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1

Anemias.  

PubMed

Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia. PMID:24267278

Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

2013-12-01

2

Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... don't get enough iron in their diets. Iron Deficiency Anemia Iron deficiency anemia is the most ... your body's iron stores. Back Continue Getting Enough Iron Some people feel sick if they take an ...

3

Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... 3 million Americans. Jump To: The Role of Red Blood Cells in Anemia Red blood cells carry hemoglobin, an iron-rich protein ... Anemia occurs when you do not have enough red blood cells or when your red blood cells ...

4

Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... system problems) Long-term (chronic) diseases such as chronic kidney disease, cancer, ulcerative colitis, or rheumatoid arthritis Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which ...

5

Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

6

Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... transfusions, they are rarely used to treat anemia. Blood transfusion used to be the only treatment for severe ... with erythropoietin, or, in rare cases, with a blood transfusion. Back to Fact Sheet Categories The AIDS InfoNet ...

7

Marzo de 2012 Lucha contra la anemia  

E-print Network

N° 399 Marzo de 2012 Lucha contra la anemia: una estrategia más eficaz Scientific news Actualidad cientifica Actualité scientifique La carencia de hierro y la anemia1 que ésta puede provocar constituyen un. África y la India registran los mayores índices de anemia, con casi un 50% de las mujeres afectadas. En

8

About Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... as citrus fruits, green vegetables, and fortified cereals. Anemia also can develop if the bone marrow is not working properly. This may be because of an infection or a chronic illness, such as arthritis or kidney disease. In rare cases, someone might be born without ...

9

Sickle cell anemia - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association - www.ascaa.org/ National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute - www. ...

10

Iron deficiency anemia  

MedlinePLUS

Anemia - iron deficiency ... Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia. Red blood cells bring oxygen to the ... such as your spleen, remove old blood cells. Iron is a key part of red blood cells. ...

11

Anemia (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... of inherited hemolytic anemia include sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, and hereditary ... children is born with this form of anemia. Thalassemia , which usually affects people of Mediterranean, African, and ...

12

What Causes Aplastic Anemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: Next >> Featured Video ...

13

What Causes Anemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... red blood cells to cause anemia. Lack of Red Blood Cell Production Both acquired and inherited conditions ... also can cause aplastic anemia. High Rates of Red Blood Cell Destruction Both acquired and inherited conditions ...

14

Sickle Cell Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... do not have the disease itself. What Is Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is a blood disorder that ... NIH) recommends that all newborns be screened for sickle cell disease, and testing at birth is now required in ...

15

Age, anemia, and fatigue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many conditions that would not be considered normal in a younger population are routinely accepted in older people as a part of so-called “normal” aging. Among these conditions are many chronic and debilitating conditions such as chronic pain, insomnia, weakness, fatigue, and anemia. This article reviews current evidence regarding the relationships among age, fatigue, weakness, anemia, and erythropoiesis. Anemia in

Matti S. Aapro; David Cella; Martin Zagari

2002-01-01

16

Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia  

PubMed Central

The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particularly helpful in distinguishing iron deficiency from thalassemia minor. Significant changes have occurred in the laboratory evaluation of macrocytic anemia, and a new syndrome of nitrous oxide-induced megaloblastosis and neurologic dysfunction has been recognized. A suggested approach to the hemolytic anemias includes using the micro-Coombs' test and ektacytometry. Finally, a number of causes have been identified for normocytic anemia without reticulocytosis, including normocytic megaloblastic anemia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3577135

Wallerstein, Ralph O.

1987-01-01

17

Genetics Home Reference: Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... on Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia alpha thalassemia atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome beta thalassemia Coats plus syndrome congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Diamond-Blackfan ...

18

Iron deficiency anemia.  

PubMed

Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z; Webb, Jinelle A; Giger, Urs

2012-03-01

19

Inborn anemias in mice  

SciTech Connect

hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

1981-06-01

20

Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

1985-01-01

21

Sickle Cell Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

22

Anemia: determining the cause.  

PubMed

Anemia is a common finding in small animal practice; however, the multitude of potential causes can make determining the underlying diagnosis a challenging and frustrating endeavor. With a basic understanding of red blood cell production and a systematic diagnostic approach, clinicians should be able to clearly define the cause of anemia in most cases. PMID:22692674

Fleischman, Wendy

2012-06-01

23

Anemia of renal disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient group It is estimated that 15–30% of geriatric cats will develop chronic kidney disease (CKD), and that 30–65% of these cats will develop anemia as their renal disease worsens. Anemia of renal disease is multifactorial in its pathogenesis, but the main cause is reduced production of erythropoietin, a renal hormone that controls the bone marrow's production of red blood

Cathy E. Langston; Adam Eatroff

2011-01-01

24

MEGALOBLASTIC AND OTHER MACROCYTIC ANEMIA  

E-print Network

9/16/2013 1 MEGALOBLASTIC AND OTHER MACROCYTIC ANEMIA MACROCYTOSIS MCV > 100 fL MCHC ­ Normal False) Absorption Transport VITAMIN B 12 DEFICIENCY Pernicious Anemia Shilling Test Other Causes of Malabsorption Oral Parenteral ­ Pernicious Anemia OTHER MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIAS Drugs Enzyme Deficiencies Congenital

25

Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Topics and Titles : Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease On this page: What is anemia? How is ... carry oxygen throughout the body. [ Top ] What causes anemia in chronic kidney disease? When kidneys are diseased or damaged, they do ...

26

Anemia in Frailty  

PubMed Central

Synopsis While anemia is regarded as a relatively common occurrence in older adults, the vigor with which the medical community should intervene to correct this common problem is disputed. Epidemiologic data clearly correlate anemia with functional decline, disability and mortality. Anemia may contribute to functional decline by restricting oxygen delivery to muscle, or to cognitive decline by restricting oxygen delivery to the brain. On the other hand, the erythron may be a separate target of the same biological mediators that influence deterioration of physiologic systems that contribute to weakness, functional and cognitive decline and mortality. Clinical trials aimed to treat anemia in older adults could assess whether physical performance is improved or whether mortality risk declines with improved hemoglobin, but sufficient evidence from such trials is currently lacking. With few guidelines regarding treatment for older adults and significant risk for adverse events associated with transfusion and erythroid stimulating agents (ESA), anemia often goes untreated or ignored in geriatric clinics. This article reviews the problem of anemia in older adults, with a particular emphasis on the frail elderly. We will review the gaps in our evidence base for the treatment of anemia in older adults and assess options for advancing the field. PMID:21093723

Roy, Cindy N.

2010-01-01

27

Anemia in the Elderly  

PubMed Central

As the population ages, increasing attention has become focused on the prevalence of anemia in elderly individuals. Anemia occurs in more than 10% of individuals who are older than the age of 65 years, and it increases to more than 50% in individuals who are older than the age of 80 years. Although the anemia is typically mild and unlikely to result in symptoms, it is uniformly associated with increased morbidity and mortality as assessed in large cohort studies. Anemia is an independent predictor of these adverse outcomes both in healthy community-dwelling subjects and in patients with significant co-morbidities. Efforts to understand the pathophysiology of anemia in this population, especially the one third of patients with “unexplained” anemia, have focused on the potential contributions of inflammatory pathways, erythropoietin resistance, and changes in hematopoietic stem cells to the age-dependent decrease in red cell mass. We would argue that these pathways are closely interrelated and combine to lead to anemia in aging individuals. This brief review summarizes the current understanding of this entity and our studies aimed at further delineating its pathophysiology. PMID:23874029

Berliner, Nancy

2013-01-01

28

Iron-Deficiency Anemia  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste ... Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow- ...

29

Cooley's Anemia Foundation  

MedlinePLUS

Cooley's Anemia Foundation Leading the Fight against Thalassemia About Us Mission/Purpose History Medical Research Board/Staff Contact the Foundation U.S. Patients: Register for Information Learn about Thalassemia About Thalassemia Clinical ...

30

Anemia in the Newborn  

MedlinePLUS

... mother's abdomen when the umbilical cord is clamped. Twin-to-twin transfusions, in which blood flows from one fetus to the other, can cause anemia in one twin and too much blood (polycythemia) in the other ...

31

[Heart failure and anemia].  

PubMed

Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available. PMID:23900390

Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

2013-09-01

32

How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?  

MedlinePLUS

... medicines rituximab and cyclosporine. If you have severe sickle cell anemia , your doctor may recommend a medicine ... hemoglobin that newborns have. In people who have sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin helps prevent red blood ...

33

What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disease. ... can also raise the risk for infection. Sickle Cell Trait People who inherit a sickle hemoglobin gene ...

34

Facts about Diamond Blackfan Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare blood disorder ...

35

Anemia and inflammatory bowel diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Too often anemia,is considered,a rare or unimportant manifestation,in inflammatory,bowel,disease,(IBD). However, over the last 10 years a number of studies have been conducted,and the most relevant conclusions obtained are: (1) anemia,is quite common,in IBD; (2) although,in many,cases anemia,parallels the clinical activity of the disease, many patients in remission have anemia, and iron, vitamin B12 and\\/or folic acid deficiency; (3) anemia,

Fernando Gomollón; Javier P Gisbert

2009-01-01

36

Living with Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... and young children have a greater need for iron because of their rapid growth. Not enough iron can lead to anemia. Premature and low-birth- ... only or formula that isn't fortified with iron, especially after the child is 6 months old. ...

37

Aplastic Anemia, Pediatric Aspects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFs) comprise at least one-fourth of children with aplastic ane- mia, and perhaps up to 10% of adults. The most common syndrome is Fanconi's anemia (FA), with more than 1,000 reported cases. FA is autosomal recessive, with birth defects in ~75% of patients. It is a DNA repair syn- drome, diagnosed by finding chromosomal aberrations

BLANCHE P. A LTER

38

Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

Christy, Steven C.

39

Anemia and inflammatory bowel diseases  

PubMed Central

Too often anemia is considered a rare or unimportant manifestation in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, over the last 10 years a number of studies have been conducted and the most relevant conclusions obtained are: (1) anemia is quite common in IBD; (2) although in many cases anemia parallels the clinical activity of the disease, many patients in remission have anemia, and iron, vitamin B12 and/or folic acid deficiency; (3) anemia, and also iron deficiency without anemia, have important consequences in the clinical status and quality of life of the patient; (4) oral iron can lead to gastrointestinal intolerance and failure of treatment; (5) intravenous iron is an effective and safe way to treat iron deficiency; (6) erythropoietin is needed in a significant number of cases to achieve normal hemoglobin levels. Thus, the clinician caring for IBD patients should have a comprehensive knowledge of anemia, and apply recently published guidelines in clinical practice. PMID:19787829

Gomollón, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P

2009-01-01

40

[Anemia induced by cadmium intoxication].  

PubMed

Anemia is commonly induced by chronic cadmium (Cd) intoxication. Three main factors are involved in the development of Cd-induced anemia: hemolytic, iron-deficiency, and renal. Intravascular hemolysis can occur at the early stage of Cd exposure owing to the direct damaging effect on erythrocytes. In addition, Cd that accumulates in erythrocytes affects membrane cytoskeletons and decreases cell deformability, and these cells are then trapped and destroyed in the spleen. Iron deficiency can be detected in animals after an oral exposure to Cd, which competes with iron for absorption in the intestines, leading to anemia. However, an increase in body iron content along with anemia is often observed in cases of parenteral exposure or itai-itai disease. Therefore, it is estimated that Cd disrupts the efficient usage of iron in hemoglobin synthesis in the body. Renal anemia is observed during the very last phase of chronic, severe Cd intoxication, such as itai-itai disease, showing a decrease in the production of erythropoietin from renal tubular cells. Because the renal anemia is based on the same pathophysiology as Cd-induced osteomalacia, which is derived from the disturbance of mineral metabolism due to renal tubular dysfunction, it is reasonable to include renal anemia in the criteria for the diagnosis of itai-itai disease. Hemodilution could also contribute to the development of Cd-induced anemia. Bone marrow hypoplasia or the inhibition of heme synthesis might only be involved in Cd-induced anemia in severe cases of Cd intoxication. PMID:17575787

Horiguchi, Hyogo

2007-05-01

41

Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... high in iron. Kids or teens on a vegetarian diet also might not get enough iron, because iron ... Multivitamins with iron and changes to a child's diet can help, but usually are not enough on ... Anemia Word! Anemia About Anemia ...

42

Who Is at Risk for Anemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Anemia? Anemia is a common condition. It ... people have other medical conditions as well. Major Risk Factors Factors that raise your risk for anemia ...

43

Sickle Cell Anemia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this case study on sickle cell anemia, students are introduced to some of the key researchers responsible for determining the molecular basis of the disease and learn about the functioning of erythrocytes as well as the notion that changes in the environment can influence the functioning of cells.  Students also become familiar with the process of osmosis and how it can influence the sickling of the erythrocytes.  Throughout the case, students must address experimental design questions. The case was designed for use in the first semester of an introductory majors biology course.

Debra L. Stamper

2000-01-01

44

FA (Fanconi Anemia) Family Newsletter  

MedlinePLUS

Family Newsletter The Fanconi Anemia Research Fund publishes the FA Family Newsletter twice a year and mails it to all FA patients and their ... of note Dave Frohnmayer, Co-founder of the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, has sadly passed away... learn more... ...

45

Cardio-renal anemia syndrome  

PubMed Central

The interaction between cronic heart failure, cronic kidney insufficiency and anemia, form a vicious cycle, termed as the cardio-renal anemia syndrome. The interaction between these three conditions causes deterioration of the cardiac and renal function and increases anemia. Each of the three can cause or be caused by the others. We herein analyze and speculate the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of this new syndrome highlighting the main points of interest that seem to expand upon more than one specialty. The cardio-renal anemia syndrome is emerging in the area of clinical investigation with progressively elevated significance. Additionaly we report the data related to anemia treatment as part of therapeutic perspective concerning the management of patients manifesting the profile of this syndrome. PMID:18923761

Efstratiadis, G; Konstantinou, D; Chytas, I; Vergoulas, G

2008-01-01

46

Managing Anemia of Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia begins early in the course of declining kidney function and is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease. Both anemia and chronic kidney disease are underdiagnosed and undertreated. Anemia is associated with significantly increased risk of morbidity and mortality, including increased risks of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure. Although the detrimental effects of anemia are more common in

Susan A. Krikorian

2009-01-01

47

Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia?  

MedlinePLUS

Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems > Blood > Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? Print A A A Text Size What's in ... to stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is an inherited (say: ...

48

The Molecular Connection Between Aluminum Toxicity, Anemia,  

E-print Network

25 The Molecular Connection Between Aluminum Toxicity, Anemia, Inflammation and Obesity D. Appanna Laurentian University Canada 1. Introduction Anemia is reported to be the most common of the types of anemia has different underlying causes. Iron (Fe) deficiency, a potent instigator of anemia

Appanna, Vasu

49

Mitochondrial Iron Metabolism and Sideroblastic Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by mitochondrial iron overload in developing red blood cells. The unifying characteristic of all sideroblastic anemias is the ring sideroblast, which is a pathological erythroid precursor containing excessive deposits of non-heme iron in mitochondria with perinuclear distribution creating a ring appearance. Sideroblastic anemias may be hereditary or acquired. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias

Alex D. Sheftel; Des R. Richardson; Josef Prchal; Prem Ponka

2009-01-01

50

Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Besarab A, Coyne DW. Iron supplementation to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. Nature Reviews Nephrology . 2010;6(12):699–710. ... Anemia in Kidney Disease and Dialysis at www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov. 4 Anemia of Inflammation ... Eating, Diet, and Nutrition People with anemia caused ...

51

[Autoimmune hemolytic anemia].  

PubMed

Autoimmune hemolytic anemias (AIHAs) are the most ancient and well known example of clinical autoimmunity. They may be still distinguished in two main groups, that is with "warm" or "cold" antibodies, according to the optimal temperature at which they react with the erythrocyte antigens in vivo and in vitro. There is also a subgroup where both kinds of autoantibodies coexist. AIHAs may be idiopathic or secondary. The immunologic techniques for the demonstration of the antibodies are well established, but one must remember that there are infrequent cases with negative DAT (Coombs) test when performed with conventional procedures. The fundamental concepts of therapy are discussed, and the detailed review of the principal procedures is performed, including blood transfusions (when and how), plasma exchanges, high-dose immunoglobulins, glycocorticosteroids, splenectomy, cytotoxic agents and stem cell transplantation, autologous and allogeneic. PMID:11072741

Marmont, A; Zanella, A

2000-10-01

52

How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?  

MedlinePLUS

... need for blood transfusions. Medicines To Suppress the Immune System Research suggests that aplastic anemia may sometimes occur because the body's immune system attacks its own cells by mistake. For this ...

53

Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding  

MedlinePLUS

... Blood Cell Disorders Plasma Cell Disorders Leukemias Lymphomas Myeloproliferative Disorders Spleen Disorders Topics in Anemia Overview of ... stomach or small intestine and diverticulosis, polyps, or cancers in the large intestine. Other sources of chronic ...

54

Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia  

PubMed Central

Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

2013-01-01

55

Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. Anemia - Multiple Languages Arabic (???????) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) ... Arabic) ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Anemia Anemija - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information ...

56

Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia  

MedlinePLUS

Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

57

How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?  

MedlinePLUS

... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia ... cells, hemoglobin, and iron. Dietary Changes and Supplements Iron You may need iron supplements to build up ...

58

Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Besarab A, Coyne DW. Iron supplementation to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. Nature Reviews Nephrology. 2010;6(12):699–710. [ Top ] How is AI/ACD treated? Anemia of inflammation and chronic disease often is not ...

59

Feline Nonregenerative Anemia: Diagnosis and Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia in cats is not a diagnosis but rather a sign of an underlying disease. The diagnos- tic work-up for an anemic patient is often extensive, starting with classification of the anemia as re- generative or nonregenerative. Once nonregenerative anemia is diagnosed, a number of tests may be required to determine its cause, including a close examination of the patient's

Carrie White; Nyssa Reine

60

(Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report  

SciTech Connect

Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

Bernstein, S.E.

1987-01-01

61

Thymoma with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia  

PubMed Central

A 38-year-old Japanese male was referred to our hospital with abnormal chest X-ray results and severe Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. He was diagnosed with a stage IV, WHO type A thymoma and was treated with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and subsequent chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection of the thymoma. Hemolysis rapidly disappeared and did not return after the discontinuation of oral corticosteroids. Corticosteroid therapy may be preferable to chemotherapy or thymoma surgical resection in the management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia with thymoma. PMID:25722666

Suzuki, Kensuke; Inomata, Minehiko; Shiraishi, Shiori; Hayashi, Ryuji; Tobe, Kazuyuki

2014-01-01

62

[Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and CREST syndrome].  

PubMed

There are few studies addressing the frequency and etiology of anemia in progressive systemic sclerosis. Anemia is present in about 25% of these patients. Among the implicated causes are ferropenia, generally associated with gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and renal failure. In a considerable number of patients, the specific etiology of anemia remained unknown. We report a 59-year-old female with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and incomplete CREST syndrome. We emphasize the rarity of autoimmune hemolysis as a cause of anemia in systemic sclerosis, and we discuss its significance as indirectly supporting the possible autoimmune pathogenesis of that condition. PMID:2201843

Jordana, R; Tolosa, C; Selva, A; Ordi, J

1990-05-19

63

Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes  

MedlinePLUS

... and sending the sample to a lab for analysis. A complete blood count is usually the first test a health care provider uses to detect aplastic anemia or MDS. The test includes measurement of a person’s hematocrit, the percentage of the blood that consists of red blood ...

64

Erythema nodosum and pernicious anemia.  

PubMed

Erythema nodosum (EN) often presents as a sudden onset of tender, erythematous, subcutaneous nodules on the legs and ankles. Although rare, pernicious anemia may be related to vitamin B12 deficiency. Discussion of this association in the context of a particular patient is presented. PMID:24010520

Milman, Perry J; Goldenberg, Steven P; Scheinfeld, Noah; Pereira, Frederick A

2013-07-01

65

Deafferentation anemia in splenectomized animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments on cats have shown that the reaction of the blood and bone marrow to division of the brachial plexus is the same in intact and splenectomized animals. This reaction consists of the development of anemia and neutrophilic leukocytosis, as the result of myeloid metaplasia of the bone marrow, which regularly develops in response to a focus of deafferentation in

M. I. Pekarskii

1970-01-01

66

Y O U R G U I D E T O Iron-Deficiency Anemia  

E-print Network

Y O U R G U I D E T O Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anema Anemia Healthy Lifestyle Changes Prevent Treat Control #12;#12;Y O U R G U I D E T O Anemia AnemiaHealthy Lifestyle Changes Prevent Treat Control Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Aplastic

Bandettini, Peter A.

67

Megaloblastic anemia: back in focus.  

PubMed

Megaloblastic anemia (MA), in most instances in developing countries, results from deficiency of vitamin B(12) or folic acid. Over the last two to three decades, incidence of MA seems to be increasing. Of the two micronutrients, folic acid deficiency contributed to MA in a large majority of cases. Now deficiency of B(12) is far more common. In addition to anemia, occurrence of neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia is increasingly being reported. Among cases presenting with pancytopenia, MA stands out as an important (commonest cause in some series) cause. This article focuses on these and certain other aspects of MA. Possible causes of increasing incidence of MA are discussed. Observations on other clinical features like neurocognitive dysfunction, associated hyperhomocysteinemeia and occurrence of tremors and thrombocytosis during treatment are highlighted. PMID:20589460

Chandra, Jagdish

2010-07-01

68

Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Children  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. PMID:24237973

Hartung, Helge D.; Olson, Timothy S.; Bessler, Monica

2013-01-01

69

Aplastic anemia following varicella vaccine.  

PubMed

Varicella zoster vaccine is a safe vaccine that is rarely associated with life-threatening complications. We describe an immunocompetent child who developed transient severe aplastic anemia concomitant with a typical clinical and laboratory-proven chickenpox syndrome 3 weeks after immunization. A causative association between the vaccine and the hematologic disease is possible, and pediatricians should be aware of this severe although rare adverse event. PMID:19633522

Angelini, Paola; Kavadas, Fotini; Sharma, Navneet; Richardson, Susan E; Tipples, Graham; Roifman, Chaim; Dror, Yigal; Nofech-Mozes, Yehuda

2009-08-01

70

[Anemia in chronic kidney disease].  

PubMed

Anemia is almost unavoidable in the last stages of chronic kidney disease. It is defined as a condition where hemoglobin concentration is below 2 standard deviations from the mean hemoglobin level of the general population, corrected for age and sex (typically, hemoglobin < 13 g/dL in adults and 12 g/dL in women). Although the cause is multi-factorial, the most known is inadequate erythropoietin production. Anemia has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several conditions such as cancer, chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure. Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, such as erythropoietin, is a logical strategy that has enabled clinical improvement and reduced transfusion requirements for the patients; however, total correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents has demonstrated an increase in the risk of mortality or cardiovascular complications associated with these agents. In randomized trials, the achievement of normal or nearly normal hemoglobin levels is not associated with improved survival and reduced cardiovascular risk; however the ideal hemoglobin level with the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents seems to be problematic. More information is needed in order to obtain definite conclusions; in the meantime, using the lowest possible dose of erythropoietin seems to be the most prudent approach. PMID:25354060

Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián

2014-01-01

71

Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.  

PubMed

Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children. PMID:24662257

Gelbart, David

2014-04-01

72

Therapy Insight: congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease and anemia, the cardio–renal–anemia syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) often progress to end stage even with optimum medical therapy. One factor that is common to both conditions is anemia, which is present in about a third of CHF patients. CHF can cause or worsen both anemia and CKD, and CKD can cause or worsen both anemia and CHF. Thus, a

Donald S Silverberg; Dov Wexler; Adrian Iaina

2005-01-01

73

[Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and aplastic anemia].  

PubMed

The case of a 14 year-old adolescent girl presenting with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) associated with aplastic anemia is reported. This disease, rare in children, is characterized by an acquired hemolytic anemia, with abnormal sensitivity to complement: PNH actually affects the bone marrow stem cell. This explains its possible association with any type of malignant blood disease and with aplastic anemia. When aplastic anemia is the first sign of the disease, diagnosis is delayed, due to the possible negative response of the specific Ham's test. Therefore, the proper complications of PNH, especially thromboses, may be misappreciated and poorly managed. PMID:6742973

Thollot, F; Bordigoni, P; Olive, D

1984-03-01

74

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Sickle Cell Anemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... TRIALS LINKS Quiz Related Topics Anemia Blood Transfusion Hemolytic Anemia Pulmonary Hypertension Stroke Send a link to NHLBI ... a life-threatening condition linked to sickle cell anemia. This syndrome is similar ... and abnormal chest x ray results. Pulmonary Hypertension ...

75

Gua breve sobre la La anemia es un trastorno de la sangre. La sangre es  

E-print Network

Anemia Guía breve sobre la La anemia es un trastorno de la sangre. La sangre es un líquido esencial de anemia, como la anemia por deficien- cia de hierro, la anemia perniciosa, la anemia aplásica y la anemia hemolítica. Los distintos tipos de anemia tienen relación con diversas enfermedades y problemas de

Bandettini, Peter A.

76

Management of postoperative complications: anemia.  

PubMed

Anemia is extremely common following hip fracture. Consistent data from randomized trials show that transfusion of less blood, with a transfusion threshold around 8 g/dL hemoglobin concentration, is preferable to a traditional threshold of 10 g/dL. Adoption of a lower threshold leads to at least equivalent clinical outcomes, with much less exposure to transfusion costs and risks. The most common complication of transfusion is circulatory overload. Future research may elucidate the optimal transfusion threshold for these elderly patients and address the specific needs of subgroups of patients, including those with acute coronary syndrome or chronic kidney disease. PMID:24721367

Willett, Laura Rees; Carson, Jeffrey L

2014-05-01

77

Anemia in Children and Adolescents with Hypothyroidism  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a review of 17 adolescents and children (excluding newborns) with definite clinical signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings of hypothyroidism, 11 patients (65%) had anemia. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) of the red blood cells was either macrocytic or normocytic. The hemoglobin did not correlate with the serum thyroxine level. Anemia occurred only in those patients with heights below the

Jen-Yih Chu; James A. Monteleone; Virginia H. Peden; Edward R. Graviss; Anthony M. Vernava

1981-01-01

78

Serum Erythropoietin (ESF) Titers in Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erythropoietin (ESF) titers were determined in sera from patients with different types of anemia using the fetal mouse liver cell bioassay. An inverse relationship was found between hemoglobin concentration and ESF titer. However, ESF titers differed markedly between patients at comparable degrees of anemia. Several groups of patients were distinguished on the basis of the activity of their erythroid bone

G. de Klerk; P. C. J. Rosengarten; R. J. W. M. Vet; R. Goudsmit

1981-01-01

79

Anemia hemolítica em cães e gatos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hemolytic anemia is the reduction in the numbers of an individual's red blood cells (RBCs) due to shortening of the life span of these cells. There are several hemolytic disorders caused by infectious agents in dogs and cats, namely babesiosis, rangeliosis, trypanoso- miasis, cytauxzoonosis, hemobartonellosis, dirofilariasis and hemolytic anemia associated with the infection by the feline leukemia virus. Non- infectious

Rafael Almeida Fighera

80

9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products...DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of livestock too anemic to produce wholesome...

2011-01-01

81

9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products...DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of livestock too anemic to produce wholesome...

2012-01-01

82

9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products...DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of livestock too anemic to produce wholesome...

2013-01-01

83

9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products...DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of livestock too anemic to produce wholesome...

2014-01-01

84

The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

Tetrault, Sylvia M.

1981-01-01

85

Unexplained Aspects of Anemia of Inflammation  

PubMed Central

Anemia of inflammation (AI), also known as anemia of chronic inflammation or anemia of chronic disease was described over 50 years ago as anemia in association with clinically overt inflammatory disease, and the findings of low plasma iron, decreased bone marrow sideroblasts and increased reticuloendothelial iron. Pathogenic features underlying AI include a mild shortening of red cell survival, impaired erythropoietin production, blunted responsiveness of the marrow to erythropoietin, and impaired iron metabolism mediated by inflammatory cytokines and the iron regulatory peptide, hepcidin. Despite marked recent advances in understanding AI, gaps remain, including understanding of the pathogenesis of AI associated with “noninflammatory” or mildly inflammatory diseases, the challenge of excluding iron deficiency anemia in the context of concomitant inflammation, and understanding more precisely the contributory role of hepcidin in the development of AI in human inflammatory diseases. PMID:20368776

Price, Elizabeth A.; Schrier, Stanley L.

2010-01-01

86

Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

2014-01-01

87

Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia  

SciTech Connect

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likely that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.

Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kruglyak, L. [Whitehead Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01

88

Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias.  

PubMed

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70-85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6-12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80-90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

2014-10-01

89

Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... in divided doses. For example, if you are prescribed two pills daily, take one in morning with breakfast and the ... getting enough iron, iron pills (supplements) may be prescribed. In extreme ... Iron pills can help when diet alone can't restore the iron level back ...

90

Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... 2 pregnancies close together Being pregnant with twins, triplets or more Becoming pregnant as a teenager Losing ... of passing these diseases on to your unborn baby. If you or someone in your family has ...

91

Posttransplant anemia in solid organ recipients.  

PubMed

Posttransplantation anemia (PTA) is a prevalent sequela of solid organ transplantation and a potential independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in kidney transplant recipients. There are multiple causes of PTA, some of which are associated with early phase anemia (<6 months), whereas others more often induce anemia in the late posttransplant phase (>6 months). Although impaired kidney function contributes to PTA, it is only one of many factors that result in anemia in transplant recipients. Other causes include iron deficiency, medications, infections, acute rejection, inflammation, and erythropoietin deficiency. Unlike in the predialysis chronic kidney disease population, the impact of anemia after kidney transplantation outcomes is unknown. This is in large part due to the absence of controlled trials that address whether correction of anemia improves allograft function or patient morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend evaluation for hemoglobin level of less than 12 g/dL and treatment when the value falls less than 11 g/dL and a target of 11 to 12 g/dL. Additional treatments may entail removing the cause of the anemia, nutritional supplementation, and/or an erythrocyte stimulating agent. PMID:20303457

Blosser, Christopher D; Bloom, Roy D

2010-04-01

92

Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)  

SciTech Connect

Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

Bernstein, S.E.

1982-07-19

93

Reticulocytopenic, coombs' positive anemia induced by procainamide.  

PubMed

A case of Coombs' positive anemia in a man who had procainamide-induced lupus erythematosus syndrome is reported. The patient had a hemoglobin of 4.3 gm/dl and reticulocytopenia (3.1% corrected). Serum lactate dehydrogenase and haptoglobin levels were normal, and total bilirubin was only slightly elevated. Two other reported cases of procainamide-induced hemolytic anemia have demonstrated similar findings. Apparently, procainamide occasionally may induce a reversible, reticulocytopenic, Coombs' positive anemia that is not associated with laboratory evidence of acute hemolysis. PMID:6858967

Schifman, R B; Garewal, H; Shillington, D

1983-07-01

94

Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia  

SciTech Connect

Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

1984-04-01

95

TNF-? signaling in Fanconi anemia  

PubMed Central

Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-? is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in systemic inflammation and the acute phase reaction. Dysregulation of TNF production has been implicated in a variety of human diseases including Fanconi anemia (FA). FA is a genomic instability syndrome characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. The patients with FA are often found overproducing TNF-?, which may directly affect hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function by impairing HSC survival, homing and proliferation, or indirectly change the bone marrow microenvironment critical for HSC homeostasis and function, therefore contribute to disease progression in FA. In this brief review, we discuss the link between TNF-? signaling and FA pathway with emphasis on the implication of inflammation in the pathophysiology and abnormal hematopoiesis in FA. PMID:23890415

Du, Wei; Erden, Ozlem; Pang, Qishen

2013-01-01

96

Nonregenerative anemia: mechanisms of decreased or ineffective erythropoiesis.  

PubMed

In veterinary medicine, anemia without an appropriate compensatory hematopoietic response is termed nonregenerative. Nonregenerative anemia is a common clinical entity, occurring as a result of diminished or ineffective erythropoiesis in association with many types of pathology. This article reviews nonregenerative anemia in domestic animals, emphasizing mechanisms of disease, and also covers other conditions associated with nonregenerative anemia in people. Many aspects of nonregenerative anemia in animals are worthy of further investigation, from molecular mechanisms of disease to epidemiologic impacts. PMID:24807888

Grimes, C N; Fry, M M

2015-03-01

97

How Is Sickle Cell Anemia Diagnosed?  

MedlinePLUS

... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sickle Cell Anemia Diagnosed? A simple blood test, done at ... Next >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Nicholas) 10/14/2014 Living With and ...

98

FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency  

MedlinePLUS

... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data ... for the U.S. Morbidity Percent of persons with iron deficiency (based on the body iron model): Children ...

99

Anemia caused by low iron - children  

MedlinePLUS

Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

100

Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells  

MedlinePLUS

... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re feeling constantly exhausted ... when your body doesn’t have enough healthy red blood cells. You may either have too few ...

101

Darbepoetin alfa for anemia with myelodysplastic syndrome.  

PubMed

The myelodysplastic syndromes are characterized by refractory cytopenias that lead to symptomatic anemia, bleeding, and increased risk for infections. For almost two decades, the use of darbepoetin and other erythropoietin stimulating agents to treat symptomatic anemia in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes has been a standard of care. This practice is supported by numerous Phase I/II studies and one Phase III study demonstrating the benefit of using erythropoietin stimulating agents alone, or in combination with granulocyte colony stimulating factor, for treatment of symptomatic anemia with the goal of decreasing red blood cell transfusion requirements. This review summarizes the published experience regarding the use of erythropoietin stimulating agents, with a special focus on darbepoetin, in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and symptomatic anemia. PMID:25579702

Seastone, David J; Gerds, Aaron T

2015-04-01

102

Stroke in sickle cell anemia: alternative etiologies.  

PubMed

Stroke is common in children with sickle cell anemia, but is rarely attributed to the traditional causes of stroke identified in other children. An 11-year-old girl with sickle cell anemia presented with severe headache and was found to have recurrent bilateral multifocal strokes in a cardioembolic pattern. Evaluation revealed the presence of a patent foramen ovale, antiphospholipid antibodies, and elevations in factor VIII and lipoprotein(a). Sickle cell anemia is itself a hypercoagulable state with potential for increased right heart pressures, both of which predispose to paradoxical embolization via right-to-left intracardiac shunting of emboli, thus causing stroke. The present case suggests that the more traditional etiologies for pediatric stroke may also cause stroke in children with sickle cell anemia. PMID:19589461

Dowling, Michael M; Quinn, Charles T; Rogers, Zora R; Journeycake, Janna M

2009-08-01

103

Gametophyte development in Anemia mexicana Klotzsch  

E-print Network

GAMETOPHYTE DEVELOPMENT IN ANEMIA MEXICANA KLOTZSCH A Thesis by JOAN ELIZABETH NESTER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major... Subject: Botany GAMETOPHYTE DEVELOPMENT IN ANEMIA MEXICANA KLOTZSCH A Thesis by JOAN ELIZABETH NESTER Approved as sty e and content by: rl, udge(~u Chatrman of Committee ember e ber Head o Department August 1979 ABSTRACT Gametophyte Development...

Nester, Joan Elizabeth

1979-01-01

104

Anemia in cats infected by Trypanosoma evansi  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the main characteristics of the trypanosomosis is the development of anemia, although its pathogenesis still remains\\u000a unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to discuss the possible pathogenesis of anemia in the infection by Trypanosoma evansi in cats. A study using an experimental model with T. evansi-infected cats reported changes in serum iron levels, alterations in the

Aleksandro Schafer da Silva; Patrícia Wolkmer; Márcio Marcio Costa; Sonia Terezinha dos Anjos Lopes; Silvia Gonzalez Monteiro

2011-01-01

105

Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.  

PubMed

Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico. PMID:23294876

Schmeer, Kammi K

2013-10-01

106

Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization has met with limited success via the use of hyperbaric oxygen, electron-affinic radiosensitizers, and mitomycin. Improvements in tumor oxygenation via the use of carbogen and nicotinamide, RSR13, and tirapazamine have shown promising clinical results and are all currently being tested in Phase III trials. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend transfusion or erythropoietin for symptomatic patients with a hemoglobin of 10-11 g/dl and state that erythropoietin should strongly be considered if hemoglobin falls to less than 10 g/dl. These recommendations were based on studies that revealed an improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients, but not patient survival with anemia correction. Phase III studies evaluating the correction of anemia via erythropoietin have shown mixed results with some studies reporting a decrease in patient survival despite an improvement in hemoglobin levels. Diverse functions of erythropoietin are reviewed, including its potential to inhibit apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Correction of anemia by the use of blood transfusions has also shown a decrement in patient survival, possibly through inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive pathways. Conclusions: Anemia is a prevalent condition associated with cancer and its therapies. Proper Phase III trials are necessary to find the best way to correct anemia for specific patients. Future studies of erythropoietin must evaluate the possible anti-apoptotic effects by directly assessing the tumor for erythropoietin receptors or the presence of the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Due to the ability of transfusions to cause immunosuppression, most probably through inflammatory pathways, it may be best to study the effects of transfusion with the prolonged use of anti-inflammatory medications.

Varlotto, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston VA Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth (Israel) and Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston VA Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel/Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-09-01

107

Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios) in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33), and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6). The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003), and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03) compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6). Conclusion The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results. PMID:24624032

Wollmann, Muriel; Gerzson, Branca Maria Cerezer; Schwert, Vanessa; Figuera, Rafael Weber; Ritzel, Guilherme de Oliveira

2014-01-01

108

Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

2014-01-01

109

Risk factors associated with anemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in rural Nepali pregnant women.  

PubMed

We conducted a cross sectional study to investigate risk factors associated with severe anemia [hemoglobin (Hb) < 8.0 g dl(-1)] and poor iron status among Nepali pregnant women. Socio-demographic, anthropometric, health and dietary data were collected from 3,531 women living in the southeastern plains of Nepal. Stool samples were analyzed for intestinal helminthes. Dark adaptation was assessed using the Night Vision Threshold Test (NVTT). Hb levels were measured in all subjects to detect anemia and the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) was measured among a subsample of 479 women. The iron status categories were: 1) normal (Hb> or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR < or = 8.5 mg/l); 2) anemia without iron deficiency (Hb<11.0 g/dl and sTfR < or = 8.5 mg/l); 3) iron deficiency without anemia (Hb > or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR>8.5 mg/l); and 4) iron deficiency anemia (IDA): (Hb<11.0 g/dl and sTfR>8.5 mg/l). Factors associated with severe anemia and poor iron status were determined using logistic regression. Hookworm infection increased the risk for developing severe anemia [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 4.26; 95% CI 1.67-10.89; p<0.01] and IDA [relative risk ratio (RRR): 2.18; 95% CI 1.14-4.16; p<0.05]. Impaired dark adaptation was a common risk factor for iron deficiency with and without anemia. Intake of iron supplements as tablets and/or tonic was protective against severe anemia, anemia without iron deficiency and IDA. Dietary heme iron was significantly associated with iron deficiency without anemia (RRR: 0.1; 95% CI 0.02-0.47; p<0.01). These results indicate the risk factors varied by classification and multiple approaches are needed to reduce anemia and associated nutrient deficiencies. PMID:23077854

Makhoul, Zeina; Taren, Douglas; Duncan, Burris; Pandey, Pooja; Thomson, Cynthia; Winzerling, Joy; Muramoto, Myra; Shrestha, Ram

2012-05-01

110

Managing Anemia in the Cancer Patient: Old Problems, Future Solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia and associated symptoms commonly mani- fest in cancer patients and may have a considerable impact on outcomes. Preliminary studies suggest that overall survival and locoregional control following radi- ation therapy may be compromised by anemia, and recent preliminary data also suggest that anemia may be related to poorer outcomes following chemotherapy. Health-related quality of life of cancer patients is

MICHAEL S. GORDON

111

Short Report Menstruation Does Not Cause Anemia: Endometrial Thickness  

E-print Network

Short Report Menstruation Does Not Cause Anemia: Endometrial Thickness Correlates Positively for iron-deficiency anemia. This study tested whether normal, premenopausal women's luteal endometrial), and therefore whether a high ET put women at risk for anemia. Endometrial thickness can be con- sidered

Lummaa, Virpi

112

Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.  

PubMed

Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed. PMID:22948485

Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

2013-07-01

113

Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia  

SciTech Connect

Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.H. [Univ. of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson, MS (United States)

1995-05-01

114

Megaloblastic anemia presenting with massive reversible splenomegaly.  

PubMed

Megaloblastic anemia (MA) is a common disorder with varied manifestations. It generally results in mild to moderate splenomegaly which is due to sequestration of macrocytic erythrocytes in spleen. Massive splenomegaly is generally seen in infections, myeloproliferative diseases, neoplasms, storage disorders or hematological conditions; but is not heard of and has rarely been reported in MA. We discuss a case of massive splenomegaly who presented with symptomatic anemia and was found to have MA. He was extensive evaluated for all other causes of massive splenomegaly which was normal. Further, after a therapeutic trial of MA he showed a regression in spleen size confirming that the massive splenomegaly was attributable to MA. PMID:25825577

Behera, Vineet; Randive, Makarand; Sharma, Praveen; Nair, Velu

2015-06-01

115

The Invisible Malady: Sickle Cell Anemia  

PubMed Central

Though several articles have appeared on the history of sickle cell anemia in the United States, none has dealt with the dissemination of information from the scientific community to the public. It is an interesting commentary on our society that 60 years have passed before this important but racially oriented disease has reached the public forum. In this article, the author tries to describe the major events in the history of sickle cell anemia and to explain why it has not been publicized. PMID:7021863

Savitt, Todd L.

1981-01-01

116

Iron-deficiency anemia caused by a proton pump inhibitor.  

PubMed

A 59-year-old man was orally administered rabeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), for gastroesophageal reflux disease, after which he gradually developed iron-deficiency anemia. The anemia did not improve following the administration of ferrous fumarate, and endoscopic screening of the entire gastrointestinal tract, including the small intestine, did not reveal any findings indicating the cause of the anemia. The patient was then switched from rabeprazole to famotidine and the anemia was cured within three months. There is much debate as to whether the long-term use of PPIs causes iron-deficiency. However, this case strongly suggests that PPIs can induce iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:25318791

Hashimoto, Rintaro; Matsuda, Tomoki; Chonan, Akimichi

2014-01-01

117

Hb F in sickle cell anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have reviewed the methodology for an accurate quantitation of Hb F in the blood of patients with sickle cell anemia, values observed in hundreds of patients of different (racial or ethnic) backgrounds and with differences in severity of the disease, and the various factors that affect the level of Hb F. The latter include sex, age, genetic background or

A. D. Adekile; T. H. J. Huisman

1993-01-01

118

Respiration Unaffected by Anemia in Chemodenervated Cats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of acute isovolemic anemia on the control of respiration was examined in chemodenervated decerebrate cats to determine whether the peripheral chemoreceptors are normally responsible for the reported respiratory indifference to a reduction in blood hemoglobin. The tidal volume\\/CO2 response lines and the respiratory frequency\\/ tidal volume relationship were determined during inhalation of air and of oxygen with the

Herbert L. Borison; Jeffrey H. Hurst; Lawrence E. McCarthy

1982-01-01

119

Regulation of equine infectious anemia virus expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is an ungulate lentivirus that is related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Much of the understanding of lentiviral gene regulation comes from studies using HIV. HIV studies have provided insights into molecular regulation of EIAV expression; however, much of the regulation of EIAV expression stands in stark contrast to that of HIV. This review provides

Wendy Maury; S. Dak

1998-01-01

120

[Disseminated lymphangiomatosis: A rare cause of anemia].  

PubMed

Disseminated lymphangiomatosis is a congenital lymphovenous vascular malformation. It can occur in different regions, some of which are unusual. The treatment of this vascular malformation is based on surgical excision, sclerotherapy, or recombinant interferon therapy. We report the case of disseminated lymphangiomatosis in a 13-year-old girl who presented with anemia. PMID:25725973

Ben Abdallah Chabchoub, R; Kamoun, F; Hidouri, S; Nouri, A; Hachicha, M; Mahfoudh, A

2015-04-01

121

Anemia identified one month after renal transplantation is predictive of anemia identified after twelve months.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether anemia identified earlier than 3 months postengraftment in modern era could be predictive of anemia at 12 months. Cross-sectional and cohort studies based on retrospective analysis of existing clinical records were performed. Data on recipient's age at transplantation, follow-up serum creatinine (SCR) and hemoglobin (Hb) on day 7 (D7), at month 1 (M1) and at month 3 (M3) postengraftment were collected. Outcome was anemia identified at 12 months (M12) postengraftment. There were 75 patients on D7, 74 at M1 and 61 at M3. Multiple linear regression model that included recipient's age at transplantation, Hb and creatinine on D7 and tested the risk for anemia at M12 retained only the age in the model, with the coefficient of 0,84 (P=0,001). The same model at M1 retained Hb and age, with the coefficients of 0,26 (P=0,03) and 0,81 (P=0,0002), respectively and at M3 it retained Hb and age, with the coefficients of 0,41 (P=0,004) and 0,70 (P=0,003), respectively. Anemia identified at M1 after renal transplantation is predictive of anemia at M12. PMID:19754477

Imamovi?, Goran; Zerem, Enver; Omerovi?, Safet

2009-08-01

122

Serum transferrin receptor distinguishes the anemia of chronic disease from iron deficiency anemia.  

PubMed

Recent studies have shown that the serum transferrin receptor is a sensitive, quantitative measure of tissue iron deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine the serum transferrin receptor's ability to distinguish iron-deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic inflammation and to identify iron deficiency in patients with liver disease. The mean transferrin receptor level in 17 normal controls was 5.36 +/- 0.82 mg/L compared with 13.91 +/- 4.63 mg/L in 17 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (p less than 0.001). The mean serum receptor level was normal in all 20 patients with acute infection, including five with acute hepatitis, and was also normal in 8 of 10 anemic patients with chronic liver disease. Receptor levels were in the normal range in all but 4 of 41 patients with anemia of chronic disease. We conclude that unlike serum ferritin levels, which are disproportionately elevated in relation to iron stores in patients with inflammation or liver disease, the serum transferrin receptor level is not affected by these disorders and is therefore a reliable laboratory index of iron deficiency anemia. PMID:1583389

Ferguson, B J; Skikne, B S; Simpson, K M; Baynes, R D; Cook, J D

1992-04-01

123

Fanconi anemia and the development of leukemia.  

PubMed

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive cancer-prone inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, due to mutations in 16 genes, whose protein products collaborate in a DNA repair pathway. The major complications are aplastic anemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and specific solid tumors. A severe subset, due to mutations in FANCD1/BRCA2, has a cumulative incidence of cancer of 97% by age 7 years; the cancers are AML, brain tumors, and Wilms tumor; several patients have multiple events. Patients with the other genotypes (FANCA through FANCQ) have cumulative risks of more than 50% of marrow failure, 20% of AML, and 30% of solid tumors (usually head and neck or gynecologic squamous cell carcinoma), by age 40, and they too are at risk of multiple adverse events. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant may cure AML and MDS, and preemptive transplant may be appropriate, but its use is a complicated decision. PMID:25455269

Alter, Blanche P

2014-01-01

124

Schilling evaluation of pernicious anemia: current status  

SciTech Connect

The Schilling examination remains a popular means of evaluating in vivo absorption of vitamin B/sub 12/. When absorption is abnormally low, the test may be repeated with addition to exogenous intrinsic factor (IF) in order to correct the IF deficiency that characterizes pernicious anemia. A dual-isotope variation provides a means of performing both stages of the test simultaneously, thereby speeding up the test and reducing dependence on complete urine collection. In vivo studies indicate that, when administered simultaneously, the absorption of unbound B/sub 12/ is elevated, and IF-bound B/sub 12/ is reduced, in pernicious-anemia patients, relative to the classic two-stage examination. A number of clinical studies indicate significant difficulty in resolving clincial diagnoses with the dual-tracer test. An algorithm is offered for selecting the most suitable variation of the Schilling test to improve the accuracy of test results and the ease of performance.

Zuckier, L.S.; Chervu, L.R.

1984-09-01

125

Animal Models of Anemia of Inflammation  

PubMed Central

Anemia of inflammation (AI) is a complex multi-organ response to inflammatory disorders. Because AI can result from many infectious and non-infectious inflammatory diseases, multiple mechanisms may contribute to its pathogenesis including iron restriction, direct erythropoietic suppression, shortened red cell survival or frank hemolysis. Animal models have been helpful in the study of the mechanisms of AI and its potential treatments but each model reflects distinct aspects of this heterogeneous syndrome. It is therefore important to study a variety of models of AI. This review focuses on the use of infectious and noninfectious mouse models of inflammation that have been shown to manifest anemia. We review many of the models reported in the literature or developed in our laboratory, and discuss their respective merits and drawbacks. PMID:19786203

Rivera, Seth; Ganz, Tomas

2009-01-01

126

Diagnosis and classification of pernicious anemia.  

PubMed

Pernicious anemia (PA) is a complex disorder consisting of hematological, gastric and immunological alterations. Diagnosis of PA relies on histologically proven atrophic body gastritis, peripheral blood examination showing megaloblastic anemia with hypersegmented neutrophils, cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor and to gastric parietal cells. Anti-parietal cell antibodies are found in 90% of patients with PA, but have low specificity and are seen in atrophic gastritis without megaloblastic anemia as well as in various autoimmune disorders. Anti-intrinsic factor antibodies are less sensitive, being found in only 60% of patients with PA, but are considered highly specific for PA. The incidence of PA increases with age and is rare in persons younger than 30 years of age. The highest prevalence is seen in Northern Europeans, especially those in the United Kingdom and Scandinavia, although PA has been reported in virtually every ethnic group. Because of the complexity of the diagnosis, PA prevalence is probably underestimated and no reliable data are available on the risk of gastric cancer as the end-stage evolution of atrophic gastritis in these patients. PMID:24424200

Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio

2014-01-01

127

Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia  

PubMed Central

Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA) is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary) or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies. PMID:24106518

Gu, Wangang

2013-01-01

128

THE TRANSFER OF RAT ANEMIA TO NORMAL ANIMALS  

PubMed Central

Fifty-eight white and hooded rats have been splenectomized and all of them have shown a more or less severe anemia and an infection of the red blood cells with Bartonella muris. Another strain of white rats obtained from Littlestown showed no anemia and no bartonellas in the blood after splenectomy, until exposed to infected rats. Others of these Littlestown rats, kept in the laboratory for some time before operation and exposed to infected rats, came down with bartonella anemia within 6 days after splenectomy. Whole blood or the washed red blood corpuscles from splenectomized rats which show bartonellas and anemia will produce a similar condition in young rats when injected intraperitoneally. Adult rats of strains which harbor the virus (as demonstrated by splenectomy) cannot be infected by injection. Intravenous inoculation of young normal rabbits with blood from an infected rat will sometimes produce a similar infection and anemia in the rabbit, and the virus can then be transferred back to young rats. The virus of rat anemia may be transferred from young normal rat to young normal rat with the appearance of Bartonella muris and the production of anemia. In the early transfers the disease may be fatal, but it usually becomes milder in successive passages. Although we have not yet been able to cultivate Bartonella muris and prove its etiological relationship to rat anemia by inoculation of cultures, we have added to the evidence that Bartonella muris is the cause of the anemia. Washed red blood corpuscles, containing bartonellas, will produce the anemia in the usual way while plasma from the same cells will either fail to produce it altogether or only after a prolonged incubation period. Blood heated to 57°C. for ½ hour fails to produce anemia or the appearance of bartonellas in the blood of inoculated animals. From these observations the following conclusions may be drawn: 1. All rats which harbor Bartonella muris ratti come down with a more or less severe anemia after splenectomy. 2. Young rats which have not yet developed an immunity undergo the typical anemia after intraperitoneal injection of blood from a splenectomized animal in the early stages of the anemia. 3. Young rabbits may show bartonellas and develop anemia following intravenous inoculation of infected blood. 4. The virus of rat anemia and Bartonella muris ratti may be transferred from normal animal to normal animal for successive generations. Such strains have now been transferred for five, nine and thirty generations. 5. The resistance of rats to bartonella anemia is almost wholly dependent on the spleen. Other organs do not take over this function of protection as shown by the relapse of splenectomized rats many months after recovery. Young rats which have recovered from an attack of anemia are not protected by this previous infection from the invasion of the virus following splenectomy. Adult splenic tissue mixed with infected blood before injection does not inhibit or neutralize the virus. 6. The virus of rat anemia is highly contagious and rats exposed to infection acquire it in some unknown way. 7. Bartonella muris ratti represents the virus of rat anemia or at least cannot be separated from the virus because: (a) The anemia in splenectomized and injected animals is always preceded by the appearance of bartonellas and the grade of anemia is proportional to the degree of infection with bartonellas. (b) Washed corpuscles containing bartonellas always produce anemia. Plasma either fails to do so, or produces a mild anemia after a long incubation period with a few bartonellas in the blood. (c) The thermal death point of virus and bartonella is the same. PMID:19869499

Ford, William W.; Eliot, Calista P.

1928-01-01

129

Reassessment of the microcytic anemia of lead poisoning  

SciTech Connect

Hematologic abnormalities in childhood lead poisoning may be due, in part, to the presence of other disorders, such as iron deficiency or thalassemia minor. In order to reassess increased lead burden as a cause of microcytic anemia, we studied 58 children with class III or IV lead poisoning, normal iron stores, and no inherited hemoglobinopathy. Anemia occurred in 12% and microcytosis in 21% of these children. The combination of anemia and microcytosis was found in only one of 58 patients (2%). When only children with class IV lead poisoning were studied, the occurrence of microcytosis increased to 46%. However, the combination of microcytosis and anemia was found in only one of these 13 more severely affected patients. Microcytic anemia was similarly uncommon in children with either blood lead concentration greater than or equal to 50 microgram/100 ml. These data indicate that microcytosis and anemia occur much less commonly than previously reported in childhood lead poisoning uncomplicated by other hematologic disorders.

Cohen, A.R.; Trotzky, M.S.; Pincus, D.

1981-06-01

130

Las Vegas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image of Las Vegas, NV was acquired on August, 2000 and covers an area 42 km (25 miles) wide and 30 km (18 miles) long. The image displays three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region, with a spatial resolution of 15 m. McCarran International Airport to the south and Nellis Air Force Base to the NE are the two major airports visible. Golf courses appear as bright red areas of worms. The first settlement in Las Vegas (which is Spanish for The Meadows) was recorded back in the early 1850s when the Mormon church, headed by Brigham Young, sent a mission of 30 men to construct a fort and teach agriculture to the Indians. Las Vegas became a city in 1905 when the railroad announced this city was to be a major division point. Prior to legalized gambling in 1931, Las Vegas was developing as an agricultural area. Las Vegas' fame as a resort area became prominent after World War II. The image is located at 36.1 degrees north latitude and 115.1 degrees west longitude.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

2001-01-01

131

LATEST STRATEGY IN RENAL ANEMIA MANAGEMENT IN PERITONEAL DIALYSIS PATIENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The target of renal anemia correction with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs) has been traditionally set at a hemoglobin (Hb) level of 11 - 12 g\\/dL. However, a trend has arisen of progressively increasing the Hb level to beyond 12 g\\/dL. Recent randomized control trials (RCTs) on correction of renal anemia in chronic kidney disease patients found that normalization of anemia

Wai Kei Lo

132

A novel ubiquitin ligase is deficient in Fanconi anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage response pathway involving breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2 (refs. 1,2). A key step in this

Amom Ruhikanta Meetei; Johan P de Winter; Annette L Medhurst; Michael Wallisch; Quinten Waisfisz; Henri J van de Vrugt; Anneke B Oostra; Zhijiang Yan; Chen Ling; Colin E Bishop; Maureen E Hoatlin; Hans Joenje; Weidong Wang

2003-01-01

133

Hepcidin expression in anemia of chronic disease and concomitant iron-deficiency anemia.  

PubMed

Hepcidin is a key hormone governing mammalian iron homeostasis and may be directly or indirectly involved in the development of most iron deficiency/overload and inflammation-induced anemia. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of hepcidin in anemia of chronic disease. To characterize serum hepcidin, iron and inflammatory indicators associated with anemia of chronic disease (ACD), we studied ACD, ACD concomitant iron-deficiency anemia (ACD/IDA), pure IDA and acute inflammation (AcI) patients and analyzed the associations between hepcidin levels and inflammation parameters in various types of anemia. Serum hepcidin levels in patient groups were statistically different, from high to low: ACD, AcI > ACD/IDA > the control > IDA. Serum ferritin levels were significantly increased in ACD and AcI patients but were decreased significantly in ACD/IDA and IDA. Elevated serum EPO concentrations were found in ACD, ACD/IDA and IDA patients but not in AcI patients and the controls. A positive correlation between hepcidin and IL-6 levels only existed in ACD/IDA, AcI and the control groups. A positive correlation between hepcidin and ferritin was marked in the control group, while a negative correlation between hepcidin and ferritin was noted in IDA. The significant negative correlation between hepcidin expression and reticulocyte count was marked in both ACD/IDA and IDA groups. All of these data demonstrated that hepcidin might play role in pathogenesis of ACD, ACD/IDA and IDA, and it could be a potential marker for detection and differentiation of these anemias. PMID:20499129

Cheng, Pan-pan; Jiao, Xiao-yang; Wang, Xue-hua; Lin, Jing-hua; Cai, Ying-mu

2011-03-01

134

Iron deficiency anemia--bridging the knowledge and practice gap.  

PubMed

Despite its high prevalence, anemia often does not receive proper clinical attention, and detection, evaluation, and management of iron deficiency anemia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis can possibly be an unmet medical need. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians with expertise in anemia management convened and reviewed recent published data on prevalence, etiology, and health implications of anemia as well as current therapeutic options and available guidelines on management of anemia across various patient populations and made recommendations on the detection, diagnostic approach, and management of anemia. The available evidence confirms that the prevalence of anemia is high across all populations, especially in hospitalized patients. Anemia is associated with worse clinical outcomes including longer length of hospital stay, diminished quality of life, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and it is a modifiable risk factor of allogeneic blood transfusion with its own inherent risks. Iron deficiency is usually present in anemic patients. An algorithm for detection and management of anemia was discussed, which incorporated iron study (with primary emphasis on transferrin saturation), serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate, and vitamin B12 and folic acid measurements. Management strategies included iron therapy (oral or intravenous), erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and referral as needed. PMID:24931617

Shander, Aryeh; Goodnough, Lawrence T; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Auerbach, Michael; Carson, Jeffrey; Ershler, William B; Ghiglione, Mary; Glaspy, John; Lew, Indu

2014-07-01

135

Biomarkers for the differentiation of anemia and their clinical usefulness  

PubMed Central

The World Health Organization defines anemia as the point at which the amount of hemoglobin in the circulation falls below World Health Organization cutoffs for specific age and sex groups. Anemia is a worldwide problem of complex etiology and is associated with many factors. The purpose of this review was to describe the biomarkers used to identify the nature of anemia in patients and in the community. The important biomarkers are the automated red cell counts, tests for nutritional deficiencies, hemoglobinopathies, and inflammation. Diseases are important potential initiators of anemia, but biomarkers of specific diseases are not included in this review, only the underlying feature common to all disease – namely, inflammation. PMID:23687454

Northrop-Clewes, Christine A; Thurnham, David I

2013-01-01

136

Determinants of anemia among preschool children in rural, western Kenya.  

PubMed

Although anemia in preschool children is most often attributed to iron deficiency, other nutritional, infectious, and genetic contributors are rarely concurrently measured. In a population-based, cross-sectional survey of 858 children 6-35 months of age in western Kenya, we measured hemoglobin, malaria, inflammation, sickle cell, ?-thalassemia, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency, anthropometry, and socio-demographic characteristics. Anemia (Hb < 11 g/dL) and severe anemia (Hb < 7 g/dL) prevalence ratios (PRs) for each exposure were determined using multivariable modeling. Anemia (71.8%) and severe anemia (8.4%) were common. Characteristics most strongly associated with anemia were malaria (PR: 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-1.9), iron deficiency (1.3; 1.2-1.4), and homozygous ?-thalassemia (1.3; 1.1-1.4). Characteristics associated with severe anemia were malaria (10.2; 3.5-29.3), inflammation (6.7; 2.3-19.4), and stunting (1.6; 1.0-2.4). Overall 16.8% of anemia cases were associated with malaria, 8.3% with iron deficiency, and 6.1% with inflammation. Interventions should address malaria, iron deficiency, and non-malarial infections to decrease the burden of anemia in this population. PMID:23382166

Foote, Eric M; Sullivan, Kevin M; Ruth, Laird J; Oremo, Jared; Sadumah, Ibrahim; Williams, Thomas N; Suchdev, Parminder S

2013-04-01

137

Diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anemia.  

PubMed

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a common hematologic condition, affecting a substantial proportion of the world's women and young children. Optimal management of IDA requires an accurate diagnosis, identification and correction of the underlying cause, provision of medicinal iron therapy, and confirmation of treatment success. There are limited data to support current treatment approaches regarding oral iron preparation, dosing, monitoring, and duration of therapy. New intravenous iron agents have improved safety profiles, which may foster their increased utilization in the treatment of patients with IDA. Clinical trials focused on improving current treatment standards for IDA are sorely needed. PMID:25064710

Powers, Jacquelyn M; Buchanan, George R

2014-08-01

138

Aplastic Anemia in Adolescents and Young Adults  

PubMed Central

Adolescent and young adult patient presentations of aplastic anemia require a particular perspective on both diagnosis and treatment. This unique age group necessitates a thorough diagnostic evaluation to ensure the etiology, acquired or inherited, is sufficiently determined. The treatment options include human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic cell transplantation or immunosuppressive therapy, and both require attention to the specific medical and social needs of these adolescents and young adults. Longitudinal surveillance throughout life for the development of late complications of the disease and treatment is mandatory. PMID:25228559

DeZern, Amy E.; Guinan, Eva C.

2014-01-01

139

Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:24418298

Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

2014-01-01

140

Microradiographic Study of Odontologic Tissues in Cooley's Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

SYNOPSIS IN INTERLINGUA STUDIO MICRORADIOGRAPHIC DE Tissu ODONTOLOGIC IN ANEMIA DE COOLEY.—Le presente studio esseva effectuate pro determinar le effectos de anemia de Cooley super le configuration del mineralisation e le morphologia del dentes e de lor structuras de supporto. Sectiones mollite esseva obtenite ab specimens includitein bioplastico. Examines microradiographic revelava que le dentina esseva mal mineralisate e que inusual

Narendar N. Soni; Frank E. Barbee; Angella D. Ferguson; Barbara A. Parrish

1966-01-01

141

Neurologic Complications After Allogeneic Marrow Transplantation for Sickle Cell Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

ARROW transplantation from HLA-identical siblings is effective therapy in children with nonmalignant disorders, including aplastic anemia, congenital immunode- ficiency syndromes, thalassemia major, and certain inborn errors of metabolism.',2 Its use in the treatment of sickle cell anemia has been limited to date but initial reports confirm that bone marrow transplantation is curative treatment for this di~order.~\\

Mark C. Walters; Keith M. Sullivan; Francoise Bernaudin; Gerard Souillet; Jean-Pierre Vannier; F. Leonard Johnson; Carl Lenarsky; Darleen Powars; Nancy Bunin; Kwaku Ohene-Frempong; Donna Wall; G. Michel; E. Plouvier; P. Bodigoni; P. Lutz; Jean E. Sanders; Dana C. Matthews; Frederick R. Appelbaum; Rainer Storb

1995-01-01

142

Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.…

DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

2006-01-01

143

Correction of Anemia with Epoetin Alfa in Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Anemia, a common complication of chronic kidney disease, usually develops as a consequence of erythropoietin deficiency. Recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa) is indicated for the correction of anemia associated with this condition. However, the optimal level of hemoglobin correction is not defined. Methods In this open-label trial, we studied 1432 patients with chronic kidney disease, 715 of whom were

Ajay K. Singh; Lynda Szczech; Kezhen L. Tang; Huiman Barnhart; Shelly Sapp; Marsha Wolfson; Donal Reddan

2006-01-01

144

Liver Function and Anemia Pathogenesis in Iranian Traditional Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background: Nutritional deficiency, bleeding, and inflammation are three main causes of anemia. On the other hand, erythropoietin (EPO) production, iron availability, and a healthy bone marrow are essential for erythropoiesis. Recently, recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has been used to treat the patients already taking iron supplements. In Iranian traditional medicine literature, much has been written about anemia and its treatment. Objectives: This study aimed to review Iranian traditional medicine theories in the treatment of anemia. Materials and Methods: In the present study, authors have attempted to find the etiology and pathogenesis of anemia in Iranian traditional Medicine Literature and the views of ancient physicians in this field. Results: Our findings proved that Iranian traditional medicine defined anemia as blood humor production dysfunction, which is caused by several reasons mainly hepatic dysfunction. Thus, liver is supposed to be the most important organ in this regard. This will make considering hepatoprotective medicines in anemia even in patients with non-hepatic problems. Conclusions: The article presents the relation between anemia and liver dysfunction viewed by Iranian traditional medicine as an important finding in designing a treatment plan. Despite the new findings on the evaluation of liver function (i.e. laboratory tests), it seems that further studies for earlier evaluation of liver function in anemia are highly required.

Yarjou, Saeedeh; Sadeghpour, Omid; Nazem, Esmail; Emami, Amir Hossein

2014-01-01

145

Genetics Home Reference: Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia On this page: Description Genetic changes ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed July 2014 What is iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia? Iron-refractory iron deficiency ...

146

Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism in Pernicious Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

P EIiNICIOUS ANEMIA is a deficiency disease which involves the metab- olism of at least the hematologic, gastiointestinal and nervous systems. Signs and symptoms occurring from the disease may result directly from the effects of the deficiency on cell metabolism or more indirectly l)ecause of the anemia. The tongue and nervous system may he involved with little or no cvi-

PERITZ SCHEINBERG

2010-01-01

147

Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in Hispanic patients with anemia.  

PubMed

Pernicious anemia represents the final phase of a process that begins with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and evolves through progressive levels of atrophy until loss of parietal cell mass. Numerous studies have suggested an association between H. pylori infection, unexplained iron deficiency anemia and cobalamin deficiency. Our research question was to determine whether there is an association between with H. pylori infection and development of anemia in Hispanic patients. This cross sectional pilot study involved data analysis of individual from years 2010-2012 examining the association between H. pylori infection and hemoglobin levels in patients with Hispanic ethnicity. A total of 189 records were evaluated, of which 33 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The study sample was divided in two groups. Group-A: 5 subjects with H. pylori infection and anemia; Group-B: 28 patients with H. pylori without anemia. Fisher exact test applied between categorical variables to determine the statistical significance of symptoms comparing anemic vs. non-anemic H. pylori infected patients yielded a p = 0.0027. In addition, restoration of anemia in two subjects following eradication therapy without previous iron or cobalamin replacement therapy suggested a potential role of this bacterium in the development of anemia in Hispanics. In conclusion, from the results of this study a potential association between Helicobacter pylori infection and anemia in Hispanic patients is suggested. Restoration of hemoglobin after eradication of bacteria further supports this concept. PMID:25065045

Ortiz, Melissa; Rosado-Carrión, Bárbara; Bredy, Rafael

2014-01-01

148

Anemia and decline in physical performance among older persons  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeAnemia is prevalent in old age and is potentially modifiable, but its effects on physical function have not been determined. We examined whether anemia in older persons increases the risk of subsequent decline in physical function, as measured by objective performance-based tests.

Brenda W. J. H Penninx; Jack M Guralnik; Graziano Onder; Luigi Ferrucci; Robert B Wallace; Marco Pahor

2003-01-01

149

Acute psychosis: a presentation of cyanocobalamin deficiency megaloblastic anemia.  

PubMed

Cyanocobalamin deficiency is not rare in India. Patients present with megaloblastic anemia, pancytopenia and sometimes neuropsychiatric manifestations. Subacute combined degeneration of the cord, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychotic depression and paranoid schizophrenia are well reported. We are reporting a case of cyanocobalamine deficiency anemia who presented with acute psychosis which readily reversed on cyanocobalamin replacement. PMID:21886392

Tripathi, A K; Verma, S P; Himanshu, D

2010-09-01

150

Acute Psychosis: A Presentation of Cyanocobalamin Deficiency Megaloblastic Anemia  

PubMed Central

Cyanocobalamin deficiency is not rare in India. Patients present with megaloblastic anemia, pancytopenia and sometimes neuropsychiatric manifestations. Subacute combined degeneration of the cord, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychotic depression and paranoid schizophrenia are well reported. We are reporting a case of cyanocobalamine deficiency anemia who presented with acute psychosis which readily reversed on cyanocobalamin replacement. PMID:21886392

Tripathi, A. K.; Himanshu, D.

2010-01-01

151

Mild Anemia and Pregnancy Outcome in a Swiss Collective  

PubMed Central

Background. Over half of all women in the world experience anemia during their pregnancy. Our aim was to investigate the relation between hemoglobin and iron status examined in second trimester and pregnancy outcome. Methods. In a prospective longitudinal study, 382 pregnant women were included. Blood samples were examined for hematological status and serum ferritin between 16 and 20 weeks and for hemoglobin before delivery. The adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes were determined. Regression analysis was performed to establish if anemia and low serum ferritin are risk factors for pregnancy complications. Results. There was no increase of complications in women with mild anemia and in women with depleted iron stores. The finding showed that mild iron deficiency anemia and depleted iron stores are not risk factors for adverse outcomes in iron supplemented women. Conclusions. Mild anemia and depleted iron stores detected early in pregnancy were not associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in iron supplemented women. PMID:25478229

Bencaiova, Gabriela; Breymann, Christian

2014-01-01

152

Hemolytic Anemia Following Rasburicase Administration: A Review of Published Reports  

PubMed Central

Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a potentially lethal complication of anticancer treatment. It is caused by the rapid death of malignant cells after initiation of cytotoxic therapy and is typically observed in patients with bulky or highly proliferative malignancies. Currently, rasburicase is one of the recommended therapies for this oncologic emergency. Although this drug is generally well tolerated among patients, there have been several reports of hemolytic anemia following rasburicase infusions. With drug-induced hemolytic anemia, the condition usually resolves shortly after the offending agent is discontinued. However, anemia that is prolonged or severe can lead to problems such as splenomegaly and rapid heart rate. This paper will review primary literature identified through PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Embase concerning the incidence of hemolytic anemia with rasburicase use. From the available data, the occurrence of hemolytic anemia will be discussed.

Nguyen, Annhien P.

2014-01-01

153

The epidemiology of aplastic anemia in Thailand  

PubMed Central

Aplastic anemia has been linked to environmental exposures, from chemicals and medical drugs to infectious agents. The disease occurs more frequently in Asia than in the West, with incidence rates 2- to 3-fold higher. We report updated results of an epidemiologic study conducted in Thailand from 1989 to 2002, in which 541 patients and 2261 controls were enrolled. Exposures were determined by in-person interview. We observed significantly elevated relative risk estimates for benzene (3.5) and other solvents (2.0) and for sulfonamides (5.6), thiazides (3.8), and mebendazole (3.0). Chloramphenicol use was infrequent, and no significant association was observed. Agricultural pesticides were implicated in Khonkaen (northeastern Thailand). There were significant associations with organophosphates (2.1), DDT (6.7), and carbamates (7.4). We found significant risks for farmers exposed to ducks and geese (3.7) and a borderline association with animal fertilizer (2.1). There was a significant association in Khonkaen with drinking other than bottled or distilled water (2.8). Nonmedical needle exposure was associated in Bangkok and Khonkaen combined (3.8). Most striking was the large etiologic fraction in a rural region accounted for by animal exposures and drinking of water from sources such as wells, rural taps, and rainwater, consistent with an infectious etiology for many cases of aplastic anemia in Thailand. PMID:16254144

Issaragrisil, Surapol; Kaufman, David W.; Anderson, Theresa; Chansung, Kanchana; Leaverton, Paul E.; Shapiro, Samuel; Young, Neal S.

2006-01-01

154

The Fanconi anemia pathway and ubiquitin  

PubMed Central

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by aplastic anemia, cancer/leukemia susceptibility and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, such as cisplatin. To date, 12 FA gene products have been identified, which cooperate in a common DNA damage-activated signaling pathway regulating DNA repair (the FA pathway). Eight FA proteins form a nuclear complex harboring E3 ubiquitin ligase activity (the FA core complex) that, in response to DNA damage, mediates the monoubiquitylation of the FA protein FANCD2. Monoubiquitylated FANCD2 colocalizes in nuclear foci with proteins involved in DNA repair, including BRCA1, FANCD1/BRCA2, FANCN/PALB2 and RAD51. All these factors are required for cellular resistance to DNA crosslinking agents. The inactivation of the FA pathway has also been observed in a wide variety of human cancers and is implicated in the sensitivity of cancer cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Drugs that inhibit the FA pathway may be useful chemosensitizers in the treatment of cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; ). PMID:18047734

Jacquemont, Céline; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

2007-01-01

155

Simplification of an Erythropoiesis Model for Design of Anemia Management Protocols in End Stage Renal Disease  

E-print Network

Simplification of an Erythropoiesis Model for Design of Anemia Management Protocols in End Stage be used for anemia management protocol (AMP) design based on formal feedback control methods. · In end of anemia; EPO resistance is often observed. A shortened RBC life-span further contributes to the anemia

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

156

The Role of Anemia in Congestive Heart Failure and Chronic Kidney Insufficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia is a major problem in patients with chronic kidney insuffi- ciency.The development of recombinant human erythropoietin has enabled physicians to correct this anemia. Although anemia has not been considered to be a common or important contributor to congestive heart failure, anemia of any cause can lead to car- diac damage and eventually congestive heart failure. Our joint renal-cardiac heart

Donald S. Silverberg; Dov Wexler; Adrian Iaina

2004-01-01

157

The effect of automated alerts on preoperative anemia management.  

PubMed

Objectives This study evaluated the role of an automated anemia notification system that alerted providers about anemic pre-operative patients. Methods After scheduling surgery, the alert program continuously searched the patient's laboratory data for hemoglobin value(s) in the medical record. When an anemic patient according to the World Health Oganization's criteria was identified, an email was sent to the patient's surgeon, and/or assistant, and/or patient's primary care physician suggesting that the anemia be managed before surgery. Results Thirteen surgeons participated in this pilot study. In 11 months, there were 70 pre-surgery anemia alerts generated on 69 patients. The surgeries were 60 orthopedic, 7 thoracic, 2 general surgery, and 1 urological. The alerts were sent 15±10 days before surgery. No pre-operative anemia treatment could be found in 37 of 69 (54%) patients. Some form of anemia management was found in 32 of 69 (46%) patients. Of the 23 patients who received iron, only 3 of 23 (13%) of these patients started iron shortly after the alert was generated. The alert likely resulted in the postponement of one surgery for anemia correction. Discussion Although anemia diagnosis and management can be complex, it was hoped that receipt of the alert would lead to the management of all anemic patients. Alerts are only effective if they are received and read by a healthcare provider empowered to treat the patient or to make an appropriate referral. Conclusions Automated preoperative alerts alone are not likely to alter surgeons' anemia management practices. These alerts need to be part of a comprehensive anemia management strategy. PMID:25148476

Dilla, Andrew; Wisniewski, Mary Kay; Waters, Jonathan H; Triulzi, Darrell J; Yazer, Mark H

2015-04-01

158

Anemia management: development of a rapidaccess anemia and intravenous iron service  

PubMed Central

This article describes the initiation and evolution of the Rapid-Access Anemia Clinic (RAAC) at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals, London, UK. This clinic was set up to provide diagnosis and treatment, and to coordinate investigative procedures, where necessary, into the underlying causes of anemia. Initially piloted with anemic preoperative orthopedic patients, the clinic now treats a wide range of conditions, deriving from both internal and external referrals. Treatment includes dietary advice, supplementation with iron, vitamin B12 and folate, and blood transfusion. Most patients at the RAAC need iron replacement, the majority of which require intravenous (IV) iron. Therefore the first-line IV iron-administration protocol is carefully considered to ensure viability of the service and patient satisfaction. Four IV irons available in the UK are discussed, with explanation of the benefits and drawbacks of each product and the reasoning behind the IV iron choice at different stages of the RAAC’s development. Costs to the service, affected by IV iron price and administration regimen, are considered, as well as the product’s contraindications. Finally, the authors reflect on the success of the RAAC and how it has improved patients’ quality-of-treatment experience, in addition to benefiting the hospital and National Health Service in achieving specific health-care mandates and directives. Drawing from the authors’ experiences, recommendations are given to assist others in setting up and providing a successful rapid-access anemia service or similar facility. PMID:23950666

Radia, Deepti; Momoh, Ibrahim; Dillon, Richard; Francis, Yvonne; Cameron, Laura; Fagg, Toni-Lee; Overland, Hannah; Robinson, Susan; Harrison, Claire N

2013-01-01

159

Anemia management: development of a rapidaccess anemia and intravenous iron service.  

PubMed

This article describes the initiation and evolution of the Rapid-Access Anemia Clinic (RAAC) at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals, London, UK. This clinic was set up to provide diagnosis and treatment, and to coordinate investigative procedures, where necessary, into the underlying causes of anemia. Initially piloted with anemic preoperative orthopedic patients, the clinic now treats a wide range of conditions, deriving from both internal and external referrals. Treatment includes dietary advice, supplementation with iron, vitamin B12 and folate, and blood transfusion. Most patients at the RAAC need iron replacement, the majority of which require intravenous (IV) iron. Therefore the first-line IV iron-administration protocol is carefully considered to ensure viability of the service and patient satisfaction. Four IV irons available in the UK are discussed, with explanation of the benefits and drawbacks of each product and the reasoning behind the IV iron choice at different stages of the RAAC's development. Costs to the service, affected by IV iron price and administration regimen, are considered, as well as the product's contraindications. Finally, the authors reflect on the success of the RAAC and how it has improved patients' quality-of-treatment experience, in addition to benefiting the hospital and National Health Service in achieving specific health-care mandates and directives. Drawing from the authors' experiences, recommendations are given to assist others in setting up and providing a successful rapid-access anemia service or similar facility. PMID:23950666

Radia, Deepti; Momoh, Ibrahim; Dillon, Richard; Francis, Yvonne; Cameron, Laura; Fagg, Toni-Lee; Overland, Hannah; Robinson, Susan; Harrison, Claire N

2013-01-01

160

Isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis presenting with severe anemia  

PubMed Central

Introduction Gastric polyps exist in a wide variety of types, most of which are small and often benign. Discovery of gastric polyps during Endoscopy necessitates biopsies. Case presentation We present a case report of an isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis in a 26 years old Hispanic female when she was investigated for profound anemia. The Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed numerous gastric polyps filling the entire stomach. She was treated with near-total gastrectomy and her anemia resolved Conclusion Isolated diffuse hyperplasic gastric polyposis with normal gastrin level is a rare entity and can present with severe anemia. PMID:18755016

Jayawardena, Suriya; Anandacoomaraswamy, Dharshan; Burzyantseva, Olga; Abdullah, Muhammad

2008-01-01

161

How I treat Diamond-Blackfan anemia  

PubMed Central

Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is characterized by red cell failure, the presence of congenital anomalies, and cancer predisposition. In addition to being an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, DBA is also categorized as a ribosomopathy as, in more than 50% of cases, the syndrome appears to result from haploinsufficiency of either a small or large subunit-associated ribosomal protein. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism by which haploinsufficiency results in erythroid failure, as well as the other clinical manifestations, remains uncertain. New knowledge regarding genetic and molecular mechanisms combined with robust clinical data from several international patient registries has provided important insights into the diagnosis of DBA and may, in the future, provide new treatments as well. Diagnostic criteria have been expanded to include patients with little or no clinical findings. Patient management is therefore centered on accurate diagnosis, appropriate use of transfusions and iron chelation, corticosteroids, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and a coordinated multidisciplinary approach to these complex patients. PMID:20651069

Muir, Ellen

2010-01-01

162

Ubiquitylation and the Fanconi anemia pathway.  

PubMed

The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway maintains genome stability through co-ordination of DNA repair of interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Disruption of the FA pathway yields hypersensitivity to interstrand crosslinking agents, bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition. Early steps in DNA damage dependent activation of the pathway are governed by monoubiquitylation of FANCD2 and FANCI by the intrinsic FA E3 ubiquitin ligase, FANCL. Downstream FA pathway components and associated factors such as FAN1 and SLX4 exhibit ubiquitin-binding motifs that are important for their DNA repair function, underscoring the importance of ubiquitylation in FA pathway mediated repair. Importantly, ubiquitylation provides the foundations for cross-talk between repair pathways, which in concert with the FA pathway, resolve interstrand crosslink damage and maintain genomic stability. PMID:21605559

Garner, Elizabeth; Smogorzewska, Agata

2011-09-16

163

[Cardiopulmonary complications in sickle cell anemia].  

PubMed

Sickle cell anemia, considered the most prevalent genetic disease among African Americans, is a disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, characterized by the production of hemoglobin S. This abnormal protein polymerizes and facilitates the formation of fibrillar aggregates that alters the erythrocyte morphology. The stiffness of the red blood cells hinders the adequate transit across microcirculation, leading to hemolysis and increased blood viscosity, which ease thrombogenesis and vascular occlusion, resulting in tissue ischemia and microinfarcts. This disease has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, especially in the first three years of life, when a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential. Cardiovascular complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension may develop independently, and each one contributes to increased mortality, being the combination of both risk factors, an important aggravating factor for prognosis and a determinant indicator of mortality. PMID:24215682

Rojas-Jiménez, Sara; Lopera-Valle, Johan; Yabur-Espítia, Mirna

2013-01-01

164

Animal models of Diamond Blackfan Anemia  

PubMed Central

Diamond Blackfan anemia is a genetic syndrome characterized by red blood cell aplasiain association with developmental abnormalities such as growth retardation, orofacial, hand or limb malformations, urogenital anomalies and heart defects. The only known cause is heterozygosity for mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins. Understanding how defective ribosome biogenesis and function, important for all cells, causes defects in erythropoiesis and tissue-specific phenotypes during development is paramount to the evolution of effective treatment protocols. Here, we discuss how animal models based on mammals, insects and fish replicate genetic or developmental aspects of DBA and have led to the identification of pathways and candidate molecules that are important in the pathogenesis of the disease. A recurring theme in many of these models suggests that defective ribosome biogenesis induces a p53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint in cells that require high levels of ribosome production and leads to cell type-specific, whole animal phenotypes. PMID:21435507

McGowan, Kelly A.; Mason, Philip J.

2011-01-01

165

Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

2006-11-01

166

Dapsone-induced methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

The treatment of two common adverse effects of dapsone (methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia) is discussed, and a case of acute dapsone intoxication is described. A pregnant 29-year-old woman was admitted to an emergency room three hours after ingesting 50 tablets of dapsone (100 mg each) and six alcoholic drinks. One hour after admission 50 g of activated charcoal was given p.o., and 65 mg of methylene blue was given i.v. The patient was found to have a methemoglobin concentration of 25.1%. Arterial blood gases while the patient was breathing 4 L/min of oxygen by nasal cannula were PO2, 136 mm Hg (72.1% saturation); PCO2, 28.9 mm Hg; bicarbonate content, 18.9 mmol/L; and pH, 7.42. Oxygen therapy was changed to 100% oxygen by face mask, 50 g of activated charcoal in sorbitol was administered p.o., and another 65 mg of methylene blue was given i.v. Two more 50-g doses of activated charcoal in sorbitol were given (18.5 and 22 hours after dapsone ingestion). Methylene blue 130 mg was given 14 hours after dapsone ingestion, and 65 mg was given 21, 36, and 55.5 hours after ingestion. Methemoglobin concentrations never rose above 20% after the sixth dose of methylene blue. On hospital days 2 and 3, laboratory values were consistent with a diagnosis of hemolytic anemia; the patient received two units of packed red blood cells. The hematocrit decreased over the next three days to 23.9%, and the patient received four units of packed red blood cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1521404

Erstad, B L

1992-09-01

167

Hepatitis associated aplastic anemia: case report and discussion.  

PubMed

Aplastic anemia (AA) is thought to represent an autoimmune disorder leading to generation of activated CD8+ T-cells that target the bone marrow precursors. Hepatitis associated aplastic anemia (HAAA) is a subtype of aplastic anemia that develops within several months ofan episode of acute hepatitis. Etiologic agents include hepatitis viruses (A-E and G), Epstein-Bar virus, cytomegalovirus, HIV, parvovirus B19, and echoviruses amongst others. However, most HAAA cases are labeled "idiopathic" as the inciting agent cannot be identified. Drugs and/or toxins are rarely causal factors. We describe herein a unique case of HAAA linked with the anabolic steroid methasterone that caused a transient cholestatic hepatitis and, subsequently, a severe aplastic anemia in a young man. PMID:25314890

Khurana, Arushi; Dasanu, Constantin A

2014-09-01

168

Genetics Home Reference: Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... Patients and Families Resources for Health Professionals What glossary definitions help with understanding thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia ... many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary . See also Understanding Medical Terminology . References (7 links) ...

169

Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts  

PubMed Central

Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

2013-01-01

170

Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia  

MedlinePLUS

... helps maintain an appropriate balance of iron (iron homeostasis) in developing red blood cells. ABCB7 mutations slightly ... its usual role in heme production and iron homeostasis. Anemia results when heme cannot be produced normally, ...

171

Anemia caused by low iron - infants and toddlers  

MedlinePLUS

... absorbed better when it is in breast milk. Formula with iron added (iron fortified) also provides enough ... milk rather than breast milk or iron-fortified formula are more likely to have anemia. Cow's milk ...

172

Sickle cell anemia causes a distinct pattern of glomerular dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sickle cell anemia causes a distinct pattern of glomerular dysfunction. We characterized glomerular function in adults with sickle cell anemia (SSA): 12 with normal renal function (SSA-controls), and 15 with renal insufficiency (SSA-CRF). GFR was similar in SSA-controls and healthy-controls, however, renal plasma flow was increased in SSA-controls. In SSA-CRF, the albumin and IgG excretion rates were enhanced. The fractional

Antonio Guasch; Millicent Cua; Wei You; William E Mitch

1997-01-01

173

Discontinuing penicillin prophylaxis in children with sickle cell anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the consequences of discontinuing penicillin prophylaxis at 5 years of age in children with sickle cell anemia who had received prophylactic penicillin for much of their lives. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Setting: Eighteen teaching hospitals throughout the United States. Patients: Children with sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS or hemoglobin S ?0-thalassemia) who had received prophylactic penicillin

John M. Falletta; Gerald M. Woods; Joel I. Verter; George R. Buchanan; Charles H. Pegelow; Rathi V. Iyer; Scott T. Miller; C. Tate Holbrook; Thomas R. Kinney; Elliott Vichinsky; David L. Becton; Winfred Wang; Helen S. Johnstone; Doris L. Wethers; Gregory H. Reaman; Michael R. DeBaun; Neil J. Grossman; Karen Kalinyak; James H. Jorgensen; Ann Bjornson; Marilyn D. Thomas; Clarice Reid

1995-01-01

174

Sickle cell anemia with malaria: a rare case report.  

PubMed

Sickle cell disease is the prototype of hereditary hemoglobinopathies, characterized by the production of structurally abnormal hemoglobin. Sickle cell anemia results from a point mutation that leads to substitution of valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position of the ? globin chain. We report a young male admitted with fever and weakness for 3 days. Hematological test reveals Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite and sickle cell anemia. Patient was treated and get cured from malaria and discharged. PMID:24554820

Gupta, Narendra Kumar; Gupta, Meenakshi

2014-03-01

175

Androgen therapy for anemia in elderly uremic patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Androgens were the mainstay of treatment of renal anemia prior to the introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin. With\\u000a the introduction of this recombinant hormone, the protocols of treatment of anemia were completely modified, and the use of\\u000a androgens was relegated to the background. However, several authors have continued showing interest in the use of androgenic\\u000a steroids for the treatment of

Juan F. Navarro; Carmen Mora

2001-01-01

176

Anemia in Cambodia: prevalence, etiology and research needs.  

PubMed

Anemia is a severe global public health problem with serious consequences for both the human and socio-economic health. This paper presents a situation analysis of the burden of anemia in Cambodia, including a discussion of the country-specific etiologies and future research needs. All available literature on the prevalence and etiology of anemia in Cambodia was collected using standard search protocols. Prevalence data was readily identified for pre-school aged children and women of reproductive age, but there is a dearth of information for school-aged children, men and the elderly. Despite progress in nation-wide programming over the past decade, anemia remains a significant public health problem in Cambodia, especially for women and children. Anemia is a multifaceted disease and both nutritional and non-nutritional etiologies were identified, with iron deficiency accounting for the majority of the burden of disease. The current study highlights the need for a national nutrition survey, including collection of data on the iron status and prevalence of anemia in all population groups. It is impossible to develop effective intervention programs without a clear picture of the burden and cause of disease in the country. PMID:22507602

Charles, Christopher V; Summerlee, Alastair J S; Dewey, Cate E

2012-01-01

177

Anemia in the elderly: a public health crisis in hematology.  

PubMed

Over 3 million people in the United States aged 65 years and older are anemic. This condition is associated with significant functional impairment and, perhaps, increased mortality. In March 2004, the American Society of Hematology (in conjunction with the National Institute of Aging) convened a "blue ribbon" panel of twenty physicians who are experts on various aspects of this topic. This paper highlights important consensus concepts resulting from that meeting. In particular, four areas of thought are shared. First, the epidemiology of anemia in the elderly is reviewed, including its definition, its expression in different racial groups, and its wide-ranging manifestations. Second, the pathophysiology of anemia in the elderly is reviewed as pertains to three general etiological categories (nutritional, chronic diseases, and so-called "unexplained" anemias). Particular emphasis is given to pathophysiologic mechanisms of anemia that are potentially unique to this age group. Third, a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of anemia for this patient population for the practicing hematologist is provided. Finally, the public health implications of anemia in the elderly for key stakeholder constituencies will be discussed in the oral presentation. PMID:16304431

Guralnik, Jack M; Ershler, William B; Schrier, Stanley L; Picozzi, Vincent J

2005-01-01

178

Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: an under-estimated problem?  

PubMed

Anemia is one of the most frequent complications and/or extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Iron deficiency even without anemia may impact the quality of life of our IBD patients. In the last 10?years, the understanding of the pathology of iron-deficiency anemia and "anemia of chronic diseases" has increased; new diagnostic tools have been developed and new therapeutic strategies have been discussed. Hepcidin has been identified to be a central regulator of iron absorption from the intestine and of iron plasma levels. Hepcidin is regulated by iron deficiency but also as an acute phase protein by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6. Innovative diagnostic tools have not been introduced in clinical routine or are not available for routine diagnostics. As iron substitution therapy is easy these days with a preference for intravenous substitution, the impact of differential diagnosis of anemia in IBD patients is underestimated. PMID:25646159

Rogler, Gerhard; Vavricka, Stephan

2014-01-01

179

Orofacial manifestations of hematological disorders: anemia and hemostatic disorders.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper is to review the literature and identify orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with particular reference to anemias and disorders of hemostasis. A computerized literature search using MEDLINE was conducted for published articles on orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with emphasis on anemia. Mesh phrases used in the search were: oral diseases AND anaemia; orofacial diseases AND anaemia; orofacial lesions AND anaemia; orofacial manifestations AND disorders of haemostasis. The Boolean operator "AND" was used to combine and narrow the searches. Anemic disorders associated with orofacial signs and symptoms include iron deficiency anemia, Plummer-Vinson syndrome, megaloblastic anemia, sickle cell anemia, thalassaemia and aplastic anemia. The manifestations include conjunctiva and facial pallor, atrophic glossitis, angular stomatitis, dysphagia, magenta tongue, midfacial overgrowth, osteoclerosis, osteomyelitis and paraesthesia/anesthesia of the mental nerve. Orofacial petechiae, conjunctivae hemorrhage, nose-bleeding, spontaneous and post-traumatic gingival hemorrhage and prolonged post-extraction bleeding are common orofacial manifestations of inherited hemostatic disorders such as von Willebrand's disease and hemophilia. A wide array of anemic and hemostatic disorders encountered in internal medicine has manifestations in the oral cavity and the facial region. Most of these manifestations are non-specific, but should alert the hematologist and the dental surgeon to the possibilities of a concurrent disease of hemopoiesis or hemostasis or a latent one that may subsequently manifest itself. PMID:22048588

Adeyemo, Titilope A; Adeyemo, Wasiu L; Adediran, Adewumi; Akinbami, Abd Jaleel A; Akanmu, Alani S

2011-01-01

180

Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque  

SciTech Connect

Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure has been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.

Tucker, C.S. (Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Stoneville (USA)); Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H. (College of Veterinary Medicine, Stoneville, MS (USA))

1989-08-01

181

Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Under-Estimated Problem?  

PubMed Central

Anemia is one of the most frequent complications and/or extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Iron deficiency even without anemia may impact the quality of life of our IBD patients. In the last 10?years, the understanding of the pathology of iron-deficiency anemia and “anemia of chronic diseases” has increased; new diagnostic tools have been developed and new therapeutic strategies have been discussed. Hepcidin has been identified to be a central regulator of iron absorption from the intestine and of iron plasma levels. Hepcidin is regulated by iron deficiency but also as an acute phase protein by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6. Innovative diagnostic tools have not been introduced in clinical routine or are not available for routine diagnostics. As iron substitution therapy is easy these days with a preference for intravenous substitution, the impact of differential diagnosis of anemia in IBD patients is underestimated. PMID:25646159

Rogler, Gerhard; Vavricka, Stephan

2015-01-01

182

Erythropoietin May Improve Anemia in Patients with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Associated with Reticulocytopenia  

PubMed Central

Background Management of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and reticulocytopenia remains challenging. Case Reports Two patients with decompensated AIHA who were receiving immunosuppressive drugs were treated with erythropoietin (EPO). Administration of EPO increased reticulocyte counts and hemoglobin concentrations in both cases. One patient completely recovered following a short course of treatment. Hemolysis could be compensated in the second patient using only mild doses of immunosuppressive drugs in combination with EPO. Conclusion The administration of EPO should be considered in patients with therapy-refractory AIHA, particularly in the presence of reticulocytopenia. PMID:22851939

Arbach, Olga; Funck, Robert; Seibt, Frank; Salama, Abdulgabar

2012-01-01

183

Erythropoietin May Improve Anemia in Patients with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Associated with Reticulocytopenia.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Management of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and reticulocytopenia remains challenging. CASE REPORTS: Two patients with decompensated AIHA who were receiving immunosuppressive drugs were treated with erythropoietin (EPO). Administration of EPO increased reticulocyte counts and hemoglobin concentrations in both cases. One patient completely recovered following a short course of treatment. Hemolysis could be compensated in the second patient using only mild doses of immunosuppressive drugs in combination with EPO. CONCLUSION: The administration of EPO should be considered in patients with therapy-refractory AIHA, particularly in the presence of reticulocytopenia. PMID:22851939

Arbach, Olga; Funck, Robert; Seibt, Frank; Salama, Abdulgabar

2012-06-01

184

Recent advances in treatment of aplastic anemia  

PubMed Central

Recent advances in the treatment of aplastic anemia (AA) made most of patients to expect to achieve a long-term survival. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) from HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD-SCT) is a preferred first-line treatment option for younger patients with severe or very severe AA, whereas immunosuppressive treatment (IST) is an alternative option for others. Horse anti-thymocyte globuline (ATG) with cyclosporin A (CsA) had been a standard IST regimen with acceptable response rate. Recently, horse ATG had been not available and replaced with rabbit ATG in most countries. Subsequently, recent comparative studies showed that the outcomes of patients who received rabbit ATG/CsA were similar or inferior compared to those who received horse ATG/CsA. Therefore, further studies to improve the outcomes of IST, including additional eltrombopag, are necessary. On the other hand, the upper age limit of patients who are able to receive MSD-SCT as first-line treatment is a current issue because of favorable outcomes of MSD-SCT of older patients using fludarabine-based conditioning. In addition, further studies to improve the outcomes of patients who receive allogeneic SCT from alternative donors are needed. In this review, current issues and the newly emerging trends that may improve their outcomes in near futures will be discussed focusing the management of patients with AA. PMID:25378968

Shin, Seung Hwan; Lee, Sung Eun

2014-01-01

185

[History of the therapy of pernicious anemia].  

PubMed

Increased blood cell regeneration in exsanguinated experimental animals treated either with liver or with aqueous liver extracts was reported by Whipple and by Jeney and Jobling, respectively. These findings stimulated Minot and Murphy to provide evidence for the efficacy of liver against anaemia in clinical studies. After oral administration of liver (45-50 g per day) for 45 patients with anaemia perniciosa improvement of the hematological status was demonstrated. Consequently, for proving the therapeutic value of liver therapy Whipple, Minot and Murphy received Nobel price in 1934. The isolation of the antianemic factor from the liver has been succeeded in 1948 and designated as vitamin B12. At the same time Lucy Wills applied yeast for the treatment of pregnant women with anemia related to undernourishment. The conclusions of this study inspired the discovery of folate. The detailed investigation of the mode of action of vitamin B12 and folate enriched our knowledge in the area of pathophysiology and extended the clinical application of these two drugs. PMID:24161600

Jeney, András

2013-11-01

186

Characteristics of sickle cell anemia in Yemen.  

PubMed

We studied 136 males and 105 females with sickle cell anemia to determine the characteristics of the disease in Yemen. Their mean age [± SD (standard deviation)] was 12.8 ± 9.5 years (range: 9 months-40 years). Taiz, Hudaydah and Hajjah governorates, in the South-Central and the Northwestern provinces, showed the highest prevalence. Eighty percent of the patients had family history of the disease, 73.0% patients had history of parental consanguinity and 20.7% of death of relative(s) due to the disease; 5.4% patients were older than 30 years of age. Pain, jaundice and infection were the most frequent features. Splenomegaly, cholelithiasis, osteomyelitis, acute chest syndrome (ACS), osteonecrosis and stroke occurred in 12.0, 9.5, 8.7, 6.6, 6.6 and 2.9%, respectively. Priapism and leg ulcers were rare. The mean laboratory values (obtained in the steady state) were: hemoglobin (Hb) 7.9 g/dL, WBC 14.08 × 10(9)/L, platelet 460 × 10(9)/L, reticulocytes 14.5%, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 597 U/L, Hb F (?2?2) 16.69%, Hb S [?6(A3)Glu?Val, GAG>GTG] 77.31% and Hb A(2) (?2?2) 1.47%, respectively. There was no significant difference between South-Central and Northwestern provinces regarding clinical events and hematological parameters. PMID:23234436

Al-Ghazaly, Jameel; Al-Dubai, Waled; Abdullah, Munasser; Al-Mahagri, Altaf; Al-Gharasi, Leila

2013-01-01

187

The Fanconi anemia pathway of genomic maintenance.  

PubMed

Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessive syndrome with both autosomal and X-linked inheritance, features diverse clinical symptoms, such as progressive bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, chromosomal instability and susceptibility to cancer. At least 12 genetic subtypes have been described (FA-A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L, M) and all except FA-I have been linked to a distinct gene. Most FA proteins form a complex that activates the FANCD2 protein via monoubiquitination, while FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 function downstream of this step. The FA proteins typically lack functional domains, except for FANCJ/BRIP1 and FANCM, which are DNA helicases, and FANCL, which is probably an E3 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Based on the hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents, the FA proteins are thought to function in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links, which block the progression of DNA replication forks. Here we present a hypothetical model, which not only describes the assembly of the FA pathway, but also positions this pathway in the broader context of DNA cross-link repair. Finally, the possible role for the FA pathway, in particular FANCF and FANCB, in the origin of sporadic cancer is discussed. PMID:16675878

Levitus, Marieke; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P

2006-01-01

188

Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia  

PubMed Central

Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P?=?0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P?=?0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2?=?0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2?=?0.05) and age (partial r2?=?0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

2014-01-01

189

Infections and inequalities: anemia in AIDS, the disadvantages of poverty  

PubMed Central

Objective To study anemia in AIDS patients and its relation with socioeconomic, employment status and educational levels. Methods A total number of 442 patients who visited the Infectious Diseases University Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina were included in the study. Patients were dividied into two groups, i.e. one with anemia and the other without anemia. Anemia epidemiology and its relationship with educational level, housing, job situation, monthly income, total daily caloric intake and weekly intake of meat were evaluated. Results Anemia was found in 228 patients (54%). Comparing patients with or without anemia, a statistically significant difference was found (P<0.000?1) in those whose highest educational level reached was primary school, who lived in a precarious home, who had no stable job or were unable to work, whose income was less than 30 dollars per month, whose meat consumption was less than twice a week or received less than 8?000 calories per day. Conclusions The high prevalence of anemia found in poor patients with AIDS suggests that poverty increases the risk to suffer from this hematological complication. The relationship between economic development policies and AIDS is complex. Our results seem to point to the fact that AIDS epidemic may affect economic development and in turn be affected by it. If we consider that AIDS affects the economically active adult population, despite recent medical progress it usually brings about fatal consequences, especially within the poorest sectors of society where the disease reduces the average life expectancy, increases health care demand and tends to exacerbate poverty and iniquity. PMID:23569955

Gonzalez, Lucia; Seley, Celeste; Martorano, Julieta; Garcia-Moreno, Isabella; Troncoso, Alcides

2012-01-01

190

Issues in prevention of iron deficiency anemia in India.  

PubMed

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be major public health problem in India. It is estimated that about 20% of maternal deaths are directly related to anemia and another 50% of maternal deaths are associated with it. The question, therefore, is why, despite being the first country to launch the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme in 1970, the problem of IDA remains so widespread. As is to be expected, the economic implications of IDA are also massive. The issues of control of IDA in India are multiple. Inadequate dietary intake of iron, defective iron absorption, increased iron requirements due to repeated pregnancies and lactation, poor iron reserves at birth, timing of umbilical cord clamping, timing and type of complementary food introduction, frequency of infections in children, and excessive physiological blood loss during adolescence and pregnancy are some of the causes responsible for the high prevalence of anemia in India. In addition, there are other multiple programmatic and organizational issues. This review, therefore, is an attempt to examine the current burden of anemia in India, its epidemiology, and the various issues regarding its prevention and control, as well as to offer some innovative approaches to deal with this major health problem. PMID:24984990

Anand, Tanu; Rahi, Manju; Sharma, Pragya; Ingle, Gopal K

2014-01-01

191

Abnormal erythrocyte membrane protein pattern in severe megaloblastic anemia.  

PubMed Central

The erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of patients with megaloblastic anemia was determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. In severe megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid or vitamin B12 deficiency, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was grossly abnormal, lacking bands 1, 2 (spectrin), and 3 and having several diffuse, faster migrating bands. After adequate vitamin replacement therapy, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern returned to normal. In mild megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid of vitamin B12 deficiency, and in severe iron deficiency anemia, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was normal. Erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of normal membranes did not change after mixing with abnormal membranes before polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Protease activity extracted from membranes of megalocytes was not different from normal. These findings indicate that the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern is abnormal in severe megaloblastic anemia and that this abnormality is not secondary to increased activity of the endogenous erythrocyte membrane proteinase. Images PMID:659579

Ballas, S K

1978-01-01

192

Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease  

PubMed Central

Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient’s quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. PMID:23766655

Goldberg, Neil D

2013-01-01

193

Chk1 Haploinsufficiency Results in Anemia and Defective Erythropoiesis  

PubMed Central

Background Erythropoiesis is a highly regulated and well-characterized developmental process responsible for providing the oxygen transport system of the body. However, few of the mechanisms involved in this process have been elucidated. Checkpoint Kinase 1 (Chk1) is best known for its role in the cell cycle and DNA damage pathways, and it has been shown to play a part in several pathways which when disrupted can lead to anemia. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that haploinsufficiency of Chk1 results in 30% of mice developing anemia within the first year of life. The anemic Chk1+/? mice exhibit distorted spleen and bone marrow architecture, and abnormal erythroid progenitors. Furthermore, Chk1+/? erythroid progenitors exhibit an increase in spontaneous DNA damage foci and improper contractile actin ring formation resulting in aberrant enucleation during erythropoiesis. A decrease in Chk1 RNA has also been observed in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts, further supporting a role for Chk1 in clinical anemia. Conclusions/Significance Clinical trials of Chk1 inhibitors are currently underway to treat cancer, and thus it will be important to track the effects of these drugs on red blood cell development over an extended period. Our results support a role for Chk1 in maintaining the balance between erythroid progenitors and enucleated erythroid cells during differentiation. We show disruptions in Chk1 levels can lead to anemia. PMID:20052416

Chen, Alice J.; Goodell, Margaret A.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

2010-01-01

194

Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1980-1981)  

SciTech Connect

The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs each type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.

Bernstein, S.E.

1981-07-02

195

Macrocytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia Induced by Orlistat  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The overall incidence of obesity and its prevalence is increasing continuously. The obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor whose importance is increasing too. It is associated with many chronic conditions such as type II diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular diseases. The obesity is also implicated as a risk factor for several kinds of cancer such as esophagus, pancreas, colon, rectum, breast cancer in menopausal women. The treatment of the obesity may reduce the incidence of these diseases. The mainstray of the treatment of obesity is changing the lifestyles, but obesity´s treatment may need drug therapy or even though surgical treatment. Orlistat is a specific inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases, which stops fat absortion. It is used along with a hypocaloric diet, for obesity´s treatment. The beneficial effects of orlistat include weight loss, the improvement of blood pressure´s control, it may delay the development of diabetes mellitus, and it may reduce HbA1c. Case Report: Besides the interaction with other drugs (mainly warfarin and amiodarone). Orlistat´s mainly side effects are gastrointestinal disorders such as the existence of oily spotting from the rectum, abdominal pain or discomfort, fecal urgency. There are also side effects at other levels, like flu symptoms, hypoglycemia, heathache or upper respiratory infections. There are other side effects with very low incidence but clinically relevant like pancreatitis, subacute liver failure, severe liver disease, myopathy, or tubular necrosis secondary to oxalate nephropathy induced by Orlistat. Discussion: In this case report appears a new adverse effect of Orlistat that has not been described above: thrombopenia and macrocytic anemia. PMID:24719628

Palacios-Martinez, David; Garcia-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Montero-Santamaria, Nieves; Villar-Ruiz, Olga Patricia; Ruiz-Garcia, Antonio; Diaz-Alonso, Raquel Asuncion

2013-01-01

196

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside.  

PubMed

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT) still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services. PMID:24678166

Chaudhary, R K; Das, Sudipta Sekhar

2014-01-01

197

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT) still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The “best match” or “least incompatible units” can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue “best match” packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services. PMID:24678166

Chaudhary, R. K.; Das, Sudipta Sekhar

2014-01-01

198

Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980  

SciTech Connect

Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

1980-08-01

199

Pernicious anemia: What are the actual diagnosis criteria?  

PubMed Central

A gastric intrinsic factor output under 200 U/h after pentagastrin stimulation (N > 2000 U/h) is specific for pernicious anemia. The other findings are either variable or non specific. Serum intrinsic factor antibodies, considered as specific in general practice, are present only in half of the patients with pernicious anemia. In their absence, since the disappearance of the Schilling tests, the gastric tubage currently used for the study of gastric acid secretion, is obligatory for the simultaneous study of intrinsic factor output. This study is important to eliminate another disease much more frequent than pernicious anemia, the protein bound to cobalamin malabsorption was observed in achlorhydric simple atrophic gastritis in the presence of intrinsic factor secretion. PMID:21274387

Cattan, Daniel

2011-01-01

200

[5 episodes of transient aplastic anemia in 3 patients].  

PubMed

We report five episodes of severe aplastic anemia (AA) followed by spontaneous remission in three patients. They were classified as transient aplastic anemia (TAA). Two were females and one male of 32, 56 and 41 years of age, respectively; the man had two recurrences. They had been in contact with insecticides, solvents or drug ingestion. The three had fever, anemia and muco-cutaneous purpura. Supportive measures were used (transfusion of packed red blood cells and platelets, antibiotics, corticosteroids and danazol, the latter two given for ten days in three episodes). They showed spontaneous remission after 16 to 45 days of evolution. The patients did not suffer infection or myeloproliferative disorders which might explain the AA. Transient AA is infrequent and should be considered a variant of AA. PMID:9707996

Pizzuto-Chávez, J; Gómez-Morales, E; Sánchez-Valle, E; Chávez-Sánchez, G; Morales-Polanco, M R

1997-01-01

201

Prevention of anemia alleviates heart hypertrophy in copper deficient rats  

SciTech Connect

The present investigation was designed to examine the role of anemia in the cardiomegaly and myocardial pathology of copper deficiency. Weanling rats were fed a copper deficient diet containing either starch (ST) or fructose (FRU) for five weeks. Six rats consuming the FRU diet were intraperitoneally injected once a week with 1.0 ml/100g bw of packed red blood cells (RBC) obtained from copper deficient rats fed ST. FRU rats injected with RBC did not develop anemia. Additionally, none of the injected rats exhibited heart hypertrophy or gross pathology and all survived. In contrast, non-injected FRU rats were anemic, exhibited severe signs of copper deficiency which include heart hypertrophy with gross pathology, and 44% died. Maintaining the hematocrit with RBC injections resulted in normal heart histology and prevented the mortality associated with the fructose x copper interaction. The finding suggest that the anemia associated with copper deficiency contributes to heart pathology.

Lure, M.D.; Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G. (Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (United States) Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States) Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States))

1991-03-11

202

Benign gastric ulcer in a patient with pernicious anemia.  

PubMed

This is the report of the presence of a benign gastric ulcer in a patient with achlorhydria and documented pernicious anemia. The pernicious anemia was established by a Histalog-fast achlorhydria, a Schilling test of 2.1% excretion of tagges vitamin B12 in a 24-hr urine, and reticulocytosis after administration of cyanocobalamine. Following Histalog (1.5 mg per kg of body weight), the gastric volume was 40 ml, there was no acid, and the pH was 8.1. The ulcer demonstrated by gastroscopy was confirmed at gastrectomy. Histological examination of the ulcer and the remainder of the stomach showed no malignancy. The principal conclusion of this paper is that the patient did not have an acid-produced ulcer, but that bile regurgitation coupled with alcohol ingestion produced the lesion. Surgical investigation of the ulcer seemed mandatory because of the known increased incidence of gastric carcinoma in patients with pernicious anemia. PMID:1158091

Manier, J W; Beltaos, E

1975-09-01

203

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in patients with ?-thalassemia major.  

PubMed

Hemolysis is a common feature in patients with ?-thalassemia major. As a result, autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicating ?-thalassemia is easily overlooked. Here, the authors described the clinical features and management of 7 patients with ?-thalassemia major and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. These patients had fever, cough, and tea-colored urine on admission. The laboratory investigations showed a significant drop in hemoglobin and increased serum bilirubin. Coombs' tests revealed that anti-immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-C3 was positive in 7 and 5 cases, respectively, whereas anti-Rh E alloantibody was positive in 3 cases. All the patients received corticosteroids treatments and blood transfusions. Patients with anti-Rh E alloantibodies also received immunoglobulin treatments. Six of the patients responded well to the management, but 1 patient developed recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia that required cyclosporin A treatment. All the patients remained well by following up for more than 6 months. PMID:22475299

Xu, Lu-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei; Weng, Wen-Jun; Huang, Ke; Zhang, Ya-Ting

2012-04-01

204

Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease  

PubMed Central

Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body’s loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

Miller, Jeffery L.

2014-01-01

205

Idiopathic immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in a calf.  

PubMed

Severe anemia was found in a 4-month-old heifer, which was admitted with a 1-day history of anorexia, signs of depression, and recumbency. A diagnosis of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IHA) was made on the basis of a Coomb's titer of 1:128 and decreased resistance to osmotic stress, as determined by an RBC fragility test. Anaplasmosis and leptospirosis were ruled out as possible causes of the IHA. Other causes of hemolytic anemia, including intoxication by copper, water, Brassica spp, or drugs were ruled out. Therefore the IHA was considered idiopathic. Treatment consisted of supportive therapy, oxytetracycline, and dexamethasone. After 60 days of treatment, CBC, Coomb's test result, and RBC fragility were within normal limits. PMID:1644656

Fenger, C K; Hoffsis, G F; Kociba, G J

1992-07-01

206

Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care  

PubMed Central

Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

2009-01-01

207

Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia  

PubMed Central

Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID:24379786

Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

2013-01-01

208

From a Dry Bone to a Genetic Portrait: A Case Study of Sickle Cell Anemia  

E-print Network

From a Dry Bone to a Genetic Portrait: A Case Study of Sickle Cell Anemia MARINA FAERMAN,1* ALMUT identification; Y chromosome polymorphic markers; sickle cell anemia ABSTRACT The potential and reliability sample, which represented a documented case of sickle cell anemia. -globin gene sequences obtained from

209

Mechanisms of Homogeneous Nucleation of Polymers of Sickle Cell Anemia Hemoglobin in Deoxy State  

E-print Network

Mechanisms of Homogeneous Nucleation of Polymers of Sickle Cell Anemia Hemoglobin in Deoxy State, TX 77204-4004, USA The primary pathogenic event of sickle cell anemia is the polymerization reserved. Keywords: sickle cell anemia; hemoglobin S polymerization; fiber nucleation; homogeneous

Vekilov, Peter

210

Aplastic anemia in cats – clinicopathological features and associated disease conditions 1996–2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

A retrospective study of 128 feline bone marrow reports identified 13 cases of aplastic anemia. Clinical diagnoses included chronic renal failure (n=5), feline leukemia virus infection (n=2), hyperthyroidism treated with methimazole (n=1) and idiopathic aplastic anemia (n=5). In some cats, starvation may play a role in the development of marrow aplasia. Some cats with aplastic anemia can have prolonged survival

Douglas J. Weiss

2006-01-01

211

Plenary paper Carboxy terminal region of the Fanconi anemia protein, FANCG/XRCC9,  

E-print Network

Plenary paper Carboxy terminal region of the Fanconi anemia protein, FANCG/XRCC9, is required D. D'Andrea Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive cancer susceptibility syndrome with eight Introduction Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive cancer suscepti- bility syndrome characterized

212

Hierarchical Models for Screening of Iron Deficiency Anemia Technical Report No. 99--14  

E-print Network

Hierarchical Models for Screening of Iron Deficiency Anemia Technical Report No. 99--14 Department and Background Anemia, a reduction in the circulating red cell mass that may diminish the oxygen­carrying capacity of the blood, is one of the most common medical problems. For diagnostic evalu­ ation of anemia

Smyth, Padhraic

213

ForPeerReview Molecular basis of Diamond-Blackfan anemia  

E-print Network

ForPeerReview Molecular basis of Diamond-Blackfan anemia: Structure and function analysis of RPS19 basis of Diamond-Blackfan anemia: Structure and function analysis of RPS19 Running title : Crystal) Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital disease linked to mutations in the ribosomal protein

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

PREDICTING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HYDROXYUREA IN INDIVIDUAL SICKLE CELL ANEMIA PATIENTS  

E-print Network

of two -chains and two -chains (22). Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disease in which the two - chains1 PREDICTING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HYDROXYUREA IN INDIVIDUAL SICKLE CELL ANEMIA PATIENTS Homayoun patients with sickle cell anemia. The study described in this paper was undertaken to develop the ability

Valafar, Faramarz

215

Racial variation in the relationship of anemia with mortality and mobility disability among older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia is more common among older blacks than older whites. However, it is unclear whether anemia predicts adverse events similarly in both races. Data on 1018 black and 1583 white adults aged 71 to 82 years were analyzed. Anemia, as defined by World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, was used to predict mortal- ity over 6 years and incidence of mobility

Kushang V. Patel; Tamara B. Harris; Marion Faulhaber; Sara B. Angleman; Stephanie Connelly; Douglas C. Bauer; Lewis H. Kuller; Anne B. Newman; Jack M. Guralnik; J.-Y. Zhang; Z. Zhang; X. Wang; J.-L. Fu; J. Yao; Y. Jiao; L. Chen; H. Zhang; J. Wei; L. Jin; M. Shi; G. F. Gao; H. Wu; F.-S. Wang; W. G. Wierda; S. O'Brien; S. Faderl; A. Ferrajoli; K.-A. Do; J. Cortes; D. Thomas; G. Garcia-Manero; C. Koller; M. Beran; F. Giles; F. Ravandi; S. Lerner; H. Kantarjian; M. Keating; R. Hehlmann; U. Berger; M. Pfirrmann; H. Heimpel; A. Hochhaus; J. Hasford; H.-J. Kolb; T. Lahaye; O. Maywald; A. Reiter; D. K. Hossfeld; C. Huber; H. Loffler; H. Pralle; W. Queisser; A. Tobler; C. Nerl; M. Solenthaler; M. E. Goebeler; M. Griesshammer; T. Fischer; S. Kremers; H. Eimermacher; M. Pfreundschuh; W.-D. Hirschmann; K. Lechner; B. Wassmann; C. Falge; H. H. Kirchner

2007-01-01

216

Diamond Blackfan Anemia Treatment: Past, Present, and Future  

PubMed Central

Despite significant improvements in our understanding of the pathophysiology of Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA), there have been few advances in therapy. The cornerstones of treatment remain corticosteroids, chronic red cell transfusions, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, each of which is fraught with complications. In this article, we will review the history of therapies that have been offered to patients with DBA, summarize the current standard of care including management of side effects, and discuss novel therapeutics that are being developed in the context of the research into the roles of ribosomal haploinsufficiency and p53 activation in Diamond Blackfan anemia. PMID:21435508

Narla, Anupama; Vlachos, Adrianna; Nathan, David G.

2011-01-01

217

Evaluation and management of anemia in the elderly.  

PubMed

Anemia is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of adverse outcomes in the elderly, including hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality. What constitutes appropriate evaluation and management for an elderly patient with anemia, and when to initiate a referral to a hematologist, are significant issues. Attempts to identify suggested hemoglobin levels for blood transfusion therapy have been confounded for elderly patients with their co-morbidities. Since no specific recommended hemoglobin threshold has stood the test of time, prudent transfusion practices to maintain hemoglobin thresholds of 9-10 g/dL in the elderly are indicated, unless or until evidence emerges to indicate otherwise. PMID:24122955

Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Schrier, Stanley L

2014-01-01

218

Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in a toddler with iron deficiency anemia.  

PubMed

Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is an increasingly recognized cause of neurological morbidity and mortality within the pediatric population. Unlike its manifestation in the adult population, CSVT in children has a broad and often multifactorial cause. Our case describes an 18-month-old young boy presenting to the emergency department twice during a 48-hour period with vomiting and lethargy. The child was found to have a sagittal sinus venous thrombosis caused by severe dietary iron deficiency anemia. Severe iron deficiency anemia has been linked to CSVT formation in several recent case reports. PMID:21057282

Habis, Arie; Hobson, Wendy L; Greenberg, Richard

2010-11-01

219

Coomb’s Positive Hemolytic Anemia Due To Insect Bite  

PubMed Central

Hemolytic anemia has occasionally been described in association with insect bites. The venom of certain spiders, bees and wasps, and some snakes can rarely cause intravascular hemolysis. We report here a case of Coombs positive hemolytic anemia due to an insect bite. These bites often pose diagnostic challenges and when associated with systemic manifestations necessitate early intervention. This communication reviews the clinico- hematologic spectrum in these cases and also emphasizes the need to capture the insect as identification would help in early diagnosis and management. PMID:22400097

2007-01-01

220

EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ANEMIA IN THE ELDERLY  

PubMed Central

Anemia is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of adverse outcomes in the elderly, including hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality. What constitutes appropriate evaluation and management for an elderly patient with anemia, and when to initiate a referral to a hematologist, are significant issues. Attempts to identify suggested hemoglobin levels for blood transfusion therapy have been confounded for elderly patients with their co-morbidities. Since no specific recommended hemoglobin threshold has stood the test of time, prudent transfusion practices to maintain hemoglobin thresholds of 9–10 g/dl in the elderly are indicated, unless or until evidence emerges to indicate otherwise. PMID:24122955

Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Schrier, Stanley L.

2015-01-01

221

Therapy of aplastic anemia with sequential antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporin.  

PubMed

Five consecutive patients with severe aplastic anemia were treated with antithymocyte globulin followed by cyclosporin A. All received antithymocyte globulin initially, and because of lack of response within a 4 week period, cyclosporin was administered subsequently. Hematologic improvement occurred within four months of initiation of cyclosporin. Four patients no longer require blood product support, while one remains transfusion-dependent. In two patients, thrombocytopenia developed when the cyclosporin was tapered but re-institution of the drug resulted in a prompt improvement of counts. These observations indicate that the sequential use of antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporin may be an effective therapeutic approach in the treatment of severe aplastic anemia. PMID:2012065

Doolittle, G C; Bodensteiner, D C; Skikne, B S; Amare, M

1991-02-01

222

How to define anemia in children with chronic kidney disease?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a cross-sectional study, we compared the prevalence of anemia based on age- and gender-specific reference intervals for\\u000a hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct) with the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) anemia definition (Hgb?

Guido Filler; Kyle Mylrea; Janusz Feber; Hubert Wong

2007-01-01

223

Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

2014-02-14

224

Chromosomes to Genes to Proteins: The Story of Sickle Cell Anemia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This unit, developed by Charlotte Mulvihill, DeAnn Campbell, and Megan Waugh at Oklahoma City Community College, explores the story of "disease genes" and sickle cell anemia. The unit is divided into six parts, each one with questions that check for student understanding: Molecular Biology of Sickle Cell Anemia, Genetics of Sickle Cell Anemia, a Laboratory in which students use electrophoresis to test blood for the disease, Bioinformatics of Sickle Cell Anemia, Inquiry on Sickle Cell Anemia, and an Assessment section with a number of questions for students to complete.

Campbell, DeAnn

225

Abnormal Pulmonary Function in Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale: Pulmonary complications of sickle cell anemia (Hb-SS) commonly cause morbidity, yet few large studies of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in this population have been reported. Objectives: PFTs (spirometry, lung volumes, and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO)) from 310 adults with Hb-SS were ana- lyzed to determine the pattern of pulmonary dysfunction and their association with other systemic complications

Elizabeth S. Klings; Diego F. Wyszynski; Vikki G. Nolan; Martin H. Steinberg

2006-01-01

226

Hydroxyurea and sickle cell anemia: effect on quality of life  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Multicenter Study of Hydroxyurea (HU) in Sickle Cell Anemia (MSH) previously showed that daily oral HU reduces painful sickle cell (SS) crises by 50% in patients with moderate to severe disease. The morbidity associated with this disease is known to have serious negative impact on the overall quality of life(QOL) of affected individuals. METHODS: The data in this

Samir K Ballas; Franca B Barton; Myron A Waclawiw; Paul Swerdlow; James R Eckman; Charles H Pegelow; Mabel Koshy; Bruce A Barton; Duane R Bonds

2006-01-01

227

Early glomerular dysfunction in patients with sickle cell anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to analyze the determinants of glomerular filtration in nonnephrotic young adult patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA). We prospectively screened 14 patients with homozygous SCA who had normal plasma creatinine concentrations and normal or moderately elevated albuminuria (

F Schmitt; F Martinez; G Brillet; I Giatras; G Choukroun; R Girot; D Bachir; F Galacteros; B Lacour; JP Grunfeld

1998-01-01

228

The Anemia of Inflammation\\/Malignancy: Mechanisms and Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia is a common complication in patients with inflammatory diseases of many kinds, including cancer. The mechanisms that have captured the most attention include cytokine-mediated changes in both the production of and the response to erythropoietin (Epo), as well as important alterations in iron metabo- lism. The last is brought about by the relatively recently recognized peptide hormone, hepcidin. The

John W. Adamson

2008-01-01

229

Perioperative anemia management in colorectal cancer patients: a pragmatic approach.  

PubMed

Anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, is highly prevalent among patients with colorectal cancer. Inflammatory cytokines lead to iron restricted erythropoiesis further decreasing iron availability and impairing iron utilization. Preoperative anemia predicts for decreased survival. Allogeneic blood transfusion is widely used to correct anemia and is associated with poorer surgical outcomes, increased post-operative nosocomial infections, longer hospital stays, increased rates of cancer recurrence and perioperative venous thromboembolism. Infections are more likely to occur in those with low preoperative serum ferritin level compared to those with normal levels. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, minimizes or eliminates allogeneic blood transfusion. This includes restrictive transfusion policy, thromboprophylaxis and anemia management to improve outcomes. Normalization of preoperative hemoglobin levels is a World Health Organization recommendation. Iron repletion should be routinely ordered when indicated. Oral iron is poorly tolerated with low adherence based on published evidence. Intravenous iron is safe and effective but is frequently avoided due to misinformation and misinterpretation concerning the incidence and clinical nature of minor infusion reactions. Serious adverse events with intravenous iron are extremely rare. Newer formulations allow complete replacement dosing in 15-60 min markedly facilitating care. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents may improve response rates. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management used to minimize or eliminate allogeneic blood transfusion is indicated to improve outcomes. PMID:24587673

Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Auerbach, Michael

2014-02-28

230

Anemia, Heart Failure and Evidence-Based Clinical management  

PubMed Central

Anemia is a prevalent comorbidity and marker of a poorer prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). Its clinical relevance, as well as its pathophysiology and the clinical management of these patients are important subjects in the specialized literature. In the present review, we describe the current concepts on the pathophysiology of anemia in HF, its diagnostic criteria, and the recommendations for iron supplementation. Also, we make a critical analysis of the major studies showing evidences on the benefits of this supplementation. The four main components of anemia are addressed: chronic disease, dilutional, "renal" and malabsorption. In patients with HF, the diagnostic criteria are the same as those used in the general population: serum ferritin levels lower than 30 mcg/L in patients without kidney diseases and lower than 100 mcg/L or serum ferritin levels between 100-299 mcg/L with transferring saturation lower than 20% in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Finally, the therapeutic possibilities for anemia in this specific patient population are discussed. PMID:23917508

Pereira, Camila Alves; Roscani, Meliza Goi; Zanati, Silméia Garcia; Matsubara, Beatriz Bojikian

2013-01-01

231

Influence of Maternal Anemia During Pregnancy on Placenta and Newborns  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Sideropenic anemia is a common pregnancy disorder. Depending on severity, maternal anemia can significantly influence morphometric characteristic of placental tissue, pregnancy course and outcome. Objectives: to estimate if maternal anemia a) results with significant placental changes; b) influence on newborn weight, length and vitality. Patients, material and methods: Research included 100 women and their newborns, 50 anemic, and 50 women in the control group. Sixty placentas were collected, placental mass and volume was determined, and blood vessels of terminal villi were stereologically analyzed. Newborns mass and body length, and Apgar scores within 1 and 5 minutes after delivery were recorded. The results: Placentas of anemic pregnant women showed significant increase of terminal villi blood vessels (224,18 vs. 197,00 cm3; p<0,0001), but total placental mass and volume did not differ significantly. Anemic mothers’ newborns were significantly shorter (51,76 vs. 55,54 cm; p<0,0001), smaller body mass (3048,00 vs. 3615,60 g; p<0,0001) and delivered one week early (38,2 vs. 39,2 GW; p<0,0001), but not significantly poorer vitality (p>0,05) comparing with the control group. Conclusion: Sideropenic anemia increase placental maturity, that could be a possible cause of earlier spontaneous delivery among anemic women. The anemic mothers’ newborns are shorter and lower body mass, but not poorer vitality index. PMID:25568530

Lelic, Melisa; Bogdanovic, Gordana; Ramic, Suada; Brkicevic, Elvira

2014-01-01

232

Isocitrate ameliorates anemia by suppressing the erythroid iron restriction response  

PubMed Central

The unique sensitivity of early red cell progenitors to iron deprivation, known as the erythroid iron restriction response, serves as a basis for human anemias globally. This response impairs erythropoietin-driven erythropoiesis and underlies erythropoietic repression in iron deficiency anemia. Mechanistically, the erythroid iron restriction response results from inactivation of aconitase enzymes and can be suppressed by providing the aconitase product isocitrate. Recent studies have implicated the erythroid iron restriction response in anemia of chronic disease and inflammation (ACDI), offering new therapeutic avenues for a major clinical problem; however, inflammatory signals may also directly repress erythropoiesis in ACDI. Here, we show that suppression of the erythroid iron restriction response by isocitrate administration corrected anemia and erythropoietic defects in rats with ACDI. In vitro studies demonstrated that erythroid repression by inflammatory signaling is potently modulated by the erythroid iron restriction response in a kinase-dependent pathway involving induction of the erythroid-inhibitory transcription factor PU.1. These results reveal the integration of iron and inflammatory inputs in a therapeutically tractable erythropoietic regulatory circuit. PMID:23863711

Richardson, Chanté L.; Delehanty, Lorrie L.; Bullock, Grant C.; Rival, Claudia M.; Tung, Kenneth S.; Kimpel, Donald L.; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Goldfarb, Adam N.

2013-01-01

233

Precursors of Executive Function in Infants With Sickle Cell Anemia  

PubMed Central

Executive dysfunction occurs in sickle cell anemia, but there are few early data. Infants with sickle cell anemia (n = 14) and controls (n = 14) performed the “A-not-B” and Object Retrieval search tasks, measuring precursors of executive function at 9 and 12 months. Significant group differences were not found. However, for the A-not-B task, 7 of 11 sickle cell anemia infants scored in the lower 2 performance categories at 9 months, but only 1 at 12 months (P = .024); controls obtained scores at 12 months that were statistically comparable to the scores they had already obtained at 9 months. On the Object Retrieval task, 9- and 12-month controls showed comparable scores, whereas infants with sickle cell anemia continued to improve (P = .027); at 9 months, those with lower hemoglobin oxygen saturation passed fewer trials (R s = 0.670, P = .024) and took longer to obtain the toy (R s = –0.664, P = .013). Subtle delays in acquiring developmental skills may underlie abnormal executive function in childhood. PMID:22859700

Hogan, Alexandra M.; Telfer, Paul T.; Kirkham, Fenella J.; de Haan, Michelle

2013-01-01

234

THE ERYTHROPOIETIC ACTIVITY OF CHOLINE CHLORIDE IN MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

M OOSNICK, Schleicher, and Peterson' reported in 1945 that the administra- tion of choline chloride resulted in the hematological remission of a case of pernicious anemia refractory to parenteral liver therapy. This action, attributed to choline, appeared to merit further study since, if it were confirmed, it would be desirable not only to assess the value of choline in the

J. DAVIS; ALEXANDER BROWN

235

Fanconi's anemia: Anomaly of enzyme passage through the nuclear membrane?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In cells of Fanconi's anemia (FA) spontaneous breakage of chromosomes was first recognized by Schroeder et al. (1964). Sensitivity to bivalent alkylants has been found to be a constant feature, whereas low levels of several repair-related enzymes have been described in different FA cell lines. In a family with known FA, during a further pregnancy the prenatal diagnosis of the

E. Wunder; U. Burghardt; B. Lang

1981-01-01

236

Gastrin biosynthesis in the antrum of patients with pernicious anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The gastrin precursor progastrin produces multiple alternative active products, but the pathways of posttranslational processing in human antral mucosa have not yet been studied directly. The aim of this study was to investigate the biosynthetic relationships and release kinetics of newly synthesized progastrin-derived peptides in the antrum of patients with pernicious anemia.METHODS: Antral mucosal explants were incubated

A Varro; GJ Dockray; GW Bate; C Vaillant; A Higham; E Armitage; DG Thompson

1997-01-01

237

Studies of the pathogenesis of anemia of inflammation: erythrocyte survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erythrocyte survival was investigated in healthy cats and in cats with sterile abscesses. Erythrocyte survival time in cats with sterile abscesses was found to be significantly reduced. The erythrocyte destruction appeared to be the major factor in the early stages of anemia of inflammation.

D. J. Weiss; J. D. Krehbiel

1983-01-01

238

Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1982-1983)  

SciTech Connect

The nature of the defects that shorten the effective lifespan of red blood cells in the circulation and which gave rise to anemia, jaundice and to spleen, liver and heart enlargement are studied because they so closely parallel inherited hemolytic anemias in man. In mice, ''hemolytic disease'' initiated by the ja, sph, sph/sup ha/, or the nb genes has been traced to abnormalities in the protein components of their red cell membranes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of detergent solubilized membranes reveal that in the different genetic types one or more of the major high molecular weight proteins called spectrins is decreased or totally missing. It is one thing to observe a correlation between missing or defective components in selected analytical procedures, and another to establish a causal relationship between the two. To investigate the possible interrelationships, we examined the associations between spectrin or ankyrin content, the severity of the resulting anemia, red cell osmotic fragilities, and the capacity of cells from each genotype to be deformed in a continuous osmotic gradient at constant sheer stress. Our findings indicate that sensitivity to osmotic stress, cell rigidity (inadequate deformability), deficiency of spectrin or ankyrin, and the severity of the anemia, are statistically highly correlated. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

Bernstein, S.E.

1983-09-09

239

The prognostic importance of anemia in patients with heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposePhysiologic studies have suggested that anemia could adversely affect the cardiovascular condition of patients with heart failure. Yet, the prognostic importance of this treatable condition is not well established by epidemiologic studies. We sought to determine the prognostic value of hematocrit level in a cohort of elderly patients hospitalized with heart failure.

Mikhail Kosiborod; Grace L Smith; Martha J Radford; JoAnne M Foody; Harlan M Krumholz

2003-01-01

240

Positional Cloning of a Novel Fanconi Anemia Gene, FANCD2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease with birth defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. To date, genes for five of the seven known complementation groups have been cloned. Complementation group D is heterogeneous, consisting of two distinct genes, FANCD1 and FANCD2. Here we report the positional cloning of FANCD2. The gene consists of 44 exons, encodes a novel

Cynthia Timmers; Toshiyasu Taniguchi; James Hejna; Carol Reifsteck; Lora Lucas; Donald Bruun; Matthew Thayer; Barbara Cox; Susan Olson; Alan D. D'Andrea; Robb Moses; Markus Grompe

2001-01-01

241

Effect of 131I on the anemia of hyperthyroidism  

SciTech Connect

Data from the National Thyrotoxicosis Therapy Follow-Up Study (NTTFS) are presented here to document the existence of anemia in hyperthyroidism, a mild and reversible anemia that is simultaneously ameliorated with reversal of the hyperthyroid state. Among 20,600 women entered into the NTTF study with no previous history of hematological disorders, the prevalence of anemia was found to range from 10-15%, appearing to be higher in those selected for treatment with 131I when compared to those selected for surgery. An attempt is made to verify the recent hypothesis that thyroid hormone levels in the supraphysiologic range may suppress erythrogenesis. Two statistically significant regression models are consistent with a hypothesis of thyrotoxic bone marrow suppression. However, both associations are weak enough to suggest that some other physiologic improvement underlies the amelioration of anemia when hyperthyroidism is reversed. The degree of improvement in hematological status is similar for women in both treatment groups. Among 4464 women for whom serial hematological tests are obtained, over 3/4 of anemic patients are no longer anemic after an average 6.2 yr of follow-up. Clinicians are reassured that radioactive iodine exposure causes no further insult to the bone marrow, no matter what the cumulative dosage. The highly fractionated low dose bone marrow exposures to radiation account for the minimal hematological risks of 131I treatment.

Perlman, J.A.; Sternthal, P.M.

1983-01-01

242

Perioperative anemia management in colorectal cancer patients: A pragmatic approach  

PubMed Central

Anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, is highly prevalent among patients with colorectal cancer. Inflammatory cytokines lead to iron restricted erythropoiesis further decreasing iron availability and impairing iron utilization. Preoperative anemia predicts for decreased survival. Allogeneic blood transfusion is widely used to correct anemia and is associated with poorer surgical outcomes, increased post-operative nosocomial infections, longer hospital stays, increased rates of cancer recurrence and perioperative venous thromboembolism. Infections are more likely to occur in those with low preoperative serum ferritin level compared to those with normal levels. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, minimizes or eliminates allogeneic blood transfusion. This includes restrictive transfusion policy, thromboprophylaxis and anemia management to improve outcomes. Normalization of preoperative hemoglobin levels is a World Health Organization recommendation. Iron repletion should be routinely ordered when indicated. Oral iron is poorly tolerated with low adherence based on published evidence. Intravenous iron is safe and effective but is frequently avoided due to misinformation and misinterpretation concerning the incidence and clinical nature of minor infusion reactions. Serious adverse events with intravenous iron are extremely rare. Newer formulations allow complete replacement dosing in 15-60 min markedly facilitating care. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents may improve response rates. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management used to minimize or eliminate allogeneic blood transfusion is indicated to improve outcomes. PMID:24587673

Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Auerbach, Michael

2014-01-01

243

Inadequate erythropoietin response to anemia: definition and clinical relevance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The development of a specific and sensitive immunoassay for the measurement of serum erythropoietin (s-Epo) allows to improve our understanding of the model of in vivo regulation of erythropoiesis. In most anemias, circulating hemoglobin level determines Epo production which in turn stimulates erythropoietic activity. The disruption of the expected feedback mechanism of Epo production leads to an inadequately low

G. Barosi

1994-01-01

244

Bone marrow changes following treatment of renal anemia with erythropoietin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bone marrow changes following treatment of renal anemia with erythropoietin. In 14 severely anemic patients with end-stage renal disease and chronic hemodialysis the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) on hemopoiesis was investigated. Bone marrow biopsies were taken before and after four and 26 months of treatment with EPO to evaluate quantitative and qualitative changes of histomorphology. EPO induced normalization

Jörg H Horina; Christine R Schmid; Johannes M Roob; Hanns M Winkler; Michael A Samitz; Heinz F Hammer; Helmut Pogglitsch; Guenter J Krejs

1991-01-01

245

Studies of the pathogenesis of anemia of inflammation: erythrocyte survival  

SciTech Connect

Erythrocyte survival was investigated in healthy cats and in cats with sterile abscesses. Erythrocyte survival time in cats with sterile abscesses was found to be significantly reduced. The erythrocyte destruction appeared to be the major factor in the early stages of anemia of inflammation.

Weiss, D.J.; Krehbiel, J.D.

1983-10-01

246

Prevalence and outcomes of anemia in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus: a systematic review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

In patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), anemia is a commonly encountered hematologic abnormality that has a significant impact on clinical outcomes and quality of life (QOL). This review describes the prevalence of anemia in several populations of patients with HIV and the effects of anemia on survival, morbidity, disease progression, transfusion requirements, and QOL. The prevalence of anemia in

Pamela S Belperio; David C Rhew

2004-01-01

247

Prevalence of anemia amongst primary school age children (6–11 years) in national capital territory of Delhi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sir, Anemia is a major public health problem in India. The prevalence of anemia is 60-90% in different age groups. Pregnant women, infants, young children, and adolescents are at a risk of anemia as they have a high demand of iron, folic acid and other nutrients? Anemia in children results in impaired cognitive performance, behavioural and language development, and scholastic

V. Sethi; G. Goindi; U. Kapil

2003-01-01

248

Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease outpatients: prevalence, risk factors, and etiology.  

PubMed

Anemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, epidemiological studies of nonwestern IBD populations are limited and may be confounded by demographic, socioeconomic, and disease-related influences. This study evaluated the prevalence, risk factors, and etiology of anemia in Brazilian outpatients with IBD. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 100 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 100 ulcerative colitis (UC) subjects were assessed. Anemia workup included complete blood count, ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. Results. The overall prevalence of anemia in IBD was 21%. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of anemia between CD subjects (24%) and UC (18%). Moderate disease activity (OR: 3.48, 95% CI, 1.95-9.64, P = 0.002) and elevated CRP levels (OR: 1.8, 95% CI, 1.04-3.11, P = 0.02) were independently associated with anemia. The most common etiologies of anemia found in both groups were iron deficiency anemia (IDA; 10% on CD and 6% on UC) followed by the anemia of chronic disease (ACD; 6% for both groups). Conclusions. In Brazilian IBD outpatients, anemia is highly concurrent condition. Disease moderate activity as well as increased CRP was strongly associated with comorbid anemia. IDA and/or ACD were the most common etiologies. PMID:25705682

Antunes, Carla Valéria de Alvarenga; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Nascimento, Cristiano Rodrigo de Alvarenga; Chebli, Liliana Andrade; Moutinho, Ivana Lúcia Damásio; Pinheiro, Bruno do Valle; Reboredo, Maycon Moura; Malaguti, Carla; Castro, Antonio Carlos Santana; Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca

2015-01-01

249

Hemolytic anemias due to erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies.  

PubMed

Red blood cells can only fulfil their functions over the normal period of approximately 120 days with 1.7 x 10(5) circulatory cycles efficiently if they withstand external and internal loads. This requires ATP and redox equivalents, which have to be permanently regenerated by the energy and redox metabolism. These pathways are necessary to maintain the biconcave shape of the cells, their specific intracellular cation concentrations, the reduced state of hemoglobin with a divalent iron and the sulfhydryl groups of enzymes, glutathione and membrane components. If an enzyme deficiency of one of these metabolic pathways limits the ATP and/or NADPH production, distinct membrane alterations result causing a removal of the damaged cells by the monocyte-macrophage system. Most metabolic needs of erythrocytes are covered by glycolysis, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), the glutathione cycle, nucleotide metabolism and MetHb reductase. Hereditary enzyme deficiencies of all these pathways have been identified; those that cause non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia are listed in Table 4. Their frequencies differ markedly both with respect to the affected enzyme and geographic distribution. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzymopathies (G6PD) are with more than 400 million cases by far the most common deficiency. The highest gene frequency has been found with 0.7 among Kurdish Jews. G6PD deficiencies are furthermore prevalent with frequencies of about 0.1 among Africans, Black Americans, and populations of Mediterranean countries and South East Asia. In Middle and Northern Europe the frequency of G6PD is much lower, and with approximately 0.0005, comparable with the frequency of pyruvate kinase (PK) enzymopathies, the most frequent enzyme deficiency in glycolysis in this area (Luzzatto, 1987; Beutler and Kuhl, 1990). The relationship between the degree of enzyme deficiency and the extent of metabolic dysfunction in red blood cells and other tissues depend on several factors: on the importance of the affected enzyme; its expression rate; the stability of the mutant enzyme against proteolytic degradation and functional abnormalities; the possibility to compensate the deficiency by an overexpression of the corresponding isoenzyme or by the use of an alternative metabolic pathway. Difficulties in estimating the quantitative degree of disorder in severe cases are due to the fact that these populations contain many reticulocytes, which generally have higher enzyme activities and concentrations of intermediates than erythrocytes. An alternative approach to predict metabolic changes is the analysis by mathematical modeling. Mathematical modeling of the main metabolic pathways of human erythrocytes has reached an advanced level (Rapoport et al., 1976; Holzhütter et al., 1985; Schuster et al., 1988). Models have been successfully employed to describe stationary and time-dependent metabolic states of the cell under normal conditions as well as in the presence of enzyme deficiencies. Figure 5 shows computational results of erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies. This analysis is based on the comprehensive mathematical model of the energy and redox metabolism for human erythrocyte presented in Fig. 6. Stationary states of the cell metabolism have been calculated by varying the activity of each of the participating enzymes by several orders of magnitude. To predict consequences of enzyme deficiencies a performance function has been introduced (Schuster and Holzhütter, 1995). It takes into account the homeostasis of three essential metabolic variables: the energetic state (ATP), the reductive capacity (reduced glutathione) and the osmotic state. From the data given in Fig. 5 one can conclude that generally the metabolic impairment resulting in deficiencies occurs earlier for enzymes with high control coefficients than for those catalyzing equilibrium reactions. On the other hand the flux curves of latter enzymes decrease more steeply below a critica PMID:8813716

Jacobasch, G; Rapoport, S M

1996-04-01

250

Management of Anemia in Children Receiving Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis  

PubMed Central

Little information exists regarding the efficacy, modifiers, and outcomes of anemia management in children with CKD or ESRD. We assessed practices, effectors, and outcomes of anemia management in 1394 pediatric patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) who were prospectively followed in 30 countries. We noted that 25% of patients had hemoglobin levels below target (<10 g/dl or <9.5 g/dl in children older or younger than 2 years, respectively), with significant regional variation; levels were highest in North America and Europe and lowest in Asia and Turkey. Low hemoglobin levels were associated with low urine output, low serum albumin, high parathyroid hormone, high ferritin, and the use of bioincompatible PD fluid. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) were prescribed to 92% of patients, and neither the type of ESA nor the dosing interval appeared to affect efficacy. The weekly ESA dose inversely correlated with age when scaled to weight but did not correlate with age when normalized to body surface area. ESA sensitivity was positively associated with residual diuresis and serum albumin and inversely associated with serum parathyroid hormone and ferritin. The prevalence of hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy increased with the degree of anemia. Patient survival was positively associated with achieved hemoglobin and serum albumin and was inversely associated with ESA dose. In conclusion, control of anemia in children receiving long-term PD varies by region. ESA requirements are independent of age when dose is scaled to body surface area, and ESA resistance is associated with inflammation, fluid retention, and hyperparathyroidism. Anemia and high ESA dose requirements independently predict mortality. PMID:23471197

Borzych-Duzalka, Dagmara; Bilginer, Yelda; Ha, Il Soo; Bak, Mustafa; Rees, Lesley; Cano, Francisco; Munarriz, Reyner Loza; Chua, Annabelle; Pesle, Silvia; Emre, Sevinc; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Quiroz, Lily; Ruscasso, Javier Darío; White, Colin; Pape, Lars; Ramela, Virginia; Printza, Nikoleta; Vogel, Andrea; Kuzmanovska, Dafina; Simkova, Eva; Müller-Wiefel, Dirk E.; Sander, Anja; Warady, Bradley A.

2013-01-01

251

Cost-effectiveness of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in anemia  

PubMed Central

Background Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are the mainstay of anemia therapy. Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is a highly effective, long-acting ESA developed for once-monthly dosing. A multitude of clinical studies has evaluated the safety and efficiency of this treatment option for patients with renal anemia. In times of permanent financial pressure on health care systems, the cost-effectiveness of CERA should be of particular importance for payers and clinicians. Objective To critically analyze, from the nephrologists’ point of view, the published literature focusing on the cost-effectiveness of CERA for anemia treatment. Methods The detailed literature search covered electronic databases including MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase, as well as international conference abstract databases. Results Peer-reviewed literature analyzing the definite cost-effectiveness of CERA is scarce, and most of the available data originate from conference abstracts. Identified data are restricted to the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease. Although the majority of studies suggest a considerable cost advantage for CERA, the published literature cannot easily be compared. While time and motion studies clearly indicate that a switch to CERA could minimize health care staff time in dialysis units, the results of studies comparing direct costs are more ambivalent, potentially reflecting the differences between health care systems and variability between centers. Conclusion Analyzed data are predominantly insufficient; they miss clear evidence and have to thus be interpreted with great caution. In this day and age of financial restraints, results from well-designed, head-to-head studies with clearly defined endpoints have to prove whether CERA therapy can achieve cost savings without compromising anemia management. PMID:25050070

Schmid, Holger

2014-01-01

252

Anemia and Microvascular Complications in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Background: Although chronic kidney disease-induced anemia is more prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), anemia is a common finding prior to manifestation of kidney disease. In presence of some risk factors at the time of diagnosing DM, microvascular complications must be considered. The effect of anemia as a risk factor on progression of DM complications is still unclear. Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and its association with microvascular complications in patients with type 2 DM. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in the outpatient endocrinology clinic at Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Study was done from February 2011 to February 2012. Patients with type 2 DM without any obvious symptom or sign of anemia were included in study. Results: A total of 93 patients (30.4%) had anemia including 46 (15.1%) with normochromic normocytic, 44 (14.4%) with hyperchromic microcytic, and 3 (1%) with hyperchromic macrocytic anemias. There was a positive correlation between duration of DM and anemia. Microvascular complications were more frequent with normocytic or microcytic anemias. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was higher in patients without anemia; moreover, nephropathy was less frequent among them. Among patients with anemia, 43% had GFR of more than 90 mL/min and 19.4% had normoalbuminuria. Neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy had strong association with anemia (odds ratio of 1.99, 1.7, and 1.5, respectively). Conclusions: Anemia is a common complication of DM and is associated with duration of disease and microvascular complications. PMID:25695026

Hosseini, Mahboobeh Sadat; Rostami, Zohreh; Saadat, Alireza; Saadatmand, Sayyed Mehdi; Naeimi, Effat

2014-01-01

253

Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.  

PubMed

Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months. PMID:25166299

Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

2015-02-01

254

Increased IL10 plasmatic levels in Fanconi anemia patients.  

PubMed

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare disease, autosomal recessive and X linked, which is clinically prone to development of hematological abnormalities and neoplasms, especially acute myeloid leukemia. In this work IL-10 and TGF-? levels were measured on FA patients' plasma since they are the regulatory cytokines of TNF-? and INF-? which had been described to be overexpressed in this genetic disease. Our results show increased IL-10 plasma levels in 25% of FA patients studied, but levels of TGF-? within the normal range. TNF-? and INF-? were also measured and found to be increased in 24% and 23% of FA patients, respectively. However, no inverse correlation was observed between augmented levels of IL-10 and TNF or IFN-?. Patients with elevated levels of TNF-? and INF-? presented bone marrow hypocellularity. IL-10 levels did not appear to be determinant for bone marrow cellularity. These data suggest that IL-10 is also a feature of Fanconi anemia pathophysiology. PMID:24021704

Justo, Graça A; Bitencourt, Marco A; Pasquini, Ricardo; Castelo-Branco, Morgana T L; Rumjanek, Vivian M

2013-11-01

255

Inactivation of equine infectious anemia virus by chemical disinfectants.  

PubMed

Twelve chemicals and commercial disinfectants were tested for inactivation of equine infectious anemia virus. In the presence of 10% bovine serum, all chemicals inactivated 4 log10 (based on 0.1 ml) of the virus within 5 minutes at 23 C. A reduction of at least 4 log10 was observed when the virus was exposed for 1 minute to substituted phenolic disinfectants (3 commercial preparations and sodium orthophenylphenate), halogen derivatives (iodophor and sodium hypochlorite), chlorhexidine, and 70% ethanol. Sodium hydroxide (5%), 2% formalin, and 2% glutaraldehyde were slower to inactivate the virus, but achieved 4 log10 reduction in titer by 5 minutes' contact time. The susceptibility of the equine infectious anemia virus to chemical disinfectants is similar to that of other enveloped viruses. PMID:199094

Shen, D T; Crawford, T B; Gorham, J R; McGuire, T C

1977-08-01

256

Myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia: a new syndrome.  

PubMed

We describe 2 sibs (brother and sister) with myopathy, sideroblastic anemia, lactic acidosis, mental retardation, microcephaly, high palate, high philtrum, distichiasis, and micrognathia. Very low levels of cytochromes a, b, and c were detected in the patients' muscle mitochondria. Deposition of iron within the mitochondria of bone marrow erythroblasts was observed on electron microscopy. Irregular and enlarged mitochondria with paracrystalline inclusions were also seen on electron microscopy of the patients' muscle specimen. Examination of DNA from the affected sibs showed no deletions in the mitochondrial DNA nor the mutations identified in the syndromes of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS) or myoclonus, and epilepsy associated with rugged-red fibers (MERRF). Since the parents were first cousins and 2 of 6 sibs (male and female) were affected, we suggest that the syndrome expressed by our patients represents a previously unknown autosomal recessive disorder that includes mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia. PMID:7726239

Inbal, A; Avissar, N; Shaklai, M; Kuritzky, A; Schejter, A; Ben-David, E; Shanske, S; Garty, B Z

1995-01-30

257

[Use of Venofer in management of anemia in cancer patients].  

PubMed

Therapy of anemia raises hemoglobin (Hb) level which in turn improves quality of life. Venofer was tested in 20 anemic (grade 1) patients with various malignancies. The drug was administered in 3 courses, i/v, 200 mg at a 4-5 week interval during chemotherapy. Hb levels rose or remained unchanged in 75%; they fell mostly in cases of tumor progression. There was no correlation between Hb concentration and chemotherapy regimen--with or without platinum. Venofer treatment was followed by improvement in quality of life or by stabilization only in 73.3%. Quality of life improved by 9,3% (FACT-An) after an 1g/dl increase in Hb level. Venofer treatment prevented further anemia. PMID:17168365

Makhnova, E V; Livshits, M E; Gershanovich, M L

2006-01-01

258

Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (?15 mg day(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM. PMID:24952011

Yang, YaLi; Sang, Junjun; Pan, Weihua; Du, Lin; Liao, Wanqing; Chen, Jianghan; Zhu, Yuanjie

2014-08-01

259

Effects of ionizing radiation on cells from Fanconi's anemia patients  

SciTech Connect

The lymphocytes from some Fanconi's anemia patients appeared to be more radiosensitive than normal as measured by the number of X-ray-(or bleomycin-) induced chromosome aberrations seen following G2 treatment. Fibroblasts from the same patients, however, all showed the same degree of colony survival as normals following exposure to gamma-rays (Do, 1.13 +/- 0.072 (S.E.) Gy and 1.14 +/- 0.077 Gy for Fanconi's anemia and normal fibroblasts, respectively). The lack of increased radiosensitivity in Fanconi's fibroblasts was also observed by the same degree of inhibition of DNA synthesis as seen in normals following gamma-irradiation. The results show clearly that there is no increase in radiosensitivity common to all cell types from Fanconi's patients, although an apparent increase in chromosomal radiosensitivity may be seen in the lymphocytes from an occasional patient.

Duckworth-Rysiecki, G.; Taylor, A.M.

1985-01-01

260

Fanconi anemia and the cell cycle: new perspectives on aneuploidy  

PubMed Central

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a complex heterogenic disorder of genomic instability, bone marrow failure, cancer predisposition, and congenital malformations. The FA signaling network orchestrates the DNA damage recognition and repair in interphase as well as proper execution of mitosis. Loss of FA signaling causes chromosome instability by weakening the spindle assembly checkpoint, disrupting centrosome maintenance, disturbing resolution of ultrafine anaphase bridges, and dysregulating cytokinesis. Thus, the FA genes function as guardians of genome stability throughout the cell cycle. This review discusses recent advances in diagnosis and clinical management of Fanconi anemia and presents the new insights into the origins of genomic instability in FA. These new discoveries may facilitate the development of rational therapeutic strategies for FA and for FA-deficient malignancies in the general population. PMID:24765528

2014-01-01

261

MOLECULAR MEDICINE: "Sickle Cell Anemia, a Molecular Disease"  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Fifty years ago this month, Linus Pauling published his seminal Science paper describing the difference in electrophoretic mobilities between normal hemoglobin and that from patients with sickle cell anemia. In so doing he founded the field of molecular medicine, as Strasser explains in a lively Perspective that looks at the discovery and its aftermath.

Bruno J. Strasser (University of Geneva; Louis-Jeantet Institute for the History of Medicine)

1999-11-19

262

The Fanconi anemia protein interaction network: casting a wide net.  

PubMed

It has long been hypothesized that a defect in the repair of damaged DNA is central to the etiology of Fanconi anemia (FA). Indeed, an increased sensitivity of FA patient-derived cells to the lethal effects of various forms of DNA damaging agents was described over three decades ago [A.J. Fornace, Jr., J.B. Little, R.R. Weichselbaum, DNA repair in a Fanconi's anemia fibroblast cell strain, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 561 (1979) 99-109; Y. Fujiwara, M. Tatsumi, Repair of mitomycin C damage to DNA in mammalian cells and its impairment in Fanconi's anemia cells, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 66 (1975) 592-598; A.J. Rainbow, M. Howes, Defective repair of ultraviolet- and gamma-ray-damaged DNA in Fanconi's anaemia, Int. J. Radiat. Biol. Relat. Stud. Phys. Chem. Med. 31 (1977) 191-195]. Furthermore, the cytological hallmark of FA, the DNA crosslink-induced radial chromosome formation, exemplifies an innate impairment in the repair of these particularly cytotoxic DNA lesions [A.D. Auerbach, Fanconi anemia diagnosis and the diepoxybutane (DEB) test, Exp. Hematol. 21 (1993) 731-733]. Precisely defining the collective role of the FA proteins in DNA repair, however, continues to be one of the most enigmatic and challenging questions in the FA field. The first six identified FA proteins (A, C, E, F, G, and D2) harbored no recognizable enzymatic features, precluding association with a specific metabolic process. Consequently, our knowledge of the role of the FA proteins in the DNA damage response has been gleaned primarily through biochemical association studies with non-FA proteins. Here, we provide a chronological discourse of the major FA protein interaction network discoveries, with particular emphasis on the DNA damage response, that have defined our current understanding of the molecular basis of FA. PMID:19101576

Rego, Meghan A; Kolling, Frederick W; Howlett, Niall G

2009-07-31

263

Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1983-1984)  

SciTech Connect

The hypotranserrinemic-hemochromatosis mutation in mice discovered in our laboratory is an almost exact duplicate of human atransferrinemia. Just as in man, the condition is inherited as a recessive lethal. The disease appears to stem from a congenital deficiency in transferrin. The new mutation arose spontaneously in BALB/c mice and results in death before 12 days of age. It is characterized by stunted growth, low numbers of erythrocytes, hypochromia, and in the absence of jaundice. Treatments with Imferon or other iron preparations were uniformly unsuccessful, but the use of normal mouse serum proved successful as a therapeutic measure. We find that we are able to keep these afflicted mice alive for more than a year with small amounts of normal serum, and transferrin bands are missing on cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins from affected individuals receiving no treatment. Genetic tests indicated that the new mutation was not an allele of any of the other known iron deficiency anemias in the mouse: sex linked anemia (sla), microcytic anemia (mk), or flexed anemia (f) or any of the members of the hemolytic disease group (sph, sph/sup ha/, nb, or ja). Biochemical and genetic analyses carried out during the past year indicate that the new mutation, tentatively designated hpx is not likely to be a mutation at the transferrin (Trf) locus on Chromosome 9. We observed no unusual serum proteins on cellulose acetate electrophoresis, such as might be expected if the Trf gene had mutated. Moreover, radial immunodiffusion examination and Ouchterlony analysis did not show the presence of smaller molecules (or fragments) with transferrin antigenic specificities. Instead they showed a total loss in serum transferrin. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

Bernstein, S.E.

1984-09-01

264

Salmonella pyomyositis complicating sickle cell anemia: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Pyomyositis is a bacterial infection of skeletal muscle and a rare complication of sickle cell anemia. It may present a difficult problem in diagnosis, leading to delay in appropriate treatment and development of complications including abscess formation and osteomyelitis. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 44-year-old Afro-Caribbean woman with homozygous sickle cell disease who presented with chest

Vanessa K Wong; Maxine E Lissack; Tom D Turmezei; Jenny A Maitland

2010-01-01

265

Chicken anemia virus induced apoptosis: underlying molecular mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1990, the chicken anemia virus (CAV) genome was cloned by us and proven to be representative for CAV isolates worldwide. This genome contains unique promoter\\/enhancer replication elements and genes. Upon infection of its target cells, CAV replicates via a double-stranded (ds) DNA intermediate. From this ds CAV molecule, a single mRNA is transcribed, which encodes for three distinct proteins

Mathieu H. M Noteborn

2004-01-01

266

Increased incidence of pancreatic neoplasia in pernicious anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a Swedish population, 361 patients with pernicious anemia were followed closely during a 7-year period with regard to the occurrence of all forms of malignant neoplasia. In addition to an increased incidence of gastric neoplasia (0.6%\\/year), there seemed to be an increased incidence of pancreatic neoplasia (0.3%\\/year) in the series. With reference to age- and sex-specific incidence rates in

Kurt Borch; Eric Kullman; Stefan Hallhagen; Torbjörn Ledin; Ingemar Ihse

1988-01-01

267

Structure of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Matrix Protein  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gag polyprotein is key to the budding of retroviruses from host cells and is cleaved upon virion mat- uration, the N-terminal membrane-binding domain forming the matrix protein (MA). The 2.8-Å resolution crystal structure of MA of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus, reveals that, despite showing no sequence similarity, more than half of the molecule can be superimposed

Hideki Hatanaka; Oleg Iourin; Zihe Rao; Elizabeth Fry; Alan Kingsman; David I. Stuart

2002-01-01

268

Vitamin D, Race, and Risk for Anemia in Children  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency and anemia in a cohort of otherwise healthy children, and to determine whether race modifies the association between 25(OH)D status and hemoglobin (Hgb). Study design Cross-sectional study of 10,410 children and adolescents aged 1-21 years from the 2001-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin less than the 5th percentile for age and sex based on NHANES III data. Results Lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with increased risk for anemia; < 30 ng/mL, adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21, 3.08, p=0.006, and < 20 ng/mL, OR 1.47, 95%CI 1.14-1.89, p=0.004. In linear regression, small but significant increases in Hgb were noted in the upper quartiles of 25(OH)D compared with the lowest quartile (< 20 ng/mL) in the full cohort. Results of race-stratified linear regression by 25(OH)D quartile in white children were similar to those observed in the full cohort, but in black children, increase in Hgb in the upper 25(OH)D quartiles was only apparent compared with the lowest black race specific quartile (<12 ng/mL). Conclusions 25(OH)D deficiency is associated with increased risk of anemia in a healthy U.S. children, but the 25(OH)D threshold levels for lower Hgb are lower in black children in comparison with white children. PMID:24112861

Atkinson, Meredith A.; Melamed, Michal L.; Kumar, Juhi; Roy, Cindy N.; Miller, Edgar R.; Furth, Susan L.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.

2013-01-01

269

Aplastic anemia and membranous nephropathy induced by intravenous mercury  

PubMed Central

Self-injection of mercury can be life-threatening. We report a case of attempted suicide by self-intravenous injection of elemental mercury. The patient suffered from two side effects : membranous nephropathy and aplastic anemia. She was treated and the systemic effects of mercury were reversed after 4 years. The toxicology of mercury, mechanisms of renal and systemic toxicities, and the various therapeutic measures for mercury poisoning are discussed. PMID:23439491

Priya, N.; Nagaprabhu, V. N.; Kurian, G.; Seethalakshmi, N.; Rao, G. G.; Unni, V. N.

2012-01-01

270

Serum transferrin receptor in the megaloblastic anemia of cobalamin deficiency.  

PubMed

In order to further study the relation between transferrin receptor and erythropoiesis we examined serum receptor levels in megaloblastic anemia, which is the classic example of ineffective erythropoiesis. We studied 33 patients with unequivocal cobalamin deficiency, only 22 of whom were anemic. High serum transferrin receptor levels were found in 12 patients, all of whom were anemic and had high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels; in contrast, only 10 of the 21 patients with normal receptor levels were anemic. Receptor correlated most strongly with LDH (r = 0.573, p < 0.001) and, inversely, with hemoglobin values (r = -0.560, p < 0.001); it also correlated with ferritin and total bilirubin levels, but not with cobalamin, MCV or erythropoietin. No association was found with the hemolytic component of megaloblastic anemia, represented indirectly by haptoglobin levels. Changes induced by cobalamin therapy were also examined in 13 patients. Transferrin receptors rose in all 6 patients who initially had high levels and in 2 of 3 patients who had borderline levels, but not in the 4 patients with initially normal levels. The receptor levels began to rise within 1-3 days, peaked at about 2 weeks and returned to normal at about the 5th wk. The findings indicate that serum transferrin receptor levels reflect the severity of the megaloblastic anemia. The elevated receptor levels rise further with cobalamin therapy, however, as effective erythropoiesis replaces ineffective erythropoiesis, and these persist until the increased erythropoiesis returns to normal. PMID:1473586

Carmel, R; Skikne, B S

1992-11-01

271

Treatment of anemia with epoetin in kidney transplant recipients.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and efficacy of renal anemia treated with epoetin in maintenance kidney transplant recipients in Slovenia. By the end of 2009, 107 out of 537 patients (19.9%) had been treated with epoetin. A cohort of 49 patients (45.8%) were analyzed in detail: 11 patients received epoetin alpha, 18 epoetin beta, 10 darbepoetin alpha, and 10 patients received methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta. The median epoetin dose was 0.36 µg/kg body weight per week. The median serum laboratory parameters were as follows: hemoglobin 120 g/L, hematocrit 0.36, ferritin 332 ng/mL, transferrin saturation 34%, serum creatinine 145 µmol/L, serum albumin 41 g/L, intact parathyroid hormone 79 ng/L, and C-reactive protein 3 mg/L. We concluded that the prevalence of renal anemia in kidney transplant recipients treated with epoetin was approximately 20%, and laboratory parameters suggested that the treatment of renal anemia in this study cohort was optimal. PMID:21624072

Bren, Andrej; Arnol, Miha; Kandus, Aljoša; Varl, Janez; Oblak, Manca; Lindi?, Jelka; Pajek, Jernej; Knap, Bojan; Kova?, Damjan; Mlinšek, Gregor; Buturovi?-Ponikvar, Jadranka

2011-06-01

272

The Impact of Anemia on Child Mortality: An Updated Review  

PubMed Central

Iron deficiency anemia and child mortality are public health problems requiring urgent attention. However, the degree to which iron deficiency anemia contributes to child mortality is unknown. Here, we utilized an exhaustive article search and screening process to identify articles containing both anemia and mortality data for children aged 28 days to 12 years. We then estimated the reduction in risk of mortality associated with a 1-g/dL increase in hemoglobin (Hb). Our meta-analysis of nearly 12,000 children from six African countries revealed a combined odds ratio of 0.76 (0.62–0.93), indicating that for each 1-g/dL increase in Hb, the risk of death falls by 24%. The feasibility of a 1-g/dL increase in Hb has been demonstrated via simple iron supplementation strategies. Our finding suggests that ~1.8 million deaths in children aged 28 days to five years could be avoided each year by increasing Hb in these children by 1 g/dL. PMID:25533005

Scott, Samuel P.; Chen-Edinboro, Lenis P.; Caulfield, Laura E.; Murray-Kolb, Laura E.

2014-01-01

273

The impact of anemia on child mortality: an updated review.  

PubMed

Iron deficiency anemia and child mortality are public health problems requiring urgent attention. However, the degree to which iron deficiency anemia contributes to child mortality is unknown. Here, we utilized an exhaustive article search and screening process to identify articles containing both anemia and mortality data for children aged 28 days to 12 years. We then estimated the reduction in risk of mortality associated with a 1-g/dL increase in hemoglobin (Hb). Our meta-analysis of nearly 12,000 children from six African countries revealed a combined odds ratio of 0.76 (0.62-0.93), indicating that for each 1-g/dL increase in Hb, the risk of death falls by 24%. The feasibility of a 1-g/dL increase in Hb has been demonstrated via simple iron supplementation strategies. Our finding suggests that ~1.8 million deaths in children aged 28 days to five years could be avoided each year by increasing Hb in these children by 1 g/dL. PMID:25533005

Scott, Samuel P; Chen-Edinboro, Lenis P; Caulfield, Laura E; Murray-Kolb, Laura E

2014-12-01

274

Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia  

PubMed Central

Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human ?-globin subunit results in replacement of ?6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

Imaga, Ngozi Awa

2013-01-01

275

Phytomedicines and nutraceuticals: alternative therapeutics for sickle cell anemia.  

PubMed

Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the "SS" individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human ? -globin subunit results in replacement of ? 6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

Imaga, Ngozi Awa

2013-01-01

276

Direct identification of sickle cell anemia by blot hybridization.  

PubMed

Several reports have been published on the use of polymorphisms found in the human hemoglobin genes as a means for prenatal diagnosis of sickle cell anemia. The disadvantages of this approach reside in its limited application and the need for family analysis. Here we report that, by use of restriction endonuclease Dde I and diazobenzyloxymethyl-paper transfer procedures, a direct analysis can be made. Individuals with normal hemoglobin (AA) show two bands (175 and 201 base pairs) complementary to a 5'-specific beta-globin gene probe. Sickle cell trait individuals (AS) exhibit an additional band (376 base pairs). Individuals with sickle cell anemia (SS) show the band at 376 base pairs with a concomitant loss of the 175-base pair band. We interpret these changes in banding pattern to be the result of the elimination of a restriction site for Dde I in the altered codon associated with the sickle cell allele. Because an analysis can be performed on as little as 20 micrograms of cellular DNA, the application to prenatal diagnosis of sickle cell anemia should be possible. PMID:6272289

Geever, R F; Wilson, L B; Nallaseth, F S; Milner, P F; Bittner, M; Wilson, J T

1981-08-01

277

Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

1999-01-01

278

Immunosuppressive therapy for transplant-ineligible aplastic anemia patients.  

PubMed

Aplastic anemia is a rare life-threatening bone marrow failure that is characterized by bicytopenia or pancytopenia in the peripheral blood and a hypoplastic or aplastic bone marrow. The patients are at risk of infection and hemorrhage due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and suffer from symptoms of anemia. The main treatment approaches are allogeneic stem cell transplantation and immunosuppression. Here, we review current standard immunosuppression and the attempts that have been made in the past two decades to improve results: review of recent developments also reveals that sometimes not only the advent of new drugs, good ideas and well-designed clinical trials decide the progress in the field but also marketing considerations of pharmaceutical companies. Aplastic anemia experts unfortunately had to face the situation that efficient drugs were withdrawn simply for marketing considerations. We will discuss the current options and challenges in first-line treatment and management of relapsing and refractory patients with an emphasis on adult patients. Some promising new approaches are currently under investigation in prospective, randomized trials. PMID:25572607

Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Körper, Sixten; Höchsmann, Britta

2015-02-01

279

Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

1997-01-01

280

Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact.  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

2015-01-01

281

Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD.

Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

2015-01-01

282

Enhanced Erythrocyte Apoptosis in Sickle Cell Anemia, Thalassemia and Glucose6Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erythrocyte diseases such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency decrease the erythrocyte life span, an effect contributing to anemia. Most recently, erythro-cytes have been shown to undergo apoptosis upon increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity. The present study has been performed to explore whether sickle cell anemia, thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency enhance the sensitivity of erythrocytes to

Karl Lang; Benjamin Roll; Svetlana Myssina; Markus Schittenhelm; Hans-Gerhard Scheel-Walter; Lothar Kanz; Jasmin Fritz; Florian Lang; Stephan Huber; Thomas Wieder

2002-01-01

283

Chicken anemia virus infection in broiler chickens in Shahrekord, Iran: serological, hematological, and histopathological findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chicken infectious anemia caused by a single-strand DNA circovirus is a disease in young chickens that is characterized by\\u000a aplastic anemia, generalized lymphoid atrophy, and immunosuppression. In the present study, the presence of chicken anemia\\u000a virus (CAV) infection and the hematologic and histopathologic changes in CAV seropositive broiler chickens in Shahrekord region,\\u000a center of Iran, were investigated. Blood and lymphoid

Iraj Karimi; Mohammadreza Mahzounieh; Shahab Bahadoran; Farhan Azad

2010-01-01

284

Insights and perspectives in the clinical and operational management of cancer-related anemia.  

PubMed

Management of anemia in patients with cancer presents challenges from clinical, operational, and economic perspectives. Clinically, anemia in these patients may result from treatment (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgical interventions) or from the malignancy itself. Anemia not only contributes to cancer-related fatigue and other quality of life issues, but also affects prognosis. From the operational perspective, a patient with cancer who is also anemic may consume more laboratory, pharmacy, and clinical resources than other patients with cancer. PMID:20947722

Hinkel, Jennifer M; Li, Edward C; Sherman, Stephen L

2010-09-01

285

[Transitory acute atrioventricular block in an African patient: consider sickle cell anemia].  

PubMed

This case report shows a rare cardiac complication of sickle cell anemia in a young African patient which was an acute paroxysmal atrio-ventricular block. Acute paroxysmal atrioventricular block is a rare complication of polymerization of hemoglobin S during sickle cell disease. Hence, sickle cell anemia should be considered as a cause of auriculoventricular block in black African patients. Cardiac complications of sickle cell anemia are presented in this article. PMID:22980397

Gacon, P-H; Jourdain, P; Funck, F; Amara, W

2012-11-01

286

Iron status in patients receiving erythropoietin for dialysis-associated anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Iron status in patients receiving erythropoietin for dialysis-associated anemia. Adequate body iron stores are crucial to assuring rapid and complete response to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). In the present study, markers of iron storage were examined in 27 patients with normochromic, normocytic anemia undergoing acute rHuEPO (150 to 300 U\\/kg t.i.w.) treatment for anemia. We calculated projected iron needed for

David B Van Wyck; John C Stivelman; Joaquin Ruiz; Linda F Kirlin; Murray A Katz; David A Ogden

1989-01-01

287

Erythropoietin–hematocrit feedback circuit in the anemia of end–stage renal disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erythropoietin–hematocrit feedback circuit in the anemia of end–stage renal disease. Deficient erythropoietin (EP) production is thought to be a key factor in the pathogenesis of the anemia of end-stage renal disease. We describe the interrelationships between radioimmunoas-sayed plasma EP levels, reticulocyte counts corrected for anemia (CRC) and hematocrit (HCT) under challenge by hemorrhage, transfusions and hemodialysis in 32 chronically–hemodialyzed patients.

Alexander J Walle; George Y Wong; Gisela K Clemons; Joseph F Garcia; Walter Niedermayer

1987-01-01

288

The DNA helicase BRIP1 is defective in Fanconi anemia complementation group J.  

PubMed

The protein predicted to be defective in individuals with Fanconi anemia complementation group J (FA-J), FANCJ, is a missing component in the Fanconi anemia pathway of genome maintenance. Here we identify pathogenic mutations in eight individuals with FA-J in the gene encoding the DEAH-box DNA helicase BRIP1, also called FANCJ. This finding is compelling evidence that the Fanconi anemia pathway functions through a direct physical interaction with DNA. PMID:16116423

Levitus, Marieke; Waisfisz, Quinten; Godthelp, Barbara C; de Vries, Yne; Hussain, Shobbir; Wiegant, Wouter W; Elghalbzouri-Maghrani, Elhaam; Steltenpool, Jûrgen; Rooimans, Martin A; Pals, Gerard; Arwert, Fré; Mathew, Christopher G; Zdzienicka, Ma?gorzata Z; Hiom, Kevin; De Winter, Johan P; Joenje, Hans

2005-09-01

289

Prevalence of High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Thalassemia, Sickle-Cell Anemia, and Iron-Deficiency Anemia among the UAE Adolescent Population  

PubMed Central

This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities. PMID:23606864

Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

2013-01-01

290

9 CFR 75.4 - Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN HORSES, ASSES, PONIES, MULES, AND ZEBRAS Equine Infectious Anemia (swamp Fever) § 75.4 Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...

2013-01-01

291

9 CFR 75.4 - Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN HORSES, ASSES, PONIES, MULES, AND ZEBRAS Equine Infectious Anemia (swamp Fever) § 75.4 Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...

2014-01-01

292

9 CFR 75.4 - Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN HORSES, ASSES, PONIES, MULES, AND ZEBRAS Equine Infectious Anemia (swamp Fever) § 75.4 Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...

2010-01-01

293

9 CFR 75.4 - Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN HORSES, ASSES, PONIES, MULES, AND ZEBRAS Equine Infectious Anemia (swamp Fever) § 75.4 Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...

2011-01-01

294

9 CFR 75.4 - Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN HORSES, ASSES, PONIES, MULES, AND ZEBRAS Equine Infectious Anemia (swamp Fever) § 75.4 Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...

2012-01-01

295

Iron deficiency anemia in captive ?alayan tapir calves (Tapirus indicus).  

PubMed

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was diagnosed in two captive female neonatal Malayan tapirs (Tapirus indicus) at separate institutions. Both calves had unremarkable exams and normal blood parameters within the first 3 days of life. Microcytic hypochromic anemia (hematocrit, HCT= 20%; mean corpuscular volume, MCV = 32.8 fl; mean corpuscular hemoglobin, MCH = 10.5 pg) was diagnosed at day 66 of age in calf EPZ-1. Iron dextran (10 mg/kg i.m.) was administered at day 71. A normal HCT (33%) with microcytosis and hypochromasia (MCV = 33.0 fl; MCH = 11.7 pg) was identified at day 80. No further concerns were noted through 610 days of age. Microcytic hypochromic anemia (HCT = 16%; MCV = 38.4 fl; MCH = 13.3 pg; mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, MCHC= 34.6 g/dl) with thrombocytosis (platelets= 1018 10(3)/UL) and poikilocytosis was diagnosed at day 38 of age in calf WPZ-1 by samples obtained through operant conditioning. Iron dextran (10 mg/kg i.m.) was administered at day 40 and day 68. Improving hematocrit (32%) and low serum iron (45 micorg/dl) was identified at day 88; total iron binding capacity (TIBC; 438 microg/dl) and percentage saturation (10%) were also measured. No further concerns were noted through day 529 of age. Retrospective evaluation identified presumptive IDA in two male siblings of calf WPZ-1. One calf died at day 40 (iron = 40 microg/dl; TIBC = 482 microg/dl; percentage saturation = 4%) and another at day 72 (HCT = 11%; iron = 26 microg/dl; TIBC = 470 microg/dl; percentage saturation = 6%). Death in both calves was attributed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and bacterial septicemia. IDA can develop in Malayan tapirs between day 38 and day 72 of age and may be a significant precursor to bacterial septicemia and death in neonatal Malayan tapirs. PMID:23272357

Helmick, Kelly E; Milne, Victoria E

2012-12-01

296

Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.  

PubMed

Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection. PMID:25083899

Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

2014-01-01

297

[Mechanisms of congenital erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies associated with hemolytic anemia].  

PubMed

The search for a mechanism for red cell enzyme deficiency associated with congenital hemolytic anemia, requires one to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the enzyme reaction and study the physico-chemical and immunological characteristics of the protein which supports enzyme activity. The technique of iso-electric focalisation and the use of specific anti-enzyme antibodies, is the reason for recent progress in the understanding of the mechanism of these deficiencies. Examples of application of these techniques are given in relation to glucose-6-dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, glucose phosphate isomerase, phosphofructokinase and phosphoglycerate kinase of deficiencies showing the multiplicity of the molecular mechanisms. PMID:135522

Boivin, P; Kahn, A

1976-01-01

298

Seizure disorders and anemia associated with chronic borax intoxication  

PubMed Central

During the course of investigation of two infants with seizure disorders it was discovered that both had been given large amounts of a preparation of borax and honey which resulted in chronic borate intoxication. In one child a profound anemia developed as well. The symptoms of chronic borate intoxication are different from those of the acute poisoning with which we are more familiar. The borax and honey preparations are highly dangerous and should no longer be manufactured or distributed for sale. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4691106

Gordon, A. S.; Prichard, J. S.; Freedman, M. H.

1973-01-01

299

Trichoderma longibrachiatum infection in a pediatric patient with aplastic anemia.  

PubMed Central

Trichoderma longibrachiatum infection of the skin in an 11-year-old child with severe aplastic anemia and prolonged neutropenia is reported. The patient received systemic antifungal therapy and underwent bone marrow transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first description of T. longibrachiatum infection in a pediatric patient. It also is the first case successfully treated with medical therapy. A review of the literature suggests that Trichoderma spp. are recognized as human pathogens with increasing frequency, particularly for immunocompromised patients, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fungal infections in the pediatric population. PMID:9003627

Munoz, F M; Demmler, G J; Travis, W R; Ogden, A K; Rossmann, S N; Rinaldi, M G

1997-01-01

300

Hemolytic anemia in wild seaducks caused by marine oil pollution.  

PubMed

Clinico-pathological examinations were conducted on wild white-winged scoters (Melanitta fusca) contaminated with fuel oil (Bunker C oil) from a capsized cargo ship in February 1993 in Japan. The erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit value in the oiled seaducks all were decreased and numerous immature erythrocytes were observed in blood smears. In addition, hemosiderosis was observed in the liver, kidney, and lung of some birds. We propose that the sea-ducks suffered from hemolytic anemia induced by ingestion of oil, which occurs when the birds preen their oiled plumage. PMID:8722285

Yamato, O; Goto, I; Maede, Y

1996-04-01

301

Iron-induced thrombocytopenia in severe iron-deficiency anemia.  

PubMed

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is commonly associated with reactive thrombocytosis, but thrombocytopenia is relatively uncommon and generally associated with more severe IDA. Even more rarely described has been thrombocytopenia following iron replacement therapy to treat IDA, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The authors present the case of a patient with severe IDA, who developed thrombocytopenia after the initiation of iron therapy. An analysis is made of all the previous reports of similar cases, to compare and start on the path of understanding this rare entity. PMID:25673365

Cunha, Vitória; Ferreira, Melanie; Barosa, Rita; Fonseca, Ana Glória; Delerue, Francisca; Carvalho, Carla

2015-04-01

302

Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood  

PubMed Central

AIM: To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. METHODS: A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen?I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). RESULTS: We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type?I?diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen?I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological evaluation showed corpus atrophic gastritis with lymphocytic infiltration (5/5), patchy oxyntic gland mononuclear cell infiltration (5/5), intestinal and/or pseudo-pyloric metaplasia in corpus mucosa (4/5), and enterochromaffin cell hyperplasia (4/5). Immunochemistry for gastrin on corpus biopsies was negative in all cases. Duodenal histology was normal. All biopsies were negative for H. pylori (Giemsa staining and cultural examination). CONCLUSION: We highlight autoimmune gastritis as a diagnosis to be considered when investigating refractory iron deficiency anemia in children, particularly in the setting of a personal/familial history of autoimmune disease, as well as the diagnostic contribution of a careful immunohistological evaluation. PMID:25400463

Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

2014-01-01

303

Falls in nursing home residents receiving pharmacotherapy for anemia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Falls are common among nursing home residents and have potentially severe consequences, including fracture and other trauma. Recent evidence suggests anemia may be independently related to these falls. This study explores the relationship between the use of anemia-related pharmacotherapies and falls among nursing home residents. Methods Forty nursing homes in the United States provided data for analysis. All incidents of falls over the 6-month post-index follow-up period were used to identify the outcomes of falls (?1 fall) and recurrent falls (>1 fall). Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between falls and recurrent falls with each of the anemia pharmacotherapies after adjusting for potential confounders. Results A total of 632 residents were eligible for analysis. More than half (57%) of residents were identified as anemic (hemoglobin < 12 g/dL females, or <13 g/dL males). Of anemic residents, 50% had been treated with one or more therapies (14% used vitamin B12, 10% folic acid, 38% iron, 0.3% darbepoetin alfa [DARB], and 1.3% epoetin alfa [EPO]). Rates of falls/ recurrent falls were 33%/18% for those receiving vitamin B12, 40%/16% for folic acid, 27%/14% for iron, 38%/8% for DARB, 18%/2% for EPO, and 22%/11% for those receiving no therapy. In the adjusted models, use of EPO or DARB was associated with significantly lower odds of recurrent falls (odds ratio = 0.06; P = 0.001). Other significant covariates included psychoactive medication use, age 75–84 years, age 85+ years, worsened balance score, and chronic kidney disease (P < 0.05 for all). Conclusion Only half of the anemic residents were found to be using anemia therapy (vitamin B12, folic acid, or iron). There is little evidence to support an association between the use of vitamin B12, folic acid, or iron in reducing the rates of falls and recurrent falls in nursing homes. Reduced odds of recurrent falls were observed for DARB or EPO users. PMID:23055706

Reardon, Gregory; Pandya, Naushira; Bailey, Robert A

2012-01-01

304

Aplastic anemia and red cell aplasia due to pentachlorophenol  

SciTech Connect

Repeated exposure to commercial (technical grade) pentachlorophenol (PCP) preceded aplastic anemia in four patients and pure red cell aplasia in two. Two patients developed concomitant or subsequent Hodgkin's disease and acute leukemia. The hematologic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effect of PCP and its chemical contaminants have been documented in other clinical and experimental reports. In view of the widespread contamination of our environment by PCP, clinicians and public health investigators must seek out such exposure in these and related disorders and initiate measures to reduce it.

Roberts, H.J.

1983-01-01

305

Isolated Hemolytic Anemia: An Unusual Manifestation of Occult Malignancy  

PubMed Central

Hemolysis is an uncommon and usually late complication of malignancy, and very rarely the presenting feature. Cancer-associated hemolysis may be immune-mediated, or may result from thrombotic microangiopathy accompanied by thrombocytopenia. We describe an unusual case of isolated hemolysis in the setting of occult metastatic breast cancer. The patient initially presented with symptomatic anemia, with evidence of hemolysis but with negative direct antiglobulin testing and a normal platelet count. Subsequent investigation discovered metastatic adenocarcinoma of the breast involving bone marrow. Hemolysis worsened despite initial treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy and a trial of corticosteroids, but later resolved with aromatase inhibitor therapy. PMID:24711918

Butler, Matthew J.; Yin, Ming; Quddus, Fahd

2014-01-01

306

Pleural solitary fibrous tumor complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

We herein report a 74-year-old woman who presented with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) associated with pleural solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Her AIHA was initially treated with 1 mg/kg daily of oral prednisolone (PSL) for 2 months, which had a limited effect. However, after surgical tumor resection, the patient showed remarkable improvement of AIHA with normalizations of serum lactate dehydrogenase and bilirubin levels, and we were able to rapidly reduce the PSL dosage. This is the first description of a case of AIHA caused by SFT. PMID:25030571

Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ohkawara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Harada-Shirado, Kayo; Furukawa, Miki; Sukegawa, Masumi; Shichishima-Nakamura, Akiko; Noji, Hideyoshi; Wakamatsu, Saho; Tasaki, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Kazuei; Takeishi, Yasuchika

2014-01-01

307

Role of hepcidin in the pathophysiology and diagnosis of anemia  

PubMed Central

This review summarizes the central role of hepcidin in the iron homeostasis mechanism, the molecular mechanism that can alter hepcidin expression, the relationship between hepcidin and erythropoiesis, and the pathogenetic role of hepcidin in different types of anemia. In addition, the usefulness of hepcidin dosage is highlighted, including the problems associated with analytical methods currently used as well as the measures of its molecular isoforms. Considering the central role of hepcidin in iron arrangement, it is reasonable to ponder its therapeutic use mainly in cases of iron overload. Further clinical trials are required before implementation. PMID:23589789

2013-01-01

308

Discovery may help prevent chemotherapy-induced anemia  

Cancer.gov

Cancer chemotherapy can cause peripheral neuropathy—nerve damage often resulting in pain and muscle weakness in the arms and legs. Now, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University (home of the Albert Einstein Cancer Center) have discovered that chemo also induces an insidious type of nerve damage inside bone marrow that can cause delays in recovery after bone marrow transplantation. The findings, made in mice and published online today in Nature Medicine, suggest that combining chemotherapy with nerve-protecting agents may prevent long-term bone marrow injury that causes anemia and may improve the success of bone marrow transplants.

309

Fanconi Anemia: A Signal Transduction and DNA Repair Pathway  

PubMed Central

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a fascinating, rare genetic disorder marked by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Research in recent years has led to the elucidation of FA as a DNA repair disorder and involved multiple pathways as well as having wide applicability to common cancers, including breast, ovarian, and head and neck. This review will describe the clinical aspects of FA as well as the current state of its molecular pathophysiology. In particular, work from the Kupfer laboratory will be described that demonstrates how the FA pathway interacts with multiple DNA repair pathways, including the mismatch repair system and signal transduction pathway of the DNA damage response. PMID:24348213

Kupfer, Gary M.

2013-01-01

310

A stochastic model for infectious salmon anemia (ISA) in Atlantic salmon farming  

E-print Network

A stochastic model for infectious salmon anemia (ISA) in Atlantic salmon farming Ida Scheel1 salmon anemia (ISA) is one of the main infectious diseases in Atlantic salmon farming with major, worldwide. We study the data covering salmon farming in Norway from 2002 to 2005 and propose a stochastic

Aldrin, Magne

311

Early detection and the course of glomerular injury in patients with sickle cell anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early detection and the course of glomerular injury in patients with sickle cell anemia. We performed a cross sectional analysis of glomerular function in 34 adult patients with sickle cell anemia (SSA). Patients were divided according to GFR and albumin excretion rate (AER): SSA controls (normal GFR and AER, N = 10), albuminuria (increased AER, but normal GFR, N =

Antonio Guasch; Millicent Cua; William E Mitch

1996-01-01

312

Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy with myelofibrosis and anemia: a case report and review of literature  

PubMed Central

Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) is a rare and usually benign disorder of bone and connective tissue growth. Here we present a 28-year-old male patient presenting to our hospital with PHO and symptomatic anemia. Bone marrow biopsy suggested myelofibrosis, a serious complication of PHO, which is often neglected upon admission, but may lead to life-threatening anemia.

Li, Sheyu; Li, Qianrui; Wang, Qin; Chen, Decai; Li, Jianwei

2015-01-01

313

"Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a…

Howe, Eric Michael

2007-01-01

314

A Case of Fetal Intestinal Volvulus Without Malrotation Causing Severe Anemia  

PubMed Central

Fetal intestinal volvulus without malrotation is a rare, life-threatening disease. Left untreated, hemorrhage from necrotic bowel tissue will lead to severe fetal anemia and even intrauterine death. We encountered a case of fetal intestinal volvulus causing severe anemia, which was diagnosed postnatally and successfully treated with surgical intervention. PMID:25628516

Nakagawa, Tomoko; Tachibana, Daisuke; Kitada, Kohei; Kurihara, Yasushi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Sakae, Yukari; Morotomi, Yoshiki; Nomura, Shiho; Saito, Mika

2015-01-01

315

Effects of Anemia and Uremia and a Combination of Both on Cardiovascular Structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Cardiovascular complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Chronic anemia is a complication of CRF and a cardiovascular risk factor per se. It was the aim of the present study to clarify whether uremia and anemia are additive or supra-additive with respect to cardiovascular alterations. Methods: Thirty SD rats were sham

J. S. Jürgensen; R. Grimm; K. Benz; S. Philipp; K. U. Eckardt; K. Amann

2010-01-01

316

Recombinant Human Erythropoietin: Physiology, Pathophysiology of Anemia in Renal Failure, and Economic Aspects Related to Dosing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The anemia associated with renal failure has been studied for over 150 years. It results primarily from inadequate production of erythropoietin such that plasma levels in dialysis patients are only 25% of those expected for the degree of anemia. Shortened red call survival, iron and other nutritional deficiencies, and uremic inhibitors have a secondary and minor role. Recombinant human erythropoietin

A. Besarab

1990-01-01

317

THE EPIDEMIOLOGY AND BURDEN OFPLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM RELATED ANEMIA AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paucity of precise information on the burden of malaria among pregnant women has hampered effective lobbying for the inclusion of preventative strategies against malaria in Safe Motherhood Initiatives. This article reviews the evidence on the coincidental risks of malaria and anemia in Africa and attempts to estimate the probable burden of malaria-related severe anemia in this susceptible group. Twenty-six

HELEN L. GUYATT; ROBERT W. SNOW

2001-01-01

318

Malaria and Anemia among Children in a Low Resource Setting In Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background This study aimed at determining the prevalence of malaria and anemia among children in rural community of Okada, Edo State Nigeria, as well as to assess the level of use of Insecticide treated bed nets and its impact on prevalence of malaria and anemia among study population. Methods Thick blood films from 226 children with signs and symptoms of malaria in Okada community were stained and examined for presence of malaria parasites. Hemoglobin concentration of all children was also determined using standard method. Result A total of 185 (81.9%) children were infected with malaria parasite. Malaria parasitaemia was significantly affected by age (P =0.003). A significantly higher number of positive cases of malaria and anemia was observed in rainy season as compared to dry season (P<0.05). The prevalence of anemia in children was 47.3%. Malaria was a risk factor for development of anemia in children (OR=2.551; 95% CI=1.227, 5.305; P=0.015). Use of insecticide treated bed nets was recorded in 11(4.9%) of children studied, and did not significantly reduce the prevalence of malaria and anemia. However among malaria parasite infected children, its use significantly reduced the prevalence of anemia (OR=0.126; 95%CI=0.015, 1.047; P=0.031). Conclusion Malaria and anemia among children was high malaria intervention progammes by relevant agencies is strongly advocated. PMID:23109959

Oladeinde, BH; Omoregie, R; Olley, M; Anunibe, JA; Onifade, AA; Oladeinde, OB

2012-01-01

319

Predictors of ESA Use in the Non-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease Population with Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Anemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but anemia treatment may be less comprehensive than guidelines suggest. Methods: The study population (n = 11,754) included general Medicare recipients with Parts A and B coverage before January 1, 2001, aged ?65 years on January 1, 2001, and alive with Medicare as primary payer through December 31, 2001.

Allan J. Collins; Haifeng Guo; David T. Gilbertson; Brian D. Bradbury

2009-01-01

320

Studies of the small-intestinal bacterial flora and of intestinal absorption in pernicious anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

HE INTESTINAL bacterial flora in patients with pernicious anemia has long attracted the interest of investigators, but few recent studies have been reported. Tile present investigation was undertaken to reappraise the significance of the bacterial flora of the small intestine and to correlate bacterial growth with intestinal absorption in patients with pernicious anemia. The implication of intestinal bacteria in the

William C. Sherwood; Franz Goldstein; Farid I. Haurani; C. Wilmer Wirts

1964-01-01

321

Intravenous Iron Versus Oral Iron in the Treatment of Postpartum Iron Deficiency Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Postpartum anemia can develop after delivery because of unforeseen medical problems during and after delivery which could complicate a mother’s ability to properly care for her newborn child. The current treatment for postpartum anemia is oral iron supplementation but this treatment has been associated with several gastrointestinal side effects. Alternative treatments include blood transfusions and intravenous (IV) iron therapy.

Meghan Crowley

2010-01-01

322

Cerebral Hemorrhagic Infarction Associated with Anabolic Steroid Therapy for Hypoplastic Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A twenty-two-year-old student with hypoplastic anemia was treated with large doses of anabolic steroid hormone preparations for two months. Cerebral hemorrhagic infarction shown by CAT scan developed when his hematologic conditions were improving. In treating hypoplastic anemia with anabolic steroid hormone preparations, one should be aware of the possible development of ce rebral hemorrhagic infarction at the time of hematologic

Zenji Shiozawa; Shinich Tsunoda; Akitaka Noda; Masaru Saito; Hideo Yamada

1986-01-01

323

Prediction of Sickle Cell Anemia Patient's Response to Hydroxyurea Treatment Using ARTMAP Network  

E-print Network

in 100 individuals develop the disease. Sickle cell an- ima is a genetic disorder, caused by single pointPrediction of Sickle Cell Anemia Patient's Response to Hydroxyurea Treatment Using ARTMAP Network distance-based ARTMAP (MART) network to the predication of sickle cell anemia patients' response

Valafar, Faramarz

324

A Group Counseling Approach for Persons Who Work With Sickle Cell Anemia Clients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although many workshops on sickle cell anemia have been held, it is still difficult to implement a comprehensive training program for sickle cell anemia clients in many communities. Research data on the topic are somewhat nebulous and insufficient political and social pressure have been exerted to change attitudes and take action towards the…

Calvin, Richmond

325

Low dose 'Sprinkles' - An innovative Approach to Treat Iron Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Young Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Iron supplementation programs using pediatric tablets or drops have not been successful in the control of anemia amongst infants and children in India. 'Sprinkles' is an innovative multi-micronutrient home fortification strategy to control iron deficiency and anemia. Objective: We aimed to determine the hematologic response to different doses and forms of iron in Sprinkles and iron drops. Setting: Twenty two

Siddhivinayak Hirve; Sheila Bhave; Ashish Bavdekar; Sadanand Naik; Anand Pandit; Claudia Schauer; Anna Christofides; Ziauddin Hyder

326

Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: A neglected issue with relevant effects  

PubMed Central

Anemia, a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is frequently overlooked in the management of IBD patients. Unfortunately, it represents one of the major causes of both decreased quality of life and increased hospital admissions among this population. Anemia in IBD is pathogenically complex, with several factors contributing to its development. While iron deficiency is the most common cause, vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies, along with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hemolysis, drug therapies, and myelosuppression, have also been identified as the underlying etiology in a number of patients. Each of these etiological factors thus needs to be identified and corrected in order to effectively manage anemia in IBD. Because the diagnosis of anemia in IBD often presents a challenge, combinations of several hematimetric and biochemical parameters should be used. Recent studies underscore the importance of determining the ferritin index and hepcidin levels in order to distinguish between iron deficiency anemia, anemia due to chronic disease, or mixed anemia in IBD patients. With regard to treatment, the newly introduced intravenous iron formulations have several advantages over orally-administered iron compounds in treating iron deficiency in IBD. In special situations, erythropoietin supplementation and biological therapies should be considered. In conclusion, the management of anemia is a complex aspect of treating IBD patients, one that significantly influences the prognosis of the disease. As a consequence, its correction should be considered a specific, first-line therapeutic goal in the management of these patients. PMID:24707137

Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J

2014-01-01

327

Anemia and bone disease of chronic kidney disease: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.  

PubMed

Anemia and metabolic bone disease accompany chronic kidney disease (CKD), and worsen as CKD progresses. It is likely that both processes contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality seen in CKD. This paper briefly reviews the pathogenesis and diagnosis of anemia and bone disease in CKD, and summarizes recent consensus guidelines for treatment. PMID:25463623

Shemin, Douglas

2014-12-01

328

PENGARUH MINUM TEH TERHADAP KEJADIAN ANEMIA PADA USILA DI KOTA BANDUNG  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Effect of Drinking Tea to the Anemia among Elderly in Bandung. The objective of this study is to know the effect of tea to anemia iron deficiency among elderly people. The study population is the elderly people in Bandung City. The sampling was 132 elderly that were selected randomly in Sub District of Cicendo year 2005. Method of measuring

Lia Meilianingsih; Junaiti Sahar

2007-01-01

329

Dysregulation of melatonin metabolism in chronic renal insufficiency: Role of erythropoietin-deficiency anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dysregulation of melatonin metabolism in chronic renal insufficiency: Role of erythropoietin-deficiency anemia. Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with a variety of neurological and endocrine disorders. In this study, we examined the effect of CRF and the associated anemia on circadian variation of pineal hormone, melatonin. Animals were studied six weeks after 5\\/6 nephrectomy (CRF group, N = 26) or

Nostratola D Vaziri; Fariba Oveisi; Gabriel A Reyes; Xin-Jin Jhou

1996-01-01

330

Management of Aplastic Anemia: The Role of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aplastic anemia is a rare bone marrow failure disorder. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) and immunosuppressive therapy (IST) are the main therapeutic modalities currently used to treat patients with aplastic anemia. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are regarded as the highest level of evidence and as such aid practitioners in solving clinical questions. The objective of

Anat Gafter-Gvili; Ron Ram; Pia Raanani; Ofer Shpilberg

2011-01-01

331

Anemia in cats with hemotropic mycoplasma infection: Retrospective evaluation of 23 cases (1996–2005)  

PubMed Central

This study summarizes the diagnostic findings from all anemic cats diagnosed with hemotropic mycoplasma (HM) infections at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine — Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 1996 and 2005. The objectives were to determine the frequency of HM-induced anemia among all cats presented with anemia during this period, the clinical findings and risk factors associated with clinical HM infection, and factors affecting or predicting survival. Medical records were examined from 23 cats with HM-induced anemia from the total of 170 cats diagnosed with anemia during this period. The frequency of HM-induced anemia was 14% (23/170) among all anemic cats. Cats with HM-induced anemia were less likely to be purebred (P = 0.04) than other cats with anemia. Of the cats with HM-induced anemia, those with positive retroviral status (P = 0.01), concurrent illness (P < 0.01), or lack of erythroid regeneration (P = 0.01) were most likely to die. The 1-year survival of HM-infected cats was 65% (13/20). PMID:20119543

Nibblett, Belle Marie D.; Snead, Elisabeth C.; Waldner, Cheryl; Taylor, Susan M.; Jackson, Marion L.; Knorr, Laina M.

2009-01-01

332

Estudiar las redes sociales: Aportes y perspectivas para las  

E-print Network

Estudiar las redes sociales: Aportes y perspectivas para las ciencias sociales Claire Bidart LEST muchas razones en interesarse en las redes socia- les. Estos sistemas relacionales construyen lazos entre estructuracio- nes, sus dinámicas. Transversales a los grupos y a las estructuras sociales glo- bales, las redes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

333

Development of a Reverse Genetics System to Produce Live, Attenuated Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Vaccine Candidates  

E-print Network

1 Development of a Reverse Genetics System to Produce Live, Attenuated Infectious Salmon Anemia Grant Number: NA03NMF4270132 March 29, 2006 Abstract Infectious salmon anemia (ISA), induced by the viral causative agent infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), has had a large, negative economic impact

334

Functions of Early (AP-2) and Late (AIP1/ALIX) Endocytic Proteins in Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Budding*  

E-print Network

Functions of Early (AP-2) and Late (AIP1/ALIX) Endocytic Proteins in Equine Infectious Anemia Virus anemia virus (EIAV) is apparently unique in its reported ability to interact both with the 2 subunit be accessed by distinct L domain specificities. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)2 is a member

Weisz, Ora A.

335

Prevalence and determinants of anemia in older people with diabetes attending an outpatient clinic: a cross-sectional audit.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional audit investigates the prevalence and determinants of anemia in older people with diabetes attending an outpatient clinic. Anemia was found to be highly prevalent, affecting 59% of patients. Older age and longer duration of diabetes were the main predictors of anemia, whereas the presence of chronic kidney disease was a mediator rather than a direct cause. PMID:25646941

Trevest, Katie; Treadway, Hannah; Hawkins-van der Cingel, Gerlineke; Bailey, Claire; Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H

2014-10-01

336

The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.  

PubMed

Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline. PMID:23945126

Gürbüz, Fatih; Ya?c?-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Y?lmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

2014-01-01

337

Iron deficiency and anemia: a common problem in female elite soccer players.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among elite women soccer players. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum total iron binding capacity, and ferritin were determined in 28 female soccer players called up for the national team. Of the investigated female soccer players, 57% had iron deficiency and 29% iron deficiency anemia 6 months before the FIFA Women's World Cup. It is concluded that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is common in female soccer players at the top international level. Some might suffer from relative anemia and measurement of hemoglobin alone is not sufficient to reveal relative anemia. Regular monitoring of hemoglobin concentration and iron status is necessary to institute iron supplementation when indicated. PMID:16521852

Landahl, Göran; Adolfsson, Peter; Börjesson, Mats; Mannheimer, Clas; Rödjer, Stig

2005-12-01

338

Underlying Factors Associated with Anemia in Amazonian Children: A Population-Based, Cross-Sectional Study  

PubMed Central

Background Although iron deficiency is considered to be the main cause of anemia in children worldwide, other contributors to childhood anemia remain little studied in developing countries. We estimated the relative contributions of different factors to anemia in a population-based, cross-sectional survey. Methodology We obtained venous blood samples from 1111 children aged 6 months to 10 years living in the frontier town of Acrelândia, northwest Brazil, to estimate the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency by measuring hemoglobin, erythrocyte indices, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, and C-reactive protein concentrations. Children were simultaneously screened for vitamin A, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies; intestinal parasite infections; glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency; and sickle cell trait carriage. Multiple Poisson regression and adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were used to describe associations between anemia and the independent variables. Principal Findings The prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and iron-deficiency anemia were 13.6%, 45.4%, and 10.3%, respectively. Children whose families were in the highest income quartile, compared with the lowest, had a lower risk of anemia (aPR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.37–0.98). Child age (<24 months, 2.90; 2.01–4.20) and maternal parity (>2 pregnancies, 2.01; 1.40–2.87) were positively associated with anemia. Other associated correlates were iron deficiency (2.1; 1.4–3.0), vitamin B12 (1.4; 1.0–2.2), and folate (2.0; 1.3–3.1) deficiencies, and C-reactive protein concentrations (>5 mg/L, 1.5; 1.1–2.2). Conclusions Addressing morbidities and multiple nutritional deficiencies in children and mothers and improving the purchasing power of poorer families are potentially important interventions to reduce the burden of anemia. PMID:22574149

Cardoso, Marly A.; Scopel, Kézia K.G.; Muniz, Pascoal T.; Villamor, Eduardo; Ferreira, Marcelo U.

2012-01-01

339

Association of Household Environment and Prevalence of Anemia Among Children Under-5 in India  

PubMed Central

Objective: The study explores the association between the household environment and the prevalence of anemia among children under the age of 5?years in India. Data and methodology: The study is based on 52,868 children under the age of 5?years, included in India’s National Family Health Survey-3. The outcome variable was the prevalence of anemia. To understand the role of environment in determining child anemia, step wise logistic regression models consisting of environmental, child, socio-economic, and media exposure variables were applied. Results: The occurrence of childhood anemia was higher in the North Eastern and Eastern regions compared to all other regions of India. Unclean fuel use, poor toilet facilities, staying in non-concrete house, exposure to smoking were important variables determining the prevalence of anemia. Smoking, when it was controlled with only socio economic factors, showed lesser impact on anemia, but when it got adjusted with socio-economic, child, and media variables together it showed an important impact as it increased the risk of anemia. Conclusion: Children under 5?years of age generally stay inside their house and are more exposed to the household environment. Thus, among these children there are multiple risk factors causing anemia along with the nutritional deficiencies. Better resources are needed to educate the public and to increase awareness for improved hygiene, sanitation and housing facilities, health and nutrition, etc. Along with a wider program to manage nutritional deficiency, anemia in children <5?years, there should be a holistic approach toward anemia control inculcating household environmental conditions and socio economic determinants. PMID:25368862

Baranwal, Annu; Baranwal, Anshu; Roy, Nobhojit

2014-01-01

340

Anemia prevalence and treatment practice in patients with non-myeloid tumors receiving chemotherapy  

PubMed Central

Purpose To describe the prevalence and management of anemia in cancer patients. Methods This cross-sectional, observational survey was conducted in Italy and Austria. Centers prespecified one day, during a 4-month enrollment window, to report specific data collected during normal clinical practice for patients with non-myeloid tumors attending for chemotherapy (±radiotherapy) treatment. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of anemia as determined using a prespecified algorithm: hemoglobin (Hb) ?10 g/dL on/within 3 days prior to visit; ongoing anemia treatment; physician diagnosis of anemia, together with ?1 anemia symptom. Results Between November 18, 2010 and March 18, 2011, data for 1412 patients were collected (Italy n = 1130; Austria n = 282). Most patients (n = 1136; 80%) had solid tumors; 809 (57%) had received ?3 chemotherapy cycles. The prevalence of anemia was 32% (95% confidence interval: 29.4%–34.2%); 196 patients (14%) were deemed anemic based on Hb ?10 g/dL, 131 (9%) on ongoing anemia treatment, and 121 (9%) on physician diagnosis/anemia symptom. Overall, 1153 patients (82%) had Hb data; mean (standard deviation [SD]) Hb levels were 11.7 (1.7) g/dL. In total, 456 patients (32%) had anemia symptoms: fatigue (n = 392; 28%), depression (n = 122; 9%), and dyspnea (n = 107; 8%) were most common. Fifty-one patients (4%) had had their current chemotherapy cycle delayed due to anemia. On visit day, or ?28 days prior, 91 (6%), 188 (13%), and 81 patients (6%) had evidence of whole blood/red blood cell transfusion, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use, or iron use, respectively. Conclusion On the prespecified study day, one-third of patients with non-myeloid tumors undergoing chemotherapy were found to be anemic and 13% had evidence of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use then or in the 28 days prior. PMID:23946669

Merlini, Laura; Cartenì, Giacomo; Iacobelli, Stefano; Stelitano, Caterina; Airoldi, Mario; Balcke, Peter; Keil, Felix; Haslbauer, Ferdinand; Belton, Laura; Pujol, Beatriz

2013-01-01

341

Molecular aspects of erythroenzymopathies associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Since the discovery of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and of pyruvate kinase deficiencies, erythroenzymopathies associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia have been extensively investigated. Kinetic and electrophoretic studies have shown that most, if not all, erythroenzymopathies are caused by the production of a mutant enzyme. Except for a few enzymes that are abundant in blood and tissues, it is difficult to obtain enough sample to study the functional and structural abnormalities of mutant enzymes associated with genetic disorders in man. The primary structures of only two normal red cell enzymes which can cause hereditary hemolytic anemia, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and adenylate kinase, have been determined. Single amino acid substitutions of PGK variants have been found, and the identification of the exact molecular abnormalities of such variants has helped us to understand the accompanying functional abnormality. Gene cloning makes possible the identification of the DNA sequence that codes for enzyme proteins. Recently, human complementary DNA (cDNA) for aldolase, PGK, G6PD, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) have been isolated, and the nucleotide sequences for PGK and ADA determined. In the near future, human cDNA sequencing should permit identification of the gene alteration that gives rise to the mutant enzymes. PMID:2990202

Miwa, S; Fujii, H

1985-07-01

342

[Antipneumococcal vaccines in sickle-cell anemia and asplenia].  

PubMed

TWO MEANS OF PREVENTION: Asplenic and sickle-cell anemia patients are susceptible to infections caused by polysaccharide-encapsulated bacteria, particularly pneumococci, Haemophilus influenzae b, and meningococci. Prevention of these frequent and serious infections depends on antibiotic prophylaxis and vaccination. ANTI-POLYSACCHARIDE PNEUMOCOCCI: Vaccination Pneumo 23 is a 23-valent vaccine corresponding to more than 90% of the pneumococci strains implicated in systemic infections. The efficacy of conjugated polysaccharide vaccines for the prevention of systemic infections, particularly when caused by antibiotic-resistant strains, can optimize the efficacy potential of antibiotic prophylaxis, the immense majority of strains not covered by the conjugated vaccine being susceptible to penicillin. CONJUGATED PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINE: Prevenar is a seven-valence vaccine which induces a thymodependent antibody response. The efficacy of the conjugated vaccine against systemic infections, particularly antibiotic resistant strains, can have a potentializing effect on antibiotic prophylaxis, the vast majority of the strains not present in the conjugated vaccine being sensitive to penicillin. OTHER VACCINES: Finally, it should be recalled that conjugated antigroup C meningococcal vaccines are recommended for asplenic and sickle-cell anemia patients. In France, the anti-Haemophilus b vaccine is included in the vaccination calendar for all infants. PMID:14631639

Cohen, R

2003-09-01

343

Salmonella pyomyositis complicating sickle cell anemia: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pyomyositis is a bacterial infection of skeletal muscle and a rare complication of sickle cell anemia. It may present a difficult problem in diagnosis, leading to delay in appropriate treatment and development of complications including abscess formation and osteomyelitis. Case presentation We report the case of a 44-year-old Afro-Caribbean woman with homozygous sickle cell disease who presented with chest crisis and later developed pyomyositis of her hip and pelvic muscles. Salmonella agbeni was isolated from blood cultures and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis in this case. It is noteworthy of this case that there were no antecedent signs of gastroenteritis. Drainage was not appropriate and she was treated with intravenous antibiotics for six weeks. Conclusions Focal Salmonella infections are uncommon in soft tissue. Pyomyositis should be considered in patients with sickle cell anemia that continue to have muscle pain and high fevers, despite initial management of their sickle cell crisis. Radiological imaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging, is a crucial tool in establishing the diagnosis. PMID:20591146

2010-01-01

344

Intravenous iron for the treatment of predialysis anemia.  

PubMed

This article, based on our own studies and those of others, presents evidence to show that the anemia of chronic renal failure in the predialysis period is, to a significant extent, caused by iron deficiency and can be improved in most cases by the administration of intravenous (i.v.) but not oral iron. We estimate that in approximately 30% of all predialysis patients with anemia, a target hematocrit (Hct) of 35% can be reached and maintained by giving i.v. iron alone without exceeding currently acceptable limits of serum ferritin (500 microg/liter) or the percentage of iron saturation (40%). If, in addition, subcutaneous erythropoietin (EPO-usually in only low doses-is added, the combination has an additive effect on the Hct response, and almost all anemic predialysis patients can reach and maintain the target Hct of 35% over a one-year period. Therefore, the advantage of maintaining adequate iron stores with i.v. iron is that if EPO is needed, lower doses will be required to achieve the target Hct than if EPO were used alone. This not only avoids the high cost of EPO therapy but also its associated side-effects, especially hypertension. Using Venofer, a ferric hydroxide sucrose complex, as our i.v. iron supplement, we have seen no anaphylactic reactions in over 20,000 infusions over a four-year period in 360 hemodialysis, 123 predialysis, and 58 peritoneal dialysis patients. PMID:10084291

Silverberg, D S; Blum, M; Agbaria, Z; Schwartz, D; Zubkov, A; Yachnin, T; Iaina, A

1999-03-01

345

Anemia induced by high zinc intake in chicks: Mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The mechanisms by which excess Zn induced anemia in chickens was assessed in 8 studies in which chicks were randomly assigned to a 2 {times} 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with 60 or 2,000 {mu}g Zn and 10 or 250 {mu}g Cu/g diet. Less Fe-59 appeared in the plasma 1 hour after a labeled meal when chicks were fed excess Zn in 1 of 2 studies but less Fe-59 appeared in livers of chicks fed excess Zn in both studies. The decrease of Fe-59 uptake into tissues paralleled a decrease in Fe concentrations in livers and tibiotarsi. These differences in tissue Fe did not reflect differences in Fe excretion because excretion and incorporation into tissues of injected Fe-59 was not affected by high Zn intake. Although excess Zn decreased tissue Cu concentrations, excess Zn, per se, did not affect cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity, the in vivo t 1/2 of erythrocytes, or erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. The decrease in body weight of chicks fed excess Zn indicated that protein synthesis and/or degradation could be affected. Increased incorporation of C-14 tyrosine into liver and bone marrow of chicks fed excess Zn suggested increased protoporphyrin synthesis or metallothionein synthesis. These results indicated that decreased Fe absorption was the primary mechanism by which excess Zn induced anemia.

Pimentel, J.L.; Greger, J.L.; Cook, M.E. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

1991-03-15

346

Autoantibody to the gastrin receptor in pernicious anemia  

SciTech Connect

The authors examined serum IgG fractions from 20 patients with pernicious anemia and 25 control subjects for their capacity to inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)15-leu human gastrin-17 to parietal-cell-enriched gastric mucosal cells. IgG fractions from six patients reduced gastrin binding by 45.6 +/- 12.2 per cent, as compared with a reduction of 1.8 +/- 0.7 per cent by fractions from the 25 controls. The fractions from these six patients also reduced gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake by gastric cells (an index of gastric acid secretory activity in vitro) by 50.2 +/- 8.4 per cent (mean +/- S.D.), as compared with 9.2 +/- 4.1 per cent for the controls. IgG fractions from six other patients that did not reduce gastrin binding also inhibited gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake, by 48.1 +/- 9.1 per cent. These reductions in gastrin binding and aminopyrine uptake were abolished by absorption of the IgG fractions with suspensions of viable gastric mucosal cells but not by absorption with liver or kidney cells. The IgG fractions did not inhibit (/sup 3/H)histamine binding or histamine-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake. These results suggest that serum IgG from some patients with pernicious anemia contains autoantibodies to the gastrin receptor.

de Aizpurua, H.J.; Ungar, B.; Toh, B.H.

1985-08-22

347

Treatment of iron deficiency anemia associated with gastrointestinal tract diseases  

PubMed Central

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a common site of bleeding that may lead to iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Treatment of IDA depends on severity and acuity of patients’ signs and symptoms. While red blood cell transfusions may be required in hemodynamically unstable patients, transfusions should be avoided in chronically anemic patients due to their potential side effects and cost. Iron studies need to be performed after episodes of GI bleeding and stores need to be replenished before anemia develops. Oral iron preparations are efficacious but poorly tolerated due to non-absorbed iron-mediated GI side effects. However, oral iron dose may be reduced with no effect on its efficacy while decreasing side effects and patient discontinuation rates. Parenteral iron therapy replenishes iron stores quicker and is better tolerated than oral therapy. Serious hypersensitive reactions are very rare with new intravenous preparations. While data on worsening of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) activity by oral iron therapy are not conclusive, parenteral iron therapy still seems to be advantageous in the treatment of IDA in patients with IBD, because oral iron may not be sufficient to overcome the chronic blood loss and GI side effects of oral iron which may mimic IBD exacerbation. Finally, we believe the choice of oral vs parenteral iron therapy in patients with IBD should primarily depend on acuity and severity of patients’ signs and symptoms. PMID:20533591

Bayraktar, Ulas D; Bayraktar, Soley

2010-01-01

348

Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses. PMID:23689532

Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

2013-10-01

349

A New Measure of Patient Responsiveness for Improving Anemia Management Protocols MJ Germain1, CV Hollot2, J Horowitz3, and RP Shrestha4, Y Chait5  

E-print Network

A New Measure of Patient Responsiveness for Improving Anemia Management Protocols MJ Germain1, CV on performance of anemia management protocols. · Anemia of end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) is characterized-specific gains should play a role in their design. · The interaction of anemia management protocols (AMPs

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

350

Anemia and feeding practices among infants in rural Shaanxi Province in China.  

PubMed

Anemia is one of the most prevalent public health problems among infants and iron deficiency anemia has been related to many adverse consequences. The overall goal of this study is to examine the prevalence of anemia among infants in poor rural China and to identify correlates of anemia. In April 2013, we randomly sampled 948 infants aged 6-11 months living in 351 villages across 174 townships in nationally-designated poverty counties in rural areas of southern Shaanxi Province, China. Infants were administered a finger prick blood test for hemoglobin (Hb). Anthropometric measurement and household survey of demographic characteristics and feeding practices were conducted in the survey. We found that 54.3% of 6-11 month old infants in poor rural China are anemic, and 24.3% of sample infants suffer from moderate or severe anemia. We find that children still breastfed over 6 months of age had lower Hb concentrations and higher anemia prevalence than their non-breastfeeding counterparts (p < 0.01), and that children who had ever been formula-fed had significantly higher Hb concentrations and lower anemia prevalence than their non-formula-fed counterparts (p < 0.01). The results suggest the importance of iron supplementation or home fortification while breastfeeding. PMID:25533008

Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhou, Huan; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Linxiu; Sylvia, Sean; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

2014-12-01

351

Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation  

PubMed Central

A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

2014-01-01

352

Prevalence of anemia and its risk factors among lactating mothers in Myanmar.  

PubMed

In Myanmar, 60% of the population consists of mothers and children, and they are the groups most vulnerable to anemia. The objectives of this study are to determine (1) the anemia prevalence among lactating women and (2) the risk factors associated with anemia. Convenience sampling was used to select three villages in two different regions (Kachin and Shan) in Myanmar. Hemoglobin and anthropometric indicators were measured for 733 lactating women. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with anemia. The anemia prevalence rate was 60.3% in lactating women, with 20.3% of lactating women having severe anemia. Factors of malnutrition (P = 0.026), self-reported symptoms of night blindness or poor dark adaptation (P < 0.001), lack of primary education experience (P < 0.001), low family annual capita income (< 800 MMK; P < 0.001), drinking spring or river water (P < 0.001), and drinking unboiled water (P = 0.016) were associated with anemia. To promote health in lactating women, a comprehensive intervention is needed in these regions. PMID:24639302

Zhao, Ai; Zhang, Yumei; Li, Bo; Wang, Peiyu; Li, Jiayin; Xue, Yong; Gao, Hongchong

2014-05-01

353

Diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anemia in the 21st century  

PubMed Central

Iron deficiency is the single most prevalent nutritional deficiency worldwide. It accounts for anemia in 5% of American women and 2% of American men. The goal of this review article is to assist practitioners in understanding the physiology of iron metabolism and to aid in accurately diagnosing iron deficiency anemia. The current first line of therapy for patients with iron deficiency anemia is oral iron supplementation. Oral supplementation is cheap, safe, and effective at correcting iron deficiency anemia; however, it is not tolerated by some patients and in a subset of patients it is insufficient. Patients in whom the gastrointestinal blood loss exceeds the intestinal ability to absorb iron (e.g. intestinal angiodysplasia) may develop iron deficiency anemia refractory to oral iron supplementation. This population of patients proves to be the most challenging to manage. Historically, these patients have required numerous and frequent blood transfusions and suffer end-organ damage resultant from their refractory anemia. Intravenous iron supplementation fell out of favor secondary to the presence of infrequent but serious side effects. Newer and safer intravenous iron preparations are now available and are likely currently underutilized. This article discusses the possible use of intravenous iron supplementation in the management of patients with severe iron deficiency anemia and those who have failed oral iron supplementation. PMID:21694802

Johnson-Wimbley, Terri D.; Graham, David Y.

2011-01-01

354

Malaria-related anemia in patients from unstable transmission areas in Colombia.  

PubMed

Information about the prevalence of malarial anemia in areas of low-malaria transmission intensity, like Latin America, is scarce. To characterize the malaria-related anemia, we evaluated 929 malaria patients from three sites in Colombia during 2011-2013. Plasmodium vivax was found to be the most prevalent species in Tierralta (92%), whereas P. falciparum was predominant in Tumaco (84%) and Quibdó (70%). Although severe anemia (hemoglobin < 7 g/dL) was almost absent (0.3%), variable degrees of non-severe anemia were observed in 36.9% of patients. In Tierralta, hemoglobin levels were negatively associated with days of illness. Moreover, in Tierralta and Quibdó, the number of previous malaria episodes and hemoglobin levels were positively associated. Both Plasmodium species seem to have similar potential to induce malarial anemia with distinct cofactors at each endemic setting. The target age in these low-transmission settings seems shifting toward adolescents and young adults. In addition, previous malaria experience seems to induce protection against anemia development. Altogether, these data suggest that early diagnosis and prompt treatment are likely preventing more frequent and serious malaria-related anemia in Colombia. PMID:25510719

Lopez-Perez, Mary; Álvarez, Álvaro; Gutierrez, Juan B; Moreno, Alberto; Herrera, Sócrates; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

2015-02-01

355

Anemia and Feeding Practices among Infants in Rural Shaanxi Province in China  

PubMed Central

Anemia is one of the most prevalent public health problems among infants and iron deficiency anemia has been related to many adverse consequences. The overall goal of this study is to examine the prevalence of anemia among infants in poor rural China and to identify correlates of anemia. In April 2013, we randomly sampled 948 infants aged 6–11 months living in 351 villages across 174 townships in nationally-designated poverty counties in rural areas of southern Shaanxi Province, China. Infants were administered a finger prick blood test for hemoglobin (Hb). Anthropometric measurement and household survey of demographic characteristics and feeding practices were conducted in the survey. We found that 54.3% of 6–11 month old infants in poor rural China are anemic, and 24.3% of sample infants suffer from moderate or severe anemia. We find that children still breastfed over 6 months of age had lower Hb concentrations and higher anemia prevalence than their non-breastfeeding counterparts (p < 0.01), and that children who had ever been formula-fed had significantly higher Hb concentrations and lower anemia prevalence than their non-formula-fed counterparts (p < 0.01). The results suggest the importance of iron supplementation or home fortification while breastfeeding. PMID:25533008

Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhou, Huan; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Linxiu; Sylvia, Sean; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

2014-01-01

356

Anemia and retinal function in a mouse model of acute colitis.  

PubMed

Individuals with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have an elevated risk of ocular inflammation. Both the anterior and posterior eye can be affected by IBD, although posterior eye dysfunction is more likely to go undetected. Little investigative attention has been directed toward the mechanisms of ocular dysfunction with IBD; however, given the prevalence of anemia in IBD and the effects of anemia on the retina, we examined the association between retinal function (electroretinography, ERG) and the anemia induced by experimental IBD, and we tested for a potential retinal benefit of acutely attenuating anemia (via red blood cell (RBC) infusion). Colitis was induced in mice in a model involving drinking water ingestion of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), with untreated drinking water administered to controls. A subset of the DSS mice was infused with RBCs to attenuate the severity of the anemia induced by DSS. ERG signals (a-waves, b-waves, and oscillatory potential amplitudes and implicit times) were compared between the three groups of mice to evaluate retinal function. ERG amplitudes were significantly decreased in DSS mice compared to controls, with the amplitudes demonstrating a positive correlation with hematocrit, that is, the lowest ERG amplitudes were found with the most severe cases of anemia. An acute infusion of RBCs into DSS mice provided an improvement in the oscillatory potential implicit times, but no significant improvements in other ERG parameters. Despite the association between anemia and ERG signals in DSS-induced colitis, acute RBC infusion may only partially attenuate the associated retinal dysfunction. PMID:25156814

Watts, Megan N; Harris, Norman R

2014-11-01

357

Managing dialysis patients who develop anemia caused by chronic kidney disease: focus on peginesatide  

PubMed Central

Anemia in chronic kidney disease is a prevalent and expensive problem in the United States, and it is well documented that anemia worsens as glomerular filtration rates decline. The complications of severe anemia in this patient population contribute significantly to their overall morbidity with increased cardiovascular complications, decreased quality of life, and increased dependence on transfusions to maintain adequate hemoglobin levels. Erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs) have revolutionized the treatment of anemia in this population, but there has been a great deal of controversy surrounding the quest for the ideal hemoglobin target. In addition, there are economic and practice management implications where anemia treatment is concerned, with ongoing refinement of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services-bundled payments. One of the newest additions to the arsenal used to fight anemia in end-stage renal disease patients is peginesatide (Omontys), a synthetic, PEGylated, peptide-based ESA that acts by stimulating the erythropoietin receptor. The role of peginesatide in the future treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease remains uncertain, with new safety concerns being brought to attention as it emerges on the market, prompting a national recall. PMID:24023516

Valliant, Amanda; Hofmann, R Michael

2013-01-01

358

Anemia, parasitic infections and some risk factors among physical education female students in Alexandria.  

PubMed

The present study was a cross-sectional one, carried out to estimate the percentages of anemia and parasites among students of Faculty of Physical Education for girls and some of their related factors. A predesigned questionnaire was completed by the researchers through face-to-face meetings to collect data concerning age, menstruation history and some dietary habits. Blood samples were taken by finger pricks to estimate hemoglobin (Hb) concentration level (gm/dl). Stool samples were collected and examined for the presence of intestinal parasites using formol ether concentration technique. Mild anemia was found among 12.4% of the studied female students. Mean Hb level was 13.3 g/dl (SD +/- 1.03). Anemia increased in those drinking tea immediately after meals and in those not drinking tea indicating poor iron reserves. Also taking iron supplements, having a history of anemia, increased amount and duration of menstruation were associated with anemia. Percentage of girls infected with parasites was 27.2%. A higher percentage of, anemia was found among students with no parasites (13.1% vs. 9.7%). The difference was statistically insignificant. Parasitic infections were insignificantly associated with anemia which was found in only 12.5% of girls infected with Giardia lamblia, in 10% of those with Ascaris lumbricoides, and in 7.4% of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar cases. PMID:17265613

El-Sahn, Fikrat F; El-Masry, Abdel-Ghanny M; El-Sahn, Amel A

2003-01-01

359

The Association of Parasitic Infections in Pregnancy and Maternal and Fetal Anemia: A Cohort Study in Coastal Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background Relative contribution of these infections on anemia in pregnancy is not certain. While measures to protect pregnant women against malaria have been scaling up, interventions against helminthes have received much less attention. In this study, we determine the relative impact of helminthes and malaria on maternal anemia. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted in coastal Kenya among a cohort of pregnant women who were recruited at their first antenatal care (ANC) visit and tested for malaria, hookworm, and other parasitic infections and anemia at enrollment. All women enrolled in the study received presumptive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, iron and multi-vitamins and women diagnosed with helminthic infections were treated with albendazole. Women delivering a live, term birth, were also tested for maternal anemia, fetal anemia and presence of infection at delivery. Principal Findings Of the 706 women studied, at the first ANC visit, 27% had moderate/severe anemia and 71% of women were anemic overall. The infections with highest prevalence were hookworm (24%), urogenital schistosomiasis (17%), trichuria (10%), and malaria (9%). In adjusted and unadjusted analyses, moderate/severe anemia at first ANC visit was associated with the higher intensities of hookworm and P. falciparum microscopy-malaria infections. At delivery, 34% of women had moderate/severe anemia and 18% of infants' cord hemoglobin was consistent with fetal anemia. While none of the maternal infections were significantly associated with fetal anemia, moderate/severe maternal anemia was associated with fetal anemia. Conclusions More than one quarter of women receiving standard ANC with IPTp for malaria had moderate/severe anemia in pregnancy and high rates of parasitic infection. Thus, addressing the role of co-infections, such as hookworm, as well as under-nutrition, and their contribution to anemia is needed. PMID:24587473

McClure, Elizabeth M.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Mungai, Peter; Malhotra, Indu; King, Christopher L.; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Dent, Arlene E.

2014-01-01

360

Macrocytic Anemia and Mitochondriopathy Resulting from a Defect in Sideroflexin 4  

PubMed Central

We used exome sequencing to identify mutations in sideroflexin 4 (SFXN4) in two children with mitochondrial disease (the more severe case also presented with macrocytic anemia). SFXN4 is an uncharacterized mitochondrial protein that localizes to the mitochondrial inner membrane. sfxn4 knockdown in zebrafish recapitulated the mitochondrial respiratory defect observed in both individuals and the macrocytic anemia with megaloblastic features of the more severe case. In vitro and in vivo complementation studies with fibroblasts from the affected individuals and zebrafish demonstrated the requirement of SFXN4 for mitochondrial respiratory homeostasis and erythropoiesis. Our findings establish mutations in SFXN4 as a cause of mitochondriopathy and macrocytic anemia. PMID:24119684

Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Cooney, Jeffrey D.; Garone, Caterina; Kremer, Laura S.; Haack, Tobias B.; Thon, Jonathan N.; Miyata, Non; Lieber, Daniel S.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Akman, H. Orhan; Yien, Yvette Y.; Huston, Nicholas C.; Branco, Diana S.; Shah, Dhvanit I.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Koehler, Carla M.; Italiano, Joseph E.; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Beblo, Skadi; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Freisinger, Peter; Donati, M. Alice; Prokisch, Holger; Mootha, Vamsi K.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Paw, Barry H.

2013-01-01

361

The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health  

PubMed Central

Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron deficiency is a global nutritional problem affecting up to 52% of pregnant women. Many of these women are symptomatic. Lack of proper weight gain during pregnancy is an important predictor of iron deficiency. PMID:25719576

Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Jan, Mohammed M.

2015-01-01

362

Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis associated with iron deficiency anemia secondary to severe menorrhagia: a case report.  

PubMed

Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis is a rare condition presenting with a wide spectrum of nonspecific symptoms that can make early diagnosis difficult. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis has been associated with various etiologies. Iron deficiency anemia associated with cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in teenagers is rare. We present a teenage patient with complete thrombosis of the vein of Galen, straight sinus, and left internal cerebral vein associated with iron deficiency anemia due to severe menorrhagia. Mechanisms that can explain the association between iron deficiency anemia and thrombosis are discussed. PMID:24056151

Corrales-Medina, Fernando F; Grant, Leon; Egas-Bejar, Daniela; Valdivia-Ascuna, Zoila; Rodriguez, Nidra; Mancias, Pedro

2014-09-01

363

Belgian recommendations for the management of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.  

PubMed

Anemia is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) which, in most cases, results from an absolute or functional iron deficiency. Although anemia and iron deficiency may have a dramatic impact on the quality of life of IBD patients, they are underdiagnosed and undertreated. This paper provides evidence-based consensus guidelines and practical treatment algorithms that are directly applicable to the Belgian situation. In this way, the Belgian IBD research and development Group (BIRD) aims to increase awareness and knowledge among gastroenterologists in order to improve the management of anemia and iron deficiency in their IBD patients. PMID:25509205

Hindryckx, P; Amininejad, L; Van De Vijver, E; Bossuyt, P

2014-09-01

364

The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child's health.  

PubMed

Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron deficiency is a global nutritional problem affecting up to 52% of pregnant women. Many of these women are symptomatic. Lack of proper weight gain during pregnancy is an important predictor of iron deficiency. PMID:25719576

Abu-Ouf, Noran M; Jan, Mohammed M

2015-02-01

365

Human parvovirus B19-induced aplastic crisis in iron deficiency anemia.  

PubMed

Human parvovirus B19 (HPVB19) infects and replicates in erythroid progenitor cells. Its specific cytotoxic effect on these cells results in aplastic crises in patients with congenital hemolytic anemias. Aplastic crisis due to HPVB19 infection in a healthy girl revealed occult iron deficiency anemia. The condition is characterized by a high serum iron level in the aplastic phase and rapid recovery after administration of iron. Temporary HPVB19-induced red blood cell aplasia could occur in patients with other anemias, particularly those with non-inherited form of hemolysis. PMID:7942015

Kudoh, T; Yoto, Y; Suzuki, N; Oda, T; Katoh, S; Chiba, S; Matsunaga, Y

1994-08-01

366

Effect of anemia on tumor radiosensitivity under normo and hyperbaric conditions  

SciTech Connect

The effect of chronic anemia on tumor radiosensitivity in a murine tumor has been investigated. Anemia was induced by bilateral kidney irradiation given several months before tumor implantation. Anemic, anemic transfused, and normal non-anemic age-matched tumor bearing animals were irradiated with X rays (2 F/24 hr) either in air, air plus misonidazole, or under hyperbaric oxygen. The most resistant response was that of tumors grown in normal mice treated in air. Anemia produced an increase in radiosensitivity which was further enhanced by red blood cell replacement. The most sensitive overall response was seen in the anemic-transfused group treated with HBO.

Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.; Smith, K.A.; Soranson, J.A.; Randhawa, V.S.; Stratford, M.R.; Denekamp, J.

1987-11-01

367

Anemia in adolescent girls: a preliminary report from semi-urban Nepal.  

PubMed

The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of anemia in adolescent Nepalese girls in a semi urban setting. A total of 209 apparently healthy girls between the ages of 11-18 years were recruited and information collected on menarcheal status and socio-demographic profile. All girls were subjected to anthropometric examination and hematocrit estimation. Anemia was defined as hematocrit less than 36, as per WHO cut-off. The overall prevalence of anemia was found to be 68.8%. This prevalence was not related to girls' age, body mass index, menarcheal status, and socio-demographic factors including parental education or occupation ( p = 0.05). PMID:12522274

Shah, Binay Kumar; Gupta, Piyush

2002-12-01

368

The BRCA1-interacting helicase BRIP1 is deficient in Fanconi anemia.  

PubMed

Seven Fanconi anemia-associated proteins (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG and FANCL) form a nuclear Fanconi anemia core complex that activates the monoubiquitination of FANCD2, targeting FANCD2 to BRCA1-containing nuclear foci. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia of complementation groups D1 and J (FA-D1 and FA-J) have normal FANCD2 ubiquitination. Using genetic mapping, mutation identification and western-blot data, we identify the defective protein in FA-J cells as BRIP1 (also called BACH1), a DNA helicase that is a binding partner of the breast cancer tumor suppressor BRCA1. PMID:16116424

Levran, Orna; Attwooll, Claire; Henry, Rashida T; Milton, Kelly L; Neveling, Kornelia; Rio, Paula; Batish, Sat Dev; Kalb, Reinhard; Velleuer, Eunike; Barral, Sandra; Ott, Jurg; Petrini, John; Schindler, Detlev; Hanenberg, Helmut; Auerbach, Arleen D

2005-09-01

369

Food fortification strategy--preventing iron deficiency anemia: a review.  

PubMed

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a significant challenge in developing countries. It increases the risk of premature delivery and low birth weight. In children, IDA retards growth, impairs cognitive performance, and reduces physical activity. It also accelerates the mortality and morbidity rate in women. The key factors responsible include dietary elevated iron demand, socioeconomic, and disease status. To overcome IDA, disease control measures, dietary diversification, supplementation and iron fortification in food have been adopted. Iron fortification in food is considered a long term and sustainable strategy in the present scenario. For an efficient fortification program, the combination of iron fortificants and food vehicle must be safe, acceptable, and consumed by the target population. Moreover, it should not adversely affect acceptability and stability of the end product. PMID:17453923

Huma, Nuzhat; Salim-Ur-Rehman; Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Murtaza, M Anjum; Sheikh, Munir A

2007-01-01

370

Cerebral vasculopathy in children with sickle cell anemia.  

PubMed

Sickle cell anemia (SCA)-associated cerebral vasculopathy and moyamoya is a unique entity reflecting the abnormal interactions between sickled red blood cells (RBCs) and the cerebral arterial endothelium. Endothelial injury, coagulation activation, and the inflammatory response generated by sickled RBCs are implicated in the development of cerebral vasculopathy, but the pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. SCA-specific screening and treatment guidelines have successfully reduced the incidence of overt strokes in this high-risk population. However, despite aggressive hematological management, many children with cerebral vasculopathy due to SCA have progressive vasculopathy and recurrent strokes; therefore, more effective therapies, such as revascularization surgery and curative hematopoietic stem cell transplant, are urgently needed. PMID:25294561

Fasano, Ross M; Meier, Emily R; Hulbert, Monica L

2015-01-01

371

Paramagnetic Europium Salen Complex and Sickle-Cell Anemia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new europium salen complex, Eu(salen)2NH4, was synthesized, and its composition was confirmed by chemical analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Further characterization was carried out by 151 Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements were made at varying temperatures between 9 K and room temperature and a value of Debye temperature of 133 ±5 K was computed. Both Mössbauer and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the paramagnetic behavior of this complex and the trivalent state of the europium ion. In view of the fact that the "odd" paramagnetic molecule NO has been shown to reverse sickling of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia, the interaction between the paramagnetic europium salen complex and sickle cells was examined after incubation with this europium complex and shown to have similar effects.

Wynter, Clive I.; Ryan, D. H.; May, Leopold; Oliver, F. W.; Brown, Eugene; Hoffman, Eugene J.; Bernstein, David

2005-04-01

372

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia  

PubMed Central

The globally widespread single-gene disorders ?-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class–based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22553502

Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

2012-01-01

373

Diagnosis and treatment of cancer-related anemia.  

PubMed

Cancer-related anemia (CRA) is due to multiple etiologies, including chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, blood loss, functional iron deficiency, erythropoietin deficiency due to renal disease, marrow involvement with tumor as well as other factors. The most common treatment options for CRA include iron therapy, erythropoietic-stimulating agents (ESAs), and red cell transfusion. Safety concerns as well as restrictions and reimbursement issues surrounding ESA therapy for CRA have resulted in suboptimal treatment. Similarly, many clinicians are not familiar or comfortable using intravenous iron products to treat functional iron deficiency associated with CRA. This article summarizes our approach to treating CRA and discusses commonly encountered clinical scenarios for which current clinical guidelines do not apply. PMID:24532336

Gilreath, Jeffrey A; Stenehjem, David D; Rodgers, George M

2014-02-01

374

Fanconi anemia associated with moyamoya disease in Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

We report a 10-year-old Saudi girl who has Fanconi anemia (FA) and was admitted due to acute hemiplegia, of the right side. She had a previous attack of left side hemiplegia that resolved spontaneously. The brain magnetic resonance angiography showed a cerebrovascular pattern of moyamoya disease. She underwent partially matched related donor stem cell transplantation (SCT), but unfortunately died 3 months later with post SCT complications. The association of moyamoya disease with FA is uncommon, and is rarely reported in the literature. Although this condition may be acquired, it is considered a truly congenital defect in FA, and to identify the etiology of this association furthermore genetic mutation analysis is needed. PMID:25719591

Al-Hawsawi, Zakaria M.; Al-Zaid, Mohamed A.; Barnawi, Ashwaq I.; Yassine, Saadeddine M.

2015-01-01

375

Endometriosis presenting with hemorrhagic ascites, severe anemia, and shock.  

PubMed

Hemorrhagic ascites due to endometriosis is an exceedingly uncommon diagnosis rarely reported in the medical literature. We present a case of a 27-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department for flank and neck pain and was found to be hypotensive with massive hemorrhagic ascites and severe anemia. After emergency department resuscitation and hospitalization, her condition was found to be due to complications of endometriosis. A paracentesis of more than 4000 mL of bloody ascitic fluid revealed no evidence of cancer, and she was discharged on hospital day 3 with hormone therapy and no recurrence of symptoms upon outpatient follow-up. This case illustrates the clinical management, diagnostic approach, and underlying etiology of an infrequent but life-threatening complication of endometriosis. PMID:22809773

Morgan, Trent L; Tomich, Eric B; Heiner, Jason D

2013-01-01

376

Sickle cell anemia: the impact of discovery, politics, and business.  

PubMed

Sickle cell anemia affects 100,000 African Americans. Frequent blood transfusions to prevent stroke lead to fatal iron-overload. Iron chelation with deferoxamine (DFO) requires expensive infusions. In the present study, we explore the feasibility of using a new delivery system for DFO, i.e., targeted liposome entrapped DFO (LDFO). Our results reveal that our novel formulation lowered the dosage requirements by 50%-75%, allowed for less frequent and shorter treatment durations, eliminating the need for a pump and the standard multi-night administration of DFO. In an iron-overloaded rat model, LDFO reduced iron in the liver, and also improved cardiac function. The lower dosage and improved safety profile makes our novel LDFO delivery system a highly desirable new therapy. Meanwhile, this system will also provide an ideal model for studying the mechanism of Fe overload-induced arrhythmias. The political and economic factors related to health care disparities are also discussed. PMID:24241268

Xie, Lai-Hua; Doye, Angelia A; Conley, Eric; Gwathmey, Judith K

2013-11-01

377

Advances in mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of pernicious anemia.  

PubMed

Pernicious anemia (PA) is an entity initially described in 1849 as a condition that consisted of pallor, weakness, and progressive health decline. Since then several advances led to the conclusion that PA is an autoimmune disease characterized by the deficient absorption of dietary cobalamin. It is currently recognized as the most common cause of cobalamin deficiency worldwide. We hereby review the current understanding of the disease and its neurological, hematological, and biochemical manifestations with emphasis on the diagnostic approach, treatment, and monitoring strategies. We propose an algorithm for the diagnostic approach considering the current performance and limitations of the available diagnostic tools for evaluation of cobalamin status and the presence of autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). Patients with PA require lifelong treatment with cobalamin replacement therapy. The current widely available treatment can be provided through enteral or parenteral cobalamin supplements, with comparable efficacy and tolerability. PMID:25828519

Rojas Hernandez, Cristhiam M; Oo, Thein Hlaing

2015-03-01

378

A Fetal Hemolytic Anemia in a Child with Cytomegalovirus Infection  

PubMed Central

Background Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a hematologic disorder that is rarely observed in infants and young children. Most of the cases are associated with viral or bacterial infections. In some cases, AIHA can be characterized by a chronic course and an unsatisfactory control of hemolysis, thus requiring prolonged immunosuppressive therapy. Case report Especially in children younger than 2 years of age, the clinical course of the disease may show either resistance to steroids or dependence on high-dose steroids. We report here an infant fatal autoimmune Conclusion This case suggests that investigation for the presence of CMV infection in infantile AIHA should be considered. Severe hemolysis is rare but could be a potentially life-threatening complication of CMV infection described mostly in immune compromised adults and children. PMID:25002930

Hosseeini, S; Ansari, Sh; Kalantar, E; Sabzechian, M; Alibeik, A; Dorgalaleh, A

2014-01-01

379

Las Posadas on Television  

E-print Network

of the piece takes the work far beyond the exploratory scenes which toured as a germinal work-in-progress in 1975. Diablos and calaveras in the popular tradition of El Teatro inhabit this piece, but there are also earthy portrayals of men, women, workers... the Midwest and the East from March 15 through May. Las Posadas on Television The Center for the Hispanic Performing Arts at the University of Colorado (Boulder) sponsored a special television production of the traditional Christmas pageant, Las Posadas...

1976-04-01

380

[Hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia associated with anti-omeprazole antibody].  

PubMed

An 80-year-old woman was admitted with anemia, jaundice and a bleeding tendency about 5 weeks after starting omeprazole. On admission, the hemoglobin was 6.4 g/dl, platelets 0.1 x 10(4)/microliter, leukocyte count 7,500/microliter, and reticulocyte count 325/1000. The total bilirubin was 1.9 mg/dl, indirect bilirubin 0.6 mg/dl, lactate dehydrogenase 572 IU/l, and haptoglobin < 10 mg/dl. Both the direct and the indirect Coombs' tests were positive. The platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG) was 1,100.0 ng/10(7) cells. A decrease in the complement value was observed. There was an increase in the number of megakaryocytes and erythroblasts in the marrow film. After omeprazole administration was halted, her hemoglobin and platelet levels gradually returned to normal. On the 27th hospital day, the direct Coombs' test was positive but the indirect Coombs' test became negative. The PAIgG value also returned to normal, and she was discharged on the 59th hospital day. The acute phase of the drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test was negative, however, we detected the IgG antibody to omeprazole. In the recovery phase, the IgG value decreased. Forty days after discharge, the direct Coombs' test had become negative. This is apparently the first report of a patient with acute hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia due to omeprazole through an immune complex mechanism. PMID:9695674

Hayashibara, T

1998-06-01

381

Sickle Cell Anemia: Iron Availability and Nocturnal Oximetry  

PubMed Central

Study Objective: To test the hypothesis that low iron availability, measured as transferrin saturation, is associated with low nocturnal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2) in children with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA; hemoglobin SS). Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of Tanzanian children with SCA who were not receiving regular blood transfusions. Thirty-two children (16 boys) with SCA (mean age 8.0, range 3.6-15.3 years) underwent motion-resistant nocturnal oximetry (Masimo Radical) and had steady state serum transferrin saturation and hematological indices assessed. Results: Higher transferrin saturation, adjusted for age and ?-thalassemia deletion, was associated with lower nocturnal mean SpO2 (p = 0.013, r2 = 0.41), number of SpO2 dips/h > 3% from baseline (p = 0.008, r2 = 0.19) and with min/h with SpO2 < 90% (p = 0.026 r2 = 0.16). Transferrin saturation < 16% (indicative of iron deficiency) was associated with a 2.2% higher nocturnal mean SpO2. Conclusions: Contrary to our hypothesis, higher iron availability, assessed by transferrin saturation, is associated with nocturnal chronic and intermittent hemoglobin oxygen desaturation in SCA. Whether these associations are causal and are driven by hypoxia-inducible factor and hepcidin-mediated upregulation of demand for iron warrants further investigation. Citation: Cox SE; L'Esperance V; Makani J; Soka D; Prentice AM; Hill CM; Kirkham FJ. Sickle cell anemia: iron availability and nocturnal oximetry. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(5):541-545. PMID:23066366

Cox, Sharon E.; L'Esperance, Veline; Makani, Julie; Soka, Deogratius; Prentice, Andrew M.; Hill, Catherine M.; Kirkham, Fenella J.

2012-01-01

382

Mutation analysis of the Fanconi Anemia Gene FACC  

SciTech Connect

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a unique hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C (FACC) has recently been cloned. The authors have amplified FACC exons with their flanking intron sequences from genomic DNA from 174 racially and ethnically diverse families in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry and have screened for mutations by using SSCP analysis. They have identified eight different variants in 32 families; three were detected in exon 1, one in exon 4, one in intron 4, two in exon 6, and one in exon 14. Two of the eight variants, in seven families, did not segregate with the disease allele in multiplex families, suggesting that these variants represented benign polymorphisms. Disease-associated mutations in FACC were detected in a total of 25 (14.4%) of 174 families screened. The most frequent mutations were IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T (intron 4; 12 families) and 322delG (exon 1; 9 families). Other, less common mutations include Q13X in exon 1, R185X and D195V in exon 6, and L554P in exon 14. The polymorphisms were S26F in exon 1 and G139E in exon 4. All patients in the study with 322delG, Q13X, R185X, and D195V are of northern or eastern European or southern Italian ancestry, and 18 of 19 have a mild form of the disease, while the 2 patients with L554P, both from the same family, have a severe phenotype. All 19 patients with IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T have Jewish ancestry and have a severe phenotype. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Verlander, P.C.; Lin, J.D.; Udono, M.U.; Zhang, Q.; Auerbach, A.D. (Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Gibson, R.A.; Mathew, C.G. (Guy's Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

1994-04-01

383

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria.  

PubMed

Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient's blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2(nd) day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4(th) day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this. PMID:24014948

Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

2013-07-01

384

C. elegans: a model of Fanconi anemia and ICL repair.  

PubMed

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a severe recessive disorder with a wide range of clinical manifestations [M. Levitus, H. Joenje, J.P. de Winter, The Fanconi anemia pathway of genomic maintenance, Cell Oncol. 28 (2006) 3-29]. In humans, 13 complementation groups have been identified to underlie FA: A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L, M, and N [W. Wang, Emergence of a DNA-damage response network consisting of Fanconi anaemia and BRCA proteins, Nat. Rev. Genet. 8 (2007) 735-748]. Cells defective for any of these genes display chromosomal aberrations and sensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). It has therefore been suggested that the 13 FA proteins constitute a pathway for the repair of ICLs, and that a deficiency in this repair process causes genomic instability leading to the different clinical phenotypes. However, the exact nature of this repair pathway, or even whether all 13 FA proteins are involved at some stage of a linear repair process, remains to be defined. Undoubtedly, the recent identification and characterisation of FA homologues in model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, will help facilitate an understanding of the function of the FA proteins by providing new analytical tools. To date, sequence homologues of five FA genes have been identified in C. elegans. Three of these homologues have been confirmed: brc-2 (FANCD1/BRCA2), fcd-2 (FANCD2), and dog-1 (FANCJ/BRIP1); and two remain to be characterised: W02D3.10 (FANCI) and drh-3 (FANCM). Here we review how the nematode can be used to study FA-associated DNA repair, focusing on what is known about the ICL repair genes in C. elegans and which important questions remain for the field. PMID:19059419

Youds, Jillian L; Barber, Louise J; Boulton, Simon J

2009-07-31

385

Pure red-cell aplasia and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with acute hepatitis A  

PubMed Central

Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) have rarely been reported as an extrahepatic manifestation of acute hepatitis A (AHA). We report herein a case of AHA complicated by both PRCA and AIHA. A 49-year-old female with a diagnosis of AHA presented with severe anemia (hemoglobin level, 6.9 g/dL) during her clinical course. A diagnostic workup revealed AIHA and PRCA as the cause of the anemia. The patient was treated with an initial transfusion and corticosteroid therapy. Her anemia and liver function test were completely recovered by 9 months after the initial presentation. We review the clinical features and therapeutic strategies for this rare case of extrahepatic manifestation of AHA. PMID:25032187

Chang, Hyo Jeong; Cho, Sung Gyun; Oh, Tae Hoon; Jeon, Tae Joo; Shin, Won Chang; Choi, Won Choong

2014-01-01

386

Influence of Surface Protein V6 Region of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus on Cytokine Gene Expression  

E-print Network

Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a member of the lentivirus group of the family Retroviridae. EIAV encodes a highly glycosylated SU (surface) protein with interspersed conserved and variable regions. The variable regions are thought to play...

Lamon, Tennille Krystal

2014-08-14

387

A Demonstration of the Molecular Basis of Sickle-Cell Anemia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a demonstration that permits the separation of different hemoglobin molecules within two to three hours. Introduces students to the powerful technique of gel electrophoresis and illustrates the molecular basis of sickle-cell anemia. (JRH)

Fox, Marty; Gaynor, John J.

1996-01-01

388

Uncommon sites of bone infarction in a sickle cell anemia patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unusual sites of bone infarction, in the skull and sternum, were observed in a patient suffering from sickle cell anemia. A 99mTc-MDP scan was performed and demonstrated foci of decreased activity in the symptomatic regions.

I. Garty; A. Koren; E. Katzumi

1983-01-01

389

Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries  

PubMed Central

Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed. PMID:21738863

Shaw, Julia G.; Friedman, Jennifer F.

2011-01-01

390

Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome in patients suspected to have Diamond-Blackfan anemia.  

PubMed

Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a multisystem disorder caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital hypoproliferative anemia in which mutations in ribosomal protein genes and GATA1 have been implicated. Both syndromes share several features including early onset of severe anemia, variable nonhematologic manifestations, sporadic genetic occurrence, and occasional spontaneous hematologic improvement. Because of the overlapping features and relative rarity of PS, we hypothesized that some patients in whom the leading clinical diagnosis is DBA actually have PS. Here, we evaluated patient DNA samples submitted for DBA genetic studies and found that 8 (4.6%) of 173 genetically uncharacterized patients contained large mtDNA deletions. Only 2 (25%) of the patients had been diagnosed with PS on clinical grounds subsequent to sample submission. We conclude that PS can be overlooked, and that mtDNA deletion testing should be performed in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with congenital anemia. PMID:24735966

Gagne, Katelyn E; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; Yuan, Daniel; Zon, Rebecca L; Storm, Kelsie; Mazur-Popinska, Magdalena; Andolina, Laura; Bubala, Halina; Golebiowska, Sydonia; Higman, Meghan A; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Kurre, Peter; Matysiak, Michal; Niewiadomska, Edyta; Pels, Salley; Petruzzi, Mary Jane; Pobudejska-Pieniazek, Aneta; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Fleming, Mark D; Gazda, Hanna T; Agarwal, Suneet

2014-07-17

391

A case of persistent anemia in a renal transplant recipient: association with parvovirus B19 infection.  

PubMed

We report an unexplained anemia that persisted for 4 months in a renal transplant patient who was receiving immunosuppression therapy that included prednisolone, tacrolimus and azathioprine. A bone marrow biopsy demonstrated pure erythroid hypoplasia and occasional giant pronormoblasts with intranuclear inclusions, characteristic of a parvovirus B19 infection. Both the serum and bone marrow cells were positive by parvovirus B19 DNA PCR. The anemia resolved 6 weeks after the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Four months later, anemia redeveloped and IVIG was infused again. Hemoglobin levels were, however, still subnormal after 1 month of treatment and tacrolimus was then switched to cyclosporin A, resulting in a clear improvement. A parvovirus B19 infection should be included in the differential diagnosis of renal transplant recipients who present with anemia associated with a low reticulocyte count. Tacrolimus may possibly impair the clearance of a parvovirus B19 infection. PMID:11874173

Choi, Sang-Ho; Chang, Sang-Pil; Won, Jong-chul; Lee, Jun-Seung; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Yang, Won-Seok; Park, Su-Kil

2002-01-01

392

Cephalhematoma Causing Severe Anemia in the Newborn: Report of 2 Cases  

PubMed Central

This report describes two newborns with massive Cephalhematoma leading to marked blood loss and severe anemia. The hematocrits were 19% and 13% respectively. The babies were managed with blood transfusion, phototherapy, antibiotics and dexamethasone. PMID:23209978

Osaghae, DO; Sule, G; Benka-Coker, J

2011-01-01

393

Epoetin Alfa in Treating Anemia in Patients Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anemia; Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Drug/Agent Toxicity by Tissue/Organ; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2012-02-19

394

New Insights Into the Role of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus S2 Protein in Disease Expression  

E-print Network

Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is an important animal model to study the contribution of macrophages in viral persistence during lentiviral infections. EIAV is unique amongst the lentiviruses in that it causes a rapid, rather than the very...

Covaleda Salas, Lina M.

2011-08-08

395

Leg amputation for an extensive, severe and intractable sickle cell anemia ulcer in a Brazilian patient.  

PubMed

A 35-year-old African Brazilian patient had sickle cell anemia complicated with recurrent vasoocclusive (VOC) crises and refractory painful leg ulcers for 16 years. The ulcers started over both medial malleoli and expanded gradually. The ulcer on the left leg spread from the foot to the knee circumferentially and was refractory to all forms of therapy within the frame work of multi-disciplinary care. The patient agreed to a below the knee amputation of the left leg. He felt much better after the amputation but developed severe neuropathic phantom pain that was well controlled medically. He could differentiate the sickle cell anemia and ulcer pain from the neuropathic pain. About 6 months after the amputation he had dengue fever with fatal outcome. This is the first report of treatment of refractory sickle cell anemia leg ulcer with amputation and probably the first report of a Brazilian patient with sickle cell anemia and dengue fever. PMID:24471701

Queiroz, Ana Maria Mach; Campos, Jessica; Lobo, Clarisse; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia Regina; Cardoso, Gilberto; Ballas, Samir K

2014-01-01

396

Cholangiocarcinoma presenting as hemobilia and recurrent iron-deficiency anemia: a case report  

E-print Network

Abstract Introduction Iron-deficiency anemia is a relatively common presenting feature of several gastrointestinal malignancies. However, cholangiocarcinoma has rarely been reported as an underlying cause. The association of cholangiocarcinoma...

Ahmad, Saif S; Basheer, Faisal T M; Idris, Saad F; Hariraj, Radhakrishnan; Mathialagan, Rajarathnam; Douds, Andrew

2010-05-11

397

Severe periodontal destruction in a patient with advanced anemia: A case report  

PubMed Central

Anemia is a worldwide health problem that manifests in different types. This illness has some causes, which affect body health generally. Studies have shown that some anemia types make humans more sensitive to infections. A 23-year-old woman was referred to our clinic with complaints about tooth mobility. Generalized severe alveolar bone loss was verified by a radiographic examination. After a comprehensive clinical examination and taking her medical history, we decided to schedule a medical consultation with a physician. Medical consultation revealed that the patient suffered from severe anemia. Her periodontal treatment was modified because of her systemic situation. After treatment, the patient was monitored for one year. Her periodontal and systemic statuses were stable during this period. In this case report, severe periodontal destruction was observed in a patient with severe iron and B12 deficiency anemia. PMID:22229013

Hatipoglu, Hasan; Hatipoglu, Mujgan Gungor; Cagirankaya, L. Berna; Caglayan, Feriha

2012-01-01

398

Pure red-cell aplasia and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with acute hepatitis A.  

PubMed

Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) have rarely been reported as an extrahepatic manifestation of acute hepatitis A (AHA). We report herein a case of AHA complicated by both PRCA and AIHA. A 49-year-old female with a diagnosis of AHA presented with severe anemia (hemoglobin level, 6.9 g/dL) during her clinical course. A diagnostic workup revealed AIHA and PRCA as the cause of the anemia. The patient was treated with an initial transfusion and corticosteroid therapy. Her anemia and liver function test were completely recovered by 9 months after the initial presentation. We review the clinical features and therapeutic strategies for this rare case of extrahepatic manifestation of AHA. PMID:25032187

Chang, Hyo Jeong; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Cho, Sung Gyun; Oh, Tae Hoon; Jeon, Tae Joo; Shin, Won Chang; Choi, Won Choong

2014-06-01

399

Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leading to Transient Ischemic Attacks due to Intraluminal Carotid Artery Thrombus.  

PubMed

Reactive thrombocytosis secondary to iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is a rare but recognized cause of stroke. We report the case of a patient with iron-deficiency anemia presenting with multiple transient ischemic attacks (TIA) due to intraluminal thrombus of an internal carotid artery. The putative mechanisms underlying anemia and stroke syndromes are not completely understood, and it is believed that iron deficiency may cause ischemic stroke by several potential mechanisms. Thrombocytosis is often associated with iron deficiency, and microcytosis produces a reduction in the red cell deformability and could produce a hypercoagulable state. The platelet count and function observed in iron-deficiency anemia could act synergistically to promote thrombus formation, especially in the setting of an underlying atherosclerotic disease. The presence of floating thrombus in a patient with clinical and MRI evidence of stroke represents a significant therapeutic dilemma and requires immediate decision about treatment. PMID:24109530

Batur Caglayan, H Z; Nazliel, B; Irkec, C; Dumlu, A; Filiz, A; Panpalli Ates, M

2013-01-01

400

Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leading to Transient Ischemic Attacks due to Intraluminal Carotid Artery Thrombus  

PubMed Central

Reactive thrombocytosis secondary to iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is a rare but recognized cause of stroke. We report the case of a patient with iron-deficiency anemia presenting with multiple transient ischemic attacks (TIA) due to intraluminal thrombus of an internal carotid artery. The putative mechanisms underlying anemia and stroke syndromes are not completely understood, and it is believed that iron deficiency may cause ischemic stroke by several potential mechanisms. Thrombocytosis is often associated with iron deficiency, and microcytosis produces a reduction in the red cell deformability and could produce a hypercoagulable state. The platelet count and function observed in iron-deficiency anemia could act synergistically to promote thrombus formation, especially in the setting of an underlying atherosclerotic disease. The presence of floating thrombus in a patient with clinical and MRI evidence of stroke represents a significant therapeutic dilemma and requires immediate decision about treatment. PMID:24109530

Batur Caglayan, H. Z.; Nazliel, B.; Irkec, C.; Dumlu, A.; Filiz, A.; Panpalli Ates, M.

2013-01-01

401

Evaluation of erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters to identify three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency. Methods Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, inflammation, and hemoglobinopathies as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42), anemia of chronic disease (n = 28), anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22), and heterozygous ?-thalassemia (n = 25). The percentage of microcytic erythrocytes, hypochromic erythrocytes, and the levels of hemoglobin in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating anemia. Results There was no difference between the groups of iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency for any of the parameters. The percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes was the best parameter to identify absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909 with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%). The formula microcytic erythrocyte count minus hypochromic erythrocyte count was very accurate to differentiate iron deficiency anemia from heterozygous ?-thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005 with a sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8). Conclusion The erythrocyte and reticulocyte indices are moderately good to identify absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. PMID:25818816

Torino, Ana Beatriz Barbosa; Gilberti, Maria de Fátima Pererira; da Costa, Edvilson; de Lima, Gisélia Aparecida Freire; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti Wolf

2015-01-01

402

Coombs-Negative Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Crohn’s Disease  

PubMed Central

Patient: Female, 41 Final Diagnosis: Coombs negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia Symptoms: Dark urine • dizziness • dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Immunoradiometric assay for RBC-IgG Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Anemia is a common, important extraintestinal complication of Crohn’s disease. The main types of anemia in patients with Crohn’s disease are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. Although patients with Crohn’s disease may experience various type of anemia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in patients with Crohn’s disease, especially Coombs-negative AIHA, is very rare. Case Report: A 41-year-old woman with Crohn’s disease presented to our emergency room (ER) with dark urine, dizziness, and shortness of breath. The activity of Crohn’s disease had been controlled, with Crohn’s disease activity index (CDAI) score below 100 point. On physical examination, the patient had pale conjunctivae and mildly icteric sclerae. Serum bilirubin was raised at 3.1 mg/dL, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level was 1418 U/L and the haptoglobin level was <3 mg/dL. Results of direct and the indirect Coombs tests were all negative. We then measured the RBC-IgG to evaluate the possibility of Coombs-negative AIHA. The result revealed that RBC-IgG level was 352 IgG molecules/cell, with the cut-off value at 78.5 IgG molecules/cell. Conclusions: We report a case of Coombs-negative AIHA in a patient with Crohn’s disease with chronic anemia, diagnosed by red blood cell-bound immunoglobulin G (RBC-IgG) and treated with steroids therapy. PMID:25488633

Park, Bong Soo; Park, Sihyung; Jin, Kyubok; Kim, Yeon Mee; Park, Kang Min; Lee, Jeong-Nyeo; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kim, Yang Wook

2014-01-01

403

Radiological abnormalities of the skeleton in patients with sickle-cell anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The way in which bones are affected in cases of sickle-cell anemia is well known. Nevertheless, advances in treatment and\\u000a in methods of transfusion mean that we are increasingly seeing cases of older patients with this disease. A retrospective\\u000a analysis of 222 cases of sickle-cell anemia demonstrates the radiological appearance of the skeleton in the disease and reveals\\u000a the various

M. F. Ben Dridi; A. Oumaya; H. Gastli; C. Doggaz; S. Bousnina; S. Fattoum; R. Ben Osman; H. A. Gharbi

1987-01-01

404

A Randomized Trial of Captopril for Microalbuminuria in Normotensive Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Nephropathy is a common complication of sickle cell anemia and is often preceded by proteinurea. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition on microalbuminuria in sickle cell patients.Patients and Methods: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 22 normotensive patients with sickle cell anemia and persistent microalbuminuria. Patients received captopril (25 mg\\/day) or placebo

Lydia Foucan; Veronique Bourhis; Jaqueline Bangou; Lydia Mérault; Maryse Etienne-Julan; Rachid L Salmi

1998-01-01

405

Frontal and orbital bone infarctions causing periorbital swelling in patients with sickle cell anemia  

SciTech Connect

Two cases of unilateral and bilateral periorbital hematomas occurred in patients with sickle cell anemia. The cause of periorbital swelling in these cases was found to be orbital and frontal bone infarctions, respectively, diagnosed by technetium Tc 99m medronate bone scintigraphy. To our knowledge, periorbital bone infarction, as a part of the differential diagnosis of periorbital hematoma and as part of the possible ocular manifestations in patients with sickle cell anemia, has not previously been described.

Garty, I.; Koren, A.; Garzozi, H.

1984-10-01

406

Plasma levels of tocopherol in sickle cell anemia subjects1'2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plasma tocopherol levels of less than 0.8 ?g\\/g lipid were considered indicative of a vitamin E-deficient status. Based on this criterion, 10 out of 13 sickle cell anemia patients who were not in crisis, were considered deficient in vitamin E as compared to none of 24 normal control subjects. Sickle cell anemia patients treated with 150 IU vitamin E (dl-a-tocopheryl

Clayton Natta; Lawrence Machlin

407

Platelet activation and platelet-erythrocyte aggregates in patients with sickle cell anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vascular occlusion and vasculopathy underlie much of the morbidity in patients with sickle cell anemia. Platelets may play a role in this vasculopathy. Samples from 12 adult patients with sickle cell anemia were examined for evidence of platelet activation and formation of platelet-erythrocyte aggregates (PEA) using fluorescent-labeled monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. We noted an increased expression of activation-dependent antigens

Ted Wun; Teresa Paglieroni; Fern Tablin; Jeanna Welborn; Karen Nelson; Anthony Cheung

1997-01-01

408

Management of aplastic anemia in a woman during pregnancy: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Aplastic anemia is a rare disease caused by destruction of pluripotent stem cells in bone marrow. During pregnancy it could\\u000a be life-threatening for both mother and child. The only causal therapy for aplastic anemia is bone marrow transplantation,\\u000a which is contraindicated during pregnancy because of potential embryo toxicity. Treatment options are erythrocytes and platelet\\u000a transfusions and immunosuppressive therapy. There is,

Krista JM Stibbe; Hajo IJ Wildschut; Pieternella J Lugtenburg

2011-01-01

409

Aortic valve replacement for a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate deyhdrogenase (G6PD) result in severe hemolysis with different mechanisms. In patients with both pathologies, the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on red blood cells and thrombocytes demand special care before and after open heart surgery. We evaluated the preoperative management and postoperative care of a patient with severe aortic insufficiency associated with G6PD deficiency and autoimmune hemolytic anemia who underwent aortic valve replacement. PMID:15985145

Tas, Serpil; Donmez, Arzu Antal; Kirali, Kaan; Alp, Mete H; Yakut, Cevat

2005-01-01

410

Normalization of Hemoglobin Level in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Whether correction of anemia in patients with stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease improves cardiovascular outcomes is not established. Methods We randomly assigned 603 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 15.0 to 35.0 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area and mild-to-moderate anemia (hemoglobin level, 11.0 to 12.5 g per deciliter) to a

Tilman B. Drüeke; Francesco Locatelli; Naomi Clyne; Kai-Uwe Eckardt; Iain C. Macdougall; Dimitrios Tsakiris; Hans-Ulrich Burger; Armin Scherhag

2006-01-01

411

Deficiency of gamma-ray excision repair in skin fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia.  

PubMed Central

The capacity of preparations of skin fibroblasts from normal individuals and patients with Fanconi's anemia to excise gamma-ray products of the 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine type from exogenous DNA was investigated. The excision capacity of whole-cell homogenates of fibroblasts from two of four patients with Fanconi's anemia was substantially below normal. This repair deficiency was further pronounced in nuclear preparations from cells of the same two patients. PMID:1065896

Remsen, J F; Cerutti, P A

1976-01-01

412

Hemolytic-Anemia-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension: Sickle-Cell-Disease- and Thalassemia-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is now recognized as a complication of both chronic and acquired hemolytic anemias. The process\\u000a of hemolysis appears to be central to disease pathogenesis. Sickle cell disease (SCD), a congenital hemoglobinopathy affecting\\u000a as many as 30 million individuals worldwide, is the best characterized hemolytic anemia associated with PH. Multiple clinical\\u000a studies have demonstrated a 10–30% prevalence of

Elizabeth S. Klings; Mark T. Gladwin

413

Monitoring and Prevention of Anemia Relying on Nutrition and Environmental Conditions in Sports  

PubMed Central

Conflict of interest: none declared. Introduction Anemia is a blood disorder characterized by abnormally low levels of healthy red blood cells or reduced hemoglobin, the iron-bearing protein in red blood cells that delivers oxygen to tissues throughout the body. The most common symptoms of this disorder are fatigue, weakness and, in extreme cases, shortness of breath or palpitations, or you may have no symptoms at all. Sports anemia is a term loosely applied to a least three different conditions: hemodilution, iron deficiency anemia and foot-strike anemia. Not exclusive to athletes, iron deficiency anemia occurs most often among women who may lose more iron each month when they menstruate than they take in. Material and Methods Therefore, we examined its effect on the physical condition of female athletes. Several years (since 2010th until 2012th), we studied how anemia among girls (pioneers, juniors and seniors categories) that are involved in sports (women’s soccer, volleyball and handball) in Rasina’s district (Serbia), affecting their physical fitness. When their trainers approach to us, complaining that they have players who are great, so extraordinary talents, but by no means able to withstand more than twenty minutes in the game, we suggest them to perform laboratory tests. It was tested 134th female athletes. Results and Discussion Anemia was observed in 43. (9. pioneers, 19. juniors and 15. seniors). So, laboratory results showed that in these girls anemia causes poor sport condition. After that, the girls enhanced nutrition. Their diet consisted of iron supplements and vitamins. Altitude training was organized for them, also. After all these treatments, condition significantly improved. It was first time that trainers in Rasina’s district realizing significance of laboratory tests. PMID:24082840

Sacirovi?, Selim; Asotic, Jasminka; Maksimovic, Radmila; Radevic, Borislav; Muric, Benin; Mekic, Hasim; Biocanin, Rade

2013-01-01

414

Anemia management and outcomes from 12 countries in the dialysis outcomes and practice patterns study (DOPPS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Anemia is common in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Methods:Data collected from nationally representative samples of HD patients (n = 11,041) in 2002 to 2003 were used to describe current anemia management for long-term HD patients at 309 dialysis units in 12 countries. Analyses of associations and outcomes were adjusted for demographics, 15 comorbid classes, laboratory values, country, and facility clustering. Results:For

Ronald L Pisoni; Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham; Eric W Young; Tadao Akizawa; Yasushi Asano; Francesco Locatelli; Juergen Bommer; Jose Miguel Cruz; Peter G Kerr; David C Mendelssohn; Philip J Held; Friedrich K Port

2004-01-01

415

Excessive zinc ingestion: A reversible cause of sideroblastic anemia and bone marrow depression  

SciTech Connect

Two patients with sideroblastic anemia secondary to zinc-induced copper deficiency absorbed excess zinc secondary to oral ingestion. The source of excess zinc was a zinc supplement in one case; in the other, ingested coins. In each case, the sideroblastic anemia was corrected promptly after removal of the source of excess zinc. These two cases emphasize the importance of recognizing this clinical entity, since the myelodysplastic features are completely reversible.

Broun, E.R.; Greist, A.; Tricot, G.; Hoffman, R. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (USA))

1990-09-19

416

Sideroblastic anemia as a preleukemic event in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease  

SciTech Connect

Sideroblastic anemia after treatment for Hodgkin's disease was seen in two patients 3 years after completion of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This was followed in both by the development of myelomonoblastic leukemia. No evidence of recurrent Hodgkin's disease was present in either patient. Our observation suggests that development of sideroblastic anemia in patients previously treated for Hodgkin's disease is probably secondary to the treatment and is a preleukemic event.

Kitahara, M.; Cosgriff, T.M.; Eyre, H.J.

1980-05-01

417

[Flow cytometry of bone marrow cells in health, anemias of different etiology and acute leukemias].  

PubMed

The distribution of bone marrow cells by stages of cell cycle was studied by flow cytometry in 26 normal subjects and 107 adult patients (42 with anemias and 65 with acute lymphoblastic or myeloblastic leukemias). Normal myelokaryocyte cell cycle is rather stable, which manifests by low variability of cells. In anemias and, more so, in leukemias the proliferative status of cells varies within a wide range, which is explained by unstable and ineffective hemopoiesis. PMID:9417320

Shmarov, D A; Kuchma, Iu M; Kozinets, G I

1997-10-01

418

A toxicogenomic approach revealed hepatic gene expression changes mechanistically linked to drug-induced hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

A variety of pharmaceutical compounds causes hemolytic anemia as a significant adverse effect and this toxicity restricts the clinical utility of these drugs. In this study, we applied microarray technology to investigate hepatic gene expression changes associated with drug-induced hemolytic anemia and to identify potential biomarker genes for this hematotoxicity. We treated female Sprague-Dawley rats with two hemolytic anemia-inducing compounds: phenylhydrazine and phenacetin. Hepatic gene expression profiles were obtained using a whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray with pooled RNA samples from individual rats within each dose group and analyzed in comparison with hepatic histopathology, hematology, and blood chemistry data. We identified a small subset of genes that were commonly deregulated in all the severe hemolytic conditions, some of which were considered to be involved in hepatic events characteristic of hemolytic anemia, such as hemoglobin biosynthesis, heme metabolism, and phagocytosis. Among them, we selected six upregulated genes as putative biomarkers, and their expression changes from microarray measurements were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR using RNAs from individual animals. They were Alas2, beta-glo, Eraf, Hmox1, Lgals3, and Rhced. Expression patterns of all these genes showed high negative and positive correlation against erythrocyte counts and total bilirubin levels in circulation, respectively, suggesting that these genes may be the potential biomarkers for hemolytic anemia. These findings indicate that drug-induced hemolytic anemia may be detected based on hepatic changes in the expression of a subset of genes that are mechanistically linked to the hematotoxicity. PMID:17082564

Rokushima, Masatomo; Omi, Kazuo; Araki, Akiko; Kyokawa, Yoshimasa; Furukawa, Naoko; Itoh, Fumio; Imura, Kae; Takeuchi, Kumiko; Okada, Manabu; Kato, Ikuo; Ishizaki, Jun

2007-02-01

419

What is the optimal treatment for anemia in inflammatory bowel disease?  

PubMed

Anemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with a prevalence ranging from 8.8% to 73.7%. This wide range reflects the definitions used and the populations studied. Although many patients are reported to be asymptomatic, systematic studies have shown anemia to have a significant impact on quality of life. Consequently treatment should be instituted early. The commonest cause of anemia in IBD is iron deficiency, predominantly related to gastrointestinal blood loss. Anemia of chronic disease often occurs concomitantly, due to cytokine-mediated impaired erythropoiesis and dysregulated iron metabolism. Oral iron is a simple and effective method for treating iron deficiency, but requires long courses of treatment. It is also theoretically implicated with worsening intestinal inflammation, via the production of toxic reactive oxygen species. Intravenous iron avoids these concerns, especially with the development of ferric carboxymaltose, which allow up to 1000mg to be given rapidly. In patients failing to respond to intravenous iron, the anemia of chronic disease is most likely to be causative. In this setting evidence suggests that additional erythropoietin therapy can be effective. Blood transfusions should be avoided as part of routine management and reserved for patients with substantial acute gastro-intestinal bleeding, where there is a risk of hemodynamic compromise. This article discusses the underlying physiology of anemia in IBD, and presents the current evidence supporting treatment options available. PMID:22023204

Kent, Alexandra J; Blackwell, Victoria J; Travis, Simon P L

2012-07-01

420

Anemia in relation to body mass index and waist circumference among chinese women  

PubMed Central

Background This study aimed to investigate the relationship of anemia and body mass index among adult women in Jiangsu Province, China. Data were collected in a sub-national cross-sectional survey, and 1,537 women aged 20 years and above were included in the analyses. Subjects were classified by body mass index (BMI) categories as underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese according to the Chinese standard. Central obesity was defined as a waist circumference???80 cm. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentration?anemia and BMI or waist circumference were calculated using Poisson regression. Findings Overall, 31.1% of the Chinese women were anemic. The prevalence of overweight, obesity and central obesity was 34.2%, 5.8% and 36.2%, respectively. The obese group had the highest concentrations of hemoglobin compared with other BMI groups. After adjustment for confounders, overweight and obese women had a lower PR for anemia (PR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.62-0.89; PR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.43-0.79). Central obesity was inversely associated with anemia. Conclusion In this Chinese population, women with overweight/obesity or central obesity were less likely to be anemic as compared to normal weight women. No measures are required currently to target anemia specifically for overweight and obese people in China. PMID:23311667

2013-01-01

421

Effect of hemolytic and iron-deficiency anemia on intestinal absorption and tissue accumulation of cadmium.  

PubMed

Abnormal iron (Fe) metabolism induces iron-deficiency anemia (FeDA) and also affects body cadmium (Cd) accumulation. However, whether hemolytic anemia also affects Cd metabolism is not known. We compared the intestinal absorption and tissue accumulation of Cd after oral administration of Cd to mice with hemolytic anemia induced by treatment with phenylhydrazine (PHA mice) to that in mice with FeDA. Although the hematocrit decreased significantly in mice with either type of anemia, the Fe concentration decreased in the livers and kidneys of FeDA mice, but increased in those of PHA mice. After an oral administration with various amounts of Cd, hepatic and renal Cd concentrations significantly increased in both FeDA and PHA mice. An intraduodenal injection of Fe raised the hepatic Fe content in FeDA mice to the control level and raised the hepatic Fe content in PHA mice to 2.4 times that in control mice. Intestinal divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) expression increased significantly in mice with both types of anemia. These data indicate that, despite the accumulation of hepatic Fe associated with PHA, PHA also significantly increases hepatic and renal Cd accumulation according to an stimulation of intestinal DMT1 expression, as occurs in FeDA mice. This suggests that anemia may be a risk factor for Cd accumulation. PMID:18485624

Min, Kyong-Son; Iwata, Naoyuki; Tetsutikawahara, Noriko; Onosaka, Satomi; Tanaka, Keiichi

2008-06-10

422

Las Vegas Strip History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by amateur cultural historian Deanna DeMatteo, this site offers "the most detailed history of the Las Vegas Strip on the Internet today," showing in words and graphics the evolution of the properties on the Strip from its beginning to the present. Drawing on materials provided by publications, professional Las Vegas historians, and the Nevada State Museum and Historical Society, DeMatteo offers a detailed, noncommercial history with plenty of photographs (many archival) of the strip from the first night club in 1930 named Pair O Dice to the first true casino hotel, El Rancho with 63 rooms in 1941, to Hilton's giant Paris Las Vegas opening earlier this Fall with 2,914 rooms. There is also a special topics section, covering people significant in the strip's development, such as Warren "Doc" Bayley and Howard Hughes. Launched in August, the Website is continually updated with new material. Note: to reach table of contents, click on the photograph at end of the homepage.

DeMatteo, Deanna.

423

Preoperative anemia increases postoperative morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery  

PubMed Central

Background: Preoperative anemia may affect postoperative mortality and morbidity following elective cranial operations. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to identify elective cranial neurosurgical cases (2006-2012). Morbidity was defined as wound infection, systemic infection, cardiac, respiratory, renal, neurologic, and thromboembolic events, and unplanned returns to the operating room. For 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of 8015 patients who underwent elective cranial neurosurgery, 1710 patients (21.4%) were anemic. Anemic patients had an increased 30-day mortality of 4.1% versus 1.3% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001) and an increased 30-day morbidity rate of 25.9% versus 14.14% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001). The 30-day morbidity rates for all patients undergoing cranial procedures were stratified by diagnosis: 26.5% aneurysm, 24.7% sellar tumor, 19.7% extra-axial tumor, 14.8% intra-axial tumor, 14.4% arteriovenous malformation, and 5.6% pain. Following multivariable regression, the 30-day mortality in anemic patients was threefold higher than in non-anemic patients (4.1% vs 1.3%; OR = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.65-4.66). The odds of postoperative morbidity in anemic patients were significantly higher than in non-anemic patients (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). There was a significant difference in postoperative morbidity event odds with a hematocrit level above (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.78-1.48) and below (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.55-3.42) 33% [hemoglobin (Hgb) 11 g/dl]. Conclusions: Preoperative anemia in elective cranial neurosurgery was independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity when compared to non-anemic patients. A hematocrit level below 33% (Hgb 11 g/dl) was associated with a significant increase in postoperative morbidity. PMID:25422784

Bydon, Mohamad; Abt, Nicholas B.; Macki, Mohamed; Brem, Henry; Huang, Judy; Bydon, Ali; Tamargo, Rafael J.

2014-01-01

424

Independent Association of Circulating Vitamin D Metabolites with Anemia Risk in Patients Scheduled for Cardiac Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Preoperative anemia is considered an independent risk factor of poor clinical outcome in cardiac surgical patients. Low vitamin D status may increase anemia risk. Methods We investigated 3,615 consecutive patients scheduled for cardiac surgery to determine the association between preoperative anemia (hemoglobin [Hb] <12.5 g/dL) and circulating levels of the vitamin D metabolites 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH]2D). Results Of the study cohort, 27.8 % met the criteria for anemia. In patients with deficient 25OHD levels (<30 nmol/l) mean Hb concentrations were 0.5 g/dL lower than in patients with adequate 25OHD levels (50.0–125 nmol/l; P<0.001). Regarding 1,25(OH)2D, mean Hb concentrations were 1.2 g/dL lower in the lowest 1,25(OH)2D category (<40 pmol/l) than in the highest 1,25(OH)2D category (>70 pmol/l; P<0.001). In multivariable–adjusted logistic regression analyses, the odds ratios for anemia of the lowest categories of 25OHD and 1,25(OH)2D were 1.48 (95%CI:1.19-1.83) and 2.35 (95%CI:1.86-2.97), compared with patients who had adequate 25OHD levels and 1,25(OH)2D values in the highest category, respectively. Anemia risk was greatest in patients with dual deficiency of 25OHD and 1,25(OH)2D (multivariable-adjusted OR = 3.60 (95%CI:2.40-5.40). Prevalence of deficient 25OHD levels was highest in anemia of nutrient deficiency, whereas low 1,25(OH)2D levels were most frequent in anemia of chronic kidney disease. Conclusion This cross-sectional study demonstrates an independent inverse association between vitamin D status and anemia risk. If confirmed in clinical trials, preoperative administration of vitamin D or activated vitamin D (in case of chronic kidney disease) would be a promising strategy to prevent anemia in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery. PMID:25885271

Becker, Tobias; Kuhn, Joachim; Gummert, Jan F.

2015-01-01

425

Anemia and growth failure among HIV-infected children in India: a retrospective analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Anemia and poor nutrition have been previously described as independent risk factors for death among HIV-infected children. We sought to describe nutritional status, anemia burden and HIV disease correlates among infected children in India. Methods We analyzed retrospective data from 248 HIV-infected children aged 1–12 years attending three outpatient clinics in South India (2004–2006). Standard WHO definitions were used for anemia, HIV staging and growth parameters. Statistical analysis included chi square, t tests, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results The overall prevalence of anemia (defined as hemoglobin < 11 gm/dL) was 66%, and 8% had severe anemia (Hb < 7 gm/dL). The proportion of underweight and stunted children in the population was 55% and 46% respectively. Independent risk factors of anemia by multivariate analysis included the pre-school age group (age younger than 6 years) (OR: 2.87; 95% CI: 1.45, 5.70; p < 0.01), rural residence (OR: 12.04; 95% CI: 5.64, 26.00; p < 0.01), advanced HIV disease stage (OR: 6.95; 95% CI: 3.06, 15.79; p < 0.01) and presence of stunting (Height-for-age Z Score < -2) (OR: 3.24; 95% CI: 1.65, 6.35; p < 0.01). Use of iron/multivitamin supplementation was protective against risk of anemia (OR: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.22, 0.90; p = 0.03). Pulmonary tuberculosis was an independent risk factor in multivariate analysis (OR: 3.36; 95% CI: 1.43, 7.89; p < 0.01) when correlated variables such as HIV disease stage and severe immunodeficiency, and nutritional supplement use were not included. Use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) was associated with a reduced risk of anemia (OR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.53; p < 0.01). No significant association was found between anemia and gender, cotrimoxazole, or ART type (zidovudine versus stavudine). Conclusion The high prevalence and strong interrelationship of anemia and poor nutrition among HIV-infected children in India, particularly those living in rural areas underscores the need for incorporating targeted nutritional interventions during national scale up of care, support and treatment among HIV-infected children. PMID:19531242

Shet, Anita; Mehta, Saurabh; Rajagopalan, Nirmala; Dinakar, Chitra; Ramesh, Elango; Samuel, NM; Indumathi, CK; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Kurpad, Anura V

2009-01-01

426

Treating anemia early in renal failure patients slows the decline of renal function: A randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treating anemia early in renal failure patients slows the decline of renal function: A randomized controlled trial.BackgroundErythropoietin is known to improve outcomes in patients with anemia from chronic renal disease. However, there is uncertainty about the optimal timing of initiation of erythropoietin treatment in predialysis patients with non-severe anemia.MethodsWe conducted a randomized controlled trial of early versus deferred initiation of

CHARICLIA GOUVA; PETROS NIKOLOPOULOS; JOHN P A IOANNIDIS; KOSTAS C SIAMOPOULOS

2004-01-01

427

FROM CELL TO SYMBOL: A BIOCULTURAL STUDY OF ANEMIA AND SUBJECTIVITY AMONG THE POQOMCHI' MAYA IN GUATEMALA  

E-print Network

of Texas, 2000) Tamahú, Onquilha’ and Polochic River Valley 4 There has been no scholarly research of the far eastern Poqomchi’ and even within Guatemala very little is known about the population of this region, especially life along the mountain.... However, little is known about how culturally specific factors intentionally or unintentionally alter this routine degree of anemia or how communities such as the Poqomchi’ survive more abnormal severe anemia, beyond normalized anemia. Also...

Herynk, James William

2014-05-31

428

Enzymatic diagnosis in non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Blood samples from 722 unrelated patients with anemia and/or reticulocytosis were submitted to our laboratory for red cell enzyme assay during the past 7 years. Among these 722 cases, we found 82 cases of 7 different red cell enzyme deficiencies and 2 of unstable hemoglobin. Abnormalities of pyruvate kinase (PK) were found to cause hemolysis in 55 patients. Although their average PK activity was about 35% of the normal level, 5 showed normal and 2 demonstrated high PK activity. Among 17 patients in whom pyruvate kinase assays or screening tests had been carried out in routine laboratories, the correct diagnoses had been made in only 4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency was found in 15 patients, pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase deficiency in 5, glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency in 3, adenylate kinase deficiency in 2, phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency in 1, and glutathione synthetase deficiency in 1 patient. Even after we performed a panel of over 20 different red cell enzyme assays, 519 patients still remained undiagnosed. PMID:3352512

Hirono, A; Forman, L; Beutler, E

1988-03-01

429

Effect of iron liposomes on anemia of inflammation.  

PubMed

Supplementation with iron-fortified foods is an effective method for treating iron deficiency diseases. However, traditional iron agents used to treat anemia of inflammation (AI) have little effect. In this study, two types of iron liposomes, heme liposomes (HEME-LIP) and ferric citrate liposomes (FAC-LIP), were prepared by the rotary-evaporated film-ultrasonication method, and the encapsulation efficiencies, microstructures, size distributions and zeta potentials were assessed. Both types of iron liposomes showed stable physical characteristics. When used to treat rat models of AI, FAC-LIP and HEME-LIP could increase serum iron levels by 119% and 54% higher than did ferric citrate (FAC) and heme, respectively. Furthermore, the hepcidin, a key regulator of iron homeostasis was up-regulated by these iron liposomes, especially by HEME-LIP. These results indicate that the absorption of iron liposomes was improved over that of unencapsulated iron agents. Thus, iron liposomes may be used to fortify food in treating iron deficiency diseases, especially AI. PMID:23850818

Yuan, Li; Geng, Lina; Ge, Lan; Yu, Peng; Duan, Xianglin; Chen, Jun; Chang, Yanzhong

2013-09-15

430

Depression in children suffering from sickle cell anemia.  

PubMed

Sickle cell anemia is a chronic illness associated with important nonmedical complications. The prevalence of depression and its clinical profile among Congolese children suffering from sickle cell disease are unknown. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study in children between 8 and 17 years. The main goal of this study was to describe prevalence and characteristics of depression in this population living in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo. The cross-sectional survey is of patients attending 2 referral centers. Children aged 8 to 17 years old were evaluated by a semistructured interview and standardized scales for depression separated by age and sex, the Multiscore Depression Inventory for Children. Completed questionnaires were received from 81 respondents. There were 43 girls and 38 boys. Depression symptoms were observed in 70 (86.4%) cases. Among this group, 6 children (8.6%) were observed to have severe depression. The most common symptoms were observed to be social introversion (81.5%), defiance (77.8%), helplessness (76.5%), and sad mood (70.4%). Of the 70 subjects, 19 (23.5%) had suicidal ideation. In Kinshasa, the prevalence of depression was high to those reported in western countries. Psychological interventions for individuals with sickle cell disease might complement current medical treatment in our midst. PMID:25354254

Lukoo, Rita N; Ngiyulu, René M; Mananga, Gilbert L; Gini-Ehungu, Jean-Lambert; Ekulu, Pépé M; Tshibassu, Pierre M; Aloni, Michel N

2015-01-01

431

Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia.  

PubMed

Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

2014-06-01

432

[Ultrastructural characteristics of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia-type I].  

PubMed

The study was aimed to investigate the ultranstructural feature and diagnostic criteria of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia-type I (CDA-type I). Nucleated red cells in bone marrow from two patients with CDA-type I were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that the erythropoietic/granulopoietic ratio was markedly increased with megaloblastic morphology in all stage of erythrocyte. Most proerythroblast showed of irregular nuclei, while the Swiss-cheese-appearance of the heterochromatin was usually found in basophilic and polychromatic erythroblast. About half of orthochromatic erythroblast illustrated karyolysis and karyorrhexis. Some orthochromatic erythroblast exhibited karyolysis and plasmolysis simultaneously. The inter-nuclear chromatin bridge between separated erythroblasts was seldom found by TEM. The nuclear membrane and rough endoplasmic reticulum were destructed at all stage of erythrocytes in different degree. In conclusion, the megaloblastic erythrosis was the main characteristic of CDA-type I, and then nuclear membrane disruption in polychromatic erythroblast and karyolysis or karyorrhexis in orthochromatic erythroblast. The universal breakdown of cytoplasm membranous system was fundamental pathogenesis of CDA-type I. PMID:17490535

Ru, Yong-Xin; Zhu, Xiao-Fan; Zhao, Shi-Yuan; Liu, Jin-Hua; Zhong, Shu

2007-02-01

433

Salivary detection of periodontopathic bacteria in Fanconi's anemia patients.  

PubMed

Fanconi's anemia (FA) is characterized by bone marrow failure and can lead to infections such as periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of four periodontopathic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in saliva samples from children with and without FA. Paraffin-stimulated saliva samples were collected from 71 children and adolescents, aged 6-18 years old. The samples were divided in three groups: FA without HSCT (n = 25), FA with HSCT (n = 23) and Non-FA (n = 24). The test bacteria were identified using a 16S rRNA-based PCR analysis. P. gingivalis was the most frequent species in all groups and T. denticola the less frequent. P. gingivalis was also common species in combinations in all groups. No statistically difference was observed between the groups for single bacteria, pair or triple combination. The combination of the four species was detected in one saliva sample of the FA without HSCT group and in five samples of the Non-FA group, with statistical difference between them (p < 0.05, Fisher exact test). Systemic alterations found in FA subjects did not affect the salivary distribution of the four bacteria analyzed. PMID:24055631

Lyko, Karine; Bonfim, Carmem; Benelli, Elaine Machado; Torres-Pereira, Cassius Carvalho; Amenábar, José Miguel

2013-12-01

434

Altered translation of GATA1 in Diamond-Blackfan anemia.  

PubMed

Ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency occurs in diverse human diseases including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), congenital asplenia and T cell leukemia. Yet, how mutations in genes encoding ubiquitously expressed proteins such as these result in cell-type- and tissue-specific defects remains unknown. Here, we identify mutations in GATA1, encoding the critical hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-binding protein-1, that reduce levels of full-length GATA1 protein and cause DBA in rare instances. We show that ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency, the more common cause of DBA, can lead to decreased GATA1 mRNA translation, possibly resulting from a higher threshold for initiation of translation of this mRNA in comparison with other mRNAs. In primary hematopoietic cells from patients with mutations in RPS19, encoding ribosomal protein S19, the amplitude of a transcriptional signature of GATA1 target genes was globally and specifically reduced, indicating that the activity, but not the mRNA level, of GATA1 is decreased in patients with DBA associated with mutations affecting ribosomal proteins. Moreover, the defective hematopoiesis observed in patients with DBA associated with ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency could be partially overcome by increasing GATA1 protein levels. Our results provide a paradigm by which selective defects in translation due to mutations affecting ubiquitous ribosomal proteins can result in human disease. PMID:24952648

Ludwig, Leif S; Gazda, Hanna T; Eng, Jennifer C; Eichhorn, Stephen W; Thiru, Prathapan; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; George, Tracy I; Gotlib, Jason R; Beggs, Alan H; Sieff, Colin A; Lodish, Harvey F; Lander, Eric S; Sankaran, Vijay G

2014-07-01

435

ADHERENCE TO HYDROXYUREA IN CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL ANEMIA  

PubMed Central

Objective(s) To assess adherence to hydroxyurea in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), to evaluate the association between adherence and hematologic profile, and to identify barriers and facilitators of adherence. Study design Seventy-five children with SCA on hydroxyurea were recruited for a single-institution cross-sectional study. The primary outcome was association between treatment adherence and percent fetal hemoglobin (HbF). Results Good adherence was estimated at 82% by visual analog scale; 84% by Morisky score; 85% by medical provider report; 77% by clinic visits; and 49% based on pharmacy refills. Increase in HbF was moderately associated with good adherence as measured by the parent/proxy Morisky score (r= ?0.39; 95% CI= ?0.58, ?0.17; p<0.01) and prescription refills (r =0.39; 95% CI= 0.16, 0.57; p<0.01). The number of pharmacy refills and the Morisky score explained 23% of the variation in HbF response. Conclusions Adherence was ?75% by 4 out of 5 measures. Pharmacy refills and Modified Morisky Scale may be used to identify: children at high risk for poor response due to non-adherence and children with good adherence with poor response due to individual pharmacodynamics. Future research should prospectively compare adherence measures and evaluate methods to improve treatment adherence. PMID:19880135

Thornburg, Courtney D.; Calatroni, Agustin; Telen, Marilyn; Kemper, Alex R.

2014-01-01

436

Traditional Herbal Management of Sickle Cell Anemia: Lessons from Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background. Patients in West Africa where sickle cell anemia (SCA) is endemic have for ages been treated with natural products, especially herbs, as, is still the case in rural communities. Objective. In this paper we look closely at some of these herbs to see if there are any lessons to be learnt or clues to be found for optimizing the treatments based on them, as had been done in the case of NIPRISAN, which was developed from herbs in Nigeria based on Yoruba Medicine. Methods. Select publications on SCA, its molecular biology and pathology, and actual and experimental cases of herbal treatment were perused in search of molecular clues that can be linked to chemical constituents of the herbs involved. Results. The study revealed that during the last 2-3 decades, much progress was made in several aspects of SCA pharmacology, especially the approval of hydroxyurea. As for SCA herbalism, this paper revealed that antisickling herbs abound in West Africa and that the most promising may yet be found. Three new antisickling herbs (Entandrophragma utile, Chenopodium ambrosioides, and Petiveria alliacea) were reported in May 2011. At NIPRD, where NIPRISAN was developed, three other recipes are currently awaiting development. Conclusion. The study raised the hope that the search in the Tropics for more effective herbal recipes for managing sickle cell anaemia will be more fruitful with time and effort. PMID:23198140

Ameh, Sunday J.; Tarfa, Florence D.; Ebeshi, Benjamin U.

2012-01-01

437

Neuroimaging abnormalities in adults with sickle cell anemia  

PubMed Central

Objective: This study was conducted to determine the relationship of frontal lobe cortical thickness and basal ganglia volumes to measures of cognition in adults with sickle cell anemia (SCA). Methods: Participants included 120 adults with SCA with no history of neurologic dysfunction and 33 healthy controls (HCs). Participants were enrolled at 12 medical center sites, and raters were blinded to diagnostic group. We hypothesized that individuals with SCA would exhibit reductions in frontal lobe cortex thickness and reduced basal ganglia and thalamus volumes compared with HCs and that these structural brain abnormalities would be associated with measures of cognitive functioning (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, 3rd edition). Results: After adjusting for age, sex, education level, and intracranial volume, participants with SCA exhibited thinner frontal lobe cortex (t = ?2.99, p = 0.003) and reduced basal ganglia and thalamus volumes compared with HCs (t = ?3.95, p < 0.001). Reduced volume of the basal ganglia and thalamus was significantly associated with lower Performance IQ (model estimate = 3.75, p = 0.004) as well as lower Perceptual Organization (model estimate = 1.44, p = 0.007) and Working Memory scores (model estimate = 1.37, p = 0.015). Frontal lobe cortex thickness was not significantly associated with any cognitive measures. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that basal ganglia and thalamus abnormalities may represent a particularly salient contributor to cognitive dysfunction in adults with SCA. PMID:24523480

Insel, Philip; Truran, Diana; Vichinsky, Elliot P.; Neumayr, Lynne D.; Armstrong, F.D.; Gold, Jeffrey I.; Kesler, Karen; Brewer, Joseph; Weiner, Michael W.

2014-01-01

438

Microporation and ‘Iron’ tophoresis for treating Iron deficiency anemia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Iontophoretic mediated transdermal delivery of ferric pyrophosphate (FPP) in combination with microneedle pretreatment was investigated as a potential treatment for iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods In vitro transdermal delivery studies were performed using hairless rat skin and pharmacodynamic studies were performed in hairless anemic rat model. The hematological and biochemical parameters like hemoglobin, hematocrit and % serum transferrin were monitored in rats at healthy, anemic condition and post treatment. Micropores created by the microneedles were visualized in histological skin sections after staining with hemotoxylin and eosin. The recovery of micropores was investigated in vivo by measuring Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) at different time points. Results The passive, microneedle and iontophoresis mediated delivery did not lead to significant improvement in hematological and biochemical parameters in anemic rats, when used individually. When iontophoresis (0.15 mA/cm2 for 4 hours) was combined with microneedle pretreatment (for 2 minutes), therapeutically adequate amount of FPP was delivered and there was significant recovery of rats from IDA. Conclusions Microneedle and iontophoresis mediated delivery of iron via transdermal route could be developed as a potential treatment for IDA. The transdermal controlled delivery of iron could become a potential, safe and effective alternative to parenteral iron therapy. PMID:23187864

Modepalli, Naresh; Jo, Seongbong; Repka, Michael A.; Murthy, S. Narasimha

2012-01-01

439

Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia  

PubMed Central

Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

2014-01-01

440

Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

2014-12-29

441

Use Massive Parallel Sequencing and Exome Capture Technology to Sequence the Exome of Fanconi Anemia Children and Their Patents  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Fanconi Anemia; Autosomal or Sex Linked Recessive Genetic Disease; Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis Failure, Multiple Congenital Abnormalities, and Susceptibility to Neoplastic Diseases.; Hematopoiesis Maintainance.

2013-11-21

442

Disposable platform provides visual and color-based point-of-care anemia self-testing  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND. Anemia, or low blood hemoglobin (Hgb) levels, afflicts 2 billion people worldwide. Currently, Hgb levels are typically measured from blood samples using hematology analyzers, which are housed in hospitals, clinics, or commercial laboratories and require skilled technicians to operate. A reliable, inexpensive point-of-care (POC) Hgb test would enable cost-effective anemia screening and chronically anemic patients to self-monitor their disease. We present a rapid, stand-alone, and disposable POC anemia test that, via a single drop of blood, outputs color-based visual results that correlate with Hgb levels. METHODS. We tested blood from 238 pediatric and adult patients with anemia of varying degrees and etiologies and compared hematology analyzer Hgb levels with POC Hgb levels, which were estimated via visual interpretation using a color scale and an optional smartphone app for automated analysis. RESULTS. POC Hgb levels correlated with hematology analyzer Hgb levels (r = 0.864 and r = 0.856 for visual interpretation and smartphone app, respectively), and both POC test methods yielded comparable sensitivity and specificity for detecting any anemia (n = 178) (<11 g/dl) (sensitivity: 90.2% and 91.1%, specificity: 83.7% and 79.2%, respectively) and severe anemia (n = 10) (<7 g/dl) (sensitivity: 90.0% and 100%, specificity: 94.6% and 93.9%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. These results demonstrate the feasibility of this POC color-based diagnostic test for self-screening/self-monitoring of anemia. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Not applicable. FUNDING. This work was funded by the FDA-funded Atlantic Pediatric Device Consortium, the Georgia Research Alliance, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, the Georgia Center of Innovation for Manufacturing, and the InVenture Prize and Ideas to Serve competitions at the Georgia Institute of Technology. PMID:25157824

Tyburski, Erika A.; Gillespie, Scott E.; Stoy, William A.; Mannino, Robert G.; Weiss, Alexander J.; Siu, Alexa F.; Bulloch, Rayford H.; Thota, Karthik; Cardenas, Anyela; Session, Wilena; Khoury, Hanna J.; O’Connor, Siobhán; Bunting, Silvia T.; Boudreaux, Jeanne; Forest, Craig R.; Gaddh, Manila; Leong, Traci; Lyon, L. Andrew; Lam, Wilbur A.

2014-01-01

443

Iron deficiency anemia among kindergarten children living in the marginalized areas of Gaza Strip, Palestine  

PubMed Central

Background: iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of nutritional anemia; it has been recognized as an important health problem in Palestine. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and to identify possible risk factors of iron deficiency anemia among kindergarten children living in the marginalized areas of the Gaza Strip and to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementing oral iron formula in the anemic children. Methods: the study included 735 (384 male and 351 female) kindergarten children. Data was collected by questionnaire interviews, anthropometric measurements, and complete blood count analysis. All iron deficient anemic children were treated using an oral iron formula (50 mg ferrous carbonate + 100 mg vitamin C /5 mL) and the complete blood count was reassessed after three months. A univariate analysis and a multiple logistic regression model were constructed; crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results: the overall prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 33.5% with no significant differences between boys and girls. Significantly different prevalences of iron deficiency anemia were reported between different governorates of the Gaza Strip. Governorate, low education level of the parents and smoking are significant risk factors for children developing anemia. Significantly lower complete blood count parameters, except for WBC, were reported in anemic children. The oral iron treatment significantly improved hemoglobin concentrations, and normalized the iron deficiency marker. Conclusions: iron deficiency anemia is a serious health problem among children living in the marginalized areas of the Gaza Strip, which justifies the necessity for national intervention programs to improve the health status for the less fortunate development areas. PMID:24790539

Sirdah, Mahmoud Mohammed; Yaghi, Ayed; Yaghi, Abdallah R.

2014-01-01

444

Adolescent anemia screening during ambulatory pediatric visits in the United States.  

PubMed

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends anemia screening for reproductive age women every 5-10 years and annually for those with risk factors. Due to the lower risk of anemia among males, screening for men is recommended only if risk factors exist. The study objective was to examine health care professionals' current anemia screening patterns for male and female adolescents. Data are from the 2001 -2004 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a nationally representative sample of ambulatory visits to primary care practices. The frequency of anemia screening during preventive care visits by 12-21-year-olds was estimated by sex using a reported hemoglobin/hematocrit or complete blood count as an indicator of screening. Multivariable logistic regression identified patient, provider and practice-level factors associated with screening. During the study period, 1,263 preventive care visits occurred for 12-21 year-olds. In bivariate analysis, higher odds of anemia screening were observed for both younger females (OR 1.85; 95 % CI 1.09-3.14) and older males [1.83 (1.02-3.26)] compared to older females (?16 years). In the multivariable model, odds of screening increased with non-white race [3.29 (1.84-5.88)], tobacco use [3.57 (1.94-6.58)], longer visit length [1.03 (1.01-1.06)], and practice site acceptance of managed care plans [2.08 (1.04-4.14)]. Patient sex and age were not statistically significant predictors of screening. Although anemia is more prevalent among older adolescent females, they were not more likely to be screened. This suggests providers are not targeting groups at highest risk of anemia for screening. PMID:25194577

Sekhar, Deepa L; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Wang, Luojun; Kunselman, Allen R; Paul, Ian M

2015-04-01

445

Predictors of fetal anemia and cord blood malaria parasitemia among newborns of HIV-positive mothers  

PubMed Central

Background Malaria and HIV infections during pregnancy can individually or jointly unleash or confound pregnancy outcomes. Two of the probable outcomes are fetal anemia and cord blood malaria parasitemia. We determined clinical and demographic factors associated with fetal anemia and cord blood malaria parasitemia in newborns of HIV-positive women from two districts in Ghana. Results We enrolled 1,154 antenatal attendees (443 HIV-positive and 711 HIV-negative) of which 66% were prospectively followed up at delivery. Maternal malaria parasitemia, and anemia rates among HIV+ participants at enrolment were 20.3% and 78.7% respectively, and 12.8% and 51.6% among HIV- participants. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models were used to study associations. Prevalence of fetal anemia (cord hemoglobin level anemia were maternal malaria parasitemia and maternal anemia. Infant cord hemoglobin status at delivery was positively and significantly associated with maternal hemoglobin and gestational age whilst female gender of infant was negatively associated with cord hemoglobin status. Maternal malaria parasitemia status at recruitment and female gender of infant were positively associated with infant cord malaria parasitemia status. Conclusions Our data show that newborns of women infected with HIV and/or malaria are at increased risk of anemia and also cord blood malaria parasitemia. Prevention of malaria infection during pregnancy may reduce the incidence of both adverse perinatal outcomes. PMID:24007344

2013-01-01

446

Association between serum magnesium and anemia: china health and nutrition survey.  

PubMed

The role of magnesium in anemia remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of anemia and its association with serum magnesium in a nationally representative sample. A total of 8,511 participants aged 18 years and over were recruited in this cross-sectional survey in 2009. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentration less than 130 g/l for men and less than 120 g/l for women. Multiple logistic regression models were applied to explore the association of magnesium and anemia. The prevalence of anemia in total was 14.0% with 8.8% for men and 18.5% for women (P<0.0001), respectively. The interaction terms between magnesium and gender and ferritin were significant (P<0.001). In men with serum ferritin?15 ng/ml, compared with the first quartile of magnesium, the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for those in the second, third, and fourth quartile of magnesium were 0.65 (0.46, 0.91), 0.77 (0.55, 1.09), and 0.63 (0.45, 0.89), respectively, after adjusting multiple confounders. Likewise, in women with serum ferritin?15 ng/ml, the corresponding ORs (95% CIs) were 0.71 (0.56, 0.91), 0.64 (0.49, 0.84), and 0.53 (0.40, 0.71). The associations between magnesium and anemia were not significant in neither men nor women with serum ferritin<15 ng/ml. Serum magnesium was inversely associated with anemia in both men and women, in particular among adults with high serum ferritin levels. PMID:24789475

Zhan, Yiqiang; Chen, Ruoqing; Zheng, Wenwen; Guo, Chenyu; Lu, Leihong; Ji, Xiaopeng; Chi, Zhiyuan; Yu, Jinming

2014-06-01

447

Magnetic resonance imaging repercussions of intravenous iron products used for iron-deficiency anemia and dialysis-associated anemia.  

PubMed

During the past 2 decades, routine use of recombinant erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) has enabled anemia to be corrected in dialysis patients, thereby improving their quality of life and permitting better outcomes. As successful use of ESA requires sufficient available iron, almost all end-stage renal disease patients on ESA now receive concomitant parenteral iron therapy. Radiologists must be aware that iron overload among dialysis patients is now an increasingly recognized clinical situation in the ESA era yet was previously considered rare. The KDIGO Controversies Conference on Iron Management in Chronic Kidney Disease, which took place in San Francisco on March 27 to 30, 2014, recognized the entity of iron overload in hemodialysis patients and called for an agenda of research on this topic, especially by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).It is therefore very likely that radiologists will be heavily solicited in the future by nephrology teams requesting quantitative hepatic MRI in dialysis patients, both for research purposes and for diagnosis and follow-up of iron overload. Radiologists should be aware of the marked differences in the pharmacological properties of available intravenous iron products and their potential interference with MRI. Specific MRI protocols need to be established in radiology divisions for each pharmaceutical iron product, especially for treated dialysis patients. PMID:25229202

Rostoker, Guy; Cohen, Yves

2014-01-01

448

History: Las Vegas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Las Vegas (or "The Meadows" in Spanish) is a curious place, and it is not much of a stretch to say that it was transformed from a sleepy railroad town into a ring-a-ding swinging town in just a few decades during the 20th century. The Las Vegas Sun has gone above and beyond the call of duty by crafting a site that presents a multimedia-rich experience that narrates the history of this rather unique American city. Visitors should start their journey here by watching one or all eleven parts of their "Boomtown" video on the history of the town. Then visitors may want to take a look at the interactive map of the "Strip", which tells the fortunes of casinos and other buildings, past, present, and future, which have graced this notable region of mega-structures amidst the desert. After that, visitors should look at the "12 Voices from the Past" area. Voices like casino owner Benny Binion and former Nevada governor Mike O'Callaghan are featured here, and it's a great trip back through the city's varied past.

449

A genome-wide association study of total bilirubin and cholelithiasis risk in sickle cell anemia.  

PubMed

Serum bilirubin levels have been associated with polymorphisms in the UGT1A1 promoter in normal populations and in patients with hemolytic anemias, including sickle cell anemia. When hemolysis occurs circulating heme increases, leading to elevated bilirubin levels and an increased incidence of cholelithiasis. We performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bilirubin levels and cholelithiasis risk in a discovery cohort of 1,117 sickle cell anemia patients. We found 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with total bilirubin levels at the genome-wide significance level (p value <5 × 10(-8)). SNPs in UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A6, UGT1A8 and UGT1A10, different isoforms within the UGT1A locus, were identified (most significant rs887829, p = 9.08 × 10(-25)). All of these associations were validated in 4 independent sets of sickle cell anemia patients. We tested the association of the 15 SNPs with cholelithiasis in the discovery cohort and found a significant association (most significant p value 1.15 × 10(-4)). These results confirm that the UGT1A region is the major regulator of bilirubin metabolism in African Americans with sickle cell anemia, similar to what is observed in other ethnicities. PMID:22558097

Milton, Jacqueline N; Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia; Hartley, Stephen W; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Arking, Dan E; Dworkis, Daniel A; Casella, James F; Barron-Casella, Emily; Bean, Christopher J; Hooper, W Craig; DeBaun, Michael R; Garrett, Melanie E; Soldano, Karen; Telen, Marilyn J; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Gladwin, Mark T; Baldwin, Clinton T; Steinberg, Martin H; Klings, Elizabeth S

2012-01-01

450

Current management of iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel diseases: a practical guide.  

PubMed

Anemia and iron deficiency anemia are very common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In most cases, anemia is a consequence of mixed pathogenesis; inflammation and iron deficiency being the most important factors. Iron status should be evaluated carefully, as ferritin is unreliable in the presence of inflammation. It is always necessary to control disease activity; however, supplementation is usually required to fully correct iron deficiencies. Oral iron, intravenous iron, erythropoietin, and blood transfusions can be used in different clinical scenarios. Oral iron may be used in mild cases if the disease has no clinical activity. Intravenous iron should be preferred where oral iron is poorly tolerated or where it has failed in moderate to severe anemia, and in combination with erythropoietin. Iron sucrose is very safe and effective, but not very convenient, as the total needed dose must be divided into several infusions. Ferric carboxymaltose is much more convenient, and has been shown to be more effective than iron sucrose in a large randomized trial. Iron isomaltose shows theoretical promise, but very limited data are available from IBD populations. Blood transfusion can be necessary, especially in acute life-threatening situations, but the trigger for indication should be in the low range. With the correct use of available resources, anemia and iron deficiency should be well controlled in practically all IBD patients. PMID:24114623

Gomollón, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P

2013-11-01

451

Association of anemia, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia with seasonality: a realist systematic review.  

PubMed

Seasonal patterns influencing maternal health have been documented globally and are of particular importance for women in developing countries who disproportionately suffer from anemia, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. This paper adopts a realist systematic approach to investigate the maternal outcome of anemia and eclampsia in relation to seasonality. A review of 23 published studies shows a statistically significant link between these maternal disorders and seasonality in developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and Central and South Asia. Anemia and eclampsia tend to decrease during the dry season, only to increase with greater rainfall, low and cold temperatures. Numerous studies suggest that the seasonality of anemia and eclampsia is associated with changes in malaria transmission. This was observed during the rainy season, suggesting a potential seasonal relationship with malaria as a driver of these disorders in Sub-Saharan Africa. Anemia and eclampsia were principally exacerbated among primigravidae and young women. Food insecurity, access to antenatal care, poverty, and environmental factors may also play a crucial role in the predisposition to these disorders. More research is required to identify the seasonal link between malaria and eclampsia particularly as climate change may exacerbate the rate of the disorders in tropical and sub-tropical areas. PMID:25555235

Hlimi, Tina

2015-01-01

452

Risks and benefits of transfusion for children with severe anemia in Africa.  

PubMed

Severe anemia contributes significantly to child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Blood transfusion is used in emergencies but carries risks. In BMC Medicine, Olupot-Olupot and colleagues report the findings of a phase II trial in children with severe anemia in Eastern Uganda. They provide important early safety and efficacy data supporting large volume whole blood transfusion (30 ml/kg) compared with the World Health Organization recommendation of 20 ml/kg. Large volume transfusions result in more rapid and frequent correction of severe anemia; they can be expected to reduce the risk of transfusions, and help manage the scarce resource of donor blood. However, severe anemia arises from varying combinations of acute, sub-acute and chronic etiologies. The Fluid Expansion As Supportive Therapy study reminds us that the risks and benefits of even simple interventions are complex, and that rapid normalization of physiology may not always be the best strategy. There is no substitute for high quality evidence and to this end we strongly support Olupot-Oluput and colleagues' call for a definitive trial of large volume transfusions in severe anemia. Please see related research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/67/abstract. PMID:24767140

Brick, Thomas; Peters, Mark J

2014-01-01

453

A Genome-Wide Association Study of Total Bilirubin and Cholelithiasis Risk in Sickle Cell Anemia  

PubMed Central

Serum bilirubin levels have been associated with polymorphisms in the UGT1A1 promoter in normal populations and in patients with hemolytic anemias, including sickle cell anemia. When hemolysis occurs circulating heme increases, leading to elevated bilirubin levels and an increased incidence of cholelithiasis. We performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bilirubin levels and cholelithiasis risk in a discovery cohort of 1,117 sickle cell anemia patients. We found 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with total bilirubin levels at the genome-wide significance level (p value <5×10?8). SNPs in UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A6, UGT1A8 and UGT1A10, different isoforms within the UGT1A locus, were identified (most significant rs887829, p?=?9.08×10?25). All of these associations were validated in 4 independent sets of sickle cell anemia patients. We tested the association of the 15 SNPs with cholelithiasis in the discovery cohort and found a significant association (most significant p value 1.15×10?4). These results confirm that the UGT1A region is the major regulator of bilirubin metabolism in African Americans with sickle cell anemia, similar to what is observed in other ethnicities. PMID:22558097

Milton, Jacqueline N.; Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia; Hartley, Stephen W.; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Arking, Dan E.; Dworkis, Daniel A.; Casella, James F.; Barron-Casella, Emily; Bean, Christopher J.; Hooper, W. Craig; DeBaun, Michael R.; Garrett, Melanie E.; Soldano, Karen; Telen, Marilyn J.; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Gladwin, Mark T.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Steinberg, Martin H.; Klings, Elizabeth S.

2012-01-01

454

Prevalence of Anemia and Correlated Factors in the Reproductive Age Women in Rural Areas of Tabas  

PubMed Central

Objective To find out the prevalence and relationship of anemia in reproductive age women in rural area of Tabas, center of Iran. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional problem, affecting about 41.8% of pregnant and 30.2% of non-pregnant women worldwide. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on the random sample of 382 reproductive age women in rural areas of Tabas in March 2010. Independent sample t-test, one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were applied for the data analysis. Results The obtained data revealed a total response rate of 13.8% for prevalence of anemia, while 14.5% and 5.9% belonged to non-pregnant and pregnant participants, respectively. Low socioeconomic status (odds ratio 3.35) and high parity index (odds ratio 2.31) were associated with higher prevalence of anemia. Conclusion Although this study was conducted in a rural area of Tabas, where their average incomes were lower than average income of major cities in Iran, the prevalence of anemia was lower than the rate reported in previous studies carried out in other locations of Iran, even in high risk (pregnant women) groups. PMID:24971116

Sadeghian, Majid; Lesanpezeshki, Mohammad; Ahmadnezhad, Elham

2013-01-01

455

Fertility recovery and pregnancy after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Fanconi anemia patients  

PubMed Central

Reduced fertility is one clinical manifestation among other well known Fanconi anemia features. Most recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation suffer from secondary infertility owing to gonadal damage from myeloablative conditioning. In order to evaluate the rate of pregnancy in Fanconi anemia transplanted patients, we performed a retrospective analysis of female patients transplanted in 15 centers from 1976 to 2008. Among 578 transplanted Fanconi anemia patients, we identified 285 transplanted females of whom 101 patients were aged 16 years or over. Ten became pregnant (4 twice). Before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation all had confirmed Fanconi anemia diagnosis. Median age at transplantation was 12 years (range 5–17 years). Conditioning regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide with or without irradiation. During follow up, 5 of 10 patients presented signs of ovarian failure. Among those, 2 patients spontaneously recovered regular menses, and 3 received hormonal replacement therapy. Pregnancy occurred from four to 17 years after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Three patients had preterm deliveries, one patient had a hysterectomy for bleeding. All 14 newborns had normal growth and development without congenital diseases. In conclusion, recovery of normal ovarian function and a viable pregnancy is a realistic but relatively rare possibility even in Fanconi anemia patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mechanisms of fertility recovery are discussed. PMID:20494929

Nabhan, Samir K.; Bitencourt, Marco A.; Duval, Michel; Abecasis, Manuel; Dufour, Carlo; Boudjedir, Karim; Rocha, Vanderson; Socié, Gérard; Passweg, Jakob; Goi, Kumiko; Sanders, Jean; Snowden, John; Yabe, Hiromasa; Pasquini, Ricardo; Gluckman, Eliane

2010-01-01

456

A systematic analysis of global anemia burden from 1990 to 2010  

PubMed Central

Previous studies of anemia epidemiology have been geographically limited with little detail about severity or etiology. Using publicly available data, we estimated mild, moderate, and severe anemia from 1990 to 2010 for 187 countries, both sexes, and 20 age groups. We then performed cause-specific attribution to 17 conditions using data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries and Risk Factors (GBD) 2010 Study. Global anemia prevalence in 2010 was 32.9%, causing 68.36 (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 40.98 to 107.54) million years lived with disability (8.8% of total for all conditions [95% UI, 6.3% to 11.7%]). Prevalence dropped for both sexes from 1990 to 2010, although more for males. Prevalence in females was higher in most regions and age groups. South Asia and Central, West, and East sub-Saharan Africa had the highest burden, while East, Southeast, and South Asia saw the greatest reductions. Iron-deficiency anemia was the top cause globally, although 10 different conditions were among the top 3 in regional rankings. Malaria, schistosomiasis, and chronic kidney disease–related anemia were the only conditions to increase in prevalence. Hemoglobinopathies made significant contributions in most populations. Burden was highest in children under age 5, the only age groups with negative trends from 1990 to 2010. PMID:24297872

Jasrasaria, Rashmi; Naghavi, Mohsen; Wulf, Sarah K.; Johns, Nicole; Lozano, Rafael; Regan, Mathilda; Weatherall, David; Chou, David P.; Eisele, Thomas P.; Flaxman, Seth R.; Pullan, Rachel L.; Brooker, Simon J.; Murray, Christopher J. L.

2014-01-01

457

Successful Treatment of Severe Anemia using Erythropoietin in a Jehovah Witness with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Blood transfusion many times works in a life-saving way when a patient is facing a critical situation. However, some patients, such as Jehovah’s Witnesses, may refuse their administration because it opposes to their religion beliefs. Thus, clinicians are forced to respect patients’ preferences and seek other treatments in order to overcome the obstacle of the transfusion. In 1989, recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of anemia associated with chronic renal failure. This is an amino acid glycol-protein that stimulates red blood cell production in the same manner as endogenous erythropoietin. Other treatment indications approved by the FDA include anemia due to chronic kidney disease, anemia secondary to zidovudine therapy in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, and anemia secondary to cancer chemotherapy. The drug also has been used for many off-label indications. Many Jehovah’s Witnesses have accepted rHuEPO as a treatment option to maintain and enhance erythropoiesis. This paper reports the case of a 57-year-old Jehovah’s Witness man, who was diagnosed with severe anemia due to aggressive non Hodgkin lymphoma and refused transfusion of blood; thanks to the treatment with rHuEPO he has managed to complete chemotherapy and has survived a life threatening situation. PMID:25568760

Agapidou, Alexandra; Vakalopoulou, Sofia; Papadopoulou, Theodosia; Chadjiaggelidou, Christina; Garypidou, Vasileia

2014-01-01

458

Change in Serum Ferritin Concentration in Experimentally Induced Anemia of Chronic Inflammation in Dogs  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT In veterinary medicine, hyperferritinemia is often observed in dogs with various diseases (e.g., histiocytic sarcoma and immune-mediated hemolytic anemia) without evidence of iron overload. The mechanism underlying hyperferritinemia development is not well understood. Anemia caused by inflammation is termed as anemia of chronic disease (ACD), and experimentally induced ACD is known to cause slight hyperferritinemia. However, almost all these studies were based on short-term acute inflammation. Hepcidin, a protein mainly produced by hepatocytes, is thought to be a key regulator in iron release from reticuloendothelial cells (RECs), and its expression is related to ACD. We hypothesized that in the case of long-term ACD, iron deposition in RECs increases through hepcidin, causing a diachronic increase in serum ferritin levels. In the present study, we used a canine model with repeated subcutaneous administration of turpentine oil every 3 days over a period of 42 days (15 injections) and induced long-term inflammatory conditions; furthermore, we evaluated the change in serum ferritin concentration. Hypoproliferative anemia, bone marrow iron deposition and hypoferremia, which are characteristic of ACD, were observed on administering the turpentine injections. Hepatic iron content, hepatic hepcidin mRNA expression and serum ferritin concentration increased during the early period after turpentine injection, but returned to normal levels later. These results show that experimentally induced long-term ACD caused hypoproliferative anemia without sustained increase in hepcidin expression and did not cause systemic iron overload. Thus, chronic inflammation may not contribute greatly to increase in hyperferritinemia. PMID:23803460

CHIKAZAWA, Seishiro; NAKAZAWA, Takafumi; HORI, Yasutomo; HOSHI, Fumio; KANAI, Kazutaka; ITO, Naoyuki; ORINO, Koichi; WATANABE, Kiyotaka; HIGUCHI, Seiichi

2013-01-01

459

Change in serum ferritin concentration in experimentally induced anemia of chronic inflammation in dogs.  

PubMed

In veterinary medicine, hyperferritinemia is often observed in dogs with various diseases (e.g., histiocytic sarcoma and immune-mediated hemolytic anemia) without evidence of iron overload. The mechanism underlying hyperferritinemia development is not well understood. Anemia caused by inflammation is termed as anemia of chronic disease (ACD), and experimentally induced ACD is known to cause slight hyperferritinemia. However, almost all these studies were based on short-term acute inflammation. Hepcidin, a protein mainly produced by hepatocytes, is thought to be a key regulator in iron release from reticuloendothelial cells (RECs), and its expression is related to ACD. We hypothesized that in the case of long-term ACD, iron deposition in RECs increases through hepcidin, causing a diachronic increase in serum ferritin levels. In the present study, we used a canine model with repeated subcutaneous administration of turpentine oil every 3 days over a period of 42 days (15 injections) and induced long-term inflammatory conditions; furthermore, we evaluated the change in serum ferritin concentration. Hypoproliferative anemia, bone marrow iron deposition and hypoferremia, which are characteristic of ACD, were observed on administering the turpentine injections. Hepatic iron content, hepatic hepcidin mRNA expression and serum ferritin concentration increased during the early period after turpentine injection, but returned to normal levels later. These results show that experimentally induced long-term ACD caused hypoproliferative anemia without sustained increase in hepcidin expression and did not cause systemic iron overload. Thus, chronic inflammation may not contribute greatly to increase in hyperferritinemia. PMID:23803460

Chikazawa, Seishiro; Nakazawa, Takafumi; Hori, Yasutomo; Hoshi, Fumio; Kanai, Kazutaka; Ito, Naoyuki; Orino, Koichi; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Higuchi, Seiichi

2013-11-01

460

Safety Issues With Intravenous Iron Products in the Management of Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Anemia is a very common clinical problem in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in these patients. Erythropoietin is a hormone synthesized that is deficient in the majority of patients with advanced kidney disease, thereby predisposing these patients to anemia. The other cause of anemia is deficiency of iron. Iron deficiency anemia is common in people with CKD and its importance in supporting erythropoiesis is unquestioned, especially in those patients treated with erythropoietin. Intravenous iron is frequently used to treat anemia in CKD patients and is very efficacious in increasing hemoglobin but at the same time there are some safety issues associated with it. The objective of this review is to assess the frequency of adverse drug events associated with four different iron formulations: two iron dextran products known as high and low molecular weight iron dextran, iron sucrose, and sodium ferric gluconate complex. Several electronic databases were searched. In general, with the exception of high molecular weight iron dextran, serious or life-threatening adverse events appeared rare. Iron sucrose has the least reported adverse events and high molecular weight iron dextran has the highest number of reported adverse events. Low molecular weight iron dextran and ferric gluconate fall in between these two for number of adverse drug events. PMID:19325171

Hayat, Amir

2008-01-01

461

The role of intravenous iron in the treatment of anemia in cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Anemia is a major cause of morbidity in cancer patients resulting in poor physical performance, prognosis and therapy outcome. Initially, erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs) were supposed to be the treatment of choice but about one third of patients turned out to be nonresponders and meta-analyses provided evidence of an increased risk of mortality if used excessively. This along with the successful use of intravenous iron for anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease prompted seven clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of intravenous iron as an adjunct to ESAs and four additional studies using intravenous iron only for anemia in cancer patients. These studies confirmed a superior response if ESAs are combined with intravenous iron and revealed iron only to be a useful option in patients with mild and absolute iron deficiency (AID). Currently, best treatment decisions for anemia in cancer might be based on measurements of serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation (TSAT), soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), ferritin index (FI = sTfR/log SF), hypochromic reticulocytes (CHR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). However, there is still an urgent need for trials investigating diagnostic approaches to optimize therapy of anemia in cancer patients with iron and/or ESAs. PMID:23556124

2012-01-01

462

Successful Treatment of Severe Anemia using Erythropoietin in a Jehovah Witness with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.  

PubMed

Blood transfusion many times works in a life-saving way when a patient is facing a critical situation. However, some patients, such as Jehovah's Witnesses, may refuse their administration because it opposes to their religion beliefs. Thus, clinicians are forced to respect patients' preferences and seek other treatments in order to overcome the obstacle of the transfusion. In 1989, recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of anemia associated with chronic renal failure. This is an amino acid glycol-protein that stimulates red blood cell production in the same manner as endogenous erythropoietin. Other treatment indications approved by the FDA include anemia due to chronic kidney disease, anemia secondary to zidovudine therapy in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, and anemia secondary to cancer chemotherapy. The drug also has been used for many off-label indications. Many Jehovah's Witnesses have accepted rHuEPO as a treatment option to maintain and enhance erythropoiesis. This paper reports the case of a 57-year-old Jehovah's Witness man, who was diagnosed with severe anemia due to aggressive non Hodgkin lymphoma and refused transfusion of blood; thanks to the treatment with rHuEPO he has managed to complete chemotherapy and has survived a life threatening situation. PMID:25568760

Agapidou, Alexandra; Vakalopoulou, Sofia; Papadopoulou, Theodosia; Chadjiaggelidou, Christina; Garypidou, Vasileia

2014-11-19

463

Managing anemia in patients with chronic heart failure: what do we know?  

PubMed Central

Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) with an incidence ranging from 4% to 55% depending on the studied population. Several studies have highlighted that the prevalence of anemia increases with worsening heart failure as reflected by New York Heart Association classification. Additionally, several epidemiological studies have highlighted its role as a prognostic marker, linking it to worse outcomes including; malnutrition, increased hospitalizations, refractory heart failure and death. The pathophysiology of anemia is multifactorial and related to various factors including; hemodilution, iron losses from anti-platelet drugs, activation of the inflammatory cascade, urinary losses of erythropoietin and associated renal insufficiency. There are a host of epidemiological studies examining HF outcomes and anemia, but only a few randomized trials addressing this issue. The purpose of this article is to review the literature that examines the interrelationship of anemia and congestive HF, analyzing its etiology, impact on outcomes and also the role of associated kidney disease as well as cardiorenal syndrome both as a marker of morbidity and mortality. PMID:20407631

Sandhu, Ankur; Soman, Sandeep; Hudson, Michael; Besarab, Anatole

2010-01-01

464

Management of iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease – a practical approach  

PubMed Central

Although anemia is the most common systemic manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), among the broad spectrum of extraintestinal disease complications encountered in IBD, including arthritis and osteopathy, it has generally received little consideration. However, not only in terms of frequency, but also with regard to its potential effect on hospitalization rates and on the quality of life and work, anemia is indeed a significant and costly complication of IBD. Anemia is multifactorial in nature, the most prevalent etiological forms being iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of chronic disease. In a condition associated with inflammation, such as IBD, the determination of iron status using common biochemical parameters alone is inadequate. A more accurate assessment may be attained using new iron indices including reticulocyte hemoglobin content, percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin. While oral iron supplementation has traditionally been a mainstay of IDA treatment, it has also been linked to extensive gastrointestinal side effects and possible disease exacerbation. However, many physicians are still reluctant to administer iron intravenously, despite the wide availability of a variety of new IV preparations with improved safety profiles, and despite the recommendations of international expert guidelines. This article discusses improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies based on new clinical insights into the regulation of iron homeostasis. PMID:24714874

Stein, Jürgen; Dignass, Axel U.

2013-01-01

465

Effect of anemia and comorbidity on functional status and mortality in old age: results from the Leiden 85-plus Study  

PubMed Central

Background There is limited insight into the attributable effect of anemia and comorbidity on functional status and mortality in old age. Methods The Leiden 85-plus Study is a population-based prospective follow-up study of 562 people aged 85 years. Anemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria. We measured 3 parameters of functional status at baseline and annually thereafter for 5 years: disability in basic and instrumental activities of daily living, cognitive function and the presence of depressive symptoms. We obtained mortality data from the municipal registry. Results The prevalence of anemia at baseline was 26.7% (150/562). Participants who had anemia at baseline had more disability in activities of daily living, worse cognitive function and more depressive symptoms than participants without anemia at baseline (p ? 0.01). These differences disappeared after adjustment for comorbidity. After adjustment for comorbidity in the prospective analyses, anemia at baseline was associated with an additional increase in disability in instrumental activities of daily living during follow-up; incident anemia during follow-up (n = 99) was associated with an additional increase in disability in basic activities of daily living. Prevalent and incident anemia were both associated with an increased risk of death, even after we adjusted for sex, education level, income, residence in a long-term care facility, C-reactive protein level, creatinine clearance and the presence of disease (hazard ratio for prevalent anemia 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13 to 1.76; hazard ratio for incident anemia 2.08, 95% CI 1.60 to 2.70). Interpretation Anemia in very elderly people appears to be associated with an increased risk of death, independent of comorbidity. However, the associated functional decline appears to be attributed mainly to comorbidity. PMID:19635749

den Elzen, Wendy P.J.; Willems, Jorien M.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Assendelft, Willem J.J.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

2009-01-01

466

Hydroxyurea and erythropoietin therapy in sickle cell anemia.  

PubMed

Hydroxyurea has been shown to increase fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production in patients with sickle cell disease and therefore has the potential to alleviate both the hemolytic and vaso-occlusive manifestations of the disease. Preliminary evidence indicates that recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo) may also induce Hb F. Three sickle cell anemia patients were treated with escalating doses of intravenous rhEpo and, subsequently, with daily oral hydroxyurea. After the optimal hydroxyurea dose was attained, rhEpo was added again. Two additional patients were treated with hydroxyurea alone. Treatment with rhEp, either alone or in combination with hydroxyurea, had no significant effect on the percentage of F reticulocytes or F cells. In contrast, hydroxyurea treatment was associated with a 1.5-fold to sevenfold increase in F cells and a 2.3- to 27-fold increase in the percentage of Hb F. In the three patients whose response reached a plateau, hydroxyurea treatment was associated with lessened hemolysis, decreased serum bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels, and prolonged 51chromium-labeled RBC survival. Hydroxyurea treatment also resulted in decreased numbers of irreversibly sickled cells and in decreased sickling at partial oxygen saturation, increased oxygen affinity, increased total RBC cation content, and diminished potassium:chloride co-transport. All five patients treated with hydroxyurea experienced a decrease in severity and frequency of painful sickle crises. This study confirms that hydroxyurea therapy increases Hb F production and provides objective evidence of a significant reduction in hemolytic rate and intracellular polymerization. In contrast, rhEpo, either alone or in combination with hydroxyurea, offered no measurable benefit. Based on these encouraging preliminary data, large-scale, controlled clinical trials are warranted to study the safety and efficacy of hydroxyurea in the treatment of sickle cell disease. PMID:1379376

Goldberg, M A; Brugnara, C; Dover, G J; Schapira, L; Lacroix, L; Bunn, H F

1992-06-01

467

Phosphoinositides Direct Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Gag Trafficking and Release  

PubMed Central

Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), the predominant phosphoinositide on the plasma membrane, binds the matrix (MA) protein of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) with similar affinities in vitro. Interaction with PI(4,5)P2 is critical for HIV-1 assembly on the plasma membrane. EIAV has been shown to localize in internal compartments hence the significance of its interaction with PI(4,5)P2 is unclear. We therefore investigated the binding in vitro of other phosphoinositides to EIAV MA and whether intracellular association with compartments bearing these phosphoinositides was important for assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by Gag. In vitro, EIAV MA bound PI(3)P with higher affinity than PI(4,5)P2 as revealed by NMR spectra upon lipid titration. Gag was detected on the plasma membrane and in compartments enriched in PI(3,5)P2. Treatment of cells with YM201636, a kinase inhibitor that blocks production of PI(3,5)P2 from PI(3)P, caused Gag to co-localize with aberrant compartments and inhibited VLP release. In contrast to HIV-1, release of EIAV VLPs was not significantly diminished by co-expression with 5-phosphatase IV, an enzyme that specifically depletes PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane. However, co-expression with synaptojanin 2, a phosphatase with broader specificity, diminished VLP production. PI-binding pocket mutations caused striking budding defects, as revealed by electron microscopy. One of the mutations also modified Gag-Gag interaction, as suggested by altered bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We conclude that phosphoinositide-mediated targeting to peripheral and internal membranes is a critical factor in EIAV assembly and release. PMID:21176037

Fernandes, Fiona; Chen, Kang; Ehrlich, Lorna S.; Jin, Jing; Chen, Min H.; Medina, Gisselle N.; Symons, Marc; Montelaro, Ronald; Donaldson, Julie; Tjandra, Nico; Carter, Carol A.

2011-01-01

468

Hydroxyurea and sickle cell anemia: effect on quality of life  

PubMed Central

Background The Multicenter Study of Hydroxyurea (HU) in Sickle Cell Anemia (MSH) previously showed that daily oral HU reduces painful sickle cell (SS) crises by 50% in patients with moderate to severe disease. The morbidity associated with this disease is known to have serious negative impact on the overall quality of life(QOL) of affected individuals. Methods The data in this report were collected from the 299 patients enrolled in the MSH. Health quality of llife (HQOL) measures were assessed in the MSH as a secondary endpoint to determine if the clinical benefit of HU could translate into a measurable benefit perceptible to the patients. HQOL was assessed with the Profile of Mood States, the Health Status Short Form 36 (SF-36), including 4-week pain recall, and the Ladder of Life, self-administered twice 2-weeks apart pre-treatment and every 6 months during the two-year, randomized, double-blind, treatment phase. The effects of factors including randomized treatment, age, gender, pre-treatment crises frequency, Hb-F level mean, daily pain from 4-week pre-treatment diaries, and 2-year Hb-F response level (low or high) were investigated. Results Over two years of treatment, the benefit of HU treatment on QOL, other than pain scales, was limited to those patients taking HU who maintained a high HbF response, compared to those with low HbF response or on placebo. These restricted benefits occurred in social function, pain recall and general health perception. Stratification according to average daily pain prior to treatment showed that responders to HU whose average daily pain score was 5–9 (substantial pain) achieved significant reduction in the tension scale compared to the placebo group and to non-responders. HU had no apparent effect on other QOL measures. Conclusion Treatment of SS with HU improves some aspects of QOL in adult patients who already suffer from moderate-to-severe SS. PMID:16942629

Ballas, Samir K; Barton, Franca B; Waclawiw, Myron A; Swerdlow, Paul; Eckman, James R; Pegelow, Charles H; Koshy, Mabel; Barton, Bruce A; Bonds, Duane R

2006-01-01

469

Transgenic and gene knock-out mouse models of sickle cell anemia and the thalassemias.  

PubMed

Sickle cell anemia and the thalassemias are globally the most common class of inherited disorders. Current treatment options are limited (transfusion, iron chelation) and are not suited to large-scale use in developing countries where the population of affected individuals is expected to undergo a tremendous increase in the near future. As such, the development of more practical and more permanent therapies is urgently needed. Recently, transgenic and gene knock-out technologies have been used to create mouse models for sickle cell anemia and all of the clinically relevant thalassemias (hemoglobin Bart's hydrops fetalis, hemoglobin H disease, beta-thalassemia intermedia, beta-thalassemia major/Cooley's anemia). These newly developed murine models should play an important role in the development of improved approaches for treating these commonly occurring genetic diseases. PMID:9107524

Pászty, C

1997-03-01

470