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Sample records for las vegas convention

  1. Las Vegas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of Las Vegas, NV was acquired on August, 2000 and covers an area 42 km (25 miles) wide and 30 km (18 miles) long. The image displays three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region, with a spatial resolution of 15 m. McCarran International Airport to the south and Nellis Air Force Base to the NE are the two major airports visible. Golf courses appear as bright red areas of worms. The first settlement in Las Vegas (which is Spanish for The Meadows) was recorded back in the early 1850s when the Mormon church, headed by Brigham Young, sent a mission of 30 men to construct a fort and teach agriculture to the Indians. Las Vegas became a city in 1905 when the railroad announced this city was to be a major division point. Prior to legalized gambling in 1931, Las Vegas was developing as an agricultural area. Las Vegas' fame as a resort area became prominent after World War II. The image is located at 36.1 degrees north latitude and 115.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  2. EMPACT: THE LAS VEGAS INTERAGENCY PILOT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    ENPACT: The Las Vegas Interagency Pilot Project

    The Las Vegas Interagency Pilot Project of the EMPACT program has involved eleven efforts. These efforts are described in brief on the poster presentation. They include: Las Vegas Environmental Monitoring Inventory, the Qual...

  3. LANDSCAPE CHANGE OF THE LAS VEGAS VALLEY, 1972 TO 1998

    EPA Science Inventory

    Las Vegas has become one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States. The cities population has doubled from 1980 to 1994 and in 1995 Las Vegas has surpassed the one million mark. The population of Las Vegas is currently growing at a rate of 7 percent annually....

  4. Risk, Las Vegas, and "The Deer Hunter".

    PubMed

    Ratzan, R M

    1987-01-01

    Risk is inherent in every medical setting. Emergency medicine is an especially risky specialty for both patient and emergency physician, eg, the risk of death from trauma and the risk of adverse outcome from medical intervention that can't wait for more favorable circumstances. Risk assessment (the numerical quantification of certain risks) and risk acceptability (the qualification of risks as acceptable or not) are helpful concepts in understanding risk. Comparing the risks and attitudes toward these risks of gambling in Las Vegas and the movie "The Deer Hunter" with emergency medicine demonstrates the need for emergency physicians to become involved in measures designed to promote prophylactic risk avoidance. PMID:3584918

  5. Las Vegas Basin Seismic Response Project: Preliminary Results From Seismic Refraction Experiments, Las Vegas, NV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza, S. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Luke, B.; Buck, B. J.; Hanson, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    In May and September 2002, seismic refraction data were acquired in the Las Vegas basin. Located in the southern Basin and Range province, the cities of Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, and Henderson sit atop a fault-bounded basin with a depth of up to 5 km and basin dimensions of roughly 60 km wide (east-west) by 50 km in length (north-south). Previous isostatic gravity, seismic reflection, and aeromagnetic studies indicate that a series of sub-basins exist beneath the unconsolidated basin fill, with the deepest sub-basin occurring 5 km west of the fault block bounding the eastern edge of the basin (Frenchman Mountain). The basin is significantly deeper along its northern extremity, following the path of the fault block bounding the northern edge of the basin (Las Vegas Valley Shear Zone), and along the western edge of Frenchman Mountain. Recent, paleoseismic studies have indicated that faults in the Las Vegas region have the potential for an earthquake of M6.5 to 7.0. It is estimated that a M6.9 earthquake in the basin could produce about 11 billion dollars in damage and a significant number of deaths and/or injuries. In addition, an equivalent or larger event in the Death Valley fault zone, 150 km distance, would also be devastating to the metropolitan area of approximately 1.5 million residents. Therefore, it is essential to understand the seismic hazard posed to the Las Vegas region. This project is part of a larger collaborative effort to characterize the basin and its response to ground shaking. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas with assistance from the University of Texas at El Paso, students from UNLV and UTEP, volunteers from the community and several students from Centennial High school deployed 432 portable seismic recorders ("Texans") throughout the valley. Shot point locations were located at three quarries in the valley, one to the north, one to the east and one to the southwest. The profiles cross the Las Vegas Valley Shear zone as well as a prominent

  6. Radioxenon Atmospheric Measurements in North Las Vegas

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Lidey, Lance S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Karr, L.; Shafer, David S.; Tappen, J.

    2007-09-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) deployed the Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) in North Las Vegas for two weeks in February and March 2006 for the purpose of measuring the radioxenon background at a level of sensitivity much higher than previously done in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The measurements establish what might be expected if future measurements are taken at NTS itself and investigate improved methods of environmental monitoring of NTS for test site readiness. Also, such radioxenon measurements have not previously been performed in a United States location considered to be as remote from nuclear reactors. A second detector, the Portable Environmental Monitoring Station (PEMS), built and operated by the Desert Research Institute (DRI), was deployed in conjunction with the ARSA and contained a pressure ion chamber, aerosol collection filters, and meteorological sensors. Some of the radioxenon measurements detected 133Xe at levels up to 3 mBq/m3. This concentration of radioxenon is consistent with the observation of low levels of radioxenon emanating from distance nuclear reactors. Previous measurements in areas of high nuclear reactor concentration have shown similar results, but the western US, in general, does not have many nuclear reactors. Measurements of the wind direction indicate that the air carrying the radioxenon came from south of the detector and not from the NTS.

  7. What Happens in Vegas Does "Not" Stay in Vegas: Youth Leadership in the Immigrant Rights Movement in Las Vegas, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revilla, Anita Tijerina

    2012-01-01

    Students calling themselves the Las Vegas Activist Crew shut down the city's famed Strip on May 1, 2006, with an immigrant rights protest that was one of the largest demonstrations in Nevada's history. This research analyzes the ways that students engage in activism to improve their own social conditions and those of their communities. The…

  8. Wintertime aerosol in Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven G.

    Numerous studies have found adverse health effects in subjects who live next to major roadways due to air pollution; in particular, there can be severe impacts on lung function and development in children living and/or attending school next to major roadways due to their exposure to air pollutants, including particulate matter (PM) or aerosol. The composition of aerosol at an elementary school next to a major freeway in Las Vegas, Nevada during winter 2008 was measured using a suite of measurements. An Aerodyne High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) was used to quantify the composition of non-refractory PM1 aerosol, including organic matter (OM); an Aethalometer was used to quantify black carbon (BC); a Sunset OCEC analyzer was used to measure organic and elemental carbon (OC, EC); and a particle-into-liquid system (PILS) coupled to two ion chromatographs (IC) was used to measure fine particle ions. Hi-volume PM2.5 samplers were used to collect aerosol on quartz fiber filters at between 2 and 24 hour intervals during the study, a subset of which were analyzed for PAHs and the biomass burning tracer levoglucosan. Data were analyzed by positive matrix factorization (PMF) to determine the amount of fresh, hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), more oxidized OA (low-volatility and semi-volatile OA [LV-OOA, SV-OOA]) and biomass burning OA (BBOA). PM1 aerosol was predominantly carbonaceous, with OM plus BC accounting for 74% of the overall average 6.9 mug/m3 of PM measured. BC had a diurnal pattern similar to traffic volume, while OM was higher in the evening compared to the morning. OM was a mixture of fresh HOA, urban- and regional-scale OOA, and BBOA; in the evening, SV-OOA and BBOA peaked, while HOA concentrations were on average the same in the morning and evening, similar to BC. OM/OC ratios were low (1.52 +/-0.14 on average) during the morning rush hour (average OM = 2.4 mug/m3) when vehicular emissions dominate this near-road measurement site, and

  9. The Las Vegas Sustainability Atlas: Modeling Place-based Interactions and Implications in the Las Vegas Valley Bioregion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ego, H.; McCown, K.; Saghafi, N.; Gross, E.; Hunter, W.; Zawarus, P.; Gann, A.; Piechota, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Las Vegas, Nevada, with 2 million residents and 40 million annual visitors, is one of the driest metropolitan environments of its size in the world. The metro imports nearly all of its resources, including energy, water and food. Rapid population increases, drought, and temperature increases due to climate change create challenges for planning resilient systems in the Las Vegas Valley. Because of its growth rate, aridity, Las Vegas, Nevada is a significant and relevant region for the study of the water, energy, food and climate nexus. Cities in the United States and the world are seeing increasing trends in urbanization and water scarcity. How does the water-energy-climate-food nexus affect each metropolitan area? How can this complex information be used for resiliency planning? How can it be related to the public, so they can understand the issues in a way that makes them meaningful participants in the planning process? The topic of our presentation is a 'resiliency atlas.' The atlas is a place-based model tested in Las Vegas to explore bioregional distinctiveness of the water-energy-climate-food nexus, including regional transportation systems. The atlas integrates the systems within a utilitarian organization of information. Systems in this place-based model demonstrate how infrastructure services are efficiently provided for the Las Vegas Valley population. This resiliency atlas can clarify how the nexus applies to place; and how it can be used to spur geographically germane adaption strategies. In the Las Vegas Valley, climate change (drought and high sustained temperatures) and population affect water, energy, and food systems. This clarity of a place based model can help educate the public about the resilience of their place, and facilitate and organize the planning process in the face of uncertainty.

  10. Child and Family Resource Program (Las Vegas, Nevada). Program Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    An infant-toddler program of parent training in child growth and development, based primarily in the home, has become the major focus of the Child and Family Resource Program (EFRP) in Las Vegas, Nevada, one of 11 sites in this Head Start affiliated program. This report describes and evaluates: (1) the goals and operational objectives of the…

  11. 40 CFR 81.80 - Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.80 Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Las Vegas...

  12. 40 CFR 81.80 - Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.80 Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Nevada) has been revised to consist of the territorial area encompassed by... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Las Vegas Intrastate Air...

  13. 40 CFR 81.80 - Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.80 Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Nevada) has been revised to consist of the territorial area encompassed by... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Las Vegas Intrastate Air...

  14. Solar hot water system installed at Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A solar energy hot water system installed in a motor inn at Las Vegas, Nevada is described. The inn is a three story building with a flat roof for installation of the solar panels. The system consists of 1,200 square feet of liquid flat plate collectors, a 2,500 gallon insulated vertical steel storage tank, two heat exchangers, and pumps and controls. The system was designed to supply approximately 74 percent of the total hot water load.

  15. Geology of Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, R.V.; Karakouzian, M. ); Bax-Valentine, V. ); Peterson, L.; Palmer, S. ); Slemmons, D.B.

    1993-03-01

    Las Vegas is one of the fastest growing cities in the US. Its regional geologic setting is in the Basin and Range geomorphic province and in the Sevier orogenic belt. The city itself lies in a broad north-south valley formed by coalescing alluvial fans and lake beds which give rise to several soil and foundation problems. Although destructive earthquakes have not occurred in the Las Vegas area in modern times, the record is very short. Major earthquakes could have taken place in the past when the area was unoccupied except for a few nomadic tribes. Studies are underway to better define the seismicity. Although the climate is hot and dry, flash flooding occurs frequently from late summer thunderstorms and torrential rains. The Regional Flood Control District is actively constructing retention basins and drainage improvements for diversion and protection from such floods. Water supply is a problem for the increasing population. The groundwater supply has long been overdrawn, and the allotment to Nevada under the Colorado River Compact will be completely utilized in the near future. Las Vegas has faced the problems of solid waste disposal, water treatment, rational water use, flooding and earthquakes - all of which are related to the unique geologic and geomorphic setting.

  16. GIS methodology for quantifying channel change in Las Vegas, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckingham, S.E.; Whitney, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    This study applies spatial analyses to examine the consequences of accelerated urban expansion on a hydrologic system over a period of 24 years. Three sets of historical aerial photos are used in a GIS analysis to document the geomorphic history of Las Vegas Wash, which drains the rapidly growing Las Vegas urban area in southern Nevada. New spatial techniques are introduced to make quantitative measurements of the erosion at three specific time intervals in the hydrologic evolution of the channel and floodplain. Unlike other erosion studies that use two different elevation surfaces to assess erosion, this study used a single elevation surface to remove systematic and nonsystemic elevation errors. The spatial analysis quantifies channel changes for discrete time periods, calculates erosion volumes, and provides a foundation to examine how the specific mechanisms related to urban expansion have affected Las Vegas Wash. The erosion calculated over 24 years is the largest documented sediment loss attributed to the effect of rapid urban growth. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  17. City of Las Vegas Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-31

    The City of Las Vegas was awarded Department of Energy (DOE) project funding in 2009, for the City of Las Vegas Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Demonstration Program. This project allowed the City of Las Vegas to purchase electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and associated electric vehicle charging infrastructure. The City anticipated the electric vehicles having lower overall operating costs and emissions similar to traditional and hybrid vehicles.

  18. Geological Mapping Using Legacy Geophysical Data in Las Vegas Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D.; O'Donnell, J.; McLin, K.

    2014-12-01

    In 2008-2011, Clark County, Building Department contracted with Optim to collect 10,700 Reflection Microtremor (ReMi) 600 ft seismic lines that cover most of the metropolitan area of Las Vegas and other outlying communities such as Moapa, Laughlin, Primm, and Coyote Spring. The County completed their goal of characterizing seismic susceptibility of the top 100 ft and the results are posted at http://gisgate.co.clark.nv.us/openweb/. The research question of the authors is: What additional geologic information can be inferred from the data, either through reprocessing, cross correlation of drill hole data or additional data collection? An advantage of geophysical data is that it can be reprocessed to provide additional insight into the local geologic setting. The interpretation is also improved if combined with drill hole data and / or hydrologic information. It should be noted that there is also legacy geophysical data in limited areas collected by the USGS, primarily in conjunction with water well drilling, where some of the ReMi seismic data was collected. An unexpected result of the ReMi survey was a clear delineation of current and paleo channels in Laughlin, Moapa, and Las Vegas. The geometry of the paleochanel, of the Colorado River, is well away from the current position. however the signal is very similar to modern streams such as the Muddy River. Although the surficial geologic mapping in Las Vegas Valley was very detailed, and importantly, was performed prior to development; the new geophysical data provides better details of the lithologic properties of the units. That is it may be an excellent basis for remapping for specific properties related to engineering and hydrologic modeling.

  19. EFFECT OF SECONDARY EFFLUENTS ON EUTROPHICATION IN LAS VEGAS BAY, LAKE MEAD, NEVADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The eutrophication potential of Lake Mead, with primary emphasis on Las Vegas Bay, was determined with Selenastrum capricornutum. Nutrient limitation profiles were determined for three sampling stations in Las Vegas Bay and one in Boulder Basin. After heavy metals were chelated w...

  20. REMOTE SENSING OF PERCHLORATE EFFECTS ON SALT CEDAR PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE LAS VEGAS WASH

    EPA Science Inventory



    Sodium Perchlorate and ammonium Perchlorate, major components of solid rocket fuel, have been manufactured in the Las Vegas Valley immediately up gradient from the Las Vegas Wash, since 1945 and 1956, respectively. Measurements of emerging ground water quality in the vici...

  1. Problem-Solving in Las Vegas: Students Are Building Skills and a Global Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Gregory; Curry, Don

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project initiated at Silverado High School in Las Vegas, where students from Las Vegas and schools across the United States monitor the levels of radon in the atmosphere. Enables students to learn first hand about the collection, analysis, and interpretation of scientific data and to network with other students from the United States…

  2. A Total Water Management Analysis of the Las Vegas Wash Watershed, Nevada

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change, land use change, and population growth are fundamental factors affecting future hydrologic conditions in streams, especially in arid regions with scarce water resources. Located in the arid southwest, Las Vegas Valley located within the Las Vegas Wash watershed is...

  3. 78 FR 32644 - Las Vegas Wash Hydro LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Las Vegas Wash Hydro LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted..., 2012, Las Vegas Wash Hydro LLC, filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study the feasibility of the Las Vegas...

  4. Las Vegas Basin Seismic Response Project: Measured Shallow Soil Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, B. A.; Louie, J.; Beeston, H. E.; Skidmore, V.; Concha, A.

    2002-12-01

    The Las Vegas valley in Nevada is a deep (up to 5 km) alluvial basin filled with interlayered gravels, sands, and clays. The climate is arid. The water table ranges from a few meters to many tens of meters deep. Laterally extensive thin carbonate-cemented lenses are commonly found across parts of the valley. Lenses range beyond 2 m in thickness, and occur at depths exceeding 200 m. Shallow seismic datasets have been collected at approximately ten sites around the Las Vegas valley, to characterize shear and compression wave velocities in the near surface. Purposes for the surveys include modeling of ground response to dynamic loads, both natural and manmade, quantification of soil stiffness to aid structural foundation design, and non-intrusive materials identification. Borehole-based measurement techniques used include downhole and crosshole, to depths exceeding 100 m. Surface-based techniques used include refraction and three different methods involving inversion of surface-wave dispersion datasets. This latter group includes two active-source techniques, the Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method and the Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method; and a new passive-source technique, the Refraction Mictrotremor (ReMi) method. Depths to halfspace for the active-source measurements ranged beyond 50 m. The passive-source method constrains shear wave velocities to 100 m depths. As expected, the stiff cemented layers profoundly affect local velocity gradients. Scale effects are evident in comparisons of (1) very local measurements typified by borehole methods, to (2) the broader coverage of the SASW and MASW measurements, to (3) the still broader and deeper resolution made possible by the ReMi measurements. The cemented layers appear as sharp spikes in the downhole datasets and are problematic in crosshole measurements due to refraction. The refraction method is useful only to locate the depth to the uppermost cemented layer. The surface

  5. Atmospheric Radioxenon Measurements in North Las Vegas, NV

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Lidey, Lance S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Karr, L.; Shafer, D.; Tappen, J.

    2006-07-31

    PNNL deployed the ARSA radioxenon measurement system in North Las Vegas for two weeks in February and March 2006 for the purpose of measuring the radioxenon background at a level of sensitivity much higher than previously done in the vicinity of the NTS. The measurements establish what might be expected if future measurements are taken at NTS itself. The measurements are also relevant to test site readiness. A second detector, the PEMS, built and operated by DRI, was deployed in conjunction with the ARSA and contained a PIC, aerosol collection filters, and meteorological sensors. Originally, measurements were also to be performed at Mercury, NV on the NTS, but these were canceled due to initial equipment problems with the ARSA detector. Some of the radioxenon measurements detected 133Xe at levels up to 3 mBq/m3. This concentration of radioxenon is consistent with the observation of low levels of radioxenon emanating from distance nuclear reactors. Previous measurements in areas of high nuclear reactor concentration have shown similar results, but the western US, in general, does not have many nuclear reactors. Measurements of the wind direction indicate that the air carrying the radioxenon came from south of the detector and not from the NTS.

  6. Monitoring Changes in Channel Morphology in Las Vegas Wash with Global Fiducials Program Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    To borrow from a popular adage, "What happens in Las Vegas [Wash], stays in Las Vegas [Wash]"—but only with a lot of help. This past decade has seen a concerted effort to curb erosion and sediment transport along the 12 mile long channel between East Las Vegas and Lake Mead. Las Vegas Wash is prototypical of an urban river in an arid environment that is being impacted by increasing urban development and impervious surface runoff within its drainage area. Rapid urbanization since the 1970s has increased the flow of water into Las Vegas Wash, causing severe channel destabilization. Within two decades millions of cubic yards of rocks and sediment were scoured out of the wash and transported downstream to Lake Mead. The wetlands that once covered over 2,000 acres within Las Vegas Wash dwindled to 200 acres in the 1990s as the channel became as much as 40 feet deeper and 300 feet wider at some points. In 1999 the Las Vegas Wash Coordination Committee (LVWCC) initiated a 20-year plan to construct erosion control structures (weirs) for channel stabilization and rock riprap for stream bank protection. The hope is to design structures that will slow down the water flow, trap sediments, and to eventually restore much of the wetland environment. Using high-resolution satellite imagery from the Global Fiducials Program Library housed at the U. S. Geological Survey, this transition is being tracked from 1999 to the present. From November 1999 to July 2008 new residential and commercial development has claimed an additional 12 square kilometers (3000 acres) of land in Henderson, NV, along the south side of Las Vegas Wash. Even with the increased volume of surface and groundwater runoff entering the wash, current sediment yields are much lower than the 1999 totals. The imagery documents the construction of 14 of the 22 LVWCC planned weirs by the year 2011. It also shows many miles of stream bank stabilization by riprap, planting of riparian vegetation and placing of

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL GROUND WATER QUALITY SYMPOSIUM (3RD) HELD IN LAS VEGAS, NEVADA ON SEPTEMBER 15-17, 1976

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Third National Ground Water Quality Symposium was held in Las Vegas, September 15-17, 1976, in conjunction with the annual convention of the National Water Well Association. There were eight main sessions encompassing twenty-four technical papers. These were concerned with th...

  8. Identification of methyl triclosan and halogenated analogues in male common carp (Cyprinus carpio) from Las Vegas Bay and semipermeable membrane devices from Las Vegas Wash, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leiker, T.J.; Abney, S.R.; Goodbred, S.L.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Methyl triclosan and four halogenated analogues have been identified in extracts of individual whole-body male carp (Cyprinus carpio) tissue that were collected from Las Vegas Bay, Nevada, and Semipermeable Membrane Devices (SPMD) that were deployed in Las Vegas Wash, Nevada. Methyl triclosan is believed to be the microbially methylated product of the antibacterial agent triclosan (2, 4, 4'-trichloro-4-hydroxydiphenyl ether, Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number 3380-34-5, Irgasan DP300). The presence of methyl triclosan and four halogenated analogues was confirmed in SPMD extracts by comparing low- and high-resolution mass spectral data and Kovats retention indices of methyl triclosan with commercially obtained triclosan that was derivatized to the methyl ether with ethereal diazomethane. The four halogenated analogues of methyl triclosan detected in both whole-body tissue and SPMD extracts were tentatively identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. Methyl triclosan was detected in all 29 male common carp from Las Vegas Bay with a mean concentration of 596????g kg- 1 wet weight (ww) which is more than an order of magnitude higher than previously reported concentrations in the literature. The halogenated analogs were detected less frequently (21%-76%) and at much lower concentrations (< 51????g kg- 1 ww). None of these compounds were detected in common carp from a Lake Mead reference site in Overton Arm, Nevada.

  9. 76 FR 37034 - Proposed Modification of the Las Vegas, NV, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... of June 17, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011-15107, on page 35371, column 3, correct meeting number (2) in the... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Modification of the Las Vegas, NV, Class B... of June 17, 2011, concerning a proposal to modify Class B airspace at Las Vegas, NV. The...

  10. 76 FR 3678 - Board Meeting: February 16, 2011-Las Vegas, NV, the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... REVIEW BOARD Board Meeting: February 16, 2011--Las Vegas, NV, the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review... Amendments Act of 1987, the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board will meet in Las Vegas, Nevada, on... review current DOE activities related to implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The...

  11. 78 FR 2646 - Proposed Modification of Class B Airspace; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... that was published on October 26, 2012. In that document, the FAA proposed to modify the Las Vegas, NV... FR 65332) closed on December 26, 2012, is reopened until February 13, 2013. ADDRESSES: Send comments... particularly helpful in developing reasoned regulatory decisions on the proposal. Comments are...

  12. 77 FR 65332 - Proposed Modification of Class B Airspace; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... establishing the Las Vegas, NV, Terminal Control Area (TCA) with an effective date of November 11, 1974 (39 FR... to ensure that turbine-powered aircraft operations were fully contained within the TCA (47 FR 30052). In 1993, as part of the Airspace Reclassification Final Rule (56 FR 65638), the term...

  13. Changes in the morphometry of Las Vegas Wash and the impact on water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roline, Richard A.; Sartoris, James J.

    1988-01-01

    Las Vegas Wash, a natural wash east of Las Vegas, Nevada, carries stormwater, groundwater drainage, and sewage effluent from two sewage treatment plants to Lake Mean. Over 80 percent of the normal discharge of approximately 3.4 m3/s (120 ft3/s) consists of effluent from the City of Las Vegas and Clark County sewage treatment plants. Beginning in the 1950s, a large wetland area developed along the wash that supported waterfowl populations and contributed to some water quality transformations. Heavy rains and subsequent flooding in the area in 1983 and 1984 resulted in erosion and channelization that greatly reduced the wetland area within Las Vegas Wash. The reduction in wetland area shortened water travel time in the wash and affected water quality. The primary impacts on the water entering Lake Mead have been an increase in temperature, a decrease in dissolved oxygen concentration, and an increase in ammonia levels. Other physical-chemical parameters and changes in nutrient transformations are also discussed.

  14. Temperature trends and Urban Heat Island intensity mapping of the Las Vegas valley area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Adam Leland

    Modified urban climate regions that are warmer than rural areas at night are referred to as Urban Heat Islands or UHI. Islands of warmer air over a city can be 12 degrees Celsius greater than the surrounding cooler air. The exponential growth in Las Vegas for the last two decades provides an opportunity to detect gradual temperature changes influenced by an increasing presence of urban materials. This thesis compares ground based thermometric observations and satellite based remote sensing temperature observations to identify temperature trends and UHI areas caused by urban development. Analysis of temperature trends between 2000 and 2010 at ground weather stations has revealed a general cooling trend in the Las Vegas region. Results show that urban development accompanied by increased vegetation has a cooling effect in arid climates. Analysis of long term temperature trends at McCarran and Nellis weather stations show 2.4 K and 1.2 K rise in temperature over the last 60 years. The ground weather station temperature data is related to the land surface temperature images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper to estimate and evaluate urban heat island intensity for Las Vegas. Results show that spatial and temporal trends of temperature are related to the gradual change in urban landcover. UHI are mainly observed at the airport and in the industrial areas. This research provides useful insight into the temporal behavior of the Las Vegas area.

  15. PERCHLORATE UPTAKE BY SALT CEDAR (TAMARIX RAMOSISSIMA) IN THE LAS VEGAS WASH RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate ion (CIO4-) has been identified in samples of dormant salt cedar (Tamarix ramosissima) growing in the Las vegas Wash. Perchlorate is an oxidenat, but its reduction is kineticaly hindered. CXoncern over thyrpoid effects caused the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...

  16. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - NextGen Home, Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on the NextGen demo home built in Las Vegas. The home has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index score of 44 with R-40 spray foam attic insulation, R-40 insulated concrete walls, and a 4kW DC solar laminate

  17. Episodic Impacts from California Wildfires Identified in Las Vegas Near-Road Air Quality Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutant concentrations near major highways are usually attributed to a combination of nearby traffic emissions and regional background, and generally presumed to be additive in nature. During a recent year-long near-road monitoring study conducted in Las Vegas, NV, a substa...

  18. Perceptions toward the Value of Higher Education for Hotel Professionals in Las Vegas: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deel, Gary Lee

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns a qualitative investigation of the views toward higher education and its importance to hospitality career success among hotel professionals in the Las Vegas, Nevada area. Existing literature supported the premise that education may be important to professional career success in several different ways, and that values concerning…

  19. Crustal structure in the vicinity of Las Vegas, Nevada, from seismic and gravity observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roller, John C.

    1963-01-01

    A seismic-refraction profile indicates that the crust of the Earth increases in thickness by as much as 5 km over a horizontal distance of less than 25 km northeast of Las Vegas, Nevada. This feature correlates with a decrease in the Bouguer anomaly and an increase in the average surface altitude.

  20. 75 FR 38778 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 89 Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... the Federal Register (74 FR 59131-59132, 11/17/09) and the application has been processed pursuant to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 89 Las Vegas, NV Pursuant to its authority...

  1. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION HELD AT LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, MARCH 1979; VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The publication, in two volumes, contains the text of all papers presented at EPA's fifth flue gas desulfurization (FGD) symposium, March 5-8, 1979, at Las Vegas, Nevada. A partial listing of papers in Volume 2 includes the following: Basin Electric's involvement with dry flue ga...

  2. LAS VEGAS VALLEY WATER BUDGET: RELATIONSHIP OF DISTRIBUTION, CONSUMPTIVE USE, AND RECHARGE TO SHALLOW GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of quantity and geographic distribution of recharge to the shallow ground-water zone from water use return flows in Las Vegas Valley were made for the years 1973, 1965, 1958, 1950, and 1943 as part of a broader study on the impact of water and land use on ground-water q...

  3. LAND AND WATER USE EFFECTS ON GROUND-WATER QUALITY IN LAS VEGAS VALLEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrogeologic study of the shallow ground-water zone in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada determined the sources and extent of ground-water contamination to develop management alternatives and minimize adverse effects. An extensive, computerized data base utilizing water analyses, wel...

  4. 76 FR 35371 - Proposed Modification of the Las Vegas, NV, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ...: (1) The meeting on Thursday, August 18, 2011, will be held at Centennial High School, 10200... Coronado High School, 10 1 Coronado Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89052; (3) The meeting on Thursday, August 25, 2011, will be held at Shadow Ridge High School, 5050 Brent Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89131....

  5. METHODOLOGY FOR DESIGNING AIR QUALITY MONITORING NETWORKS: 2. APPLICATION TO LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, FOR CARBON MONOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective methodology presented in a companion paper (Liu et al., 1986) for determining the optimum number and disposition of ambient air quality stations in a monitoring network for carbon monoxide is applied to the Las Vegas, Nevada, area. The methodology utilizes an air qua...

  6. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Masco Environments for Living, Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Masco’s Environments for Living Certified Green demo home at the 2009 International Builders Show in Las Vegas. The home has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index score of 44, a right-sized air conditi

  7. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  8. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  9. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  10. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of... Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  11. Best Practices Case Study: Pulte Homes and Communities of Del Webb, Las Vegas Division

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    Case study of Pulte Homes Las Vegas Division, who certified nearly 1,200 homes to the DOE Builders Challenge between 2008 and 2012. All of the homes by Las Vegas’ biggest builder achieved HERS scores of lower than 70, and many floor plans got down to the mid 50s, with ducts located in sealed attics insulated along the roof line, advanced framing, and extra attention to air sealing.

  12. Geologic Interpretation of the Las Vegas Valley Based on Industry Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, A.; Snelson, C. M.

    2003-12-01

    Las Vegas Valley, NV is located in the southern Basin and Range Province where the basin was formed by the Las Vegas Valley Shear Zone as well as by several thrust and normal faulting events that occurred by Cenozoic time. The geology and tectonic setting in the Las Vegas region is poorly understood given the fact that many structures have been covered by the constant growth of the City. National studies of ground motion and amplification of seismic energy placed Nevada third in the list of states having the potential for loss of life and property due to earthquakes. The Las Vegas area has a high potential for strong ground shaking due its thick basin fill and associated amplification. Due to the amplification effects within the Valley, moderate nearby quakes or large distant quakes will produce a large amount of damage in the Valley. Las Vegas, though not known for its earthquakes, has numerous micro quakes and an active seismic history. In a study using HAZUS to predict damage associated with a M6.9 earthquake, the loss would be billions of dollars with thousands of lives lost. Long-term economic loss would be in the several billions of dollars. Recently, several normal faults, which have the potential to produce a M6.5 to 7.0 earthquake, were reclassified as active tectonic fault with Quaternary movement. As a result, there has been increased effort to understand the Las Vegas Valley and to assess its potential for seismic hazards. One such effort included acquiring industry reflection profiles that cross the Valley. In the 1980's, north/south and east/west trending reflection lines with intersecting tie points were placed between Frenchman Mountain to the East and Spring Mountains to produce seismic profiles using Vibroseis. The profiles, which are over 200 kilometers in length and extend down to 5 s in time or approximately 15 km depth, will provide a tie between the surface work that is currently being conducted and the crustal velocity models that are being

  13. Solar hot water system installed at Las Vegas, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The solar hot water system installed at LaQuinta Motor Inn Inc., at Las Vegas, Nevada is described. The Inn is a three-story building with a flat roof for installation of the solar panels. The system consists of 1200 square feet of liquid flat plate collectors, a 2500 gallon insulated vertical steel storage tank, two heat exchangers and pumps and controls. The system was designed to supply approximately 74 percent of the total hot water load.

  14. Long-term assessment of ultrafine particles on major roadways in Las Vegas, Nevada and Detroit, Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation at the National Air Monitoring conference, given at the request of OAQPS partners. The presentation will cover ultrafine particle data collected at three locations - Las Vegas, Detroit, and Research Triangle Park.

  15. Surficial geology and distribution of post-impoundment sediment in Las Vegas Bay, Lake Mead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, David C.; Cross, VeeAnn A.; Rudin, Mark J.; Parolski, Kenneth F.; Rendigs, Richard R.

    2001-01-01

    Sidescan sonar imagery and seismic-reflection profiles were collected in the northwestern part of Las Vegas Bay to map the distribution and volume of sediment that has accumulated in this part of Lake Mead since impoundment. The mapping suggests that three ephemeral streams are the primary source of this sediment, and of these, Las Vegas Wash is the largest. Two deltas off the mouth of Las Vegas Wash formed at different lake elevations and account for 41% of the total volume of post-impoundment sediment within the study area. Deltas off the other two washes (Gypsum and Government) account for only 6% of the total volume. The sediment beyond the front of the deltas is primarily mud, and it only occurs in valley floors, where it forms a flat-lying blanket that is mostly less than 1.5 m thick. Although a thin layer, the fine-grained sediment accounts for approximately 53% of the total post-impoundment sediment volume of 5.7 x 106 m3 that has accumulated in the study area. This sediment appears to have been transported several kilometers from the river sources by density flows.

  16. Quantifying multi-temporal urban development characteristics in Las Vegas from Landsat and ASTER data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.; McMahon, C.

    2008-01-01

    Urban development has expanded rapidly in Las Vegas, Nevada of the United States, over the last fifty years. A major environmental change associated with this urbanization trend is the transformation of the landscape from natural cover types to increasingly anthropogenic impervious surface. This research utilizes remote sensing data from both the Landsat and Terra-Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instruments in conjunction with digital orthophotography to estimate urban extent and its temporal changes by determining sub-pixel impervious surfaces. Percent impervious surface area has shown encouraging agreement with urban land extent and development density. Results indicate that total urban land-use increases approximately 110 percent from 1984 to 2002. Most of the increases are associated with medium-to high-density urban development. Places having significant increases in impervious surfaces are in the northwestern and southeastern parts of Las Vegas. Most high-density urban development, however, appears in central Las Vegas. Impervious surface conditions for 2002 measured from Landsat and ASTER satellite data are compared in terms of their accuracy. ?? 2008 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  17. Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site Readiness Ground Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A

    2008-01-16

    In this report we describe the data sets used to evaluate ground motion hazards in Las Vegas from nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. This analysis is presented in Rodgers et al. (2005, 2006) and includes 13 nuclear explosions recorded at the John Blume and Associates network, the Little Skull Mountain earthquake and a temporary deployment of broadband station in Las Vegas. The data are available in SAC format on CD-ROM as an appendix to this report.

  18. A brief hydrologic appraisal of the July 3-4, 1975, flash flood in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katzer, T.L.; Glancy, Patrick A.; Harmsen, Lynn

    1976-01-01

    Heavy thunderstorm precipitation on the afternoon of July 3, 1975, between metropolitan Las Vegas and the mountains to the south, west, and north, caused flash flooding in the city area. Total storm precipitation equaled or exceeded 3 inches (76 mm) in some areas. The total storm yield on the area of significant runoff was probably between 20,000 and 25,000 acre-feet (2.5 x 107 m3 and 3.1 x 107 m3) of water. Of this amount, probably less than 3,000 acre-feet (37 x 106 m3) flowed directly to Lake Mead. Peak flows of Tropicana Wash, Flamingo Wash, Las Vegas Creek, and Las Vegas Wash were the highest ever determined. Flooding caused the loss of two lives and inflicted extensive property damage. Total damage was reportedly estimated by the Clark County Flood Control District at $4-5 million. Problems associated with sediment erosion, transportation, and deposition occurred throughout the flooded area. An unknown amount of the material transported during the flood was deposited in Lake Mead near the mouth of Las Vegas Wash. Lateral erosion appeared more prominent than vertical erosion along most major channels, except on Las Vegas Wash at Northshore Road where downcutting threatened the loss of the highway. Sediment deposits were particularly noticeable and troublesome in Flamingo Wash at Caesars Palace parking lot and on the Winterwood Golf Course near the junction of Flamingo Wash and Las Vegas Wash.

  19. Earthquakes in the Classroom, Las Vegas, NV: The Nevada Educational Seismic Network (NESN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J.; Snelson, C. M.; Zaragoza, S. A.; Smith, K.; Depolo, D.

    2002-12-01

    Geophysics is a term guaranteed to strike fear into the heart of the bravest high school science student. Using math to describe the earth can involve complex equations that can only be deciphered by enigmatic computer programs. But high school science students in the Las Vegas Valley have been given a unique opportunity to gather important research information while learning about geophysics, real-time data collection, and Internet communications in a less threatening environment. Three seismograph stations funded by the Department of Energy and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas have been installed in three different high schools in the Clark County School District. These three stations form a triangle in the Las Vegas Valley basin covering areas where the basin depths change significantly. The geophones are buried outside and a cable connects the sensors and GPS receiver to a digitizer on a local PC. The data is transmitted continuously in real-time via Internet communications protocols to the Seismic Explorer Monitoring Network. There it is available to all schools and to researchers who will analyze the data. These short-period geophones will record small local earthquakes and larger more distant events contributing to real-time seismic network operations in southern Nevada. Students at a school site are able to see live real-time data from other school stations as well as from seismograph stations in southern Nevada, the western US, and the world. Mentored by researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno and University of Nevada, Las Vegas, the teachers and students conduct simple waveform analysis to determine earthquake locations and magnitudes and operate the stations in this cooperative research effort. The goal of this partnership between secondary and university educational systems is to create a successful alliance that will benefit the research community as well as the classroom teacher and his/her students. Researchers will use the data collected

  20. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of the City of North Las Vegas

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Wasiolek

    2008-06-01

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of the city of North Las Vegas for the purpose of mapping natural radiation background and locating any man-made radioactive sources. Survey areas were selected in collaboration with the City Manager's office and included four separate areas: (1) Las Vegas Motor Speedway (10.6 square miles); (2) North Las Vegas Downtown Area (9.2 square miles); (3) I-15 Industrial Corridor (7.4 square miles); and (4) Future site of University of Nevada Las Vegas campus (17.4 square miles). The survey was conducted in three phases: Phase 1 on December 11-12, 2007 (Areas 1 and 2), Phase 2 on February 28, 2008 (Area 3), and Phase 3 on March 19, 2008 (Area 4). The total completed survey covered a total of 44.6 square miles. The flight lines (without the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4. A total of eight 2.5-hour-long flights were performed at an altitude of 150 ft above ground level (AGL) with 300 feet of flight-line spacing. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to ensure quality control of the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected continually (every second) over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Collection of spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific radioactive isotopes. As a courtesy service, with

  1. The Las Vegas Valley Seismic Response Project: Ground Motions in Las Vegas Valley from Nuclear Explosions at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Tkalcic, H; McCallen, D

    2005-03-18

    Between 2001-2004 the Las Vegas Seismic Response Project has sought to understand the response of Las Vegas Valley (LVV) to seismic excitation. In this study, the author report the findings of this project with an emphasis on ground motions in LVV from nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These ground motions are used to understand building structural response and damage as well as human perception. Historical nuclear explosion observations are augmented with earthquake recordings from a temporary deployment of seismometers to improve spatial coverage of LVV. The nuclear explosions were conducted between 1968 and 1989 and were recorded at various sites within Las Vegas. The data from past nuclear tests were used to constrain ground motions in LVV and to gain a predictive capability of ground motions for possible future nuclear tests at NTS. Analysis of ground motion data includes peak ground motions (accelerations and velocities) and amplification of basin sites relative to hard rock sites (site response). Site response was measured with the Standard Spectral Ratios (SSR) technique relative to hard rock reference sites on the periphery of LVV. The site response curves indicate a strong basin amplification of up to a factor of ten at frequencies between 0.5-2 Hz. Amplifications are strongest in the central and northern portions of LVV, where the basin is deeper than 1 km based on the reported basin depths of Langenheim et al (2001a). They found a strong correlation between amplification and basin depth and shallow shear wave velocities. Amplification below 1 Hz is strongly controlled by slowness-averaged shear velocities to depths of 30 and 100 meters. Depth averaged shear velocities to 10 meters has modest control of amplifications between 1-3 Hz. Modeling reveals that low velocity material in the shallow layers (< 200 m) effectively controls amplification. They developed a method to scale nuclear explosion ground motion time series to sites around LVV

  2. Seismic Wave Amplification in Las Vegas: Site Response and Empirical Estimates of Ground Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, A.; McCallen, D.; Tkalcic, H.; Wagoner, J.; Louie, J.; Anderson, J.; Luke, B.; Snelson, C.; Taylor, W.

    2004-12-01

    This presentation will summarize a multidisciplinary effort to understand seismic wave amplification in Las Vegas Valley. The project involves weak motion recording and analysis, geotechnical and seismic refraction field studies, geologic and lithologic interpretation and model building. We will provide a brief overview of the project, then focus on specifics of seismic wave amplification including observations and interpretations. We analyzed recordings of nuclear explosions from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and regional earthquakes to estimate site response in Las Vegas. An empirical transfer function method was used to transform ground motion time-series at one (reference) station to other stations, using frequency dependent site response curves in the band 0.2-5.0 Hz. The method transforms the time-series to the frequency domain by Fast Fourier transform, multiplies the amplitude spectrum by the site response curve and inverse FFT's back to the time domain. The approach is validated by the ability to predict horizontal component S-wave ground motion measures, such as peak and rms ground velocities and accelerations. We then can provide empirical estimates of ground motion for a wider distribution of sites in Las Vegas. Frequency dependent amplifications (site response) and peak ground motions are strongly correlated with measures of shallow shear-wave (geotechnical) velocities. Details of the geotechnical measurements and models will be presented in a companion presentation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  3. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the City of North Las Vegas (Downtown) and the Motor Speedway

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Wasiolek

    2007-12-01

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey on December 11-12, 2007, with the purpose of mapping natural radiation background and locating any man-made radioactive sources. The survey covered 19.4 square miles (9.2 square miles over the downtown area of the City of North Las Vegas and 10.2 square miles over the Las Vegas Motor Speedway [LVMS]). The flight lines over the surveyed areas are presented in Figures 1 and 2. A total of four 2.5-hour-long flights were performed at an altitude of 150 ft above ground level (AGL) with 300 ft of flight line spacing. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to ensure quality control of the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system-REDAR V using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data in the form of gamma energy spectra were collected continually (every second) over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Collection of spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes sources. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific radioactive isotopes. As a courtesy service with the approval of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, RSL-Nellis is providing this summary to the office of the Mayor of City of North Las Vegas and LVMS security along with the gross counts-based exposure rate and man-made counts maps.

  4. Interferograms showing land subsidence and uplift in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, 1992-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavelko, Michael T.; Hoffmann, Jorn; Damar, Nancy A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources-Division of Water Resources and the Las Vegas Valley Water District, compiled 44 individual interferograms and 1 stacked interferogram comprising 29 satellite synthetic aperture radar acquisitions of Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, from 1992 to 1999. The interferograms, which depict short-term, seasonal, and long-term trends in land subsidence and uplift, are viewable with an interactive map. The interferograms show that land subsidence and uplift generally occur in localized areas, are responsive to ground-water pumpage and artificial recharge, and, in part, are fault controlled. Information from these interferograms can be used by water and land managers to mitigate land subsidence and associated damage. Land subsidence attributed to ground-water pumpage has been documented in Las Vegas Valley since the 1940s. Damage to roads, buildings, and other engineered structures has been associated with this land subsidence. Land uplift attributed to artificial recharge and reduced pumping has been documented since the 1990s. Measuring these land-surface changes with traditional benchmark and Global Positioning System surveys can be costly and time consuming, and results typically are spatially and temporally sparse. Interferograms are relatively inexpensive and provide temporal and spatial resolutions previously not achievable. The interferograms are viewable with an interactive map. Landsat images from 1993 and 2000 are viewable for frames of reference to locate areas of interest and help determine land use. A stacked interferogram for 1992-99 is viewable to visualize the cumulative vertical displacement for the period represented by the individual interferograms. The interactive map enables users to identify and estimate the magnitude of vertical displacement, visually analyze deformation trends, and view interferograms and Landsat images side by side. The

  5. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Las Vegas Strip and Adjacent Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Wasiolek, Piotr

    2009-02-01

    As proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of the Las Vegas Strip and adjacent areas on December 29, 2008. This survey was one of the bi-annual surveys carried in support of the city of Las Vegas Police Department (LVPD) before significant events on the Las Vegas Strip: e.g., the annual New Year’s Eve and July Fourth celebrations. The AMS operation and appropriate law enforcement agencies selected this area as an appropriate urban location to exercise AMS capability for mapping environmental radiation and searching for man-made radioactive sources. The surveys covered approximately 11 square miles. Each survey required a 2.5-hour-long flight, performed at an altitude of 300 ft above ground level (AGL) at a line spacing of 600 ft. Water line and test line flights are conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to determine the non-terrestrial background contributed by aircraft, radon, and cosmic activity, and to determine the altitude-dependent air mass correction. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2" x 4" x 16" sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Gamma energy spectral data were collected second-by-second over the survey area. This spectral data allows the system to distinguish between natural terrestrial background contributions and man-made radioisotope contributions. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific man-made radioactive isotopes. Data geo-locations were determined with a Real-Time Differential Global Positioning System (RDGPS).

  6. Perchlorate in water, soil, vegetation, and rodents collected from the Las Vegas Wash, Nevada, USA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip N; Yu, Lu; McMurry, Scott T; Anderson, Todd A

    2004-11-01

    Water, soil, vegetation, and rodents were collected from three areas along the Las Vegas Wash, a watershed heavily contaminated with perchlorate. Perchlorate was detected at elevated concentrations in water, soil, and vegetation, but was not frequently detected in rodent liver or kidney tissues. Broadleaf weeds contained the highest concentrations of perchlorate among all plant types examined. Perchlorate in rodent tissues and vegetation was correlated with perchlorate concentrations in soil as expected, however rodent residues were not highly correlated with plant perchlorate concentrations. This indicates that soil may be a greater source, or a more constant source of perchlorate exposure in rodents than vegetation. PMID:15276280

  7. The study of ozone variations in the Las Vegas metropolitan area using remote sensing information and ground observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.

    2006-01-01

    Urban development in the Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, has grown rapidly in the past fifty years. Associated with this growth has been a change in landscape from natural cover types to developed urban land mixed with planned vegetation canopy throughout in the metropolitan area. Air quality in the Las Vegas Valley has been affected by increases in anthropogenic emissions and concentrations of carbon monoxide, ozone, and criteria pollutants of particular matter. Ozone concentration in the region is generally influenced by synoptic and mesoscale meteorological conditions, as well as regional transport of pollutants from the western side of Las Vegas. Local influences from ground-level nitrogen oxide emissions and vegetation canopy coverage also affect ozone concentration. Multi-year observational data collected by a network of local air monitoring stations in Clark County, Nevada, indicate that ozone maximums develop in May and June, while minimums exist primarily from November to February. Ozone concentrations are high on the west and northwest sides of the valley. A nighttime ozone reduction in the urban area characterizes the heterogeneous features of spatial distribution for average ozone levels in the Las Vegas urban area. The urban vegetation canopy has a locally positive effect by reducing ozone in urban areas. Decreased ozone levels associated with increased urban development density suggests that the highest ozone concentrations are associated with medium- to low-density urban development in Las Vegas.

  8. Seasonal subsidence and rebound in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, observed by synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffmann, J.; Zebker, H.A.; Galloway, D.L.; Amelung, F.

    2001-01-01

    Analyses of areal variations in the subsidence and rebound occurring over stressed aquifer systems, in conjunction with measurements of the hydraulic head fluctuations causing these displacements, can yield valuable information about the compressibility and storage properties of the aquifer system. Historically, stress-strain relationships have been derived from paired extensometer/piezometer installations, which provide only point source data. Because of the general unavailability of spatially detailed deformation data, areal stress-strain relations and their variability are not commonly considered in constraining conceptual and numerical models of aquifer systems. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques can map ground displacements at a spatial scale of tens of meters over 100 km wide swaths. InSAR has been used previously to characterize larger magnitude, generally permanent aquifer system compaction and land subsidence at yearly and longer timescales, caused by sustained drawdown of ground-water levels that produces intergranular stresses consistently greater than the maximum historical stress. We present InSAR measurements of the typically small-magnitude, generally recoverable deformations of the Las Vegas Valley aquifer system occurring at seasonal timescales. From these we derive estimates of the elastic storage coefficient for the aquifer system at several locations in Las Vegas Valley. These high-resolution measurements offer great potential for future investigations into the mechanics of aquifer systems and the spatial heterogeneity of aquifer system structure and material properties as well as for monitoring ongoing aquifer system compaction and land subsidence.

  9. Quaternary Faults and Basin-fill Sediments of the Las Vegas Basin, Southern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, W. J.; Fossett, E.; Luke, B.; Snelson, C.; Rasmussen, T.; McCallen, D.; Rodgers, A.; Louie, J.

    2003-12-01

    The N-S elongated extensional Las Vegas basin, southern Nevada, contains 100's of meters of Cenozoic basin-fill sediments that are cut by several Quaternary (Q) faults. These faults define or influence the basin geometry. The basin is generally an asymmetrical half graben defined by the W-dipping, Q Frenchman Mountain fault (FMF) along its E side and a series of smaller offset E-dipping faults to the W. The N terminus of the basin is controlled by the Las Vegas Valley shear zone, along which the majority of the offset occurred prior to the Q. Here, we asses the influence of the Q faults on the distribution of the sedimentary units. Well, exposure, seismic reflection and seismic refraction data show that sedimentary units of different grain sizes or seismic velocity dominate different parts of the basin. Sections dominated by coarse clastic deposits occupy a narrow area along the E side of the basin. Coarse clastic sediments are mixed with finer grained sediments in a broader area along the W side of the basin. Based on provenance and alluvial fan distribution, the coarse deposits along the E side of the basin appear to be trapped in close proximity to the W-dipping FMF. The coarse-grained deposits along the opposite, W side of the basin, are sourced from the nearby Spring Mountains. Because of the structural asymmetry of the basin, these sediments traveled farther from their source area than those on the E side. Some of these E-dipping faults influence the depth to Paleozoic bedrock and some faults form small sub-basins filled with finer grained sediments. Along a WNW trend near the center of the basin and near the present-day Las Vegas Wash, a change in the grain size distribution occurs up stratgraphic section: continuous clay layers are less common and coarse-grained deposits are more common. This difference may reflect a change from internal drainage early in the basin history to external drainage through the Las Vegas Wash in the latter history of the basin

  10. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.917 What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection...

  11. Sociohydrology of an Arid City: Development of a Coupled Model of Water Management in Las Vegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. E.; Islam, S.; Portney, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapidly growing cities in arid regions present a significant water management challenge. Key to tackling this challenge is understanding how and why some cities transition to more sustainable water management; acknowledging that urban water resources decisions are both responding to and precipitating hydrologic change, this question is best tackled through a sociohydrology approach. While coupling of natural and societal systems is in it's infancy in the field of hydrology, there is a strong tradition of studying coupled systems in the field of Socio-Ecological Systems. We build on Ostrom's Socio-Ecological Systems framework to develop a system dynamics model of water management for the Las Vegas metropolitan area using Vensim. A key objective our proposed modeling framework is to illuminate the dynamic interactions of the sociohydrologic system components and enable testing of various assumptions and strategies. The model of Las Vegas water management consists of five sub-modules: water supply, water demand, finances, public perception and policy making process. The development of the first three modules were based on clearly defined system structure. The public perception sub-module tracks the level public risk perception of a water supply shortage and represents the hypothesis that public risk perception is updated periodically when shortage events are experienced. The policy making process module uses an algorithm capturing the hypothesized decision making process to select policy actions (or in-action) from a set of feasible actions in response to the system states tracked by the model and observable to decision makers. The model was tested and parameterized using mix of quantitative data on water demands, supplies and costs and qualitative data from document analysis and interview data covering 1990 to 2010 period. Given that not only the parameters but also the structure of the public perception and the policy making process sub-systems is contested, a

  12. Geodetic Constraints on Fault Slip Rates and Seismic Hazard in the Greater Las Vegas Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.; Blewitt, G.; Broermann, J.; Bennett, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    We address fundamental questions about how contemporary tectonic deformation of the crust in the southern Great Basin occurs in the region around Las Vegas (LV) Nevada, western Arizona and eastern California. This area lies in the intersection of the eastern Walker Lane Belt, southern Great Basin and western Colorado Plateau (CP), sharing features of transtensional and extensional deformation associated with Pacific/North America relative motion. We use GPS data collected from 48 stations of the MAGNET semi-continuous network and 77 stations from continuous networks including BARGEN and EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory. MAGNET stations have been observed for a minimum of 7 years, while most continuous stations have longer records. From these data we estimate the velocity of crustal motion for all stations with respect to the stable North America reference frame NA12. To correct for transients from recent large earthquakes including the 1999 Hector Mine and 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah events we use models of co- and post-seismic deformation, subtracting the predicted motions from the time series before estimating interseismic stain rates. We find approximately 2 mm/yr of relative motion distributed over 200 km centered on Las Vegas, with a mean strain accumulation rate of 10 × 10-9 yr-1, with lower rates of predominantly extensional strain to the east and higher rates of predominantly shear deformation to the west. The mean strain rate is lower than that of the western Walker Lane but about twice that of eastern Nevada where e.g., the Wells, NV MW 6.0 earthquake occurred in 2008. From this new velocity field we generated a horizontal tensor strain rate map and a crustal block motion model to portray the transition of active strain from the CP into the Walker Lane. For faults in the Las Vegas Valley, including the Eglington Fault and Frenchman Mountain Fault, the observed velocity gradients and model results are consistent with normal slip rates of 0.2 mm/yr, which

  13. Neighborhood Reputation and Resident Sentiment in the Wake of the Las Vegas Foreclosure Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Jeremy; Batson, Christie D.; Monnat, Shannon M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how two major components of a neighborhood’s reputation—perceived disorder and collective efficacy—shape individuals’ sentiments toward their neighborhoods during the foreclosure crisis triggered by the Great Recession. Of central interest are whether neighborhood reputations are durable in the face of a crisis (neighborhood resiliency hypothesis) or whether neighborhood reputations wane during times of duress (foreclosure crisis hypothesis). Geo-coded individual-level data from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Area Social Survey merged with data on census tract foreclosure rates are used to address this question. The results provide qualified support for both perspectives. In support of the neighborhood resiliency hypothesis, collective efficacy is positively associated with how residents feel about the quality of their neighborhoods, and this relationship is unaltered by foreclosure rates. In support of the foreclosure crisis hypothesis, foreclosure rates mediate the effects of neighborhood disorder on resident sentiment. The implications of these findings for community resiliency are discussed. PMID:25678735

  14. Observed and Simulated Urban Heat Island and Urban Cool Island in Las Vegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauceda, Daniel O.

    This research investigates the urban climate of Las Vegas and establishes long-term trends relative to the regional climate in an attempt to identify climate disturbances strictly related to urban growth. An experimental surface station network (DRI-UHI) of low-cost surface temperature (T2m) and relative humidity (RH) sensors were designed to cover under-sampled low-intensity residential urban areas, as well as complement the in-city and surrounding rural areas. In addition to the analysis of the surface station data, high-resolution gridded data products (GDPs) from Daymet (1km) and PRISM (800 m) and results from numerical simulations were used to further characterize the Las Vegas climate trends. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was coupled with three different models: the Noah Land Surface Model (LSM) and a single- and multi-layer urban canopy model (UCM) to assess the urban related climate disturbances; as well as the model sensitivity and ability to characterize diurnal variability and rural/urban thermal contrasts. The simulations consisted of 1 km grid size for five, one month-long hindcast simulations during November of 2012: (i) using the Noah LSM without UCM treatment, (ii) same as (i) with a single-layer UCM (UCM1), (iii) same as (i) with a multi-layer UCM (UCM2), (iv) removing the City of Las Vegas (NC) and replacing it with predominant land cover (shrub), and (v) same as (ii) with increasing the albedo of rooftops from 0.20 to 0.65 as a potential adaptation scenario known as "white roofing". T2m long-term trends showed a regional warming of minimum temperatures (Tmin) and negligible trends in maximum temperatures (Tmax ). By isolating the regional temperature trends, an observed urban heat island (UHI) of ~1.63°C was identified as well as a daytime urban cool island (UCI) of ~0.15°C. GDPs agree with temperature trends but tend to underpredict UHI intensity by ~1.05°C. The WRF-UCM showed strong correlations with observed T2m (0

  15. Preliminary information on ambient concentrations measured at the Las Vegas National Near-Road MSAT study site

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides preliminary information on the trends in ambient concentrations observed near a heavily traveled highway in Las Vegas, Nevada. As part of a joint effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Federal Highway Administration, an air monitoring pro...

  16. Female Adolescent Subjectivities in Las Vegas: Poststructural Thoughts on the Intersections of Gender, Sexuality, Consumer Logic and Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dentith, Audrey M.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, data collected from an ethnographic study of adolescent girls growing up in the city of Las Vegas in the US is used to further our understanding of the role of mediated sex and consumer culture and in relationship to emerging adolescent female identities. Girls in this study articulated a clear sense of their abilities to make…

  17. Seasonal and diurnal analysis of NO2 concentrations from a long-duration study conducted in Las Vegas, Nevada

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study, conducted in Las Vegas, NV from mid-December 2008 to mid-December 2009 along an interstate highway, collected continuous and integrated ambient air quality samples for a wide variety of species including NO2 and NOX. Previous near-road studies have been short duration, ...

  18. Stratospheric contribution to surface ozone in the desert Southwest during the 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Brioude, J. F.; Cooper, O. R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lin, M.; Marchbanks, R.; Pierce, R. B.; Reddy, P. J.; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.; Gustin, M. S.; Iraci, L. T.; Leblanc, T.; Yates, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS) was designed to investigate the potential impact of stratosphere-troposphere transport (STT) and long-range transport of pollution from Asia on surface O3 concentrations in Clark County, NV. This measurement campaign, which took place in May and June of 2013, was conducted at Angel Peak, NV, a high elevation site about 2.8 km above mean sea level and 45 km west of Las Vegas. The study was organized around the NOAA ESRL truck-based TOPAZ scanning ozone lidar with collocated in situ sampling of O3, CO, and meteorological parameters. These measurements were supported by the NOAA/NESDIS real time modelling system (RAQMS), FLEXPART particle dispersion model, and the NOAA GFDL AM3 model. In this talk, I will describe one of several STT events that occurred during the LVOS campaign. This intrusion, which was profiled by TOPAZ on the night of May 24-25, was also sampled by the NASA Alpha Jet, the Table Mountain ozone lidar, and by an ozonesonde flying above southern California. This event also led to significant ozone increases at surface monitors operated by Clark County, the California Air Resources Board, the U.S. National Park Service, and the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NRVOI), and resulted in exceedances of the 2008 75 ppbv O3 NAAQS both in Clark County and in surrounding areas of Nevada and southern California. The potential implications of this and similar events for air quality compliance in the western U.S. will be discussed.

  19. Human-health pharmaceutical compounds in Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona, and Las Vegas Wash, Nevada, October 2000-August 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Robert A.; Furlong, Edward T.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service conducted a reconnaissance study to investigate the occurrence of selected human-health pharmaceutical compounds in water samples collected from Lake Mead on the Colorado River and Las Vegas Wash, a waterway used to transport treated wastewater from the Las Vegas metropolitan area to Lake Mead. Current research indicates many of these compounds can bioaccumulate and may adversely affect aquatic organisms by disrupting physiological processes, impairing reproductive functions, increasing cancer rates, contributing to the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, and acting in undesirable ways when mixed with other substances. These compounds may be present in effluent because a high percentage of prescription and non-prescription drugs used for human-health purposes are excreted from the body as a mixture of parent compounds and degraded metabolite compounds; also, they can be released to the environment when unused products are discarded by way of toilets, sinks, and trash in landfills. Thirteen of 33 targeted compounds were detected in at least one water sample collected between October 2000 and August 2001. All concentrations were less than or equal to 0.20 micrograms per liter. The most frequently detected compounds in samples from Las Vegas Wash were caffeine, carbamazepine (used to treat epilepsy), cotinine (a metabolite of nicotine), and dehydronifedipine (a metabolite of the antianginal Procardia). Less frequently detected compounds in samples collected from Las Vegas Wash were antibiotics (clarithromycin, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim), acetaminophen (an analgesic and anti-inflammatory), cimetidine (used to treat ulcers), codeine (a narcotic and analgesic), diltiazem (an antihypertensive), and 1,7-dimethylxanthine (a metabolite of caffeine). Fewer compounds were detected in samples collected from Lake Mead than from Las Vegas Wash. Caffeine was detected in all samples

  20. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of Lake Mead National Recreation Area; Las Vegas Wash to Virgin River, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laney, R.L.; Bales, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    This study is the last of a series of eight geohydrologic reconnaissance studies that were done in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. The studies were done to evaluate the water resources in the recreation area and to identify areas having potential for the development of water supplies that would be adequate for marinas and campgrounds. The study area includes about 250 square miles north of Lake Mead from Las Vegas Wash to the Virgin River (Overton Arm), Nevada. Volcanic rocks, consolidated sedimentary rocks, and unconsolidated to semiconsolidated sedimentary rocks underlie the area. Surface-water sources include the Colorado River, Virgin River, Muddy River, and Las Vegas Wash. Elsewhere in the area, streamflow is meager and extremely variable. Ground water originates from four sources: (1) subsurface flow in local basins, (2) infiltration of water from Lake Mead into permeable rocks near the lake, (3) subsurface flow in valleys of perennial streams, and (4) subsurface flow in consolidated rocks of the Muddy Mountains. The quantity of water from Lake Mead that has saturated rocks adjacent to the lake probably is greater than the quantity of ground water from all the Other sources. Rocks saturated by water from the lake probably extend less than 0.5 mileinland from the lake shore. The quality of virtually all the ground water in the area is not acceptable for drinking purposes. The most favorable areas for obtaining ground water are those underlain by the coarse-grained deposits of the older alluvium and the younger alluvium adjacent to Lake Mead. The least favorable areas are those underlain by the mudstone facies of the Muddy Creek Formation and fine-grained rocks of the Horse Spring Formation. Four areas identified as having potential for ground-water development are (1) near Overton Beach, (2) west of Callville Bay, (3) near Middle Point, and (4) in the lower Moapa Valley. Usable quantities of water probably can be obtained at these sites, but the

  1. Reference materials and intercomparison samples available from the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, E.J.; Laska, P.R.

    1985-06-01

    Reference materials and intercomparison samples may be obtained by laboratories involved in the analysis of environmental samples containing radioactivity, pesticides, toxic inorganic species, or toxic organic species. These reference materials and intercomparison samples are available from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Quality Assurance Division located at the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). These materials are useful for incorporation into a laboratory's quality control program for the evaluation of the precision and accuracy of analytical work. Media used for radiation reference materials are pitchblende, Monazite ore, uranium mill tailings, Mancos shale, fly ash, and water spiked with radionuclides. Radioactivity intercomparison samples consist of water, milk, air, urine, and a simulated diet slurry spiked with radionuclides. Media available for toxic organic reference materials are sludge, shale oil, and rag oil, and for intercomparison samples are soil and water. Characterized fly ash, foundry sludge, and river sediment serve as reference materials for toxic inorganics, while spiked soil and water serve as intercomparison samples. Finally, spiked adipose tissue, blood plasma, urine, and water comprise the pesticide intercomparison samples, and, after the disclosure of the true pesticide compositions and concentrations of these samples, the laboratory can use the samples as reference materials. The reference materials are generally available continuously, but the intercomparison samples are distributed on a scheduled basis and in some cases only to certain laboratories. 9 tables.

  2. Episodic Impacts from California Wildfires Identified in Las Vegas Near-Road Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, Sue; Hays, Michael; Preston, Bill; Vallero, Daniel A; Hagler, Gayle S W

    2016-01-01

    Air pollutant concentrations near major highways are usually attributed to a combination of nearby traffic emissions and regional background, and generally presumed to be additive in nature. During a near-road measurement study conducted in Las Vegas, NV, the effects of distant wildfires on regional air quality were indicated over a several day period in the summer of 2009. Area-wide elevated particulate levoglucosan (maximum of 0.83 μg/m(3)) and roadside measurements of ultraviolet light-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM) in comparison to black carbon (Delta-C) were apparent over the three-day period. Back-trajectory modeling and satellite images supported the measurement results and indicated the transport of air pollutants from wildfires burning in southern California. Separating roadside measurements under apparent biomass burning event (Delta-C > 1000 ng m(-3)) and nonevent (Delta-C < 1000 ng m(-3)) periods, and constraining to specific days of week, wind speed range, wind direction from the road and traffic volume range, roadside carbon monoxide, black carbon, total particle number count (20-200 nm), and accumulation mode particle number count (100-200 nm) increased by 65%, 146%, 58%, and 366%, respectively, when biomass smoke was indicated. Meanwhile, ultrafine particles (20-100 nm) decreased by 35%. This episode indicates that the presence of aged wildfire smoke may interact with freshly emitted ultrafine particles, resulting in a decrease of particles in the ultrafine mode. PMID:26618236

  3. Understanding Ground Motion in Las Vegas: Insights from Data Analysis and Two-Dimensional Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Tkalcic, H; McCallen, D

    2004-02-05

    Seismic ground motions are amplified in low velocity sedimentary basins relative to adjacent sites on high velocity hard rock. We used historical recordings of NTS nuclear explosions and earthquake recordings in Las Vegas Valley to quantify frequency-dependent basin amplification using Standard Spectral Ratios. We show that amplifications, referred to as site response, can reach a factor of 10 in the frequency band 0.4-2.0 Hz. Band-averaged site response between 0.4-2.0 Hz is strongly correlated with basin depth. However, it is also well known that site response is related to shallow shear-wave velocity structure. We simulated low frequency (f<1Hz) ground motion and site response with two-dimensional elastic finite difference simulations. We demonstrate that physically plausible models of the shallow subsurface, including low velocity sedimentary structure, can predict relative amplification as well as some of the complexity in the observed waveforms. This study demonstrates that site response can be modeled without invoking complex and computationally expensive three-dimensional structural models.

  4. Documentation of potential for surface faulting related to ground-water withdrawal in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    Leveling data collected in Las Vegas Valley are compatible with the interpretation that ongoing land-surface displacements related to ground-water withdrawal may be precursory to fault offset of the land surface. Zones of potential faulting intersect regions of intense urban development. The degree of risk and the potential economic consequences from possible surface faulting cannot be assessed adequately without additional data and analysis of the relation between surface faulting and ground-water withdrawal.

  5. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering in Mexico City: Comparison With Las Vegas, NV, and Los Angeles, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Campbell, D.; Fujita, E.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The primary site in Mexico City was an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP). Similar campaigns were held in Las Vegas, NV in January-February, 2003; and Los Angeles, CA at numerous sites during all seasons from 2003 through 2007. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions. The photoacoustic instrument (PAS) used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In Mexico City the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of Mexico City resulted in more direct solar radiation. Further insight on the meteorological connections and population dynamics will be discussed.

  6. Analysis of the real estate market in Las Vegas: Bubble, seasonal patterns, and prediction of the CSW indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei-Xing; Sornette, Didier

    2008-01-01

    We analyze 27 house price indices of Las Vegas from June 1983 to March 2005, corresponding to 27 different zip codes. These analyses confirm the existence of a real estate bubble, defined as a price acceleration faster than exponential, which is found, however, to be confined to a rather limited time interval in the recent past from approximately 2003 to mid-2004 and has progressively transformed into a more normal growth rate comparable to pre-bubble levels in 2005. There has been no bubble till 2002 except for a medium-sized surge in 1990. In addition, we have identified a strong yearly periodicity which provides a good potential for fine-tuned prediction from month to month. A monthly monitoring using a model that we have developed could confirm, by testing the intra-year structure, if indeed the market has returned to “normal” or if more turbulence is expected ahead. We predict the evolution of the indices one year ahead, which is validated with new data up to September 2006. The present analysis demonstrates the existence of very significant variations at the local scale, in the sense that the bubble in Las Vegas seems to have preceded the more global USA bubble and has ended approximately two years earlier (mid-2004 for Las Vegas compared with mid-2006 for the whole of the USA).

  7. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Las Vegas, Nevada, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect

    2011-03-16

    LAS VEGAS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Las Vegas, Nevada DOE Tribal Roundtable convened on March 16th, at the Las Vegas Hilton. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy) and facilitated by JR Bluehouse, Program Manager, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). Mr. Bluehouse was assisted by Tamara, Underwood, Program Assistant, U.S. Institute.  Tribal leaders and representatives from multiple tribal governments and communities attended the roundtable. Tracey LeBeau, newly appointed Director of the Office of Indian Energy attended.    LaMont Jackson from DOE’s Office of Electricity attended. Also attending from the administration and federal agencies were Kim Teehee, Senior Policy Advisor for Native American Affairs, The White House; Charlie Galbraith, Associate Director of the Office of Public Engagement and Deputy Associate Director of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, The White House; Jodi Gillette, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Economic Development, the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  8. Reconciling Scale Mismatch in Water Governance, Hydro-climatic Processes and Infrastructure Systems of Water Supply in Las Vegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. E.; Alarcon, T.; Portney, K.; Islam, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water resource systems are a classic example of a common pool resource due to the high cost of exclusion and the subtractability of the resource; for common pool resources, the performance of governance systems primarily depends on how well matched the institutional arrangements and rules are to the biophysical conditions and social norms. Changes in water governance, hydro-climatic processes and infrastructure systems occur on disparate temporal and spatial scales. A key challenge is the gap between current climate change model resolution, and the spatial and temporal scale of urban water supply decisions. This gap will lead to inappropriate management policies if not mediated through a carefully crafted decision making process. Traditional decision support and planning methods (DSPM) such as classical decision analysis are not equipped to deal with a non-static climate. While emerging methods such as decision scaling, robust decision making and real options are designed to deal with a changing climate, governance systems have evolved under the assumption of a static climate and it is not clear if these methods are well suited to the existing governance regime. In our study, these questions are contextualized by examining an urban water utility that has made significant changes in policy to adapt to changing conditions: the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) which serves metropolitan Las Vegas. Like most desert cities, Las Vegas exists because of water; the artesian springs of the Las Vegas Valley once provided an ample water supply for Native Americans, ranchers and later a small railroad city. However, population growth has increased demands far beyond local supplies. The area now depends on the Colorado River for the majority of its water supply. Natural climate variability with periodic droughts has further challenged water providers; projected climate changes and further population growth will exacerbate these challenges. Las Vegas is selected as a case

  9. SOURCE AND PATHWAY DETERMINATION FOR BERYLLIUM FOUND IN BECHTEL NEVADA NORTH LAS VEGAS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-07-01

    In response to the report ''Investigation of Beryllium Exposure Cases Discovered at the North Las Vegas Facility of the National Nuclear Security Administration'', published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in August 2003, Bechtel Nevada (BN) President and General Manager Dr. F. A. Tarantino appointed the Beryllium Investigation & Assessment Team (BIAT) to identify both the source and pathway for the beryllium found in the North Las Vegas (NLV) B-Complex. From September 8 to December 18, 2003, the BIAT investigated the pathway for beryllium and determined that a number of locations existed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which could have contained sufficient quantities of beryllium to result in contamination if transported. Operations performed in the B-1 Building as a result of characterization activities at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD); Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (RMAD); Test Cells A and C; and the Central Support Facility in Area 25 had the greatest opportunity for transport of beryllium. Investigative monitoring and sampling was performed at these sites with subsequent transport of sample materials, equipment, and personnel from the NTS to the B-1 Building. The timeline established by the BIAT for potential transport of the beryllium contamination into the B-1 Building was from September 1997 through November 2002. Based on results of recently completed swipe sampling, no evidence of transport of beryllium from test areas has been confirmed. Results less than the DOE beryllium action level of 0.2 ???g/100 cm2 were noted for work support facilities located in Area 25. All of the identified sites in Area 25 worked within the B-1 tenant's residency timeline have been remediated. Legacy contaminants have either been disposed of or capped with clean borrow material. As such, no current opportunity exists for release or spread of beryllium contamination. Historical

  10. Surface and Airborne Arsenic Concentrations in a Recreational Site near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic, up to 7058 μg g-1 in topsoil and bedrock, and more than 0.03 μg m-3 in air on a 2-week basis, were measured in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a very popular off-road area near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. The elevated arsenic concentrations in the topsoil and bedrock are correlated to outcrops of yellow sandstone belonging to the Muddy Creek Formation (≈ 10 to 4 Ma) and to faults crossing the area. Mineralized fluids moved to the surface through the faults and deposited the arsenic. A technique was developed to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations from the arsenic content in the topsoil. The technique was tested by comparing calculated with measured concentrations at 34 locations in the NDRA, for 3 periods of 2 weeks each. We then applied it to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations for more than 500 locations all over the NDRA. The highest airborne arsenic concentrations occur over sand dunes and other zones with a surficial layer of aeolian sand. Ironically these areas show the lowest levels of arsenic in the topsoil. However, they are highly susceptible to wind erosion and emit very large amounts of sand and dust during episodes of strong winds, thereby also emitting much arsenic. Elsewhere in the NDRA, in areas not or only very slightly affected by wind erosion, airborne arsenic levels equal the background level for airborne arsenic in the USA, approximately 0.0004 μg m-3. The results of this study are important because the NDRA is visited by more than 300,000 people annually. PMID:25897667

  11. Site Response in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada from NTS Explosions and Earthquake Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Arthur; Tkalcic, Hrvoje; McCallen, David; Larsen, Shawn; Snelson, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    We report site response in Las Vegas Valley (LVV) from historical recordings of Nevada Test Site (NTS) nuclear explosions and earthquake recordings from permanent and temporary seismic stations. Our data set significantly improves the spatial coverage of LVV over previous studies, especially in the northern, deeper parts of the basin. Site response at stations in LVV was measured for frequencies in the range 0.2 5.0 Hz using Standard Spectral Ratios (SSR) and Horizontal-Vertical Spectral Ratios (HVR). For the SSR measurements we used a reference site (approximately NEHRP B ``rock'' classification) located on Frenchman Mountain outside the basin. Site response at sedimentary sites is variable in LVV with average amplifications approaching a factor of 10 at some frequencies. We observed peaks in the site response curves at frequencies clustered near 0.6, 1.2 and 2.0 Hz, with some sites showing additional lower amplitude peaks at higher frequencies. The spatial pattern of site response is strongly correlated with the reported depth to basement for frequencies between 0.2 and 3.0 Hz, although the frequency of peak amplification does not show a similar correlation. For a few sites where we have geotechnical shear velocities, the amplification shows a correlation with the average upper 30-meter shear velocities, V 30. We performed two-dimensional finite difference simulations and reproduced the observed peak site amplifications at 0.6 and 1.2 Hz with a low velocity near-surface layer with shear velocities 600 750 m/s and a thickness of 100 200 m. These modeling results indicate that the amplitude and frequencies of site response peaks in LVV are strongly controlled by shallow velocity structure.

  12. Tritium contamination at EG&G/EM in North Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Sowell, C.V.; Arent, L.J.

    1996-06-01

    The tritium contamination discovered at the EG&G Energy Measurements (EG&G/EM) facility in North Las Vegas, Nevada, on 20 April 1995, could have been averted by good health physics practices and/or adequate management oversight. Scandium tritide (ScT{sub 3}) targets were installed for use in sealed tube neutron generators at EG&G/EM. In addition, EG&G/EM was also storing zirconium tritide (ZrT{sub 3}) and titanium tritide (TiT{sub 3}) foils. Since the targets were classified as sealed sources, the appropriate administrative and engineering control measures such as relocating targets/sources, air monitoring, bioassay, waste stream management, labeling/posting and training were not implemented. In all there were six unreported incidents of tritium contamination from March 1994 to July 1995. Swipe surveys revealed areas exceeding the action level of 10,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} by up to three orders of magnitude. After reclassifying the targets as unsealed sources, a bioassay program was instituted, and the results were higher than expected for three employees. The doses assigned to the three individuals working in the contaminated area were 35, 58, and 61 mrem committed effective dose equivalent. Though the doses were low, the decontamination costs were in excess of $350,000.00. An investigation, was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office to analyze the events that led to the tritium contamination and recommend actions to prevent recurrence. Event and causal factor charting, Project Evaluation Tree (PET) analysis techniques, and root cause analysis, were used to evaluate management systems, causal sequences, and systems factors contributing to the tritium release.

  13. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of Lake Mead National Recreation Area; Las Vegas Wash to Opal Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laney, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study is a geohydrologic reconnaissance of about 170 square miles in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area from Las Vegas Wash to Opal Mountain, Nevada. The study is one of a series that describes the geohydrology of the recreation area and that indentifies areas where water supplies can be developed. Precipitation in this arid area is about 5 inches per year. Streamflow is seasonal and extremely variable except for that in the Colorado River, which adjoins the area. Pan evaporation is more than 20 times greater than precipitation; therefore, regional ground-water supplies are meager except near the Colorado River, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave. Large ground-water supplies can be developed near the river and lakes, and much smaller supplies may be obtained in a few favorable locations farther from the river and lakes. Ground water in most of the areas probably contains more than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, but water that contains less than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids can be obtained within about 1 mile of the lakes. Crystalline rocks of metamorphic, intrusive and volcanic origin crop out in the area. These rocks are overlain by conglomerate and mudstone of the Muddy Creek Formation, gravel and conglomerate of the older alluvium, and sand and gravel of the Chemehuevi Formation and younger alluvium. The crystalline rocks, where sufficiently fractured, yield water to springs and would yield small amounts of water to favorably located wells. The poorly cemented and more permeable beds of the older alluvium, Chemehuevi Formation, and younger alluvium are the better potential aquifers, particularly along the Colorado River and Lakes Mead and Mohave. Thermal springs in the gorge of the Colorado River south of Hoover Dam discharge at least 2,580 acre-feet per year of water from the volcanic rocks and metamorphic and plutonic rocks. The discharge is much greater than could be infiltrated in the drainage basin above the springs

  14. Distress in the Desert: Neighborhood Disorder, Resident Satisfaction, and Quality of Life during the Las Vegas Foreclosure Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Batson, Christie D.; Monnat, Shannon M.

    2014-01-01

    Using surveys collected from a sample of households nested within ‘naturally occurring’ neighborhoods in Las Vegas, NV during the 2007-2009 economic recession, this study examines the associations between real and perceived measures of neighborhood distress (foreclosure rate, physical decay, crime) and residents' reports of neighborhood quality of life and neighborhood satisfaction. Consistent with social disorganization theory, both real and perceived measures of neighborhood disorder were negatively associated with quality of life and neighborhood satisfaction. Residents' perceptions of neighborliness partially acted as a buffer against the effects of neighborhood distress, including housing foreclosures, on quality of life and neighborhood satisfaction. PMID:25750507

  15. An analysis of urban thermal characteristics and associated land cover in Tampa Bay and Las Vegas using Landsat satellite data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.

    2006-01-01

    Remote sensing data from both Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 systems were utilized to assess urban area thermal characteristics in Tampa Bay watershed of west-central Florida, and the Las Vegas valley of southern Nevada. To quantitatively determine urban land use extents and development densities, sub-pixel impervious surface areas were mapped for both areas. The urban-rural boundaries and urban development densities were defined by selecting certain imperviousness threshold values and Landsat thermal bands were used to investigate urban surface thermal patterns. Analysis results suggest that urban surface thermal characteristics and patterns can be identified through qualitatively based urban land use and development density data. Results show the urban area of the Tampa Bay watershed has a daytime heating effect (heat-source), whereas the urban surface in Las Vegas has a daytime cooling effect (heat-sink). These thermal effects strongly correlated with urban development densities where higher percent imperviousness is usually associated with higher surface temperature. Using vegetation canopy coverage information, the spatial and temporal distributions of urban impervious surface and associated thermal characteristics are demonstrated to be very useful sources in quantifying urban land use, development intensity, and urban thermal patterns. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. On-road vehicle particulate matter and gaseous emission distributions in Las Vegas, Nevada, compared with other areas.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, Claudio; Kuhns, Hampden D; Moosmüller, Hans; Keislar, Robert E; Barber, Peter W; Robinson, Norman F; Watson, John G; Nikolic, Djordje

    2004-06-01

    During the spring and summer of 2000, 2001, and 2002, gaseous and particulate matter (PM) fuel-based emission factors for approximately 150,000 low-tailpipe, individual vehicles in the Las Vegas, NV, area were measured via on-road remote sensing. For the gaseous pollutants (carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxide), a commercial vehicle emissions remote sensing system (VERSS) was used. The PM emissions were determined using a Lidar-based VERSS. Emission distributions and their shapes were analyzed and compared with previous studies. The large skewness of the distributions is evident for both gaseous pollutants and PM and has important implications for emission reduction policies, because the majority of emissions are attributed to a small fraction of vehicles. Results of this Las Vegas study and studies at other geographical locations were compared. The gaseous pollutants were found to be close to those measured by VERSS in other U.S. cities. The PM emission factors for spark ignition and diesel vehicles are in the range of previous tunnel and dynamometer studies. PMID:15242151

  17. Reproductive responses of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) exposed in cages to influent of the Las Vegas Wash in Lake Mead, Nevada, from late winter to early spring.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Erin M; Snyder, Shane A; Kelly, Kevin L; Gross, Timothy S; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Villalobos, Sergio A; Giesy, John P

    2004-12-01

    The Las Vegas Wash (LW) delivers tertiary-treated municipal wastewater effluent, nonpotable shallow groundwater seepage, and runoff from the urbanized Las Vegas Valley to Las Vegas Bay (LX) of Lake Mead. To investigate the potential for contaminants in LW influent to produce effects indicative of endocrine disruption in vivo, adult male and female common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed in cages for 42-48 d at four sites in Lake Mead: LW, LX, and two reference locations in the lake. End points examined included gonadosomatic index; gonad histology; concentrations of plasma vitellogenin (VTG) and plasma sex steroids (17beta-estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT)); plasma estrogen:androgen ratios (E2:T, E2:11-KT), in vitro production of T by gonad tissue, and hepatopancreas ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity. Few differences among fish caged at different sites were potentially attributable to exposure to contaminants PMID:15597896

  18. Assessment of Residential Biomass Burning During Winter in Las Vegas, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. G.; Lee, T.; Olson, D.; Norris, G.; Roberts, P. T.; Collett, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Concentrations of organic matter (OM) and black carbon (BC) were measured at a site in a residential area of Las Vegas, Nevada, and multiple analytical methods were used to determine the amounts attributable to biomass burning. In January 2008, measurements of a wood burning tracer, levoglucosan, were made via gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (n=17). In addition, an Aerodyne High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) measured OM and C2H4O2+, a levoglucosan-derived fragment. During 2007 and 2008, two-channel Aethalometer data were also collected; the difference between the 370 nm and 880 nm channels (UV-BC difference) was used to indicate the presence of wood smoke. Concentrations of OM, BC, C2H4O2+, and levoglucosan, as well as the UV-BC difference, were all highest during the evening hours (generally between 1800 and 0000 LST). Average OM concentrations were 3.3 μg/m3 during January but were 6.9 μg/m3 during the overnight hours (between 1700 and 0000 LST). Median levoglucosan concentrations were 0.14 μg/m3. The correlation of levoglucosan with C2H4O2+ was very high (r2=0.92). During the evening hours, correlation between BC and C2H4O2+ was good (r2=0.79); however, correlation was poor during other hours (r2<0.40), suggesting that other emissions such as mobile-source emissions were likely the dominant source of BC during those hours. C2H4O2+ showed modest correlation with UV-BC (e.g., r2=0.45). Using EPA's positive matrix factorization tool, EPA PMF, on the January HR-AMS data, we determined that biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) constituted 12% of the OM on average, but about 25% of the OM during evening hours. BBOA correlated well with levoglucosan (r2=0.82) and C2H4O2+ (r2=0.93). Levoglucosan measurements suggested that wood burning could constitute 38% of the OM during the overnight periods on average, although this number greatly depends on the assumed ratio of levoglucosan to OM in a source profile for residential biomass burning. The

  19. Changes in air quality at near-roadway schools after a major freeway expansion in Las Vegas, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven G; McCarthy, Michael C; DeWinter, Jennifer L; Vaughn, David L; Roberts, Paul T

    2014-09-01

    Near-roadway ambient black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations were measured at two schools adjacent to a freeway and at an urban background school 2 km from the freeway to determine the change in concentrations attributable to vehicle emissions after the three-lane expansion of U.S. Highway 95 (US 95) in Las Vegas, Nevada. Between summer 2007 and summer 2008, average weekday small-vehicle volume increased by 40% +/- 2% (standard error). Average weekday large-vehicle volume decreased by 17% +/- 5%, due to a downturn in the economy and an associated decline in goods movement. Average vehicle speed increased from 58 to 69 mph, a 16% +/- 1% increase. The authors compared BC and CO concentrations in summer 2007 with those in summer 2008 to understand what effect the expansion of the freeway may have had on ambient concentrations: BC and CO were measured 17 m north of the freeway sound wall, CO was measured 20 m south of the sound wall, and BC was measured at an urban background site 2 km south of the freeway. Between summer 2007 and summer 2008, median BC decreased at the near-road site by 40% +/- 2% and also decreased at the urban background site by 24% +/- 4%, suggesting that much of the change was due to decreases in emissions throughout Las Vegas, rather than only on US 95. CO concentrations decreased by 14% +/- 2% and 10% +/- 3% at the two near-road sites. The decrease in BC concentrations after the expansion is likely due to the decrease in medium- and heavy-duty-vehicle traffic resulting from the economic recession. The decrease in CO concentrations may be a result of improved traffic flow, despite the increase in light-duty-vehicle traffic. Implications: Monitoring of BC and CO at near-road locations in Las Vegas demonstrated the impacts of changes in traffic volume and vehicle speed on near-road concentrations. However, urban-scale declines in concentrations were larger than near-road changes due to the impacts of the economic recession that

  20. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering at Four Sites in and Near Mexico City: Comparison with Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Miranda, G. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    Four photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS) for aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The four sites included: an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP); a suburban site at the Technological University of Tecamac; a rural site at "La Biznaga" ranch; and a site at the Paseo de Cortes (altitude 3,810 meters ASL) in the rural area above Amecameca in the State of Mexico, on the saddle between the volcanoes Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl. A similar campaign was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA in January-February, 2003. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions while the other sites provided characterization of the plume, mixed in with any local sources. The second and third sites are north of Mexico City, and the fourth site is south. The PAS used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Instruments at the second and third sites operate at 870 nm, and the one at the fourth site at 780 nm. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In the urban site the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. Comparisons with TSI nephelometer scattering at the T0 site will be presented. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of

  1. Reproductive Responses of Common Carp Cyprinus carpio in Cages to Influent of the Las Vegas Wash in Lake Mead, Nevada, from late Winter to early Spring

    EPA Science Inventory

    To investigate the potential for contaminants in Las Vegas Wash (LW) influent to produce effects indicative of endocrine disruption in vivo, adult male and female common carp were exposed in cages for 42-48 d at four sites and two reference locations in Lake Mead.

  2. Explorations of Colleges, Universities, and Career Training Centers in Las Vegas, Nevada: Creating Educational and Training Programs for Displaced Workers to Learn Marketable Employment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonyea, Jacob Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The city of Las Vegas, Nevada has experienced a slowdown in tourism, a drop in property taxes and consolidated tax revenue used to support the city's operating budget, and a lack of economic diversification. Because of these changes, the ability of displaced workers to learn marketable employment skills continues to be an important issue for…

  3. Institutional trust, information, and risk perceptions; Report of findings of the Las Vegas metropolitan area survey, June 29--July 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Mushkatel, A.H.; Pijawka, K.D.

    1992-09-01

    This study reports on the preliminary results of a survey of attitudes and perceptions of Las Vegas area residents regarding the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository. The survey`s focus was to examine the various dimensions of trust and confidence in government`s efforts to develop the country`s nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  4. Exploring the effects of population growth on future land use change in the Las Vegas Wash watershed: an integrated approach of geospatial modeling and analytics

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Las Vegas Valley metropolitan area is one of the fastest growing areas in the southwestern United States. The rapid urbanization has led to many environmental problems. For instance, as population growth and urbanization continue, there will be a problem with water shortage. ...

  5. Long-term continuous measurement of near-road air pollution in Las Vegas: Seasonal variability in traffic emissions impact on local air quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess air pollution along roadways is an issue of public health concern and motivated a long-term measurement effort established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Las Vegas, Nevada. Measurements of air pollutants – including black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO),...

  6. School Resegregation in the Mississippi of the West: Community Counternarratives on the Return to Neighborhood Schools in Las Vegas, 1968-1994

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsford, Sonya Douglass; Sampson, Carrie; Forletta, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    Background: School desegregation and resegregation in the Mountain West remain understudied despite the substantial impact the region's growth and demographic change have had on racial balance and diversity in schools. Home to the largest school district in the Mountain West and fifth largest school district in the country, Las Vegas's…

  7. Six month progress report on the Waste Package Project at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, July 1991--January 1992: Management, quality assurance and overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ladkany, S.G.

    1991-12-31

    The progress of the waste package project at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas was the subject of this report. It covered aspects of management and quality assurance, container design, application of ASME Pressure Vessel Codes, structural analysis of containers, design of rock tunnels for storage, and heat transfer phenomena. (MB)

  8. Six month progress report on the Waste Package Project at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, July 1991--January 1992: Management, quality assurance and overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ladkany, S.G.

    1991-01-01

    The progress of the waste package project at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas was the subject of this report. It covered aspects of management and quality assurance, container design, application of ASME Pressure Vessel Codes, structural analysis of containers, design of rock tunnels for storage, and heat transfer phenomena. (MB)

  9. Summary of chemical data from onsite and laboratory analyses of groundwater samples from the surficial aquifer, Las Vegas, Nevada, April and August 1993 and September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Gunther, Charmaine D.

    2012-01-01

    Samples were collected from groundwater wells in and about the city of Las Vegas, Nevada, and were analyzed for selected major, minor and trace constituents. Analyses of blank and reference samples are summarized as mean and standard deviation values for all positive results.

  10. Full House: The Las Vegas building boom has stretched the creativity and resources of the fastest-growing school district in the nation. Edutopia, September/October 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furger, Roberta

    2004-01-01

    This once sleepy community, founded by Mormon missionaries in 1855 and jumpstarted by gambling 85 years later, now gobbles up real estate faster than a conventioneer chowing down at a midnight buffet. Every day of the week, two acres of Las Vegas area land are developed for commercial or residential use in a frenetic drive to accommodate the…

  11. The Birth of a New Vocational-Technical Center. National Vocational-Technical Facility Planning Conference (Las Vegas, Nevada, May, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, Clayton

    The principal of the Southern Nevada Vocational-Technical Center at Las Vegas, Nevada, briefly outlines its development and function. The facility cost approximately 3 million dollars and was built on 390 acres of land purchased from the Federal government. The PERT method was used in planning. Instructional facilities, including those for auto…

  12. A preliminary assessment of earthquake ground shaking hazard at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and implications to the Las Vegas region

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, I.G.; Green, R.K.; Sun, J.I.; Pezzopane, S.K.; Abrahamson, N.A.; Quittmeyer, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    As part of early design studies for the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the authors have performed a preliminary probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of ground shaking. A total of 88 Quaternary faults within 100 km of the site were considered in the hazard analysis. They were characterized in terms of their probability o being seismogenic, and their geometry, maximum earthquake magnitude, recurrence model, and slip rate. Individual faults were characterized by maximum earthquakes that ranged from moment magnitude (M{sub w}) 5.1 to 7.6. Fault slip rates ranged from a very low 0.00001 mm/yr to as much as 4 mm/yr. An areal source zone representing background earthquakes up to M{sub w} 6 1/4 = 1/4 was also included in the analysis. Recurrence for these background events was based on the 1904--1994 historical record, which contains events up to M{sub w} 5.6. Based on this analysis, the peak horizontal rock accelerations are 0.16, 0.21, 0.28, and 0.50 g for return periods of 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 10,000 years, respectively. In general, the dominant contributor to the ground shaking hazard at Yucca Mountain are background earthquakes because of the low slip rates of the Basin and Range faults. A significant effect on the probabilistic ground motions is due to the inclusion of a new attenuation relation developed specifically for earthquakes in extensional tectonic regimes. This relation gives significantly lower peak accelerations than five other predominantly California-based relations used in the analysis, possibly due to the lower stress drops of extensional earthquakes compared to California events. Because Las Vegas is located within the same tectonic regime as Yucca Mountain, the seismic sources and path and site factors affecting the seismic hazard at Yucca Mountain also have implications to Las Vegas. These implications are discussed in this paper.

  13. Heavy Metal Contamination and Salt Efflorescence Associated With Decorative Landscaping Rocks, Las Vegas, Nevada: The Need for Regulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, S. A.; Buck, B. J.; Brock, A. L.

    2004-12-01

    Las Vegas, Nevada is one of the fastest growing cities in the United States. Faced with water restrictions, decorative rock xeroscaping has become a very popular form of landscaping. Currently, there are no regulations controlling the geochemistry of the decorative rocks that can be used for these purposes. In this study, we examined three sites containing two different decorative rock products. The landscaping rocks, underlying soil, and surface salt crusts were analyzed to determine their mineralogy and chemistry. Methods of analysis include scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP), thin section analysis, and laser particle size analysis (LPSA). Preliminary results indicate the presence of halite (NaCl), bloedite (Na2Mg(SO4)2 4H2O), a hydrated magnesium sulfate, and possibly copper sulfate and copper chloride mineral phases in the surface salt crusts. Both copper minerals are regarded as hazardous substances by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); these agencies have established minimum exposure limits for human contact with these substances. Copper sulfate and copper chloride are not naturally occurring minerals in the soils of the Las Vegas Valley, and analyses indicate that their formation may be attributed to the mineralogy of the decorative landscaping rocks. Further testing is needed to characterize this potential health hazard; however the preliminary results of this study demonstrate the need for regulations controlling the geochemistry of decorative rocks used for urban landscaping.

  14. Geologic and geophysical maps of the Las Vegas 30' x 60' quadrangle, Clark and Nye counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, William R.; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Harris, Anita G.; Langenheim, V.E.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Mahan, Shannon; Paces, James B.; Dixon, Gary L.; Rowley, Peter D.; Burchfiel, B.C.; Bell, John W.; Smith, Eugene I.

    2005-01-01

    Las Vegas and Pahrump are two of the fastest growing cities in the US, and the shortage of water looms as among the greatest future problems for these cities. These new maps of the Las Vegas 30 x 60-minute quadrangle provide a geologic and geophysical framework and fundamental earth science database needed to address societal issues such as ground water supply and contamination, surface flood, landslide, and seismic hazards, and soil properties and their changing impact by and on urbanization. The mountain ranges surrounding Las Vegas and Pahrump consist of Mesozoic, Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks. A majority of these rocks are Paleozoic carbonate rocks that are part of Nevada's carbonate rock aquifer province. The Spring Mountains represent a major recharge site in the province, where maximum altitude is 3,632 m (Charleston Peak) above sea level. Rocks in the Sheep and Las Vegas Ranges and Spring Mountains contain correlative, northeast-striking, southeast-verging thrust faults that are part of the Cretaceous, Sevier orogenic belt. These thrusts were offset during the Miocene by the Las Vegas Valley shear system (LVVSZ). We conducted new mapping in the Blue Diamond area, highlighting refined work on the Bird Spring thrust, newly studied ancient landslides, and gravity-slide blocks. We conducted new mapping in the Las Vegas Range and mapped previously unrecognized structures such as the Valley thrust and fold belt; recognition of these structures has led to a refined correlation of Mesozoic thrust faults across the LVVSZ. New contributions in the quadrangle also include a greatly refined stratigraphy of Paleozoic bedrock units based on conodont biostragraphy. We collected over 200 conodont samples in the quadrangle and established stratigraphic reference sections used to correlate units across the major Mesozoic thrust faults. Quaternary deposits cover about half of the map area and underlie most of the present urbanized area. Deposits consist of large coalescing

  15. Selenium concentrations in water and plant tissues of a newly formed arid wetland in Las Vegas, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Pollard, James; Cizdziel, James; Stave, Krystyna; Reid, Michelle

    2007-12-01

    There is concern that elevated levels of selenium found in the source water of a newly formed wetland park in Las Vegas, Nevada, may have detrimental effects on local wildlife. In this study, we collected and analyzed water samples monthly for a three year period from the inflow and outflow of the system. We also gathered dominant aquatic plants and selected terrestrial plants and analyzed the water and plant tissues (root, shoot, leaf and flower) for selenium by high resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer. Except for storm events and the introduction of an alternative low selenium content source water during summer low-flow conditions, selenium in the water was relatively stable. The concentration in the outflow tended to be slightly lower than the inflow. Concentrations of selenium in the dominant plant taxa in this wetlands were typical of ecosystems in the western United States and varied by taxa, tissue type, localized conditions (e.g., contact with selenium-laden water), and to a lesser extent, seasons. Selenium in the aquatic plant spiny naiad (Najas marina) was relatively high and may pose an ecological risk to wildlife during the late spring and summer. Additional work is underway investigating aquatic food chain accumulations of selenium as well as mass balance of selenium in the system. PMID:17394092

  16. Ground-water conditions in Las Vegas Valley, Clark County, Nevada; Part 2, Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, David S.; Dettinger, Michael D.

    1996-01-01

    In sedimentary deposits beneath arid Las Vegas Valley, ground-water levels have declined as much as 280 feet since 1912 in deeper aquifers due to pumping associated with urban development. Accompanying land subsidence has been as great as 5 feet. Predictive simulations show that by maintaining pumpage and recharge at 1980 levels and using municipal wells only during periods of peak water demand, rates of water-level decline and land subsidence will be reduced.

  17. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 - Control Tower and Support Building, Las Vegas, NV

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-31

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Las Vegas, Nevada by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  18. New 40Ar/39Ar isotopic dates from Miocene volcanic rocks in the Lake Mead area and southern Las Vegas Range, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Duebendorfer, E.M.; Deibert, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar dates on volcanic rocks interlayered with synextensional Miocene sedimentary rocks in the western Lake Mead area and southern end of the Las Vegas Range provide tight constraints on magmatism, basin formation, and extensional deformation in the Basin and Range province of southern Nevada. Vertical axis rotations associated with movement along the Las Vegas Valley shear zone occurred after 15.67??0.10 Ma (2??), based on a 40Ar/39Ar date from a tuff in the Gass Peak formation in the southern Las Vegas Range. Basaltic magmatism in the western Lake Mead area began as early as 13.28??0.09 Ma, based on a date from a basalt flow in the Lovell Wash Member of the Horse Spring Formation. Isotopic dating of a basalt from the volcanic rocks of Callville Mesa indicates that these rocks are as old as 11.41??0.14 Ma, suggesting that volcanic activity began shortly after formation of the Boulder basin, the extensional basin in which the informally named red sandstone unit was deposited. The red sandstone unit is at least as old as 11.70??0.08 Ma and contains megabreccia deposits younger than 12.93??0.10 Ma. This results shows that formation of the Boulder basin was associated with development of topographic relief that was probably generated by movement along the Saddle Island low-angle normal fault. Stratal tilting associated with extension occurred both prior to and after 11.5 Ma.

  19. Analysis of impacts of urban land use and land cover on air quality in the Las Vegas region using remote sensing information and ground observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.

    2007-01-01

    Urban development in the Las Vegas Valley of Nevada (USA) has expanded rapidly over the past 50 years. The air quality in the valley has suffered owing to increases from anthropogenic emissions of carbon monoxide, ozone and criteria pollutants of particular matter. Air quality observations show that pollutant concentrations have apparent heterogeneous characteristics in the urban area. Quantified urban land use and land cover information derived from satellite remote sensing data indicate an apparent local influence of urban development density on air pollutant distributions. Multi-year observational data collected by a network of local air monitoring stations specify that ozone maximums develop in the May and June timeframe, whereas minimum concentrations generally occur from November to February. The fine particulate matter maximum occurs in July. Ozone concentrations are highest on the west and northwest sides of the valley. Night-time ozone reduction contributes to the heterogeneous features of the spatial distribution for average ozone levels in the Las Vegas metropolitan area. Decreased ozone levels associated with increased urban development density suggest that the highest ozone and lowest nitrogen oxides concentrations are associated with medium to low density urban development in Las Vegas.

  20. A Tale of two Cities: Photoacoustic and Aethalometer Measurements Comparisons of Light Absorption in Mexico City and Las Vegas, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-05-01

    As part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments, MIRAGE-Mex deployment to Mexico City in the period of 30 days, March 2006, a suite of photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS; W. Arnott & G. Paredes), nephelometer scattering, and aetholemeter absorption instruments (N. Marley & J.Gaffney) were installed to measure at ground level the light absorption and scattering by aerosols at the urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP). This IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions. The PAS used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In the urban site the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed. The Las Vegas, NV site was located at East Charleston Street on January-February, 2003. In east Las Vegas typical westerly winds carry the city plume across the site. Comparisons of PAS aerosol light absorption and aetholemeter absorption measurements at 521 nm at both Las Vegas NV and Mexico City sites will be presented. We will also present a broad overview of the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the sites in relation to secondary aerosol formation.

  1. The influence of faults in basin-fill deposits on land subsidence, Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    The role of horizontal deformation caused by pumping of confined-aquifer systems is recognized as contributing to the development of earth fissures in semiarid regions, including Las Vegas Valley, Nevada. In spite of stabilizing water levels, new earth fissures continue to develop while existing ones continue to lengthen and widen near basin-fill faults. A three-dimensional granular displacement model based on Biot's consolidation theory (Biot, MA, 1941, General theory of three-dimensional consolidation. Jour. Applied Physics 12:155-164) has been used to evaluate the nature of displacement in the vicinity of two vertical faults. The fault was simulated as (1) a low-permeability barrier to horizontal flow, (2) a gap or structural break in the medium, but where groundwater flow is not obstructed, and (3) a combination of conditions (1) and (2). Results indicate that the low-permeability barrier greatly enhances horizontal displacement. The fault plane also represents a location of significant differential vertical subsidence. Large computed strains in the vicinity of the fault may suggest high potential for failure and the development of earth fissures when the fault is assumed to have low permeability. Results using a combination of the two boundaries suggest that potential fissure development may be great at or near the fault plane and that horizontal deformation is likely to play a key role in this development. Résumé. On considère que la déformation horizontale provoquée par un pompage dans un aquifère captif joue un rôle dans le développement des fissures du sol en régions semi-arides, comme la vallée de Las Vegas (Nevada). Malgré des niveaux d'eau stabilisés, de nouvelles fissures du sol continuent de se développer en longueur et en largeur au voisinage de failles dans les bassins sédimentaires. Un modèle de déplacement granulaire tri-dimensionnel, basé sur la théorie de la consolidation de Biot (Biot, M A, 1941, General theory of three

  2. The influence of faults in basin-fill deposits on land subsidence, Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    The role of horizontal deformation caused by pumping of confined-aquifer systems is recognized as contributing to the development of earth fissures in semiarid regions, including Las Vegas Valley, Nevada. In spite of stabilizing water levels, new earth fissures continue to develop while existing ones continue to lengthen and widen near basin-fill faults. A three-dimensional granular displacement model based on Biot's consolidation theory (Biot, MA, 1941, General theory of three-dimensional consolidation. Jour. Applied Physics 12:155-164) has been used to evaluate the nature of displacement in the vicinity of two vertical faults. The fault was simulated as (1) a low-permeability barrier to horizontal flow, (2) a gap or structural break in the medium, but where groundwater flow is not obstructed, and (3) a combination of conditions (1) and (2). Results indicate that the low-permeability barrier greatly enhances horizontal displacement. The fault plane also represents a location of significant differential vertical subsidence. Large computed strains in the vicinity of the fault may suggest high potential for failure and the development of earth fissures when the fault is assumed to have low permeability. Results using a combination of the two boundaries suggest that potential fissure development may be great at or near the fault plane and that horizontal deformation is likely to play a key role in this development. Résumé. On considère que la déformation horizontale provoquée par un pompage dans un aquifère captif joue un rôle dans le développement des fissures du sol en régions semi-arides, comme la vallée de Las Vegas (Nevada). Malgré des niveaux d'eau stabilisés, de nouvelles fissures du sol continuent de se développer en longueur et en largeur au voisinage de failles dans les bassins sédimentaires. Un modèle de déplacement granulaire tri-dimensionnel, basé sur la théorie de la consolidation de Biot (Biot, M A, 1941, General theory of three

  3. American Vocational Education Research Association Proceedings, Annual Convention (Las Vegas, Nevada, December 11-14, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt-Gohdes, Wanda

    This proceedings includes the following papers and carousel presentations: "Information Technology Related Career Development Needs of Secondary Vocational Teachers" (Joe W. Kotrlik, Betty C. Harrison, Donna H. Redmann, Cindy S. Handley); "Do Gender and Academic Risk Matter? Influences on Career Decision Making and Occupational Choice in Early…

  4. Palinspastic reconstruction of Lower Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences near the latitude of Las Vegas: Implications for the entire Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Marzolf, J.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    On the Colorado Plateau, lower Mesozoic stratigraphy is subdivided by regional unconformities into the Lower Triassic Moenkopi, Upper Triassic Chinle, Lower and Middle( ) Jurassic Glen Canyon, and Middle Jurassic lower San Rafael tectonosequences. Palinspastic reconstruction for Cenozoic extensional and mesozoic compressional deformations near the latitude of Las Vegas indicates the Moenkopi tectono-sequence constructed a passive-margin-like architecture of modest width overlapping folded. Thrust-faulted, and intruded Permian strata, with state boundaries fixed relative to the Colorado Plateau, comparison of the location of the Early Triassic shelf-slope break near latitude 36[degree] with the palinspastically restored location of the shelf-slope break in southeastern Idaho implies strata of the Moenkopi tectonosequence in the Mesozoic marine province of northwest NV lay in western utah in the Early Triassic. This reconstruction: suggests that the Galconda and Last Chance faults are part of the same thrust system; aligns late Carnian paleovalleys of the chinle tectonosequence on the Colorado Plateau with a coeval northwest-trending paleovalley cut across the Star Pea, and the Norian Cottonwood paleovalley with the coeval Grass Valley delta; defines a narrow, northward deepening back-arc basin in which the Glen Canyon tectonosequence was deposited; aligns east-facing half grabens along the back side of the arc from the Cowhole Mountains to the Clan Alpine Range; projects the volcan-arc/back-arc transition from northwest Arizona to the east side of the Idaho batholith; and predicts the abrupt facies change from silicic volcanics to marine strata of the lower San Rafael sequence lay in western Utah. The paleogeographic was altered in the late Bathonian to Callovian by back-arc extension north of a line extending from Cedar City, UT to Mina, NV. The palinspastic reconstruction implies the Paleozoic was tectonically stacked at the close of the Paleozoic.

  5. First records of Canis dirus and Smilodon fatalis from the late Pleistocene Tule Springs local fauna, upper Las Vegas Wash, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Late Pleistocene groundwater discharge deposits (paleowetlands) in the upper Las Vegas Wash north of Las Vegas, Nevada, have yielded an abundant and diverse vertebrate fossil assemblage, the Tule Springs local fauna (TSLF). The TSLF is the largest open-site vertebrate fossil assemblage dating to the Rancholabrean North American Land Mammal Age in the southern Great Basin and Mojave Desert. Over 600 discrete body fossil localities have been recorded from the wash, including an area that now encompasses Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument (TUSK). Paleowetland sediments exposed in TUSK named the Las Vegas Formation span the last 250 ka, with fossiliferous sediments spanning ∼100–13 ka. The recovered fauna is dominated by remains of Camelopsand Mammuthus, and also includes relatively common remains of extinct Equusand Bisonas well as abundant vertebrate microfaunal fossils. Large carnivorans are rare, with only Puma concolor and Panthera atrox documented previously. Postcranial remains assigned to the species Canis dirus (dire wolf) and Smilodon fatalis (sabre-toothed cat) represent the first confirmed records of these species from the TSLF, as well as the first documentation of Canis dirus in Nevada and the only known occurrence of Smilodonin southern Nevada. The size of the recovered canid fossil precludes assignment to other Pleistocene species of Canis. The morphology of the felid elements differentiates them from other large predators such as Panthera, Homotherium, and Xenosmilus, and the size of the fossils prevents assignment to other species of Smilodon. The confirmed presence of S. fatalis in the TSLF is of particular interest, indicating that this species inhabited open habitats. In turn, this suggests that the presumed preference of S. fatalis for closed-habitat environments hunting requires further elucidation. PMID:27366649

  6. First records of Canis dirus and Smilodon fatalis from the late Pleistocene Tule Springs local fauna, upper Las Vegas Wash, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Scott, Eric; Springer, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Late Pleistocene groundwater discharge deposits (paleowetlands) in the upper Las Vegas Wash north of Las Vegas, Nevada, have yielded an abundant and diverse vertebrate fossil assemblage, the Tule Springs local fauna (TSLF). The TSLF is the largest open-site vertebrate fossil assemblage dating to the Rancholabrean North American Land Mammal Age in the southern Great Basin and Mojave Desert. Over 600 discrete body fossil localities have been recorded from the wash, including an area that now encompasses Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument (TUSK). Paleowetland sediments exposed in TUSK named the Las Vegas Formation span the last 250 ka, with fossiliferous sediments spanning ∼100-13 ka. The recovered fauna is dominated by remains of Camelopsand Mammuthus, and also includes relatively common remains of extinct Equusand Bisonas well as abundant vertebrate microfaunal fossils. Large carnivorans are rare, with only Puma concolor and Panthera atrox documented previously. Postcranial remains assigned to the species Canis dirus (dire wolf) and Smilodon fatalis (sabre-toothed cat) represent the first confirmed records of these species from the TSLF, as well as the first documentation of Canis dirus in Nevada and the only known occurrence of Smilodonin southern Nevada. The size of the recovered canid fossil precludes assignment to other Pleistocene species of Canis. The morphology of the felid elements differentiates them from other large predators such as Panthera, Homotherium, and Xenosmilus, and the size of the fossils prevents assignment to other species of Smilodon. The confirmed presence of S. fatalis in the TSLF is of particular interest, indicating that this species inhabited open habitats. In turn, this suggests that the presumed preference of S. fatalis for closed-habitat environments hunting requires further elucidation. PMID:27366649

  7. Inverse modeling using PS-InSAR for improved calibration of hydraulic parameters and prediction of future subsidence for Las Vegas Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, T. J.; Zhang, M.

    2015-11-01

    Las Vegas Valley has had a long history of surface deformation due to groundwater pumping that began in the early 20th century. After nearly 80 years of pumping, PS-InSAR interferograms have revealed detailed and complex spatial patterns of subsidence in the Las Vegas Valley area that do not coincide with major pumping regions. High spatial and temporal resolution subsidence observations from InSAR and hydraulic head data were used to inversely calibrate transmissivities (T), elastic and inelastic skeletal storage coefficients (Ske and Skv) of the developed-zone aquifer and conductance (CR) of the basin-fill faults for the entire Las Vegas basin. The results indicate that the subsidence observations from PS-InSAR are extremely beneficial for accurately quantifying hydraulic parameters, and the model calibration results are far more accurate than when using only water-levels as observations, and just a few random subsidence observations. Future predictions of land subsidence to year 2030 were made on the basis of existing pumping patterns and rates. Simulation results suggests that subsidence will continue in northwest subsidence bowl area, which is expected to undergo an additional 11.3 cm of subsidence. Even mitigation measures that include artificial recharge and reduced pumping do not significantly reduce the compaction in the northwest subsidence bowl. This is due to the slow draining of thick confining units in the region. However, a small amount of uplift of 0.4 cm is expected in the North and Central bowl areas over the next 20 years.

  8. The Las Vegas Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sughrua, William

    2010-01-01

    Following "reflexive ethnography" and utilizing an approach of "performative narrative" and "layered text", this article explores how Bachelor of Arts students in the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language program at a public university in Mexico successfully manage the writing of an inductive-oriented thesis in English by resisting…

  9. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Las Vegas, Nevada, October 26--29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'', (S-101) which was conducted October 26--29, 1992 at EG G Measurement, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide examination results, and recommendations for improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments and Appendix B presents a copy of the course evaluation form that students were asked to complete.

  10. High-level nuclear waste transport and storage assessment of potential impacts on tourism in the Las Vegas area. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    SciTech Connect

    1985-12-01

    The literature review and empirical analyses presented in this report were undertaken, for the most part, between August and October 1983. They are not comprehensive. No primary data were gathered, nor were any formal surveys conducted. Additionally, because construction of a repository at Yucca Mountain, if that site is selected for a repository, is not scheduled to begin until 1993, engineering design and planned physical appearance of the repository are very preliminary. Therefore, specific design features or visual appearance were not addressed in the analyses. Finally, because actual transportation routes have not been designated, impacts on tourism generated specifically by transportation activities are not considered separately. Chapter 2 briefly discusses possible means by which a repository could impact tourism in the Las Vegas area. Chapter 3 presents a review of previous research on alternative methods for predicting the response of people to potential hazards. A review of several published studies where these methods have been applied to facilities and activities associated with radioactive materials is included in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 contains five case studies of tourism impacts associated with past events that were perceived by the public to represent safety hazards. These perceptions of safety hazards were evidenced by news media coverage. These case studies were conducted specifically for this report. Conclusions of this preliminary analysis regarding the potential impact on tourism in the Las Vegas area of a repository at Yucca Mountain are in Chapter 5. Recommendations for further research are contained in Chapter 6.

  11. Evapotranspiration of Mixed Shrub Communities in Phreatophytic Zones of the Great Basin D.A. Devitt1, L.K. Fenstermaker2, M. Young2, B. Conrad1 and B. Bird1 1 School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 2 Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, D. A.; Fenstermaker, L. K.; Young, M.; Conrad, B.; Bird, B.

    2009-12-01

    Water limitations in the arid and semiarid regions of the southwestern United States have led many water managers of municipalities to begin the process of diversifying their water resource portfolios. Las Vegas in particular, is pursuing groundwater exportation from east central basins in Nevada. Estimating evapotranspiration (ET) is a critical component to closing hydrologic balances in these basins. As such, ET was estimated for three valleys in the Great Basin Region of Nevada (USA) during a three year period. ET estimates were made based on an energy balance approach using the eddy covariance method. ET estimates at the basin scale were made by developing empirical relationships between ET and remotely sensed spectral data (Landsat). Groundwater, soil moisture, rainfall and leaf level measurements were used to validate the differences in ET estimates based on site, year and basin. When the ET correlations were based on average NDVI values during the growing period and incorporated previously published values attained for the same valleys during the same time period, we could account for 97% of the variation in the ET estimate for the May 10 to September 5 growing period and 93% of the variation in the ET estimates based on measured or projected yearly ET totals. Variations in yearly ET estimates at the different shrub and grassland sites ranged from 20 to 50 cm during the two dry years (2006, 2007, not including the irrigated site). The amount of winter precipitation was shown to be a significant driving force in the physiological response of the plants and the yearly ET totals. In the case of White River Valley the ratio of winter precipitation to reference evapotranspiration declined from 79% to 11% over the 3 year monitoring period. Such changes led to a direct impact on leaf xylem water potential values of greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus). During the two drier years (2006 and 2007) greasewood plants entered into the growing period with lower mid day

  12. Sensing the ups and downs of Las Vegas: InSAR reveals structural control of land subsidence and aquifer-system deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelung, Falk; Galloway, Devin L.; Bell, John W.; Zebker, Howard A.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    1999-06-01

    Land subsidence in Las Vegas, Nevada, United States, between April 1992 and December 1997 was measured using spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar. The detailed deformation maps clearly show that the spatial extent of subsidence is controlled by geologic structures (faults) and sediment composition (clay thickness). The maximum detected subsidence during the 5.75 yr period is 19 cm. Comparison with leveling data indicates that the subsidence rates declined during the past decade as a result of rising ground-water levels brought about by a net reduction in ground-water extraction. Temporal analysis also detects seasonal subsidence and uplift patterns, which provide information about the elastic and inelastic properties of the aquifer system and their spatial variability.

  13. Sensing the ups and downs of Las Vegas: InSAR reveals structural control of land subsidence and aquifer-system deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amelung, F.; Galloway, D.L.; Bell, J.W.; Zebker, H.A.; Laczniak, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Land subsidence in Las Vegas, Nevada, United States, between April 1992 and December 1997 was measured using spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar. The detailed deformation maps clearly show that the spatial extent of subsidence is controlled by geologic structures (faults) and sediment composition (clay thickness). The maximum detected subsidence during the 5.75 yr period is 19 cm. Comparison with leveling data indicates that the subsidence rates declined during the past decade as a result of rising ground-water levels brought about by a net reduction in ground-water extraction. Temporal analysis also detects seasonal subsidence and uplift patterns, which provide information about the elastic and inelastic properties of the aquifer system and their spatial variability.

  14. INNOVATIVE MEANS OF DEALING WITH POTENTIAL SOURCES OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL GROUND WATER QUALITY SYMPOSIUM (7TH) HELD AT LAS VEGAS, NEVADA ON SEPTEMBER 26-28, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Seventh National Ground Water Quality Symposium was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, on September 26-28, 1984. The symposium was dedicated to the memory of Mahdi S. Hantush (1921-1984), a pioneering scientist who specialized in the application of mathematics to solve transient grou...

  15. Estimates of hydraulic properties from a one-dimensional numerical model of vertical aquifer-system deformation, Lorenzi site, Las Vegas, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavelko, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    Land subsidence related to aquifer-system compaction and ground-water withdrawals has been occurring in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, since the 1930's, and by the late 1980's some areas in the valley had subsided more than 5 feet. Since the late 1980's, seasonal artificial-recharge programs have lessened the effects of summertime pumping on aquifer-system compaction, but the long-term trend of compaction continues in places. Since 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey has continuously monitored water-level changes in three piezometers and vertical aquifer-system deformation with a borehole extensometer at the Lorenzi site in Las Vegas, Nevada. A one-dimensional, numerical, ground-water flow model of the aquifer system below the Lorenzi site was developed for the period 1901-2000, to estimate aquitard vertical hydraulic conductivity, aquitard inelastic skeletal specific storage, and aquitard and aquifer elastic skeletal specific storage. Aquifer water-level data were used in the model as the aquifer-system stresses that controlled simulated vertical aquifer-system deformation. Nonlinear-regression methods were used to calibrate the model, utilizing estimated and measured aquifer-system deformation data to minimize a weighted least-squares objective function, and estimate optimal property values. Model results indicate that at the Lorenzi site, aquitard vertical hydraulic conductivity is 3 x 10-6 feet per day, aquitard inelastic skeletal specific storage is 4 x 10-5 per foot, aquitard elastic skeletal specific storage is 5 x 10-6 per foot, and aquifer elastic skeletal specific storage is 3 x 10-7 per foot. Regression statistics indicate that the model and data provided sufficient information to estimate the target properties, the model adequately simulated observed data, and the estimated property values are accurate and unique.

  16. U.S. Geological Survey Subsidence Interest Group Conference; proceedings of the Technical Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, February 14-16, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prince, Keith R.; Leake, Stanley A.

    1997-01-01

    Introducation to Papers: This report is a compilation of short papers that are based on oral presentations summarizing the results of recent research that were given at the third meeting of the Subsidence Interest Group held in Las Vegas, Nevada, February 14?16, 1995. The report includes case studies of land subsidence and aquifer-system deformation resulting from fluid withdrawal, geothermal development, and mine collapse. Methods for monitoring land subsidence using Global Positioning System technology for the rapid and accurate measurement of changes in land-surface altitude also are described. The current status of numerical simulation of land subsidence in the USGS is summarized, and several of the short papers deal with the development and application of new numerical techniques for simulation and quantification of aquifersystem deformation. Not all oral presentations made at the meeting are documented in this report. Several of the presentations were of ongoing research and as such, the findings were provisional in nature and were offered at the meeting to stimulate scientific discussion and debate among colleagues. The information presented in this report, although only a subset of the proceedings of the meeting in Las Vegas, should help expand the scientific basis for management decisions to mitigate or control the effects of land subsidence. The short papers describing the results of these studies provide a cross section of ongoing research in aquifer mechanics and land subsidence and also form an assessment of the current technology and 'state of the science.' The analytical and interpretive methods described in this report will be useful to scientists involved in studies of ground-water hydraulics and aquifer-system deformation.

  17. Ground-water conditions in Las Vegas Valley, Clark County, Nevada; Part II, Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, D.S.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Groundwater withdrawals in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, primarily for municipal supplies, totaled more than 2.5 million acre-ft between 1912 and 1981, with a peak annual withdrawal rate of 88,000 acre-ft in 1968. Effects of heavy pumping are evident over large areas of the valley but are more pronounced near the major well fields. Secondary recharge from lawn irrigation and other sources is estimated to have totaled more than 340,000 acre-ft during 1972-81. Resulting rises in water-level in shallow, unconfined aquifers in the central and southeastern parts of the valley have caused: widespread water-logging of soils; increased groundwater discharge to Las Vegas Wash and its tributaries; and potential for degradation of water quality in deeper aquifers by accentuating downward vertical hydraulic potential in areas where shallow groundwater has high concentrations of dissolved solids and nitrate. A 3-dimensional groundwater flow model of the valley-fill aquifer system was constructed for use in evaluating possible groundwater management alternatives aimed at alleviating problems related to overdraft and water-logging while maximizing use of the groundwater resources. Natural recharge to the valley-fill aquifers is about 33,000 acre-ft/yr; in 1979, an estimated 44,000 acre-ft of secondary recharge infiltrated to the near-surface and developed-zone aquifers. Peak water use for lawn irrigation during summer results in rates of secondary recharge that may increase threefold from winter rates. Simulated rates of seepage to washes in the valley increased correspondingly from an average of 850 acre-ft/mo in winter to about 1,300 acre-ft/mo in the summer. Groundwater withdrawals by pumping totaled 620,000 acre-ft during 1972-81, and model results indicate that about 190,000 acre-ft of that total was derived from storage. Use of the model as a predictive tool was demonstrated by simulating the effects of using most municipal wells only during the peak-demand season of June 1

  18. An overview of the 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS): Impact of stratospheric intrusions and long-range transport on surface air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J.; Brioude, J.; Cooper, O. R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lin, M. Y.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Pierce, R. B.; Sandberg, S. P.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.

    2015-05-01

    The 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS) was conducted in the late spring and early summer of 2013 to assess the seasonal contribution of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT) and long-range transport to surface ozone in Clark County, Nevada and determine if these processes directly contribute to exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) in this area. Secondary goals included the characterization of local ozone production, regional transport from the Los Angeles Basin, and impacts from wildfires. The LVOS measurement campaign took place at a former U.S. Air Force radar station ∼45 km northwest of Las Vegas on Angel Peak (∼2.7 km above mean sea level, asl) in the Spring Mountains. The study consisted of two extended periods (May 19-June 4 and June 22-28, 2013) with near daily 5-min averaged lidar measurements of ozone and backscatter profiles from the surface to ∼2.5 km above ground level (∼5.2 km asl), and continuous in situ measurements (May 20-June 28) of O3, CO, (1-min) and meteorological parameters (5-min) at the surface. These activities were guided by forecasts and analyses from the FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTticle) dispersion model and the Real Time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS), and the NOAA Geophysical Research Laboratory (NOAA GFDL) AM3 chemistry-climate model. In this paper, we describe the LVOS measurements and present an overview of the results. The combined measurements and model analyses show that STT directly contributed to each of the three O3 exceedances that occurred in Clark County during LVOS, with contributions to 8-h surface concentrations in excess of 30 ppbv on each of these days. The analyses show that long-range transport from Asia made smaller contributions (<10 ppbv) to surface O3 during two of those exceedances. The contribution of regional wildfires to surface O3 during the three LVOS exceedance events was found to be negligible, but wildfires were found to be a major factor during exceedance events

  19. Risk of exposure to second hand smoke for adolescents in Las Vegas casinos: an evaluation of the Nevada Clean Indoor Air Act.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Christopher; Henriques, Dominic; York, Nancy; Lee, Kiyoung

    2012-01-01

    Since the Surgeon General's groundbreaking report of 1964, "Smoking and Health," the medical and scientific communities have uncovered the devastating effects of tobacco smoke on health. In reaction to these findings, local and state governments have enacted a variety of clean air acts to prevent unnecessary exposure to this known carcinogen. The Nevada Clean Indoor Air Act (NCIAA), a non-comprehensive smoke-free law, permits smoking in designated areas of casinos, bars, and taverns. With many Las Vegas casinos catering to all ages, this study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of NCIAA in protecting children from second hand smoke exposure. Using a device that measures ambient air particle matter concentrations, this study sampled the air quality in 15 casino gaming areas and corresponding non-smoking, children-friendly areas. The results indicate that current policy fails to preserve indoor air quality in these children-friendly areas. Furthermore, this research suggests the adoption of a more comprehensive, 100% smoke-free policy as the only effective remedy. PMID:23113419

  20. A comparison of greenhouse gas emissions and local area pollution of highspeed rail and air travel between Los Angeles and Las Vegas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Damien

    Global warming is one of the most discussed global environmental issues in the world today. Global warming is driven by fossil fuel combustion emissions known as Green-house Gases (GHG). One of the major contributors to GHG emissions is the transport sector, emitting approximately 30% of total U.S. CO 2 emissions in 2010. Air travel contributed approximately 3.5% of total U.S. CO2 in 2008. High-speed Rail (HSR) is often touted as cleaner, more sustainable mode of transport than air travel. HSR is one of few modes of transport capable of competing with air travel for short to medium-haul distances. There has been considerable study of GHG emissions of each independently. Research has also been carried out into the economics and competition of these transport modes. However, there has been very limited study of the comparative emissions of each, apart from one study in Europe (Givoni, 2007). The current study was undertaken with the goal of quantifying potential emission savings due to mode substitution from air travel to HSR in the Los Angeles to Las Vegas corridor. This study only considered the emissions which occurred from the combustion of the relevant fuels, either in power plants or the engines of an aircraft. Emissions from fuel production/refining or transport of fuels were not considered. Another issue compared was Local Area Pollution (LAP), which is a measure of the severity of emissions effect on the environment. This was examined because all emissions from HSR occur close to the surface of the earth, and hence effect the local environment, while only a portion of aircraft emissions do. This study was carried out using internationally recognized emission inventory methodologies. For the air travel emission estimate methodologies and data published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) were used. The HSR energy use was estimated from energy use data from currently running HSR

  1. Immunotoxicological and neurotoxicological profile of health effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dust from sand dunes at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area, Las Vegas, NV.

    PubMed

    Keil, Deborah; Buck, Brenda; Goossens, Dirk; Teng, Yuanxin; Leetham, Mallory; Murphy, Lacey; Pollard, James; Eggers, Margaret; McLaurin, Brett; Gerads, Russell; DeWitt, Jamie

    2016-01-15

    Exposure to geogenic particulate matter (PM) comprised of mineral particles has been linked to human health effects. However, very little data exist on health effects associated with geogenic dust exposure in natural settings. Therefore, we characterized particulate matter size, metal chemistry, and health effects of dust collected from the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a popular off-road vehicle area located near Las Vegas, NV. Adult female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to several concentrations of mineral dust collected from active and vegetated sand dunes in NDRA. Dust samples (median diameter: 4.4 μm) were suspended in phosphate-buffered saline and delivered at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 mg dust/kg body weight by oropharyngeal aspiration. ICP-MS analyses of total dissolution of the dust resulted in aluminum (55,090 μg/g), vanadium (70 μg/g), chromium (33 μg/g), manganese (511 μg/g), iron (21,600 μg/g), cobalt (9.4 μg/g), copper (69 μg/g), zinc (79 μg/g), arsenic (62 μg/g), strontium (620 μg/g), cesium (13 μg/g), lead 25 μg/g) and uranium (4.7 μg/g). Arsenic was present only as As(V). Mice received four exposures, once/week over 28-days to mimic a month of weekend exposures. Descriptive and functional assays to assess immunotoxicity and neurotoxicity were performed 24 h after the final exposure. The primary observation was that 0.1 to 100 mg/kg of this sand dune derived dust dose-responsively reduced antigen-specific IgM antibody responses, suggesting that dust from this area of NDRA may present a potential health risk. PMID:26644169

  2. Health effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dusts from arsenic-rich sediment at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area, Las Vegas, NV.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, Jamie; Buck, Brenda; Goossens, Dirk; Hu, Qing; Chow, Rebecca; David, Winnie; Young, Sharon; Teng, Yuanxin; Leetham-Spencer, Mallory; Murphy, Lacey; Pollard, James; McLaurin, Brett; Gerads, Russell; Keil, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Geogenic dust from arid environments is a possible inhalation hazard for humans, especially when using off-road vehicles that generate significant dust. This study focused on immunotoxicological and neurotoxicological effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dust generated from sediments in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area near Las Vegas, Nevada that are particularly high in arsenic; the naturally-occurring arsenic concentrations in these surficial sediments ranged from 4.8 to 346μg/g. Dust samples from sediments used in this study had a median diameter of 4.5μm and also were a complex mixture of naturally-occurring metals, including aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, strontium, cesium, lead, uranium, and arsenic. Adult female B6C3F1 mice exposed via oropharyngeal aspiration to 0.01 to 100mg dust/kg body weight, four times, a week apart, for 28days, were evaluated 24h after the last exposure. Peripheral eosinophils were increased at all concentrations, serum creatinine was dose responsively increased beginning at 1.0mg/kg/day, and blood urea nitrogen was decreased at 10 and 100mg/kg/day. Antigen-specific IgM responses and natural killer cell activity were dose-responsively suppressed at 0.1mg/kg/day and above. Splenic CD4+CD25+ T cells were decreased at 0.01, 0.1, 10, and 100mg/kg/day. Antibodies against MBP, NF-68, and GFAP were selectively reduced. A no observed adverse effect level of 0.01mg/kg/day and a lowest observed adverse effect level of 0.1mg/kg/day were determined from IgM responses and natural killer cell activity, indicating that exposure to this dust, under conditions similar to our design, could affect these responses. PMID:27221630

  3. Vega balloon meteorological measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Hildebrand, C. E.; Preston, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Vega balloons obtained in situ measurements of pressure, temperature, vertical winds, cloud density, ambient illumination, and the frequency of lightning during their flights in the Venus middle cloud layer. The Vega measurements were used to develop a comprehensive description of the meteorology of the Venus middle cloud layer. The Vega measurements provide the following picture: large horizontal temperature gradients near the equator, vigorous convection, and weather conditions that can change dramatically on time scales as short as one hour.

  4. Ground-water quality and geochemistry of Las Vegas Valley, Clark County, Nevada, 1981-83; implementation of a monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettinger, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    As a result of rapid urban growth in Las Vegas Valley, rates of water use and wastewater disposal have grown rapidly during the last 25 years. Concern has developed over the potential water quality effects of this growth. The deep percolation of wastewater and irrigation return flow (much of which originates as imported water from Lake Mead), along with severe overdraft conditions in the principal aquifers of the valley, could combine to pose a long-term threat to groundwater quality. The quantitative investigations of groundwater quality and geochemical conditions in the valley necessary to address these concerns would include the establishment of data collection networks on a valley-wide scale that differ substantially from existing networks. The valley-wide networks would have a uniform areal distribution of sampling sites, would sample from all major depth zones, and would entail repeated sampling from each site. With these criteria in mind, 40 wells were chosen for inclusion in a demonstration monitoring network. Groundwater in the northern half of the valley generally contains 200 to 400 mg/L of dissolved solids, and is dominated by calcium, magnesium , and bicarbonate ions, reflecting a chemical equilibrium between the groundwater and the dominantly carbonate rocks in the aquifers of this area. The intermediate to deep groundwater in the southern half of the valley is of poorer quality (containing 700 to 1,500 mg/L of dissolved solids) and is dominated by calcium, magnesium, sulfate, and bicarbonate ions, reflecting the occurrence of other rock types including evaporite minerals among the still-dominant carbonate rocks in the aquifers of this part of the valley. The poorest quality groundwater in the valley is generally in the lowland parts of the valley in the first few feet beneath the water table, where dissolved solids concentrations range from 2,000 to > 7,000 mg/L , and probably reflects the effects of evaporite dissolution, secondary recharge, and

  5. Remarks of Charles D. Ferris, Chairman, Federal Communications Commission before the 56th Annual Convention of the National Association of Broadcasters, The Las Vegas Hilton Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, Wednesday, April 12, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Charles D.

    Broadcasters should aim for diversity and excellence in programing rather than basing programing decisions on the Nielsen ratings and aiming for maximized profits. Broadcasting reflects, shapes, alters, and informs the national consciousness; entertainment programs as well as newscasts have tremendous impact on the public, and the effect of…

  6. Hydrologic and geologic characteristics of the Yucca Mountain site relevant to the performance of a potential repository: Day 1, Las Vegas, Nevada to Pahrump, Nevada: Stop 6A. Keane Wonder Spring and regional groundwater flow in the Death Valley region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinkampf, W.C.

    2000-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, located ~100 mi northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been designated by Congress as a site to be characterized for a potential mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This field trip will examine the regional geologic and hydrologic setting for Yucca Mountain, as well as specific results of the site characterization program, The first day focuses on the regional seeing with emphasis on current and paleo hydrology, which are both of critical concern for predicting future performance of a potential repository. Morning stops will be in southern Nevada and afternoon stops will be in Death Valley. The second day will be spent at Yucca Mountain. The filed trip will visit the underground testing sites in the "Exploratory Studies Facility" and the "Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Field Test" plus several surface-based testing sites. Much of the work at the site has concentrated on studies of the unsaturated zone, and element of the hydrologic system that historically has received little attention. Discussions during the second day will comprise selected topics of Yucca Mountain geology, mic hazard in the Yucca Mountain area. Evening discussions will address modeling of regional groundwater flow, the geology and hydrology of Yucca Mountain to the performance of a potential repository. Day 3 will examine the geologic framework and hydrology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Groundwater Basin and then will continue to Reno via Hawthorne, Nevada and the Walker Lake area.

  7. Hidden Fermi liquid; the moral: a good effective low-energy theory is worth all of Monte Carlo with Las Vegas thrown in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Philip W.; Casey, Philip A.

    2010-04-01

    We present a formalism for dealing directly with the effects of the Gutzwiller projection implicit in the t-J model which is widely believed to underlie the phenomenology of the high-Tc cuprates. We suggest that a true Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer condensation from a Fermi liquid state takes place, but in the unphysical space prior to projection. At low doping, however, instead of a hidden Fermi liquid one gets a 'hidden' non-superconducting resonating valence bond state which develops hole pockets upon doping. The theory which results upon projection does not follow conventional rules of diagram theory and in fact in the normal state is a Z = 0 non-Fermi liquid. Anomalous properties of the 'strange metal' normal state are predicted and compared against experimental findings.

  8. Status of the VEGA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Kondtatyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Jacobs, N.; Malaza, V.

    2015-06-01

    Motivation and status of the VEGA (Velocity-Energy Guide based Array) project is presented. One armed fission fragments spectrometer with an electrostatic guide system is proposed for installation at the vertical experimental channel of the IBR-2 reactor. Scientific program aimed at investigation of new multi-body decays of actinides, shapeisomeric states in fission fragments and fission modes is reported.

  9. Retrofitting Las Vegas. Implementing Energy Efficiency in Two Las Vegas Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Puttagunta, S.

    2013-04-01

    In 2009, the state of Nevada received nearly $40 million in Neighborhood Stabilization Funds from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to use to stabilize communities that have suffered from foreclosures and abandonment. In order to provide guidance to local officials and maximize how effectively this NSP funding is used in retrofitting homes, the CARB team provided design specifications, energy modeling, and technical support for the BARA team and its local partners—Better Building Performance, Nevada Energy Star Partners Green Alliance, and Home Free Nevada—for two retrofit test homes. One home demonstrated a modest retrofit and the other a deep energy retrofit. This report describes the retrofit packages, which were used as an educational experience for home performance professionals, building trades, remodelers, and the general public.

  10. UV SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF VEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.

    2010-12-20

    We show that the UV spectrum (1280-3200 A) of the 'superficially normal' A-star Vega, as observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite at a resolution comparable to the star's rotational broadening width, can be fit remarkably well by a single-temperature synthetic spectrum based on LTE atmosphere models and a newly constructed UV line list. If Vega were a normal, equator-on, slow-rotating star, then its spectrum and our analysis would indicate a temperature of T{sub eff} {approx_equal}9550 K, surface gravity of log g {approx_equal}3.7, general surface metallicity of [m/H] {approx_equal}-0.5, and a microturbulence velocity of v{sub turb} {approx_equal}2.0 km s{sup -1}. Given its rapid rotation and nearly pole-on orientation, however, these parameters must be regarded as representing averages across the observed hemisphere. Modeling the complex UV line spectrum has allowed us to determine the specific surface abundances for 17 different chemical elements, including CNO, the light metals, and the iron group elements. The resultant abundance pattern agrees in general with previous results, although there is considerable scatter in the literature. Despite its peculiarities, Vega has turned out to provide a powerful test of the extent of our abilities to model the atmospheric properties of the early A-stars, particularly the detailed UV line spectrum. The value of the measurements from this pilot study will increase as this analysis is extended to more objects in the rich high-dispersion IUE data archive, including both normal and peculiar objects.

  11. VEGAS: VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussa, Srikanth; VEGAS Development Team

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (NSF-ATI) program is funding a new spectrometer backend for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This spectrometer is being built by the CICADA collaboration - collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) at the University of California Berkeley.The backend is named as VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) and will replace the capabilities of the existing spectrometers. This backend supports data processing from focal plane array systems. The spectrometer will be capable of processing up to 1.25 GHz bandwidth from 8 dual polarized beams or a bandwidth up to 10 GHz from a dual polarized beam.The spectrometer will be using 8-bit analog to digital converters (ADC), which gives a better dynamic range than existing GBT spectrometers. There will be 8 tunable digital sub-bands within the 1.25 GHz bandwidth, which will enhance the capability of simultaneous observation of multiple spectral transitions. The maximum spectral dump rate to disk will be about 0.5 msec. The vastly enhanced backend capabilities will support several science projects with the GBT. The projects include mapping temperature and density structure of molecular clouds; searches for organic molecules in the interstellar medium; determination of the fundamental constants of our evolving Universe; red-shifted spectral features from galaxies across cosmic time and survey for pulsars in the extreme gravitational environment of the Galactic Center.

  12. VEGA, a small launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duret, François; Fabrizi, Antonio

    1999-09-01

    Several studies have been performed in Europe aiming to promote the full development of a small launch vehicle to put into orbit one ton class spacecrafts. But during the last ten years, the european workforce was mainly oriented towards the qualification of the heavy class ARIANE 5 launch vehicle.Then, due also to lack of visibility on this reduced segment of market, when comparing with the geosatcom market, no proposal was sufficiently attractive to get from the potentially interrested authorities a clear go-ahead, i.e. a financial committment. The situation is now rapidly evolving. Several european states, among them ITALY and FRANCE, are now convinced of the necessity of the availability of such a transportation system, an important argument to promote small missions, using small satellites. Application market will be mainly scientific experiments and earth observation; some telecommunications applications may be also envisaged such as placement of little LEO constellation satellites, or replacement after failure of big LEO constellation satellites. FIAT AVIO and AEROSPATIALE have proposed to their national agencies the development of such a small launch vehicle, named VEGA. The paper presents the story of the industrial proposal, and the present status of the project: Mission spectrum, technical definition, launch service and performance, target development plan and target recurring costs, as well as the industrial organisation for development, procurement, marketing and operations.

  13. The long-term variability of Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkovskaya, V.; Plachinda, S.; Valyavin, G.; Baklanova, D.; Lee, B.-C.

    2011-12-01

    Over the time of 60 years Vega (α Lyrae = HD 172167, A0V) has been generally accepted as a standard star in the near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet regions. But is the spectrophotometric standard Vega really non-variable star? Researchers give very different answers to this question. We aim to search a periodicity in our results of spectropolarimetric study of Vega, namely periodic variations in equivalent width of the spectral lines and longitudinal magnetic field measurements. High-accuracy spectropolarimetric observations of Vega have been performed during 26 nights from 1997 to 2010 using the Coudé spectrograph of the 2.6-m Shain reflector at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO, Ukraine) and during 4 nights in 2007 and 2008 using the echelle spectrograph BOES at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO, South Korea). The long-term (year-to-year) variability of Vega was confirmed. It was concluded that this variability does not have magnetic nature. The paper is dedicated to the memory of V.P. Merezhin.

  14. Line Blanketing in Vega and Sirus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical model and spectrum calculation for Vega is discussed. The abundance of carbon is approximately -3.8, which is 0.3 lower than the old solar value and supports Mount and Linsky's newer value. The oxygen abundance is approximately -3.5. Assuming that Vega has solar abundances, the solar oxygen abundance appears to have been overestimated by 0.3 in the log. Other abundances appear to be solar. For Sirius the calculations do not agree with the observed spectrum. Line opacity is considerably underestimated, notably in third-spectrum iron group lines. Carbon is underabundant relative to Vega by 0.2 in the log. Nitrogen is unchanged. Oxygen is enhanced by 0.3. Heavier elements are enhanced by 1.0 in the log. Calibration yields 1.3E-10 ergs/sq cm/s/nm for each U1 Copernicus count at 130 nm.

  15. Retrofitting Vegas: Implementing Energy Efficiency in Two Las Vegas Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Puttagunta, S.

    2013-04-01

    In 2009, the state of Nevada received nearly forty million dollars in Neighborhood Stabilization Funds from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The purpose of this funding was to stabilize communities that have suffered from foreclosures and abandonment. In an effort to provide guidance to local officials and maximize how effectively this NSP funding is utilized in retrofitting homes, CARB provided design specifications, energy modeling, and technical support for the Building America Retrofit Alliance (BARA) team and its local partners - Better Building Performance, Nevada Energy Star Partners Green Alliance, and Home Free Nevada - for two retrofit test homes. One home was to demonstrate a modest retrofit and the other a deep energy retrofit. Through this project, CARB has provided two robust solution packages for retrofitting homes built in this region between the 1980s and early 1990s without substantially inconveniencing the occupants. The two test homes, the Carmen and Sierra Hills, demonstrate how cost-effectively energy efficient upgrades can be implemented in the hot, dry climate of the Southwest. In addition, the homes were used as an educational experience for home performance professionals, building trades, remodelers, and the general public. In-field trainings on air-sealing, HVAC upgrades, and insulating were provided to local contractors during the retrofit and BARA documented these retrofits through a series of video presentations, beginning with a site survey and concluding with the finished remodel and test out.

  16. Proceedings of Selected Research Paper Presentations at the 1986 Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology and Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division (Las Vegas, NV, January 16-21, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael R., Ed.; And Others

    Current issues in educational communications and technology are addressed in this collection of 47 papers, in which research reports dominate. Topics discussed include factors related to the learner, e.g., problem-solving skills, motivation, comparison of instructional design strategies, effects of organizational cues and text layouts, and…

  17. Massive Smash-up at Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist concept illustrates how a massive collision of objects perhaps as large as the planet Pluto smashed together to create the dust ring around the nearby star Vega. New observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope indicate the collision took place within the last one million years. Astronomers think that embryonic planets smashed together, shattered into pieces, and repeatedly crashed into other fragments to create ever finer debris.

    In the image, a collision is seen between massive objects that measured up to 2,000 kilometers (about 1,200 miles) in diameter. Scientists say the big collision initiated subsequent collisions that created dust particles around the star that were a few microns in size. Vega's intense light blew these fine particles to larger distances from the star, and also warmed them to emit heat radiation that can be detected by Spitzer's infrared detectors.

  18. University of Nevada Las Vegas LED Display Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-31

    The primary objective of this part of the project is to develop and implement a method that compensates for the inefficiency of the green LED. The proposed engineering solution which will be the backbone of this project will be to use RGBW combination in every pixel to save energy. Two different RGBW geometrical pixel configurations will be implemented and compared against traditional LED configurations. These configurations will be analyzed for energy efficiency while keeping the quality of the display the same. Cost of the addition of white LEDs to displays along with energy cost savings will be presented and analyzed.

  19. Fear and Loving in Las Vegas: Evolution, Emotion, and Persuasion.

    PubMed

    Griskevicius, Vladas; Goldstein, Noah J; Mortensen, Chad R; Sundie, Jill M; Cialdini, Robert B; Kenrick, Douglas T

    2009-06-01

    How do arousal-inducing contexts, such as frightening or romantic television programs, influence the effectiveness of basic persuasion heuristics? Different predictions are made by three theoretical models: A general arousal model predicts that arousal should increase effectiveness of heuristics; an affective valence model predicts that effectiveness should depend on whether the context elicits positive or negative affect; an evolutionary model predicts that persuasiveness should depend on both the specific emotion that is elicited and the content of the particular heuristic. Three experiments examined how fear-inducing versus romantic contexts influenced the effectiveness of two widely used heuristics-social proof (e.g., "most popular") and scarcity (e.g., "limited edition"). Results supported predictions from an evolutionary model, showing that fear can lead scarcity appeals to be counter-persuasive, and that romantic desire can lead social proof appeals to be counter-persuasive. The findings highlight how an evolutionary theoretical approach can lead to novel theoretical and practical marketing insights. PMID:19727416

  20. University of Nevada (UNLV): Las Vegas, Nevada (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2006-03-18

    A partnership with the University of Nevada and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  1. Nevada Power: Clark Station; Las Vegas, Nevada (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2006-03-27

    A partnership with the University of Nevada and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  2. MONITORING PILOT PROJECTS IN EMPACT CITIES - LAS VEGAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task develops, demonstrates, and transfers an interagency approach of implementing an Environmental Monitoring for Public Access and Community Tracking (EMPACT) project. It serves EMPACT in a program development role by piloting various methodologies (surveys, program integr...

  3. Fear and Loving in Las Vegas: Evolution, Emotion, and Persuasion

    PubMed Central

    Griskevicius, Vladas; Goldstein, Noah J.; Mortensen, Chad R.; Sundie, Jill M.; Cialdini, Robert B.; Kenrick, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    How do arousal-inducing contexts, such as frightening or romantic television programs, influence the effectiveness of basic persuasion heuristics? Different predictions are made by three theoretical models: A general arousal model predicts that arousal should increase effectiveness of heuristics; an affective valence model predicts that effectiveness should depend on whether the context elicits positive or negative affect; an evolutionary model predicts that persuasiveness should depend on both the specific emotion that is elicited and the content of the particular heuristic. Three experiments examined how fear-inducing versus romantic contexts influenced the effectiveness of two widely used heuristics—social proof (e.g., “most popular”) and scarcity (e.g., “limited edition”). Results supported predictions from an evolutionary model, showing that fear can lead scarcity appeals to be counter-persuasive, and that romantic desire can lead social proof appeals to be counter-persuasive. The findings highlight how an evolutionary theoretical approach can lead to novel theoretical and practical marketing insights. PMID:19727416

  4. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, John B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet spectral atlas for the A0 V star Alpha Lyr (Vega) has been prepared from data taken by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. The spectral region from 2000 to 3187 A has been scanned with a resolution of 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in graphs with a normalized continuum, and an identification table for the absorption features has been prepared.

  5. The Vega balloon global ground network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagdeev, R. Z.; Matveenko, L. I.; Linkin, V. M.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.

    1986-02-01

    The Project Vega balloon experiment was supported by the world's largest radio telescopes, joined to form a uniform VLBI network operating at a wavelength of 18 cm. Included were the Soviet radio telescopes at Evpatoria and Ussuriisk, the 22-25-m antennas at Simeiz, Pushchino station, and Ulan-Ude, and the 64-m antennas of the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network at Goldstone, California, Madrid, and Canberra. The international network included radio interferometers with baselines of widely differing length and orientation, making it possible to eliminate the ambiguity of the coordinate measurements.

  6. Reactive Vega: A Streaming Dataflow Architecture for Declarative Interactive Visualization.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayan, Arvind; Russell, Ryan; Hoffswell, Jane; Heer, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    We present Reactive Vega, a system architecture that provides the first robust and comprehensive treatment of declarative visual and interaction design for data visualization. Starting from a single declarative specification, Reactive Vega constructs a dataflow graph in which input data, scene graph elements, and interaction events are all treated as first-class streaming data sources. To support expressive interactive visualizations that may involve time-varying scalar, relational, or hierarchical data, Reactive Vega's dataflow graph can dynamically re-write itself at runtime by extending or pruning branches in a data-driven fashion. We discuss both compile- and run-time optimizations applied within Reactive Vega, and share the results of benchmark studies that indicate superior interactive performance to both D3 and the original, non-reactive Vega system. PMID:26390466

  7. Evolution of Vega-like disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, C.; Habing, H. J.; Hjhvega Consortium

    Vega-like stars are main-sequence stars with IR excesses usually attributed to the presence of a circumstellar debris disk. According to the results from the IRAS database, approximately 30 % or more of all main sequence stars should show such an excess (Aumann & Good 1990, AJ 350, 408; Aumann 1988, AJ 96, 1414) however, a more recent re-evaluation of this problem indicates numbers clearly below 20 % (Plets 1997, PHD-thesis, University Leuven). One of the problems of the IRAS studies was that the samples used to study the phenomenon usually were poorly defined. This was also prohibitive to a detailed statistical study of age effects these stars. We have undertaken the study of a volume-limited sample with ISO. Studying this sample and theoretical models we will show in this contribution that: 1. There is an age-excess relation for main sequence stars. We find a fraction of excess stars in our sample of approximately 20 %, higher for young stars. 2. By example of a particular G type star we show that the inner hole in the disk required to fit the observations needs not only to be created when the stars forms, but also needs to be maintained over the history of the stars evolution. 3. We present calculations which indicate that the sun was a Vega-like star when it was young, but that the current amount of material is too little to produce an amount of dust which would be observable with current technology (ISO) from a nearby star.

  8. VEGA, An Environment for Gravitational Waves Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Derome, L.; Flaminio, R.; Marion, F.; Massonet, L.; Mours, B.; Morand, R.; Verkindt, D.; Yvert, M.

    A new generation of large scale and complex Gravitational Wave detectors is building up. They will produce big amount of data and will require intensive and specific interactive/batch data analysis. We will present VEGA, a framework for such data analysis, based on ROOT. VEGA uses the Frame format defined as standard by GW groups around the world. Furthermore, new tools are developed in order to facilitate data access and manipulation, as well as interface with existing algorithms. VEGA is currently evaluated by the VIRGO experiment.

  9. A New View of Vega's Composition, Mass, and Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinmi; Peterson, Deane M.; Kurucz, Robert L.; Zagarello, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    We present estimates of Vega's composition, mass, and age based on a simultaneous fit of high-resolution metal line profiles, the wings of the Balmer lines, the absolute visible/near-IR fluxes, and high angular resolution triple phase data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer to gravity-darkened Roche models. This substantially expands our earlier analysis. We determine that Vega has a much lower mass, 2.135 ± 0.074 M sun, than generally assumed. This strongly supports the contention that Vega is metal-poor throughout (Z ~ 0.008), suggesting it was formed that way. Assuming a uniform composition equal to that derived for the surface, and the luminosity and radius obtained here, we derive a best estimate of Vega's age, 455 ± 13 Myr, and mass, 2.157 ± 0.017 M sun, by fitting to standard isochrones. We continue to argue that Vega is much too old to be coeval with other members of the Castor moving group and is thus unlikely to be a member. The updated chemical abundances continue to support the conclusion that Vega is a λ Boo star.

  10. A NEW VIEW OF VEGA'S COMPOSITION, MASS, AND AGE

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jinmi; Peterson, Deane M.; Kurucz, Robert L.; Zagarello, Robert J. E-mail: dpeterson@astro.sunysb.ed E-mail: rzagarello@mail.astro.sunysb.ed

    2010-01-01

    We present estimates of Vega's composition, mass, and age based on a simultaneous fit of high-resolution metal line profiles, the wings of the Balmer lines, the absolute visible/near-IR fluxes, and high angular resolution triple phase data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer to gravity-darkened Roche models. This substantially expands our earlier analysis. We determine that Vega has a much lower mass, 2.135 +- 0.074 M{sub sun}, than generally assumed. This strongly supports the contention that Vega is metal-poor throughout (Z approx 0.008), suggesting it was formed that way. Assuming a uniform composition equal to that derived for the surface, and the luminosity and radius obtained here, we derive a best estimate of Vega's age, 455 +- 13 Myr, and mass, 2.157 +- 0.017 M{sub sun}, by fitting to standard isochrones. We continue to argue that Vega is much too old to be coeval with other members of the Castor moving group and is thus unlikely to be a member. The updated chemical abundances continue to support the conclusion that Vega is a lambda Boo star.

  11. Software structure for Vega/Chara instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausse, J.-M.

    2008-07-01

    VEGA (Visible spEctroGraph and polArimeter) is one of the focal instruments of the CHARA array at Mount Wilson near Los Angeles. Its control system is based on techniques developed on the GI2T interferometer (Grand Interferometre a 2 Telescopes) and on the SIRIUS fibered hyper telescope testbed at OCA (Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur). This article describes the software and electronics architecture of the instrument. It is based on local network architecture and uses also Virtual Private Network connections. The server part is based on Windows XP (VC++). The control software is on Linux (C, GTK). For the control of the science detector and the fringe tracking systems, distributed API use real-time techniques. The control software gathers all the necessary informations of the instrument. It allows an automatic management of the instrument by using an original task scheduler. This architecture intends to drive the instrument from remote sites, such as our institute in South of France.

  12. Hot exozodiacal dust resolved around Vega with IOTA/IONIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Absil, O.; Augereau, J.-C.; di Folco, E.; Berger, J.-P.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Kervella, P.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Lebreton, J.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Monnier, J. D.; Olofsson, J.; Traub, W.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Although debris discs have been detected around a significant number of main-sequence stars, only a few of them are known to harbour hot dust in their inner part where terrestrial planets may have formed. Thanks to infrared interferometric observations, it is possible to obtain a direct measurement of these regions, which are of prime importance for preparing future exo-Earth characterisation missions. Aims: We resolve the exozodiacal dust disc around Vega with the help of infrared stellar interferometry and estimate the integrated H-band flux originating from the first few AUs of the debris disc. Methods: Precise H-band interferometric measurements were obtained on Vega with the 3-telescope IOTA/IONIC interferometer (Mount Hopkins, Arizona). Thorough modelling of both interferometric data (squared visibility and closure phase) and spectral energy distribution was performed to constrain the nature of the near-infrared excess emission. Results: Resolved circumstellar emission within ~6 AU from Vega is identified at the 3-σ level. The most straightforward scenario consists in a compact dust disc producing a thermal emission that is largely dominated by small grains located between 0.1 and 0.3 AU from Vega and accounting for 1.23 ± 0.45% of the near-infrared stellar flux for our best-fit model. This flux ratio is shown to vary slightly with the geometry of the model used to fit our interferometric data (variations within ± 0.19%). Conclusions: The presence of hot exozodiacal dust in the vicinity of Vega, initially revealed by K-band CHARA/FLUOR observations, is confirmed by our H-band IOTA/IONIC measurements. Whereas the origin of the dust is still uncertain, its presence and the possible connection with the outer disc suggest that the Vega system is currently undergoing major dynamical perturbations.

  13. High-contrast imaging with Spitzer: deep observations of Vega, Fomalhaut, and ɛ Eridani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Markus; Quanz, Sascha P.; Carson, Joseph C.; Thalmann, Christian; Lafrenière, David; Amara, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Stars with debris disks are intriguing targets for direct-imaging exoplanet searches, owing both to previous detections of wide planets in debris disk systems, and to commonly existing morphological features in the disks themselves that may be indicative of a planetary influence. Here we present observations of three of the most nearby young stars, which are also known to host massive debris disks: Vega, Fomalhaut, and ɛ Eri. The Spitzer Space Telescope is used at a range of orientation angles for each star to supply a deep contrast through angular differential imaging combined with high-contrast algorithms. The observations provide the opportunity to probe substantially colder bound planets (120-330 K) than is possible with any other technique or instrument. For Vega, some apparently very red candidate point sources detected in the 4.5 μm image remain to be tested for common proper motion. The images are sensitive to ~2 Mjup companions at 150 AU in this system. The observations presented here represent the first search for planets around Vega using Spitzer. The upper 4.5 μm flux limit on Fomalhaut b could be further constrained relative to previous data. In the case of ɛ Eri, planets below both the effective temperature and the mass of Jupiter could be probed from 80 AU and outward, although no such planets were found. The data sensitively probe the regions around the edges of the debris rings in the systems where planets can be expected to reside. These observations validate previous results showing that more than an order of magnitude improvement in performance in the contrast-limited regime can be acquired with respect to conventional methods by applying sophisticated high-contrast techniques to space-based telescopes, thanks to the high degree of PSF stability provided in this environment.

  14. The Vega balloon experiment - Initial results from the global radio tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Hildebrand, C. E.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Finley, S. G.; Stelzried, C. T.; Ellis, J.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Matveenko, L. I.; Linkin, V. M.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.

    1986-01-01

    A unique global array of 20 radio telescopes provided 24-h telemetry acquisition of meteorological data from the Vega balloons and differential VLBI measurements of their trajectories. Initial Doppler-tracking analysis indicates mean zonal wind velocities of 69 + or - 1 and 66 + or - 1 m/sec at the Vega 1 and Vega 2 float heights, and discloses an anomaly in the Vega 2 trajectory above the mountains in Aphrodite Terra.

  15. Resolving Vega and the Inclination Controversy with CHARA/MIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J. D.; Che, Xiao; Zhao, Ming; Ekström, S.; Maestro, V.; Aufdenberg, Jason; Baron, F.; Georgy, C.; Kraus, S.; McAlister, H.; Pedretti, E.; Ridgway, S.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Thureau, N.; Turner, N.; Tuthill, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    Optical and infrared interferometers definitively established that the photometric standard Vega (=α Lyrae) is a rapidly rotating star viewed nearly pole-on. Recent independent spectroscopic analyses could not reconcile the inferred inclination angle with the observed line profiles, preferring a larger inclination. In order to resolve this controversy, we observed Vega using the six-beam Michigan Infrared Combiner on the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy Array. With our greater angular resolution and dense (u, v)-coverage, we find that Vega is rotating less rapidly and with a smaller gravity darkening coefficient than previous interferometric results. Our models are compatible with low photospheric macroturbulence and are also consistent with the possible rotational period of ~0.71 days recently reported based on magnetic field observations. Our updated evolutionary analysis explicitly incorporates rapid rotation, finding Vega to have a mass of 2.15+0.10 - 0.15 M ⊙ and an age 700-75 + 150 Myr, substantially older than previous estimates with errors dominated by lingering metallicity uncertainties (Z = 0.006+0.003 - 0.002).

  16. Modelling the Dust Around Vega-Like Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sylvester, Roger J.; Skinner, C. J.; Barlow, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Models are presented of four Vega-like stars: main-sequence stars with infrared emission from circumstellar dust. The dusty environments of the four stars are rather diverse, as shown by their spectral energy distributions. Good fits to the observations were obtained for all four stars.

  17. VEGAS - VISUAL ENVIRONMENT FOR GRAPHICS-ORIENTED ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelectic, J. F.

    1994-01-01

    VEGAS is a program which allows application programmers to create X-Y plots in various modes through high-level subroutine calls. The modes consist of passive, autoupdate, and interactive modes. The passive mode takes input data, produces a plot, and returns the control to an application program. Autoupdate mode forms plots and automatically updates them as more information is received. The interactive mode displays the plot and provides pop-up menus for the user to alter the display's appearance or to modify the data. Among the many functions available in interactive mode are the abilities to zoom in on particular points; to position the plot; to scale the axes; to remove specific points; and to flag, modify and curve fit points and curves. This package is built on top of and is consistent with the TEMPLATE graphics subroutine package. VEGAS is written in FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX series computers running VMS. It requires TEMPLATE 6.0, a graphics library from the Liant Software Corporation. VEGAS requires 350K of RAM. The program is available in DEC VAX BACKUP format on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape (standard distribution medium) or on a TK50 tape cartridge. VEGAS was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. TEMPLATE is a registered trademark of Liant Software Corporation.

  18. The Effect of Rotation on the Spectrum of Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinmi; Peterson, Deane M.; Zagarello, Robert J.; Armstrong, J. Thomas; Pauls, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The discovery that Vega is a rapidly rotating pole-on star has raised a number of questions about this fundamental standard, including such issues as its composition, and in turn its mass and age. We report here a reanalysis of Vega's composition. A full spectral synthesis based on the Roche model derived earlier from NPOI interferometry is used. We find the line shapes in Vega's spectrum to be more complex than just flat-bottomed, which have been previously reported; profiles range from slightly self-reversed to simple "V" shapes. A high S/N spectrum, obtained by stacking spectra from the ELODIE archive, shows excellent agreement with the calculations, provided we add about 10 km s-1 of macroturbulence to the predicted spectra. From the abundance analysis, we find that Vega shows the peculiar abundance pattern of a λ Bootis star as previously suggested. We investigate the effects of rotation on the deduced abundances and show that the dominant ionization states are only slightly affected compared to analyses using nonrotating models. We argue that the rapid rotation requires that the star be fully mixed. The composition leads to masses and particularly ages that are quite different compared to what are usually assumed. Based on spectral data retrieved from the ELODIE archive at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP).

  19. The geology of the Venera/Vega landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Weitz, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed a photogeological analysis of the Venera Vega landing sites using Magellan radar images. These seven sites are the only places on Venus where geochemistry measurements were taken. In this study, the updated coordinates of the landing sites are used and the landing circle has a radius with an admissible error of about 150 km.

  20. Interferometric Gravity Darkening Observations of Vega with the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufdenberg, J. P.; Merand, A.; Coude Foresto, V.; Absil, O.; Di Folco, E.; Kervella, P.; Ridgway, S. T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; Turner, N. H.; Berger, D. H.; McAlister, H. A.

    2005-12-01

    We have obtained high-precision interferometric measurements of the A0 V standard star Vega with the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array and the Fiber Linked Unit for Optical Recombination (FLUOR) beam combiner in the K' band at projected baselines between 103 m and 273 m. The measured squared visibility amplitudes beyond the first lobe are significantly weaker than expected for a slowly rotating star and provide strong evidence for the model of Vega as a rapidly rotating star viewed very nearly pole on. We have constructed a Roche-von Zeipel gravity-darkened model atmosphere which is in generally good agreement with both our interferometric data and archival spectrophotometry. Our model indicates Vega is rotating at ˜92% of its angular break-up rate with an equatorial velocity of ˜275 km s-1. We find a polar effective temperature of ˜10150 K and a pole-to-equator effective temperature difference of ˜2500 K, much larger than the ˜300 K derived by Gulliver, Hill, and Adelman. Our model suggests that Vega's cool equatorial atmosphere may have significant convective flux and predicts a significantly cooler spectral energy distribution for Vega as seen by its surrounding debris disk. This work was performed in part under contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) funded by NASA through the Michelson Fellowship Program. JPL is managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology. The CHARA Array is operated by the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy with support from Georgia State University and the National Science Foundation, the Keck Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  1. Asteroid Belts in Debris Disk Twins: Vega and Fomalhaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Malhortra, Renu; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bonsor, Amy; Wilner, David J.; Balog, Zoltan; Watson, Dan M.; Werner, Michael W.; Misselt, Karl A.

    2013-01-01

    Vega and Fomalhaut are similar in terms of mass, ages, and global debris disk properties; therefore, they are often referred to as debris disk twins. We present Spitzer 10-35 micrometers spectroscopic data centered at both stars and identify warm, unresolved excess emission in the close vicinity of Vega for the first time. The properties of the warm excess in Vega are further characterized with ancillary photometry in the mid-infrared and resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The Vega warm excess shares many similar properties with the one found around Fomalhaut. The emission shortward of approximately 30 micrometers from both warm components is well described as a blackbody emission of approximately 170 K. Interestingly, two other systems, Eri and HR 8799, also show such an unresolved warm dust using the same approach. These warm components may be analogous to the solar system s zodiacal dust cloud, but of far greater mass (fractional luminosity of approximately 10(exp-5) to 10(exp-6) compared to 10(exp-8) to 10(exp-7). The dust temperature and tentative detections in the submillimeter suggest that the warm excess arises from dust associated with a planetesimal ring located near the water-frost line and presumably created by processes occurring at similar locations in other debris systems as well. We also review the properties of the 2 micrometers hot excess around Vega and Fomalhaut, showing that the dust responsible for the hot excess is not spatially associated with the dust we detected in the warm belt.We suggest it may arise from hot nano grains trapped in the magnetic field of the star. Finally, the separation between the warm and cold belt is rather large with an orbital ratio greater than or approximately 10 in all four systems. In light of the current upper limits on the masses of planetary objects and the large gap, we discuss the possible implications for their underlying planetary architecture and suggest that multiple, low

  2. ASTEROID BELTS IN DEBRIS DISK TWINS: VEGA AND FOMALHAUT

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Misselt, Karl A.; Malhotra, Renu; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bonsor, Amy; Balog, Zoltan; Watson, Dan M.; Werner, Michael W.

    2013-02-15

    Vega and Fomalhaut are similar in terms of mass, ages, and global debris disk properties; therefore, they are often referred to as 'debris disk twins'. We present Spitzer 10-35 {mu}m spectroscopic data centered at both stars and identify warm, unresolved excess emission in the close vicinity of Vega for the first time. The properties of the warm excess in Vega are further characterized with ancillary photometry in the mid-infrared and resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The Vega warm excess shares many similar properties with the one found around Fomalhaut. The emission shortward of {approx}30 {mu}m from both warm components is well described as a blackbody emission of {approx}170 K. Interestingly, two other systems, {epsilon} Eri and HR 8799, also show such an unresolved warm dust using the same approach. These warm components may be analogous to the solar system's zodiacal dust cloud, but of far greater mass (fractional luminosity of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} compared to 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7}). The dust temperature and tentative detections in the submillimeter suggest that the warm excess arises from dust associated with a planetesimal ring located near the water-frost line and presumably created by processes occurring at similar locations in other debris systems as well. We also review the properties of the 2 {mu}m hot excess around Vega and Fomalhaut, showing that the dust responsible for the hot excess is not spatially associated with the dust we detected in the warm belt. We suggest it may arise from hot nano grains trapped in the magnetic field of the star. Finally, the separation between the warm and cold belt is rather large with an orbital ratio {approx}>10 in all four systems. In light of the current upper limits on the masses of planetary objects and the large gap, we discuss the possible implications for their underlying planetary architecture and suggest that multiple, low-mass planets likely reside between the

  3. The Mg II h and k lines in Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, R. F.; Gouttebroze, P.; Kondo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    High resolution h (2802.7 A) and k (2795.5 A) lines Mg II obtained for the star Vega (Alpha Lyr, A0V) with Copernicus satellite and a balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrometer (BUSS) are interpreted by means of theoretical NLTE line profiles in the frame work of complete (CR) and partial (PR) redistribution hypothesis. The PR profiles are remarkably coincident with the observed ones for a magnesium abundance Mg/H = 0.00001 and a projected rotation velocity v sin i = 17 km/s. LTE and NLTE atmospheric models with a temperature plateau or with temperature rises (depending on whether the atmosphere is in radiative equilibrium or not) are used to account for the possible presence of a chromosphere on Vega. The possible presence of an interstellar Mg II absorption line superimposed on the stellar ones is also discussed.

  4. Hubble space telescope calspec flux standards: Sirius (and Vega)

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2014-06-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) has measured the flux for Sirius from 0.17 to 1.01 μm on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) White Dwarf scale. Because of the cool debris disk around Vega, Sirius is commonly recommended as the primary IR flux standard. The measured STIS flux agrees well with predictions of a special Kurucz model atmosphere, adding confidence to the modeled IR flux predictions. The IR flux agrees to 2%-3% with respect to the standard template of Cohen and to 2% with the Midcourse Space Experiment absolute flux measurements in the mid-IR. A weighted average of the independent visible and mid-IR absolute flux measures implies that the monochromatic flux at 5557.5 Å (5556 Å in air) for Sirius and Vega, respectively, is 1.35 × 10{sup –8} and 3.44 × 10{sup –9} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} Å{sup –1} with formal uncertainties of 0.5%. Contrary to previously published conclusions, the Hipparcos photometry offers no support for the variability of Vega. Pulse pileup severely affects the Hp photometry for the brightest stars.

  5. Mean zonal winds on Venus from Doppler tracking of the Vega balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, R. A.; Altunin, V. I.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Kogan, L. R.; Kostenko, V. I.; Kustodiev, V. D.; Linkin, V. M.; Matveenko, L. I.; Hildebrand, C. E.; Preston, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Doppler measurements of the two Vega balloons yield the following provisional estimates for the mean zonal wind velocity at the 53-54 km level in the Venus atmosphere: 69 + or - 1 m/sec for Vega 1 and 66 + or - 1 m/sec for Vega 2, with westward flow. The wind data show a perturbation which might be an evidence of solar tides.

  6. EGSE (Electrical Ground Support Equipment) for ESA VEGA Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, M.; Ortenzi, A.; del Re, V.; Bordin, M.; Saccucci, Fr.

    2004-08-01

    Activities belonging to Assembly, Integration and Validation (AIV) phase of a launch vehicle are fundamental in development of a so much delicate system. The equipment used to support this long and crucial phase can be described as a set of Mechanical and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE). This paper describes the approach followed to develop such a system, and the benefits that this brings in terms of lower risk, more coordinated interfaces and improved functionality. The paper briefly outlines VEGA Electrical Ground Support Equipment major characteristics. In particular, this paper describes the EGSE design for a small launch vehicle such as VEGA. The objective of EGSE is to provide hardware and software for efficient electrical testing of either single stages and integrated launcher. The needs to develop a small launcher is a response to a Resolution in the Space Transportation Strategy adopted by the ESA Council in June 2000, aiming at: "completing, in the medium term, the range of launch services offered by the addition of European manufactured small and medium launcher, complementary to Ariane, consistent with diversified users' needs and relying on common elements, such as stages, subsystems, technologies, production facilities and operational infrastructure, thereby increasing the European launcher industry's competitiveness". Three different parts principally compose the Vega EGSE: TCS (Test Configuration System), TES (Test Execution System), PPS (Post Processing System). The TES is the part of the EGSE devoted to the tests execution; it has capabilities of immediate test data analysis, parameters monitoring and it is able to undertake pre-defined actions, in case of anomalous events happen, in order to put in safe conditions the Unity Under Test (UUT). The TES is composed of two main components: HLCS and LLCS. The HLCS is based on SCOS 2000 ESA product; it is mainly devoted to the interaction with operators. It allows loading Test Sequences and

  7. A search for Vega-like fields in OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Folsom, C. P.; Blazere, A.

    2014-12-01

    Very weak magnetic fields (with a longitudinal component below 1 Gauss) have recently been discovered in the A star Vega as well as in a few Am stars. According to fossil field scenarios, such weak fields should also exist in more massive stars. In the framework of the ANR project Imagine, we have started to investigate the existence of this new class of very weakly magnetic stars among O and B stars thanks to ultra-deep spectropolarimetric observations. The first results and future plans are presented.

  8. Vega-Giotto flyby missions and cometary cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Bruno

    1989-01-01

    The most important implication of the Vega/Giotto flyby missions to Halley's Comet for cometary cosmogony is the opportunity to absorb the results of the in-situ measurements as made onboard the spacecrafts. Unfortunately the exploration of ejecta form the nucleus was unable to provide an unambiguous definition of the chemical-mineralogical nature of the nucleus: it failed to provide information comparable to that which was expected from a sample return mission. However, the obtained results are significant enough to affect and redirect cosmogonical thinking. Accordingly, the understanding of the cometary-matter dichotomy is modified as deduced from the distiction of water-dominated volitiles and silicate-based non-volitiles. Organic carbon compounds emerge as a major constituent of cometary nuclei. Presently, it is likely that the revision of Whipple's classic concept of the icy conglomerate cannot be avoided. Affected by the Vega/Giotto flyby missions to Hally's Comet, cometary cosmogony seems to enter a new conceptual period. The results of the in-situ measurements (mass spectrometric, UV spectroscopic, and IR spectroscopic) appear to be of basic importance. A chemical explanation is employed to explain the occurrence inside the nuclei of the variety of species, as inferred from the mass spectrometric data, to predict the results of the processes possibly involved. A cosmochemical factor is postulated to operate behind the observed cometary phenomena. The chemistry of the interstellar medium, covering the circumstellar and interstellar dust, advances cometary cosmogony.

  9. Follow-up of Candidate Companions to Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Markus; Quanz, Sascha; Carson, Joseph; Thalmann, Christian; Lafreniere, David; Amara, Adam

    2014-12-01

    Vega hosts one of the most nearby massive debris disks, with a morphology that may be indicative of wide giant planetary companions. Its proximity and relatively young age also make it an attractive target for direct imaging searches for such companions. We therefore observed Vega with Spitzer during cycle 9, which provides the best sensitivity to planets in wide orbits that is available with any existing facility. Three candidates were discovered in the data which are substantially brighter at 4.5 micron than at 3.6 micron, while typical background sources have much smaller brightness differences between these bands. We now propose to follow the system up in a second epoch to test the three candidates for common proper motion with the primary star. If real, physical companions, the candidates have separations of 265-335 AU and masses of 2-3 Mjup according to evolutionary models (regardless of initial entropy conditions), and would therefore constitute the coldest and lowest-mass planets ever imaged outside of the Solar System.

  10. Review and latest news from the VEGA/CHARA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardetto, N.; Mourard, D.; Perraut, K.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Meilland, A.; Stee, P.; Ligi, R.; Challouf, M.; Clausse, J.-M.; Berio, P.; Spang, A.

    2014-12-01

    The VEGA instrument located at the focus of the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) array in California is a collaborating project between the Lagrange laboratory in Nice, where it has been developed (Mourard et al. 2009, 2011), the IPAG (Grenoble) and CRAL (Lyon) laboratories, and the CHARA group at Mount Wilson Observatory. The outcome from this international collaboration is to provide to the community a visible spectro-interferometer with an unprecedented angular resolution of 0.3 milli-second of arc (mas) together with a spectral resolution of 5000 or 30000. With such an instrument it becomes possible to determine simultaneously the size and the kinematic of the photosphere and/or of the circumstellar environment of the star as a function of the wavelength, which basically means for each spectral channel in the continuum and/or within spectral lines (in Hα for instance). The only limitation is to get enough signal to noise ratio in each spectral channel. We can currently reach a limiting magnitude of 8 in visible in medium spectral resolution (5000) and 4.5 in high resolution (30000). In this proceeding, we illustrate the two main subjects studied with the VEGA instrument, namely (1) how angular diameters are useful to accurately derive the fundamental parameters of stars, (2) how the spectral resolution can allow to study the kinematical structure of stars or even to derive chromatic images of stellar objects.

  11. An overview of the Soviet Vega balloon experiment and studies of the atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagdeev, R. Z.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the VEGA probe to Venus is given, including a detailed examination of the balloon experiment to study the atmosphere of Venus. The areas of study include the ground network, the global network of radiotelescopes, meteorological measurements, the thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere in the middle cloud layer, atmospheric dynamics, and other results of the VEGA 1 and 2 experiments.

  12. Plasma-tail activity at the time of the Vega encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedner, Malcolm B., Jr.; Schwingensuch, Konrad

    1986-01-01

    Physical associations are sought between Halley's plasma tail activity seen in ground-based imagery and near-comet, solar wind/IMF measurements obtained by the Vega spacecraft. Disconnection Events (DE's) and the sector boundary/frontside magnetic reconnection model (Niedner and Brandt, 1978) of their origin are discussed. Strong support for the model comes from 2 DE's: a major event whose onset, on March 7 to 8, is strongly correlated with a reversal of the comet's magnetic barrier observed by Vega-1 and Vega-2 and with an IMF sector boundary observed by Vega-1; and a minor event on March 7 which may be associated with the two-polarity (possibly reconnecting) magnetic barrier seen by Vega-1 on March 6, when the solar-wind density was low.

  13. In-Orbit Collision Analysis for VEGA Second Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpi, M.; Fossati, T.; Battie, F.

    2013-08-01

    ELV, as prime contractor of the VEGA launcher, which operates in the protected LEO zone (up to 2000 km altitude), has to demonstrate that it abides by ESA debris mitigation rules, as well as by those imposed by the French Law on Space Operations (LOS). After the full success of VEGA qualification flight, the second flight(VV02) will extend the qualification domain of the launcher to multi-payload missions, with the release of two satellites (Proba-V and VNRedSat-1) and one Cubesat (ESTCube-1) on different SSO orbits The multi-payload adapter, VESPA, also separates its upper part before the second payload release. This paper will present the results of the long-term analyses on inorbit collision between these different bodies. Typical duration of propagation requested by ELV customer is around 50 orbits, requiring a state-of-the-art simulator able to compute efficiently orbits disturbs, usually neglected in launcher trajectory optimization itself. To address the issue of in-orbit collision, ELV has therefore developed its own simulator, POLPO [1], a FORTRAN code which performs the long-term propagation of the released objects trajectories and computes the mutual distance between them. The first part of the paper shall introduce the simulator itself, explaining the computation method chosen and briefly discussing the perturbing effects and their models taken into account in the tool, namely: - gravity field modeling (zonal and tesseral harmonics) - atmospheric model - solar pressure - third-body interaction A second part will describe the application of the in-orbit collision analysis to the second flight mission. Main characteristics of the second flight will be introduced, as well as the dispersions considered for the Monte-Carlo analysis performed. The results of the long-term collision analysis between all the separated bodies will then be presented and discussed.

  14. Photometric characteristics of the Vega 1 and Vega 2 CCD cameras for the observation of Comet Halley.

    PubMed

    Abergel, A; Bertaux, J L; Avanessov, G A; Tarnopolsky, V I; Zhukov, B S

    1987-10-15

    The first pictures of the nucleus of Comet Halley were returned from the CCD TV system (TVS) placed onboard the two Soviet spacecraft Vega 1 and 2. Comet Halley was observed from 4 to 11 Mar. 1986, and ~1500 images were transmitted to the earth. The raw data are given in digital numbers which must be converted into units of brightness. After a brief description of the experiment, the on-ground calibration tests are discussed. Many images were registered and processed to obtain standard correcting images and absolute calibration. Photometric performance could also be checked during flight with observations of Jupiter; in-flight and on-ground performances are compared. PMID:20523385

  15. VEGAS-SSS: A VST Early-Type GAlaxy Survey: Analysis of Small Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.

    VEGAS-SSS is a program devoted to study the properties of small stellar systems (SSSs) around bright galaxies, built on the VEGAS survey. At completion, the survey will have collected detailed photometric information of ˜ 100 bright early-type galaxies to study the properties of diffuse light (surface brightness, colours, SBF, etc.) and the clustered light (compact stellar systems) out to previously unreached projected galactocentric radii. VEGAS-SSS will define an accurate and homogeneous dataset that will have an important legacy value for studies of the evolution and transformation processes taking place in galaxies through the fossil information provided by SSSs.

  16. Is Internet Addiction Prevalent Among Methadone Maintenance Treatment Patients? Data from Las Vegas and Tel Aviv.

    PubMed

    Peles, Einat; Linzy, Shirley; Sason, Anat; Tene, Oren; Adelson, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Internet addiction is known to be associated with depression. The Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) for depression were studied among non-selective methadone maintenance treatment patients from the United States (n = 164) and Israel (n = 113). Thirty percent were not exposed to the internet, and 2.9% (n = 8) had an "occasional/frequent problem." The IAT and CES-D scores correlated significantly (p = .03). The non-exposed group was older, less educated, and had more benzodiazepine abusers. Unlike other behavioral addictions that characterized these patients, the internet addiction problem is rare, but should not be ignored. PMID:26284288

  17. 78 FR 43772 - Modification of Class B Airspace; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... (77 FR 65332). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by submitting... reopening the comment period until February 13, 2013 (78 FR 2646). The Aircraft Owners and Pilots... commenter stated that increasing the Class B ceiling to 10,000 MSL limits Sport Pilot...

  18. Lasers '85; Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Dec. 2-6, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on laser technology development encompasses issues in such areas as VUV and X-ray lasers; optical phase conjugation and nonlinear optics; laser applications in medicine; methods for optical processing; laser and nonlinear spectroscopy; ultrashort-pulse lasers and their applications; frequency selection in pulsed lasers; and interactions between laser beams, material surfaces, and material volumes. Also treated are laser applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative program, chemical laser design and performance, the lasing of biophysical materials, laser diagnostics in fluids and plasma, semiconductor laser diodes and arrays, solid state lasers, radiation- and solar-pumped lasers, laser cavities and propagation, remote sensing with lasers and fiber-optics, coupled resonators and diode lasers, industrial applications of lasers, excimer lasers, optoelectronics, CO/sub 2/ lasers, fiber-optic sensors, alexandrite lasers, free electron lasers, and IR and visible wavelength lasers.

  19. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Pulte Homes, Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    The builder teamed with Building Science Corporation to design HERS-54 homes with high-efficiency HVAC with ducts in conditioned space, jump ducts, and a fresh air intake; advanced framed walls; low-e windows; and PV roof tiles.

  20. 1985 SEM Spring Conference on Experimental Mechanics, Las Vegas, NV, June 9-14, 1985, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Various papers on experimental mechanics are presented. The general topics considered include: fracture, composites, digital techniques in optics, vibration testing for damping analysis, modal analysis methods, photoelasticity, materials testing, strain gages and transducers, fracture of composites, general optics, biomechanics, modal analysis, ultrasonic NDE of composites, transducers, improved TM for structural testing, optical applications, and residual stress. Other subjects addressed include: practical applications using acoustic emission in the aerospace industry, dynamics of fracture, vibration analysis, joints, internal marketing of technology to management, testing for design verification, fiber-optic applications in experimental mechanics, moire and speckle, and SPATE applications.

  1. The National Near-Road Mobile Source Air Toxics Study: Las Vegas

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in collaboration with FHWA, has been involved in a large-scale monitoring research study in an effort to characterize highway vehicle emissions in a near-road environment. The pollutants of interest include particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microns ...

  2. Las Vegas Valley Public Land and Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2012-06-27

    06/27/2012 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (text of measure as introduced: CR S4677-4682) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. 77 FR 54859 - Proposed Establishment of VOR Federal Airway V-629; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory..., 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The incorporation by... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 RIN 2120-AA66 Proposed Establishment of VOR Federal...

  4. 78 FR 2200 - Establishment of VOR Federal Airway V-629; Las Vegas, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ..., NV. (77 FR 54859). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory..., 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p.389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation...

  5. Resurrecting an Extinct Species: Archival DNA, Taxonomy, and Conservation of the Vegas Valley Leopard Frog

    EPA Science Inventory

    Suggestions that the extinct Vegas Valley leopard frog (Rana fisheri = Lithobates fisheri) may have been synonymous with one of several declining species has complicated recovery planning for imperiled leopard frogs in southwestern North America. To address this concern, we recon...

  6. The Vega Debris Disk: A Surprise from Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, K. Y. L.; Rieke, G. H.; Misselt, K. A.; Stansberry, J. A.; Moro-Martin, A.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Werner, M. W.; Trilling, D. E.; Bendo, G. J.; Gordon, K. D.; Hines, D. C.; Wyatt, M. C.; Holland, W. S.; Marengo, M.; Megeath, S. T.; Fazio, G. G.

    2005-07-01

    We present high spatial resolution mid- and far-infrared images of the Vega debris disk obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). The disk is well resolved, and its angular size is much larger than found previously. The radius of the disk is at least 43" (330 AU), 70" (543 AU), and 105" (815 AU) in extent at 24, 70, and 160 μm, respectively. The disk images are circular, smooth, and without clumpiness at all three wavelengths. The radial surface brightness profiles follow radial power laws of r-3 or r-4 and imply an inner boundary at a radius of 11''+/-2'' (86 AU). Assuming an amalgam of amorphous silicate and carbonaceous grains, the disk can be modeled as an axially symmetric and geometrically thin disk, viewed face-on, with the surface particle number density following an inverse radial power law. The disk radiometric properties are consistent with a range of models using grains of sizes ~1 to ~50 μm. The exact minimum and maximum grain size limits depend on the adopted grain composition. However, all of these models require an r-1 surface number density profile and a total mass of (3+/-1.5)×10-3M⊕ in grains. We find that a ring, containing grains larger than 180 μm and at radii of 86-200 AU from the star, can reproduce the observed 850 μm flux, while its emission does not violate the observed MIPS profiles. This ring could be associated with a population of larger asteroidal bodies analogous to our own Kuiper Belt. Cascades of collisions starting with encounters among these large bodies in the ring produce the small debris that is blown outward by radiation pressure to much larger distances, where we detect its thermal emission. The relatively short lifetime (<1000 yr) of these small grains and the observed total mass, ~3×10-3M⊕, set a lower limit on the dust production rate, ~1015 g s-1. This rate would require a very massive asteroidal reservoir for the dust to be produced in a steady state throughout Vega's life. Instead

  7. A Study on the Characteristics of the Structure of Vega's Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Ji, Jiang-hui

    2013-10-01

    The clumpy structure in the Vega's debris disk was reported at millimeter wavelengths previously, and attributed to the concentration of dust grains trapped in resonances with a potential high-eccentricity planet. However, current imaging at multi-wavelengths with higher sensitivity indicates that the Vega's debris disk has a smooth structure. But a planet orbiting Vega could not be neglected, and the present-day observations may place a severe constraint on the orbital parameters for the potential planet. Herein, we utilize the modi- fied MERCURY codes to numerically simulate the Vega system, which consists of a debris disk and a planet. In our simulations, the initial inner and outer boundaries of the debris disk are assumed to be 80 AU and 120 AU, respectively. The dust grains in the disk have the sizes from 10 μm to 100 μm, and the nearly coplanar orbits. From the outcomes, we show that the evolution of debris disk is consistent with recent observations, if there is no planet orbiting Vega. However, if Vega owns a planet with a high eccentricity (e.g., e = 0.6), the planet's semi- major axis cannot be larger than 60 AU, otherwise, an aggregation phenomenon will occur in the debris disk due to the existence of the postulated planet. In addition, the 2:1 mean motion resonances may play a significant role in forming the structure of debris disk.

  8. Vega-Constellation Tools to Analize Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savorskiy, V.; Loupian, E.; Balashov, I.; Kashnitskii, A.; Konstantinova, A.; Tolpin, V.; Uvarov, I.; Kuznetsov, O.; Maklakov, S.; Panova, O.; Savchenko, E.

    2016-06-01

    Creating high-performance means to manage massive hyperspectral data (HSD) arrays is an actual challenge when it is implemented to deal with disparate information resources. Aiming to solve this problem the present work develops tools to work with HSD in a distributed information infrastructure, i.e. primarily to use those tools in remote access mode. The main feature of presented approach is in the development of remotely accessed services, which allow users both to conduct search and retrieval procedures on HSD sets and to provide target users with tools to analyze and to process HSD in remote mode. These services were implemented within VEGA-Constellation family information systems that were extended by adding tools oriented to support the studies of certain classes of natural objects by exploring their HSD. Particular developed tools provide capabilities to conduct analysis of such objects as vegetation canopies (forest and agriculture), open soils, forest fires, and areas of thermal anomalies. Developed software tools were successfully tested on Hyperion data sets.

  9. Dust in beta PIC / VEGA Main Sequence Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, D. E.

    1996-09-01

    The beta Pictoris disk is an especially dense and fortuitously edge-on arrangement of solid material around a nearby A5 main sequence star, a prime example of a new class of objects discovered by IRAS. Three similar systems (alpha Lyrae = Vega, A0; alpha Piscis Austrinus = Fomalhaut, A3; and epsilon Eridani, K2) have been resolved in the IR or sub-mm. The grain temperatures in the prototype systems are 50-150 K, implying disk scales of a few x 100 AU. Each has a central zone of relatively low density with size similar to our solar system's planetary zone. Lifetime arguments imply that the dust is not primordial but must be replenished from larger bodies. The dust in the resolved systems appears to lie in disks in the stellar equatorial planes based on a comparison between the shapes of the emitting regions and values of stellar rotational v sin(i). As many as 100 other nearby main sequence stars have far-IR excesses in IRAS and ISO data. Circumstellar dust appears to be common among main sequence stars and may persist well beyond the protoplanetary stage. At the same time, some nearby systems with especially dense disks may be very young stars with disks still clearing. Spectra of the material close to beta Pic and 51 Oph show 10 mu m silicate emission mineralogically resembling the grains in comet comae. Silicate and organic hydrocarbon emission has been observed from other systems. The best solar system analog in scale and morphology to the main sequence disks is the Kuiper Belt. Ground-based and HST observations have revealed a population of planetesimals in the Kuiper Belt, allowing the equilibrium dust population and evolutionary status of the extrasolar systems to be compared with the KB. The IR emission from the zodiacal and KB dust components of our solar system would be much easier to detect externally than radiation from the planets themselves.

  10. 2--14 microns Spectroscopy of Vega-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Knacke, R. F.; Hackwell, J. A.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Hanner, M. S.

    1994-12-01

    We present intermediate-resolution (lambda /Delta lambda ~ 50) infrared (2--14 microns) spectroscopy of four early-type main-sequence stars, conducted with the Aerospace Corp. Infrared Spectrograph. We observed beta UMa (A1 V), alpha Aql (A7 V), and beta Leo (A3 V) at the 1.3-m KPNO telescope in May 1993, and zeta Lep (A2 V) at the 3.0-m IRTF telescope in Nov. 1993. The Vega-type stars beta UMa and zeta Lep showed weak but definite excess flux at ~ 10 microns in previous groundbased photometric surveys (Fajardo-Acosta, Telesco & Knacke 1994, in preparation; Aumann & Probst 1991, ApJ, 368, 264). We observed alpha Aql and beta Leo to confirm that their ~ 10 microns spectra do not show any excess. The weak ~ 10 microns excess features in our spectra of beta UMa and zeta Lep are probably indicative of large grains and/or a small quantity of dust around these stars. Their weak features contrast with the prominent silicate emission feature previously seen in beta Pic and 51 Oph. The grains are hotter in zeta Lep than in beta UMa, as indicated by an excess already present at short wavelengths ( ~ 8.5 microns) in the spectrum of the former, as opposed to the 10--11 microns excess of the latter. Dust around these two stars could be an assemblage of amorphous minerals, probably of a variety of sizes, as suggested by their broad features. We compared the excess spectra of zeta Lep and beta UMa with those of comets (reviewed by Hanner, Lynch, & Russell 1994, ApJ, 425, 274) and found they resemble those of dust-poor comets such as Austin 1990 V and Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko 1989 XIX.

  11. Large Debris Dragging and De-Orbiting by the VEGA Launcher Using a Tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Christophe; Federico, Martina; Gallucci, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    Thanks to limited adaptations - additional propellant tanks, addition of a small probe, few SW and Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) modifications - the launcher VEGA can be shown to be suited in terms of performances, safety and costs to a de-orbiting mission. Such a mission consists of three main phases: rendezvous, capture and de-orbiting. Focused on the last phase, this work presents the adaptation of GNC algorithms to realize the de-orbiting of a debris dragged by VEGA by means of a tether.

  12. VEGA--an open platform to develop chemo-bio-informatics applications, using plug-in architecture and script programming.

    PubMed

    Pedretti, Alessandro; Villa, Luigi; Vistoli, Giulio

    2004-03-01

    In this paper we present the expandability and flexibility features of the VEGA program (downloadable free of charge at http://www.ddl.unimi.it), for the development of custom applications, using it as a multipurpose graphical environment. VEGA can be customized using both plug-in architecture and script programming. The first is useful to add new features and functions, using homemade routines, written with the VEGA Plug-in Development Kit (SDK). With the second approach it is possible to design scripts in VEGA, using the REBOL language, in order to (1) add new functions or customize existing ones; (2) automate common procedures; and (3) allow network communications, by creating a bridge between VEGA and other applications (or other PCs) through the TCP/IP protocol. PMID:15368917

  13. Vega rocket series of multi-stage amateur's rocket program 1965-1968

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstein, Aleksander; Krmelj, Miloš

    2003-08-01

    The Astronautical and Rocket Society of Celje (ARSC — Astronavtično in raketno društvo Celje) Slovenia has been involved in experimental programs for students and adults since early in 1962 when the early maned space flight inspired many young people. In the history of ARSC (1962-1999) many project undergone the period 37 years, but one is significant; the PROJECT MULTISTAGE ROCKETS VEGA. The present paper contains chronological and systematical presentation of most rockets, launching and static tests undergone during the period of 1965-1968. VEGA - III - C launching was viewed by some of 500 participants of XVIII International Astronautic Federation Congress, which was held in Belgrade in the former Yugoslavia at that time. Project VEGA, whose main objecture was solid fuel ≫micrograne≪ motor of 100 mm to 160 mm diameter improvements and interconnecting motors in parallel spree and sequentially in stages has been completed with rocket VEGA - IV. This rocket has never been launched and it is still in storage.

  14. VEGA 4th Stage Direct Re-Entry Survivability Analysis and Casualty Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battie, F.; Fossati, T.; Gallucci, S.

    2013-08-01

    A key task in launch vehicle (LV) system design process consists in the estimation of upper stage fragmentation during atmospheric re-entry once accomplished the launcher mission, and the related probability of making on-ground casualties. As a European launcher operating from French Guyana, VEGA has to abide by ESA debris mitigation rules, and by the French Law on Space Operations (LOS). The second flight of VEGA aims at demonstrating the versatility of the launcher by performing a multi-payload launch with different target orbits. From a safety point of view, the compliance of VEGA to the LOS will also be extended through the performance of the direct deorbiting of its upper stage, the AVUM, at the end of its mission. Indeed, during the qualification flight, VEGA had submitted to the safety authorities the derogation envisaged by the LOS: under certain conditions, it allows the indirect re-entry of the launcher's upper stage, provided it shall do so in less than 25 years.

  15. Weyl Calculus in Phase Space and the Torres-Vega and Frederick Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Gosson, Maurice de

    2006-01-04

    We show that the Schroedinger equation in phase space proposed by Torres-Vega and Frederick is canonical in the sense that it is a natural consequence of Weyl calculus provided that one lets Heisenberg-Weyl operators act on functions (or half-densities) defined on phase space. We interpret our results in terms of deformation quantization.

  16. VEGA balloon dynamics and vertical winds in the Venus middle cloud region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linkin, V. M.; Young, R. E.; Seiff, A.; Blamont, J. E.; Elson, L. S.

    1986-01-01

    The VEGA balloons provided a long-term record of vertical wind fluctuations in a planetary atmosphere other than earth's. The vertical winds were calculated from the observed displacement of the balloon relative to its equilibrium float altitude. The winds were intermittent; a large burst lasted several hours, and the peak velocity was 3 meters per second.

  17. VEGAS-SSS: A VST Programme to Study the Satellite Stellar Systems around Bright Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Napolitano, N.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Paolillo, M.; Iodice, E.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Raimondo, G.; Spavone, M.; La Barbera, F.; Puzia, T. H.; Schipani, P.

    2015-03-01

    The VEGAS-SSS programme is devoted to studying the properties of small stellar systems (SSSs) in and around bright galaxies, built on the VLT Survey Telescope early-type galaxy survey (VEGAS), an ongoing guaranteed time imaging survey distributed over many semesters (Principal Investigator: Capaccioli). On completion, the VEGAS survey will have collected detailed photometric information of ~ 100 bright early-type galaxies to study the properties of diffuse light (surface brightness, colours, surface brightness fluctuations, etc.) and the distribution of clustered light (compact ''small'' stellar systems) out to previously unreached projected galactocentric radii. VEGAS-SSS will define an accurate and homogeneous dataset that will have an important legacy value for studies of the evolution and transformation processes taking place in galaxies through the fossil information provided by SSSs.

  18. The design of real time infrared image generation software based on Creator and Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-feng; Wu, Wei-dong; Huo, Jun-xiu

    2013-09-01

    Considering the requirement of high reality and real-time quality dynamic infrared image of an infrared image simulation, a method to design real-time infrared image simulation application on the platform of VC++ is proposed. This is based on visual simulation software Creator and Vega. The functions of Creator are introduced simply, and the main features of Vega developing environment are analyzed. The methods of infrared modeling and background are offered, the designing flow chart of the developing process of IR image real-time generation software and the functions of TMM Tool and MAT Tool and sensor module are explained, at the same time, the real-time of software is designed.

  19. Anisotropy of the neutral gas distribution of Comet Halley deduced from NGE/Vega 1 measurements. [Neutral Gas Experiment (NGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Eip, WING-H. AFKEPPLER, E. agrichter, a. k; Eip, WING-H. AFKEPPLER, E. agrichter, a. k

    1986-01-01

    The neutral gas density profile of comet Halley measured by the Neutral Gas Experiment on Vega 1 showed an asymmetry between the inbound and the outbound legs during the fly-by on 6 March 1986. The implications of this asymmetry are discussed, and it is shown how the asymmetry detected by NGE on Vega 1 can be traced back to regions on or near the nucleus to obtain their relative gas production activities at specific times of emission.

  20. CONFIRMING THE PRIMARILY SMOOTH STRUCTURE OF THE VEGA DEBRIS DISK AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Plambeck, Richard; Chiang, Eugene; Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M.; Mason, Brian; Carpenter, John M.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Williams, Jonathan P.; Hales, Antonio; Su, Kate; Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phil; Devlin, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Clumpy structure in the debris disk around Vega has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with an unseen planet. However, recent imaging at similar wavelengths with higher sensitivity has disputed the observed structure. We present three new millimeter-wavelength observations that help to resolve the puzzling and contradictory observations. We have observed the Vega system with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at a wavelength of 880 {mu}m and an angular resolution of 5''; with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at a wavelength of 1.3 mm and an angular resolution of 5''; and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at a wavelength of 3.3 mm and angular resolution of 10''. Despite high sensitivity and short baselines, we do not detect the Vega debris disk in either of the interferometric data sets (SMA and CARMA), which should be sensitive at high significance to clumpy structure based on previously reported observations. We obtain a marginal (3{sigma}) detection of disk emission in the GBT data; the spatial distribution of the emission is not well constrained. We analyze the observations in the context of several different models, demonstrating that the observations are consistent with a smooth, broad, axisymmetric disk with inner radius 20-100 AU and width {approx}> 50 AU. The interferometric data require that at least half of the 860 {mu}m emission detected by previous single-dish observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope be distributed axisymmetrically, ruling out strong contributions from flux concentrations on spatial scales of {approx}<100 AU. These observations support recent results from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer indicating that previous detections of clumpy structure in the Vega debris disk were spurious.

  1. ASTROMETRIC STUDIES OF ALDEBARAN, ARCTURUS, VEGA, THE HYADES, AND OTHER REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gatewood, George

    2008-07-15

    The results of astrometric studies in the regions of Groombridge 34A, the Hyades, Aldebaran, Ross 47, BD+5{sup 0} 1668, 81 Cancri, BD+15{sup 0} 2620, Arcturus, Vega, and Ross 248 are presented. Estimates of the absolute parallax of each star are presented and a mass estimate is present for 81 Cancri. Comments include the discussion of the apparent motions of a few previously suggested planetary systems.

  2. Infrared space observatory photometry of circumstellar dust in Vega-type systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Stencel, R. E.; Backman, D. E.; Thakur, N.

    1998-01-01

    The ISOPHOT (Infrared Space Observatory Photometry) instrument onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was used to obtain 3.6-90 micron photometry of Vega-type systems. Photometric data were calibrated with the ISOPHOT fine calibration source 1 (FCS1). Linear regression was used to derive transformations to make comparisons to ground-based and IRAS photometry systems possible. These transformations were applied to the photometry of 14 main-sequence stars. Details of these results are reported on.

  3. The Fast Rotating Star 51 Oph Probed by VEGA/CHARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamialahmadi, N.; Berio, P.; Meilland, A.; Perraut, K.; Mourard, D.; Lopez, B.; Stee, P.; Nardetto, N.; Pichon, B.; Clausse, J. M.; Spang, A.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2015-12-01

    Stellar rotation is a key in our understanding of both mass-loss and evolution of intermediate and massive stars. It can lead to anisotropic mass-loss in the form of radiative wind or an excretion disk. We used the VEGA visible beam combiner installed on the CHARA array that reaches a sub milliarcsecond resolution. We derived, for the first time, the extension and flattening of 51 Oph photosphere. We found an elongated ratio of 1.45 ± 0.12.

  4. Dynamic Simulation of VEGA SRM Bench Firing By Using Propellant Complex Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Trapani, C. D.; Mastrella, E.; Bartoccini, D.; Squeo, E. A.; Mastroddi, F.; Coppotelli, G.; Linari, M.

    2012-07-01

    During the VEGA launcher development, from the 2004 up to now, 8 firing tests have been performed at Salto di Quirra (Sardinia, Italy) and Kourou (Guyana, Fr) with the objective to characterize and qualify of the Zefiros and P80 Solid Rocket Motors (SRM). In fact the VEGA launcher configuration foreseen 3 solid stages based on P80, Z23 and Z9 Solid Rocket Motors respectively. One of the primary objectives of the firing test is to correctly characterize the dynamic response of the SRM in order to apply such a characterization to the predictions and simulations of the VEGA launch dynamic environment. Considering that the solid propellant is around 90% of the SRM mass, it is very important to dynamically characterize it, and to increase the confidence in the simulation of the dynamic levels transmitted to the LV upper part from the SRMs. The activity is articulated in three parts: • consolidation of an experimental method for the dynamic characterization of the complex dynamic elasticity modulus of elasticity of visco-elastic materials applicable to the SRM propellant operative conditions • introduction of the complex dynamic elasticity modulus in a numerical FEM benchmark based on MSC NASTRAN solver • analysis of the effect of the introduction of the complex dynamic elasticity modulus in the Zefiros FEM focusing on experimental firing test data reproduction with numerical approach.

  5. Crystalline Silicate Feature of the Vega-like Star HD 145263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Mitsuhiko; Kataza, Hirokazu; Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Miyata, Takashi; Yamashita, Takuya; Sako, Shigeyuki; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Ito, Meguru; Okada, Yoko; Sakon, Itsuki; Onaka, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    We have observed the 8-13 μm spectrum (R~250) of the Vega-like star candidate HD 145263 using Subaru/COMICS. The spectrum of HD 145263 shows the broad trapezoidal silicate feature with the shoulders at 9.3 and 11.44 μm, indicating the presence of crystalline silicate grains. This detection implies that crystalline silicate may also be commonly present around Vega-like stars. The 11.44 μm feature is slightly shifted to a longer wavelength compared to the usual 11.2-3 μm crystalline forsterite feature detected toward Herbig Ae/Be stars and T Tauri stars. Although the peak shift due to the effects of the grain size cannot be ruled out, we suggest that Fe-bearing crystalline olivine explains the observed peak wavelength fairly well. Fe-bearing silicates are commonly found in meteorites and most interplanetary dust particles, which originate from planetesimal-like asteroids. According to studies of meteorites, Fe-bearing silicate must have been formed in asteroidal planetesimals, supporting the scenario that dust grains around Vega-like stars are of planetesimal origin, if the observed 11.44 μm peak is due to Fe-bearing silicates. ID="FN1"> 1Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  6. THE DEBRIS DISK OF VEGA: A STEADY-STATE COLLISIONAL CASCADE, NATURALLY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S.; Loehne, T.; Krivov, A. V.

    2010-01-10

    The archetypical debris disk around Vega has been observed intensively over the past 25 years. It has been argued that the resulting photometric data and images may be in contradiction with a standard, steady-state collisional scenario of the disk evolution. In particular, the emission in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) appears to be in excess of what is expected from a 'Kuiper belt' at approx100 AU, which is evident in the submillimeter images and inferred from the majority of photometric points. Here we re-address the question of whether or not the Vega disk observations are compatible with a continuous dust production through a collisional cascade. Instead of seeking a size and spatial distribution of dust that provide the best fit to observations, our approach involves physical modeling of the debris disk 'from the sources'. We assume that dust is maintained by a belt of parent planetesimals, and employ our collisional and radiative transfer codes to consistently model the size and radial distribution of the disk material and then thermal emission of dust. In doing so, we vary a broad set of parameters, including the stellar properties, the exact location, extension, and dynamical excitation of the planetesimal belt, chemical composition of solids, and the collisional prescription. We are able to reproduce the spectral energy distribution in the entire wavelength range from the near-IR to millimeter, as well as the mid-IR and submillimeter radial brightness profiles of the Vega disk. Thus, our results suggest that the Vega disk observations are not in contradiction with a steady-state collisional dust production, and we put important constraints on the disk parameters and physical processes that sustain it. The total disk mass in approx<100 km-sized bodies is estimated to be approx10 Earth masses. Provided that collisional cascade has been operating over much of the Vega age of approx350 Myr, the disk must have lost a few Earth masses of solids during that time. We

  7. The Debris Disk of Vega: A Steady-state Collisional Cascade, Naturally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S.; Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The archetypical debris disk around Vega has been observed intensively over the past 25 years. It has been argued that the resulting photometric data and images may be in contradiction with a standard, steady-state collisional scenario of the disk evolution. In particular, the emission in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) appears to be in excess of what is expected from a "Kuiper belt" at ~100 AU, which is evident in the submillimeter images and inferred from the majority of photometric points. Here we re-address the question of whether or not the Vega disk observations are compatible with a continuous dust production through a collisional cascade. Instead of seeking a size and spatial distribution of dust that provide the best fit to observations, our approach involves physical modeling of the debris disk "from the sources." We assume that dust is maintained by a belt of parent planetesimals, and employ our collisional and radiative transfer codes to consistently model the size and radial distribution of the disk material and then thermal emission of dust. In doing so, we vary a broad set of parameters, including the stellar properties, the exact location, extension, and dynamical excitation of the planetesimal belt, chemical composition of solids, and the collisional prescription. We are able to reproduce the spectral energy distribution in the entire wavelength range from the near-IR to millimeter, as well as the mid-IR and submillimeter radial brightness profiles of the Vega disk. Thus, our results suggest that the Vega disk observations are not in contradiction with a steady-state collisional dust production, and we put important constraints on the disk parameters and physical processes that sustain it. The total disk mass in lsim100 km-sized bodies is estimated to be ~10 Earth masses. Provided that collisional cascade has been operating over much of the Vega age of ~350 Myr, the disk must have lost a few Earth masses of solids during that time. We also demonstrate

  8. Public health assessment for Vega Baja Solid Waste Disposal, Rio Abajo Ward/La Trocha, Vega Baja County, Puerto Rico, Region 2: CERCLIS Number PRD980512669. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The Vega Baja Waste Disposal Site is a public health hazard because long-term exposure to lead in soil in some yards cause harmful effects in children. Children and especially preschool children who live in yards with elevated levels of soil lead might be exposed to small amounts of lead when they accidentally swallow soil and dust that cling to their hands. The level of lead in garden vegetables from the site is not a public health threat. It is safe for residents to grow and eat garden vegetables. ATSDR recommends that EPA prevent long-term exposure to lead-contaminated soil where lead levels are consistently elevated. ATSDR also recommends that EPA consult with ATSDR officials to ensure that Superfund activities to stop exposure to lead-contaminated soil at the site continues to be protective of public health.

  9. 76 FR 76934 - Foreign-Trade Zone 89-Las Vegas, NV; Application for Reorganization and Expansion Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... (74 FR 1170, 1/ 12/09 (correction 74 FR 3987, 1/22/09); 75 FR 71069-71070, 11/22/10). The ASF is an..., 48 FR 51665, 11/10/1983) and expanded on December 4, 1989 (Board Order 452,54 FR 50787, 12/11/1989), March 11, 1994 (Board Order 688, 59 FR 12893, 3/18/1994) and June 22, 2010 (Board Order 1688, 75...

  10. 75 FR 428 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Revision to the Las Vegas Resource Management Plan and Associated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    .../st/en/fo/lvfo.html . In order to be included in the Draft EIS, all comments must be received prior to... by any of the following methods: Web site: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/fo/lvfo.html . E-mail:...

  11. Proceedings of the National Association of Educational Buyers Annual Meeting. 52nd, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 7-10, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Educational Buyers, Westbury, NY.

    In addition to general session addresses and the dialogue at 14 workshops, these proceedings include the treasurer's report and lists of committee members, board of directors, exhibitors, and participants. Workshop topics are: "A Good Manager--From a Personnel View,""Effective Use of Specialized Consultants,""Public Utilities,""Computer…

  12. The fate of haloacetic acids and trihalomethanes in an aquifer storage and recovery program, Las Vegas, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.M.; McKay, W.A.; Colec, E.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of disinfection byproducts during aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is evaluated for aquifers in Southern Nevada. Rapid declines of haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations during ASR, with associated little change in Cl concentration, indicate that HAAs decline primarily by in situ microbial oxidation. Dilution is only a minor contributor to HAA concentration declines during ASR. Trihalomethane (THM) concentrations generally increased during storage of artificial recharge (AR) water and then declined during recovery. The decline of THM concentrations during recovery was primarily from dilution of current season AR water with residual AR water remaining in the aquifer from previous ASR seasons and native ground water. In more recent ASR seasons, for wells with the longest history of ASR, brominated THMs declined during storage and recovery by processes in addition to dilution. These conclusions about THMs are indicated by THM/Cl values and supported by a comparison of measured and model predicted THM concentrations. Geochemical mixing models were constructed using major-ion chemistry of the three end-member waters to calculate predicted THM concentrations. The decline in brominated THM concentrations in addition to that from dilution may result from biotransformation processes.

  13. 77 FR 28569 - Reorganization and Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 89 Under Alternative Site Framework, Las Vegas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ..., the Board adopted the alternative site framework (ASF) (74 FR 1170, 01/12/2009; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/2009; 75 FR 71069- 71070, 11/22/2010) as an option for the establishment or reorganization of... the Federal Register (76 FR 76934, 12/09/2011) and the application has been processed pursuant to...

  14. ITC/USA/'90; Proceedings of the International Telemetering Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Oct. 29-Nov. 2, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This conference presents papers in the fields of airborne telemetry, measurement technology, video instrumentation and monitoring, tracking and receiving systems, and real-time processing in telemetry. Topics presented include packet telemetry ground station simulation, a predictable performance wideband noise generator, an improved drone tracking control system transponder, the application of neural networks to drone control, and an integrated real-time turbine engine flight test system.

  15. International Congress on Experimental Mechanics, 7th, Las Vegas, NV, June 8-11, 1992, Proceedings. Vols. 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The present volume on experimental mechanics discusses composites, fatigue fracture, NDE and ultrasonic applications, and hybrid methods in experimental mechanics. Attention is given to applications in biomechanics, residual stress, measuring stresses in bolted connections, and applied/industrial applications of photoelasticity. Topics addressed include applications in electronics and material science, performance evaluation of civil structures, brittle materials and crack propagation, and transducers. Also discussed are intelligent structures, strain gages, effects of dynamic stimulus on structures, dynamic modeling, and residual stress measurement in nonmetallic materials.

  16. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 19th, Las Vegas, NV, July 20-22, 1982, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The results of research concerning the effects of nuclear and space radiation are presented. Topics discussed include the basic mechanisms of nuclear and space radiation effects, radiation effects in devices, and radiation effects in microcircuits, including studies of radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in MOS structures, silicon solar cell damage from electrical overstress, radiation-induced charge dynamics in dielectrics, and the enhanced radiation effects on submicron narrow-channel NMOS. Also examined are topics in SGEMP/IEMP phenomena, hardness assurance and testing, energy deposition, desometry, and radiation transport, and single event phenomena. Among others, studies are presented concerning the limits to hardening electronic boxes to IEMP coupling, transient radiation screening of silicon devices using backside laser irradiation, the damage equivalence of electrons, protons, and gamma rays in MOS devices, and the single event upset sensitivity of low power Schottky devices.

  17. Proceedings of the 1988 IPMAAC Conference on Personnel Assessment (12th, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 19-23, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Personnel Management Association, Washington, DC.

    Author-generated summaries/outlines of papers presented at the annual conference of the International Personnel Management Association Assessment Council (IPMAAC) in 1988 are provided. The "Presidential Address" is by N. E. Abrams. The keynote address is "Is There a Future for Intelligence?" by R. Thorndike. Summaries of 53 papers on the following…

  18. The Trade and Industrial Education Research Committee. Proceedings of the Carousel Session, American Vocational Conference (Las Vegas, Nevada, December 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L., Ed.; Walter, Richard, Ed.

    This document presents three papers dealing with trade and industrial education research. "Educating the Vocational Teacher Educator" (Clyde Knight) reports a study to identify needs of vocational teacher educators to improve existing programs and make necessary changes in doctoral programs. "The Relationship between Perceived Learning Style and…

  19. International Conference on Environmental Sensing and Assessment, Las Vegas, Nev., September 14-19, 1975, Proceedings. Volumes 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The papers deal with the detection of hazardous environmental pollutants, the development of emission control plans, and the design of compliance monitoring systems. Topics include remote sensing techniques in environmental pollution monitoring, monitoring of atmospheric particulate matter, air pollution due to sulfur dioxide and other inorganic compounds, marine pollution, atmospheric aerosols, industrial pollution, and legal aspects of pollution monitoring. Other papers examine the toxic effects of heavy metals and halogenated hydrocarbons, pollution associated with waste-disposal processes, pesticide residues in soil and groundwater, evaluations of groundwater quality, and monitoring of nuclear wastes. The interaction of climate and pollution is also discussed along with global pollutant transport, environmental modeling, ambient environmental air quality, aircraft and ground-vehicle emissions, and pollution associated with energy extraction and utilization processes. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  20. EPA/Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Near Road Collaboration Project: Las Vegas Near Road Study – MSAT Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    The series of studies conducted as part of the National Near Road Study focused on the collection of criteria air pollutants and mobile source air toxics (MSATs). The six priority compounds of interest were diesel particulate matter, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, acrolein, acetaldehyde...

  1. Proceedings of the CIAE Pre-Conference (61st, Las Vegas, Nevada, November 4-6, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Commission on International Adult Education (CIAE) of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) provides a forum for the discussion of international issues related to adult education in general, as well as adult education in various countries around the globe. The following purposes summarize the work of the…

  2. ITC/USA/'90; Proceedings of the International Telemetering Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Oct. 29-Nov. 2, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This conference presents papers in the fields of airborne telemetry, measurement technology, video instrumentation and monitoring, tracking and receiving systems, and real-time processing in telemetry. Topics presented include packet telemetry ground station simulation, a predictable performance wideband noise generator, an improved drone tracking control system transponder, the application of neural networks to drone control, and an integrated real-time turbine engine flight test system.

  3. Conference on Decision and Control, 23rd, Las Vegas, NV, December 12-14, 1984, Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Various papers on decision and control in engineering are presented. The general topics considered include: large-scale computing; adaptive control theory; stochastic nonlinear control and filtering; robot motion and control; bilinear, affine and other nonlinear systems; adaptive algorithms in filtering, estimation, and optimal control; production planning and control of manufacturing systems; delay systems; fuzzy logic control; and optimal control. Also discussed are: identification; analysis and synthesis in robust adaptive control; deterministic nonlinear control; robot and manipulator control; discrete and continuous systems and optimization; applications of estimation and control to missile guidance and control; distributed control in communication systems; control and stabilization of infinite dimensional systems described by partial differential equations; game theory; and design of robust feedback systems.

  4. Poder es Saber. Workshop: Developing a Bilingual Curriculum (New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, New Mexico, June 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass de Martinez, Bernice

    Bilingual teachers and program directors of northern New Mexico attended a workshop at New Mexico Highlands University to examine the curriculum designed to meet the needs of students within the bilingual bicultural setting. Participants were asked to redefine curriculum within the "workshop" setting. Consultants assisted the group in establishing…

  5. Extraction of Point Source Gamma Signals from Aerial Survey Data Taken over a Las Vegas Nevada Residential Area

    SciTech Connect

    Thane J. Hendricks

    2007-05-01

    Detection of point-source gamma signals from aerial measurements is complicated by widely varying terrestrial gamma backgrounds, since these variations frequently resemble signals from point-sources. Spectral stripping techniques have been very useful in separating man-made and natural radiation contributions which exist on Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) plant sites and other like facilities. However, these facilities are generally situated in desert areas or otherwise flat terrain with few man-made structures to disturb the natural background. It is of great interest to determine if the stripping technique can be successfully applied in populated areas where numerous man-made disturbances (houses, streets, yards, vehicles, etc.) exist.

  6. Light-weight alloys for aerospace applications; Proceedings of the Symposium, Las Vegas, NV, Feb. 28-Mar. 2, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.W.; Chia, E.H.; Kim, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on lightweight alloys for aerospace applications are presented. Individual topics addressed include: P/M-aluminum alloy for high-temperature application, elevated temperature behavior of RST Al-Ti-X alloys, microstructural characterization of rapidly solidified Al-Ze-V alloys, high-strength aluminum alloys for aerospace applications, oxidation behavior of some Mg-Li and Mg-Li-SI alloys, the effect of various environments on fatigue crack propagation in a 2090 Al-Li alloy, and surface-generated scratches and their effects on the fatigue life of Al-Li alloys. Consideration is given to the stretch formability of sheet Al-Li, hydrogen solution in Al-Li alloys, particle-reinforced aluminum-based composites, applications for discontinuously reinforced aluminum, age hardening of cast SiC-reinforced Mg-6Zn, superplasticity in high-strength aluminum alloys and in spray-deposited 7075 Al alloys, and superplastic behavior in an aluminum-lithium alloy.

  7. Work-Related Pain and Injury and Barriers to Workers’ Compensation Among Las Vegas Hotel Room Cleaners

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Teresa; Rugulies, Reiner; Krause, Niklas

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the prevalence of work-related pain and injury and explored barriers to and experiences of reporting among workers. Methods. We surveyed 941 unionized hotel room cleaners about work-related pain, injury, disability, and reporting. Results. During the past 12 months, 75% of workers in our study experienced work-related pain, and 31% reported it to management; 20% filed claims for workers’ compensation as a result of work-related injury, and 35% of their claims were denied. Barriers to reporting injury included “It would be too much trouble” (43%), “I was afraid” (26%), and “I didn’t know how” (18%). An estimated 69% of medical costs were shifted from employers to workers. Conclusions. The reasons for underreporting and the extent of claim denial warrant further investigation. Implications for worker health and the precise quantification of shifting costs to workers also should be addressed. PMID:15727981

  8. The Vega balloons - A tool for studying atmosphere dynamics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kremnev, R. S.; Selivanov, A. S.; Linkin, V. M.; Lipatov, A. N.; Tarnoruder, I. IA.; Puchkov, V. I.; Kustodiev, V. D.; Shurupov, A. A.; Ragent, B.; Preston, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Vega balloon experiment, designed to measure the dynamics of the Venus atmosphere, comprised the balloons themselves, their gondolas with on-board sensors and radio transmitters, and the radio telescope network on the earth. The structures and the physical parameters of the balloon probe are described, together with the instruments on the gondola, designed for the measurements of the atmospheric pressure, temperature, and vertical wind flows, and illumination, as well as possible flashes of lightning. Consideration is also given to the formatting of the information flow for the individual parameters measured.

  9. Performance, results, and prospects of the visible spectrograph VEGA on CHARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourard, Denis; Challouf, Mounir; Ligi, Roxanne; Bério, Philippe; Clausse, Jean-Michel; Gerakis, Jérôme; Bourges, Laurent; Nardetto, Nicolas; Perraut, Karine; Tallon-Bosc, Isabelle; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Ridgway, S.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we review the current performance of the VEGA/CHARA visible spectrograph and make a review of the most recent astrophysical results. The science programs take benefit of the exceptional angular resolution, the unique spectral resolution and one of the main features of CHARA: Infrared and Visible parallel operation. We also discuss recent developments concerning the tools for the preparation of observations and important features of the data reduction software. A short discussion of the future developments will complete the presentation, directed towards new detectors and possible new beam combination scheme for improved sensitivity and imaging capabilities.

  10. Vega roll and attitude control system algorithms trade-off study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, N.; Cuciniello, G.; Cruciani, I.; Corraro, F.; Spallotta, D.; Nebula, F.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the trade-off study for the selection of the most suitable algorithms for the Roll and Attitude Control System (RACS) within the FPS-A program, aimed at developing the new Flight Program Software of VEGA Launcher. Two algorithms were analyzed: Switching Lines (SL) and Quaternion Feedback Regulation. Using a development simulation tool that models two critical flight phases (Long Coasting Phase (LCP) and Payload Release (PLR) Phase), both algorithms were assessed with Monte Carlo batch simulations for both of the phases. The statistical outcomes of the results demonstrate a 100 percent success rate for Quaternion Feedback Regulation, and support the choice of this method.