low disease-free survival rates. The spread of tumor cells on the perineural sheath highlights the histopathological and clinically aggressive behavior of this type of tumor, which may extend proximally or distally in the nerve for >10 cm. Therefore, the surgical resection margin is generally insufficient to treat patients with laryngeal cancer presenting with perineural invasion (PNI) with surgery alone. In PNI, the minor laryngeal nerves are frequently involved, rather than the superior and inferior laryngeal nerves. The aim of the present study was: i) To evaluate the prognostic importance of PNI; ii) to correlate the rate of infiltration with factors associated with the tumor, including histotype, site and tumor-node-metastasis stage, and with the type of surgery (total or partial laryngectomy); and iii) to evaluate the rate of disease-free survival according to the outcome of combined surgery and radiotherapy (RT) treatment, by means of retrospective analysis. The results of the present study highlighted the importance of performing a closer clinical and instrumental follow-up in patients with laryngeal cancer whose histopathological examination is positive for PNI. In such cases, it is important to complement the surgical therapeutic treatment with adjuvant RT. PMID:27073523

  1. Computed tomographic imaging of dogs with primary laryngeal or tracheal airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krystina; Hartman, Susan; Matheson, Jodi; O'Brien, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen dogs with clinical signs attributable to nonneoplastic obstruction of the larynx, trachea, or large bronchi underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging. In 16 of the 17 dogs, CT was performed without general anesthesia using a positioning device. Fifteen of these 16 dogs were imaged without sedation or general anesthesia. Three-dimensional (3D) internal rendering was performed on each image set based on lesion localization determined by routine image planes. Visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, video fluoroscopy, and necropsy were used for achieving the cause of the upper airway obstruction. The CT and 3D internal rendering accurately indicated the presence and cause of upper airway obstruction in all dogs. CT findings indicative of laryngeal paralysis included failure to abduct the arytenoid cartilages, narrowed rima glottis, and air-filled laryngeal ventricles. Laryngeal collapse findings depended on the grade of collapse and included everted laryngeal saccules, collapse of the cuneiform processes and corniculate processes, and narrowed rima glottis. Trachea abnormalities included hypoplasia, stenosis, or collapse syndrome. The CT findings in tracheal hypoplasia consisted of a severely narrowed lumen throughout the entire length. Tracheal stenosis was represented by a circumferential decrease in tracheal lumen size limited to one region. Tracheal collapse syndrome was diagnosed by severe asymmetric narrowing. Lobar bronchi collapse appeared in CT images as a narrowed asymmetric lumen diameter. CT imaging of unanesthetized dogs with upper airway obstruction compares favorably with traditional definitive diagnostic methods. PMID:21447037

  2. Bilateral traumatic facial paralysis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Undabeitia, Jose; Liu, Brian; Pendleton, Courtney; Nogues, Pere; Noboa, Roberto; Undabeitia, Jose Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Although traumatic injury of the facial nerve is a relatively common condition in neurosurgical practice, bilateral lesions related to fracture of temporal bones are seldom seen. We report the case of a 38-year-old patient admitted to Intensive Care Unit after severe head trauma requiring ventilatory support (Glasgow Coma Scale of 7 on admission). A computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed a longitudinal fracture of the right temporal bone and a transversal fracture of the left. After successful weaning from respirator, bilateral facial paralysis was observed. The possible aetiologies for facial diplegia differ from those of unilateral injury. Due to the lack of facial asymmetry, it can be easily missed in critically ill patients, and both the high resolution CT scan and electromyographic studies can be helpful for correct diagnosis. PMID:23541180

  3. An Unusual Case of Neuralgic Amyotrophy Presenting with Bilateral Phrenic Nerve and Vocal Cord Paresis

    PubMed Central

    Holtbernd, F.; Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, A. am; Duning, T.; Kemmling, A.; Ringelstein, E.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuralgic amyotrophy (brachial plexus neuropathy, brachial plexus neuritis, or Parsonage-Turner syndrome) is an uncommon inflammatory condition typically characterized by acute and severe shoulder pain followed by paresis with muscle weakness and atrophy of the upper limb or shoulder girdle. We report an unusual clinical manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy, namely bilateral phrenic nerve palsy with concomitant laryngeal paresis. Case Report A 55-year-old male presented with orthopnea and aphonia after an episode of bilateral shoulder pain preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection. Spirometry, chest X-ray and videolaryngoscopy revealed bilateral and simultaneous paresis of the diaphragm and the vocal cords. Clinical examination at admission and at the 2-month follow-up did not show upper limb weakness or atrophy, except for a mild atrophy of the right supraspinatus muscle. An electromyography of the upper limb muscles and nerve conduction studies did not reveal signs of denervation. Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid and an MRI of the neuraxis were unremarkable. After treatment with prednisolone, vocal cord function markedly improved within 8 weeks, whereas paresis of the diaphragm persisted. Conclusion Shoulder pain followed by diaphragmatic paralysis with dyspnea and hoarseness may be a manifestation of neuralgic amyotrophy even if upper limb or shoulder girdle palsies are absent. PMID:21490716

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of laryngeal cancer include a sore throat and ear pain. These and other signs and ... hoarseness in the voice. Tests that examine the throat and neck are used to help detect (find), ...

  5. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection in laryngeal diseases.

    PubMed

    Siupsinskiene, Nora; Jurgutaviciute, Vilma; Katutiene, Inga; Janciauskas, Dainius; Vaitkus, Saulius; Adamonis, Kęstutis

    2013-08-01

    Clinical studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori can be found not only in the mucosa of the stomach, but in the pharyngeal and laryngeal regions as well. The aim of this prospective case-control study was to identify H. pylori infection in the biopsy material from the larynx of the patients suffering from benign laryngeal diseases (vocal fold polyps, laryngitis) and laryngeal cancer and to investigate the possible relationships between the laryngeal H. pylori and patients' socio-demographic data and laryngopharyngeal reflux. The results of the biopsy material from 67 adult patients treated for benign laryngeal diseases and laryngeal cancer and 11 individuals of the control group revealed that H. pylori infection could be identified in more than one-third of the patients. In the majority of cases H. pylori was found in the patients with chronic laryngitis (45.5%) and laryngeal cancer (46.2%). The findings of these sub-groups significantly differed from those of the control group (9.1%) (p < 0.05). No significant relationships between H. pylori infection found in the laryngeal region and patients' demographic data, their unhealthy habits and reflux-related symptoms or signs were obtained. It could be concluded that H. pylori can colonize in the larynx of patients with benign laryngeal diseases and laryngeal cancer. To clarify the role of H. pylori as a risk factor for laryngeal diseases further research is needed. PMID:23572292

  7. Different mechanism of vocal cord paralysis between spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA 1 and SCA 3) and multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Eiji; Naito, Rie; Kanda, Takemasa; Mizutani, Toshio; Hirai, Shunsaku

    2002-05-15

    While multiple system atrophy (MSA) is frequently associated with vocal cord paralysis (VCP) causing severe respiratory failure, it is still unknown whether hereditary types of spinocerebellar degeneration develop similar laryngeal paralysis. We analyzed the laryngeal function from the viewpoints of fiberoptic laryngoscopy and laryngeal myopathology and then attempted to clarify the difference of the mechanism of VCP among the patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA 1), type 3 (SCA 3), and MSA. Seven patients with SCA 1, nineteen with SCA 3, and eleven with MSA were studied. Vocal cord movement was analyzed by fiberoptic laryngoscopy during wakefulness and diazepam-induced sleep (sleep load test). Paraffin-embedded sections or cryosections of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles from five autopsied cases (one with SCA 1 and four with SCA 3) were histologically examined. VCP was found in two of the seven SCA 1 patients (29%), three of the nineteen SCA 3 patients (16%), and in nine of the eleven MSA patients (82%). VCP observed in SCA 1 and SCA 3 was various in the severity and showed no exacerbation on sleep load test in all of the eight patients but one SCA 3 patient. In this patient, the findings of fiberoptic laryngoscopy were quite similar to those found in MSA. All the intrinsic laryngeal muscles including cricothyroid (CT), interarytenoid (IA), and posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscles showed neurogenic atrophy in one autopsied SCA 1 and four SCA 3 patients. Our conclusion is that VCP in SCA 1 and SCA 3 contrasts with that in MSA in its occurrence, response to the sleep load test, and the distribution of the neurogenic abnormalities among the intrinsic laryngeal muscles. PMID:11997064

  8. [Vocal cord paralysis--analysis of a cohort of 400 patients].

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Pickhard, A; Smith, E; Hansch, K; Weber, T; Hoffmann, T K; Brosch, S

    2015-02-01

    Vocal cord paralysis has diverse etiologies. In the present study, vocal chord paralysis caused by surgery/trauma was present in more than two thirds of the cases, followed by primary malignancy-associated paralysis. Thyroidectomy was the most common cause in bilateral paresis, especially if performed in recurrent or malignant disease. Voice therapy was promising in pa-tients with unilateral paresis and hoarseness as main symptom. Persistent dysphonia due to insufficiency of the glottic closure led to an operative glottis restricting procedure in only 6% of cases. In almost half the patients with dyspnea as the main symp-tom of bilateral vocal cord paresis, temporary tracheotomy or surgical glottis widening procedures had to be performed. The group of idiopathic and traumatic paresis patients showed the best spontaneous recovery within the first 12 months in comparison to primary malignancy-associated paralysis, which showed no recovery of the recurrens nerve. PMID:24676872

  9. Lifestyle Changes After Laryngeal or Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer affect your emotional health? Lifestyle changes after laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer You can’ ... people want to know if there are specific lifestyle changes they can make to reduce their risk ...

  10. The effects of botulinum toxin injections into the cricopharyngeus muscle of patients with cricopharyngeus dysfunction associated with pharyngo-laryngeal weakness.

    PubMed

    Woisard-Bassols, Virginie; Alshehri, Sarah; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2013-03-01

    This prospective, open study was carried out in order to assess changes in the swallowing and dietary status after injection of Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) into the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) in a series of patients with cricopharyngeus (CP) muscle dysfunction associated with pharyngo-laryngeal weakness during at least 1 year follow-up after treatment. Patients who had a cricopharyngeus (CP) muscle dysfunction associated with pharyngo-laryngeal weakness and who were at risk for aspiration were included in the study. The upper border of the cricoid cartilage was identified and the CP muscle localized using a standard electromyogram (EMG). The dose of BoNT-A was determined depending on the results of EMG performed just before the injection. Outcomes were assessed by the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), the level of residue in the pyriform sinus and the National Institute of Health-Swallow Safety Scale (NIH-SSS) on a video fluoroscopic swallowing (VFSS) assessment, the patient's subjective impressions of their ability to swallow by the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI), and changes in dietary status by the Functional Oral Intake Scale. Eleven patients underwent the complete assessment of swallowing function at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. After the first set of treatment, seven patients had a good response and four did not respond. A significant decrease in the PAS score (p = 0.03), the amount of residue (p = 0.04) and the NIH-SSS score (p = 0.03) was observed 3 months after the injection in comparison with the first VFSS before the treatment. A relapse of dysphagia occurred in 3 out of the 11 treated patients; at 3 and 4 months for 2 patients with a Wallenberg syndrome, and at 11 months for a patient with cranial nerve paralysis after a surgery for a glomus tumor. Two of them underwent a second injection. One patient had a good response and remained stable for at least 1 year. The second did not respond either to the second injection or to a myotomy of the

  11. For Parents: Children and Teens with Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are available to answer your questions. Call toll-free 1-800-539-7309 Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm ... are people living with or impacted by paralysis. Free services and downloads > Paralysis Resource Guide Our free ...

  12. Hyperkalemic paralysis in primary adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Pandya, Himanshu V.; Dave, Nikhil; Sapre, Chinmaye M.; Chaudhary, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Hyperkalemic paralysis due to Addison's disease is rare, and potentially life-threatening entity presenting with flaccid motor weakness. This case under discussion highlights Hyperkalemic paralysis as initial symptomatic manifestation of primary adrenal insufficiency. PMID:25136192

  13. [Hypokalemic periodic paralysis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Areta-Higuera, J D; Algaba-Montes, M; Oviedo-García, A Á

    2014-01-01

    Periodic paralysis is a rare disorder that causes episodes of severe muscle weakness that can be confused with other diseases, including epilepsy or myasthenia gravis. Hyperkalemic and hypokalemic paralysis are included within these diseases, the latter being divided into periodic paralysis (familial, thyrotoxic or sporadic) and non-periodic paralysis. In this regard, we present a case of familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis in an eighteen year-old female who was diagnosed with epilepsy in childhood, as well as a subclinical hypothyroidism (for which she received replacement therapy) months ago. The diagnosis was made by the anamnesis and the confirmation of hypokalemia. PMID:24360869

  14. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF LARYNGEAL FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we have investigated laryngeal air flows by numerically solving the corresponding Navier-Stokes equations expressed in a two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system. The glottal aperture, defined by the geometry of the vocal folds was allowed to change with the v...

  15. Laryngeal obstruction by heroin packets.

    PubMed

    Colombage, Senarath M

    2003-06-01

    A 28-year-old healthy man collapsed while being arrested by the police for alleged possession of heroin and was found dead on admission to the hospital. Autopsy revealed complete occlusion of the laryngeal opening by a cellophane bag containing 24 packets of heroin powder. PMID:12773851

  16. Laryngeal dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a review and case report

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Christopher R; Vanryckeghem, Martine

    2001-01-01

    Background Laryngeal dysfunction can be a salient feature in the clinical symptomatology of speakers diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In addition to dysphonia, swallowing function is also disrupted. This paper reviews what is known about laryngeal dysfunction resulting from ALS. Results Presented is a case report of a female, diagnosed with ALS, whose initial symptoms were caused by laryngeal bulbar involvement that was characterized by dysphonia and dysphagia. Conclusions In bulbar forms of ALS, voice and/or swallowing difficulties are often the initial signs of disease. Careful examination of the muscles innervated by bulbar nerves, and tracking the rate of progressive deficit in the affected muscles, will help to solidify an accurate diagnosis. With therapy, the ability to swallow safely may still be maintained even when voice and articulation abilities are such that oral communication is inefficient. PMID:11722802

  17. Dosimetric Predictors of Laryngeal Edema

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Adapala, Prashanth; Endres, Eugene J. C; Brack, Collin; Fiorino, Claudio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Parker, Brent

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric predictors of laryngeal edema after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 66 patients were selected who had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with grossly uninvolved larynx at the time of RT, no prior major surgical operation except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, treatment planning data available for analysis, and at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from RT performed by a single observer. Both the biologically equivalent mean dose at 2 Gy per fraction and the cumulative biologic dose-volume histogram of the larynx were extracted for each patient. Laryngeal edema was prospectively scored after treatment. Time to endpoint, moderate or worse laryngeal edema (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2+), was calculated with log rank test from the date of treatment end. Results: At a median follow-up of 17.1 months (range, 0.4- 50.0 months), the risk of Grade 2+ edema was 58.9% {+-} 7%. Mean dose to the larynx, V30, V40, V50, V60, and V70 were significantly correlated with Grade 2+ edema at univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, mean laryngeal dose (continuum, hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.15; p < 0.001), and positive neck stage at RT (N0-x vs. N +, hazard ratio, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-9.58; p = 0.008) were the only independent predictors. Further stratification showed that, to minimize the risk of Grade 2+ edema, the mean dose to the larynx has to be kept {<=}43.5 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Conclusion: Laryngeal edema is strictly correlated with various dosimetric parameters; mean dose to the larynx should be kept {<=}43.5 Gy.

  18. Was Anna O.'s black snake hallucination a sleep paralysis nightmare? Dreams, memories, and trauma.

    PubMed

    Powell, R A; Nielsen, T A

    1998-01-01

    The final traumatic event recalled by Anna O. during her treatment with Josef Breuer was a terrifying hallucination she once had of a black snake attacking her ailing father. This event has been variously interpreted as indicating an underlying psychodynamic conflict, as a temporal lobe seizure, and as an hypnotic confabulation. We argue, however, that the hallucination--during which Anna O.'s arm was reportedly "asleep" due to nerve blockage--was probably a sleep paralysis nightmare. Sleep paralysis nightmares continue to be overlooked or misdiagnosed in clinical practice, and, in recent years, have been implicated in the controversy surrounding memories of trauma and sexual abuse. PMID:9823033

  19. Surgical and conservative methods for restoring impaired motor function - facial nerve, spinal accessory nerve, hypoglossal nerve (not including vagal nerve or swallowing)

    PubMed Central

    Laskawi, R.; Rohrbach, S.

    2005-01-01

    The present review gives a survey of rehabilitative measures for disorders of the motor function of the mimetic muscles (facial nerve), and muscles innervated by the spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves. The dysfunction can present either as paralysis or hyperkinesis (hyperkinesia). Conservative and surgical treatment options aimed at restoring normal motor function and correcting the movement disorders are described. Static reanimation techniques are not dealt with. The final section describes the use of botulinum toxin in the therapy of dysphagia. PMID:22073058

  20. Toward A Simulation-Based Tool for the Treatment of Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rajat; Zheng, Xudong; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Seo, Jung Hee; Xue, Qian; Bielamowicz, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Advances in high-performance computing are enabling a new generation of software tools that employ computational modeling for surgical planning. Surgical management of laryngeal paralysis is one area where such computational tools could have a significant impact. The current paper describes a comprehensive effort to develop a software tool for planning medialization laryngoplasty where a prosthetic implant is inserted into the larynx in order to medialize the paralyzed vocal fold (VF). While this is one of the most common procedures used to restore voice in patients with VF paralysis, it has a relatively high revision rate, and the tool being developed is expected to improve surgical outcomes. This software tool models the biomechanics of airflow-induced vibration in the human larynx and incorporates sophisticated approaches for modeling the turbulent laryngeal flow, the complex dynamics of the VFs, as well as the production of voiced sound. The current paper describes the key elements of the modeling approach, presents computational results that demonstrate the utility of the approach and also describes some of the limitations and challenges. PMID:21556320

  1. Influence and interactions of laryngeal adductors and cricothyroid muscles on fundamental frequency and glottal posture control

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Neubauer, Juergen; Sofer, Elazar; Berry, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles (ILMs) in controlling fundamental frequency (F0) and glottal posture remain unclear. In an in vivo canine model, three sets of intrinsic laryngeal muscles—the thyroarytenoid (TA), cricothyroid (CT), and lateral cricoarytenoid plus interarytenoid (LCA/IA) muscle complex—were independently and accurately stimulated in a graded manner using distal laryngeal nerve stimulation. Graded neuromuscular stimulation was used to independently activate these paired intrinsic laryngeal muscles over a range from threshold to maximal activation, to produce 320 distinct laryngeal phonatory postures. At phonation onset these activation conditions were evaluated in terms of their vocal fold strain, glottal width at the vocal processes, fundamental frequency (F0), subglottic pressure, and airflow. F0 ranged from 69 to 772 Hz and clustered into chest-like and falsetto-like groups. CT activation was always required to raise F0, but could also lower F0 at low TA and LCA/IA activation levels. Increasing TA activation first increased then decreased F0 in all CT and LCA/IA activation conditions. Increasing TA activation also facilitated production of high F0 at a lower onset pressure. Independent control of membranous (TA) and cartilaginous (LCA/IA) glottal closure enabled multiple pathways for F0 control via changes in glottal posture. PMID:25235003

  2. Progress in laryngeal framework surgery.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, N

    2000-03-01

    This paper reviews progress in laryngeal framework surgery since it was first reported about 25 years ago. The success of this type of surgery requires both a basic knowledge of the physiology of phonation, in order to make decisions about the surgical procedure, and surgical skill, in order to accomplish the intended procedure successfully. The main reason for hoarseness is imperfect closure of the glottis, but the second most important reason for hoarseness, increased stiffness of the vocal fold, cannot be corrected by mere medialization of the vocal fold. Laryngeal framework surgery is different in concept from conventional surgery, which is intended to remove the lesion. Controversial points discussed here regarding type I thyroplasty include: (i) whether the cartilage window should be removed; (ii) materials for fixation of the window; and (iii) comparison of type I thyroplasty with arytenoid adduction. A new surgical treatment for spasmodic dysphonia and its results in three patients are described briefly. Surgery for raising the vocal pitch requires further improvement. In the future, laryngeal framework surgery will have wider application in treatment of dysphonias, such as asthenic voice due to atrophy in professional singers or aging, pitch problems in females and gender identity disorder and spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:11603755

  3. Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, William M. Mancuso, Anthony A.; Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Werning, John W.; Amdur, Robert J.; Villaret, Douglas B.

    2007-10-01

    The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

  4. Electrophysiological properties of laryngeal motoneurones in rats submitted to chronic intermittent hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2015-01-01

    To keep an appropriate airflow to and from the lungs under physiological conditions a precise neural co-ordination of the upper airway resistance by laryngeal motoneurones in the nucleus ambiguus is essential. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), an important component of obstructive sleep apnoea, may alter these fine mechanisms. Here, using nerve and whole cell patch clamp recordings in in situ preparations of rats we investigated the effects of CIH on the respiratory control of the upper airway resistance, on the electrophysiological properties of laryngeal motoneurones in the nucleus ambiguus, and the role of carotid body (CB) afferents to the brainstem on the underlying mechanisms of these effects. CIH rats exhibited longer pre-inspiratory and lower post-inspiratory superior laryngeal nerve activities than control rats. These changes produced exaggerated glottal abduction (before inspiration) and decreased glottal adduction during post-inspiration, indicating a reduction of upper airway resistance during these respiratory phases after CIH. CB denervation abolished these changes produced by CIH. Regarding choline acetyltransferase positive-laryngeal motoneurones, CIH increased the firing frequency of inspiratory and decreased the firing frequency of post-inspiratory laryngeal motoneurones, without changes in their intrinsic electrophysiological properties. These data show that the effects of CIH on the upper airway resistance and laryngeal motoneurones activities are driven by the integrity of CB, which afferents induce changes in the central respiratory generators in the brainstem. These neural changes in the respiratory network seem to be an adaptive process required for an appropriated pulmonary ventilation and control of upper airway resistance under intermittent episodes of hypoxia. Key points The respiratory control of the glottis by laryngeal motoneurones is characterized by inspiratory abduction and post-inspiratory adduction causing decreases and

  5. Laryngeal sarcocystosis accompanying laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Cheewaruangroj, Wichit; Nitiyanant, Prawat

    2011-09-01

    Laryngeal sarcocystosis is an uncommon zoonotic coccidian protozoal infestation of human beings. The authors reviewed the pathology of 1,063 laryngeal biopsies over the past 10 years (2000 to 2009). Only one case of laryngeal sarcocystosis accompanying laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma was identified. The overall prevalence of laryngeal sarcocystosis was 0.094%. The case was a 66-year-old man who presented with voice hoarseness for six months. Physical examination and computed tomography revealed an ulcerative exophytic mass on the right true vocal cord, suggestive of laryngeal carcinoma. He underwent a right frontolateral partial laryngectomy. Histopathology showed a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma with Sarcocystis spp in the vocalis muscle. He was followed up and enrolled in speech therapy. The authors briefly review the clinicopathologic features and pathogenesis of muscular sarcocystosis and concurrent laryngeal sarcocystosis and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:22299431

  6. Respiratory paralysis in a child: The severe axonal variant of childhood Guillain-Barré syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, N.

    2015-01-01

    Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS) is a common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in children. Axonal variants of this disease are rare, and frequently life-threatening or debilitating. The course and outcome of a 17-month-old child with acute flaccid paralysis including severe respiratory involvement are presented. GBS was suspected. Nerve conduction studies demonstrated acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy including both phrenic nerves. The difficulties with the diagnosis and management of this severe and life-threatening condition are discussed. Significant morbidity is also highlighted. Axonal variants of GBS although rare cause significant morbidity in children. Diagnosis relies solely on accurate neurophysiologic testing and is important because the available treatment options for GBS are frequently ineffective in these variants. PMID:25878751

  7. [Laryngeal and larynx-associated reflexes].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Miller, S; Jungheim, M; Schroeter, S

    2016-06-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex and the pharyngoglottal closure reflex protect the trachea and lower respiratory tract against the entrance of foreign material. The laryngeal expiration reflex and the cough reflex serve to propel foreign material, which has penetrated in the cranial direction. The inspiration reflex, the sniff reflex, and the swallowing reflex are further larynx-associated reflexes. In patients with dysphagia the laryngeal adductor reflex can be clinically tested with air pulses. The water swallow test serves to show the integrity of the cough reflex. The sniff reflex is useful to test the abduction function of the vocal folds. Future studies should address laryngeal reflexes more specifically, both for a better understanding of these life-supporting mechanisms and to improve diagnostic procedures in patients with impaired laryngeal function. PMID:27240793

  8. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy may be done to help diagnose: Axon degeneration (destruction of the axon portion of the nerve cell) Damage to the ... Demyelination Inflammation of the nerve Leprosy Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis

  9. Pinched Nerve

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Pinched Nerve Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Pinched Nerve? The term "pinched nerve" is a colloquial term ...

  10. A new technique for hypoglossal-facial nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Atlas, M D; Lowinger, D S

    1997-07-01

    Hypoglossal reinnervation of the facial nerve may be required after a proximal facial nerve injury. The classic hypoglossal-facial graft procedure involves transection of the donor hypoglossal nerve, resulting in hemiglottic paralysis that, in association with paralysis of other cranial nerves, may cause speech and swallowing difficulties. Multiple lower cranial nerve palsies in conjunction with facial paralysis, as may occur after procedures such as skull base surgery, contraindicate the use of such techniques. The successful use of XII-VII "interposition jump grafts" without hemiglossal weakness has been described However, a prolonged recovery period and weaker facial reanimation have been seen. In order to attain maximum facial reinnervation while preserving hypoglossal function, we have developed a new technique of XII-VII repair. This method involves mobilization of the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve remnant, achieving a single anastomosis with the hypoglossal nerve, which has been partially incised. This technique has been used in three patients to date, with 6 to 11 months follow-up. In all cases facial tone and symmetry have been restored and voluntary facial expression accomplished. The authors conclude that by employing the techniques described highly satisfactory cosmetic and functional results may be expected, without compromising hypoglossal nerve function. PMID:9217143

  11. Occupational risk for laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, W.D.; Rothman, K.J.

    1982-04-01

    In a case-control analysis, we studied the effects of type of employment on laryngeal cancer risk using the interview data from the Third National Cancer Survey. Effects were measured relative to the risk for those employed in a group of arbitrarily defined industries and occupations with low risk. We excluded females and controlled for age, tobacco use, alcohol use, and race in the analysis. We found ratio estimates above 3.0 for workers in the railroad industry and the lumber industry; and for sheetmetal workers, grinding wheel operators, and automobile mechanics.

  12. Multifunctional laryngeal motoneurons: an intracellular study in the cat.

    PubMed

    Shiba, K; Satoh, I; Kobayashi, N; Hayashi, F

    1999-04-01

    We studied the patterns of membrane potential changes in laryngeal motoneurons (LMs) during vocalization, coughing, swallowing, sneezing, and the aspiration reflex in decerebrate paralyzed cats. LMs, identified by antidromic activation from the recurrent laryngeal nerve, were expiratory (ELMs) or inspiratory (ILMs) cells that depolarized during their respective phases in eupnea. During vocalization, most ELMs depolarized and most ILMs hyperpolarized. Some ILMs depolarized slightly during vocalization. During coughing, ELMs depolarized abruptly at the transition from the inspiratory to the expiratory phase. In one-third of ELMs, this depolarization persisted throughout the abdominal burst. In the remainder ("type A"), it was interrupted by a transient repolarization. ILMs exhibited a membrane potential trajectory opposite to that of type A ELMs during coughing. During swallowing, the membrane potential of ELMs decreased transiently at the onset of the hypoglossal burst and then depolarized strongly during the burst. ILMs hyperpolarized sharply at the onset of the burst and depolarized as hypoglossal activity ceased. During sneezing, ELMs and ILMs exhibited membrane potential changes similar to those of type A ELMs and ILMs during coughing. During the aspiration reflex, ELMs and ILMs exhibited bell-shaped hyperpolarization and depolarization trajectories, respectively. We conclude that central drives to LMs, consisting of complex combinations of excitation and inhibition, vary during vocalization and upper airway defensive reflexes. This study provides data for analysis of the neuronal networks that produce these various behaviors and analysis of network reorganization caused by changes in dynamic connections between the respiratory and nonrespiratory neuronal networks. PMID:10087084

  13. [Facial paralysis surgery. Current concepts].

    PubMed

    Robla-Costales, David; Robla-Costales, Javier; Socolovsky, Mariano; di Masi, Gilda; Fernández, Javier; Campero, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Facial palsy is a relatively common condition, from which most cases recover spontaneously. However, each year, there are 127,000 new cases of irreversible facial paralysis. This condition causes aesthetic, functional and psychologically devastating effects in the patients who suffer it. Various reconstructive techniques have been described, but there is no consensus regarding their indication. While these techniques provide results that are not perfect, many of them give a very good aesthetic and functional result, promoting the psychological, social and labour reintegration of these patients. The aim of this article is to describe the indications for which each technique is used, their results and the ideal time when each one should be applied. PMID:25498528

  14. Axillary Nerve Reconstruction: Anterior-Posterior Exposure With Sural Nerve Cable Graft Pull-Through Technique.

    PubMed

    Baltzer, Heather L; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2015-12-01

    Deltoid paralysis after axillary nerve injury results in limitations in shoulder function and stability. In the setting of an isolated axillary nerve injury with no clinical or electromyographic evidence of recovery that is within 6 to 9 months postinjury, the authors' preferred technique to reinnervate the deltoid is to reconstruct the axillary nerve with sural nerve grafting. Intraoperative neuromuscular electrophysiology is critical to determine the continuity of the axillary nerve before proceeding with reconstruction. The majority of the time, both an anterior and posterior incision and dissection of the axillary nerve is required to adequately delineate the zone of injury. This also ensures that both proximally and distally, uninjured axillary nerve is present before graft inset and also facilitates the ability to perform a meticulous microsurgical inset of the nerve graft posteriorly. The nerve graft must be pulled through from posterior to anterior to span the zone of injury and reconstruct the axillary nerve. Careful infraclavicular brachial plexus dissection is necessary to prevent further injury to components of the brachial plexus in the setting of a scarred bed. Patients will require postoperative therapy to prevent limitations in shoulder range of motion secondary to postoperative stiffness. This paper presents a detailed surgical technique for axillary nerve reconstruction by an anterior-posterior approach with a pull-through technique of a sural nerve cable graft. PMID:26524659

  15. Bilateral Diaphragmatic Paralysis in a Patient With Critical Illness Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Hung-Chen; Lin, Meng-Chih; Liaw, Mei-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) manifests as respiratory muscle weakness, and its association with critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) was rarely reported. Here, we present a patient with BDP related to CIP, who successfully avoided tracheostomy after diagnosis and management. A 71-year-old male presented with acute respiratory failure after sepsis adequately treated. Repeated intubation occurred because of carbon dioxide retention after each extubation. After eliminating possible factors, septic shock-induced respiratory muscle weakness was suspected. Physical examination, a nerve conduction study, and chest ultrasound confirmed our impression. Pulmonary rehabilitation and reconditioning exercises were arranged, and the patient was discharged with a diagnosis of BDP. The diagnosis of BDP is usually delayed, and there are only sporadic reports on its association with polyneuropathy, especially in patients with preserved limb muscle function. Therefore, when physicians encounter patients that are difficult to wean from mechanical ventilation, CIP associated with BDP should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26252301

  16. Cranial nerve injuries with supraglottic airway devices: a systematic review of published case reports and series.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatarajan, V; Van Wijk, R M; Rajbhoj, A

    2015-03-01

    Cranial nerve injuries are unusual complications of supraglottic airway use. Branches of the trigeminal, glossopharyngeal, vagus and the hypoglossal nerve may all be injured. We performed a systematic review of published case reports and case series of cranial nerve injury from the use of supraglottic airway devices. Lingual nerve injury was the most commonly reported (22 patients), followed by recurrent laryngeal (17 patients), hypoglossal (11 patients), glossopharyngeal (three patients), inferior alveolar (two patients) and infra-orbital (one patient). Injury is generally thought to result from pressure neuropraxia. Contributing factors may include: an inappropriate size or misplacement of the device; patient position; overinflation of the device cuff; and poor technique. Injuries other than to the recurrent laryngeal nerve are usually mild and self-limiting. Understanding the diverse presentation of cranial nerve injuries helps to distinguish them from other complications and assists in their management. PMID:25376257

  17. [Amyotrophic neuralgia associated with bilateral phrenic paralysis treated with non-invasive mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    García García, María Del Carmen; Hernández Borge, Jacinto; Antona Rodríguez, María José; Pires Gonçalves, Pedro; García García, Gema

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic neuralgia is an uncommon neuropathy characterized by severe unilateral shoulder pain. Isolated or concomitant involvement of other peripheral motor nerves depending on the brachial plexus such as phrenic or laryngeal nerves is unusual(1). Its etiology is unknown, yet several explanatory factors have been proposed. Phrenic nerve involvement, either unilateral or bilateral, is exceedingly rare. Diagnosis relies on anamnesis, functional and imaging investigations and electromyogram. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a past history of renal transplantation due to proliferative glomerulonephritis with subsequent transplant rejection, who was eventually diagnosed with amyotrophic neuralgia with bilateral phrenic involvement, and who required sustained non-invasive mechanical ventilation. PMID:26049960

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  19. Chondrosarcoma of the Laryngeal Thyroid Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Righi, Stefano; Boffano, Paolo; Pateras, Dimitrios; Chiodo, Domenico; Zanardi, Fabio; Patetta, Roberta

    2015-09-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the larynx is a rare tumor, accounting for 0.07% to 2% of all laryngeal cancers. Nevertheless, it represents the most frequent nonepithelial neoplasm of the laryngeal region.Laryngeal chondrosarcomas are usually characterized by slow growth and low metastatic potential.The exact etiopathogenesis of chondrosarcoma is still debated. Diagnosis can be difficult given the slow rate of growth and nonspecific patient symptoms at presentation.Because of its rarity, literature about laryngeal chondrosarcoma is mainly made up of case reports and small case series.Therefore, it is important to add any information regarding this pathology.The aim of this article was to present and discuss a new case of chondrosarcoma located in the thyroid cartilage in a 63-year-old woman. PMID:26267570

  20. Laryngeal Reflexes: Physiology, Technique and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the current level of knowledge and techniques available for the study of laryngeal reflexes. Overall, the larynx is under constant control of several systems (including respiration, swallowing and cough) as well as sensory-motor reflex responses involving glossopharyngeal, pharyngeal, laryngeal and tracheobronchial sensory receptors. Techniques for the clinical assessment of these reflexes are emerging and need to be examined for sensitivity and specificity in identifying laryngeal sensory disorders. Quantitative assessment methods for the diagnosis of sensory reductions as well as sensory hypersensitivity may account for laryngeal disorders such as chronic cough, paradoxical vocal fold disorder and muscular tension dysphonia. The development of accurate assessment techniques could improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these disorders. PMID:26241237

  1. Two Cases of the Laryngeal Cystic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Takeshi; Wada, Ryo; Homma, Hirotomo; Kidokoro, Yoshinobu; Yanai, Aya; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    We experienced two rare cases with laryngeal cystic lesions (laryngocele and laryngeal cyst). In the first case, the laryngocele case was removed by laryngomicrosurgery using an oral approach under general anesthesia. In the second case, the magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dumbbell-type cyst with mucus widely extending from the laryngeal lumen to the neck through the thyroid cartilage. The patient had undergone chemotherapy for renal carcinoma with multiple lung and bone metastases. Therefore, we performed only fine needle aspiration rather than aggressive surgery for extirpation of the cyst using an external approach. This fine needle aspiration could improve the quality of life by decreasing both the left laryngeal swelling and the resulting pain, which were the chief complaints. PMID:27162605

  2. Dynamic 320-slice CT larynx for detection and management of idiopathic bilateral vocal cord paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Laurence E; Lau, Kenneth K; Low, Kathy; Crossett, Marcus; Vallance, Neil; Bardin, Philip G

    2014-03-01

    Idiopathic bilateral vocal cord paralysis (VCP) is a rare and difficult condition often undiagnosed and frequently confused with asthma and other respiratory conditions. Accurate diagnosis is crucial since 80% of cases patients require surgical intervention, such as tracheostomy or laser surgery, to relieve symptoms. The "gold standard" for diagnosing VCP has been laryngoscopy. In this case study, we demonstrate for the first time that idiopathic bilateral VCP can be accurately diagnosed by means of a novel noninvasive methodology: dynamic volume 320-slice computed tomography larynx. Three-dimensional reconstruction of laryngeal motion during the breathing cycle permitted functional assessment of the larynx showing absence of vocal cord movements. The new methodology may be valuable for noninvasive diagnosis of vocal cord movement disorders before and for follow-up after surgery. PMID:25473555

  3. Laryngitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling and irritation (inflammation) of the voice box (larynx). The problem is most often associated with hoarseness ... The voice box (larynx) is located at the top of the airway to the lungs (trachea). The larynx contains the vocal cords. When ...

  4. Laryngitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015: ... et al. Clinical practice guideline: hoarseness (dysphonia). Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2009;141(3 Suppl 2):S1-S31. ...

  5. Intralesional Cidofovir application in recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Pudszuhn, Annett; Welzel, Cornelia; Bloching, Marc; Neumann, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis is a benign disease of the larynx often leading to organic and functional restrictions. The therapeutic treatment of choice in larynx-obstructing papillomatosis is at present surgical laser ablation. The effectiveness of adjuvant intralesional injection of the virustaticum Cidofovir has been investigated recently in a variety of therapeutic models. The present case study deals with the treatment of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis by means of surgical laser ablation of the laryngeal papillomas with adjuvant local injection of the virustaticum Cidofovir (dose of 5 mg/1 ml). Within the period from October 2001 to August 2004, ten patients aged between 5- and 70 years were treated with intralesional injections of Cidofovir. Papillomatosis was confirmed histologically in all cases, and the virus types were defined in part. Each of the patients underwent clinical-phoniatric examinations and was photographed for documentation. After 2-7 treatments with surgical laser papilloma ablation and intralesional Cidofovir injections, all patients showed a definite papilloma reduction, while in six cases complete remission was achieved. During the follow-up period of 8-30 months, not a single recurrence of the laryngeal papillomatosis occurred. In the majority of patients, a clear improvement in the voice was achieved. There were no local or systemic side effects caused by the virustaticum. Intralesional injection of Cidofovir is an adjuvant, but not a curative therapeutic option in recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Remission of previously frequently recurrent laryngeal papillomas can be achieved, but recurrence after longer treatment-free intervals is also possible. PMID:17058091

  6. Laryngeal release with slide tracheoplasty for long-segment congenital tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Komori, Koji; Toma, Miki; Shimojima, Naoki; Yamamoto, Yuki; Uto, Keiichi; Ogata, Satsuki; Kano, Motohiro; Hirobe, Seiichi

    2015-10-01

    Slide tracheoplasty is a standard treatment for long-segment congenital tracheal stenosis (LCTS). However, in severe cases of LCTS, aggressive divisions of inferior constrictor muscle from the thyroid cartilage and extensive circumferential dissection of the upper tracheal segment are often necessary to mobilize the upper tracheal segment enough to make an anastomosis, but they increase the risks of anastomotic dehiscence, recurrent nerve injury, and impaired deglutition. Alternatively, laryngeal release provides safe mobilization of the upper tracheal segment, minimizing dissection of the inferior constrictor muscle and preserving the lateral tissue pedicle without circumferential dissection. We successfully performed laryngeal release with slide tracheoplasty on six patients with severe LCTS, and report our findings. PMID:24113995

  7. Neuronal Activation in the Medulla Oblongata during Selective Elicitation of the Laryngeal Adductor Response

    PubMed Central

    Ambalavanar, Ranjinidevi; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Selbie, W. Scott; Ludlow, Christy L.

    2008-01-01

    Swallow and cough are complex motor patterns elicited by rapid and intense electrical stimulation of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN). The laryngeal adductor response (LAR) includes only a laryngeal response, is elicited by single stimuli to the ISLN, and is thought to represent the brain stem pathway involved in laryngospasm. To identify which regions in the medulla are activated during elicitation of the LAR alone, single electrical stimuli were presented once every 2 s to the ISLN. Two groups of 5 cats each were studied; an experimental group with unilateral ISLN stimulation at 0.5 Hz and a surgical control group. Three additional cats were studied to evaluate whether other oral, pharyngeal or respiratory muscles were activated during ISLN stimulation eliciting LAR. We quantified up to 22 sections for each of 14 structures in the medulla to determine if regions had increased Fos-like immunoreactive neurons in the experimental group. Significant increases (p <0.0033) occurred with unilateral ISLN stimulation in the interstitial subnucleus, the ventrolateral subnucleus, the commissural subnucleus of the nucleus tractus solitarius, the lateral tegmental field of the reticular formation, the area postrema and the nucleus ambiguus. Neither the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, usually active for swallow, nor the nucleus retroambiguus, retrofacial nucleus, or the lateral reticular nucleus, usually active for cough, were active with elicitation of the laryngeal adductor response alone. The results demonstrate that the laryngeal adductor pathway is contained within the broader pathways for cough and swallow in the medulla. PMID:15212423

  8. Sleep paralysis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Wing, Y K; Chiu, H; Leung, T; Ng, J

    1999-06-01

    Isolated sleep paralysis (SP) is a common sleep phenomenon that is highly colored by indigenous beliefs. In Hong Kong Chinese, the 'ghost oppression phenomenon' (GO) has been shown to be descriptively identical to SP. The prevailing concept is that the majority of cases with SP have their onset during adolescence, but the lack of any systematic study on an older population means that late-onset cases can not be excluded. In a study investigating the prevalence of mental disorders in Chinese elderly aged above 70 y in Hong Kong, we employed the revised GO questionnaire to study the prevalence of SP in this group of elderly as well. One hundred and fifty-eight subjects were finally analyzed for the study. Almost 18% (95% C.I. 11.77%, 23.68%) of the subjects reported experiences of GO. Their description of the features of GO showed striking similarity to those of SP. There was a clear bimodal distribution of onset of GO with peaks during adolescence and after age 60 y. At least one-third of the cases were late onset. In concordance with the rapid eye movement (REM)/wakefulness dissociation hypothesis of SP, those elderly with GO+ experiences also had more frequent nocturnal sleep disturbances. A family history was reported in 10% of subjects. PMID:10389097

  9. Medialization vs. Reinnervation for Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis: A Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paniello, Randal C.; Edgar, Julia D.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Vocal fold medialization laryngoplasty (ML) and laryngeal reinnervation (LR) as treatments for unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) were compared in a multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial. Methods Previously untreated patients with UVFP were randomized to undergo either ML or LR. Voice results were compared pre-treatment and at 6 and 12 months post-treatment using perceptual ratings by untrained listeners (RUL), blinded speech pathologist GRBAS scores, and voice-related quality of life (VRQOL) scores. Other secondary data included maximum phonation time (MPT), cepstral analysis, and EMG findings. Results 24 patients from 9 sites completed the study, 12 in each group. There were no significant intergroup differences in pre-treatment variables. At 12 months, both study groups showed significant improvement in RUL, GRBAS and VRQOL scores, but no significant differences were found between the two groups. However, patient age significantly affected the LR, but not the ML, group results. The age<52 LR subgroup had significantly (p<0.05) better scores than the age>52 LR subgroup, and had better RUL and GRBAS scores than the age<52 ML subgroup. The age>52 ML subgroup results were significantly better than the age>52 LR subgroup. The secondary data generally followed the primary data, except that the MPTs for the ML patients were significantly longer than for the LR patients. Conclusion ML and LR are both effective surgical options for patients with UVFP. Laryngeal reinnervation should be considered in younger patients, while medialization laryngoplasty should be favored in older patients. PMID:21898419

  10. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  11. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve bundles (fascicles) ... two neurons, it must first be converted to a chemical signal, which then crosses a space of ...

  12. What's New in Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional resources for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers What’s new in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers research and treatment? ... to better tests for early detection and to new targeted treatments. Chemoprevention Chemoprevention is the use of ...

  13. What Are the Key Statistics about Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers? What are the key statistics about laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers? The American Cancer ... 000 cancers will start in the hypopharynx. Survival statistics for these cancers are discussed in “ Survival rates ...

  14. Coonhound paralysis. Further clinical studies and electron microscopic observations.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J F; de Lahunta, A; Holmes, D F; Schultz, R D

    1982-01-01

    Prior study of coonhound paralysis (CHP) revealed an acute polyradiculoneuritis in raccoon-hunting dogs with clinical and pathologic features resembling those of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). In the present series of five cases, the clinical features were investigated with emphasis on electrodiagnostic and CSF findings, and pathologic changes were evaluated with both the light and electron microscope. The demonstration of motor nerve conduction delay and CSF albuminocytologic dissociation in affected dogs further supported the clinical similarity of CHP and GBS. As in GBS, affected roots and nerves contained mononuclear cell infiltrates, segmental myelin changes and axon degeneration. Despite these general pathologic similarities, the present study suggested that axon damage was a more consistent finding in CHP than in GBS. In contrast to ultrastructural findings in GBS, the demyelinating process in CHP did not appear dependent upon macrophages for its initiation. Swelling, separation and vesiculation of myelin occurred around axons of reduced diameter often in the absence of proximate macrophages. Macrophages, rather than initiating demyelination, appeared to be superimposed on existing damage. In this regard, the observed changes resembled those reported in galactocerebroside-induced EAN and sera-mediated in vivo demyelination. PMID:7072488

  15. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis or Laryngeal Papillomatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2011 Download PDF version Order free publications Find organizations Related Topics Dysphagia Hoarseness Vocal Fold Paralysis News New model could help identify root cause of swallowing disorder: Findings may 'change the landscape' of dysphagia intervention University of Missouri ( ...

  16. Facial diplegia, pharyngeal paralysis, and ophthalmoplegia after a timber rattlesnake envenomation.

    PubMed

    Madey, Jason J; Price, Amanda B; Dobson, Joseph V; Stickler, David E; McSwain, S David

    2013-11-01

    The timber rattlesnake, also known as Crotalus horridus, is well known to cause significant injury from toxins stored within its venom. During envenomation, toxic systemic effects immediately begin to cause damage to many organ systems including cardiovascular, hematologic, musculoskeletal, respiratory, and neurologic. One defining characteristic of the timber rattlesnake is a specific neurotoxin called crotoxin, or the "canebrake toxin," which is a potent β-neurotoxin affecting presynaptic nerves that can cause paralysis by inhibiting appropriate neuromuscular transmission. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old boy bitten twice on his calf by a timber rattlesnake, who presented with a life-threatening envenomation and suffered multisystem organ failure as well as a prominent presynaptic neurotoxicity resulting in facial diplegia, pharyngeal paralysis, and ophthalmoplegia. PMID:24196093

  17. Restoration of prehensile function for motor paralysis in Hopkins syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Satbhai, Nilesh G; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Sotetsu

    2014-02-01

    Hopkins syndrome is a rare cause of poliomyelitis-like paralysis affecting 1 or more extremities after an acute attack of asthma. The exact etiology of Hopkins syndrome is not known. A 4-year-old girl developed acute asthma followed by complete flaccid paralysis of the left upper extremity. She underwent staged reconstruction using the double free muscle transfer technique. Rigorous postoperative physiotherapy was carried out to achieve a good functional outcome. At recent follow-up, 27 months after the first procedure, the patient was able to effectively use the reconstructed hand for most daily activities. She had good control and could perform 2-handed activities. The selection of a suitable operative treatment and suitable donor nerves is critical, and there are no clear guidelines in the literature. The double free muscle transfer can be effectively employed in similar cases to restore grasping function. PMID:24480689

  18. Hypokalemic paralysis in a professional bodybuilder.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Florian B; Domanovits, Hans; Laggner, Anton N

    2012-09-01

    Severe hypokalemia is a potentially life-threatening disorder and is associated with variable degrees of skeletal muscle weakness, even to the point of paralysis. On rare occasions, diaphragmatic paralysis from hypokalemia can lead to respiratory arrest. There may also be decreased motility of smooth muscle, manifesting with ileus or urinary retention. Rarely, severe hypokalemia may result in rhabdomyolysis. Other manifestations of severe hypokalemia include alteration of cardiac tissue excitability and conduction. Hypokalemia can produce electrocardiographic changes such as U waves, T-wave flattening, and arrhythmias, especially if the patient is taking digoxin. Common causes of hypokalemia include extrarenal potassium losses (vomiting and diarrhea) and renal potassium losses (eg, hyperaldosteronism, renal tubular acidosis, severe hyperglycemia, potassium-depleting diuretics) as well as hypokalemia due to potassium shifts (eg, insulin administration, catecholamine excess, familial periodic hypokalemic paralysis, thyrotoxic hypokalemic paralysis). Although the extent of diuretic misuse in professional bodybuilding is unknown, it may be regarded as substantial. Hence, diuretics must always be considered as a cause of hypokalemic paralysis in bodybuilders. PMID:21871759

  19. [Hypokalemic periodic paralysis provoked by "Ambene"].

    PubMed

    Wessel, K; Schumm, F; Peiffer, J; Schlote, W

    1985-12-01

    The case of a 42-year-old man is reported, who on four occasions developed a hypokalaemic periodic paralysis after an intramuscular injection of "Ambene". The detailed examination of this patient shows, that it is the primary, autosomal dominant inherited form of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis, and not the secondary form, which is caused by a renal or gastrointestinal loss of potassium. Clinical and electrophysiological, as well as histopathological and electron microscopic findings are presented, showing the typical vacuolar myopathy with submicroscopic tubular structures. In the literature there is evidence for an increased sensitivity of the muscle membrane to insulin with an increased potassium-shift inside the cell in hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. "Ambene" is a combination, which contains amongst other substances dexamethasone and the local anaesthetic drug lidocain. In the present case the paresis was possibly caused by a combined effect of dexamethasone with a consequent hyperglycaemia and lidocain with a change in the excitability of the muscle membrane. The pathophysiological mechanism of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis is discussed in terms of the release by the combination of these two drugs. It has not previously been reported that "Ambene" can provoke a hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. This is a severe side effect because of the resulting cardiac and respiratory problems. PMID:2936967

  20. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Mohamad R.; Samuels, Stuart E.; Bellile, Emily; Shalabi, Firas L.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP), composite nodal volumes (GTVN) and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC) had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance. PMID:26569309

  1. Laryngeal aspergilloma: a complication of inhaled fluticasone therapy for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Darley, David; Lowinger, David; Plit, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    Primary laryngeal aspergillosis in immunocompetent patients is rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old woman with laryngeal aspergillosis thought to be secondary to long-term inhaled fluticasone therapy. Laryngeal aspergillosis may be an underrecognized complication of inhaled corticosteroid therapy. PMID:25530858

  2. Lip Forces and Chewing Efficiency in Children with Peripheral Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Cristea, Alexandru; Dudescu, Cristian M; Hurubeanu, Lucia; Vâjâean, Cosmin; Albu, Silviu; Câmpian, Radu S

    2015-08-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis is accompanied by facial motor disorders and also, by oral dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the lip forces and chewing efficiency in a group of children with peripheral facial paralysis. The degree of peripheral facial paralysis in the study group (n 11) was assessed using the House-Brackmann scale. The control group consisted of 21 children without facial nerve impairment. To assess lip forces, acrylic vestibular plates of three sizes were used: large (LVP), medium (MVP) and small (SVP). The lip force was recorded with a force transducer coupled with the data acquisition system. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated by the ability to mix two differently colored chewing gums. The images were processed with Adobe Photoshop CS3 (Delaware Corporation, San Jose, California, United States) and the number of pixels was quantified with the Image J software (DHHS/NIH/NIMH/RSB, Maryland, United States). For statistical analysis, the following statistical analysis were used: Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression analysis, multiple logistic regression analysis, and optimal cutoff values for muscular dysfunction. There were statistically significant differences between lip forces in the following three groups: p=0.01 (LVP), p=0.01 (MVP), and p=0.008 (SVP). The cutoff values of lip forces in the study group were as follows: 7.08 N (LVP), 4.89 N (MVP), and 4.24 N (SVP). There were no statistically significant differences between the masticatory efficiency in the two groups (p=0.25). Lip forces were dependent on the degree of peripheral facial paralysis and age, but not on gender. In peripheral facial paralysis in children, a significant decrease of lip forces, but not masticatory efficiency, occurs. PMID:25974875

  3. Pre-clinical evaluation of a minimally invasive laryngeal pacemaker system in mini-pig.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Gerhard; Arnold, Dirk; Bischoff, Sabine; Boltze, Karsten; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Schubert, Harald; Mueller, Andreas H

    2016-01-01

    Microlaryngoscopic enlargement techniques have been the standard treatment for bilateral vocal fold paralysis (BVFP) for decades. Laryngeal pacing is a promising alternative treatment based on the electrostimulation of the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle. This paper reports on the results of a pre-clinical study aiming to evaluate this method. Eight Göttingen mini-pigs were implanted with a laryngeal pacemaker (LP) implant prototype and with two LP electrodes, one in each PCA muscle. The 6-week follow-up included endoscopic stimulation controls in general anaesthesia and radiographic controls of electrode integrity and position stability. Stimulation parameters for optimal glottal opening were evaluated via videolaryngoscopy. Histopathology was performed upon conclusion of the study. 7/8 (87.5 %) animals were successfully implanted with the LP implant prototype and two LP electrodes. In general, stimulation was effectively delivered and correlated with the expected PCA muscle activation. 2/14 (14.3 %) electrodes dislocated and 1/14 (7.1 %) electrode tip broke. The LP system used in this experiment to induce vocal fold abduction by means of selective functional electrical stimulation of the PCA showed promising results. It may be a valid alternative to the current golden standard for BVFP treatment. Clinical studies are needed to confirm the medical relevance of the LP. PMID:26264908

  4. Literature study on clinical treatment of facial paralysis in the last 20 years using Web of Science

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Feng, Ling; Du, Liang; Zhang, Anxiang; Tang, Tian

    2012-01-01

    only other year during the study period saw such a drop is 1993. Specifically, there are 192 published articles on facial paralysis treated by rehabilitation in the past two decades, far more than the output of physiotherapy treatment. Physiotherapy treatment scored only 25 articles including acupuncture treatment, with over 80% of these written by Chinese researchers and clinicians. Ranked by regions, USA is by far the most productive country in terms of the number of publications on facial paralysis rehabilitation and physiotherapy research. Seeing from another angle, the journals that focus on otolaryngology published the most number of articles in rehabilitation and physiotherapy studies, whereas most acupuncture studies on facial paralysis were published in the alternative and complementary medicine journals. CONCLUSION: Study of facial paralysis remains an area of active investigation and innovation. Further clinical studies in humans addressing the use of growth factors or stem cells continue to successful facial nerve regeneration. PMID:25767492

  5. Isolated unilateral idiopathic transient hypoglossal nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Viqar; Akram, Muhammad Saqub

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old Caucasian man presented with sudden onset of difficulty in moving his tongue to the left with preceding left-sided headache with no neck pain. Earlier, he had self-limiting chest infection without rashes or tonsillar enlargement. His medical and surgical history was unremarkable with no recent trauma. Oral examination revealed difficulty in protruding his tongue to the left with muscle bulk loss and fasciculation on the same side, suggesting left hypoglossal nerve palsy. Examination of the rest of the cranial nerves and nervous system was normal. The patient's oropharyngeal and laryngeal examination was unremarkable with no cervical lymphadenopathy. He had normal laboratory investigations and cerebrospinal fluid examination. Extensive imaging of the head, neck and chest failed to reveal any pathology. Further review by an otorhinologist and rheumatologist ruled out any other underlying pathology. He made a good recovery without treatment. English literature search revealed very few cases of idiopathic, transient, unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy. PMID:24969070

  6. [The review of transoral laser microsurgery in laryngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Wang, Jihua; Xiao, Xuping

    2016-02-01

    Transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) has developed more than 40 years in the treatment of laryngeal cancer. TLM is especially important in the minimally invasive surgery of laryngeal carcinoma. Compared with the traditional open surgery, it is a major breakthrough, which has the significant advantages such as safety, effectiveness, low rate of local recurrence and high rate of larynx preservation. Not only can cure early laryngeal cancer, but also more and more the use of TLM in advanced supraglottic and glottic laryngeal cancer were reported. This article will review the characteristics, indications, superiority, surgical options and efficacy of the TLM in laryngeal carcinomas. PMID:27373106

  7. Challenges in the Management of Laryngeal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Satish; Nilakantan, Ajith; Sood, Amit; Gupta, Atul; Gupta, Abhishek

    2016-09-01

    Laryngeal stenosis is one of the most complex and challenging problems in the field of head and neck surgery. The management involves a multidisciplinary approach with multiple complex procedures. In this study we discuss our experience of laryngeal stenosis with regards to patient characteristics, cause and management. A retrospective analysis of 35 patients of laryngeal stenosis treated at a tertiary care centre was evaluated. Inclusion criteria were all patients with laryngeal stenosis who required surgical intervention. Exclusion criteria were patients with associated tracheal stenosis and laryngeal stenosis due to cancer. Demographic data was recorded and findings relating to aetiology, characteristics of stenosis and the various aspects of therapeutic procedures performed are discussed with review of literature. Among 35 patients, 24 were males and 11 females of the age group 2-79 years. 2 (5.7 %) patients had supraglottic stenosis, 11 (31.4 %) had glottis stenosis, 16 (45.7 %) had subglottic stenosis and 6 (17.1 %) had combined multiple sites stenosis. Each patient underwent an average of 3.22 surgical procedures like microlaryngoscopy and excision with cold instrument, CO2 laser excision or open procedures like laryngofissure and excision and laryngoplasty. Montgomery t tube insertion was a common procedure in 17 patients (48.6 %). Of the total 35 patients with severe LS, 27 (77.1 %) patients were successfully decanulated. The results of glottic (100 %) and supraglottic stenosis (100 %) are excellent as compared to subglottic (68.8 %) and combined stenosis (50 %) of multiple sites. Laryngeal stenosis with airway compromise causes significant morbidity to the patients and is a difficult condition to treat in both adult and pediatric population. The need for multiple surgical procedures is common in the treatment of laryngeal stenosis with the t-tube being an important aid in the management of this condition. Trauma especially post intubation

  8. [Diagnosis and therapy of laryngitis gastrica].

    PubMed

    Pahn, J; Schlottmann, A; Witt, G; Wilke, W

    2000-07-01

    We treated 64 patients with the diagnosis of laryngitis gastrica with Antra (Omeprazol) in doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg. To determine the success of the therapy, pH monitoring of the esophagus and hypopharynx, the voice status and measurement of vocal penetrating capacity were used. The results prove that a 20-mg dose of Antra is suitable for the therapy of laryngitis gastrica with a high rate of success. Problems which arose during the investigation, consequent changes of the original concept of the project as well as new aspects and questions which resulted from this are discussed with respect to further investigation. PMID:10955230

  9. Laryngeal Leishmaniasis with Extra-pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Swati; Khatiwada, Saurav; Sehrawat, Priyanka; Nischal, Neeraj; Jorwal, Pankaj; Soneja, Manish; Sharma, M C; Sharma, S K; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Anup

    2015-09-01

    Clinical presentations of Leishmania infection include visceral (most common form), cutaneous, mucocutaneous, mucosal and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. Mucosal form of leishmaniasis mostly involves oral and nasal mucosa. Rarely, laryngeal and pharyngeal mucosa may also be involved. Its concomitant presence with tuberculosis (TB), a disease rampant in India, is uncommon. Here we are reporting a case of isolated laryngeal leishmaniasis associated with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), with approach to diagnosis and treatment in a tropical resource-limited setting. PMID:27608871

  10. Hyperkalaemic paralysis--a bizarre presentation of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cumberbatch, G L; Hampton, T J

    1999-05-01

    Paralysis due to hyperkalaemia is rare and the diagnosis may be overlooked in the first instance. However it is rapidly reversible and so long as electro-cardiography and serum potassium measurement are urgently done in all patients presenting with paralysis, it will not be missed. A case of hyperkalaemic paralysis is described and a review of the emergency management discussed. PMID:10353058