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Sample records for laser ablation spectroscopy

  1. Particle analysis using laser ablation mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Eric P.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    2003-09-09

    The present invention provides a method of quickly identifying bioaerosols by class, even if the subject bioaerosol has not been previously encountered. The method begins by collecting laser ablation mass spectra from known particles. The spectra are correlated with the known particles, including the species of particle and the classification (e.g., bacteria). The spectra can then be used to train a neural network, for example using genetic algorithm-based training, to recognize each spectra and to recognize characteristics of the classifications. The spectra can also be used in a multivariate patch algorithm. Laser ablation mass specta from unknown particles can be presented as inputs to the trained neural net for identification as to classification. The description below first describes suitable intelligent algorithms and multivariate patch algorithms, then presents an example of the present invention including results.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of gallium arsenide investigated with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    von der Linde, D.

    Femtosecond laser ablation of gallium arsenide investigated with time- of-flight mass spectroscopy laser-induced ablation of gallium arsenide using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. At the ablation into a collisional expansion process. Above the ablation threshold, the behavior of gallium particles can

  3. Laser Ablation Solid Sampling processes investigated usinginductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, X.L.; Ciocan, A.C.; Borisov, O.V.; Russo, R.E.

    1997-07-01

    The symbiotic relationship between laser ablation mechanismsand analytical performance using inductively coupled plasma-atomicemission spectroscopy are addressed in this work. For both cases, it isimportant to ensure that the ICP conditions (temperature and electronnumber density) are not effected by the ablated mass. By ensuring thatthe ICP conditions are constant, changes in spectral emission intensitywill be directly related to changes in laser ablation behavior. Mg ionicline to atomic line ratios and excitation temperature were measured tomonitor the ICP conditions during laser-ablation sample introduction. Thequantity of ablated mass depends on the laser pulse duration andwavelength. The quantity of mass removed per unit energy is larger whenablating with shorter laser wavelengths and pulses. Preferential ablationof constituents from a multicomponent sample was found to depend on thelaser beam properties (wavelength and pulse duration). Fornanosecond-pulsed lasers, thermal vaporization dominates the ablationprocess. For picosecond-pulsed lasers, a non-thermal mechanism appears todominate the ablation process. This work will describe the mass ablationbehavior during nanosecond and picosecond laser sampling into the ICP.The behavior of the ICP under mass loading conditions is firstestablished, followed by studies of the ablation behavior at variouspower densities. A thermal vaporization model is used to explainnanosecond ablation, and a possible non-thermal mechanism is proposed toexplain preferential ablation of Zn and Cu from brass samples duringpicosecond ablation.

  4. Laser Paint Interactions Studied by Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Pump and Probe Analysis of the Ablation Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollar, E.; Oujja, M.; Martín, M.; Castillejo, M.

    The ablation plumes resulting from the laser irradiation of pigments in the form of pellets and as tempera paints were studied by optical spectroscopic methods including optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF), using a probe laser, delayed with respect to the ablation laser. The differences observed between emissions from pellets and from tempera paints of a given pigment, and between organic and inorganic pigments, serve to discuss the mechanisms operating in the laser irradiation of the paint systems.

  5. Laser-ablated active doping technique for visible spectroscopy measurements on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew Robert

    2013-09-01

    Visible spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic, allowing plasma parameters ranging from temperature and density to electric and magnetic fields to be measured. Spectroscopic dopants are commonly introduced to make these measurements. On Z, dopants are introduced passively (i.e. a salt deposited on a current-carrying surface); however, in some cases, passive doping can limit the times and locations at which measurements can be made. Active doping utilizes an auxiliary energy source to disperse the dopant independently from the rest of the experiment. The objective of this LDRD project was to explore laser ablation as a method of actively introducing spectroscopic dopants. Ideally, the laser energy would be delivered to the dopant via fiber optic, which would eliminate the need for time-intensive laser alignments in the Z chamber. Experiments conducted in a light lab to assess the feasibility of fibercoupled and open-beam laser-ablated doping are discussed.

  6. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the matrix, as do strontium and calcium.

  7. Progress of laser ablation for accelerator mass spectroscopy at ATLAS utilizing an ECRIS.

    PubMed

    Scott, R; Palchan, T; Pardo, R; Vondrasek, R; Kondev, F; Nusair, O; Peters, C; Paul, M; Bauder, W; Collon, P

    2014-02-01

    Beams of ions from the laser ablation method of solid materials into an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma have been used for the first time in experiments at ATLAS. Initial accelerator mass spectroscopy experiments using laser ablation for actinides and samarium have been performed. Initial results of coupling the laser system to the ECR source have guided us in making a number of changes to the original design. The point of laser impact has been moved off axis from the center of the ECR injection side. Motor control of the laser positioning mirror has been replaced with a faster and more reliable piezo-electric system, and different raster scan patterns have been tested. The use of the laser system in conjunction with a multi-sample changer has been implemented. Two major problems that are being confronted at this time are beam stability and total beam intensity. The status of the development will be presented and ideas for further improvements will be discussed. PMID:24593480

  8. Dynamics of femto- and nanosecond laser ablation plumes investigated using optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Freeman, J. R.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and electron density associated with femto- and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas (LPP) from brass under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, brass targets were ablated in vacuum employing pulses either from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) or from a Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). Optical emission spectroscopy is used to infer the density and temperature of the plasmas. The electron density (n{sub e}) was estimated using Stark broadened profiles of isolated lines while the excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) was estimated using the Boltzmann plot method. At similar fluence levels, continuum and ion emission are dominant in ns LPP at early times (<50 ns) followed by atomic emission, while the fs LPP provided an atomic plume throughout its visible emission lifetime. Though both ns and fs laser-plasmas showed similar temperatures ({approx}1 eV), the fs LPP is found to be significantly denser at shorter distances from the target surface as well as at early phases of its evolution compared to ns LPP. Moreover, the spatial extension of the plume emission in the visible region along the target normal is larger for fs LPP in comparison with ns LPP.

  9. Laser-ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The various mechanisms by which ablation of materials can be induced with lasers are discussed in this paper. The various ablation processes and potential applications are reviewed from the threshold for ablation up to fluxes of about 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, with emphasis on three particular processes; namely, front-surface spallation, two-dimensional blowoff, and contained vaporization.

  10. Laser-ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-05-01

    The various mechanisms by which ablation of materials can be induced with lasers are discussed in this paper. The various ablation processes and potential applications are reviewed from the threshold for ablation up to fluxes of about 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, with emphasis on three particular processes; namely, front-surface spallation, two-dimensional blowoff, and contained vaporization.

  11. Multielemental analysis of prehistoric animal teeth by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Galiova, Michaela; Kaiser, Jozef; Fortes, Francisco J.; Novotny, Karel; Malina, Radomir; Prokes, Lubomir; Hrdlicka, Ales; Vaculovic, Tomas; Nyvltova Fisakova, Miriam; Svoboda, Jiri; Kanicky, Viktor; Laserna, Javier J.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation (LA) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS) were utilized for microspatial analyses of a prehistoric bear (Ursus arctos) tooth dentine. The distribution of selected trace elements (Sr, Ba, Fe) was measured on a 26 mmx15 mm large and 3 mm thick transverse cross section of a canine tooth. The Na and Mg content together with the distribution of matrix elements (Ca, P) was also monitored within this area. The depth of the LIBS craters was measured with an optical profilometer. As shown, both LIBS and LA-ICP-MS can be successfully used for the fast, spatially resolved analysis of prehistoric teeth samples. In addition to microchemical analysis, the sample hardness was calculated using LIBS plasma ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios of Mg (or Ca). To validate the sample hardness calculations, the hardness was also measured with a Vickers microhardness tester.

  12. Time-of-flight spectroscopy characterization of the plasma plume from a laser-ablated potassium titanyl phosphate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Minju; Wang, XiaoXiao; Cheng, Wei; Liao, Bin; Zhang, Xu

    2015-06-01

    Optical emission spectra of the plasma produced by 1.06-?m Nd:YAG laser irradiation of a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal were recorded and analyzed in a time- and spatially resolved manner. The composition and evolution of the plasma plume were studied in low vacuum conditions. Emission lines associated with Ti(I), Ti(II) and K(I) were identified in the plasma. The delay times of emission peaks for the ablated species were investigated as a function of the observation distance from the target surface, and the velocities of these species were derived accordingly. Two emission peaks corresponding to a fast and a slow component of ablated Ti(I) were observed by optical time-of-flight spectroscopy. The origins of the two peaks and a possible mechanism for the laser ablation are discussed.

  13. Characteristics of the ablation plume induced on glasses for analysis purposes with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Sokolova, Ekaterina B.; Zheng, Ronger; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Yanping; Yu, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been demonstrated as an efficient tool for elemental analyses of transparent dielectric materials such as glasses or crystals for more than ten years. The induced plasma is however much less studied compared to that induced on the surface of a metal. The purpose of this work is therefore to characterize the plasma induced on the surface of a glass sample for analytical purpose as a function of the ablation laser wavelength, infrared (IR) or ultraviolet (UV), and the ambient gas, air or argon. The surface damage of the samples was also observed for ablation with IR or UV laser pulse when the sample was a float glass or a frosted one. Optimized ablation fluence was then determined. The morphology of the plasma was observed with time-resolved spectroscopic imaging, while the profiles of the electron density and temperature were extracted from time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy. The analytical performance of the plasmas was then studied in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio for several emission lines from some minor elements, Al, Fe, contained in glasses, and of the behavior of self-absorption for another minor element, Ca, in the different ablation conditions.

  14. Modeling of plasma distortions by laser-induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) and implications for the interpretation of LIAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.; Gierse, N.; Philipps, V.; Samm, U.

    2015-09-01

    For the interpretation of the line radiation observed from laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) such parameters as the density and temperature of electrons within very compact clouds of atoms and singly charged ions of ablated material have to be known. Compared to the local plasma conditions prior to the laser pulse, these can be strongly changed during LIAS since new electrons are generated by the ionisation of particles ejected from the irradiated target. Because of their transience and spatial inhomogeneity it is technically difficult to measure disturbances induced in the plasma by LIAS. To overcome this uncertainty a numerical model has been elaborated, providing a self-consistent description for the spreading of ablated particles and accompanying modifications in the plasma. The results of calculations for LIAS performed on carbon-containing targets in Ohmic and additionally heated discharges in the tokamak TEXTOR are presented. Due to the increase in the electron density the ‘ionisation per photon’ ratio, S/XB factor, is significantly enhanced compared to unperturbed plasma conditions. The impact of the amount of material ablated and of the plasma conditions before LIAS on the level of the S/XB-enhancement is investigated.

  15. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal atoms survive for several milliseconds while the gaseous carbon atoms and small molecules nucleate more rapidly. Additional experiments and the development of in situ methods for carbon nanotube detection would allow these results to be interpreted from the perspective of carbon nanotube formation.

  16. LASER ABLATION STUDIES OF CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-s...

  17. High resolution pulsed infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy: Application to laser ablated carbon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaes, Raphael; Provençal, Robert; Paul, Joshua; Saykally, Richard J.

    2002-04-01

    We report the design and performance of a tunable, pulsed high resolution mid infrared cavity ringdown spectrometer. Stimulated Raman scattering in H2/D2 is used to downconvert the output of a SLM Alexandrite ring laser (720-800 nm) to the mid infrared (3-8 ?m). The infrared frequency bandwidth was determined to be 90±5 MHz from measurements of Doppler broadened OCS transitions at 5 ?m. The minimum detectable per pass fractional absorption is 1 ppm. We observe a frequency dependent ringdown cavity transmission of ±5 ppm due to spatial variations of the mirror reflectivity. The ?6 band of linear C9 formed by laser ablation of graphite in a He molecular beam was measured, showing a factor of 2 improvement in sensitivity relative to previous IR diode laser experiments. Based on calculated IR intensities, the number density of C9 in the molecular beam is 1.3*1011molec/cm3 and the minimum detectable density is 1*109 molec/cm3. We expect this spectrometer to be a powerful tool for the study of transient species formed in molecular beams.

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Mengqi

    In this dissertation, femtosecond laser materials processing is studied. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been designed, constructed and utilized to measure the time-of-flight spectra of the ions ablated by femtosecond laser pulses. The velocities and kinetic energies of the ions are determined. Emission spectroscopy and imaging have been carried out to analyze the laser-induced plume. Craters ablated in vacuum and under ambient pressure are measured by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a light interferometric microscope. Numerical methods in microscale energy transfer are first reviewed. Subsequently, a numerical model based on the two-temperature concept is utilized to account for the non-equilibrium energy transfer processes dominating the ultrashort laser pulse excitation of materials. Time-of-flight measurements reveal the presence of extremely energetic ions in femtosecond laser-induced plumes, with kinetic energies more than one order of magnitude higher than those of nanosecond laser-induced ions. Two different ablation regimes, exhibiting different laser fluence dependence of the total ion yields, and the corresponding percentage of energetic ions and the crater depths, are discovered for femtosecond laser ablation of titanium. Numerical modeling shows that the laser fluences associated with the second ablation regime can raise the lattice system to the range of the thermodynamic critical point and hence may cause explosive evaporation leading to the observed higher ablation rates. The first regime, however, occurs at lower laser fluences, when the laser energy is mainly deposited in the shallow region defined by the optical penetration depth. The more localized energy deposition is believed to lead to higher percentage of energetic ions, albeit to less total ablation volume. Femtosecond laser-induced plumes have been found to be much smaller in spatial dimensions and weaker in intensity than those induced by nanosecond laser pulses. The ambient pressure is found to restrain the expansion of the plumes. The non-equilibrium microscopic energy transfer between the electron and lattice subsystems needs to be considered to model femtosecond laser materials processing. The two-temperature approach is capable of at least semi-quantitatively modeling real engineering problems. Due to the large temperature range encountered in typical laser ablation applications, the temperature dependence of the materials thermal properties is found to be very important for accurate modeling. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  19. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  20. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Qingmei; Li, Cong; Hai, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin; Zhou, Yan; Yan, Longwen; Duan, Xuru

    2014-05-15

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ?20 nm in depth and ?500 ?m or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern.

  1. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingmei; Li, Cong; Hai, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Zhou, Yan; Yan, Longwen; Duan, Xuru; Ding, Hongbin

    2014-05-01

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ~20 nm in depth and ~500 ?m or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern. PMID:24880373

  2. Forensic analysis of printing inks using tandem Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Kiran; Trejos, Tatiana; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Elemental analysis, using either LA-ICP-MS or LIBS, can be used for the chemical characterization of materials of forensic interest to discriminate between source materials originating from different sources and also for the association of materials known to originate from the same source. In this study, a tandem LIBS/LA-ICP-MS system that combines the benefits of both LIBS and LA-ICP-MS was evaluated for the characterization of samples of printing inks (toners, inkjets, intaglio and offset.). The performance of both laser sampling methods is presented. A subset of 9 black laser toners, 10 colored (CMYK) inkjet samples, 12 colored (CMYK) offset samples and 12 intaglio inks originating from different manufacturing sources were analyzed to evaluate the discrimination capability of the tandem method. These samples were selected because they presented a very similar elemental profile by LA-ICP-MS. Although typical discrimination between different ink sources is found to be > 99% for a variety of inks when only LA-ICP-MS was used for the analysis, additional discrimination was achieved by combining the elemental results from the LIBS analysis to the LA-ICP-MS analysis in the tandem technique, enhancing the overall discrimination capability of the individual laser ablation methods. The LIBS measurements of the Ca, Fe, K and Si signals, in particular, improved the discrimination for this specific set of different ink samples previously shown to exhibit very similar LA-ICP-MS elemental profiles. The combination of these two techniques in a single setup resulted in better discrimination of the printing inks with two distinct fingerprint spectra, providing information from atomic/ionic emissions and isotopic composition (m/z) for each ink sample.

  3. Laser ablation plume of FeSi2 alloy target studied by TOF mass and optical emission spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narazaki, Aiko; Sato, Tadatake; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2003-02-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) mass and optical emission spectroscopies have been performed on the ablation plume from ?-FeSi2 alloy target under KrF excimer laser irradiation at a fluence of 0.35-2.5J/cm2 to characterize the mass, kinetic energies and excited states of the ejected species. According to the TOF mass measurements in vacuum, the most prominent species were Si and Fe atoms and ions over the entire fluence range, in addition to Si dimer. At 0.4-0.7 J/cm2, only neutrals of Si, Fe and Si2 with the kinetic energy of around 0.2eV were observed. At the fluences above 0.7J/cm2, doubly and singly charged Si and Fe ions appeared abruptly increased their number density and kinetic energies from 6 eV at 0.7 J/cm2 to over 100 eV at 2.5 J/cm2. Consistent with the TOF mass spectra, the optical emission lines stemmed from the monatomic Si and Fe as well as Si dimer in the wavelength range of 240-800 nm in vacuum. On the other hand, we confirmed some luminescent lines appeared only in helium atmosphere of 10 Torr, suggesting the cluster formation such as FeSi.

  4. Diagnostics Techniques of Plasmas Produced by Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Villagran Muniz, M.; Sobral, H.; Sanchez Ake, C.; Sangines de Castro, R.; Sterling, E.; Bredice, F.

    2005-04-21

    Laser ablation in addition for thin film growing is also used for analytical techniques as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and for applications as simulation of natural lightning. In this work we present several diagnostic techniques such as probe beam deflection, shadowgraphy, interferometry, pulsed laser photoacoustic and the electrical perturbation induced by laser ablation plasmas that's gives essential information of the plasma, hot core air and shock wave expansion.

  5. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  6. Species-resolved imaging and gated photon counting spectroscopy of laser ablation plume dynamics during KrF- and ArF-laser PLD of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    Gated photon counting spectroscopy and species-resolved ICCD photography were used to study the weak plasma luminescence following the propagation of the initial ablation plume in vacuum and during the rebound of the plume with a substrate during pulsed laser deposition of amorphous diamond. These methods techniques were required in order to investigate notable differences between amorphous diamond-like carbon films formed by pulsed laser deposition from ArF (193 nm) and KrF (248 nm) irradiation of pyrolytic graphite in vacuum. Three principal regions of plume emission were found: (1) a bright luminescent ball (v {approximately}3--5 cm/{mu}s) displaying nearly entirely C{sup +} emission which appears to result from laser interaction with the initial ejecta, (2) a spherical ball of emission (v {approximately} 1 cm/{mu}s) displaying neutral carbon atomic emission lines and, at early times, jets of excited C{sub 2}, and (3) a well-defined region of broadband emission (v {approximately} 0.3 cm/{mu}s) near the target surface first containing emission bands from C{sub 2}, then weak, continuum emission thought to result from C{sub 3} and higher clusters and/or blackbody emission from hot clusters or nanoparticles.

  7. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  8. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  9. UV laser ablation of parylene films from gold substrates

    SciTech Connect

    O. R. Musaev, P. Scott, J. M. Wrobel, and M. B. Kruger

    2009-11-19

    Parylene films, coating gold substrates, were removed by laser ablation using 248 nm light from an excimer laser. Each sample was processed by a different number of pulses in one of three different environments: air at atmospheric pressure, nitrogen at atmospheric pressure, and vacuum. The laser-induced craters were analyzed by optical microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Multi-pulse ablation thresholds of gold and parylene were estimated.

  10. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy Talk: Laser Ablated Metal Atom Reactions to Form Novel Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Lester

    2010-03-01

    A wide variety of laser-ablated metal atom reactions in solid rare gas matrices at cryogenic temperatures to form novel product molecules will be presented. These will include the ion-pair molecule Li^+O2^-, the dialane molecule Al2H6, the thorium methylidene CH2=ThH2, the thorium borylene FB=ThF2, the uranium methylidyne HC?UF3, the nitride N?UF3, and other recently prepared uranium bearing molecules.

  11. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Castillo, Jr.; Rodriguez, E.; Jimenez-Villar, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Salomon-García, I.; de Sá, Gilberto F.; García-Fernández, T.; Almeida, DB; Cesar, CL; Johnes, R.; Ibarra, Juana C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag+ concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  12. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  13. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  14. Ultra-short laser ablation of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalova, A.; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    The investigation of mechanism of ultra-short laser ablation process of biological tissue represents one of the challenging subjects over the last couple of years. The femtosecond laser pulses are very well suited for high precision surgery, due to its low thermal and mechanical stress. The current research was emphasized on the examination of the interaction mechanism of high intensity ultra-short femtosecond and nanosecond laser pulses with hard biological tissue material (tooth, bones). It was established that femtosecond ablation works well for ablation of complex biological molecule systems. A more detailed view was taken by investigating the ablation dynamics at several wavelengths. The precise examination of the mass spectra of laser ablation with 193 nm and 800 nm introduces the way of altering the chemical composition of the ablated tissue. In general, it was found that ablation with ultra-short (femtosecond) pulses at 800 nm radiation yields the highest number of characteristic ions. To better understand the interaction mechanism we have performed post-ionization experiments. It was of main importance to succeed to establish efficient ionization of the organic molecules with minimal fragmentation. This work demonstrates sensitivity of the time-of-flight (TOF) technique and the great potential of the laser ablation/ultra-short laser secondary neutrals mass spectroscopy (LA/US-LSNMA) method in increasing the information content of biomolecular mass spectra.

  15. Real-Time Analysis of Individual Airborne Microparticles Using Laser Ablation Mass Spectroscopy and Genetically Trained Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, E.P.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1999-01-22

    We are developing a method for analysis of airborne microparticles based on laser ablation of individual molecules in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Airborne particles enter the spectrometer through a differentially-pumped inlet, are detected by light scattered from two CW laser beams, and sampled by a pulsed excimer laser as they pass through the center of the ion trap electrodes. After the laser pulse, the stored ions are separated by conventional ion trap methods. The mass spectra are then analyzed using genetically-trained neural networks (NNs). A number of mass spectra are averaged to obtain training cases which contain a recognizable spectral signature. Averaged spectra for a bacteria and a non-bacteria are shown to the NNs, the response evaluated, and the weights of the connections between neurodes adjusted by a Genetic Algorithm (GA) such that the output from the NN ranges from 0 for non-bacteria to 1 for bacteria. This process is iterated until the population of the GA converges or satisfies predetermined stopping criteria. Using this type of bipolar training we have obtained generalizing NNs able to distinguish five new bacteria from five new non-bacteria, none of which were used in training the NN.

  16. Laser Ablation Propulsion A Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Sayed A.; Ugalatad, Akshata C.

    Laser Ablation Propulsion (LAP) will serve as an alternative propulsion system for development of microthrusters. The principle of LAP is that when a laser (pulsed or continuous wave) with sufficient energy (more than the vaporization threshold energy of material) is incident on material, ablation or vaporization takes place which leads to the generation of plasma. The generated plasma has the property to move away from the material hence pressure is generated which leads to the generation of thrust. Nowadays nano satellites are very common in different space and defence applications. It is important to build micro thruster which are useful for orienting and re-positioning small aircraft (like nano satellites) above the atmosphere. modelling of LAP using MATLAB and Mathematica. Schematic is made for the suitable optical configuration of LAP. Practical experiments with shadowgraphy and self emission techniques and the results obtained are analysed taking poly (vinyl-chloride) (PVC) as propellant to study the

  17. Laser Ablation in Pediatric Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Robert; Estronza-Ojeda, Samuel; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation is an emerging, minimally invasive treatment for selected children with intractable focal epilepsy with improved procedural morbidity. Data for children lag similar studies in adults, but the hope is for near-equivalent seizure-control rates and improved neuropsychological outcome when compared with standard open surgical resection. The approach seems particularly beneficial when dealing with deep, focal lesions, such as hypothalamic hamartomas or hippocampal sclerosis. PMID:26615109

  18. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Paisner, Jeffrey A. (San Ramon, CA); Story, Thomas (Antioch, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  19. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Paisner, Jeffrey A. (San Ramon, CA); Story, Thomas (Antioch, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  20. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePLUS

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  1. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, H.; Yoneda, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-02-01

    Anderson localization of matter-waves in a controlled disorder: a quantum simulator? / A. Aspect ... [et al.] -- Squeezing and entanglement in a Bose-Einstein condensate / C. Gross ... [et al.] -- New physics in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates / Y. Kawaguchi, H. Saito, and M. Ueda -- Observation of vacuum fluctuations in a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate / C. Klempt ... [et al.] -- Negative-index media for matter waves / F. Perales ... [et al.] -- Entanglement of two individual atoms using the Rydberg blockade / A. Browaeys ... [et al.] -- Array of mesoscopic ensembles on a magnetic atom chip / A. F. Tauschinsky ... [et al.] -- Stability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio tested with molecules using an optical link to primary clock / A. Amy-Klein ... [et al.] -- Metastable helium: lifetime measurements using cold atoms as a test of QED / K. G. H. Baldwin ... [et al.] -- Optical lattice clocks with single occupancy bosons and spin-polarized fermions toward 10[symbol] accuracy / M. Takamoto ... [et al.] -- Frequency measurements of Al[symbol] and Hg[symbol] optical standards / W. M. Itano ... [et al.] -- Switching of light with light using cold atoms inside a hollow optical fiber / M. Bajcsy ... [et al.] -- Room-temperature atomic ensembles for quantum memory and magnetometry / K. Jensen ... [et al.] -- Components for multi-photon non-classical state preparation and measurement / G. Puentes ... [et al.] -- Quantum field state measurement and reconstruction in a cavity by quantum nondemolition photon counting / M. Brune ... [et al.] -- XUV frequency comb spectroscopy / C. Gohle ... [et al.] -- Ultrahigh-repetition-rate pulse train with absolute-phase control produced by an adiabatic raman process / M. Katsuragawa ... [et al.] -- Strongly correlated bosons and fermions in optical lattices / S. Will ... [et al.] -- Bragg spectroscopy of ultracold bose gases in optical lattices / L. Fallani ... [et al.] -- Synthetic quantum many-body systems / C. Guerlin ... [et al.] -- Ultracold Ytterbium atoms in optical lattices / S. Sugawa ... [et al.] -- Ultracold polar molecules in the rovibrational ground state / J. Deiglmayr ... [et al.] -- Polar molecules near quantum degeneracy / J. Ye and D. S. Jin -- Production of a quantum gas of rovibronic ground-state molecules in an optical lattice / J. G. Danzl ... [et al.] -- Recent progress in x-ray nonlinear optics / K. Tamasaku, K. Sawada, and T. Ishikawa -- Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - laser spectroscopy in unconventional environments / S. Svanberg -- Laser spectroscopy on relativistic ion beams / S. Reinhardt ... [et al.] -- Single frequency microcavity lasers and applications / L. Xu ... [et al.].

  2. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  3. Fractal Character of Titania Nanoparticles Formed by Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O.; Midgley, A; Wrobel, J; Yan, J; Kruger, M

    2009-01-01

    Titania nanoparticles were fabricated by laser ablation of polycrystalline rutile in water at room temperature. The resulting nanoparticles were analyzed with x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The electron micrograph image of deposited nanoparticles demonstrates fractal properties.

  4. Infrared laser ablation of hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Tsikrikas, G. N.; Helidonis, Emmanuel S.; Kavvalos, George; Sobol, Emil N.

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this work is the experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of variable laser parameters (wavelength, fluence, pulse repetition rate) and the optical and thermophysical properties of bone tissue (absorption coefficient, tissue inhomogeneity) on the ablation thresholds and the extent of thermally influenced zones. Ablation and perforation experiments were realized by using (1) a semiconductively preionized TEA CO2 laser (10.6 micrometers ) and (2) a sliding discharge TEA HF laser (2.9 micrometers ).

  5. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  6. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  7. Characterization of toners and inkjets by laser ablation spectrochemical methods and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejos, Tatiana; Corzo, Ruthmara; Subedi, Kiran; Almirall, José

    2014-02-01

    Detection and sourcing of counterfeit currency, examination of counterfeit security documents and determination of authenticity of medical records are examples of common forensic document investigations. In these cases, the physical and chemical composition of the ink entries can provide important information for the assessment of the authenticity of the document or for making inferences about common source. Previous results reported by our group have demonstrated that elemental analysis, using either Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) or Laser Ablation Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), provides an effective, practical and robust technique for the discrimination of document substrates and writing inks with minimal damage to the document. In this study, laser-based methods and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) methods were developed, optimized and validated for the forensic analysis of more complex inks such as toners and inkjets, to determine if their elemental composition can differentiate documents printed from different sources and to associate documents that originated from the same printing source. Comparison of the performance of each of these methods is presented, including the analytical figures of merit, discrimination capability and error rates. Different calibration strategies resulting in semi-quantitative and qualitative analysis, comparison methods (match criteria) and data analysis and interpretation tools were also developed. A total of 27 black laser toners originating from different manufacturing sources and/or batches were examined to evaluate the discrimination capability of each method. The results suggest that SEM-EDS offers relatively poor discrimination capability for this set (~ 70.7% discrimination of all the possible comparison pairs or a 29.3% type II error rate). Nonetheless, SEM-EDS can still be used as a complementary method of analysis since it has the advantage of being non-destructive to the sample in addition to providing imaging capabilities to further characterize toner samples by their particle morphology. Laser sampling methods resulted in an improvement of the discrimination between different sources with LIBS producing 89% discrimination and LA-ICP-MS resulting in 100% discrimination. In addition, a set of 21 black inkjet samples was examined by each method. The results show that SEM-EDS is not appropriate for inkjet examinations since their elemental composition is typically below the detection capabilities with only sulfur detected in this set, providing only 47.4% discrimination between possible comparison pairs. Laser sampling methods were shown to provide discrimination greater than 94% for this same inkjet set with false exclusion and false inclusion rates lower than 4.1% and 5.7%, for LA-ICP-MS and LIBS respectively. Overall these results confirmed the utility of the examination of printed documents by laser-based micro-spectrochemical methods. SEM-EDS analysis of toners produced a limited utility for discrimination within sources but was not an effective tool for inkjet ink discrimination. Both LA-ICP-MS and LIBS can be used in forensic laboratories to chemically characterize inks on documents and to complement the information obtained by conventional methods and enhance their evidential value.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  9. PROCEEDINGS288 ---c..*. LASER ABLATION: I:`.

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    AIP I CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS288 ---c..*. . LASER ABLATION: I:`. MECHANEMS: . JOHN C. MILLER . . . DAVID B. GEOHEGAN . . SOLID STATE DIVISION . OAK RIDGE NATIONAL MBORATORY AIP !s. Address inquiries to Series Editor, AIP Conference Proceedings, AIP Press, American Institute of Physics

  10. Dual beam optical system for pulsed laser ablation film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus having a laser source outputting a laser ablation beam includes an ablation chamber having a sidewall, a beam divider for dividing the laser ablation beam into two substantially equal halves, and a pair of mirrors for converging the two halves on a surface of the target from complementary angles relative to the target surface normal, thereby generating a plume of ablated material emanating from the target.

  11. Dual beam optical system for pulsed laser ablation film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-09-24

    A laser ablation apparatus having a laser source outputting a laser ablation beam includes an ablation chamber having a sidewall, a beam divider for dividing the laser ablation beam into two substantially equal halves, and a pair of mirrors for converging the two halves on a surface of the target from complementary angles relative to the target surface normal, thereby generating a plume of ablated material emanating from the target. 3 figs.

  12. Nanosecond laser ablation of gold nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Choi, Yeonho; Hwang, David J.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chung, Jaewon; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-10-02

    Ablation of self-assembled monolayer protected gold nanoparticle films on polyimide was explored using a nanosecond laser. When the nanoparticle film was ablated and subsequently thermally sintered to a continuous film, the elevated rim structure by the expulsion of molten pool could be avoided and the ablation threshold fluence was reduced to a value at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the gold film. This could be explained by the unusual properties of nanoparticle film such as low melting temperature, weak bonding between nanoparticles, efficient laser energy deposition, and reduced heat loss. Finally, submicron lines were demonstrated.

  13. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  14. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 ?m up to 3.2 ?m. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  15. Highspeed laser ablation cutting of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, F.; Loeschner, U.; Hartwig, L.; Szczepanski, D.; Schille, J.; Gronau, S.; Knebel, T.; Drechsel, J.; Ebert, R.; Exner, H.

    2013-02-01

    In laser ablation cutting, irradiation of high-intense laser beams causes ejection of molten and evaporated material out of the cutting zone as a result of high pressure gradients, induced by expanding plasma plumes. This paper investigates highspeed laser ablation cutting of industrial grade metal sheets using high-brilliant continuous wave fiber lasers with output powers up to 5 kW. The laser beam was deflected with scan speeds up to 2700 m/min utilizing both a fast galvanometer scan system and a polygon scan system. By sharp laser beam focusing using different objectives with focal lengths ranging between 160 mm and 500 mm, small laser spot diameters between 16.5 ?m and 60 ?m were obtained, respectively. As a result high peak intensities between 3*108 W/cm² and 2.5*109 W/cm² were irradiated on the sample surface, and cutting kerfs with a maximum depth of 1.4 mm have been produced. In this study the impact of the processing parameters laser power, laser spot diameter, cutting speed, and number of scans on both the achievable cutting depth and the cutting edge quality was investigated. The ablation depths, the heights of the cutting burr, as well as the removed material volumes were evaluated by means of optical microscope images and cross section photographs. Finally highspeed laser ablation cutting was studied using an intensified ultra highspeed camera in order to get useful insights into the cutting process.

  16. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  17. Optical properties of tin oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in water: Influence of laser ablation time duration and laser fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Desarkar, Himadri Sankar; Kumbhakar, P. Mitra, A.K.

    2012-11-15

    Colloidal tin oxide nanoparticles are prepared by laser (having a wavelength of 1064 nm) ablation of tin metallic target immersed in pure deionized water. The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence on the size and optical properties of the synthesized nanoparticles are studied. Prepared tin oxide nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The morphology of prepared tin oxide nanoparticles is found to be mostly spherical and with sizes in the nanometric range (mean radius of 3.2 to 7.3 nm). The measured UV-Visible absorption spectra show the presence of absorption peaks in the ultraviolet region. The band gap energy of samples prepared with different laser ablation time duration is calculated and is found to be increased with decrease in size (radius) of the prepared nanoparticles. Photoluminescence emission measurements at room temperature show that all the samples exhibit photoluminescence in the visible region. The peak photoluminescence emission intensity in the sample prepared with 50 min of laser ablation time is 3.5 times larger than that obtained in the sample prepared with 10 min of laser ablation time. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles (6.4-14.6 nm) are prepared by laser ablation in liquid technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples are characterized by TEM and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV-Visible absorption spectra exhibit quantum confinement effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples exhibit enhanced photoluminescence emissions in the visible region.

  18. Improved laser ablation model for asteroid deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Massimiliano; Gibbings, Alison; Watson, Ian; Hopkins, John-Mark

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an improved laser ablation model and compares the performance - momentum coupling and deflection system mass - of laser ablation against contactless deflection methods based on ion-propulsion. The deflection of an asteroid through laser ablation is achieved by illuminating the surface of the asteroid with high intensity laser light. The absorbed energy induces the sublimation of the surface material and the generation of a plume of gas and ejecta. Similar to a rocket engine, the flow of expelled material produces a continuous and controllable thrust that could be used to modify the trajectory and tumbling motion of the asteroid. Recent results gained from a series of laser ablation experiments were used to improve the sublimation and deflection models. In each experiment a terrestrial olivine sample was ablated, under vacuum, with a 90 W continuous wave laser. The paper presents a model that better fits the outcomes of the experimental campaign, in particular in terms of mass flow rate and spot temperature.

  19. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 ?m and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  20. Pulsed Laser Deposition — Ablation Mechanism and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. C.

    Laser ablation is the process of removing material from a solid surface by irradiating it with a laser beam. At low laser flux, the material is heated by the absorbed laser energy and evaporates or sublimates. At high laser flux, the material is typically converted to a plasma. Usually, laser ablation refers to removing material with a pulsed laser, but it is possible to ablate material with a continuous wave laser beam if the laser intensity is high enough. In general, the method of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is simple. Only few parameters need to be controlled during the process. Targets used in PLD are small compared with other targets used in other sputtering techniques. It is quite easy to produce multi-layer film composed of two or more materials. Besides, by controlling the number of pulses, a fine control of film thickness can be achieved. Pulsed-laser deposition has been used to deposit an extraordinarily wide range of materials. Historically, the most significant application of PLD has been in the area of high temperature superconducting thin films. The demonstration that PLD could be used to deposit YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) films with zero resistivity at nearly 85 K sparked a significant amount of high temperature superconductivity research over the past decade and has stimulated research in PLD in general. The most striking limitations of PLD are the generation of particulates during the deposition process and the non uniform coating thickness, when substrates of large area are deposited.

  1. Rapid tooling using controlled laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Manfred; Schubart, Doris; Kauf, Michael

    1996-08-01

    Laser based rapid tooling techniques enable the completion of tools within a minimized period of time. Especially the controlled laser ablation process of metals or ceramics allows precise manufacturing along with a high surface accuracy of the parts. The reactive ablation mechanism of ferrous materials in oxygen atmosphere -- the chip removal - is described, as well as the optimization of the process parameters by systematical procedures. The processing results are limited with given radius of the interaction zone between the laser beam and the workpiece surface. Essential process-parameter is therefore the focus radius. This parameter, effectively being controlled by an adaptive optical mirror, strongly influences the process and thus the workpiece result. The laser ablation process characteristically offers a high flexibility concerning workpiece materials and geometries. In combination with the ability of processing even hardened steels without any tool wear laser ablation is predestined for the rapid tooling of metal forming tools like hot forging dies. Obtaining high workpiece accuracy along with short manufacturing times recommends the optimized ablation process not only for prototyping but for serial manufacturing as well.

  2. Surface Decontamination Using Laser Ablation Process - 12032

    SciTech Connect

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier; Damerval, Frederique

    2012-07-01

    A new decontamination method has been investigated and used during two demonstration stages by the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA. This new method is based on the use of a Laser beam to remove the contaminants present on a base metal surface. In this paper will be presented the type of Laser used during those tests but also information regarding the efficiency obtained on non-contaminated (simulated contamination) and contaminated samples (from the CEA and La Hague facilities). Regarding the contaminated samples, in the first case, the contamination was a quite thick oxide layer. In the second case, most of the contamination was trapped in dust and thin grease layer. Some information such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. Laser technology appears to be an interesting one for the future of the D and D applications. As shown in this paper, the results in terms of efficiency are really promising and in many cases, higher than those obtained with conventional techniques. One of the most important advantages is that all those results have been obtained with no generation of secondary wastes such as abrasives, chemicals, or disks... Moreover, as mentioned in introduction, the Laser ablation process can be defined as a 'dry' process. This technology does not produce any liquid waste (as it can be the case with chemical process or HP water process...). Finally, the addition of a vacuum system allows to trap the contamination onto filters and thus avoiding any dissemination in the room where the process takes place. The next step is going to be a commercial use in 2012 in one of the La Hague buildings. (authors)

  3. Femtosecond laser lithotripsy: feasibility and ablation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M H; Wang, Tianyi; Neev, Joseph; Glickman, Randolph D; Chan, Kin Foong; Milner, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Light emitted from a femtosecond laser is capable of plasma-induced ablation of various materials. We tested the feasibility of utilizing femtosecond-pulsed laser radiation (lambda=800 nm, 140 fs, 0.9 mJ/pulse) for ablation of urinary calculi. Ablation craters were observed in human calculi of greater than 90% calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYST), or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MAPH). Largest crater volumes were achieved on CYST stones, among the most difficult stones to fragment using Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) lithotripsy. Diameter of debris was characterized using optical microscopy and found to be less than 20 microm, substantially smaller than that produced by long-pulsed Ho:YAG ablation. Stone retropulsion, monitored by a high-speed camera system with a spatial resolution of 15 microm, was negligible for stones with mass as small as 0.06 g. Peak shock wave pressures were less than 2 bars, measured by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) needle hydrophone. Ablation dynamics were visualized and characterized with pump-probe imaging and fast flash photography and correlated to shock wave pressures. Because femtosecond-pulsed laser ablates urinary calculi of soft and hard compositions, with micron-sized debris, negligible stone retropulsion, and small shock wave pressures, we conclude that the approach is a promising candidate technique for lithotripsy. PMID:20459291

  4. From Laser Desorption to Laser Ablation of Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Hillenkamp

    1998-03-01

    For selected indications laser ablation and cutting of biological tissues is clinical practice. Preferentially lasers with emission wavelengths in the far UV and the mid IR are used, for which tissue absorption is very high. Morphologically the ablation sites look surprisingly similar for the two wavelength ranges, despite of the very different prim y putative interaction mechanisms. Ablation depth as a function of fluence follows a sigmoidal curve. Even factors below the nominal ablation threshold superficial layers of material get removed from the surface. This is the fluence range for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI). Evidence will be presented which suggest that strong similarities exist between the desorption and ablation processes both for UV- as well as for IR-wavelengths.

  5. Plasma luminescence feedback control system for precise ultrashort pulse laser tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchick, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrown, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue without damaging nearby soft tissue using ultrashort pulse laser (USPL). Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  6. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  7. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  8. Generation of Core/shell Nanoparticles with Laser Ablation 

    E-print Network

    Jo, Young Kyong

    2012-10-19

    Two types of core/shell nanoparticles (CS-NPs) generation based on laser ablation are developed in this study, namely, double pulse laser ablation and laser ablation in colloidal solutions. In addition to the study of the generation mechanism of CS...

  9. Picosecond laser ablation of transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Simone; Siebert, Christof; Eppelt, Urs; Hartmann, Claudia; Faißt, Birgit; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Processing of thin and ultra-thin glass displays is becoming more important in the fast increasing market of display manufacturing. As conventional technologies such as mechanical scribing followed by manual breaking mostly lead to bad edge quality and thus to a huge amount of reject, other processes like ablation processes [1] with picosecond lasers are getting more and more interesting. However processing with ultrashort pulsed lasers partially leads to unwanted effects which should be understood in a better way by means of intensive basic research. Therefore the ablation mechanism of ultrashort pulses on transparent materials was investigated in this research project. On the one hand the ablation mechanism was analyzed in a simulative way by means of rate equations on the other hand by laboratory experiments.

  10. Laser ablation threshold of cultural heritage metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, A.; Nassisi, V.; Buccolieri, A.; Buccolieri, G.; Castellano, A.; Leo, L. S.; di Giulio, M.; Torrisi, L.; Caridi, F.; Borrielli, A.

    The present work has the purpose to evaluate experimentally the ablation threshold fluences of copper, silver, and their alloys in order to induce a safety laser cleaning of the metal artifacts avoiding damages to the bulkE We used two different pulsed lasers: a KrF excimer laser operating at 248 nm, 23 ns pulse duration and a Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm (second harmonic), 3 ns pulse. Preliminary experimental results about the laser cleaning of bronze coins will be reported. The laser cleaning consists on the reduction of the chlorine concentration from the surface of the coins. The laser cleaning, carried out by the KrF laser, provides a safe way of removing the chlorine concentration as the Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence analyses will demonstrate.

  11. Spectroscopic studies of laser ablation plumes of artwork materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oujja, M.; Rebollar, E.; Castillejo, M.

    2003-04-01

    Studies on the plasma plume created during KrF laser (248 nm) ablation of dosimeter tempera samples in vacuum have been carried out to investigate the basic interactions of the laser with paint materials. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to measure the translational velocity of electronically excited transients in the plasma plume. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) studies using a probe dye laser, allowed to determine the velocities of non-emitting species. The propagation velocities of C 2 in the a 3? u and d 3? g electronic states and of excited atomic species are indicative of a high translational temperature. Differences between the velocities of organic and inorganic species and between emissions from the tempera systems and from the pigments as pellets allow to discuss the participation of photochemical mechanisms in the laser irradiation of the paint systems.

  12. Femtosecond filament-laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Huaming; Chan, George C.-Y.; Mao, Xianglei; Zheng, Ronger; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    A new remote sensing technology for real-time isotopic analysis is introduced: Femtosecond Filament-Induced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (F2-LAMIS). The technique combines femtosecond (fs) laser filamentation and ablation-based molecular isotopic spectroscopy, thereby enabling isotopic analysis of samples at a distance, in ambient air and at ambient pressure conditions. Isotopic analysis of zirconium (Zr) samples by F2-LAMIS is demonstrated, and the molecular and atomic emission intensity, and properties of the filament-induced plasma generated at different filament propagation distances were investigated. Spectral fitting of F2-LAMIS spectra enabled semi-quantitative isotopic analysis without the use of calibration standards, which was independent of the filament propagation distance for the studied range. This technology provides new capabilities for direct isotopic ratio measurements at remote distances.

  13. Time-resolved monitoring of ZnO plume by ArF laser ablation: influence of surrounding gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Narazaki, Aiko; Sato, Tadatake; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2003-02-01

    We have investigated dynamics of ablated species in ZnO plume under ArF excimer laser irradiation with emission imaging and spectroscopy, and discussed the effect of a surrounding inert gas. Surrounding He or Ar gas strongly cools down the plume and encourages aggregation of ablated species, which is visualized by second laser irradiation to the plume.

  14. Picosecond laser ablation of porcine sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, Wojciech S.; Harvey, Eleanor M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Parson, Simon H.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Lasers have been shown to be successful in certain medical procedures and they have been identified as potentially making a major contribution to the development of minimally invasive procedures. However, the uptake is not as widespread and there is scope for many other applications where laser devices may offer a significant advantage in comparison to the traditional surgical tools. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential of using a picosecond laser for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy. Experiments were carried out on porcine scleral samples due to the comparable properties to human tissue. Samples were prepared with a 5mm diameter trephine and were stored in lactated Ringer's solution. After laser machining, the samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, then dried and investigated under SEM. The laser used in the experiments is an industrial picosecond TRUMPF TruMicro laser operating at a wavelength of 1030nm, pulse length of 6ps, repetition rate of 1 kHz and a focused spot diameter of 30?m. The laser beam was scanned across the samples with the use of a galvanometer scan head and various ablation patterns were investigated. Processing parameters (pulse energy, spot and line separation) which allow for the most efficient laser ablation of scleral tissue without introducing any collateral damage were investigated. The potential to create various shapes, such as linear incisions, square cavities and circular cavities was demonstrated.

  15. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-08

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  16. Excimer Laser Ablation of Egg Tempera Paints and Varnishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, P. J.; Bordalo, R.; Santos, L. dos; Marques, S. F.; Salgueiredo, E.; Gouveia, H.

    In this work a series of egg tempera paint and varnish systems have been prepared, artificially aged and irradiated with KrF excimer laser at a wavelength of 248 nm. The samples were prepared with pure pigments and selected mixtures. It was found that, for some pigments, the colour changed upon laser irradiation even at low energy densities, below the ablation threshold while for other inorganic pigmented egg temperas the degree of discoloration is very small at moderate fluence of ˜0.30 J cm?2. The varnish systems did not present signs of discoloration. The thickness, superficial roughness and magnitude of the colour changes of the samples were measured. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and UV/visible spectroscopy were used in order to investigate the changes induced by the KrF excimer laser radiation.

  17. Stereotactic Laser Ablation for Hypothalamic Hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Rolston, John D; Chang, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic laser ablation (SLA) is a minimally invasive approach to the treatment of medication-resistant epilepsy that accomplishes ablation of the seizure focus with real-time magnetic resonance thermal mapping. Rates of seizure freedom in early series suggest that SLA approaches and perhaps surpasses the effectiveness of open resection. SLA minimizes the neurocognitive and endocrine adverse effects of open surgery. Secondary benefits of SLA include decreased length of stay, elimination of intensive care unit stay, reduced procedure-related discomfort, and improved access to surgical treatment for patients less likely to consider an open resective procedure. PMID:26615108

  18. Laser ablation comparison by picosecond pulses train and nanosecond pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednev, V. N.; Filippov, M. N.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of laser ablation by a train of picosecond pulses and nanosecond pulses revealed a difference in laser craters, ablation thresholds, plasma sizes and spectral line intensities. Laser ablation with a train of picosecond pulses resulted in improved crater quality while ablated mass decreased up to 30%. A reduction in laser plasma dimensions for picosecond train ablation was observed while the intensity of atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was greater by a factor of 2–4 indicating an improved excitation and atomization in the plasma.

  19. Synthesis of CaWO4 nanocolloidal suspension via pulsed laser ablation and its optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jeong Ho; Park, Gyeong Seon; Kim, Kang Min; Lim, Chang Sung; Yoon, Jong-Won; Shim, Kwang Bo

    2007-09-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in the liquid phase was successfully employed to synthesize calcium tungstate (CaWO4) nanocolloidal suspension. The crystalline phase, particle morphology and laser ablation mechanism for the colloidal nanoparticles were investigated using XRD, TEM and SEM. The obtained colloidal suspension consisted of well-dispersed CaWO4 nanoparticles which showed a spherical shape with sizes ranging from 5 to 30 nm. The laser ablation and the nanoparticle forming process were discussed under consideration of the photo-ablation mechanism, where the nanoparticles were generated by rapid condensation of the plume in high pressured ethanol vapor. The optical properties of the prepared CaWO4 colloidal nanoparticles were analyzed in detail using XPS, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and PL spectrophotometry. The optical band gap was estimated by Tauc and Menths law.

  20. Experimental research of two-wavelength laser ablation biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yucheng; Huang, Chuyun; He, Yanyan; Chen, Xia

    2009-08-01

    Laser ablation biologic tissue is an important performance of laser application. Based on the combination function of two-wavelength laser to biologic tissue ablation, the semi-continuous two-wavelength laser at 532nm and 1064nm ablating blood tissue was investigated by experiment. The fresh pork and pig liver specimens were ablated at different laser power density and different laser power proportion in water conditions and ablation depth and thermo-damage thickness were measured. The experiment results indicate that there is no effective ablation but deeper thermo-damage of the 1064 nm laser to biologic tissue in water conditions when the 532nm laser power is little but the ablation efficiency sharp inc- reases and the thermo-damage sharp decreases when the 532nm laser power arrives to a threshold. The combination function of two wavelength laser to tissue ablation is appeared here. It indicates that the ablation efficiency and hemostatic function in laser surgery can be adjusted by the two-wavelength laser power proportion.

  1. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  2. Modeling CO{sub 2} Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  3. Advances in laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arecchi, F.T.; Strumia, F.; Walther, H.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the lectures and seminars given at the NATO Study Institute on ''Advances in Laser Spectroscopy'' held in Italy in 1981. Topics include experimental and theoretical techniques (e.g., Rydberg atoms in magnetic and electric fields; progress in tunable lasers; UV-generation in CW dye lasers); applications of laser spectroscopy (e.g., new phenomena in coherent optical transients); and recent results and trends (e.g., the search for parity non-conservation in atoms; a possible new approach to free-electron lasers). Recommended for young researchers and advanced students engaged in the area of quantum electronics.

  4. Nanochemical effects in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-02-01

    We study chemical energy released from the oxidation of aluminum in multipulse femtosecond laser ablation in air and oxygen. Our study shows that the released chemical energy amounts to about 13% of the incident laser energy, and about 50% of the ablated material is oxidized. The ablated material mass per laser pulse is measured to be on the nanogram scale. Our study indicates that femtosecond laser ablation is capable of inducing nanochemical reactions since the femtosecond laser pulse can controllably produce nanoparticles, clusters, and atoms from a solid target.

  5. A novel method for the identification of inorganic and organic gunshot residue particles of lead-free ammunitions from the hands of shooters using scanning laser ablation-ICPMS and Raman micro-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abrego, Zuriñe; Grijalba, Nagore; Unceta, Nora; Maguregui, Maite; Sanchez, Alicia; Fernández-Isla, Alberto; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2014-12-01

    A method based on scanning laser ablation and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SLA-ICPMS) and Raman micro-spectroscopy for the detection and identification of compounds consistent with gunshot residue particles (GSR) has been developed. The method has been applied to the characterization of particles resulting from the discharge of firearms using lead-free ammunition. Modified tape lifts were used to collect the inorganic and organic residues from skin surfaces in a single sample. Using SLA-ICPMS, aggregates related to the composition of the ammunition, such as Cu-Zn-Sn, Zr-Sr, Cu-Zn, Al-Ti, or Al-Sr-Zr were detected, but this composition is only consistent with GSR from lead-free ammunitions. Additional evidence was provided by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which identified the characteristic organic groups of the particles as centralite, diphenylamine or their nitrated derivatives, which are indicative of GSR. PMID:25303642

  6. Viscous liquid expulsion in nanosecond UV laser ablation: From ``clean'' ablation to nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, V. N.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reviews recent results on modeling UV nanosecond laser ablation. Particular attention is given to a viscous liquid flow driven by ablation pressure. Based on the analysis of the Navier-Stokes equation, various strongly different manifestations of this phenomenon are explained. These are (i) a “clean” laser ablation, when the laser spot has a clean sharp spot border free of resolidified melt dross; (ii) a new form of material removal in laser ablation, expulsion on a poly(methyl methacrylate) target of long (up to 1 mm) nanofibers with a radius about 150-200 nm to the exterior of the spot under the action of a single pulse of a KrF excimer laser; and (iii) a new method of laser surface nanostructuring, the formation of a surface foam having a structure of micropores interconnected by nanofilaments with diameters of about 100 nm as a result of single-pulse KrF laser ablation of biopolymer films.

  7. Effect of Laser Wavelength and Ablation Time on Pulsed Laser Ablation Synthesis of AL Nanoparticles in Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, A.; Mamoory, R. Sarraf

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol for 5-15 minutes using the 1064 and 533 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser with energies of 280-320 mJ per pulse. It has been found that higher wavelength leads to significantly higher ablation efficiency, and finer spherical nanoparticles are also synthesized. Besides, it was obvious that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, while lower ablation rate was observed. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, are synthesized in higher ablation times.

  8. Novel method for Ag colloidal cluster formation by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Teppei; Akimoto, Yusuke; Takahashi, Naoko; Kitazumi, Kosuke; Kajiya, Shuji; Watanabe, Yoshihide

    2015-09-01

    We report a novel method for formation of sub-nanoclusters by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface. The density of plasma induced by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface should be lower than that produced by laser ablation in liquid. In the lower density plasma, the produced clusters rarely grow or aggregate into larger clusters because the collision probability is low, resulting in the formation of small clusters. Ag sub-nanoclusters were observed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These results show that low-density plasma can be applied to small-cluster formation and that laser ablation at the air-liquid interface produces a good reactive field for the formation of sub-nanoclusters. Our results highlight the importance of low-density plasma induced at the air-liquid interface for sub-nanocluster formation.

  9. Investigating Age Resolution in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstwood, Matt; Kosler, Jan; Jackson, Simon; Pearson, Norman; Sylvester, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Workshop on Data Handling in LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Geochronology; Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 12-13 July 2008; Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) dating is an increasingly popular approach for determining the age of mineral grains and the timing of geological events. The spatial resolution offered by this technique allows detailed investigations of complex igneous and metamorphic processes, and the speed of data capture allows vast amounts of information to be gathered rapidly. Laser ablation U-Th-Pb dating is therefore becoming an increasingly influential technique to the geochronology community, providing cost-effective and ready access to age data for laboratories and end users worldwide. However, complications in acquiring, processing, and interpreting data can lead to inaccurate age information entering the literature. With the numbers of practitioners expanding rapidly, the need to standardize approaches and resolve difficulties (particularly involving the subjectivity in processing laser ablation U-Th-Pb data) is becoming important.

  10. The optical strength of the glass nanocomposites at laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemanin, V. G.; Mkrtychev, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental study of the nanocomposites laser ablation have been used to predict its optical strength dynamics under laser irradiation. A practical application of statistical regularities observed in the laser ablation destruction of materials using Weibull-Gnedenko three-parameter statistics has been proposed.

  11. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  12. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  13. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  14. Growth modes of ZnO nanostructures from laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Amarilio-Burshtein, I.; Tamir, S.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2010-03-08

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) and other nanostructures were grown by laser ablation of a ZnO containing target onto different substrates with and without the presence of an Au catalyst. The morphology and structure of the NWs were studied using high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopes [including imaging, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS)]. The different growth modes obtainable could be tuned by varying the Zn concentration in the vapor phase keeping other growth parameters intact. Possible growth mechanisms of these nanowires are suggested and discussed.

  15. CO2 Laser Absorption in Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tegel, Jochen; Schall, Wolfgang O.

    2006-05-02

    The impulse formation by laser ablation is limited by the premature absorption of the incident laser radiation in the initially produced cloud of ablation products. The power fraction of a CO2 laser pulse transmitted through a small hole in a POM sample for pulse energies of 35 to 150 J focused on a spot of 2 cm2 has been compared with the incident power. The plasma formation in vacuum and in air of 3500 Pa and the spread of the shock wave with velocities of 1.6 to 2.4 km/s in the low pressure air was observed by Schlieren photography. A sharp edged dark zone with a maximum extension of 10 to 12 mm away from the target surface develops within 5 {mu}s independently of the pressure and is assumed to be a plasma. In order to find out, if this is also the zone where the majority of the incident laser radiation is absorbed, a CO2 probe laser beam was directed through the expansion cloud parallel to and at various distances from the sample surface. The time behavior of the absorption signal of the probe beam has been measured and an absorption wave could be observed.

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of laser ablation brass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Nek M.; Hafeez, Sarwat; Kalyar, M. A.; Ali, R.; Baig, M. A.

    2008-11-15

    We present optical emission studies of the laser ablation brass plasma generated by the fundamental, second, and third harmonics of a neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The spectra predominantly reveal the spectral lines of the neutral and singly ionized copper and zinc. The excitation temperatures are determined by the Boltzmann plot method, whereas the electron number densities have been extracted from the Stark broadened line profiles. The spatial variations in the spectral line intensities and the plasma parameters at 1000, 500, and 100 mbar air pressures have been evaluated. Besides, the effect of the ambient gases (He, Ne, and Ar), the laser irradiance, and the laser wavelengths on the plasma parameters have been investigated.

  17. Comparisons of Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Derived Bulk Chemistries for Natural Surfaces of Volcanic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, K.; Wyatt, M.; Kelley, K.

    2007-12-01

    The GRS and TES datasets provide unique and complementary insights into the bulk compositions of martian surface materials. GRS measures the composition of the upper few tens of centimeters of the surface while TES measures the composition of the upper hundred microns. Recent GRS studies have reported global distributions of bulk chemical abundances for Si, K, Fe, Th, and K/Th (Karunatillake et al., 2007; Taylor et al., 2007). A major result from these studies is the near uniform distribution of relative Si concentrations across martian low-albedo regions. This is significant because a primary difference between the TES Surface Type 1 and Surface Type 2 global spectral end-members is the modeled abundance of high-silica mineral-phases (e.g. Bandfield et al., 2000; Wyatt et al., 2002; McSween et al., 2003). A way of reconciling this apparent discrepancy between the two datasets is to account for the different penetration depths of the two techniques and attribute compositional variations to near-surface coatings of high-silica phases. This, however, leads to another question involving the accuracy of linear deconvolution results for materials with surface coatings. Laboratory studies by Rampe et al. (2007) reveal that secondary alteration products on a surface can cause non- linear mixing between spectral end-members and thus affect the modeled abundances of primary minerals in a mixture. This is significant because small amounts of weathering products on the martian surface may thus result in modeled primary mineral abundances that differ from the actual composition, resulting in a possible misclassification of volcanic compositions. In this study, we further the work by Rampe et al. (2007) and examine the accuracy of bulk chemical oxide abundances derived from thermal infrared laboratory measurements of chemically weathered natural surfaces and fresh cut surfaces of basalt. TES has mainly been utilized as a mineralogical tool, but thermal emission spectroscopy also provides a means for deriving chemical oxide abundances. Chemical compositions can be calculated from deconvolved modal mineralogies (vol. %) by combining the compositions of the spectral endmembers (wt. % oxides) in proportion to their relative modeled abundances. Wyatt et al. (2001) quantified the uncertainties in derived chemical compositions for fresh cut surfaces of volcanic rocks and demonstrated their use in correctly classifying compositions based on total silica contents. This study will specifically examine natural surfaces of volcanic rocks and whether non-linear mixing of mineral-phase spectral endmembers, which can adversely affect modeled mineral abundances, also affects derived chemical oxide abundances or if substitution of chemically similar phases results in consistent values. We analyze the bulk chemistries of basaltic natural surfaces using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and electro microprobe (EMP) and compare bulk chemistries to values derived from thermal emission data.

  18. Nanosecond laser ablation for pulsed laser deposition of yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sucharita

    2013-09-01

    A thermal model to describe high-power nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of yttria (Y2O3) has been developed. This model simulates ablation of material occurring primarily through vaporization and also accounts for attenuation of the incident laser beam in the evolving vapor plume. Theoretical estimates of process features such as time evolution of target temperature distribution, melt depth and ablation rate and their dependence on laser parameters particularly for laser fluences in the range of 6 to 30 J/cm2 are investigated. Calculated maximum surface temperatures when compared with the estimated critical temperature for yttria indicate absence of explosive boiling at typical laser fluxes of 10 to 30 J/cm2. Material ejection in large fragments associated with explosive boiling of the target needs to be avoided when depositing thin films via the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique as it leads to coatings with high residual porosity and poor compaction restricting the protective quality of such corrosion-resistant yttria coatings. Our model calculations facilitate proper selection of laser parameters to be employed for deposition of PLD yttria corrosion-resistive coatings. Such coatings have been found to be highly effective in handling and containment of liquid uranium.

  19. Ablation dynamics in laser sclerotomy ab externo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf; Droege, Gerit; Mohrenstecher, Dirk; Scheu, M.; Birngruber, Reginald

    1996-01-01

    Laser sclerostomy ab externo with flashlamp excited mid-IR laser systems emitting in the 2-3 micrometer spectral range is in phase II clinical trials. Although acutely high success rates were achieved, the restenosis rate after several months is about 40%. Laser pulses of several hundreds of microseconds, known to induce thermo-mechanical explosive evaporation were used for this procedure. We investigated the ablation dynamics in tissue and the cavitation bubble dynamics in water by means of an Er:YAG laser system to estimate the extent of mechanical damage zones in the sclera and in the anterior chamber, which may contribute to the clinical failure. We found substantial mechanical tissue deformation during the ablation process caused by the cavitation effects. Stress waves up to several bar generated by explosive evaporization were measured. The fast mechanical stretching and collapsing of the scleral tissue induced by cavitation resulted in tissue dissection as could be proved by flash photography and histology. The observed high restenosis might be a result of a subsequent enhanced wound healing process. Early fistula occlusions due to iris adherences, observed in about 20% of the clinical cases may be attributed to intraocular trauma induced by vapor bubble expansion through the anterior chamber after scleral perforation. An automatic feedback system minimizing adverse effects by steering and terminating the laser process during scleral fistulization is demonstrated. Moreover, a new approach in laser sclerostomy ab externo is presented using a cw-IR laser diode system emitting at the 1.94 micrometer mid-IR water absorption peak. This system was used in vitro and showed smaller damage zones compared to the pulsed laser radiation.

  20. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. PMID:26203381

  1. Numerical study on propulsion properties of laser ablated polymer target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nanlei; Hong, Yanji; Wu, Jie; Zhou, Weijing; Ye, Jifei

    2013-05-01

    Laser propulsion as a new concept propulsion technology, it is paid more and more extensive concern. Laser ablation micro thruster is one of the focus with its high specific impulse, wide dynamic range of impulse, small minimum impulse bit, low power etc, laser ablation micro thruster has wide application prospects on high-precision task of satellite attitudeadjustment, orbit maintain and networking formation control. Due to low thermal conduction, low ablation threshold, polymer material was easily ablated to generate thrust. A computational model of laser ablated polymer was established to simulated the micro-thruster working in vacuum environment. The polymer don't have fixed fusion point, so build the ablation criterion based on threshold energy, which has observed in many experiments. Put forward the polymer ablation criterion in the numerical model, the target ablation phenomenon happens when inner deposited energy achieve the threshold value. Established the energy distribution equation to describes the ablation process of temperature rise, phase change and the influence of chemical exothermic process. When ablation phenomenon happened the ablation products would ejected, and the target gained recoil impulse from ejection process. According to energy distribution equations we can get the ejection energy, and then get the recoil momentum of target based on momentum conservation law. The propulsion properties of laser ablated polymer was studied through the numerical analysis model. Revealed the relationship between the propulsion capability and laser parameters. Analyzed influence of different propellants to propulsion performance. The numerical analysis model can reflect the propulsion capability of different polymer propellant, revealed the law of propulsion parameters in laser ablation process.

  2. Laser Ablation Synthesis and Optical Characterization of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Laser Ablation Synthesis and Optical Characterization of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Wensheng Shi Kong, SAR, China Silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires were synthesized at 900°C by the laser ablation and composite nanostructures,4 have been fabricated by this technique. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide

  3. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Toftmann, B.; Schou, J.; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Lunney, J. G.

    2013-02-28

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at {approx}2 J cm{sup -2} has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation are similar; both show a singly peaked time-of-flight distribution. The angular distribution of ion emission and the deposition are well described by the adiabatic and isentropic model of plume expansion, though distributions for femtosecond ablation are significantly narrower. In this laser fluence regime, the energy efficiency of mass ablation is higher for femtosecond pulses than for nanosecond pulses, but the ion production efficiency is lower.

  4. Determination of femtosecond ablation thresholds by using laser ablation induced photoacoustics (LAIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzi, Daniel J. O.; Alvira, Fernando C.; Bilmes, Gabriel M.

    2013-03-01

    Femtosecond laser material processing as micromachining and nanoparticles fabrication require a careful control of the fluences deposited on the samples. In many cases, best results are obtained by using fluences slightly above the Laser Ablation Threshold (LAT), therefore its accurate determination is an important requirement. LAT can be obtained by measuring the intensity of the acoustic signal generated during the ablation process as a function of the laser fluence. In this work femtosecond laser ablation thresholds of commercially polished stainless steel plates, white high impact polystyrene, frosted glass, antique rag papers and silicon oxynitride thin films were determined by using laser ablation induced photoacoustics (LAIP). Results were compared with similar data previously obtained by using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser.

  5. Mechanism study of skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms in laser tissue ablation is essential to improve clinical laser applications by reducing collateral damage and laser pulse energy requirement. The motive of this dissertation is to study skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses in a wide spectral region from near-infrared to ultraviolet for a clear understanding of the mechanism that can be used to improve future design of the pulsed lasers for dermatology and plastic surgery. Multiple laser and optical configurations have been constructed to generate 9 to 12ns laser pulses with similar profiles at 1064. 532, 266 and 213nm for this study of skin tissue ablation. Through measurements of ablation depth as a function cf laser pulse energy, the 589nm spectral line in the secondary radiation from ablated skin tissue samples was identified as the signature of the occurrence of ablation. Subsequently, this spectral signature has been used to investigate the probabilistic process of the ablation near the threshold at the four wavelengths. Measurements of the ablation probability were conducted as a function of the electrical field strength of the laser pulse and the ablation thresholds in a wide spectral range from 1064nm to 213nm were determined. Histology analysis and an optical transmission method were applied in assessing of the ablation depth per pulse to study the ablation process at irradiance levels higher than threshold. Because more than 70% of the wet weight of the skin tissue is water, optical breakdown and backscattering in water was also investigated along with a nonlinear refraction index measurement using a z-scan technique. Preliminary studies on ablation of a gelatin based tissue phantom are also reported. The current theoretical models describing ablation of soft tissue ablation by short laser pulses were critically reviewed. Since none of the existing models was found capable of explaining the experimental results, a new plasma-mediated model was developed. A laser-induced and localized thermal ionization pathway has been investigated and it was found to have significant influence on the initial free electron density during plasma formation due to the combination of strong light absorption by chromophores and confined temperature rise in the chromophores. Good agreements have been found between the new plasma-mediated ablation model and experimental results. The implications of this dissertation research to the future improvement of laser systems in dermatology and plastic surgery are discussed.

  6. Laser ablation loading of a surface-electrode ion trap

    E-print Network

    David R. Leibrandt; Robert J. Clark; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Paul Antohi; Waseem Bakr; Kenneth R. Brown; Isaac L. Chuang

    2007-06-22

    We demonstrate loading by laser ablation of $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions into a mm-scale surface-electrode ion trap. The laser used for ablation is a pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG with pulse energies of 1-10 mJ and durations of 3-5 ns. An additional laser is not required to photoionize the ablated material. The efficiency and lifetime of several candidate materials for the laser ablation target are characterized by measuring the trapped ion fluorescence signal for a number of consecutive loads. Additionally, laser ablation is used to load traps with a trap depth (40 meV) below where electron impact ionization loading is typically successful ($\\gtrsim$ 500 meV).

  7. Laser ablation of aluminum from normal evaporation to phase explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Gragossian, A.; Tavassoli, S. H.; Shokri, B.

    2009-05-15

    A study of laser ablation of Aluminum sample by nanosecond laser pulses considering two simultaneous mechanisms of normal evaporation and phase explosion is theoretically carried out. The temperature distribution in the sample is calculated by a one dimensional heat conduction equation. Ablation depth due to the evaporation and explosion is calculated as a function of laser pulse energies. Variation in some effective sample parameters during the laser ablation and their effects on laser ablation mechanisms are taken into account. At low irradiance, ablation is mainly due to the evaporation, while after a threshold intensity, the phase explosion becomes the dominant mechanism. Theoretical results of transition from the normal evaporation to the phase explosion are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of brass in air and liquid media

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, M. E.; Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tanta University, Tanta ; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4

    2013-06-07

    Laser ablation of brass in air, water, and ethanol was investigated using a femtosecond laser system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm and a pulse width less than 130 fs. Scanning electron and optical microscopy were used to study the efficiency and quality of laser ablation in the three ablation media at two different ablation modes. With a liquid layer thickness of 3 mm above the target, ablation rate was found to be higher in water and ethanol than in air. Ablation under water and ethanol showed cleaner surfaces and less debris re-deposition compared to ablation in air. In addition to spherical particles that are normally formed from re-solidified molten material, micro-scale particles with varying morphologies were observed scattered in the ablated structures (craters and grooves) when ablation was conducted under water. The presence of such particles indicates the presence of a non-thermal ablation mechanism that becomes more apparent when ablation is conducted under water.

  9. Treatment of ulcers with ablative fractional lasers.

    PubMed

    Morton, Laurel M; Dover, Jeffrey S; Phillips, Tania J; Krakowski, Andrew C; Uebelhoer, Nathan S

    2015-03-01

    Chronic, nonhealing ulcers are a frustrating therapeutic challenge and investigation of innovative therapies continues to be an important research pursuit. One unique and newly applied intervention is the use of ablative fractional lasers. This technology has recently been employed for the treatment of hypertrophic, disfiguring and function-limiting scars, and was first shown to induce healing of chronic wounds in patients with persistent ulcers and erosions within traumatic scars. Recent reports suggest it may be applicable for other types of chronic wounds as well. The mechanism of action for this modality remains to be elucidated but possible factors include laser-induced collagen remodeling, photomicrodebridement and disruption of biofilms, and induction of a proper wound healing cascade. PMID:25922956

  10. Laser ablation plume dynamics in nanoparticle synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V V; Platonov, V V; Lisenkov, V V

    2009-06-30

    The dynamics of the plume ejected from the surface of solid targets (YSZ, Nd:YAG and graphite) by a CO{sub 2} laser pulse with a duration of {approx}500 {mu}s (at the 0.03 level), energy of 1.0-1.3 J and peak power of 6-7 kW have been studied using high-speed photography of the plume luminescence and shadow. The targets were used to produce nanopowders by laser evaporation. About 200 {mu}s after termination of the pulse, shadowgraph images of the plumes above the YSZ and Nd:YAG targets showed dark straight tracks produced by large particles. The formation of large ({approx}10 {mu}m) particles is tentatively attributed to cracking of the solidified melt at the bottom of the ablation crater. This is supported by the fact that no large particles are ejected from graphite, which sublimes without melting. Further support to this hypothesis is provided by numerical 3D modelling of melt cooling in craters produced by laser pulses of different shapes. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  11. Optical characterization of laser ablated silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetto, Rosario; Roush, Ted L.; Marra, Anna Cinzia; Orofino, Vincenzo

    2007-11-01

    We perform an optical characterization of UV laser ablated silicates (olivine, pyroxene), starting from their reflectance spectra in the 0.3-2.5 ?m spectral range. The goal is to provide useful tools to model space weathering effects on surfaces of asteroids and TNOs (trans-neptunian objects). We determine that the reddening and darkening spectral trend is compatible with the Hapke's space weathering model, using the optical constants of metallic iron in a silicate matrix. This result is supported by new magnetic susceptibility measurements on laser ablated orthopyroxene. We also investigate the potential contribution of formation of amorphous silicates in the process. Applying our results to silicate-rich surfaces in the Solar System, we investigate the possibility of a weathered olivine component on the surface of Centaur 5145 Pholus. Inclusion of this component slightly decreases the amount of complex organics and water ice from those previously estimated. Thus, the current Pholus spectrum is consistent with the presence of either unweathered or weathered olivine, or potentially both materials.

  12. Laser ablated copper plasmas in liquid and gas ambient

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-05-15

    The dynamics of copper ablated plasma plumes generated using laser ablation of copper targets in both liquid (de-ionized water) and gas (air) ambients is reported. Using time and space resolved visible emission spectroscopy (450-650 nm), the plasma plumes parameters are investigated. The electron density (n{sub e}) determined using Stark broadening of the Cu I (3d{sup 10}4d{sup 1} {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}-3d{sup 10}4p{sup 1} {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} at 521.8 nm) line is estimated and compared for both plasma plumes. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) was estimated using the relative line emission intensities of the neutral copper transitions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectral analysis of the ablated copper surface indicated abundance of spherical nanoparticles in liquid while those in air are amalgamates of irregular shapes. The nanoparticles suspended in the confining liquid form aggregates and exhibit a surface plasmon resonance at ?590 nm.

  13. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  14. Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Autrique, D.; Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk ; Gornushkin, I.; Alexiades, V.; Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2013-10-21

    A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm{sup 2}. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

  15. CO2 TEA Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the relative abundance of isotopes in enriched materials can be determined via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in a technique known as laser-ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS). The original LAMIS work has focused on single-pulse (SP) LIBS for the excitation. However, dual-pulse (DP) LIBS reduces shot-to-shot variation and can lower detection limits of an element by about an order of magnitude or more. It also has the potential to improve the accuracy of the determination of the relative abundances of isotopes in LAMIS by minimizing the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a DP-LIBS technique for improving LAMIS relative-abundance information from a sample is presented. The new technique, called (TEA) Transverse-Excited breakdown in Atmosphere Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS), uses a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to increase the breakdown emission from LIBS in the LAMIS method. This technique is demonstrated on a collection of relative abundance isotopes of boron- 10 and boron-11 in varying concentrations in boric acid. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models are used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. DTRA.

  16. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  17. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  18. The impact of laser ablation on optical soft tissue differentiation for tissue specific laser surgery-an experimental ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Optical diffuse reflectance can remotely differentiate various bio tissues. To implement this technique in an optical feedback system to guide laser surgery in a tissue-specific way, the alteration of optical tissue properties by laser ablation has to be taken into account. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the general feasibility of optical soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy under the influence of laser ablation, comparing the tissue differentiation results before and after laser intervention. Methods A total of 70 ex vivo tissue samples (5 tissue types) were taken from 14 bisected pig heads. Diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded before and after Er:YAG-laser ablation. The spectra were analyzed and differentiated using principal component analysis (PCA), followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). To assess the potential of tissue differentiation, area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity was computed for each pair of tissue types before and after laser ablation, and compared to each other. Results Optical tissue differentiation showed good results before laser exposure (total classification error 13.51%). However, the tissue pair nerve and fat yielded lower AUC results of only 0.75. After laser ablation slightly reduced differentiation results were found with a total classification error of 16.83%. The tissue pair nerve and fat showed enhanced differentiation (AUC: 0.85). Laser ablation reduced the sensitivity in 50% and specificity in 80% of the cases of tissue pair comparison. The sensitivity of nerve–fat differentiation was enhanced by 35%. Conclusions The observed results show the general feasibility of tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy even under conditions of tissue alteration by laser ablation. The contrast enhancement for the differentiation between nerve and fat tissue after ablation is assumed to be due to laser removal of the surrounding lipid-rich nerve sheath. The results create the basis for a guidance system to control laser ablation in a tissue-specific way. PMID:22704127

  19. Plume dynamics in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T.; Lunney, J. G.; Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Wang, X.

    2010-10-08

    In femtosecond laser ablation the plume has two components: a faster-moving plasma part and a slower nanoparticle plume which contains most of the ablated material. This paper describes the results of experiments to comprehensively characterize the plume in laser ablation of Ni with {approx_equal}300 fs pulses at 527 nm. Both single-pulse and double-pulse irradiation was used. The laser ablation depth was measured using white light interferometry. The dynamics of the plasma part of the ablation plume was measured using Langmuir ion probes. The shape of the overall ablation plume was recorded by depositing a thin film on a transparent substrate and measuring the thickness distribution. The expansion of the plasma plume is well described by the Anismov isentropic model of plume expansion. Just above the ablation threshold, the nanoparticle plume is also well described by the Anisimov expansion model. However, at higher fluence a wider plume is formed, perhaps due to the pressure exerted by plasma. For double-pulse ablation it is observed that as the second pulse is delayed beyond {approx_equal}20 ps the ablation depth is reduced and the ion yield is increased. This behaviour is due to reheating of the nascent plasma plume produced by the first pulse. This generates a pressure pulse that acts as a tamper which impedes the fragmentation and ablation of deeper layers of material.

  20. RESONANCE LASER ABLATION WITH AN OPTICAL PARAMETRIC OSCILLATOR LASER AND DETECTION BY A

    E-print Network

    Michel, Robert G.

    RESONANCE LASER ABLATION WITH AN OPTICAL PARAMETRIC OSCILLATOR LASER AND DETECTION BY A MICROWAVE, University of Connecticut, 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT, 06269- 3060, U.S.A. Abstract: Laser ablation of solid samples was used for the determination of trace metals by use of either a pulsed excimer laser (20

  1. Laser ablation methods for analysis of urinary calculi: Comparison study based on calibration pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Št?pánková, K.; Novotný, K.; Vašinová Galiová, M.; Kanický, V.; Kaiser, J.; Hahn, D. W.

    2013-03-01

    Methods based on laser ablation, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass/Optical Emission Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS/OES) are particularly suitable for urinary calculi bulk and micro analysis. Investigation of spatial distribution of matrix and trace elements can help to explain their emergence and growth. However, quantification is still very problematic and these methods are often used only for qualitative elemental mapping. There are no commercially available standards, which would correspond to the urinary calculi matrix. Internal standardization is also difficult, mainly due to different crystalline phases in one kidney stone. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the calibration capabilities and examine the limitations of laser ablation based techniques. Calibration pellets were prepared from powdered human urinary calculi with phosphate, oxalate and urate matrix. For this comparative study, the most frequently used laser-ablation based analytical techniques were chosen, such as LIBS and LA-ICP-MS. Moreover, some alternative techniques such as simultaneous LIBS-LA-ICP-OES and laser ablation LA-LIBS were also utilized.

  2. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    LIBS-1 Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;LIBS-2 Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES of species at a distance or in hard­to­reach or hazardous environments. Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

  3. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Polan, J.; Rus, B.

    2009-03-01

    We report results from laser-solid experiments at PALS using an x-ray laser probe with a pulse length of 0.1 ns and a wavelength of 21.2 nm. A laser with a pulse length of 0.3 ns, a peak intensity of up to 5 × 1013 W cm-2 and a wavelength of 1.3 µm was focused to a 0.15 mm wide line on 3 mm long zinc and 1 mm long iron targets and the probe was passed along the length of the plasma formed. The results show plasma 'hairs', or filaments, appearing only below the critical density, 0.1 ns before the peak of the laser pulse. The plasma around the critical density was clearly imaged and remained uniform. Magneto-hydrodynamic modelling indicates that this is caused by a magnetic field that diffuses from the critical surface, where it is generated, leading to a magnetic pressure comparable to the plasma pressure below the critical density. A dispersion relation is derived for density perturbations perpendicular to a temperature gradient in the presence of an existing magnetic field, which shows that such perturbations always grow, with the growth rate being the greatest for small wavelength perturbations and at low densities. These results indicate that the hair-like structures should be a typical feature of laser ablated plasmas below the critical density following significant plasma expansion, in agreement with numerous experimental results. The implications for x-ray lasers and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  4. Laser ablation system, and method of decontaminating surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edelson, Martin C. (Ames, IA); Pang, Ho-ming (Ames, IA)

    1998-07-14

    A laser ablation system comprising a laser head providing a laser output; a flexible fiber optic cable optically coupled to the laser output and transmitting laser light; an output optics assembly including a nozzle through which laser light passes; an exhaust tube in communication with the nozzle; and a blower generating a vacuum on the exhaust tube. A method of decontaminating a surface comprising the following steps: providing an acousto-optic, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light ablation system having a fiber optically coupled output optics assembly; and operating the laser light ablation system to produce an irradiance greater than 1.times.10.sup.7 W/cm.sup.2, and a pulse width between 80 and 170 ns.

  5. Selective photothermal ablation of tissue with a fiber-delivered Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Mark C.; Dickinson, Mark R.; Devlin, Hugh

    1999-06-01

    The feasibility of using laser-induced photoemission signals to distinguish between hard and soft biological tissues during photothermal ablation with a pulsed Er:YAG laser has been investigated. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy indicated a threshold fluence of approximately 35 J/cm2 to regularly initiate photoemission from dental enamel, while no emission was detected from porcine muscle tissue with incident laser fluences of up to approximately 140 J/cm2. The delay time of an emission signal with respect to the incident, ablative Er:YAG laser pulse was found to decrease from approximately 150 microseconds near the emission threshold fluence to approximately 60 microseconds at the highest fluence level used. Optical multichannel analyzer spectroscopy of Er:YAG irradiated enamel demonstrated that photoemissions typically consisted of a broad, continuous background in the visible region, with superimposed peaks arising from the presence of elements including calcium, characteristic of plasma emission either from the sample surface or emission plume.

  6. Amalgam ablation with the Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Any laser that will be used by dentist to replace the dental drill (handpiece) must remove dental hard tissues safely. These lasers must also have the ability to ablate the restorative dental materials which are present in the teeth being treated. Prior to any laser being used to treat humans a thorough knowledge of the effects of the laser treatment on dental materials must be understood. Cores of dental amalgam were created and sliced into thin wafers for this experiment. Ablation efficiency and thermal changes were evaluated with and without water. It appears as if the Er:YAG laser can effectively ablate amalgam dental material with and without water. The water prevents the temperature from increasing much above baseline and does not reduce efficiency of ablation.

  7. Dynamics of laser ablated colliding plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shyam L.; Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-01-15

    We report the dynamics of single and two collinearly colliding laser ablated plumes of ZnO studied using fast imaging and the spectroscopic measurements. Two dimensional imaging of expanding plume and temporal evolution of various species in interacting zones of plumes are used to calculate plume front velocity, electron temperature, and density of plasma. The two expanding plumes interact with each other at early stage of expansion ({approx}20 ns) resulting in an interaction zone that propagates further leading to the formation of stagnation layer at later times (>150 ns) at the lateral collision front of two plumes. Colliding plumes have larger concentration of higher ionic species, higher temperature, and increased electron density in the stagnation region. A one-to-one correlation between the imaging and optical emission spectroscopic observations in interaction zone of the colliding plumes is reported.

  8. Carbon nanofoam formed by laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Hideo; Tatsutani, Kentaro; Ichikawa, Satoshi

    2012-03-01

    Foam-like carbon (carbon nanofoam, CNF) which belongs to the porous carbon family is formed by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in liquid nitrogen. Each bubble is about 3-10 nm in size and has a layered structure with typically one to four graphene layers. The CNF forms nanoparticles of about 100 nm in size. CNF encapsulating platinum nanoparticles (Pt@CNF) is formed when a mixture of graphite, platinum, and hexadecanoic acid is used as a target. Each bubble encapsulating a platinum nanoparticle is approximately 15 +/- 4 nm in diameter and contains typically 6 +/- 3 graphene walls. The platinum nanoparticles in the CNF are 9 +/- 4 nm in diameter. The annealing of the Pt@CNF at 300 degrees C for a week in vacuum reveals that the CNF effectively prevents the platinum nanoparticles from aggregating. PMID:22755133

  9. Solid state laser ablation effect on laser-proof composite coating applied in aerospace material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Jing; Liu, Zhichao; Chen, Songlin; Zhang, Yuzhong; Wang, Zhiyong

    2014-02-01

    This paper concentrates on the measurement and analysis of laser ablation effect of particularly prepared aerospace material, polycarbosilane (PCS). Laser ablation experiment setup is designed and built, based on a continuous-wave high-power solid-state laser (CWHPSSL). Steel samples with composite PCS coating are prepared. After that, a group of laser ablation experiment is performed. The samples are shot by laser beam with thousands W/cm2 fluence. The results, including the ablation morphology and temperature data, is shown and discussed. Temperature data gives a good demonstration of thermal protection effect of composite coating, and in the meanwhile the morphological features in the ablated region reveal the principle of PCS laser-proof effect. Theoretical investigation has also been carried out. The temperature field is simulated based on Fourier equation of heat conduction, and the simulation result provides a good demonstration on thermal-proof effect of PCS coating layer during laser ablation process.

  10. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation.

  11. F2 excimer laser (157 nm) ablation of polymers: relation of neutral and ionic fragment detection and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnke, M.; Cramer, L.; Dyer, P. E.; Dickinson, J. T.; Lippert, T.; Niino, H.; Pervolaraki, M.; Walton, C. D.; Wokaun, A.

    2007-04-01

    The ablation products of various polymers (triazene polymers, polyimides and glycidyl azide polymer) with 157 nm F2 laser irradiation were studied with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, ion probe and white-light interferometry. In contrast to the ablation with longer UV wavelengths, 157 nm irradiation results in non-preferential bond-breaking and a much more pronounced fragmentation into fragments with masses <50 amu. This result suggests a photochemical ablation process that occurs at any bond in the molecule. In addition, ions have been detected at very low fluence similar to the threshold of neutral detection, which is below 30 mJcm-2 for the triazene polymers and Kapton. The observation of ions from the onset of ablation suggests a 2-photon ablation mechanism and possibly involves an excited neutral as an intermediate step. The low thresholds were verified by ion probe measurements of the ablation plume and white-light interferometry of the ablated target surface.

  12. Fullerene-reduced graphene oxide composites obtained by ultrashort laser ablation of fullerite in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, A.; Curcio, M.; Santagata, A.; Rau, J. V.; Galasso, A.; Teghil, R.

    2015-05-01

    The laser ablation in liquid of carbon-based solid targets is of particular interest thanks to the possibility of obtaining different carbon allotropes by varying the experimental parameters employed. The ablation of a fullerite target in water using a frequency-doubled Nd:glass laser source with a pulse duration of 250 fs and a frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz is presented. The obtained products have been characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies and by X-ray photoelectron and micro-Raman spectroscopies. During the femtosecond laser ablation, the collapse of fullerene cages has been considered with the consequent formation of graphene oxide (GO) and its successive hydrogenation. The process of self-assembling in microtube structures of the formed reduced graphene oxide-fullerene composites has then been reported.

  13. Infrared Laser Ablation Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Infrared Laser Ablation Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Mass Spectrometry Anu Vaikkinen ablation atmo- spheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI), a novel atmospheric pressure ion source for mass analytes are desolvated and ionized in the gas-phase by atmospheric pressure photoionization using a 10 e

  14. Absorption-Ablation-Excitation Mechanisms of Laser-Cluster Interactions in a Nanoaerosol System

    E-print Network

    Ren, Yihua; Zhang, Yiyang; Tse, Stephen D; Long, Marshall B

    2014-01-01

    The absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism in laser-cluster interactions is investigated by measuring Rayleigh scattering of aerosol clusters along with atomic emission from phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (PS-LIBS). As the excitation laser intensity is increased beyond 0.16GW/cm2, the scattering cross-section of TiO_2 clusters begins to decrease, concurrent with the onset of atomic emission of Ti, indicating a scattering-to-ablation transition and the formation of nanoplasmas. To better clarify the process, time-resolved measurements of scattering signals are examined for different excitation laser intensities. For increasing laser intensities, the cross-sections of clusters decrease during a single pulse, evincing the shorter ablation delay time and larger ratios of ablation clusters. Assessment of the electron energy distribution during the ablation process is conducted by non-dimensionalizing the Fokker-Planck equation, with analogous Strouhal Sl_E, Peclet Pe_E, and Damkohler Da_E n...

  15. Production of silver nanoparticles by laser ablation in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; del Val, J.; Pou, J.

    2015-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted much attention as a subject of investigation due to their well-known properties, such as good conductivity, antibacterial and catalytic effects, etc. They are used in many different areas, such as medicine, industrial applications, scientific investigation, etc. There are different techniques for producing Ag nanoparticles, chemical, electrochemical, sonochemical, etc. These methods often lead to impurities together with nanoparticles or colloidal solutions. In this work, laser ablation of solids in open air conditions (LASOA) is used to produce silver nanoparticles and collect them on glass substrates. Production and deposition of silver nanoparticles are integrated in the same step to reduce the process. The obtained particles are analysed and the nanoparticles formation mechanism is discussed. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. The obtained nanoparticles consisted of Ag nanoparticles showing rounded shape with diameters ranging from few to 50 nm

  16. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  17. Imaging of excimer laser vascular tissue ablation by ultrafast photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyga, Ralf; Neu, Walter; Preisack, M.; Haase, Karl K.; Karsch, Karl R.

    1991-11-01

    Ablation and tissue removal of normal and atherosclerotic arterial tissue by UV excimer-laser radiation were probed by taking photographs with a dye laser as a flash light-source. The ablating pulses were transmitted through a fused silica fiber into a cuvette with the samples exposed to saline solution. The delay time of the probing dye-laser pulse with respect to the ablating excimer-laser pulse was varied in the nanosecond range up to several hundred microseconds. The ablation process and the resulting plume above the tissue surface were recorded with a CCD camera attached to a PC-based image processing system. All samples under investigation were fresh human cadaver aortic and femoral artery specimens which had been shock-frozen for less than 48 hours. The arterial segments showed different types of lipid-rich and calcified plaques. Big cavitation bubbles and small tissue particles emerging from the irradiated area have been recorded.

  18. Fabrication of CVD graphene-based devices via laser ablation for wafer-scale characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, David M. A.; Buron, Jonas D.; Whelan, Patrick R.; Jessen, Bjarke S.; Silajd?i?, Adnan; Pesquera, Amaia; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Bøggild, Peter; Petersen, Dirch H.

    2015-12-01

    Selective laser ablation of a wafer-scale graphene film is shown to provide flexible, high speed (1 wafer/hour) device fabrication while avoiding the degradation of electrical properties associated with traditional lithographic methods. Picosecond laser pulses with single pulse peak fluences of 140 mJ cm?2 for 1064 nm, 40 mJ cm?2 for 532 nm, and 30 mJ cm?2 for 355 nm are sufficient to ablate the graphene film, while the ablation onset for Si/SiO2 (thicknesses 500 ?m/302 nm) did not occur until 240 mJ cm?2, 150 mJ cm?2, and 135 mJ cm?2, respectively, allowing all wavelengths to be used for graphene ablation without detectable substrate damage. Optical microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy were used to assess the ablation of graphene, while stylus profilometery indicated that the SiO2 substrate was undamaged. CVD graphene devices were electrically characterized and showed comparable field-effect mobility, doping level, on–off ratio, and conductance minimum before and after laser ablation fabrication.

  19. Laser tattoo removal with preceding ablative fractional treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenci?, Boris; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-06-01

    A combined laser tattoo removal treatment, first the ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) with an Er:YAG laser and then the q-switched (QSW) Nd:YAG laser treatment, was studied. Experiments show that significantly higher fluences can be used for the same tissue damage levels.

  20. Double-pulse nanosecond laser ablation of silicon in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, A.; Mahdieh, M. H.

    2015-07-01

    This work was conducted experimentally to investigate the material removal rate and its mechanisms during the single-pulse and double-pulse nanosecond laser ablation of a silicon wafer in distilled water. The laser ablation processes were performed under the same experimental conditions with the same total pulse energy (E single pulse = E double pulse). The amount of ablated material was estimated for all of the processes based on measuring the dimensions (depths and widths) and volumes of the laser-induced craters on the silicon wafer. The results indicate that double-pulsed laser processing can result in a higher material removal rate compared to the more common single-pulse process, when the inter-pulse delay time is less than the pulse duration. The higher ablation yield in the double-pulse process can be due to the higher coupling efficiency of the second laser pulse with the melted target induced by the laser pre-pulse, leading to the more efficient laser energy absorption and deposition within the irradiated region. The double-pulse nanosecond laser processing with delay time of ~5?ns not only results in a higher material removal rate, but also leads to preparation of silicon nanoparticles with a greater mean particle size compared to that of the more common single-pulse laser ablation process.

  1. Laser ablation of iron: A comparison between femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, M. E.; Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tanta University, Tanta ; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4

    2013-08-28

    In this study, a comparison between femtosecond (fs) and picosecond (ps) laser ablation of electrolytic iron was carried out in ambient air. Experiments were conducted using a Ti:sapphire laser that emits radiation at 785 nm and at pulse widths of 110 ps and 130 fs, before and after pulse compression, respectively. Ablation rates were calculated from the depth of craters produced by multiple laser pulses incident normally to the target surface. Optical and scanning electron microscopy showed that picosecond laser pulses create craters that are deeper than those created by the same number of femtosecond laser pulses at the same fluence. Most of the ablated material was ejected from the ablation site in the form of large particles (few microns in size) in the case of picosecond laser ablation, while small particles (few hundred nanometers) were produced in femtosecond laser ablation. Thermal effects were apparent at high fluence in both femtosecond and picosecond laser ablation, but were less prevalent at low fluence, closer to the ablation threshold of the material. The quality of craters produced by femtosecond laser ablation at low fluence is better than those created at high fluence or using picosecond laser pulses.

  2. Momentum Transfer by Laser Ablation of Irregularly Shaped Space Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D A; Libby, S B; Rubenchik, A

    2010-02-04

    Proposals for ground-based laser remediation of space debris rely on the creation of appropriately directed ablation-driven impulses to either divert the fragment or drive it into an orbit with a perigee allowing atmospheric capture. For a spherical fragment, the ablation impulse is a function of the orbital parameters and the laser engagement angle. If, however, the target is irregularly shaped and arbitrarily oriented, new impulse effects come into play. Here we present an analysis of some of these effects.

  3. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Holloway, Brian C; Eklund, Peter C; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C; Shinn, Michelle

    2012-11-27

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  4. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  5. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of side pumped, preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  6. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  7. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 ?m/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  8. Collinear double pulse laser ablation in water for the production of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dell'Aglio, Marcella; Gaudiuso, Rosalba; ElRashedy, Remah; De Pascale, Olga; Palazzo, Gerardo; De Giacomo, Alessandro

    2013-12-28

    Experiments of collinear Double Pulse Laser Ablation in Liquid (DP-LAL) were carried out for studying the production mechanisms of nanoparticles (NPs) in water, which revealed the fundamental role of the cavitation bubble dynamics in the formation of aqueous colloidal dispersions. In this work, DP-LAL was used to generate silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from a silver target submerged in water at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, by using the second harmonic (532 nm) of two Nd:YAG lasers. The second laser pulse was shot at different delay times (i.e. interpulse delay) during the bubble temporal evolution of the first laser induced bubble. Optical Emission Spectroscopy, Shadowgraph Images, Surface Plasmon Resonance absorption spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering were carried out to study the behaviour of laser-induced plasma and cavitation bubbles during the laser ablation in liquid, to monitor the generation of AgNPs under different conditions, and for characterization of NPs. The results of DP-LAL were always compared with the corresponding ones obtained with Single Pulse Laser Ablation in Liquid (SP-LAL), so as to highlight the peculiarities of the two different techniques. PMID:24196485

  9. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  10. Laser ablation with applied magnetic field for electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishcheva, Alla; Batishchev, Oleg; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-10-01

    Using ultrafast lasers with tera-watt-level power allows efficient ablation and ionization of solid-density materials [1], creating dense and hot (˜100eV) plasma. We propose ablating small droplets in the magnetic nozzle configurations similar to mini-helicon plasma source [2]. Such approach may improve the momentum coupling compared to ablation of solid surfaces and facilitate plasma detachment. Results of 2D modeling of solid wire ablation in the applied magnetic field are presented and discussed. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev et al, Ultrafast Laser Ablation for Space Propulsion, AIAA technical paper 2008-5294, -16p, 44th JPC, Hartford, 2008.[0pt] [2] O. Batishchev and J.L. Cambier, Experimental Study of the Mini-Helicon Thruster, Air Force Research Laboratory Report, AFRL-RZ-ED-TR-2009-0020, 2009.

  11. Laser Ablation Increases PEM/Catalyst Interfacial Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitacre, Jay; Yalisove, Steve

    2009-01-01

    An investigational method of improving the performance of a fuel cell that contains a polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) is based on the concept of roughening the surface of the PEM, prior to deposition of a thin layer of catalyst, in order to increase the PEM/catalyst interfacial area and thereby increase the degree of utilization of the catalyst. The roughening is done by means of laser ablation under carefully controlled conditions. Next, the roughened membrane surface is coated with the thin layer of catalyst (which is typically platinum), then sandwiched between two electrode/catalyst structures to form a membrane/ele c t - rode assembly. The feasibility of the roughening technique was demonstrated in experiments in which proton-conducting membranes made of a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, protonconducting polymer were ablated by use of femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that when proper combinations of the pulse intensity, pulse-repetition rate, and number of repetitions was chosen, the initially flat, smooth membrane surfaces became roughened to such an extent as to be converted to networks of nodules interconnected by filaments (see Figure 1). In further experiments, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed on a pristine (smooth) membrane and on two laser-roughened membranes after the membranes were coated with platinum on both sides. Some preliminary EIS data were interpreted as showing that notwithstanding the potential for laser-induced damage, the bulk conductivities of the membranes were not diminished in the roughening process. Other preliminary EIS data (see Figure 2) were interpreted as signifying that the surface areas of the laser-roughened membranes were significantly greater than those of the smooth membrane. Moreover, elemental analyses showed that the sulfur-containing molecular groups necessary for proton conduction remained intact, even near the laser-roughened surfaces. These preliminary results can be taken as indications that laser-roughened PEMs should function well in fuel cells and, in particular, should exhibit current and power densities greater than those attainable by use of smooth membranes.

  12. Nanoparticle generation in ultrafast pulsed laser ablation of nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Bing; Hu Zhendong; Che Yong; Chen Yanbin; Pan Xiaoqing

    2007-01-22

    The process of particle generation during ultrafast pulsed laser ablation of nickel is investigated. Two types of particles with different sizes depending on the laser fluence are found, indicating different particle generation mechanisms. By limiting the laser fluence below a threshold of strong plasma formation, the large dropletlike particles can be eliminated. In addition, by supplying different background gases, various crystalline structures are obtained for the particles, including Ni/NiO core/shell spheres and NiO cubes. This study provides evidence that ultrafast laser ablation can be a room temperature physical method for generating nanocrystals with a narrow particle size distribution.

  13. Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.; Nocholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We will present possible mechanisms for nanotube production by laser oven process. Spectral emission of excited species during laser ablation of a composite graphite target is compared with that of laser irradiated C60 vapor. The similarities in the transient and spectral data suggest that fullerenes are intermediate precursors for nanotube formation. The confinement of the ablation products by means of a 25-mm diameter tube placed upstream of the target seems to improve the production and purity of nanotubes. Repeated laser pulses vaporize the amorphous/graphitic carbon and possibly catalyst particles, and dissociate fullerenes yielding additional feedstock for SWNT growth.

  14. Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin; Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping

    2012-03-01

    Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  15. Ablation enhancement of silicon by ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Shin, Yung C.

    2014-09-15

    In this study, the ultrashort double-pulse ablation of silicon is investigated. An atomistic simulation model is developed to analyze the underlying physics. It is revealed that the double-pulse ablation could significantly increase the ablation rate of silicon, compared with the single pulse ablation with the same total pulse energy, which is totally different from the case of metals. In the long pulse delay range (over 1?ps), the enhancement is caused by the metallic transition of melted silicon with the corresponding absorption efficiency. At ultrashort pulse delay (below 1?ps), the enhancement is due to the electron excitation by the first pulse. The enhancement only occurs at low and moderate laser fluence. The ablation is suppressed at high fluence due to the strong plasma shielding effect.

  16. Combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratisto, Hans S.; Frenz, Martin; Koenz, Flurin; Altermatt, Hans J.; Weber, Heinz P.

    1996-05-01

    Erbium lasers emitting at 2.94 micrometers and holmium lasers emitting at 2.1 micrometers are interesting tools for cutting, drilling, smoothing and welding of water containing tissues. The high absorption coefficient of water at these wavelengths leads to their good ablation efficiency with controlled thermally altered zones around the ablation sites. Combination of pulses with both wavelengths transmitted through one fiber were used to perform incisions in soft tissue and impacts in bone disks. Histological results and scanning electron microscope evaluations reveal the strong influence of the absorption coefficient on tissue effects, especially on the ablation efficiency and the zone of thermally damaged tissue. It is demonstrated that the combination of high ablation rates and deep coagulation zones can be achieved. The results indicate that this laser system can be considered as a first step towards a multi-functional medical instrument.

  17. Excimer laser ablation of polyimide: a 14-year IBM perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, James H.; Wassick, Thomas A.

    1997-05-01

    IBM introduced the first commercial high-end mainframe computer system incorporating laser ablation technology in 1991. This milestone was the culmination of nearly a decade of scientific, engineering, and manufacturing effort. Extensive research and development on 308 nm laser ablation of polyimide lead to the first IBM prototype ablation tool in 1987 for the production of via-holes in thin film packaging structures. This prototype, similar to step and repeat photolithography systems, evolved into full-scale manufacturing tools which utilize sophisticated beam shaping, beam homogenizing, and projection optics. But the maturity of this technology belies the fact that the scientific understanding of the laser ablation process is still far from complete. This paper briefly reviews the engineering and scientific accomplishments, both within and external to IBM, that lead to the commercial utilization of the laser ablation process. Current technical tissues are discussed, in addition to alternative IBM applications of polyimide ablation. The paper concludes by discussing the relative merits of excimer vs. solid-state lasers, and how each may impact future manufacturing technology.

  18. Successive laser ablation ignition of premixed methane/air mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    Laser ablation has been used to study successive ignition in premixed methane/air mixtures under conditions in which the flow speed leads to flame blow-out. A range of laser pulse frequencies is experimentally mimicked by varying the time interval between two closely spaced laser pulses. Emission intensities from the laser ablation kernels are measured to qualitatively estimate laser energy coupling, and flame CH* chemiluminescence is recorded in a time-resolved manner to capture the flame evolution and propagation. A comparison of the measurements is made between the two successive breakdown ignition events. It is found that the formation of the subsequent ablation kernel is almost independent of the previous one, however, for the successive breakdowns, the first breakdown and its ensuing combustion created temporal regions of no energy coupling as they heat the gas and lower the density. Flame imaging shows that the second ablation event successfully produces another flame kernel and is capable of holding the flame-base even at pulse intervals where the second laser pulse cannot form a breakdown. This study demonstrates that successive ablation ignition can allow for the use of higher laser frequencies and enhanced flame stabilization than successive breakdown ignition. PMID:26072866

  19. Application of erbium: YAG laser in ocular ablation.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, K

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in lasers have provided us the possibility of laser ocular surgery. The xenon, argon, neodymium:YAG and dye lasers have been successfully used in out-patient clinics. The excimer laser has been attracting researchers' interest in the new application of laser to cornea and lens. The erbium:YAG laser emits a 2.94-microns beam that can ablate the transparent ocular tissues such as lenses and corneas. The author has applied this laser to the cornea, lens, vitreous and other ocular tissues. The erbium:YAG laser beam was directed through a 1.5-meter-long, 200-microns-diameter fiberoptic guide. The radiant energy measured about 50 mJ at the end of the probe. The laser was emitted as a 400-microsecond pulse. Freshly enucleated rabbit eyes were used in this study. Laser burns were applied to the tissue surface at various energy settings. At minimal power, the tissues were coagulated by the erbium:YAG laser application. At a power of more than 636-954 mJ/mm2, tissue began to evaporate; the tissue loss was observed under a surgical light microscope. Corneal photoablation, lens ablation, iridotomy, trabeculotomy, cutting of the vitreous and retinal ablation were easily performed. Like the excimer laser, the erbium:YAG laser is a potential tool for ocular surgery. PMID:2345625

  20. Optical nerve identification in head and neck surgery after Er:YAG laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Stelzle, Florian; Knipfer, Christian; Bergauer, Bastian; Rohde, Maximilian; Adler, Werner; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Nkenke, Emeka; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Facial nerve function may be hampered by iatrogenic damage during head and neck laser surgery procedures. Optical techniques can serve as a basis for feedback-controlled tissue-specific laser surgery on the jaw bone and the parotid gland. In order to preserve nerve tissue during laser surgery, the alteration of optical tissue properties through laser-tissue interactions have to be taken into account. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the viability of optical tissue differentiation through diffuse reflectance spectroscopy after exposure to laser light as a basis for a feedback system for tissue-specific laser surgery. Spectra of diffuse reflectance (wavelength, 350-650 nm) of nerves, salivary glands, and cortical and cancellous bone of the midfacial region (ex vivo domestic pig heads) were acquired before/after Er:YAG laser (wavelength, 2.94 ?m) ablation (each 16,800 spectra). Principal component analysis was computed followed by quadratic discriminant analysis. The tissue classification performance as well as area under the curve (AUC) sensitivity and specificity for tissue differentiation was assessed before and after laser-tissue exposure. A high classification performance was observed before laser ablation (total error, 7.74%). Nerve tissue was differentiated from bone and salivary glands with results greater than 0.96 in AUC, sensitivity and specificity. After laser exposure, a total classification error of 18.61% was observed. The differentiation of nerve tissue was reduced with an AUC of >0.94, sensitivity of >0.95, and specificity >0.87. Er:YAG laser ablation only slightly reduces the differentiation performance through diffuse reflectance in the investigated tissue types. The results show the general viability of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in identifying neural structures in the vicinity of salivary glands and bone as a basis for nerve preservation during feedback-controlled laser surgery. PMID:24696381

  1. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  2. Ultrashort laser ablation of PMMA and intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Makropoulou, M.; Fabrikesi, E.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Thomson, R. R.; Kar, A. K.

    2008-10-01

    The use of intraocular lenses (IOLs) is the most promising method to restore vision after cataract surgery. Several new materials, techniques, and patterns have been studied for forming and etching IOLs to improve their optical properties and reduce diffractive aberrations. This study is aimed at investigating the use of ultrashort laser pulses to ablate the surface of PMMA and intraocular lenses, and thus provide an alternative to conventional techniques. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates (PMMA samples, hydrophobic acrylic IOL, yellow azo dye doped IOL, and hydrophilic acrylic IOL consist of 25% H2O). The irradiation was performed using 100 fs pulses of 800 nm radiation from a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser system. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the phenomenology of the ablated patterns by probing the ablation depth using a profilometer. The surface modification was examined using a high resolution optical microscope (IOLs) or atomic force microscope—AFM (PMMA samples). It was found that different polymers exhibited different ablation characteristics, a result that we attribute to the differing optical properties of the materials. In particular, it was observed that the topography of the ablation tracks created on the hydrophilic intraocular lenses was smoother in comparison to those created on the PMMA and hydrophobic lens. The yellow doped hydrophobic intraocular lenses show higher ablation efficiency than undoped hydrophobic acrylic lenses.

  3. Green synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by excimer pulsed laser ablation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Overschelde, O.; Guisbiers, G.; Snyders, R.

    2013-10-01

    Pure selenium nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by Liquid Phase - Pulsed Laser Ablation (LP-PLA) in de-ionized water. Excimer laser (248 nm) operating at low fluence (F ˜ 1 J/cm2) was used to generate colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles. The obtained selenium nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. We describe the multi-modal size distributions generated and use the centrifugation method to isolate the smallest nanoparticles (˜60 nm in diameter).

  4. Absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism of laser-cluster interactions in a nanoaerosol system.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yihua; Li, Shuiqing; Zhang, Yiyang; Tse, Stephen D; Long, Marshall B

    2015-03-01

    The absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism in laser-cluster interactions is investigated by measuring Rayleigh scattering of aerosol clusters along with atomic emission from phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For 532 nm excitation, as the laser intensity increases beyond 0.16??GW/cm^{2}, the scattering cross section of TiO_{2} clusters begins to decrease, concurrent with the onset of atomic emission of Ti, indicating a scattering-to-ablation transition and the formation of nanoplasmas. With 1064 nm laser excitation, the atomic emissions are more than one order of magnitude weaker than that at 532 nm, indicating that the thermal effect is not the main mechanism. To better clarify the process, time-resolved measurements of scattering signals are examined for different excitation laser intensities. For increasing laser intensity, the cross section of clusters decreases during a single pulse, evincing the shorter ablation delay time and larger ratios of ablation clusters. Assessment of the electron energy distribution during the ablation process is conducted by nondimensionalizing the Fokker-Planck equation, with analogous Strouhal Sl_{E}, Peclet Pe_{E}, and Damköhler Da_{E} numbers defined to characterize the laser-induced aerothermochemical environment. For conditions where Sl_{E}?1, Pe_{E}?1, and Da_{E}?1, the electrons are excited to the conduction band by two-photon absorption, then relax to the bottom of the conduction band by electron energy loss to the lattice, and finally serve as the energy transfer media between laser field and lattice. The relationship between delay time and excitation intensity is well correlated by this simplified model with quasisteady assumption. PMID:25793812

  5. Absorption-Ablation-Excitation Mechanism of Laser-Cluster Interactions in a Nanoaerosol System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yihua; Li, Shuiqing; Zhang, Yiyang; Tse, Stephen D.; Long, Marshall B.

    2015-03-01

    The absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism in laser-cluster interactions is investigated by measuring Rayleigh scattering of aerosol clusters along with atomic emission from phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For 532 nm excitation, as the laser intensity increases beyond 0.16 GW /cm2 , the scattering cross section of TiO2 clusters begins to decrease, concurrent with the onset of atomic emission of Ti, indicating a scattering-to-ablation transition and the formation of nanoplasmas. With 1064 nm laser excitation, the atomic emissions are more than one order of magnitude weaker than that at 532 nm, indicating that the thermal effect is not the main mechanism. To better clarify the process, time-resolved measurements of scattering signals are examined for different excitation laser intensities. For increasing laser intensity, the cross section of clusters decreases during a single pulse, evincing the shorter ablation delay time and larger ratios of ablation clusters. Assessment of the electron energy distribution during the ablation process is conducted by nondimensionalizing the Fokker-Planck equation, with analogous Strouhal SlE , Peclet PeE , and Damköhler DaE numbers defined to characterize the laser-induced aerothermochemical environment. For conditions where SlE?1 , PeE?1 , and DaE?1 , the electrons are excited to the conduction band by two-photon absorption, then relax to the bottom of the conduction band by electron energy loss to the lattice, and finally serve as the energy transfer media between laser field and lattice. The relationship between delay time and excitation intensity is well correlated by this simplified model with quasisteady assumption.

  6. Ultrafast laser ablation ICP-MS: role of spot size, laser fluence, and repetition rate in signal intensity

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Ultrafast laser ablation ICP-MS: role of spot size, laser fluence, and repetition rate in signal,a Richard E. Russob and Ahmed Hassaneina Ultrafast laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass system. Though ultrafast laser ablation sample introduction provides better accuracy and precision

  7. Ablation behaviors of carbon reinforced polymer composites by laser of different operation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen-Wu; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2015-10-01

    Laser ablation mechanism of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composite is of critical meaning for the laser machining process. The ablation behaviors are investigated on the CFRP laminates subject to continuous wave, long duration pulsed wave and short duration pulsed wave lasers. Distinctive ablation phenomena have been observed and the effects of laser operation modes are discussed. The typical temperature patterns resulted from laser irradiation are computed by finite element analysis and thereby the different ablation mechanisms are interpreted.

  8. Laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ming Hui; Sugioka, Koji; Wu, Dong Jiang; Chew, K. J.; Lu, Y. F.; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Chong, Tow Chong

    2003-02-01

    It is a high challenge to fabricate glass microstructures in Photonics and LCD industries. Different from direct ablation with ultrafast or short wavelength lasers, laser-induced-plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA) is one of the potential candidates for transparent substrate microfabrication with conventional visible laser sources. In the processing, laser beam goes through glass substrate first and then irradiates on a solid target behind. For laser fluence above target ablation threshold, plasma generated from target ablation flies forward at a high speed. At a small target-to-substrate distance, there are strong interactions among laser light, target plasma and glass substrate at its rear side surface. With target materials deposition on glass surface or even doping into the substrate, light absorption characteristic at the interaction zone is modified, which causes the glass ablation. LIPAA is used to get color printing of characters, structures and even images on the glass substrate. It is also used to obtain the glass surface metallization for electrodes and circuits fabrication. Potential application of this technique to fabricate functional microstructures, such as micro-Total-Analysis-System (TAS) for DNA analysis and holographic diffuser for IR wireless home networking, is also discussed.

  9. Laser Ablation Surface Preparation of Ti-6A1-4V for Adhesive Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Watson, Kent A.; Morales, Guillermo; Williams, Thomas; Hicks, Robert; Wohl, Christopher J.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive bonding offers many advantages over mechanical fastening, but requires certification before it can be incorporated in primary structures for commercial aviation without disbond-arrestment features or redundant load paths. Surface preparation is widely recognized as the key step to producing robust and predictable bonds. Laser ablation imparts both topographical and chemical changes to a surface which can lead to increased bond durability. A laser based process provides an alternative to chemical-dip, manual abrasion and grit blast treatments which are expensive, hazardous, polluting, and less precise. This report documents preliminary testing of a surface preparation technique using laser ablation as a replacement for the chemical etch and abrasive processes currently applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloy adherends. Failure mode, surface roughness, and chemical makeup were analyzed using fluorescence enhanced visualization, microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Single lap shear tests were conducted on bonded and aged specimens to observe bond strength retention and failure mode. Some promising results showed increasing strength and durability of lap shear specimens as laser ablation coverage area and beam intensity increased. Chemical analyses showed trends for surface chemical species which correlated with improved bond strength and durability. Combined, these results suggest that laser ablation is a viable process for inclusion with or/and replacement of one or more currently used titanium surface treatments. On-going work will focus on additional mechanical tests to further demonstrate improved bond durability.

  10. Plasma mediated ablation of biological tissues with ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Oraevsky, A.A. |; DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D.

    1995-03-08

    Plasma mediated ablation of collagen gels and porcine cornea was studied at various laser pulse durations in the range from 350 fs to 1 ns at 1,053 nm wavelength. A time resolved stress detection technique was employed to measure transient stress profiles and amplitudes. Optical microscopy was used to characterize ablation craters qualitatively, while a wide band acoustic transducer helped to quantify tissue mechanical response and the ablation threshold. The ablation threshold was measured as a function of laser pulse duration and linear absorption coefficient. For nanosecond pulses the ablation threshold was found to have a strong dependence on the linear absorption coefficient of the material. As the pulse length decreased into the subpicosecond regime the ablation threshold became insensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The ablation efficiency was found to be insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient. High quality ablation craters with no thermal or mechanical damage to surrounding material were obtained with 350 fs laser pulses. The mechanism of optical breakdown at the tissue surface was theoretically investigated. In the nanosecond regime, optical breakdown proceeds as an electron collisional avalanche ionization initiated by thermal seed electrons. These seed electrons are created by heating of the tissue by linear absorption. In the ultrashort pulse range, optical breakdown is initiated by the multiphoton ionization of the irradiated medium (6 photons in case of tissue irradiated at 1,053 nm wavelength), and becomes less sensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The energy deposition profile is insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient.

  11. Solid sampling with 193-nm excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser ablation in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  12. Novel CO2 laser system for hard tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapchev, Vladimir B.; Rabii, Christopher D.; Harrington, James A.

    1994-09-01

    A line-tunable and variable pulselength CO2 laser system for ablation of dental and bone tissues has been tested. To avoid the undesirable effects of plasma formation, acoustic shock waves and collateral thermal damage to the tissues, we have found an optimum laser pulselength in the 10 - 20 microseconds range. At a fluence of 30 J/cm2 and laser wavelength of 10.6 micrometers the ablation depths in enamel (dentin) were 12(18) micrometers and no significant noise was observed. Without water cooling enamel showed no visible color change, while some minimal carbonization of dentin was present even at low pulse repetition frequencies.

  13. Laser ablation and waveguide fabrication using CR39 polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, W.; Ong, Y. S.; Lim, W. H.; Zakaria, R.

    2014-04-01

    We report on the ablation and fabrication of optical waveguide using allyl-diglycol CR39 polymer. Pulse nanosecond (ns) laser (248 nm KrF) and continuous wave (CW) (244 nm argon-ion) irradiation are performed to observe surface modification on the polymer and potentially utilize it for channel waveguide. The pulsed UV laser creates craters with different depth as fluence increases to quantify threshold fluence for this material. For continuous wave UV irradiation, refractive index value on the CR39 channels varied as fluence changed, and shows the potential use of this polymer in planar waveguide applications. An upper fluence limit where laser ablation commences is also determined.

  14. Laser ablation-based methods for nanostructuring of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabashin, A. V.

    2009-05-01

    An overview of laser-ablation-based methods for nanofabrication developed by our research group is presented. All methods imply laser-related ablation of material from a solid target and the production of nanoclusters, which are then either deposited on a substrate to form a nanostructured thin film or released to a liquid to form a colloidal nanoparticle solution. Particular attention is given on the absence or presence of the plasmarelated absorption of laser radiation, which provides different nano fabrication regimes. The methods lead to the production of nanomaterials, which are of importance for photonics and biosensing applications.

  15. UV solid state laser ablation of intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, A.; Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Commercially available intraocular lenses (IOLs) are manufactured from silicone and acrylic, both rigid (e.g. PMMA) and foldable (hydrophobic or hydrophilic acrylic biomaterials), behaving different mechanical and optical properties. Recently, the use of apodizing technology to design new diffractive-refractive multifocals improved the refractive outcome of these intraocular lenses, providing good distant and near vision. There is also a major ongoing effort to refine laser refractive surgery to correct other defects besides conventional refractive errors. Using phakic IOLs to treat high myopia potentially provides better predictability and optical quality than corneal-based refractive surgery. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of laser ablation on IOL surface shaping, by drilling circular arrays of holes, with a homemade motorized rotation stage, and scattered holes on the polymer surface. In material science, the most popular lasers used for polymer machining are the UV lasers, and, therefore, we tried in this work the 3rd and the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (?=355 nm and ?=213 nm respectively). The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variations in surface height and, finally, the ablation rates were also mathematically simulated for depicting the possible laser ablation mechanism(s). The experimental results and the theoretical modelling of UV laser interaction with polymeric IOLs are discussed in relation with the physical (optical, mechanical and thermal) properties of the material, in addition to laser radiation parameters (laser energy fluence, number of pulses). The qualitative aspects of laser ablation at ?=213 nm reveal a smooth optical surface on the intraocular lens with no irregularities, observed with other wavelengths.

  16. Laser ablation sample transfer for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit K

    2015-01-01

    Infrared laser ablation sample transfer (IR-LAST) is a novel ambient sampling technique for mass spectrometry. In this technique, a pulsed mid-IR laser is used to ablate materials that are collected for mass spectrometry analysis; the material can be a solid sample or deposited on a sample target. After collection, the sample can be further separated or analyzed directly by mass spectrometry. For IR-LAST sample transfer tissue imaging using MALDI mass spectrometry, a tissue section is placed on a sample slide and material transferred to a target slide by scanning the tissue sample under a focused laser beam using transmission-mode (back side) IR laser ablation. After transfer, the target slide is analyzed using MALDI imaging. The spatial resolution is approximately 400 ?m and limited by the spread of the laser desorption plume. IR-LAST for MALDI imaging provides several new capabilities including ambient sampling, area to spot concentration of ablated material, multiple ablation and analysis from a single section, and direct deposition on matrix-free nanostructured targets. PMID:25361673

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of cluster formation in femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatomi, Daiki; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Nishikino, Masaharu

    2013-09-01

    Short-period laser ablation of a platinum solid target was investigated through three-dimensional classical molecular dynamics simulations using the embedded atom method potential. The platinum target was ablated by an ultrashort-pulse laser with three different fluences near the ablation threshold and single 100-fs pulse. Although each laser fluence causes melting and evaporation of the target surface, ablation processes are morphologically different. When the laser fluence is just above the ablation threshold, the surface layer of the solid target breaks away, and so-called spallation occurs. With the moderate laser fluence, homogeneous nucleation of nano-sized clusters takes place in the liquidized layer at the surface, resulting in the homogenization in the emitted cluster size, while the surface layer fragments and vaporizes with the higher fluence. Moreover, in the spallation regime, the recreated surface has nano-sized roughness and is formed after the surface oscillates with a rv20-ns period. This inherent roughness formation may be a seed of the nano-sized regular structure observed by past experiments with repetitive pulses.

  18. Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Fehring, Jr., Edward J. (Dublin, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  19. Optical, structural and morphological properties of zirconia nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Borodina, T I; Val'yano, G E; Gololobova, O A; Karpukhin, V T; Malikov, M M; Strikanov, D A

    2014-09-30

    Absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectra, the structural composition and morphology of zirconia nanoparticles synthesised via the laser ablation of a metal in water and aqueous solutions of the sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) surfactant have been studied using absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results demonstrate that, exposing zirconium to intense nanosecond laser pulses at a high repetition rate in these liquids, one can obtain stable cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic crystalline phases of nanozirconia with a particle size in the range 40 – 100 nm and a Zr – SDS organic – inorganic composite. The absorption and fluorescence of the synthesised zirconia strongly depend on the SDS concentration in the starting solution. The gas – vapour bubbles forming during ablation are shown to serve as templates for the formation of hollow nanoand microstructures. (nanostructures)

  20. Optical, structural and morphological properties of zirconia nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodina, T. I.; Val'yano, G. E.; Gololobova, O. A.; Karpukhin, V. T.; Malikov, M. M.; Strikanov, D. A.

    2014-09-01

    Absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectra, the structural composition and morphology of zirconia nanoparticles synthesised via the laser ablation of a metal in water and aqueous solutions of the sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) surfactant have been studied using absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results demonstrate that, exposing zirconium to intense nanosecond laser pulses at a high repetition rate in these liquids, one can obtain stable cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic crystalline phases of nanozirconia with a particle size in the range 40 - 100 nm and a Zr - SDS organic - inorganic composite. The absorption and fluorescence of the synthesised zirconia strongly depend on the SDS concentration in the starting solution. The gas - vapour bubbles forming during ablation are shown to serve as templates for the formation of hollow nanoand microstructures.

  1. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations studies of laser ablation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Johannes; Sonntag, Steffen; Karlin, Johannes; Paredes, Carolina Trichet; Sartison, Marc; Krauss, Armin; Trebin, Hans-Rainer

    2012-07-30

    An overview of several aspects of our recent molecular dynamics simulations of femtosecond laser ablation is presented. This includes the study of phase diagrams for suitable interactions, analysis of ablated material and bubble formation below threshold, study of two-pulse ablation and the classification of materials with respect to electron properties and electron-phonon coupling in the two-temperature model. A treatment of boundary conditions and of an extended twotemperature model is also included. Most of the results apply to aluminum, others also to copper and iron, and to metals in general.

  3. Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue Using Pulsed CO{sub 2} Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hashishin, Yuichi; Sano, Shu; Nakayama, Takeyoshi

    2010-10-13

    Laser scalpels are currently used as a form of laser treatment. However, their ablation mechanism has not been clarified because laser excision of biological tissue occurs over a short time scale. Biological tissue ablation generates sound (laser-induced sound). This study seeks to clarify the ablation mechanism. The state of the gelatin ablation was determined using a high-speed video camera and the power reduction of a He-Ne laser beam. The aim of this study was to clarify the laser ablation mechanism by observing laser excision using the high-speed video camera and monitoring the power reduction of the He-Ne laser beam. We simulated laser excision of a biological tissue by irradiating gelatin (10 wt%) with radiation from a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser (wavelength: 10.6 {mu}m; pulse width: 80 ns). In addition, a microphone was used to measure the laser-induced sound. The first pulse caused ablation particles to be emitted in all directions; these particles were subsequently damped so that they formed a mushroom cloud. Furthermore, water was initially evaporated by laser irradiation and then tissue was ejected.

  4. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-06-15

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collinear—double pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8?nm and 610.3?nm), and ionic (548.4?nm and 478.8?nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case.

  5. Production of copper and brass nanoparticles upon laser ablation in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Pavel V; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A; Voronov, Valerii V

    2004-10-31

    The production of nanoparticles upon ablation of copper and brass by pulsed radiation from Nd:YAG and copper lasers in water, ethanol, and acetone is studied. The nanoparticles were investigated by the methods of X-ray diffractometry, optical spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The produced copper and brass nanoparticles were shown to exhibit a plasmon resonance lying in the visible spectral range near 580 and 510 nm. The brass nanoparticles produced by ablation in ethanol have a shell approximately 10-nm thick for an average dimension of 20-30 nm. A chemical modification of ethanol was observed, which manifested itself in the appearance of intense UV absorption bands. Upon laser irradiation of brass nanoparticles in a liquid their absorption spectrum gradually transformed into the spectrum of copper nanoparticles. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  6. Cleaning and characterization of objects of cultural value by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilmes, Gabriel M.; Freisztav, Cesar; Schinca, Daniel; Orsetti, Alberto

    2005-06-01

    Surface ablation with nanosecond laser pulses was applied to preservation, cleaning and compositional identification of objects of cultural value. On one hand, treatments of fabrics, coins, bones, and other archeological objects are shown, as well as applications to the preservation of covers, front of books and old manuscripts made in rag paper. Damage fluence thresholds for 17 different XIXth century types of papers, made by processing textiles, were determined. On the other hand, we use the spectroscopic analysis of the plasma generated as a result of laser ablation (LIBS- laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy-) for the determination of the elementary composition of unique pieces in anthropology and archaeology. In particular, we show applications to the identification of trace elements in Hominide teeth, of interest concerning the analysis of eating habits. We also apply LIBS to the determination of the composition of acheological objects belonging to different pre-Columbian cultures.

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of polymeric substrates for the fabrication of microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Kuznetsov, Arseniy; Eaton, Shane M.; Kiyan, Roman; Cerullo, Giulio; Osellame, Roberto; Chichkov, Boris N.; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2011-05-01

    This manuscript presents a study of physical and chemical properties of microchannels fabricated by femtosecond laser processing technology in thermoplastic polymeric materials, including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene (PS) and cyclic olefin polymer (COP). By surface electron microscopy and optical profilometry, the dimensions of microchannels in the polymers were found to be easily tunable, with surface roughness values comparable to those obtained by standard prototyping techniques such as micromilling. Through colorimetric analysis and optical microscopy, PMMA was found to remain nearly transparent after ablation while COP and PS darkened significantly. Using infrared spectroscopy, the darkening in PS and COP was attributed to significant oxidation and dehydrogenation during laser ablation, unlike PMMA, which was found to degrade by a thermal depolymerization process. The more stable molecular structure of PMMA makes it the most viable thermoplastic polymer for femtosecond laser fabrication of microfluidic channels.

  8. The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample introduction in inductively coupled

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample wavelength on laser ablation (LA) and its relation to laser generated aerosol counts and particle ablated using 400 nm and 800 nm fs laser pulses to study the effect of wavelength on laser ablation rate

  9. Ablative Laser Propulsion Using Multi-Layered Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nehls, Mary; Edwards, David; Gray, Perry; Schneider, T.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental investigations are ongoing to study the force imparted to materials when subjected to laser ablation. When a laser pulse of sufficient energy density impacts a material, a small amount of the material is ablated. A torsion balance is used to measure the momentum produced by the ablation process. The balance consists of a thin metal wire with a rotating pendulum suspended in the middle. The wire is fixed at both ends. Recently, multi-layered material systems were investigated. These multi-layered materials were composed of a transparent front surface and opaque sub surface. The laser pulse penetrates the transparent outer surface with minimum photon loss and vaporizes the underlying opaque layer.

  10. Near-field mapping by laser ablation of PMMA coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiutowski, J.; Maibohm, C.; Kostiucenko, O.; Kjelstrup-Hansen, J.; Rubahn, H.-G.

    2011-10-01

    The optical near-field of lithography-defined gold nanostructures, arranged into regular arrays on a gold film, is characterized via ablation of a polymer coating by laser illumination. The method utilizes femto-second laser pulses from a laser scanning microscope which induces electrical field enhancements on and around the gold nanostructures. At the positions of the enhancements, the ablation threshold of the polymer coating is significantly lowered creating subdiffractional topographic modifications on the surface which are quantified via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The obtained experimental results for different polymer coating thicknesses and nanostructure geometries are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of the near field distribution for corresponding enhancement mechanisms. The developed method and its tunable experimental parameters show that the different stages in the ablation process can be controlled and characterized making the technique suitable for characterizing optical near-fields of metal nanostructures.

  11. Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, R.; Akturk, S.; Simsek, E.

    2014-02-03

    We report on nanometer-scale patterning of single layer graphene on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate through femtosecond laser ablation. The pulse fluence is adjusted around the single-pulse ablation threshold of graphene. It is shown that, even though both SiO{sub 2} and Si have more absorption in the linear regime compared to graphene, the substrate can be kept intact during the process. This is achieved by scanning the sample under laser illumination at speeds yielding a few numbers of overlapping pulses at a certain point, thereby effectively shielding the substrate. By adjusting laser fluence and translation speed, 400?nm wide ablation channels could be achieved over 100??m length. Raster scanning of the sample yields well-ordered periodic structures, provided that sufficient gap is left between channels. Nanoscale patterning of graphene without substrate damage is verified with Scanning Electron Microscope and Raman studies.

  12. Acoustic online monitoring of IR laser ablation of burnt skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahen, Kester; Eisenbeiss, Werner; Vogel, Alfred

    2000-05-01

    In burn surgery necrotic tissue has to be removed prior to skin grafting. Tangential excision causes high blood loss and destruction of viable tissue. Pulsed IR laser ablation can overcome these problems because of its high precision and the superficial coagulation of the remaining tissue. We realized an acoustic on-line monitoring system for a selective removal of necrotic tissue that is based on the detection of the energy of the acoustic signal produced during ablation. We developed a PC based system for data acquisition and real-time data analysis running at laser repetition rates of more than 30 Hz, and studied free- running Er:YAG laser ablation of burned skin and stacked gelatin samples which served as reproducible tissue models. Spectral analysis of the ablation noise showed that the optimum tissue specificity of the acoustic energy can only be achieved if the bandwidth of the acoustic transducer range up to more than 300 kHz. We were able to detect the boundary between gelatin layers of different water content by applying a threshold criterion for the relative increase of the acoustic energy with respect to the first laser pulse at each ablation site. Healthy and burned parts of skin samples as well as necrotic and viable tissue layers in second degree burns could be discriminated, in agreement with the result of histologic examinations. Superficial vascular structures could be distinguished fro surrounding burned tissue with good spatial resolution.

  13. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets of standard reference materials using femtosecond (150fs) and nanosecond (4ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the collected particles revealed that there are more and larger agglomerations of particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation. In contrast to the earlier findings for metal alloy samples, no correlation between the concentration of major elements and the median particle size was found. When the current data on glass were compared with the metal alloy data, there were clear differences in terms of particle size, crater depth, heat affected zone, and ICP-MS response. For example, glass particles were larger than metal alloy particles, the craters in glass were less deep than craters in metal alloys, and damage to the sample was less pronounced in glass compared to metal alloys samples. The femtosecond laser generated more intense ICP-MS signals compared to nanosecond laser ablation for both types of samples, although glass sample behavior was more similar between ns and fs-laser ablation than for metals alloys.

  14. Visual servoing of a laser ablation based cochleostomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahrs, Lüder A.; Raczkowsky, Jörg; Werner, Martin; Knapp, Felix B.; Mehrwald, Markus; Hering, Peter; Schipper, Jörg; Klenzner, Thomas; Wörn, Heinz

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study is a defined, visually based and camera controlled bone removal by a navigated CO II laser on the promontory of the inner ear. A precise and minimally traumatic opening procedure of the cochlea for the implantation of a cochlear implant electrode (so-called cochleostomy) is intended. Harming the membrane linings of the inner ear can result in damage of remaining organ functions (e.g. complete deafness or vertigo). A precise tissue removal by a laser-based bone ablation system is investigated. Inside the borehole the pulsed laser beam is guided automatically over the bone by using a two mirror galvanometric scanner. The ablation process is controlled by visual servoing. For the detection of the boundary layers of the inner ear the ablation area is monitored by a color camera. The acquired pictures are analyzed by image processing. The results of this analysis are used to control the process of laser ablation. This publication describes the complete system including image processing algorithms and the concept for the resulting distribution of single laser pulses. The system has been tested on human cochleae in ex-vivo studies. Further developments could lead to safe intraoperative openings of the cochlea by a robot based surgical laser instrument.

  15. Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization for Atmospheric Pressure Molecular Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Chapter 9 Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization for Atmospheric Pressure Molecular Imaging Mass-IR) MALDI (3), laser ablation S.S. Rubakhin, J.V. Sweedler (eds.), Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Methods depicts the fast imaging of the entrainment of laser-ablated particulates into the electro- spray plume

  16. Ionization in vacuum ultraviolet F2 laser ablated polymer plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, P. E.; Pervolaraki, M.; Walton, C. D.; Lippert, T.; Kuhnke, M.; Wokaun, A.

    2008-03-01

    An experimental investigation of ion generation in the 157-nm vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) F2 laser ablation of three selected polymers glycidyl azide polymer (GAP), a triazene polymer (TP6) and polyimide is described. An ion collector probe is used to determine the relative ion yield and white-light interferometry of ablated surfaces to ascertain mass-removal levels. The findings indicate that ions are generated under the action of the VUV laser pulse at fluences down to at least as low as the threshold for material removal. A two-photon photoionization model is proposed that provides a good description of the results.

  17. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  18. Plume dynamics of cross-beam pulsed-laser ablation of graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Ake, C.; Sangines de Castro, R.; Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2006-09-01

    The dynamics of the interaction between two plasmas induced by cross-beam pulsed-laser ablation was analyzed by time resolved optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. The plasmas were created in vacuum by irradiating two perpendicular graphite targets with an excimer (248 nm) and a Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (1064 nm) laser. In this configuration, a laser is focused onto a target generating a highly directed plume; subsequently, an additional laser produces a second plasma from the perpendicular target which expands through the first plume. Collisional processes cause a reduction of the kinetic energy of the second plume species as compared to the single pulse experiment. For a fixed delay between lasers of 2 {mu}s, the second plume was divided in two perpendicular directions. The dynamics of this plasma has been compared with laser-induced plume propagation through a background gas in terms of the drag model.

  19. Wavelength-Dependent Conformational Changes in Collagen after Mid-Infrared Laser Ablation of Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yaowu; Guo, Mingsheng; Zhang, Peng; Shanmugam, Ganesh; Polavarapu, Prasad L.; Hutson, M. Shane

    2008-01-01

    We ablated porcine corneas with a free electron laser tuned to either 2.77 or 6.45 ?m, two matched wavelengths that predominantly target water and protein, respectively. The ejected nonvolatile debris and the crater left behind were examined by circular dichroism, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy to characterize the postablation conformation of collagen proteins. We found near-complete unfolding of collagen secondary and tertiary structure at either ablating wavelength. On the other hand, we found excess fibril swelling and evidence for excess cis-hydroxyproline in the 6.45-?m debris. These results support the hypothesis that the favorable ablative properties of protein-targeting wavelengths rest on selective heating of tissue proteins. PMID:17933877

  20. Thermal melting and ablation of silicon by femtosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I. Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Bunkin, A. F.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2013-03-15

    The space-time dynamics of thermal melting, subsurface cavitation, spallative ablation, and fragmentation ablation of the silicon surface excited by single IR femtosecond laser pulses is studied by timeresolved optical reflection microscopy. This dynamics is revealed by monitoring picosecond and (sub)nanosecond oscillations of probe pulse reflection, which is modulated by picosecond acoustic reverberations in the dynamically growing surface melt subjected to ablation and having another acoustic impedance, and by optical interference between the probe pulse replicas reflected by the spalled layer surface and the layer retained on the target surface. The acoustic reverberation periods change during the growth and ablation of the surface melt film, which makes it possible to quantitatively estimate the contributions of these processes to the thermal dynamics of the material surface. The results on the thermal dynamics of laser excitation are supported by dynamic measurements of the ablation parameters using noncontact ultrasonic diagnostics, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical interference microscopy of the modified regions appearing on the silicon surface after ablation.

  1. Laser trabecular ablation of human eyes with the erbium:YAG laser: a histopathologic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Theresa R.; Noecker, Robert J.; Snyder, Robert W.; Ellsworth, Lansing G.; Yarborough, J. Michael

    1994-06-01

    We postulated that ablation of trabecular meshwork can be accomplished without damage to Schlemm's canal and adjacent tissue. We performed Erbium:YAG laser trabecular ablation on human autopsy eyes and confirmed the results by histopathologic examination. We used an Erbium:YAG laser (2.94 micrometers ) equipped with a sapphire probe and a quartz tip (350 micrometers diameter). Energy levels of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 40 mJ per pulse were used. The probe was placed directly onto the trabecular meshwork viewed through an operating microscope and focal ablation was performed with single pulses. The tissue was then processed and examined under light and scanning microscopy. The histopathologic study of the trabecular meshwork revealed that a single pulse at an energy level of 15 mJ was optimal for ablating through the trabecular meshwork to Schlemm's canal with a minimal amount of coagulative damage to the surrounding tissue. The mean width of ablated tissue was 150 micrometers +/- 29 micrometers (n equals 18) and the mean depth of ablation was 133 +/- 48 micrometers (n equals 18) at this energy level. The mean width of coagulative damage to adjacent tissue was 16 +/- 8 micrometers (n equals 18). The ablation and coagulative damage increased with increasing energy levels. The Erbium:YAG laser equipped with a contact probe effectively ablates trabecular meshwork with little surrounding coagulative damage. This feature may minimize scarring and result in a high long-term patency rate of outflow channels created by laser trabecular ablation.

  2. Formation and characterization of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, Justin Samuel

    The work presented in this thesis encompassed laser ablation of various transition metals within a liquid environment. Through an improved understanding of the ablation process, control over the properties of the resultant nanoparticles can be obtained, and thusly nanoparticles can be tailored with specific properties. Creation of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution is a relatively youngtechnique for nanoparticle synthesis, and the work presented should prove useful in guiding further exploration in ablation processes in liquids for nanomaterial production. When a laser is focused onto a target under a liquid environment, the target material and its surrounding liquid are vaporized. The concoction of vapor is ejected normal to the surface as a bubble. The bubble has a temperature reaching the boiling point of the metal, and has a gradient to the boiling point of the solvent. The bubble expands until it reaches a critical volume, and then subsequently collapses. It is within this bubble that nanoparticle formation occurs. As the bubble expands, the vapor cools and nanoparticle growth transpires. During the bubble collapse, pressures reaching GigaPascals have been reported, and a secondary nanoparticle formation occurs as a result of these high pressures. Chapter 1 delves a little more into the nanoparticle formation mechanisms, as well as an introduction to the analytical techniques used for characterization. Ablation of titanium took place in isopropanol, ethanol, water, and n-hexane, under various fluences, with a 532 nm Nd:YAG operating at 10 Hz. It was found that a myriad of nanoparticles could be made with vastly different compositions that were both solvent and fluence dependent. Nanoparticles were made that incorporated carbon and oxygen from the solvent, showing how solvent choice is an important factor in nanoparticle creation. Chapter 3 discusses the results of the titanium work in great detail and demonstrates carbide production with ablation in isopropyl alcohol. Ablation in n-hexane also showed diffraction patterns correlating with carbides, and water showed oxygen incorporation. These results showed the ability to utilize the solvent in tailoring nanoparticles to achieve desired properties. Zirconium and nickel were ablated with the Nd:YAG at 532 nm. These studies utilized a stainless steel chamber designed and built to improve control over the experimental variables. The nickel study showcased the new chamber's ability for reproducibility in a size dependence study based upon laser fluence. The results of ablation with the Nd:YAG were compared to femtosecond ablation experiments performed with a titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system. The Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser operated at 10 Hz, produced femtosecond pulses centered at ˜795 nm. The pulse duration was varied from 100 fs to 390 fs, the nanoparticles created from each condition were characterized, and the results are presented in chapters 5 and 6. Aluminum nanoparticles were made using both nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation techniques. Aluminum nanoparticles have a great deal of potential for use as fuel additives as well as in paints and coatings. The nanosecond ablation process rendered large nanoparticles (over 200 nm) and the results are briefly shown in Appendix A. The femtosecond system produced a much smaller distribution of nanoparticles, with nanoparticles remaining in suspension for over a month's time, as evidenced by their unique UV-Vis absorbance. These nanoparticles were produced in isopropyl alcohol, and were stabilized by the solvent, as TEM analysis showed nanoparticles with very little oxygen incorporation. The solvent is bound to the nanoparticles as a result of the formation process and as a result forms a protective coating, which prevents further oxidation over time. The remarkable stability of these aluminum nanoparticles is a testament of employing the high energy scheme of the laser ablation process in a manner to tailor the production of novel nanomaterials. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  3. Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis posterior ablation platform.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Miguel J

    2005-07-01

    A laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis posterior ablation platform was developed to improve the ease and quality of the undersurface ablation of the flap technique. This ergonomic instrument combines a fixation ring with a platform that provides a physiologically spherical and smooth, low-reflective surface to extend the turned flap during the undersurface ablation of the flap retreatment. It was used successfully in 17 enhancement procedures when there was insufficient posterior stroma for additional treatment but adequate flap stroma. The result was improved globe stabilization and stromal smoothness during ablation. An efficacy index of 1 was achieved day 1 postoperatively in a greater percentage of eyes (88.2%) than without its use (29.4%; P = .001). The L-PAP appears to facilitate UAF procedures and prompt visual recovery. PMID:16009842

  4. Cluster Generation Under Pulsed Laser Ablation Of Compound Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakov, Alexander V.; Evtushenko, Anton B.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Ozerov, Igor; Marine, Wladimir

    2010-10-08

    A comparative experimental study of pulsed laser ablation in vacuum of two binary semiconductors, zinc oxide and indium phosphide, has been performed using IR- and visible laser pulses with particular attention to cluster generation. Neutral and cationic Zn{sub n}O{sub m} and In{sub n}P{sub m} particles of various stoichiometry have been produced and investigated by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. At ZnO ablation, large cationic (n>9) and all neutral clusters are mainly stoichiometric in the ablation plume. In contrast, indium phosphide clusters are strongly indium-rich with In{sub 4}P being a magic cluster. Analysis of the plume composition upon laser exposure has revealed congruent vaporization of ZnO and a disproportionate loss of phosphorus by the irradiated InP surface. Plume expansion conditions under ZnO ablation are shown to be favorable for stoichiometric cluster formation. A delayed vaporization of phosphorus under InP ablation has been observed that results in generation of off-stoichiometric clusters.

  5. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-11-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated.

  6. Stable kilohertz rate molecular beam laser ablation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Marc; de Lange, C. A.; Ullrich, Susanne; Schultz, T.; Schmitt, M.; Underwood, Jonathan G.; Shaffer, James P.; Rayner, D. M.; Stolow, Albert

    2003-11-01

    We describe a stable kHz rate laser ablation/desorption supersonic molecular beam source for use in kHz rate laser experiments. With the development of modern lasers that typically operate at kHz rates, a need has arisen for stable molecular beam laser ablation/desorption sources for the study of involatile species. Many biomolecules of interest cannot be brought into the gas phase without thermal decomposition by simply heating the substrate and most (especially refractory) metals have melting and boiling points that are impossible to reach with conventional ovens. The source is based upon strong nonresonant interaction of a dithering laser focus with a rotating and translating solid rod, hydrodynamic transport of the ablated/desorbed material in helium or argon, and subsequent supersonic expansion. Further design details include flexible and easy adjustment of the source for rapid prototyping and optimization for kHz rate performance. Due to the high rate of sample removal, a major concern is clogging of the nozzle and laser input channel due to both material condensation and debris formation. In order to illustrate the range of applications, we demonstrate (1) the kHz laser ablation of a high temperature refractory metal (niobium) for use in studies of metal clusters; and (2) the kHz laser desorption and jet cooling of an involatile biomolecule (the DNA base guanine) for use in spectroscopic and dynamical studies. This kHz source design has been shown to be stable for over 12 continuous hours of operation (>4×107 laser shots) and can be readily scaled to even higher repetition rates (>10 kHz).

  7. Laser ablation in a liquid-confined environment using a nanosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ho; Welch, Ashley J.

    2008-04-15

    Laser ablation of aluminum metal with 1 ns, 800 nm pulse at low radiant exposures was investigated in air (dry) and water (wet) environments. Compared to dry ablation, an approximately eight times increase in material removal rate was associated with wet ablation. Based on optical reflectance and scanning electron microscope images, bubble formation/collapse was responsible for augmented acoustic pressure and ablation performance. Numerically simulated temperature distributions during wet ablation were consistent with the occurrence of explosive water vaporization near the critical temperature of water. Strong pressure emission during liquid vaporization and jet formation can account for enhanced ablation process. Radial expansion of bubbles minimized the redeposition of debris, leading to improvements in energy coupling to the target and ablation performance.

  8. Acoustic online monitoring of IR laser ablation of burnt skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahen, Kester; Vogel, Alfred

    1999-06-01

    In burn surgery necrotic tissue has to be removed prior to grafting. Tangential excision causes high blood loss and destruction of viable tissue. Pulsed infrared laser ablation can overcome both problems because of its high precision and the superficial coagulation of the remaining tissue. We investigated the ablation noise to realize an acoustic feedback system for a selective removal of necrotic tissue. We studied free-running Er:YAG laser ablation of gelatin and burnt skin. Acoustic signals were detected by a condenser microphone and a piezoelectric airborne transducer. Tissue discrimination was based on the evaluation of the normalized acoustic energy. The normalized acoustic energy differs significantly between gelatin samples of different water content and between necrotic and vital tissue. The normalized acoustic energy is a suitable parameter for the discrimination between necrotic and vital tissue.

  9. Laser ablation of nitrogen-solid films by UV ps-laser irradiation: surface modification of materials by fragments in laser ablation plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Yabe, Akira

    2002-06-01

    Laser ablation of nitrogen solid film deposited on a copper plate at 10 K was investigated by the irradiation of a picosecond UV laser at 263 nm in vacuum. Photo-dissociation of nitrogen molecule in the solid film was confirmed by the optical emissions, which were ascribed to atomic nitrogen, during the laser irradiation at the fluence of 5 J cm-2 pulse-1. This photolysis was discussed by the comparison with laser-induced breakdown of nitrogen gas. At the fluence over ca. 10 J cm-2 pulse-1, the ablation of the frozen nitrogen film was observed. Employing the ablation plume including a reactive species such as nitrogen atoms, the surface reaction of a graphite oriented pyrolytic graphite plate and silicon wafer was studied. XPS analysis indicated that nitrides were formed on the surfaces by the treatment. The ps-laser ablation of nitrogen solid film provides a novel technique for surface modification of materials.

  10. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser. PMID:19404369

  11. Spin-offs from laser ablation in art conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, J.; Elford, J.; Parfenov, V.

    2013-05-01

    In 1973 The Center for Art Conservation Studies (CASS) was established at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). This was in response to demonstrations that were conducted during January-March 1972 in Venice for UNESCO, Venice in Peril, International Fund for Monuments, and the Italian Petroleum Institute (ENI). The feasibility investigation explored in-situ pulsed holography, holographic interferometry, and laser ablation divestment for applications in art conservation practice. During subsequent decades scores of UCSD graduate and undergraduate students as well as conservators, conservation scientists, academics, and engineers who resided in CASS as "Visiting Scholars" contributed to advancing the understanding and performance of radiation technologies in the arts. Several technologies in addition to those involving optical wavelengths were also investigated to aid in art conservation and conservation science. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were employed to detect and map moisture within masonry. Lead isotopic analyses revealed authenticity and provenance of Benin bronzes. Inside-out x-ray radiography facilitated the detection of defects in stone. Ultrasonic imaging was introduced for the mapping of fresco strata. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) was used to characterize varnish layers on paintings. Digital image processing was introduced in order to detect and visualize pentimenti within paintings as well as to perform virtual restoration and provide interactive museum displays. Holographic images were employed as imaginary theater sets. In the years that followed the graduation of students and the visits of professional collaborators, numerous other applications of radiation ablation began appearing in a wide variety of other fields such as aircraft maintenance, ship maintenance, toxic chemical remediation, biological sterilization, food processing, industrial fabrication, industrial maintenance, nuclear decontamination, dermatology, nuclear weapons effects simulation, and graffiti control. It was readily apparent that the customary diffusion of advanced technologies from science and industry into the art conservation field had been reversed. In this paper we trace the migration and adaptation of radiation divestment developments in art conservation to numerous applications in science, industry, and consumer products. Examples described include the robotized hybrid "Flashjet" aircraft paint stripping system, the "Novotronic" anthrax remediation installation in the Pentagon Building, the InTa automated graffiti removal system employing a carbon dioxide TEA laser, the Bellalite body hair removal product incorporating flashlamp technology, and the Foodco line of optical radiation products for the sterilization of food products. The Foodco products are also applied to the sterilization and/or pasteurization of beverages and beverage containers. A similar device has been adapted to seafood irradiation in order to increase shelf life, as well as for the ablative removal of skin and scales. The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, to etch logos and identification information into the sidewalls of pneumatic tires, also developed a flashlamp-based ablation technology. The founders of the CYMER Corporation applied UV irradiation technology to the manufacture of high-performance integrated circuits (viz., memory chips, etc.) In several instances former CASS students and Visiting Fellows consciously adapted the above-learned art conservation methodologies to still other purposes. Thus, these examples of technology transfer may be termed: "Art in the service of Science." Alternatively, it is evident that many associated innovations developed from independent activities, unconnected serendipity, or through the normal diffusion of information and knowledge across disciplines.

  12. Morphological and structural studies of WO x thin films deposited by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipescu, M.; Orlando, S.; Russo, V.; Lamperti, A.; Purice, A.; Moldovan, A.; Dinescu, M.

    2007-07-01

    Tungsten oxide is an interesting compound with many applications in gas sensors, electrochromic and photochromic devices. Thin films of tungsten oxide were obtained by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and radio frequency assisted PLD (RF-PLD). A tungsten target was ablated in reactive oxygen atmosphere (0.01-0.05 mbar). The deposition parameters such as laser fluence, substrate temperature, radiofrequency power were varied, while different materials (Corning glass and silicon) have been used as substrates. The obtained films showed good adhesion to the substrate and uniform surface aspect, which are important properties for applications. X-ray diffraction, Auger electron, Raman spectroscopies and atomic force microscopy were used for characterization.

  13. Laser induced modification and ablation of InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    He Jiayu; Chen Pingping; Lu Wei; Dai Ning; Zhu Daming

    2012-05-01

    InAs nanowires were irradiated locally under an ambient condition using a focused laser beam, which led to laser ablation and thinning of the nanowires. We show that the laser beam can induce a reduction of the local As concentration in an InAs nanowire; the change leads to a significant decrease of local melting temperature of InAs, which results in the thinning and eventually breaking of the nanowire. The results indicate that chemical and mechanical modifications of an InAs nanowire can be accomplished by using a confocal laser beam, which may prove to be a convenient approach in fabricating nanostructural materials and nanodevices.

  14. Production of nanoparticles from natural hydroxylapatite by laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Laser ablation of solids in liquids technique has been used to obtain colloidal nanoparticles from biological hydroxylapatite using pulsed as well as a continuous wave (CW) laser. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements revealed the formation of spherical particles with size distribution ranging from few nanometers to hundred nanometers and irregular submicronic particles. High resolution TEM showed that particles obtained by the use of pulsed laser were crystalline, while those obtained by the use of CW laser were amorphous. The shape and size of particles are consistent with the explosive ejection as formation mechanism. PMID:21711800

  15. Diagnostics and Impulse Performance of Laser-Ablative Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Sasoh, Akihiro; Mori, Koichi; Anju, Kohei; Suzuki, Koji; Shimono, Masaya; Sawada, Keisuke

    2008-04-28

    Pressure time variations and associated flows induced by pulsed laser ablation were experimentally studied using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and framing Schlieren visualization. The combination of either aluminum or polyacetal target and TEA CO{sub 2} laser pulse were examined. The VISAR measurement resolved that the pressure modulated from the laser power variation in the impulse generation processes. Integrated impulse induced by repetative CO{sub 2} laser pulses was measured using a torsion-type impulse balance. The effect of the ambient pressure was significant. The measured impulse characteristics were closely associated with target surface morphology and fluid dynamics.

  16. Pulsed laser ablation of pepsin on an inorganic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicco, N.; Lopizzo, T.; Marotta, V.; Morone, A.; Verrastro, M.; Viggiano, V.

    2009-03-01

    Pressed pepsin pellets used as targets were ablated with the pulses of the Nd-YAG laser. The activity of the pepsin thin layer, deposited on a glass substrate, was successfully detected by analyzing the proteolytic degradation areas on the polyacrylamide gel (PA-gel) copolymerized with albumin from the hen egg white (ovalbumin), used as an enzymatic substrate.

  17. Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics

    E-print Network

    Mazur, Eric

    Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics Eric Mazur Brian R. Tull Abstract device could greatly enhance its photovoltaic efficiency. #12;Table of Contents Abstract iii Table the injection and ejection of the seed pulse . . . . . . . . 23 2.2.4 The amplified femtosecond lase

  18. Laser ablation assisted adhesive bonding of automotive structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Warren, C.D.

    1999-07-03

    Laser ablation has been evaluated as a surface pretreatment prior to adhesive bonding. In prior experimental work, it was observed that when adhesively bonded, composite, single lap shear samples fail, the fracture often occurs at either the adhesive/adherend interface or in the resin rich surface layer of the composite. These two areas represent the weakest portion of the joint. Laser ablation pretreatment generates areas where the resin on the composite surface is selectively removed leaving behind exposed reinforcing fibers which are the major load bearing members of the composite. In a subsequent adhesive bonding operation, this allows portions of the fibers to be encapsulated in the adhesive while other portions of the fiber remain in the composite resin. This type of pretreatment permits fibers to bridge and reinforce the interface between adhesive and adherend. A secondary benefit is the removal of surface contaminantes by pyrolysis. Microscopic observation of laser ablated surfaces indicates a prominent, fiber rich area. Results of the mechanical evaluation indicated that the lap shear strength for laser ablated samples was significantly higher than specimens with no pretreatment or with solvent cleaning only, but were slightly lower than specimens that were mechanically roughened and cleaned with solvents prior to bonding.

  19. Laser Ablation of Materials for Propulsion of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Carruth, Ralph; Campbell, Jonathan; Gray, Perry

    2004-01-01

    A report describes experiments performed as part of a continuing investigation of the feasibility of laser ablation of materials as a means of propulsion for small spacecraft. In each experiment, a specimen of ablative material was mounted on a torsion pendulum and irradiated with a laser pulse having an energy of 5 J. The amplitude of the resulting rotation of the torsion pendulum was taken to be an indication of the momentum transferred from the laser beam. Of the ablative materials tested, aluminum foils yielded the smallest rotation amplitudes of the order of 10 degrees. Black coating materials yielded rotation amplitudes of the order of 90 degrees. Samples of silver coated with a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) copolymer yielded the largest rotation amplitudes 6 to 8 full revolutions. The report presents a theory involving heating of a confined plasma followed by escape of the plasma to explain the superior momentum transfer performance of the FEP specimens. It briefly discusses some concepts for optimizing designs of spacecraft engines to maximize the thrust obtainable by exploiting the physical mechanisms of the theory. Also discussed is the use of laser-ablation engines with other types of spacecraft engines.

  20. Recent advances in laser ablation modelling for asteroid deflection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2014-09-01

    Over the past few years, a series of studies have demonstrated the theoretical benefits of using laser ablation in order to mitigate the threat of a potential asteroid on a collision course with earth. Compared to other slow-push mitigation strategies, laser ablation allows for a significant reduction in fuel consumption since the ablated material is used as propellant. A precise modelling of the ablation process is however difficult due to the high variability in the physical parameters encountered among the different asteroids as well as the scarcity of experimental studies available in the literature. In this paper, we derive a new thermal model to simulate the efficiency of a laser-based detector. The useful material properties are first derived from thermochemical tables and equilibrium thermodynamic considerations. These properties are then injected in a 3D axisymetrical thermal model developed in Matlab. A temperature-dependent conduction flux is imposed on the exterior boundary condition that takes into account the balance between the incident power and the power losses due to the vaporization process across the Knudsen layer and the radiations respectively. A non-linear solver is finally used and the solution integrated over the ablation front to reconstruct the net thrust and the global mass flow. Compared to an initial 1D model, this new approach shows the importance of the parietal radiation losses in the case of a CW laser. Despite the low energy conversion efficiency, this new model still demonstrates the theoretical benefit of using lasers over more conventional low-thrust strategies.

  1. Ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: Atomistic and thermodynamic analysis of the processes at the ablation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Rethfeld, Baerbel; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-07-15

    Ultrafast laser irradiation of solids may ablate material off the surface. We study this process for thin films using molecular-dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis. Both metals and Lennard-Jones (LJ) materials are studied. We find that despite the large difference in thermodynamical properties between these two classes of materials--e.g., for aluminum versus LJ the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} of critical to triple-point temperature differs by more than a factor of 4--the values of the ablation threshold energy E{sub abl} normalized to the cohesion energy, {epsilon}{sub abl}=E{sub abl}/E{sub coh}, are surprisingly universal: all are near 0.3 with {+-}30% scattering. The difference in the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} means that for metals the melting threshold {epsilon}{sub m} is low, {epsilon}{sub m}<{epsilon}{sub abl}, while for LJ it is high, {epsilon}{sub m}>{epsilon}{sub abl}. This thermodynamical consideration gives a simple explanation for the difference between metals and LJ. It explains why despite the universality in {epsilon}{sub abl}, metals thermomechanically ablate always from the liquid state. This is opposite to LJ materials, which (near threshold) ablate from the solid state. Furthermore, we find that immediately below the ablation threshold, the formation of large voids (cavitation) in the irradiated material leads to a strong temporary expansion on a very slow time scale. This feature is easily distinguished from the acoustic oscillations governing the material response at smaller intensities, on the one hand, and the ablation occurring at larger intensities, on the other hand. This finding allows us to explain the puzzle of huge surface excursions found in experiments at near-threshold laser irradiation.

  2. Bubble formation during pulsed laser ablation: mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.; Jansen, E. Duco; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.; Borst, Cornelius

    1993-07-01

    Holmium ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) and excimer ((lambda) equals 308 nm) lasers are used for ablation of tissue. In a previous study it was demonstrated that both excimer and holmium laser pulses produce fast expanding and collapsing vapor bubbles. To investigate whether the excimer induced bubble is caused by vaporization of water, the threshold fluence for bubble formation at a bare fiber tip in water was compared between the excimer laser (pulse length 115 ns) and the Q-switched and free-running holmium lasers (pulse length 1 microsecond(s) to 250 microsecond(s) , respectively). To induce bubble formation by excimer laser light in water, the absorber oxybuprocaine-hydrochloride (OBP-HCl) was added to the water. Fast flash photography was used to measure the threshold fluence as a function of the water temperature (6 - 90 degree(s)C) at environmental pressure. The ultraviolet excimer laser light is strongly absorbed by blood. Therefore, to document the implications of bubble formation at fluences above the tissue ablation threshold, excimer laser pulses were delivered in vitro in hemoglobin solution and in vivo in the femoral artery of the rabbit. We conclude that the principal content of the fast bubble induced by a 308 nm excimer laser pulse is water vapor. Therefore, delivery of excimer laser pulses in a water or blood environment will cause fast expanding water vapor bubbles, which may induce mechanical damage to adjacent tissue.

  3. A review of Thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.

    2011-02-01

    The clinical solid-state Holmium:YAG laser lithotripter (?=2120 nm) is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but its efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates during lithotripsy. The diode-pumped experimental Thulium Fiber Laser (?=1908 nm) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate at high pulse rates. This review compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion effects for Ho:YAG and TFL. Laser lithotripsy complications also include optical fiber bending failure resulting in endoscope damage and low irrigation rates leading to poor visibility. Both problems are related to fiber diameter and limited by Ho:YAG laser multimode spatial beam profile. This study exploits TFL spatial beam profile for higher power transmission through smaller fibers. A short taper is also studied for expanding TFL beam at the distal tip of a small-core fiber. Stone mass loss, stone crater depths, fiber transmission losses, fiber burn-back, irrigation rates, and deflection through a flexible ureteroscope were measured for tapered fiber and compared with conventional fibers. The stone ablation threshold for TFL was four times lower than for Ho:YAG. Stone retropulsion with Ho:YAG increased linearly with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates < 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. TFL beam profile provides higher laser power through smaller fibers than Ho:YAG laser, potentially reducing fiber failure and endoscope damage and allowing greater irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety. Use of a short tapered distal fiber tip also allows expansion of the laser beam, resulting in decreased fiber tip damage compared to conventional fibers, without compromising fiber bending, stone ablation efficiency, or irrigation rates.

  4. Expansion dynamics of laser ablated carbon plasma plume in helium ambient

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Expansion dynamics of laser ablated carbon plasma plume in helium ambient S.S. Harilal opposite effects on the expansion dynamics of C2 species. # 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved ablation; Plasma expansion 1. Introduction Laser ablation of carbon has been extensively used

  5. Laser spectroscopy at storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Sánchez, Rodolfo

    2015-11-01

    We provide a brief overview on the infrastructure required for laser spectroscopic experiments at magnetic storage rings and summarize some recent results on laser spectroscopy at the ESR. New opportunities at the high-energy storage ring at FAIR are also highlighted.

  6. Ablation of Submicrometer Holes Using an Extreme-Ultraviolet Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossall, Andrew K.; Aslanyan, Valentin; Tallents, Greg J.; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-06-01

    Simulations and experiments are used to study extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser drilling of submicrometer holes. The ablation process is studied with a 2D Eulerian hydrodynamic code that includes bound-free absorption processes relevant to the interaction of EUV lasers with a solid material. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured ablated depths for on-target irradiances of up to 1×10 10 W cm-2 . An increase in the irradiance to 1×10 12 W cm-2 is predicted to ablate material to a depth of 3.8 ? m from a single pulse with a hole diameter 3 to 4 times larger than the focal spot size. The model allows for the simulation of the interaction of a laser pulse with the crater created by a previous shot. Multiple-pulse lower-fluence irradiation configurations under optimized focusing conditions, i.e., approaching the diffraction limit, are shown to be advantageous for applications requiring mesoscale [(100 nm )- (1 ? m ) ] features and a high level of control over the ablation profile.

  7. Infrared laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Shrestha, Bindesh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Vertes, Akos; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we introduce laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI), a novel atmospheric pressure ion source for mass spectrometry. In LAAPPI the analytes are ablated from water-rich solid samples or from aqueous solutions with an infrared (IR) laser running at 2.94 ?m wavelength. Approximately 12 mm above the sample surface, the ablation plume is intercepted with an orthogonal hot solvent (e.g., toluene or anisole) jet, which is generated by a heated nebulizer microchip and directed toward the mass spectrometer inlet. The ablated analytes are desolvated and ionized in the gas-phase by atmospheric pressure photoionization using a 10 eV vacuum ultraviolet krypton discharge lamp. The effect of operational parameters and spray solvent on the performance of LAAPPI is studied. LAAPPI offers ~300 ?m lateral resolution comparable to, e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. In addition to polar compounds, LAAPPI efficiently ionizes neutral and nonpolar compounds. The bioanalytical application of the method is demonstrated by the direct LAAPPI analysis of rat brain tissue sections and sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaves. PMID:22242626

  8. Thrust Measurements in Ballistic Pendulum Ablative Laser Propulsion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brazolin, H.; Rodrigues, N. A. S.; Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-28

    This paper describes a setup for thrust measurement in ablative laser propulsion experiments, based on a simple ballistic pendulum associated to an imaging system, which is being assembled at IEAv. A light aluminium pendulum holding samples is placed inside a 100 liters vacuum chamber with two optical windows: the first (in ZnSe) for the laser beam and the second (in fused quartz) for the pendulum visualization. A TEA-CO{sub 2} laser beam is focused to the samples providing ablation and transferring linear moment to the pendulum as a whole. A CCD video camera captures the oscillatory movement of the pendulum and the its trajectory is obtained by image processing. By fitting the trajectory of the pendulum to a dumped sinusoidal curve is possible to obtain the amplitude of the movement which is directly related to the momentum transfered to the sample.

  9. Higher Order Chemistry Models in the CFD Simulation of Laser-Ablated Carbon Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greendyke, R. B.; Creel, J. R.; Payne, B. T.; Scott, C. D.

    2005-01-01

    Production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) has taken place for a number of years and by a variety of methods such as laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition, and arc-jet ablation. Yet, little is actually understood about the exact chemical kinetics and processes that occur in SWNT formation. In recent time, NASA Johnson Space Center has devoted a considerable effort to the experimental evaluation of the laser ablation production process for SWNT originally developed at Rice University. To fully understand the nature of the laser ablation process it is necessary to understand the development of the carbon plume dynamics within the laser ablation oven. The present work is a continuation of previous studies into the efforts to model plume dynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The ultimate goal of the work is to improve understanding of the laser ablation process, and through that improved understanding, refine the laser ablation production of SWNT.

  10. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please enjoy the collection of papers in this proceeding. Also, please join us for COLA 2007, to be held in the Canary Islands, Spain (http://www.io.csic.es/cola07/index.php). Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA'05) September 11-16, 2005 Banff, Canada Supported by University of Toronto, Canada (UT) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Sponsors Sponsorship from the following companies is gratefully acknowledged and appreciated AMBP Tech Corporation GSI Lumonics Amplitude Systèmes IMRA America, Inc. Andor Technologies Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics North Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations LUMERA LASER GmbH Clark-MXR, Inc. Pascal Coherent, Lamdbda Physik, TuiLaser PVD Products, Inc. Continuum Staib Instruments, Inc. Cyber Laser Inc. Surface GAM LASER, Inc. International Steering Committee C. Afonso (Spain)W. Husinsky (Austria) D. Bäuerle (Austria)W. Kautek (Germany) I.W. Boyd (UK) H. Koinuma (Japan) E.B. Campbell (Sweden) H.U. Krebs (Germany) J.T. Dickinson (USA) D.H. Lowndes (USA) M. Dinescu (Romania) J.G. Lunney (Ireland) J.J. Dubowski (Canada) W. Marine (France) E. Fogarassy (France) K. Murakami (Japan) C. Fotakis (Greece) T. Okada (Japan) D. Geohegan (USA) R.E. Russo (USA) M. Gower (UK) J. Schou (Denmark) R.H. Haglund Jr. (USA) M. Stuke (Germany) R.R. Herman (Canada) K. Sugioka (Japan) W.P. Hess (USA) F. Traeger (Germany) J.S Horwitz (USA) A. Yabe (Japan) Local Organizing Committee Nikki Avery Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ken Beck Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Jan J. Dubowski University of Alberta Robert Fedosejevs Université de Sherbrooke Alan Joly Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michel Meunier École Polytechnique de Montréal Suwas Nikumb National Research Council Canada Ying Tsui University of Alberta Conference photograph.

  11. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of Cu at the micron/sub-micron scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Vassilia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    While femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy has been studied in the macro-scale (i.e. ablation crater sizes of tens to hundreds of micrometers), the spectral emission mechanisms at the micron/sub-micron scale remain largely unknown, mainly because of the challenges associated with spectral emission acquisition from the limited amounts of ablated mass at these small lengthscales. In this work we study the limits of detection, the laser-induced plasma properties and spectral emission efficiency of Cu at the micron/submicron scale. Although the corresponding number electron densities and temperatures are similar to those reported for macroscale laser ablation, our findings suggest less efficient luminous spectral emission per ablated volume as we scale down in laser energy and crater sizes. These results provide a first insight into fs laser-induced plasma properties at the micron/sub-micron scale regime.

  12. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation to enhance drug delivery across the skin.

    PubMed

    Garvie-Cook, Hazel; Stone, James M; Yu, Fei; Guy, Richard H; Gordeev, Sergey N

    2016-01-01

    Laser poration of the skin locally removes its outermost, barrier layer, and thereby provides a route for the diffusion of topically applied drugs. Ideally, no thermal damage would surround the pores created in the skin, as tissue coagulation would be expected to limit drug diffusion. Here, a femtosecond pulsed fiber laser is used to porate mammalian skin ex vivo. This first application of a hollow core negative curvature fiber (HC-NCF) to convey a femtosecond pulsed, visible laser beam results in reproducible skin poration. The effect of applying ink to the skin surface, prior to ultra-short pulsed ablation, has been examined and Raman spectroscopy reveals that the least, collateral thermal damage occurs in inked skin. Pre-application of ink reduces the laser power threshold for poration, an effect attributed to the initiation of plasma formation by thermionic electron emission from the dye in the ink. Poration under these conditions significantly increases the percutaneous permeation of caffeine in vitro. Dye-enhanced, plasma-mediated ablation of the skin is therefore a potentially advantageous approach to enhance topical/transdermal drug absorption. The combination of a fiber laser and a HC-NCF, capable of emitting and delivering femtosecond pulsed, visible light, may permit a compact poration device to be developed. Using a femtosecond pulsed, visible laser beam to create an array of micropores in dyed mammalian skin, with little collateral, thermal damage, leads to an enhancement in the percutaneous permeation of caffeine in vitro. PMID:26449289

  13. Tuning of the characteristics of Au nanoparticles produced by solid target laser ablation into water by changing the irradiation parameters.

    PubMed

    Kalyva, Maria; Bertoni, Giovanni; Milionis, Athanasios; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2010-10-01

    We report the production of Au nanoparticles with different average sizes and size distributions, by laser ablation of a solid Au target into pure deionized water. Tuning laser parameters such as pulse duration, energy, and wavelength is possible to tune the size and the size distributions of the produced nanoparticles into the liquid. We demonstrate the possibility of production of highly monodispersed colloidal solutions, in which the average nanoparticle size ranges from 3 to 10 nm, using laser pulses of ns duration. Laser ablation using fs laser pulses can also produce very small nanoparticles, although a small population of bigger nanoparticles is always present. Low and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in combination with UV-Vis spectroscopy have been employed for the characterization of our samples. PMID:20872736

  14. Particle size measurement from infrared laser ablation of tissue.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fan; Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Murray, Kermit K

    2016-01-01

    The concentration and size distribution were measured for particles ablated from tissue sections using an infrared optical parametric oscillator laser system. A scanning mobility particle sizer and light scattering particle sizer were used in parallel to realize a particle sizing range from 10 nm to 20 ?m. Tissue sections from rat brain and lung ranging in thickness between 10 and 50 ?m were mounted on microscope slides and irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses at 3 ?m wavelength and fluences between 7 and 21 kJ m(-2) in reflection geometry. The particle size distributions were characterized by a bimodal distribution with a large number of particles 100 nm in diameter and below and a large mass contribution from particles greater than 1 ?m in diameter. The large particle contribution dominated the ablated particle mass at high laser fluence. The tissue type, thickness, and water content did not have a significant effect on the particle size distributions. The implications of these results for laser ablation sampling and mass spectrometry imaging under ambient conditions are discussed. PMID:26630332

  15. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation, endovenous radiofrequency ablation and endovenous steam ablation.

    PubMed

    Malskat, W S J; Stokbroekx, M A L; van der Geld, C W M; Nijsten, T E C; van den Bos, R R

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous thermal ablation (EVTA) techniques are very effective for the treatment of varicose veins, but their exact working mechanism is still not well documented. The lack of knowledge of mechanistic properties has led to a variety of EVTA protocols and a commercially driven dissemination of new or modified techniques without robust scientific evidence. The aim of this study is to compare temperature profiles of 980-and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), segmental radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and endovenous steam ablation (EVSA). In an experimental setting, temperature measurements were performed using thermocouples; raw potato was used to mimic a vein wall. Two laser wavelengths (980 and 1,470 nm) were used with tulip-tip fibers and 1,470 nm also with a radial-emitting fiber. Different powers and pullback speeds were used to achieve fluences of 30, 60, and 90 J/cm. For segmental RFA, 1 cycle of 20 s was analyzed. EVSA was performed with two and three pulses of steam per centimeter. Maximum temperature increase, time span of relevant temperature increase, and area under the curve of the time of relevant temperature increase were measured. In all EVLA settings, temperatures increased and decreased rapidly. High fluence is associated with significantly higher temperatures and increased time span of temperature rise. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm EVLA with tulip-tip fibers did not differ significantly. Radial EVLA showed significantly higher maximum temperatures than tulip-tip EVLA. EVSA resulted in mild peak temperatures for longer durations than EVLA. Maximum temperatures with three pulses per centimeter were significantly higher than with two pulses. RFA temperature rises were relatively mild, resulting in a plateau-shaped temperature profile, similar to EVSA. Temperature increase during EVLA is fast with a high-peak temperature for a short time, where EVSA and RFA have longer plateau phases and lower maximum temperatures. PMID:24292197

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Laser Ablation in Liquids with Applications to Laser Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Conant, R. J.; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Walter, John Bradley

    2002-12-01

    The use of laser ablation as a means of generating ultrasonic waves in liquid metals is studied in this paper. A mathematical model for predicting the onset of ablation is developed, as is a model of the ablation process based on steady state, one-dimensional gas dynamics in which the vapor phase is treated as an ideal gas. The results of this model are then used in a quasi-two-dimensional model of laser ablation that accounts for the spatial distribution of intensity in the laser beam. Model predictions are compared with experiments conducted on liquid mercury and excellent agreement is obtained. Based on these results, a simplified model is developed that shows excellent agreement with both the theory and the experiments.

  17. FINAL REPORT. PARTICLE GENERATION BY LASER ABLATION IN SUPPORT OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF HIGH LEVEL MIXED WASTE FROM PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigate particles produced by laser irradiation and their analysis by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (LA/ICP-MS), with a view towards optimizing particle production for analysis of high level waste materials and waste glass. LA/ICP-MS has consi...

  18. Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Terashima, Kazuo; Sasaki, Takehiko

    2011-06-15

    Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm{sup 2}; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO{sub 2} with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO{sub 2} during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO{sub 2} is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

  19. Comparison of soft and hard tissue ablation with sub-ps and ns pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Stuart, B.C.; Celliers, P.M.; Feit, M.D.; Glinsky, M.E.; Heredia, N.J.; Herman, S.; Lane, S.M.; London, R.A.; Matthews, D.L.; Perry, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Chang, T.D.; Neev, J.

    1996-05-01

    Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses offers several unique advantages. The nonlinear energy deposition is insensitive to tissue type, allowing this tool to be used for soft and hard tissue ablation. The localized energy deposition lead to precise ablation depth and minimal collateral damage. This paper reports on efforts to study and demonstrate tissue ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser. Ablation efficiency and extent of collateral damage for 0.3 ps and 1000 ps duration laser pulses are compared. Temperature measurements of the rear surface of a tooth section is also presented.

  20. Ablation and nanostructuring of metals by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ashitkov, S I; Komarov, P S; Ovchinnikov, A V; Struleva, E V; Agranat, M B; Zhakhovskii, V V; Inogamov, N A

    2014-06-30

    Using an interferometric continuous monitoring technique, we have investigated the motion of the surface of an aluminium target in the case of femtosecond laser ablation at picosecond time delays relative to the instant of laser exposure. Measurements of the temporal target dispersion dynamics, molecular dynamics simulation results and the morphology of the ablation crater have demonstrated a thermomechanical (spall) nature of the disruption of the condensed phase due to the cavitation-driven formation and growth of vapour phase nuclei upon melt expansion, followed by the formation of surface nanostructures upon melt solidification. The tensile strength of heated aluminium in a condensed state has been determined experimentally at an expansion rate of ?10{sup 9} s{sup -1}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. Laser ablation mass spectrometry of sodium penetrated petroleum cokes

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, G.D.; Hopwood, F.G.; Fisher, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    Potassium and sodium modification of metallurgical cokes and carbon anodes and cathodes is of considerable interest to the aluminum industry as it can ultimately lead to the destruction of these materials. The authors have undertaken a laser ablation Fourier transform mass spectrometry study of a variety of carbon based materials including graphite, thermal black, carbon fibre, pitch coke, petroleum coke and glassy carbons in an effort to obtain information concerning the mechanism of sodium modification of these materials. A systematic analysis of a series petroleum cokes and sodium penetrated petroleum cokes which have been graphitised to different extents over the temperature range 800-2100{degrees}C have revealed noticeable differences in their respective negative-ion laser ablation FT-mass spectra.

  2. CdTe nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Logothetidis, S.; Perrie, W.; Romani, S.; Potter, R. J.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.; Sharp, M.

    2009-07-20

    Nanoparticle generation by laser ablation of a solid target in a liquid environment is an easy, fast, and 'green' method for a large scale production of nanomaterials with tailored properties. In this letter we report the synthesis of CdTe nanoparticles by femtosecond laser [387 nm, 180 fs, 1 kHz, pulse energy=6 {mu}J (fluence=1.7 J/cm{sup 2})] ablation of the target material. Nanoparticles with diameters from {approx}2 up to {approx}25 nm were observed to be formed in the colloidal solution. Their size distribution follows the log-normal function with a statistical median diameter of {approx_equal}7.1 nm. Their crystal structure is the same as that of the bulk material (cubic zincblende) and they are slightly Cd-rich (Cd:Te percentage ratio {approx}1:0.9). Photoluminescence emission from the produced nanoparticles was detected in the deep red ({approx}652 nm)

  3. Silver Nanoparticle Fabrication by Laser Ablation in Polyvinyl Alcohol Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halimah Mohamed., K.; Mahmoud Goodarz, Naseri; Amir, Reza Sadrolhosseini; Arash, Dehzangi; Ahmad, Kamalianfar; Elias, B. Saion; Reza, Zamiri; Hossein Abastabar, Ahangar; Burhanuddin, Y. Majlis

    2014-07-01

    A laser ablation technique is applied for synthesis of silver nanoparticles in different concentrations of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) aqueous solution. The ablation of high pure silver plate in the solution is carried out by a nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG pulsed laser. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy are implemented to explore the particles sizes. The effects of PVA concentrations on the absorbance of the silver nanoparticles are studied as well, by using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The preparation process is carried out for deionized water as a reference sample. The comparison of the obtained results with the reference sample shows that the formation efficiency of nanoparticles in PVA is much higher and the sizes of particles are also smaller.

  4. Pre-ignition laser ablation of nanocomposite energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, S. C.; Massad, R. A.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-06-07

    Laser ignition of energetic material composites was studied for initiation with heating rates from 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K/s. This is a unique heating rate regime for laser ignition studies because most studies employ either continuous wave CO{sub 2} lasers to provide thermal ignition or pulsed Nd:YAG lasers to provide shock ignition. In this study, aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) nanoparticle powders were pressed into consolidated pellets and ignited using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength) with varied pulse energy. Results show reduced ignition delay times corresponding to laser powers at the ablation threshold for the sample. Heating rate and absorption coefficient were determined from an axisymmetric heat transfer model. The model estimates absorption coefficients from 0.1 to 0.15 for consolidated pellets of Al + MoO{sub 3} at 1064 nm wavelength. Ablation resulted from fracturing caused by a rapid increase in thermal stress and slowed ignition of the pellet.

  5. Pre-ignition laser ablation of nanocomposite energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, S. C.; Massad, R. A.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    Laser ignition of energetic material composites was studied for initiation with heating rates from 9.5 × 104 to 1.7 × 107 K/s. This is a unique heating rate regime for laser ignition studies because most studies employ either continuous wave CO2 lasers to provide thermal ignition or pulsed Nd:YAG lasers to provide shock ignition. In this study, aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) nanoparticle powders were pressed into consolidated pellets and ignited using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength) with varied pulse energy. Results show reduced ignition delay times corresponding to laser powers at the ablation threshold for the sample. Heating rate and absorption coefficient were determined from an axisymmetric heat transfer model. The model estimates absorption coefficients from 0.1 to 0.15 for consolidated pellets of Al + MoO3 at 1064 nm wavelength. Ablation resulted from fracturing caused by a rapid increase in thermal stress and slowed ignition of the pellet.

  6. Optoacoustic monitoring of cutting and heating processes during laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bay, Erwin; Douplik, Alexandre; Razansky, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Laser-tissue interaction during laser surgery can be classified into two biophysical processes: tissue removal in the focal zone of the laser beam and heating in the surrounding tissue. In order to ensure a precise cut and minimal collateral thermal damage, the surgeon has to control several parameters, such as power, repetition rate and fiber movement velocity. In this study we propose utilizing optoacoustics for providing the necessary real-time feedback of cutting and heating processes. A single Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (532nm, 4 KHz, 18 W, pulse duration 7.6ns) was used for ablation and generation of optoacoustic signals in fresh bovine tissue samples. Both shockwaves, generated due to tissue removal, as well as normal optoacoustic responses from the surrounding tissue were detected using a single 10MHz piezoelectric transducer. It has been observed that rapid reduction in the shockwave amplitude occurs as more material is being removed from the focal zone, indicating decrease in cutting efficiency of the laser beam, whereas gradual decrease in the optoacoustic signal likely corresponds to coagulation around the ablation crater. Further heating of surrounding tissue leads to carbonization accompanied by a significant shift of spectral components of the optoacoustic signal. Our results hold promise for real-time monitoring of cutting efficiency and collateral thermal damage during laser surgery.

  7. Cavitation dynamics of laser ablation of bulk and wire-shaped metals in water during nanoparticles production.

    PubMed

    De Giacomo, A; Dell'Aglio, M; Santagata, A; Gaudiuso, R; De Pascale, O; Wagener, P; Messina, G C; Compagnini, G; Barcikowski, S

    2013-03-01

    Although the first nanoseconds to microseconds rule the resulting process yield of laser ablation in liquid, a comprehensive view involving combination of time-resolved measurement techniques is still lacking. In this paper, fundamental aspects of laser ablation of metals in water during the production of nanoparticles are discussed. Three fast diagnostic methods have been applied simultaneously. These are Optical Emission Spectroscopy for the plasma characterization, fast shadowgraph for plasma and cavitation bubble dynamics and laser scattering for the mechanisms of delivery of the produced materials in the liquid. Moreover, in order to validate the discussion, the effect on cavitation dynamics of the ablation of bulk and wire-shaped targets has been investigated together with the relative nanoparticles production yield. Unusual arrow-bow ejection phenomena between the cavitation bubble and the wire result in suppressed material back-deposition, causing efficient ejection of ablated matter into the liquid. The presented nanosecond and microsecond-resolved analysis allows estimating the timescale and role of the basic mechanisms involved in laser ablation in liquids as well as the thermodynamic characteristics of the processes. PMID:23198287

  8. Comparison of kinetic theory models of laser ablation of carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shusser, Michael

    2010-05-15

    The paper compares the predictions of three-dimensional kinetic theory models of laser ablation of carbon. All the models are based on the moment solution of the Boltzmann equation for arbitrary strong evaporation but use different approximations. Comparison of the model predictions demonstrated that the choice of the particular model has very little influence on the results. The influence of the heat conduction from the gas to the solid phase was also found to be negligible in this problem.

  9. Modeling of laser ablation and fragmentation of human calculi

    SciTech Connect

    Gitomer, S.; Jones, R.D.; Howsare, C.

    1989-01-01

    The large-scale radiation-hydrodynamics computer code LASNEX, has been used to model experimental results in the laser ablation and fragmentation of renal and biliary calculi. Recent experiments have demonstrated laser ablation and fragmentation of human calculi in vitro and in vivo. In the interaction, laser light incident upon the calculus is of sufficient intensity to produce a plasma (a hot ionized gas). The physical picture which emerges is as follows. The plasma couples to acoustic and shear waves which then propagate through the dense stone material, causing spall and fracture by reflection from material discontinuities or boundaries. Experiments have thus far yielded data on the interaction against which models can be tested. Data on the following have been published: (1) light emission, (2) absorption and emission spectra, (3) fragmentation efficiency, (4) cavitation bubble dynamics and (5) mass removal. We have performed one dimensional simulations of the laser-matter interaction to elucidate the important physical mechanisms. We find that good quantitative fits between simulation and experiment are obtained for visible light emission, electron temperature, electron density, plasma pressure and cavitation bubble growth. With regard to mass removal, experiment and simulation are consistent with each other and give an excellent estimate of the ablation threshold. The modeling indicates that a very small ablation layer at the surface of the calculus is responsible for significant mass loss by fragmentation within the bulk of the calculus. With such quantitative fits in hand, we believe this type of modeling can now be applied to the study of other procedures involving plasma formation of interest to the medical community. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Optical feedback signal for ultrashort laser pulse ablation of tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.-M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Mammini, B.M.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-07-01

    An optical feedback system for controlled precise tissue ablation is discussed. Our setup includes an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL), and a diagnostic system using analysis of either tissue fluorescence or plasma emission luminescence. Current research is focused on discriminating hard and soft tissues such as bone and spinal cord during surgery using either technique. Our experimental observations exhibit considerable spectroscopic contrast between hard and soft tissue, and both techniques offer promise for a practical diagnostic system.

  11. Laser ablation loading of a radiofrequency ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, K.; Okhapkin, M. V.; Herrera-Sancho, O. A.; Peik, E.

    2012-06-01

    The production of ions via laser ablation for the loading of radiofrequency (RF) ion traps is investigated using a nitrogen laser with a maximum pulse energy of 0.17 mJ and a peak intensity of about 250 MW/cm2. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to measure the ion yield and the distribution of the charge states. Singly charged ions of elements that are presently considered for the use in optical clocks or quantum logic applications could be produced from metallic samples at a rate of the order of magnitude 105 ions per pulse. A linear Paul trap was loaded with Th+ ions produced by laser ablation. An overall ion production and trapping efficiency of 10-7 to 10-6 was attained. For ions injected individually, a dependence of the capture probability on the phase of the RF field has been predicted. In the experiment this was not observed, presumably because of collective effects within the ablation plume.

  12. Holmium laser ablation of cartilage: effects of cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asshauer, Thomas; Jansen, Thomas; Oberthur, Thorsten; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Gerber, Bruno E.

    1995-05-01

    The ablation of fresh harvested porcine femur patellar groove cartilage by a 2.12 micrometers Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser in clinically used irradiation conditions was studied. Laser pulses were delivered via a 600 micrometers diameter fiber in isotonic saline. Ablation was investigated as a function of the angle of incidence of the delivery fiber with respect to the cartilage surface (0-90 degrees) and of radiant exposure. Laser pulses with energies of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 J and a duration of 250 microseconds were used. A constant fiber tip-tissue distance of 1 mm was maintained for all experiments. The dynamics of the induced vapor bubble and of the ablation process was monitored by time resolved flash videography with a 1 microseconds illumination. Acoustic transients were measured with a piezoelectric PVDF needle probe hydrophone. Bubble attachment to the cartilage surface during the collapse phase, leading to the direct exposition of the cartilage surface to the maximal pressure generated, was observed in all investigated irradiation conditions. Maximal pressure transients of up to 200 bars (at 1 mm distance from the collapse center) were measured at the bubble collapse at irradiation angles >= 60 degrees. No significant pressure variation was observed in perpendicular irradiation conditions as a function of radiant exposure. A significant reduction of the induced pressure for irradiation angles

  13. Experimental and computational study of complex shockwave dynamics in laser ablation plumes in argon atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Miloshevsky, G. V.; Diwakar, P. K.; LaHaye, N. L.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-08-15

    We investigated spatio-temporal evolution of ns laser ablation plumes at atmospheric pressure, a favored condition for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. The 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser were focused on to an Al target and the generated plasma was allowed to expand in 1 atm Ar. The hydrodynamic expansion features were studied using focused shadowgraphy and gated 2 ns self-emission visible imaging. Shadowgram images showed material ejection and generation of shock fronts. A secondary shock is observed behind the primary shock during the time window of 100-500 ns with instabilities near the laser cone angle. By comparing the self-emission images obtained using fast photography, it is concluded that the secondary shocks observed in the shadowgraphy were generated by fast moving target material. The plume front estimates using fast photography exhibited reasonable agreement with data obtained from shadowgraphy at early times {<=}400 ns. However, at later times, fast photography images showed plume confinement while the shadowgraphic images showed propagation of the plume front even at greater times. The structure and dynamics of the plume obtained from optical diagnostic tools were compared to numerical simulations. We have shown that the main features of plume expansion in ambient Ar observed in the experiments can be reproduced using a continuum hydrodynamics model which provided valuable insight into the expansion dynamics and shock structure of the plasma plume.

  14. Synthesis of nanoparticles in laser ablation of aluminum in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K.

    2010-09-01

    We report the synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles using pulsed laser ablation in water confined plasma. Nanoparticles have spherical shape and size distribution depends on laser fluence. Strong blue photoluminescence peaks at 405 nm (3.06 eV) and 430 nm (2.89 eV) due to oxygen deficient defects (F, F+, and F++ centers) is reported with different UV excitations. A comparative study of plasma in deionized water and air ambient reveals enhanced line broadening and higher electron density in water confined plasma compared to that in air, in agreement with radiative recombination model. The temporal dependence of spectral radiant energy density of plasma is also discussed.

  15. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  16. Transient pressure induced by laser ablation of toluene, a highly laser-absorbing liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Ding, X.; Narazaki, A.; Sato, T.; Niino, H.

    2005-02-01

    Transient processes of laser ablation of a highly laser-absorbing liquid, toluene, were investigated by directly measuring (by using a fast-response pressure gauge) the transient pressure caused by toluene ablation under KrF laser irradiation . The results were compared with time-resolved images . The peak pressure P due to a shock wave decreased slowly with increasing distance d for d=100 1000 ?m:P?d-0.33. By extrapolating P to d=8.9 ?m, the optical penetration depth of toluene at ?=248 nm, the estimated initial pressure due to toluene ablation was 65 MPa at 1.0 J cm-2 pulse-1. The estimated initial pressure increased linearly with the fluence. These results help clarify the mechanism of laser-induced backside wet etching.

  17. Generation of Cd1-xZnxS nanoparticles by laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarov, M. A.; Nasirov, E. F.; Jafarli, R.

    2014-08-01

    Approximately spherical nanoparticles of the II-VI semiconductor materials Cd1-xZnxS have been produced successfully by laser ablation of the bulk material in several liquids. The non-stabilized suspensions of particles are characterized by absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The procedure is not strongly size-selective, radii of 7±3 nm were found for Cd1-xZnxS by transmission electron microscopy. Acetonitrile stabilizes the particles for several days up to weeks. Prolonged irradiation leads effectively to a reduction in particles size, in which particle agglomeration may play an important role. Ablation in degassed liquids does not have a significant effect on the absorption of the suspended particles.

  18. Plume dynamics and cluster formation in laser-ablated copper plasma in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, R. K.

    2011-04-01

    Laser-ablated copper plasma plume expanding in a nonuniform magnetic field and ambient gas is investigated to understand plume dynamics using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging of the plume. A peculiar oscillatory behavior of the plume observed in magnetic field is discussed. The appearance and enhancement of Cu{sub 2} (A-X) band in ambient gas and in the presence of magnetic field is reported. The presence of magnetic field favors the formation of copper clusters in the expanding plumes.

  19. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( ? = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  20. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C.; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, the system is demonstrated for the in vivo study of bone regeneration. Image-guided creation of a bone defect and longitudinal evaluation of cellular injury response in the defect provides insight into the bone regeneration process. PMID:25657872

  1. Properties of zirconia thin films deposited by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Cancea, V. N.; Filipescu, M.; Colceag, D.; Dinescu, M.; Mustaciosu, C.

    2013-11-13

    Zirconia thin films have been deposited by laser ablation of a ceramic ZrO{sub 2} target in vacuum or in oxygen background at 0.01 mbar. The laser beam generated by an ArF laser (?=193 nm, ?=40 Hz) has been focalized on the target through a spherical lens at an incident angle of 45°. The laser fluence has been established to a value from 2.0 to 3.4 Jcm{sup ?2}. A silicon (100) substrate has been placed parallel to the target, at a distance of 4 cm, and subsequently has been heated to temperatures ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. Thin films morphology has been characterized by atomic force microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Biocompatibility of these thin films has been assessed by studying the cell attachment of L929 mouse fibroblasts.

  2. Ablation of biological tissues by radiation of strontium vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Vasilieva, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on sources of self- contained transitions in pairs SrI and SrII has been developed. The radiation spectrum contains 8 laser lines generating in the range of 1 - 6.45 ?m, with a generation pulse length of 50 - 150 ns, and pulse energy of ˜ 2.5 mJ. The divergence of the output beam was close to the diffraction and did not exceed 0.5 mrad. The control range of the laser pulse repetition rate varied from 10 to 15 000 Hz. The given laser system has allowed to perform ablation of bone tissue samples without visible thermal damage.

  3. Laser ablation of hard tissue: correlation between the laser beam parameters and the post-ablative tissue characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan

    2003-11-01

    Hard dental tissue laser applications, such as preventive treatment, laser diagnosis of caries, laser etching of enamel, laser decay removal and cavity preparation, and more recently use of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy, have been investigated for in vitro and in vivo applications. Post-ablative surface characteristics, e.g. degree of charring, cracks and other surface deformation, can be evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data are discussed in relevance with the laser beam characteristics, e.g. pulse duration, beam profile, and the beam delivery systems employed. Techniques based on the laser illumination of the dental tissues and the subsequent evaluation of the scattered fluorescent light will be a valuable tool in early diagnosis of tooth diseases, as carious dentin or enamel. The laser induced autofluorescence signal of healthy dentin is much stronger than that of the carious dentin. However, a better understanding of the transmission patterns of laser light in teeth, for both diagnosis and therapy is needed, before the laser procedures can be used in a clinical environment.

  4. Corneal ablation using the pulse stretched free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Joos, Karen M.; Kozub, John A.; Jansen, E. D.

    2005-04-01

    The Mark-III Free Electron Laser (FEL), tuned to ?=6.45 ?m has been demonstrated to provide for efficient ablation in ocular and neural tissues with minimal collateral damage. To date, the role of the FEL pulse structure on the mechanism of ablation has not been determined. In an effort to study the role of the FEL micropulse on the ablation of corneal tissue, the native pulse structure of the FEL, a 2.85 gigahertz repetition of picosecond pulses within a five microsecond macropulse envelope, was changed using a a pulse stretcher. This device changes the duration of the micropulse from 1 picosecond to 30-200 picoseconds in length, thus reducing the peak intensity of the micropulse by as much as 200x the original intensity, while the macropulse energy remains unchanged. Two basic metrics were studied: the ablation threshold on water and the ablation crater depth on gelatin. These metrics were employed at ?=6.45 and 6.1 ?m for 1, 100, and 200 picoseconds in micropulse duration. The results showed a very slight difference between the 1, 100, and 200 picosecond micropulse duration, given a 200 fold decrease in peak energy for both the threshold and crater depth measurements. Brightfield imaging was also performed to probe the ablation dynamics and showed no difference between the 1 and 200 ps micropulses. The effect of changing the micropulse duration was studied on the ablation of canine cornea. Craters (500 micron diameter) were created with 25 pulses at three times the ablation threshold as determined for water on freshly enucleated corneas within 12 hours of removal. Three rows of seven craters were created on the center of each cornea. The native one picosecond micropulse and 200 picosecond stretched micropulse were compared at ?=6.1 and 6.45 ?m. Histological data shows that less thermal damage is present at 6.1 ?m compared with 6.45 ?m however, there is no significant difference between the native and stretched pulses with respect to thermal damage.

  5. In-situ tomographic observation of tissue surface during laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruna, Masamitsu; Konoshita, Ryuh; Ohmi, Masato; Kunizawa, Naomi; Miyachi, Mayumi

    2001-07-01

    In laser ablation of tissues, tomography of the tissue surface is necessary for measurement of the crater depth and observation of damage of the surrounding tissue. We demonstrate here OCT images of craters made by UV laser ablation of different tissues. The maximum depth of a crater is found among several OCT images, and then the ablation rate is determined. The conventional OCT of the spatial resolution of 15 ?m was used in our experiment, but OCT of the resolution of the order of 1 ?m is required because the ablation rate is usually a few microns per pulse. Such a high-resolution OCT is also demonstrated in this paper, where the light source is a halogen lamp. Combination of laser ablation and OCT will lead to in situ tomographic observation of tissue surface during laser ablation, which should allow us to develop new laser surgeries.

  6. FEMTOSECOND TECHNOLOGIES: The role of plasma in ablation of materials by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, Sergei M.; Kononenko, Taras V.; Pivovarov, Pavel A.; Garnov, Sergei V.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Breitling, D.; Dausinger, F.

    2001-05-01

    The ablative formation of deep channels in steel by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses is studied. A significant screening of the incident energy inside deep channels is found to occur due to the air breakdown at ablated microparticles. The breakdown thresholds and the microparticle precipitation times are estimated. This kind of plasma screening stabilises the linear ablation rate and causes a significant channel broadening.

  7. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harilal, S S; Yeak, J; Phillips, M C

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filament channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also explain the near absence of ion emission but strong atomic neutral emission from plumes produced during fs LIBS in air. PMID:26480372

  8. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huifeng; Yuan, Hong; Tang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  9. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong; Tang Zhiping

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  10. A study of particle generation during laser ablation withapplications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyi

    2005-08-12

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in measurements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) which result in errors. Three different methods were employed to study the effects of particle size on chemical analysis: generating smaller particles utilizing a fs laser, filtering out larger particles with a cascade impactor and altering the size distribution by using a second pulse to fracture particles generated from the first pulse. It was found that the chemical composition of the particles varies with particle size. The variation of the composition with respect to particle size was analyzed and it was proposed that it was related to the vapor formed particles condensing on larger ejected liquid droplets.

  11. MR temperature imaging of nanoshell mediated laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Stafford, R Jason; Shetty, Anil; Elliott, Andrew M; Schwartz, Jon A; Goodrich, Glenn P; Hazle, John D

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive thermal therapy using high-power diode lasers is an active area of clinical research. Gold nanoshells (AuNS) can be tuned to absorb light in the range used for laser ablation and may facilitate more conformal tumor heating and sparing of normal tissue via enhanced tumor specific heating. This concept was investigated in a xenograft model of prostate cancer (PC-3) using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) in a 1.5T scanner to characterize the spatiotemporal temperature distribution resulting from nanoparticle mediated heating. Tumors with and without intravenously injected AuNS were exposed to an external laser tuned to 808?nm for 180?sec at 4?W/cm(2) under real-time monitoring with proton resonance frequency shift based MRTI. Microscopy indicated that these nanoparticles (140-150?nm) accumulated passively in the tumor and remained close to the tumor microvasculature. MRTI measured a statistically significant (p?ablation at power levels which do not generate significant damage in normal tissue. When used in conjunction with MRTI, this has implications for development and validation of more conformal delivery of therapy for interstitial laser ablations. PMID:22098362

  12. Energy balance in laser ablation of metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.; Bredice, F.

    2005-10-15

    Laser-generated plasma was induced on metallic targets glued to a piezoelectric microphone and placed between the plates of a planar charged capacitor. The plasma generates a temporal redistribution of electric charge on the plates that can easily be measured by a resistor connected to the ground plate; this signal is proportional to the total number of ions removed by breakdown. Both the absorbed and scattered energies were simultaneously monitored by the photoacoustic signal and an energy meter. From these signals it was possible to determine the energy involved in each of the processes. Just above the ablation threshold most of the delivered energy is absorbed and the acoustic signal prevails compared to other contributions. Above this region, the electric signal, which is proportional to the energy involved in the ablation process, becomes dominant.

  13. Simultaneous multi-point laser ablation using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, Aroshan; Hutson, Shane

    2010-03-01

    Laser-microsurgery has emerged as a powerful technique for evaluating in vivo tissue mechanics; however, for incisions involving multiple pulses, only the very first pulse ablates tissue with unaltered mechanical stress; subsequent pulses ablate tissue that is recoiling from earlier ablations. To avoid this, we have developed a system for simultaneously ablating tissue at several points by using a single laser pulse shaped by a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM). The ablating laser system is connected to a confocal microscope with a high-speed camera attachment. Using the high-speed camera and pulsed illumination, we have imaged the dynamics of multi-point ablation -- including the formation and interaction of multiple simultaneous plasmas and cavitation bubbles. We report preliminary results from simultaneous ablation of multiple spots and/or extended lines in aqueous solution, gels and fruit fly embryos.

  14. Customized ablation using an all-solid-state deep-UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, G.; Lenzner, M.; Kittelmann, O.; Zatonski, R.; Kirsch, M.; Kuklin, Y.

    2003-07-01

    We show first deep UV ablation results achieved with our new all solid state laser system. The system parameters allow high repetition rate ablation with a small spot diameter of about 0.250mm and a fluence of 350 mJ/cm2 at a wavelength of 210 nm using sequential frequency conversion of a diode pumped laser source. The single shot and multishot ablation rates as well as the ablation profiles have been defined using MicroProf (Fries Research and Technology GmbH, Germany). By means of computer controlled scanning we produce smooth ablation profiles corresponding to a correction of myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism. Due to the small spot size and high repetition rate of the laser we are able to generate in short time intervals complicated ablation profiles described by higher order polynomial functions which are required for the needs of customized corneal ablation.

  15. Nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation of brass: Particulate and ICPMS measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Mao, X.L.; Mao, S.; Zeng, X.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

    2003-11-01

    Femtosecond and nanosecond lasers were compared for ablating brass alloys. All operating parameters from both lasers were equal except for the pulse duration. The ablated aerosol vapor was collected on silicon substrates for particle size measurements or sent into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The diameters and size distribution of particulates were measured from scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the collected ablated aerosol. SEM measurements showed that particles ablated using nanosecond pulses were single spherical entities ranging in diameter from several micrometers to several hundred nanometers. Primary particles ablated using femtosecond ablation were {approx}100 nm in diameter but formed large agglomerates. ICPMS showed enhanced signal intensity and stability using femtosecond compared to nanosecond laser ablation.

  16. Onset of laser ablation in CaF2 crystal under excimer laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Narazaki, Aiko; Sato, Tadatake; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2002-06-01

    With the widespread application of excimer lasers for micro- processing, optically transparent materials in the UV region have become more important as optical components. The transparent materials currently available commercially are silica glass and fluoride crystals, CaF2 and MgF2. The resistance of these materials against cumulative irradiation of excimer lasers is required from the viewpoint of application, and it is important to clarify the mechanisms of the optical damage on these materials. In this paper, we report the onset of laser ablation, that is, the initiation of optical breakdown and plume formation, in CaF2 crystal under cumulative irradiation of an ArF excimer laser. When the laser fluence is below the ablation threshold, a blue luminescence due to self-trapped exciton is observed from the whole laser-irradiated region. When the fluence ins increased near the threshold, successive irradiation finally cause a bright, localized luminescence due to the initiation of laser ablation. SEM images of the laser-damaged region show two features: (1) a small bump with pits of the order of 0.1 micrometers formed by UV laser absorption and following local heating, (2) small cracks with triangular fragments caused by mechanisms stress under local heating.

  17. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  18. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  19. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, Dann J. (Benton City, WA); Becker, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Beem, William L. (Kennewick, WA); Berry, Tommy C. (Kennewick, WA); Cannon, N. Scott (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01

    A method of testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed.

  20. Mechanism of dye-enhanced enamel ablation by Alexandrite laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Rastegar, Sohi; Tittel, Frank K.

    1995-05-01

    Insufficient light absorption in hard dental tissues makes laser ablation in near UV, visible or near IR spectral ranges very inefficient to be employed for tooth cavity preparations. We used deposition of a liquid absorber, indocyanine green (ICG) dye, to overcome this problem. Experiments employed Alexandrite laser anticipating that future near IR diode laser technology will replace existing medical lasers. Ablation kinetics and mechanisms for both free-running and Q-switched modes of Alexandrite laser were studied with the aim to determine optimal parameters of laser irradiation and optimal volume of the dye. Four experimental parameters were monitored during each ablation event: (1) incident laser fluence, (2) temporal profile of the laser pulse, (3) temporal profile and magnitude of laser-induced stress transients, (4) temporal profile and spectrum of plasma emission. We also examined kinetics of plume by probing ablation products with CW He-Ne laser beam. Results depicted ablation process as a complex multistage phenomenon. Two distinct stages associated with the tooth ablation are revealed in the free-running mode: (1) ablation of a dye droplet from a tooth surface by the first laser micropulse of a 250-microsecond(s) macropulse, (2) plasma mediated ablation of a melted layer of enamel produced by thermal explosion of the dye. Plasma jet formation was delayed 10-100 microsecond(s) against the beginning of free-running pulse. Ablation stages and their efficiency are defined by laser irradiation parameters, dye concentration and its total volume. In contrast, Q-switched (nanosecond) laser ablation occurs as a one stage process, and, therefore, less efficient. In addition, Q-switched mode irradiation induces shock waves amplitudes that are about an order of magnitude higher compared with that induced by the free-running irradiation. Experimental comparison of Q-switched and free-running modes of irradiation is evident in favor of free-running mode that produces a nice smooth crater without noticeable thermomechanical damage to surrounding tissues.

  1. Peak polarity overturn for charged particles in laser ablation process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Ji, Y. J.; Lai, X. M.; Bian, B. M.; Li, Z. H.

    2006-07-01

    The charged particles emitted during laser ablation off a brass target are detected using a metal probe in air. A special phenomenon is found in the recorded signals: following a giant electromagnetic peak observed immediately after the emission of the pulsed laser, a minor peak occurs whose polarity merely depends on the distance between the probe and the laser focal spot on the target. Under the condition of our experiment, the overturn point is 1.47 mm, i.e., the minor peak remains negative when the probe distance is less than 1.47 mm; it becomes positive while the probe is set at a distance beyond 1.47 mm. A hypothesis is proposed to explain the overturn that takes the flight behavior of the charged particles both in plasma and propagating shock wave into consideration.

  2. Stable isotope laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, J. F.; Yaldaei, Ramil; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor laser technology have produced a reliable lightweight device ideally suited for a spacecraft high resolution molecular spectrometer. Lead-salt tunable diode lasers (TDL) emit in several spectral modes, each with a very narrow linewidth of -0.0003/cm. This spectral resolution is much narrower than typical Doppler broadened molecular linewidths in the mid-IR range. Thus it is possible to detect individual rotational lines within the vibrational band and measure their intensity, which can be used to determine gas concentration. The narrow spectral lines of any impurity gas tend to lie between the narrow lines of the gas of interest. This represents a major advantage over the accepted gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) technique for measuring gas concentrations and isotope ratios. The careful and extensive gas purification procedures required to remove impurities for reliable GCMS measurements will not be required for an IR laser gas analysis. The infrared laser gas analysis technique is being developed to measure stable isotopic ratios of gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, and NH3. This will eventually lead to development of instruments capable of in situ istopic measurements on planets such as Mars. The carbon (C-12, C-13) isotope ratio is indicative of the type of carbon fixation mechanisms (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration) in operation on a planet, while the nitrogen (N-14, N-15) isotope ratio can probably be used to date nitrogen-bearing Martian samples. The absorbance ratio of two adjacent lines of CO2 in the 2300/cm (4.3 micron) region of the spectrum was measured. The precision of the measurement is presently better than 1 percent and significant improvement is anticipated as rapid sweep-integration techniques and computer controlled data acquistion capabilities are incorporated.

  3. Stable isotope laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. F.; Yaldaei, Ramil; McKay, Christopher P.

    1989-03-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor laser technology have produced a reliable lightweight device ideally suited for a spacecraft high resolution molecular spectrometer. Lead-salt tunable diode lasers (TDL) emit in several spectral modes, each with a very narrow linewidth of -0.0003/cm. This spectral resolution is much narrower than typical Doppler broadened molecular linewidths in the mid-IR range. Thus it is possible to detect individual rotational lines within the vibrational band and measure their intensity, which can be used to determine gas concentration. The narrow spectral lines of any impurity gas tend to lie between the narrow lines of the gas of interest. This represents a major advantage over the accepted gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) technique for measuring gas concentrations and isotope ratios. The careful and extensive gas purification procedures required to remove impurities for reliable GCMS measurements will not be required for an IR laser gas analysis. The infrared laser gas analysis technique is being developed to measure stable isotopic ratios of gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, and NH3. This will eventually lead to development of instruments capable of in situ istopic measurements on planets such as Mars. The carbon (C-12, C-13) isotope ratio is indicative of the type of carbon fixation mechanisms (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration) in operation on a planet, while the nitrogen (N-14, N-15) isotope ratio can probably be used to date nitrogen-bearing Martian samples. The absorbance ratio of two adjacent lines of CO2 in the 2300/cm (4.3 micron) region of the spectrum was measured. The precision of the measurement is presently better than 1 percent and significant improvement is anticipated as rapid sweep-integration techniques and computer controlled data acquistion capabilities are incorporated.

  4. Synchronized videography of plasma plume expansion during femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolasini, Steven; Kietzig, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond lasers are gaining industrial interest for surface patterning and structuring because of the reduced heat effects to the surrounding material, resulting in a good quality product with a high aspect ratio. Analysis of the plasma plume generated during ablation can provide useful information about the laser-material interactions and thereby the quality of the resulting surface patterns. As a low-cost alternative to rather complicated ICCD camera setups, presented here is an approach based on filming the laser machining process with a high speed camera and tuning the frame rate of the camera to slightly lower than the laser pulse frequency. The delay in frequency between the laser and camera results in frames taken from sequential pulses. Each frame represents a later phase of plume expansion although taken from different pulses. Assuming equal plume evolution processes from pulse to pulse, the sequence of images obtained completes a plume expansion video. To test the assumption of homogeneity between sequential plumes, the camera can be tuned to the frequency of the laser, as to capture consecutive plumes at the same phase in their evolution. This approach enables a relatively low-cost, high resolution visualization of plasma plume evolution suitable for industrial micromachining applications with femtosecond lasers. Using this approach we illustrate differences in plume expansion at the example of machining homogeneous surface patterns in different liquid and gaseous processing environments.

  5. Morphological comparison between nano- and picosecond laser ablation in enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Kurachi, Cristina; Misoguti, Lino; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2000-03-01

    Human enamel tissue has been exposed to Nd:YAG pulsed laser operating in nanosecond and picosecond pulse regime. Morphological comparison between the regimes of operation have been investigated special attention to preservation of structure was taken. Trains of pulses with picosecond duration from a Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:YAG laser and pulses with nanosecond duration from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser both operating at 15 Hz kept at in same average power, were focused in human sound molar during 30 s. Drilled holes with different morphological characteristics were observed for several laser intensity regime. Enamel surfaces were examined in a scanning electron microscope and their morphological characteristics compared. Contrast between the morphology of the enamel when treated with different powers and lasers pulse duration were observed. Picosecond pulses promote a better defined material removal while nanosecond pulses at the equivalent average power level causes a large intermediate modified region between ablated and normal tissue, as well as a complete superficial modification of the existent original structure. Results show an important correlation between the surface morphology and the pulse width of the lasers, giving indications towards the use of ultrashort laser pulses in Dentistry.

  6. Endovenous Laser Ablation of Incompetent Perforator Veins: A New Technique in Treatment of Chronic Venous Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, Ugur

    2009-09-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of endovenous laser ablation of incompetent perforator veins in a patient with incompetency of the small saphenous vein and multiple perforator veins. Two different methods were used to ablate seven perforator veins with a laser giving 50-60 J/cm energy. Total occlusion was observed in six perforators, and partial ablation in one perforator, at 1-month follow-up. To our knowledge, endovenous laser ablation of incompetent perforator veins is easy and a good therapeutic method.

  7. Matrix Effects on Boron Containing Materials due to Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Martinez, Jorge; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique that is used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of materials in the liquid, solid, or gas phase. LIBS can also be used for the detection of isotopic shifts in atomic and diatomic species via Laser-Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectroscopy (LAMIS). However, any additional elements that are entrained into the plasma other than the element of interest, can affect the extent of ablation and quality of spectra and hence, potentially obscure or aid in the relative abundance assessment for a given element. To address the importance of matrix effects, the isotopic analysis of boron obtained from boron oxide (BO) emission originating from different boron-containing compounds, such as boron nitride (BN), boric acid (H3BO3) , and borax (Na2B4O710H2O), via LIBS has been performed here. Each of these materials has different physical properties and elemental composition in order to illustrate possible challenges for the LAMIS method. A calibration-free model similar to that for the original LAMIS work is used to determine properties of the plasma as the matrix is changed. DTRA

  8. Free-running and Q:Switched LIBS measurements during the laser ablation of Prickle Pears spines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, T.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; de Posada, E.

    2009-05-01

    The pulse laser ablation (PLA) as a new method for spines elimination of Prickle Pear fruit is presented. The new technique works thanks to the use of the pulsed light that is absorbed in a selective way, specifically in the spines. An optical characterization of both spine and cactus cortex allows to find the most convenient pulse energy for selective absorption. By using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in Q:Switch and free-running regimes, it is possible to control the process in real time and to check the cleaning results online. The feasibility of performing the laser ablation of spines without visible damages to the substrate was proved by the optical microscopy observation.

  9. Improved analytical characterization of solid waste-forms by fundamental development of laser ablation technology. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, R.E.

    1998-06-01

    'This EMSP research endeavors to understand fundamental laser-ablation sampling processes and to determine the influence of these processes on analytical characterization of EM waste-site samples. The issues germane to the EMSP are sensitivity and accuracy of analysis. These issues are researched by studying fractionation, sample transport, mass loading, and analytical system optimization. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) is emphasized in this research because of its use throughout the DOE labs and sites. This report summarizes research performed over the first half of this three-year program. Four issues were emphasized to improve analytical sensitivity and accuracy, including the time dependent laser removal of mass from a solid sample, fractionation, particle generation and transport, and optimization of the ICP-MS for laser ablation sampling. This research has led to six journal publications.'

  10. Laser Ablation Plume Expansion In The Presence Of Charged Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Djebli, M.

    2008-09-23

    The expansion of plasma created by laser ablation is investigated using the fluid model. At the first stage of the expansion, electrons are considered in thermal equilibrium. The presence of highly charged impurities is considered through Poisson's equation. The set of nonlinear differential equations is solved using a moving boundary and taken into account the charge separation effect. The uniformly distributed impurities can accelerate or decelerate the ion motion depending on their charge and concentration. It is also found that the separation of the charge is valid for a specific time which depends on the impurities parameters.

  11. FINAL REPORT. WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION USING SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION AND DECONTAMINATION BY LASER ABLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was studied as a method for removing contaminated surface layers from concrete. The objectives of this research were to determine the mechanism and efficacy of laser ablation, to understand the chemistry of contaminated concrete surfaces, and to chemically and phys...

  12. Femtosecond laser ablation of indium tin-oxide narrow grooves for thin film solar cells

    E-print Network

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Femtosecond laser ablation of indium tin-oxide narrow grooves for thin film solar cells Qiumei Bian in the fabrication and assembly of thin film solar cells. Using a femtosecond (fs) laser, we selectively removed a unique scheme to ablate the indium tin-oxide layer for the fabrication of thin film solar cells

  13. Velocity distributions of molecules ejected in laser ablation Leonid V. Zhigilei and Barbara J. Garrisona)

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Velocity distributions of molecules ejected in laser ablation Leonid V. Zhigilei and Barbara J simulations, we propose an analytical expression for the velocity distributions of molecules ejected in laser ablation. The Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution on a stream velocity, commonly used to describe the measured

  14. Process and structures for fabrication of solar cells with laser ablation steps to form contact holes

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D; Dennis, Tim; Waldhauer, Ann; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-11-19

    Contact holes of solar cells are formed by laser ablation to accomodate various solar cell designs. Use of a laser to form the contact holes is facilitated by replacing films formed on the diffusion regions with a film that has substantially uniform thickness. Contact holes may be formed to deep diffusion regions to increase the laser ablation process margins. The laser configuration may be tailored to form contact holes through dielectric films of varying thickness.

  15. Study of pulse width and magnetic field effect on laser ablated copper plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2015-07-01

    We report the comparative study of the effect of interaction of nano-second and pico-second laser pulse incident on the solid copper target placed in ambient of air and magnetic field. Larger ablation depth ˜ 67 ? m with clean crater profile is observed in the case of ps-laser pulses compared to ˜ 31 ? m of ablation depth using ns-laser pulses. However, the mass ablation rate found using ps-laser pulse is ˜ 3.25 × 10 - 9 g / s , roughly half of that using ns-laser pulse ˜ 6.0 × 10 - 9 g / s . The observed electron density at very early stage in the case of ps-laser pulse ablation ( 5.32 × 10 17 cm - 3 ) is 1.5 times higher than that of ns-laser ( 3.45 × 10 17 cm - 3 ) pulse ablation in absence of magnetic field. The observed electron temperature and density fluctuations at later time of ps-laser ablated plasma show a direct evidence of comparatively prominent magnetic Joule heating due to threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines through the plasma plume. Ionic lines Cu II at 451.6 nm, 459.69 nm, 466.13 nm, 468.19 nm, and Cu III at 438.64 nm emission is more for ps-laser pulse than the ns-pulse, whereas magnetic quenching suppresses ionic and atomic line emission in ps-laser ablated plasma.

  16. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Rocío; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2011-11-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  17. An observation of ablation effect of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin

    2007-02-01

    Because of the unique properties with regard to the absorption in organic tissue, pulsed Er:YAG laser has found most interest for various application in medicine, such as dermatology, dentistry, and cosmetic surgery. However, consensus regarding the optimal parameters for clinical use of this tool has not been reached. In this paper, the laser ablation characteristics of soft tissue by Er:YAG laser irradiation was studied. Porcine skin tissue in vitro was used in the experiment. Laser fluences ranged from 25mJ/mm2 to 200mJ/mm2, repetition rates was 5Hz, spot sizes on the tissue surface was 2mm. The ablation effects were assessed by the means of optical microscope, ablation diameters and depths were measured with reading microscope. It was shown that the ablation of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser was a threshold process. With appropriate choice of irradiation parameters, high quality ablation with clean, sharp cuts following closely the spatial contour of the incident beam can be achieved. The curves of ablation crater diameter and depth versus laser fluence were obtained, then the ablation threshold and ablation yield were calculated subsequently, and the influence of the number of pulses fired into a crater on ablation crater depth was also discussed.

  18. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun Wang, Kedian; Mei, Xuesong; State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710054

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation: afterthoughts.

    PubMed

    Neumann, H A Martino; van Gemert, Martin J C

    2014-03-01

    Physicists and medical doctors "speak" different languages. Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a good example in which technology is essential to guide the doctor to the final result: optimal treatment. However, for the doctor, it is by far insufficient just to turn on the knobs of the laser. He should understand what is going on in the varicose vein. On the other hand, the physicist is usually not aware what problems the doctor finds on his road towards improving a new technique. We have tried to bring both languages together in the special on Ins and outs of endovenous laser ablation published in this issue of Lasers in Medical Science. The 13 articles include endovenous related clinical (de Roos 2014; Kockaert and Nijsten 2014; van den Bos and Proebstle 2014) and socioeconomical articles (Kelleher et al 2014), the first paper on the molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms (Heger et al 2014), fiber tips (Stokbroekx et al 2014), the future of EVLA (Rabe 2014), a review of EVLA with some important issues for debate (Malskat et al 2014), an excellent paper on transcutaneous laser therapies of spider and small varicose veins (Meesters et al 2014), as well as several scientific modeling articles, varying from a mathematical model of EVLA that includes the carbonized blood layer on the fiber tip (van Ruijven et al 2014) and its application to the simulation of clinical conditions (Poluektova et al 2014) via experimental measurements of temperature profiles in response to EVLA, radiofrequency waves, and steam injections (Malskat et al 2014) to a literature review and novel physics approach of the absorption and particularly scattering properties of whole blood also including the infrared wavelengths used by EVLA (Bosschaart et al 2014). The aim of our afterthoughts, the 14th article in this special, is to try to amalgamate the clinical and physical contents of these contributions, providing the reader with the bridge that overlaps these different backgrounds. PMID:24399461

  20. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline niobium aluminides by laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tadashi

    This thesis presents a study of the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline Nb-aluminides by laser ablation in an ambient gas atmosphere. The goal of this work is to establish the science base for the nanocrystalline synthesis by this method by studying the relationships between processing conditions and physical characteristics of products. Using a newly developed ablation system, nanocrystalline Nb-aluminides have been synthesized by varying the processing variables such as laser energy density and He backing gas pressure. Ablation rate is relatively insensitive to the variation of He gas pressure. However, we observe a threshold laser energy density above which the ablation rate does not increase. Collection rate of powders depends strongly on the He backing gas pressure. We observe that no nanocrystalline material is formed at 0.1 Torr and the collection rate peaks near 1.0 Torr at all laser energy densities. By conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we observe that the mean diameter of the nanocrystalline particles is 5 to 13 nm depending on the processing condition. Analysis of electron diffraction patterns suggests that the crystal structure of the majority of particles is of the NbAl 3 (DO22) type. Through energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), we observe that the atomic ratio of Al/Nb decreases from the stoichiometric composition of NbAl3 with increasing laser energy density and decreasing backing gas pressure. High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) reveals the atomic structure of the NbAl3 particle of the DO22 type at all the processing conditions. Nb3Al particles of the A15-type crystal structure are identified at lower gas pressure and higher laser energy. The twinning structure in a NbAl3 particle is revealed. X-ray diffraction reveals that particles of small- and large-modes are synthesized at the same time and the volume ratio of the two distributions is between 0.7 and 1.1. Lattice constants of nanocrystalline NbAl3 intermetallic compounds are in agreement with the lattice constants of the ordinary NbAl3 despite the change of the processing condition.

  1. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (? = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-?s pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (? = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-?s pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-?m-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern.

  2. Photoluminescence from gas-suspended nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation: A pathway to optimized nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A.; Duscher, G.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Laser ablation of solids into background gases is a proven cluster-assembly method. It was used to synthesize the first carbon fullerenes in 1985.(1) In this technique, a solid material is vaporized by a high-powered laser pulse to form a partially-ionized plasma containing atoms and small molecules. The hot plasma plume quickly expands to collisionless conditions unless confined by a background gas. In this case, the plume atoms become trapped together and can form clusters as small as a few atoms, or larger clusters of 1--10 nm diameter (25--26,000 atoms for silicon). However, until now very little was known of the temporal and spatial scales for nanoparticle formation in background gases, or how the nanoparticles are transported and deposited after their formation. It is often unclear whether nanoparticles found on substrates were grown in the gas phase or from nuclei formed on the substrate surface. Here, the formation and transport of silicon nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes is revealed by a comparison of Rayleigh-scattering and the first photoluminescence measurements of nanoparticles suspended in background gases. Combined with Z-contrast transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) analysis of individual nanoparticles, the authors investigate their fundamental light absorption and emission properties without the influence of neighboring nanoparticles or surrounding solid or liquid hosts. Such understanding is critical for the deposition of optimized films.

  3. Structure, configuration, and sizing of Ni nanoparticles generated by ultrafast laser ablation in different media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñetón Arboleda, D.; Santillán, J. M. J.; Mendoza Herrera, L. J.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.; Muraca, D.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, nickel nanoparticles (NPs) have increased scientific interest because of their extensive prospects in catalysts, information storage, large-scale batteries and biomedicine. Several works on Ni NPs generation by laser ablation have appeared in the literature in the last years, using different pulsed laser regimes and different media have been published recently. In this work we analyze the characteristics of species, structure (bare core or core-shell), configuration and size distribution of NPs generated by fs pulse laser ablation over a Ni solid target in n-heptane and water. We explore the presence of NiO-Ni core-shell and hollow Ni (or air-Ni) NPs in the colloids obtained. These were experimentally characterized using AFM and TEM microscopy, as well as Optical Extinction Spectroscopy (OES). Extinction spectra were modeled using Mie theory through an appropriate modification of the complex experimental dielectric function, taking into account a size-dependent corrective term for each free and bound electron contribution. Experimental UVvisible- NIR spectra were reproduced considering a size distribution of bare core, hollow and core-shell structures NPs. In both media, Ni NPs shape and size distribution agrees with that derived from TEM and AFM analysis.

  4. Effects of Laser Irradiation on Artwork Pigments Studied by Laser Ablation and Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, R.; Jadraque, M.; Castillejo, M.; Martín, M.

    Laser ablation and time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis of the ablation plume is used to study the different response of several inorganic pigments to laser irradiation. Lead white and lead chromate in pellets and in a binding media are studied. Lead white is compared to azurite, of similar stoichiometry. For lead white the plume composition is rather independent on laser ablation wavelength and does not show important changes after repeated laser beam exposure opposite to that observed for azurite. Ablation of lead white pellets leads to ionized and neutral Pb and PbnOmHx clusters. Much less extent of aggregation in the plume is observed for lead chromate pellets and for the lead pigments in tempera. Similarities can be found between plume composition of ablated lead white and PbO, suggesting that laser/pigment interaction involves formation of PbO, therefore providing indications of the participation of a thermal decomposition mechanism.

  5. Colloidal nanoparticles produced from Cu metal in water by laser ablation and their agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hee-Jung; Jung, Euo Chang

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles were prepared from Cu metal in water without any surfactant using a simple one-step laser ablation process with 532 nm Nd-YAG beam irradiation. A surface plasmon band of Cu nanoparticles near 580 nm was not observed; instead, oxidation of the Cu colloidal nanoparticles was noticed. This seems to be due to the partially oxidized copper oxides through the route Cu?Cu2O?CuO. Around 10-nm sized colloidal nanoparticles were agglomerated as a result of oxidation according to the time elapsed, and their sizes were increased to near 200 nm. The agglomeration was confirmed by not only images from transmission electron microscopy but also the long-term observation of the particle size distribution using photon correlation spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown detection, and field flow fractionation.

  6. Antibacterial activity of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Raid A; Sulaiman, Ghassan M; Abdulrahman, Safa A; Marzoog, Thorria R

    2015-08-01

    In this study, (50-110 nm) magnetic iron oxide (?-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of iron target in dimethylformamide (DMF) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions. The structural properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV-VIS absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of laser fluence on the characteristics of these nanoparticles was studied. Antibacterial activities of iron oxide nanoparticles were tested against Gram-positive; Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative; Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The results showed a noteworthy inhibition on both bacterial strains. The preparation conditions were found to affect significantly the antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles were used to capture rapidly S. aureus bacteria under the magnetic field effect. PMID:26042717

  7. Below band-gap laser ablation of diamond for transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T.; Foote, M. C.; Vasquez, R. P.; Fortier, E. P.; Posthill, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    A 248 nm excimer laser was used to thin naturally occurring type 1a diamond substrates at normal and glancing (22 deg) incidence. Perforation of a 250-micron-thick substrate was achieved in about 15 min at normal incidence. While the substrate thinned at glancing incidence was found to have large electron-transparent areas, that thinned at normal incidence required additional argon-ion milling to achieve electron transparency. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the back surface of the diamond failed to detect any graphite or glassy carbon, confirming that damage due to laser ablation occurs only at the incident surface. Samples prepared using this technique imaged in the transmission electron microscope were observed to have retained the nitrogen platelets characteristic of such type 1a diamonds.

  8. Biomedical applications of laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    1999-07-01

    Very soon after the invention of the laser, the use of the thermal effects of the radiation was introduced. Such techniques have been refined and the laser is now routinely used for treatment in many specialities. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-thermal modality employing the combination of a tumor-seeking agent and activating laser light. During the last 15 years laser spectroscopic techniques have also been developed providing powerful means for non-intrusive medical diagnostics of tissue in real time. At the beginning only few groups were involved in exploratory work, but successively the field has developed now to occupy a large number of research teams, which meet at large specialized conferences. We will here consider three aspects of laser diagnostics: fluorescence, Raman and near-IR, and elastic scattering spectroscopy, and we will also briefly discuss PDT. The activity in the field is very extensive, and rather than trying to give a full overview, illustrations from work performed at the Lund University Medical Laser Center will be given.

  9. Laser ablation and high precision patterning of biomaterials and intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.

    2010-10-01

    The use of intraocular lenses (IOL) is the most promising method for restoring excellent vision in cataract surgery. In addition, multifocal intraocular lenses for good distant and near vision are investigated. Several new materials, techniques and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses in order to improve their optical properties and reduce the diffractive aberrations. As pulsed laser ablation is well established as a universal tool for surface processing of organic polymer materials, this study was focused in using laser ablation with short and ultra short laser pulses for surface modification of PMMA and intraocular lenses, instead of using other conventional techniques. The main advantage of using very short laser pulses, e.g. of ns, ps or fs duration, is that heat diffusion into the polymer material is negligible. As a result high precision patterning of the sample, without thermal damage of the surroundings, becomes possible. In this study, laser ablation was performed using commercially available hydrophobic acrylic IOLs, hydrophilic acrylic IOLs, and PMMA IOLs, with various diopters. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the phenomenology of the etched patterns by testing the ablation rate, versus laser energy fluence, at several wavelengths and the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The irradiated polymers have different optical properties, at the applied wavelengths, and therefore, present different ablation behaviour and morphology of the laser ablated crater walls and surrounding surfaces. The experimental results, some theoretical assumptions for mathematical modeling of the relevant ablation mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Acoustic transient generation in pulsed holmium laser ablation under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asshauer, Thomas; Rink, Klaus; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Salathe, Rene-Paul; Gerber, Bruno E.; Frenz, Martin; Pratisto, Hans; Ith, Michael; Romano, Valerio; Weber, Heinz P.

    1994-08-01

    In this study the role of acoustical transients during pulsed holmium laser ablation is addressed. For this the collapse of cavitation bubbles generated by 2.12 micrometers Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser pulses delivered via a fiber in water is investigated. Multiple consecutive collapses of a single bubble generating acoustic transients are documented. Pulse durations are varied from 130 - 230 microsecond(s) and pulse energies from 20 - 800 mJ. Fiber diameters of 400 and 600 micrometers are used. The bubble collapse behavior is observed by time resolved fast flash photography with 1 microsecond(s) strobe lamp or 5 ns 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser illumination. A PVDF needle probe transducer is used to observe acoustic transients and measure their pressure amplitudes. Under certain conditions, at the end of the collapse phase the bubbles emit spherical acoustic transients of up to several hundred bars amplitude. After the first collapse up to two rebounds leading to further acoustic transient emissions are observed. Bubbles generated near a solid surface under water are attracted towards the surface during their development. The final phase of the collapse generating the acoustic transients takes place directly on the surface, exposing it to maximum pressure amplitudes. Our results indicate a possible mechanism of unwanted tissue damage during holmium laser application in a liquid environment as in arthroscopy or angioplasty that may set limits to the choice of laser pulse duration and energies.

  11. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol?shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  12. Neutral atomic jet generation by laser ablation of copper targets

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J. B. de; Rodrigues, N. A. S.

    2014-08-15

    This work aimed the obtainment of a neutral atomic jet departing from a plume generated by laser ablation of copper targets. A pair of electrodes together with a transducer pressure sensor was used to study the ablated plume charge composition and also to measure the ion extraction from the plasma plume. The neutral beam was produced with this setup and the relative abundance of neutrals in the plasma was measured, it decreases from 30% to 8% when the laser fluence is varied from 20 J/cm{sup 2} to 32 J/cm{sup 2}. The necessary voltage to completely remove the ions from the plume varied from 10 V to 230 V in the same fluence range. TOF analysis resulted in center of mass velocities between 3.4 and 4.6 km/s, longitudinal temperature in the range from 1 × 10{sup 4} K to 2.4 × 10{sup 4} K and a Mach number of M = 2.36, calculated using purely hydrodynamic expansion approximation.

  13. Photonic Doppler velocimetry of laser-ablated ultrathin metals

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, A. R.; Rodriguez, G.; Clarke, S. A.; Thomas, K. A.

    2007-01-15

    Obtaining velocity information from the interaction of a laser pulse on a metal layer provides insight into the rapid dynamics of material removal and plasma plume physics during ablation. A traditional approach involves using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) on a reflective metal surface. However, when the target is a thin metal layer, the cohesion of the surface is quickly lost resulting in a large spread of particle velocities that cannot be easily resolved by VISAR. This is due to material ejection 'confusing' the VISAR measurement surface, effectively washing out the spatial fringe visibility in the VISAR interferometer. A new heterodyne-based optical velocimeter method is the photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). Because PDV tracks motion in a frequency encoded temporal electro-optical signal, velocity information is preserved and allows for multiple velocity components to be recorded simultaneously. The challenge lies in extracting PDV velocity information at short (nanosecond) laser ablation time scales with rapidly varying heterodyne beats by using electronic, optical, and analytical techniques to recover the velocity information from a fleeting signal. Here we show how we have been able to obtain velocity information on the nanosecond time scale and are able to compare it to hydrodynamic simulations. Also, we examine refinements to our PDV system by increasing the bandwidth, utilizing different probes, and sampling different analysis techniques.

  14. On the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts in strongly radiating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Basko, M. M. Novikov, V. G.; Grushin, A. S.

    2015-05-15

    The effect of strong thermal radiation on the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts is investigated under the assumption that all the laser flux is absorbed at the critical surface. Special attention is paid to adequate formulation of the boundary-value problem for a steady-state planar ablation flow. The dependence of the laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiency ?{sub r} on the laser intensity I{sub L} and wavelength ?{sub L} is analyzed within the non-equilibrium diffusion approximation for radiation transfer. The scaling of the main ablation parameters with I{sub L} and ?{sub L} in the strongly radiative regime 1??{sub r}?1 is derived. It is demonstrated that strongly radiating ablation fronts develop a characteristic extended cushion of “radiation-soaked” plasma between the condensed ablated material and the critical surface, which can efficiently suppress perturbations from the instabilities at the critical surface.

  15. The direct measurement of ablation pressure driven by 351-nm laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratanduono, D. E.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Barrios, M. A.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-10-01

    The instantaneous scaling of ablation pressure to laser intensity is directly inferred for ramp compression of diamond targets irradiated by 351-nm light. Continuously increasing pressure profiles from 100 to 970 GPa are produced by direct-drive laser ablation at intensities up to 7 × 1013 W/cm2. The free-surface velocity on the rear of the target is used to directly infer the instantaneous ablation-pressure profile at the front of the target. The laser intensity on target is determined by laser power measurements and fully characterized laser spots. The ablation pressure is found to depend on the laser intensity as P(GPa )=42(±3)[I(TW/cm2)]0.71(±0.01).

  16. The direct measurement of ablation pressure driven by 351-nm laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fratanduono, D. E.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W.; Barrios, M. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-10-01

    The instantaneous scaling of ablation pressure to laser intensity is directly inferred for ramp compression of diamond targets irradiated by 351-nm light. Continuously increasing pressure profiles from 100 to 970 GPa are produced by direct-drive laser ablation at intensities up to 7 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The free-surface velocity on the rear of the target is used to directly infer the instantaneous ablation-pressure profile at the front of the target. The laser intensity on target is determined by laser power measurements and fully characterized laser spots. The ablation pressure is found to depend on the laser intensity as P(GPa)=42({+-}3)[I(TW/cm{sup 2})]{sup 0.71({+-}0.01)}.

  17. Vacancies Ordered in Screw Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide Thin Film Deposition by Laser Back Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Kenneth M.; Wiley, William R.; Venkatasubramanian, Eswaranand; Ohuchi, Fumio S.

    2009-09-30

    Indium selenide thin films are important due to their applications in non-volatile memory and solar cells. In this work, we present an initial study of a new application of deposition-site selective laser back ablation (LBA) for making thin films of In2Se3. In-vacuo annealing and subsequent characterization of the films by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that control of substrate temperature during deposition and post-deposition annealing temperature is critical in determining the phase and composition of the films. The initial laser fluence and target film thickness determine the amount of material deposited onto the substrate.

  18. Shock pressures induced in condensed matter by laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Swift, Damian C; Tierney, Thomas E; Kopp, Roger A; Gammel, J Tinka

    2004-03-01

    The Trident laser was used to induce shock waves in samples of solid elements, with atomic numbers ranging from Be to Au, using pulses of 527 nm light around 1 ns long with irradiances of the order of 0.1 to 10 PW/m(2). States induced by the resulting ablation process were investigated using laser Doppler velocimetry to measure the velocity history of the opposite surface. By varying the energy in the laser pulse, relations were inferred between the irradiance and the induced pressure. For samples in vacuo, an irradiance constant in time does not produce a constant pressure. Radiation hydrodynamics simulations were used to investigate the relationship between the precise pulse shape and the pressure history. In this regime of time and irradiance, it was possible to reproduce the experimental data to within their uncertainty by including conductivity-dependent deposition of laser energy, heat conduction, gray radiation diffusion, and three temperature hydrodynamics in the treatment of the plasma, with ionizations calculated using the Thomas-Fermi equation. States induced in the solid sample were fairly insensitive to the details of modeling in the plasma, so Hugoniot points may be estimated from experiments of this type given a reasonable model of the plasma. More useful applications include the generation of dynamic loading to investigate compressive strength and phase transitions, and for sample recovery. PMID:15089414

  19. Laser ablation of dental materials using a microsecond Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siniaeva, M. L.; Siniavsky, M. N.; Pashinin, V. P.; Mamedov, Ad. A.; Konov, V. I.; Kononenko, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The action of microsecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1064 nm on dental tissues (enamel and dentin) and various dental materials used for tooth replacement and filling (ceramics, metal alloys, and composites) is studied. It is demonstrated that the ablation thresholds of all of the dental materials are significantly lower than the threshold laser fluences for the dental tissue ( E thr = 200-300 J/cm2). At the laser fluences that do not allow ablation and damage of the dental tissues, the dental materials are effectively removed at a rate of no greater than 40 ?m per pulse. It is shown that the laser ablation of the materials under study involves two processes (evaporation and volume explosion) depending on the optical density. The results obtained indicate that the laser radiation with a wavelength of 1064 nm and the microsecond pulse duration is promising for dental applications, since it allows effective cleaning of the tooth surface from various dental materials in the absence of the damages of dental tissues.

  20. Ablation of Liquids for Laser Propulsion with TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B.

    2006-05-01

    Time-resolved force sensing and intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) imaging techniques were applied to the study of the force generation mechanism for laser ablation of liquids. A Transversely Excited at Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser operated at 10.6 ?m, 300 ns pulse width, and 9 J pulse energy was used to ablate liquids contained in various aluminum and glass vessels. Net imparted impulse and coupling coefficient were derived from the force sensor data and relevant results will be presented for various container designs and liquids used. ICCD imaging was used in conjunction with the dynamic force techniques to examine dependencies on absorption depth, irradiance, surface curvature, and container geometry. ICCD imaging was also used to determine whether surface or volume absorption should be preferable for laser propulsion using liquid propellants. Finally, ballistic experiments were conducted in order to verify the dynamic force data and lend additional evidence as to the predominant methods of force generation.

  1. Measurements of erbium laser-ablation efficiency in hard dental tissues under different water cooling conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuš?er, Lovro; Diaci, Janez

    2013-10-01

    Laser triangulation measurements of Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated volumes in hard dental tissues are made, in order to verify the possible existence of a "hydrokinetic" effect that has been proposed as an alternative to the "subsurface water expansion" mechanism for hard-tissue laser ablation. No evidence of the hydrokinetic effect could be observed under a broad range of tested laser parameters and water cooling conditions. On the contrary, the application of water spray during laser exposure of hard dental material is observed to diminish the laser-ablation efficiency (AE) in comparison with laser exposure under the absence of water spray. Our findings are in agreement with the generally accepted principle of action for erbium laser ablation, which is based on fast subsurface expansion of laser-heated water trapped within the interstitial structure of hard dental tissues. Our measurements also show that the well-known phenomenon of ablation stalling, during a series of consecutive laser pulses, can primarily be attributed to the blocking of laser light by the loosely bound and recondensed desiccated minerals that collect on the tooth surface during and following laser ablation. In addition to the prevention of tooth bulk temperature buildup, a positive function of the water spray that is typically used with erbium dental lasers is to rehydrate these minerals, and thus sustaining the subsurface expansion ablation process. A negative side effect of using a continuous water spray is that the AE gets reduced due to the laser light being partially absorbed in the water-spray particles above the tooth and in the collected water pool on the tooth surface. Finally, no evidence of the influence of the water absorption shift on the hypothesized increase in the AE of the Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is observed. PMID:24105399

  2. Preparation of platinum modified titanium dioxide nanoparticles with the use of laser ablation in water.

    PubMed

    Siuzdak, K; Sawczak, M; Klein, M; Nowaczyk, G; Jurga, S; Cenian, A

    2014-08-01

    We report on the preparation method of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide modified with platinum by using nanosecond laser ablation in liquid (LAL). Titania in the form of anatase crystals has been prepared in a two-stage process. Initially, irradiation by laser beam of a titanium metal plate fixed in a glass container filled with deionized water was conducted. After that, the ablation process was continued, with the use of a platinum target placed in a freshly obtained titania colloid. In this work, characterization of the obtained nanoparticles, based on spectroscopic techniques--Raman, X-ray photoelectron and UV-vis reflectance spectroscopy--is given. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to describe particle morphology. On the basis of photocatalytic studies we observed the rate of degradation process of methylene blue (MB) (a model organic pollution) in the presence of Pt modified titania in comparison to pure TiO2--as a reference case. Physical and chemical mechanisms of the formation of platinum modified titania are also discussed here. Stable colloidal suspensions containing Pt modified titanium dioxide crystalline anatase particles show an almost perfect spherical shape with diameters ranging from 5 to 30 nm. The TiO2 nanoparticles decorated with platinum exhibit much higher (up to 30%) photocatalytic activity towards the degradation of MB under UV illumination than pure titania. PMID:24937772

  3. Research and application of surface heat treatment for multipulse laser ablation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Song; Chen, Genyu; Zhou, Cong

    2015-11-01

    This study analysed a laser ablation platform and built heat transfer equations for multipulse laser ablation of materials. The equations include three parts: laser emission after the material melt and gasification; end of laser emission after the material melts and there is the presence of a super-hot layer and solid-phase heat transfer changes during material ablation. For each of the three parts, the effects of evaporation, plasma shielding and energy accumulation under the pulse interval were considered. The equations are reasonable, and all the required parameters are only related to the laser parameters and material properties, allowing the model to have a certain versatility and practicability. The model was applied for numerical simulation of the heat transfer characteristics in the multipulse laser ablation of bronze and diamond. Next, experiments were conducted to analyse the topography of a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel after multipulse laser ablation. The theoretical analysis and experimental results showed that multipulse laser can merge the truing and dressing on a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel. This study provides theoretical guidance for optimising the process parameters in the laser ablation of a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel. A comparative analysis showed that the numerical solution to the model is in good agreement with the experimental data, thus verifying the correctness and feasibility of the heat transfer model.

  4. Preparation of Layered Organic-inorganic Nanocomposites of Copper by Laser Ablation in Water Solution of Surfactant SDS

    E-print Network

    Karpukhin, Vyacheslav T; Borodina, Tatyana I; Valyano, Evgeniy G; Gololobova, Olesya A

    2012-01-01

    The data experimental synthesis and studies of layered organic-inorganic nanocomposites [Cu2(OH)3 + DS], resulting from ablation of copper in aqueous solutions of surfactant - dodecyl sodium sulfate (SDS) are presented. By the methods of absorption spectroscopy of colloidal solutions, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) of solid phase colloids was traced the formation dynamics of this composite, depending on the exposure duration of copper vapor laser radiation on the target of copper as well as the aging time of the colloid. Bilayered structures of composite [Cu2(OH)3 + DS] fabricated by method of laser ablation copper metal target in liquid are demonstrated for the first time.

  5. Evaluation of ablation efficiency and surface morphology of human teeth upon irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates changes in ablation efficiency and surface morphology induced in human dental enamel and dentin upon interaction with femtosecond laser pulses at variable energies and number of laser pulses. Craters were created using a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser ablation system operating at a wavelength of 785?nm, pulse width of 130?fs, and repetition rate of 20?Hz. Various techniques, such as optical and scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were used to evaluate ablation depth, amount of material ablated, and surface morphology of the craters. Ablation rate (ablation depth per pulse) was found to be lower in enamel than dentin with the maximum rate occurring at fluence of 12.4?J?cm-2 in both materials. A drop in ablation rate was observed for fluence greater than 12.4?J?cm-2 and was attributed to attenuation of laser energy due to interaction with the laser-generated particles. Above this fluence, signs of thermal effects, such as melting and formation of droplets of molten material at the sample surface, were observed. The response of the ICP-MS indicated that the amount of ablated material removed from dentin is greater than that removed from enamel by a factor of 1.5 or more at all investigated fluence.

  6. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space-based missions.

  7. Outcome of Endovenous Laser Ablation of Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Rustempasic, Nedzad; Cvorak, Alemko; Agincic, Alija

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: In Bosnia and Herzegovina according to available data, treatment of incompetent superficial lower extremity varicose veins by endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) has been introduced two years ago and so far no paper has been published regarding results of EVLA treatment of patients from our country. We wanted to present our results with EVLA treatment. Aim of study: to evaluate and compare primary posttreatment outcomes of endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) with classical surgical method of varicose vein treatment. Patients and methods: The study was clinical and prospective. It was carried out at Clinic for vascular surgery in Sarajevo where fifty-eight (58) patients received surgical treatment for varicose veins and in Aesthetic Surgery Center “Nasa mala klinika” in Sarajevo were sixty-one (61) patients with varicose veins were treated by endovenous laser ablation. Total 119 patients (limbs) with pathologic reflux only in great saphenous vein were evaluated between 1st of January 2013 and 31st of April 2014. Following primary outcome endpoints were evaluated smean day of return to normal everyday activities, patient subjective quantification of pain during first seven days after intervention, incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT), incidence of wound bleeding requiring surgical intervention, incidence of peri-saphenous vein hematoma and infection rate. Results: Mean of return to normal activities (expressed in days after intervention); EVLA vs. stripping (surgery) =1.21vs12.24, T test 13,619; p=0, 000, p<0,05. T test was used for comparing Mean value of visual pain analog scale for the first 7 days between groups, for all seven days pain was significantly higher in surgical group of patients as compared to EVLA group; p<0,05. Incidence of hematoma greater than 1% of total body surface area was significantly higher in patients receiving surgical treatment; Pearson Chi Square=23,830, p<0,05; odds ratio:10,453. Incidences of infection, deep venous thrombosis and posttreatment bleeding were not statistically different between analyzed groups; EVLA vs Surgery (Pearson Chi Square =3,237; p>0,05; Pearson Chi Square=2,139, p>0,05, Pearson Chi Square=2,139, p>0,05, respectively.) Conclusion: EVLA offers better patient recovery in terms of significantly lower post treatment pain, faster return to everyday activities and lower incidence of bruising (hematomas). PMID:25568583

  8. Physical mechanisms of SiN{sub x} layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, S.; Heinrich, G.; Wollgarten, M.; Huber, H. P.; Schmidt, M.

    2015-03-14

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300?mJ/cm{sup 2} and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiN{sub x} layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiN{sub x} island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates.

  9. Iron isotope composition of particles produced by UV-femtosecond laser ablation of natural oxides, sulfides, and carbonates.

    PubMed

    d'Abzac, Francois-Xavier; Beard, Brian L; Czaja, Andrew D; Konishi, Hiromi; Schauer, James J; Johnson, Clark M

    2013-12-17

    The need for femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) systems coupled to MC-ICP-MS to accurately perform in situ stable isotope analyses remains an open question, because of the lack of knowledge concerning ablation-related isotopic fractionation in this regime. We report the first iron isotope analysis of size-resolved, laser-induced particles of natural magnetite, siderite, pyrrhotite, and pyrite, collected through cascade impaction, followed by analysis by solution nebulization MC-ICP-MS, as well as imaging using electron microscopy. Iron mass distributions are independent of mineralogy, and particle morphology includes both spheres and agglomerates for all ablated phases. X-ray spectroscopy shows elemental fractionation in siderite (C-rich agglomerates) and pyrrhotite/pyrite (S-rich spheres). We find an increase in (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratios of +2‰, +1.2‰, and +0.8‰ with increasing particle size for magnetite, siderite, and pyrrhotite, respectively. Fe isotope differences in size-sorted aerosols from pyrite ablation are not analytically resolvable. Experimental data are discussed using models of particles generation by Hergenröder and elemental/isotopic fractionation by Richter. We interpret the isotopic fractionation to be related to the iron condensation time scale, dependent on its saturation in the gas phase, as a function of mineral composition. Despite the isotopic variations across aerosol size fractions, total aerosol composition, as calculated from mass balance, confirms that fs-LA produces a stoichiometric sampling in terms of isotopic composition. Specifically, both elemental and isotopic fractionation are produced by particle generation processes and not by femtosecond laser-matter interactions. These results provide critical insights into the analytical requirements for laser-ablation-based stable isotope measurements of high-precision and accuracy in geological samples, including the importance of quantitative aerosol transport to the ICP. PMID:24261311

  10. Particle generation by laser ablation in support of chemical analysis of high level mixed waste from plutonium production operations. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, J.T.; Alexander, M.L.

    1998-06-01

    'The authors goal is to provide fundamental mechanistic studies of laser produced particulate formation in support of the use of Laser Assisted-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) to be used for analysis of radioactive/toxic materials. The work reported here represents the first nine months of this 3-year project. The major focus of these studies is determining the detailed mechanisms and character of the particulates generated by laser ablation of solid targets relevant to sampling materials for chemical analysis using inductively coupled mass spectroscopy, ICP-MS. In this application, particles generated by laser ablation must be transported to the plasma torch of the ICP-MS, often through a hollow tube with an interior diameter of a few mm. Proper digestion and ionization of particles in the plasma limits particle sizes to under a micron. Thus the production of submicron particles which truly represent the stoichiometry of the specimen is of critical importance.'

  11. Dependence of gold nanoparticle production on pulse duration by laser ablation in liquid media.

    PubMed

    Riabinina, Daria; Chaker, Mohamed; Margot, Joëlle

    2012-04-01

    The dependence on laser fluence and laser pulse duration of size, size distribution and concentration of gold nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in liquid media was investigated. It was demonstrated that increasing laser energy from 1 to 5 mJ/pulse enhances the ablation rate by a factor of 100. The behavior of the ablation rate, hence of the nanoparticle concentration, as a function of pulse duration (varied from 40 fs to 200 ps) was found to strongly differ from that in air, which can be explained by photoionization and important losses of laser energy in the femtosecond regime. The optimal pulse duration for maximum ablation rate in liquid media was found to be equal to 2 ps. PMID:22421100

  12. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Döbeli, Max; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially 18O substituted La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  13. Ablation driven by hot electrons generated during the ignitor laser pulse in shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A. R.; Rodriguez Prieto, G.; Tahir, N. A.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, S. D.; Zhao, Y. T.

    2012-12-15

    An analytical model for the ablation driven by hot electrons is presented. The hot electrons are assumed to be generated during the high intensity laser spike used to produce the ignitor shock wave in the shock ignition driven inertial fusion concept, and to carry on the absorbed laser energy in its totality. Efficient energy coupling requires to keep the critical surface sufficiently close to the ablation front and this goal can be achieved for high laser intensities provided that the laser wavelength is short enough. Scaling laws for the ablation pressure and the other relevant magnitudes of the ablation cloud are found in terms of the laser and target parameters. The effect of the preformed plasma assembled by the compression pulse, previous to the ignitor, is also discussed. It is found that a minimum ratio between the compression and the ignitor pulses would be necessary for the adequate matching of the corresponding scale lengths.

  14. Laser hydrothermal reductive ablation of titanium monoxide: Hydrated TiO particles with modified Ti/O surface

    SciTech Connect

    Blazevska-Gilev, Jadranka; Jandova, Vera; Kupcik, Jaroslav; Bastl, Zdenek; Subrt, Jan; Bezdicka, Petr; Pola, Josef

    2013-01-15

    IR laser- and UV laser-induced ablation of titanium monoxide (TM) in hydrogen (50 Torr) is compared to the same process induced in vacuum and shown to result in deposition of hydrated surface modified nanostructured titanium suboxide films. Complementary analyses of the films deposited in vacuum and in hydrogen by Fourier transform infrared, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy allowed to determine different features of both films and propose a mechanism of surface modification of ejected particles, which involves hydrothermal reduction of TM and subsequent reactions of evolved water. The films exert good adhesion to metal and quartz surfaces and are hydrophobic in spite of having their surface coated with adsorbed water. - Graphical abstract: Laser ablation of titanium monoxide (TiO) in hydrogen involves a sequence of H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O eliminations and additions and yields hydrated amorphous nanostructured titanium suboxide which is richer in oxygen than TiO. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IR and UV laser ablated particles of titanium monoxide (TiO) undergo amorphization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films deposited in vacuum have TiO stoichiometry and are oxidized in atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films deposited in hydrogen are hydrated and have more O in topmost layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films modification in hydrogen is explained by reactions in hydrogen plasma.

  15. Laser ablation of NaN3 and CsN3 Leonid Belau, Jonathan Gorodetsky, and Yehuda Haas

    E-print Network

    Haas, Yehuda

    and CO2 occluded in the salt. Addition of D2O increased the intensity of large clusters and added designed to use these salts as substrates for a laser ablation experiments is described. The ablationLaser ablation of NaN3 and CsN3 Leonid Belau, Jonathan Gorodetsky, and Yehuda Haas Department

  16. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of Ag nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picciotto, Antonino; Pucker, Georg; Lui, Alberto; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Margarone, Daniele; Bellutti, Pierluigi

    2009-05-01

    Usually the synthesis of such structures is performed using ion implantation techniques or chemical reaction methods or ablating metal targets inside liquid solutions, while here we propose pulsed laser ablation in vacuum for the generation of these particles without any catalytic environment and annealing procedures for their activation. Silver targets were ablated in a vacuum chamber at (10-7 Torr) by Nd:YAG high power pulsed laser at room temperature. The consequent deposition on Si-substrates covered by a ~50 nm thick SiO2 results in the formation of well separated nanometric spheroidal particles of Ag with a diameter of 5-10 nanometers depending on the deposition time. The generation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy analysis (SEM). The kinetic energy (2 keV) of Ag ions of the non-equilibrium plasma produced by the high power pulse was measured by the aid of Faraday's cup inserted in the interacting chamber. Monte Carlo simulations of ions tracks in solid targets (TRIM) reveal that silver ions are implanted in a region thinner than 10 nm just under the surface. Optical properties of the samples were studied by variable angle ellipsometric spectroscopy (VASE). The ellipsometric spectra were modeled with a 2-layer model. Layer-1 is modeled using the dielectric function of SiO2 and a variable thickness, while Layer-2 is best modeled with a single Lorenztian-oscillator and a constant layer thickness of 7 nm. The imaginary part of the refractive index for layer-2 reveals an absorption band in the energy range characteristic for surface plasmon resonances (SPR) of Ag nanoparticles. The maximum of SPR shifts 372 nm to 414 nm for longer deposition time indicating an increase of the average particle size [1]. Interestingly, although silver nanoparticles are located within the SiO2 layer, nanparticle formation occurs during PLD and needs no additional forming or annealing step.

  17. Laser ablation of multilayers of ink from a paper substrate for tactile printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, R.; Li, L.; Thomas, D.

    2000-07-01

    This paper reports the effects of laser ablation upon multiple-layered coloured inks which have been printed on an ordinary white paper. The aim of this work is to examine the feasibility of generating a fully tactile three-coloured image by selectively removing ink layers to reveal underlying layers of a different colour. In this paper laser ablation has been carried out upon four layered ink samples consisting of white/cyan/white/black layers. Ablation was carried out using a Q-switched Nd : YAG laser. The results show that it is possible to selectively remove the inks to expose both the top white and the cyan layers, although charring occurs with deeper ablation. An evaporation/decomposition mechanism is proposed to describe process of ink ablation.

  18. Laser lift-off initiated by direct induced ablation of different metal thin films with ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, Gerhard; Domke, Matthias; Konrad, Jan; Sarrach, Sebastian; Sotrop, Jürgen; Huber, Heinz P.

    2012-08-01

    Molybdenum thin films on glass substrates play an important role as contact layer for thin film solar cells. They can be ablated by picosecond laser pulses irradiated from the substrate side at low laser fluences of less than 1 J cm-2, while structured trenches remain free from thermal damage and residues. The fluence for that so-called direct induced ablation from the substrate side is in contrast to metal side ablation reduced by approximately one order of magnitude and is far below the thermodynamic limit for heating, melting and evaporating the complete layer. For an extended investigation of the direct induced laser ablation and the underlying mechanism, further thin film materials, chromium, titanium and platinum, with thicknesses between 200 nm and 1 µm were examined. Finally, a simple thermo-dynamical model is able to connect the observed ablation energetics with the mechanical ductility and stress limit of the metal thin films.

  19. Laser Ablation of Gallium Arsenide in Different Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R.A.; Kuroda, H.; Ryasnyanskii, A.I.

    2005-12-15

    The optical, structural, and nonlinear optical characteristics of GaAs nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in different liquids were investigated. Thermally induced self-defocusing in GaAs solutions was observed using both a high pulse repetition rate and nanosecond pulses. In studying the nonlinear optical characteristics of GaAs solutions using picosecond and femtosecond pulses, two-photon absorption was observed. The nonlinear absorption coefficient of an aqueous GaAs solution measured by the Z-scan technique and the nonlinear susceptibility of GaAs nanoparticles were, respectively, 0.7 x 10{sup -9} cm W{sup -1} and 2 x 10{sup -9} esu at a wavelength of 795 nm.

  20. Laser ablation and selective excitation directed to trace element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.

    1980-08-01

    A trace (element) analyser based on laser ablation and selectively excited radiation is proposed as an ultramicro-ultratrace technique for quantitative element analysis. Measurements of trace quantities of chromium in samples of NBS standard reference material (steel), doped skim milk powder and doped flour were undertaken. There is a linear 45 deg slope for Log/Log plot dependence of signal versus concentration that extends at least up to 1.3% (concentration by weight) in the case of chromium. The detection limit for the current unoptimized system is in the ppm range which corresponds to the absolute detection limit of 10 to the 13th power g. Although no chemical interference effects were observed, two physical interference effects were evident: differential mass vaporization and inhomogeneous spatial and temporal distribution of fast expanding analyte. The differential Doppler shift between the atoms along the line of observation reduces self-absorption even at high analyte concentrations.

  1. Growth of metal oxide nanoparticles using pulsed laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, M. A.; Drmosh, Q. A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Yamani, Z. H.

    2011-02-01

    Nano particles exhibit physical and chemical properties distinctively different from that of bulk due to high number of surface atoms, surface energy and surface area to volume ratio. Laser is a unique source of radiation and has been applied in the synthesis of nano structured metal oxides. The pulsed laser ablation (PLA) technique in liquid medium has been proven an effective and simple technique for preparing nanoparticles of high purity. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is another way to fabricate nano structured single crystal thin films of metal oxides. PLA technique has been applied in our laboratory for the growth of metal oxides such as nano-ZnO, nano-ZnO2 nano- SnO2, nano-Bi2O3, nano-NiO and nano-MnO2. Different techniques such as AFM, UV, FT-IR, PL and XRD were applied to characterize these materials. We will present our latest development in the growth of nano metal oxides using PLA and PLD.

  2. Developing laser ablation in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source for actinide detection with AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauder, W.; Pardo, R. C.; Kondev, F. G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R.; Collon, P.; Paul, M.

    2015-10-01

    A laser ablation material injection system has been developed at the ATLAS electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for use in accelerator mass spectrometry experiments. Beam production with laser ablation initially suffered from instabilities due to fluctuations in laser energy and cratering on the sample surface by the laser. However, these instabilities were rectified by applying feedback correction for the laser energy and rastering the laser across the sample surface. An initial experiment successfully produced and accelerated low intensity actinide beams with up to 1000 counts per second. With continued development, laser ablation shows promise as an alternative material injection scheme for ECR ion sources and may help substantially reduce cross talk in the source.

  3. Excimer laser ablation of a Pt target in water: the observation of hollow particles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zijie; Bao, Ruqiang; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2010-04-01

    Micro/nanoparticles were fabricated by pulsed-excimer-laser ablation of a Pt target in water. Three kinds of hollow Pt particles (coalesced by micrograins, assembled by nanocrystals or with smooth shells) were observed together with solid particles using different laser fluences (2.3-6.8 J cm(-2)) and after 6000 laser shots. We propose that the hollow particles were formed on laser-produced bubbles which provided thermodynamically preferred nucleation sites and diffusion sinks for the laser-fabricated Pt clusters or particles. Although the hollow particles are a small proportion, the results have extended the scope of particles that pulsed-laser ablation in liquid can fabricate, and have enriched the mechanistic scenario of laser ablation and nanostructure formation in liquid. PMID:20234076

  4. Modeling CO{sub 2} laser ablation impulse of polymers in vapor and plasma regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.

    2009-09-28

    An improved model for CO{sub 2} laser ablation impulse in polyoxymethylene and similar polymers is presented that describes the transition effects from the onset of vaporization to the plasma regime in a continuous fashion. Several predictions are made for ablation behavior.

  5. Formation of periodic structures upon laser ablation of metal targets in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Pavel V; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2005-09-30

    Experimental data on the formation of ordered microstructures produced upon ablation of metal targets in liquids irradiated by a copper vapour laser or a pulsed Nd:YAG laser are presented. The structures were obtained on brass, bronze, copper, and tungsten substrates immersed in distilled water or ethanol. As a result of multiple-pulse laser ablation by a scanning beam, ordered microcones with pointed vertexes are formed on the target surface. The structures are separated by deep narrow channels. The structure period was experimentally shown to increase linearly with diameter of the laser spot on the target surface. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  6. Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-04-22

    We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

  7. Manufacturing of Medical Implants by Combination of Selective Laser Melting and Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallmann, S.; Glockner, P.; Daniel, C.; Seyda, V.; Emmelmann, C.

    2015-09-01

    The perfect fit of hip stem prostheses is supposed to have positive effects on their lifetime performance. Moreover, the ingrowth of tissue into the surface of the implant has to be assured to create a firm and load bearing contact. For the manufacturing of customized hip stem prostheses, the technology of Selective Laser Melting has shown promising results. Poor surface quality, however, makes it necessary to finish up the part by e.g., sand blasting or polishing. With the use of laser ablation for post-processing, reproducible and functionalized surface morphologies might be achievable. Hence, with the motive to produce customized hip stem prostheses, a combined process chain for both mentioned laser technologies is developed. It is examined what type of surface should be produced at which part of the process chain. The produced implants should contain the demanded final surface characteristics without any conventional post-processing. Slight advantages for the Selective Laser Melting regarding the accuracy for different geometrical structures of 400 ?m depth were observed. However, an overall improvement of surface quality after the laser ablation process in terms of osseointegration could be achieved. A complete laser based production of customized hip stem implants is found to be with good prospects.

  8. Spectroscopic study of emission coal mineral plasma produced by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, L. P.; Pérez, J. A.; Riascos, H.

    2014-05-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of plasma produced by laser ablation of coal samples using 1064 nm radiation pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG on different target under air ambient, was performed. The emission of molecular band systems such as C2 Swan System (d3?g?a3?u), the First Negative System N2 (Band head at 501,53 nm) and emission lines of the C I, C II, were investigated using the optical emission spectroscopy technique. The C2 molecular spectra (Swan band) were analyzed to determine vibrational temperature (0,62 eV); the density and electron temperature of the plasma have been evaluated using Stark broadening and the intensity of the nitrogen emission lines N II, the found values of 1,2 eV and 2,2 x1018 cm-3 respectively.

  9. Laser ablation- and plasma etching-based patterning of graphene on silicon-on-insulator waveguides.

    PubMed

    Van Erps, Jürgen; Ciuk, Tymoteusz; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Van Put, Steven; Van Steenberge, Geert; Baert, Kitty; Terryn, Herman; Thienpont, Hugo; Vermeulen, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    We present a new approach to remove monolayer graphene transferred on top of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic integrated chip. Femtosecond laser ablation is used for the first time to remove graphene from SOI waveguides, whereas oxygen plasma etching through a metal mask is employed to peel off graphene from the grating couplers attached to the waveguides. We show by means of Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy that the removal of graphene is successful with minimal damage to the underlying SOI waveguides. Finally, we employ both removal techniques to measure the contribution of graphene to the loss of grating-coupled graphene-covered SOI waveguides using the cut-back method. PMID:26480176

  10. IR laser-induced metal ablation and dielectric breakdown in benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Díaz, L.; Camacho, J. J.; Urbanová, M.; Pokorná, D.; Šubrt, J.; Bakardjieva, S.; Bastl, Z.; Pola, J.

    2010-01-01

    IR laser-induced irradiation of Co and Ni sheets leads to metal ablation and when carried out in gaseous benzene (1-10 Torr) to dielectric breakdown which is accompanied by metal plasma and deposition of nanostructured carbon. The metal plasma (metal atoms and ions) as well as transients of benzene decomposition (neutral and ionic carbon and C 2 species) were detected by optical emission spectra. Different features of carbon deposited at benzene pressure 5-10 Torr on a distant glass and on the irradiated metal sheets were revealed by FTIR, Auger and Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy and explained by surface assisted carbonization. The reported process suggests a novel approach to gas-phase carbonization of organic molecules.

  11. Ablation of vitreous tissue with a high-repetition-rate erbium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Matthias; D'Amico, Donald J.

    2000-06-01

    The efficacy and predictability of Erbium (Er):YAG laser ablation of vitreous tissue and saline solution were determined. Both substances were ablated in vitro with an Er:YAG laser (pulse duration: 500 microsecond(s) ) connected to a sapphire fiber with the tip of the fiber placed in air. Pulse energies ranged between 1.0 and 20.8 mJ (vitreous) and 1.0 and 21.2 mJ (saline solution). Pulse repetition rates between 10 and 200 Hz were used. The net ablation rates were determined by weight measurement before and after laser treatment. Untreated control samples were used simultaneously to correct for evaporation. Net ablation rates were considered as the difference in the amounts of weight loss measured with and without laser treatment. Reproducible and constant ablation rates were found for both vitreous and saline solution in each of 3 consecutive measurements at constant laser parameters. Ablation rates did not significantly differ between both substances (p equals 0.25). The net ablation rates in both materials were found to increase linearly with increasing pulse frequency and nonlinearly with increasing pulse energy. The present studies suggest directions for the development of instrumentation for enhanced removal of vitreous and other tissues as well. These directions include the use of higher hertz (> 200) instruments and appropriately designed endo- probe geometries.

  12. Analysis of the change in peak corneal temperature during excimer laser ablation in porcine eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Samuel Arba; Verma, Shwetabh

    2015-07-01

    The objective is to characterize the impact of different ablation parameters on the thermal load during corneal refractive surgery by means of excimer laser ablation on porcine eyes. One hundred eleven ablations were performed in 105 porcine eyes. Each ablation was recorded using infrared thermography and analyzed mainly based on the two tested local frequencies (40 Hz, clinical local frequency; 1000 Hz, no local frequency). The change in peak corneal temperature was analyzed with respect to varying ablation parameters [local frequency, system repetition rate, pulse energy, optical zone (OZ) size, and refractive correction]. Transepithelial ablations were also compared to intrastromal ablations. The average of the baseline temperature across all eyes was 20.5°C±1.1 (17.7°C to 22.2°C). Average of the change in peak corneal temperature for all clinical local frequency ablations was 5.8°C±0.8 (p=3.3E-53 to baseline), whereas the average was 9.0°C±1.5 for all no local frequency ablations (p=1.8E-35 to baseline, 1.6E-16 to clinical local frequency ablations). A logarithmic relationship was observed between the changes in peak corneal temperature with increasing local frequency. For clinical local frequency, change in peak corneal temperature was comparatively flat (r2=0.68 with a range of 1.5°C) with increasing system repetition rate and increased linearly with increasing OZ size (r2=0.95 with a range of 2.4°C). Local frequency controls help maintain safe corneal temperature increase during excimer laser ablations. Transepithelial ablations induce higher thermal load compared to intrastromal ablations, indicating a need for stronger thermal controls in transepithelial refractive procedures.

  13. Analysis of the change in peak corneal temperature during excimer laser ablation in porcine eyes.

    PubMed

    Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Verma, Shwetabh

    2015-07-01

    The objective is to characterize the impact of different ablation parameters on the thermal load during corneal refractive surgery by means of excimer laser ablation on porcine eyes. One hundred eleven ablations were performed in 105 porcine eyes. Each ablation was recorded using infrared thermography and analyzed mainly based on the two tested local frequencies (40 Hz, clinical local frequency; 1000 Hz, no local frequency). The change in peak corneal temperature was analyzed with respect to varying ablation parameters [local frequency, system repetition rate, pulse energy, optical zone (OZ) size, and refractive correction]. Transepithelial ablations were also compared to intrastromal ablations. The average of the baseline temperature across all eyes was 20.5°C±1.1 (17.7°C to 22.2°C). Average of the change in peak corneal temperature for all clinical local frequency ablations was 5.8°C±0.8 (p=3.3E-53 to baseline), whereas the average was 9.0°C±1.5 for all no local frequency ablations (p=1.8E-35 to baseline, 1.6E-16 to clinical local frequency ablations). A logarithmic relationship was observed between the changes in peak corneal temperature with increasing local frequency. For clinical local frequency, change in peak corneal temperature was comparatively flat (r 2 =0.68 with a range of 1.5°C) with increasing system repetition rate and increased linearly with increasing OZ size (r 2 =0.95 with a range of 2.4°C). Local frequency controls help maintain safe corneal temperature increase during excimer laser ablations. Transepithelial ablations induce higher thermal load compared to intrastromal ablations, indicating a need for stronger thermal controls in transepithelial refractive procedures. PMID:26140460

  14. Influence of the per pulse laser fluence on the optical properties of carbon nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation of solids in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Contreras, Delfino; Camacho-López, Marco; Camacho-López, Miguel A.; Camacho-López, Santiago; Rodríguez-Beltrán, René I.; Mayorga-Rojas, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present experimental results on the optical characterization of carbon-nanoparticles (CNPs) synthesized by the laser ablation of solids in liquids technique (LASL). A pulsed Nd-YAG laser, a graphite disk and acetone were used in the laser ablation experiments. The per pulse laser fluence was varied, while all the other irradiation parameters (irradiation time, repetition rate, etc.) were kept constant. Both the graphite target and the obtained CNPs were characterized by Raman micro-spectroscopy. The colloidal solutions were characterized by UV-vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. Additionally, the CNPs were also characterized by TEM and HRTEM. Our results show that spherical nanoparticles in the range of 4-20 nm in diameter were obtained. UV-vis and PL results for the obtained CNPs colloidal solutions showed that the optical absorption and PL intensity are dependent on the per pulse laser fluence. We also found that the PL spectral emission of the CNPs can be tuned from blue to yellow by varying the excitation wavelength.

  15. Resonant effects in nonlinear photon absorption during femtosecond laser ablation of Nd-doped silicate glass.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yadong; Jiang, Lan; Fang, Juqiang; Chen, Qianghua; Li, Xiaowei; Lu, Yongfeng

    2012-10-10

    This study investigates the resonant effects in nonlinear photon absorption in femtosecond laser ablation of Nd-doped silicate glass (Nd:glass). During the femtosecond laser ablation process, the resonant ablation threshold fluence is decreased by up to 40% compared with that of ordinary ablation. However, it is found that the resonant effect is closely related with laser intensity, and lower laser intensities are required to achieve a significant enhancement. When the intensity is lower than 2.28×10(14) W/cm(2) at which multiphoton ionization dominates, resonant effect is enhanced by a factor of 1.4 to 4.4. When the intensity is higher than 2.28×10(14) W/cm(2), at which intensity tunnel ionization dominates, the resonant effect becomes weak and gradually fades away. It is shown that the resonant effect is still important for multiphoton ionization yet insignificant for tunnel ionization. PMID:23052083

  16. Fabrication of micro-conductive patterns using laser ablation and selective electroless Ni-B plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyoung-Shik; Kim, Hye-won; Hong, Soon-Kug; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Dong Sig; Kang, Sung Goon

    2004-10-01

    Micro-conductive patterns formed by selective electroless Ni-B plating process were fabricated to investigate the various distribution of the seed layer on insulating substrates. Selective distribution of the seed layer was forming through successive steps of laser ablation, activation treatment, mechanical polishing. A KrF Excimer laser (wavelength of 248 nm) ablation was carried out on the PMMA (Polymethymethacrylate), PET (Polyethylene Terephalate), PC (Polycarbonate) and PI (Polyimide substrates. The UV-vis spectrometer analysis showed that PMMA was a weaker absorber than other polymers at the wavelength of 248 nm. The geometrical shape of structure formed is affected by absorption coefficient. Surface morphology and characteristics after laser ablation and electroless plating is observed by Field Emission Scanning Electro Microscope (FE-SEM). As a increasing the depth of substrate patterned by laser ablation, plating was precise. Finally, we concluded this method to be suited for manufacturing micro-conductive patterns on insulating substrates without lithography.

  17. Experimental and computational study of complex shockwave dynamics in laser ablation plumes in argon atmosphere

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    in argon atmosphere S. S. Harilal, G. V. Miloshevsky, P. K. Diwakar, N. L. LaHaye, and A. Hassanein Center investigated spatio-temporal evolution of ns laser ablation plumes at atmospheric pressure, a favored condition

  18. Ablation of metal thin films using femtosecond laser Bessel vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ramazan; Ersoy, Tansu; Akturk, Selcuk

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers can provide submicron ablation resolution, making them suitable and attractive for various micro/nanofabrication applications. Laser beam shaping lends further advantages and increases the versatility of these sources. In this work, we report on the use of femtosecond laser pulses with first-order Bessel function (Bessel vortex) beam profiles in ablation of metal thin films. The diffraction-free nature of Bessel beams provides significant convenience regarding alignment and repeatability. Ablation profiles with Bessel vortex beams generally consist of single or multiple concentric rings, determined by pulse fluence on target. We investigate single-pulse ablation behavior with two laser wavelengths (1,030 and 515 nm) and three different Bessel beam cone angles. For each case, we measure inner and outer ring diameters and compare our results with theoretical calculations.

  19. Bioavailable nanoparticles obtained in laser ablation of a selenium target in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, P G; Shafeev, Georgii A; Voronov, Valerii V; Raspopov, R V; Arianova, E A; Trushina, E N; Gmoshinskii, I V; Khotimchenko, S A

    2012-11-30

    The process of producing colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles in water using the laser ablation method is described. The prospects of using nanoparticles of elementary selenium as a nutrition source of this microelement are discussed. (nanoparticles)

  20. KrF laser-induced ablation and patterning of Y--Ba--Cu--O films

    SciTech Connect

    Heitz, J.; Wang, X.Z.; Schwab, P.; Baeuerle, D. ); Schultz, L. )

    1990-09-01

    The ablation and patterning of Y--Ba--Cu--O films on (100) SrTiO{sub 3} and (100) MgO substrates by KrF excimer-laser light projection was investigated. Three different regimes of laser-material interactions were observed. Transition temperatures and critical current densities in laser-fabricated strip lines were investigated.

  1. A theoretical study of the effect of optical properties in laser ablation of tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Rastegar, S.; Motamedi, M.; Welch, A.J.; Hayes, L.J.

    1989-12-01

    The role of optical properties in the distribution of laser light and the resulting thermodynamic processes in biological tissue is studied from a theoretical perspective. Light distribution is modeled by a discrete ordinate method and heat transfer and ablation is modeled by an immobilized finite element method. The effect of parametric variation of absorption, scattering anisotropicity on the dynamics of the ablation process is examined. The manifestation of higher than the ablation threshold temperature in the subsurface tissue is observed and discussed. Results indicate significant differences in the ablation behavior which may have important clinical implications.

  2. Laser-based diagnostics for condensation in laser-ablated copper plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sappey, A.D.; Gamble, T.K.

    1991-01-01

    We are investigating the thermodynamic conditions under which condensation occurs in laser-ablated copper plasma plumes. The plasma is created by XeCl excimer laser ablation (308 nm, 350 mJ/pulse) at power densities from 500--1000 MW/cm{sup 2}. The atomic vapor expands rapidly into backing pressures of helium ranging from 0--50 torr. The backing gas serves to slow the vapor before it rarefies and provides a third body to stabilize collision complexes between vapor atoms to produce small cluster species. The formation of these small clusters is indicative of the onset of condensation, a process which, under the proper conditions, eventually forms macroscopic particulate in the plume. We use laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to probe both atomic copper and the copper dimer molecule, Cu{sub 2}. Velocities of atomic Cu have been obtained by a time-of-flight method under varying conditions of backing gas pressure. At low pressure (10 mtorr), the atomic Cu velocity peaks at approximately 2 {times} 10{sup 6} cm/s. Excitation scans of the Cu{sub 2} A {minus} X (0,0) and (1,1) bands yield both a rotational temperature and a vibrational temperature. Direct laser beam absorption is used to determine the number density of atomic copper. Rayleigh scattering from particulate is easily observable under conditions favorable to particulate production. The Cu{sub 2} LIF and Rayleigh-scattered signals disappear instantaneously in the absence of the ablation laser pulse indicating that the particulate is formed during a single laser shot. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Theoretical photo-thermo-hydrodynamic approach to the laser ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafe, Mihai

    2012-12-01

    Here, we employ theory and experiments to investigate the laser ablation process of a metal (Al) using nanosecond laser-pulses at 532 nm wavelength in atmospheric air. We analyze experimentally the dependence of the ablation rate of Al on laser fluence which is varied over a wide range (from ˜4 to 500 J/cm2) by changing the laser pulses energy. The experimental data indicate that the ablation rate increases approximately linearly to ˜1.5 ?m/pulse when increasing the fluence to ˜50 J/cm2, whereas further increase of the laser fluence leads to a much slower, non-linear increase of the ablation rate. By extrapolating towards zero the linear fitting curve, we find the ablation threshold fluence of Al to be ˜1.9 J/cm2. To understand and control the underlying phenomena involved in laser ablation, we propose a robust and efficient theoretical model for reliable yet fast calculation of the ablation rate of metals. We use a one-dimensional photo-thermo-hydrodynamic model that accounts for the material heating, melting, evaporation, melt ejection, and ablation plasma shielding during nanosecond laser irradiation. The model considers that the reflectivity of the target surface, the heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and the mass density of the metallic material depend on the aggregation state. The non-linear heat equation of the model is solved numerically in a multi-step iterative method. The solution of the heat equation gives the time evolution of the temperature within the target, leading further to the evaporation and melt ejection velocities, and to the ablation rate. There is a good agreement between the numerical and the experimental results on the ablation rate for a very wide fluence range, i.e., up to 150 J/cm2 when phase separation occurs in the ablating layer whose average temperature during the laser pulse reaches the Al critical temperature. The validity fluence range of the present model is approximately one order of magnitude wider than in previous theoretical works on nanosecond laser ablation of metals.

  4. Numerical analysis of hydrodynamic instability in magnetized laser ablation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Naofumi; Ishii, Ayako; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Morita, Taichi; Sakawa, Youichi; Takabe, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    We have conducted radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (RMHD) simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) in a magnetized counter flow produced by intense lasers. A jet-like plasma from a planar plastic target is formed and maintained in several-tens of nanoseconds by expanding plasma from rear side of two separated laser spots, and parallelly located another target is ablated by the radiation from the plasma, reproducing past experimental works. A planar shock driven by the radiation interacts with the jet as a nonuniform density structure, resulting in the RMI. The magnetic field is amplified up to ?40 times greater than the background value at the interface at which the instability occurs. However, a certain extent of the amplification results from the compression effect induced by the counter flow, and the obtained amplification level is difficult to be measured in the experiments. An experiment for observing a clear amplification must be designed through the RMHD simulations so that the RMI takes place in the low-density area between two targets.

  5. Gas Effect On Plasma Dynamics Of Laser Ablation Zinc Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T.; Lafane, S.; Malek, S.

    2008-09-01

    In order to synthesis zinc oxide thin films and nanostructures, laser ablation of ZnO target into both vacuum and oxygen atmosphere was performed. The gas effect on the plume dynamics was studied for O2 pressures varied between 10-2 to 70 mbar. Plasma plume evolution was investigated by ICCD camera fast imaging. The plasma was created by a KrF excimer laser (? = 248 nm, ? = 25 ns) at a fluence of 2 J/cm2. The light emitted by the plume was observed along the perpendicular to the ejection direction through a fast intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). We have found that the plasma dynamics is very affected by the gas pressures. The photographs reveal the stratification of plasma into slow and fast components for 0.5 mbar O2 pressures and beyond. The photographs also show the apparition of hydrodynamic instabilities which are related to chemical reactions between the plasma and the surrounding gas for a certain range of pressures.

  6. Focal Laser Ablation of Prostate Cancer: Definition, Needs, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Pierre; Mordon, Serge; Nevoux, Pierre; Marqa, Mohammed Feras; Ouzzane, Adil; Puech, Philippe; Bozzini, Gregory; Leroux, Bertrand; Villers, Arnauld; Betrouni, Nacim

    2012-01-01

    Current challenges and innovations in prostate cancer management concern the development of focal therapies that allow the treatment of only the cancer areas sparing the rest of the gland to minimize the potential morbidity. Among these techniques, focal laser ablation (FLA) appears as a potential candidate to reach the goal of focusing energy delivery on the identified targets. The aim of this study is to perform an up-to-date review of this new therapeutic modality. Relevant literature was identified using MEDLINE database with no language restrictions (entries: focal therapy, laser interstitial thermotherapy, prostate cancer, FLA) and by cross-referencing from previously identified studies. Precision, real-time monitoring, MRI compatibility, and low cost of integrated system are principal advantages of FLA. Feasibility and safety of this technique have been reported in phase I assays. FLA might eventually prove to be a middle ground between active surveillance and radical treatment. In conclusion, FLA may have found a role in the management of prostate cancer. However, further trials are required to demonstrate the oncologic effectiveness in the long term. PMID:22666240

  7. Comparison of High Rate Laser Ablation and Resulting Structures Using Continuous and Pulsed Single Mode Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebel, T.; Streek, A.; Exner, H.

    This paper compares high rate laser ablation and resulting structures of aluminum by using both a continuous wave and a ns-pulsed single mode fiber laser of high average laser power. Two different scan technologies were applied for fast deflection of the laser beams. In this work, 2.5D laser processing was studied by using a high aperture galvanometer scanner with a maximum scan speed of 18 m/s. By contrast, considerably higher scan speeds up to 1,000 m/s were achieved by using the in-house developed polygon scanner system. The ablation rates and the processing rates per unit area were analyzed by means of the depths of line-scan ablation tracks and laser processed cavities. In addition, SEM photograph of the machining samples will be presented in order to evaluate the machining quality. Finally the feasibility of this high rate technology for industrial application is demonstrated by machining examples.

  8. Human cornea wound healing in organ culture after Er:YAG laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jin-Hui; Joos, Karen M.; Robinson, Richard D.; Shetlar, Debra J.; O'Day, Denis M.

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: To study the healing process in cultured human corneas after Er:YAG laser ablation. Methods: Human cadaver corneas within 24 hours post mortem were ablated with a Q- switched Er:YAG laser at 2.94 micrometer wavelength. The radiant exposure was 500 mJ/cm2. The cornea was cultured on a tissue supporting frame immediately after the ablation. Culture media consisted of 92% minimum essential media, 8% fetal bovine serum, 0.125% HEPES buffer solution, 0.125% gentamicin, and 0.05% fungizone. The entire tissue frame and media container were kept in an incubator at 37 degrees Celsius and 5% CO2. Serial macroscopic photographs of the cultured corneas were taken during the healing process. Histology was performed after 30 days of culture. Results: A clear ablated crater into the stroma was observed immediately after the ablation. The thickness of thermal damage ranges between 1 and 25 micrometer. Haze development within the crater varies from the third day to the fourteenth day according to the depth and the roughness of the crater. Histologic sections of the cultured cornea showed complete re- epithelization of the lased area. Loose fibrous tissue is observed filling the ablated space beneath the epithelium. The endothelium appeared unaffected. Conclusions: The intensity and time of haze development appears dependent upon the depth of the ablation. Cultured human corneas may provide useful information regarding the healing process following laser ablation.

  9. Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Tissue.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a laser ablation sampling technique for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses of in-situ digested tissue proteins. Infrared laser ablation was used to remove biomolecules from tissue sections for collection by vacuum capture and analysis by MALDI. Ablation and transfer of compounds from tissue removes biomolecules from the tissue and allows further analysis of the collected material to facilitate their identification. Laser ablated material was captured in a vacuum aspirated pipette-tip packed with C18 stationary phase and the captured material was dissolved, eluted, and analyzed by MALDI. Rat brain and lung tissue sections 10 ?m thick were processed by in-situ trypsin digestion after lipid and salt removal. The tryptic peptides were ablated with a focused mid-infrared laser, vacuum captured, and eluted with an acetonitrile/water mixture. Eluted components were deposited on a MALDI target and mixed with matrix for mass spectrometry analysis. Initial experiments were conducted with peptide and protein standards for evaluation of transfer efficiency: a transfer efficiency of 16% was obtained using seven different standards. Laser ablation vacuum capture was applied to freshly digested tissue sections and compared with sections processed with conventional MALDI imaging. A greater signal intensity and lower background was observed in comparison with the conventional MALDI analysis. Tandem time-of-flight MALDI mass spectrometry was used for compound identification in the tissue. Graphical Abstract ?. PMID:26374229

  10. Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a laser ablation sampling technique for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses of in-situ digested tissue proteins. Infrared laser ablation was used to remove biomolecules from tissue sections for collection by vacuum capture and analysis by MALDI. Ablation and transfer of compounds from tissue removes biomolecules from the tissue and allows further analysis of the collected material to facilitate their identification. Laser ablated material was captured in a vacuum aspirated pipette-tip packed with C18 stationary phase and the captured material was dissolved, eluted, and analyzed by MALDI. Rat brain and lung tissue sections 10 ?m thick were processed by in-situ trypsin digestion after lipid and salt removal. The tryptic peptides were ablated with a focused mid-infrared laser, vacuum captured, and eluted with an acetonitrile/water mixture. Eluted components were deposited on a MALDI target and mixed with matrix for mass spectrometry analysis. Initial experiments were conducted with peptide and protein standards for evaluation of transfer efficiency: a transfer efficiency of 16% was obtained using seven different standards. Laser ablation vacuum capture was applied to freshly digested tissue sections and compared with sections processed with conventional MALDI imaging. A greater signal intensity and lower background was observed in comparison with the conventional MALDI analysis. Tandem time-of-flight MALDI mass spectrometry was used for compound identification in the tissue.

  11. Threshold and efficiency analysis in Er:YAG laser ablation of hard dental tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majaron, Boris; Lukac, Matjaz; Sustercic, Dusan; Funduk, Nenad; Skaleric, Uros

    1996-12-01

    Influence of pulselength on mid-IR laser ablation of hard dental tissue was studied experimentally by applying free- generated Er:YAG laser pulses with pulselengths from 50 microsecond(s) to 1 ms and different energies to dentin slices in vitro with no spray cooling. The results show that for pulselengths between 50 and 300 micrometers , dentin ablation turns up abruptly at a well defined fluence value of approximately 4 J/cm2, which is independent of the pulselength. Similarly, volumes of the resulting craters as a function of laser fluence at these pulselengths follow nearly the same curve, which corresponds well to a model of laser beam screening by the ejected debris. However, with 1 ms long laser pulses, the ablation tunes up at laser fluences above 4 J/cm2 only gradually, reaching differential ablation efficiency similar as in previous cases at fluence values several times higher than the ablation threshold value. An estimate of this 'second threshold' fluence and the pulselengths at which it should in general be observed are derived from a simple model of heat diffusion and ablation front dynamics.

  12. Laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation for shock wave loading: validation and applications.

    PubMed

    Paisley, Dennis L; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Greenfield, Scott R; Koskelo, Aaron C

    2008-02-01

    We present validation and some applications of two laser-driven shock wave loading techniques: laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation. We characterize the flyer plate during flight and the dynamically loaded target with temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics. With transient imaging displacement interferometry, we demonstrate that the planarity (bow and tilt) of the loading induced by a spatially shaped laser pulse is within 2-7 mrad (with an average of 4+/-1 mrad), similar to that in conventional techniques including gas gun loading. Plasma heating of target is negligible, in particular, when a plasma shield is adopted. For flyer plate loading, supported shock waves can be achieved. Temporal shaping of the drive pulse in confined laser ablation allows for flexible loading, e.g., quasi-isentropic, Taylor-wave, and off-Hugoniot loading. These techniques can be utilized to investigate such dynamic responses of materials as Hugoniot elastic limit, plasticity, spall, shock roughness, equation of state, phase transition, and metallurgical characteristics of shock-recovered samples. PMID:18315311

  13. Laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation for shock wave loading: Validation and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Luo Shengnian; Greenfield, Scott R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.

    2008-02-15

    We present validation and some applications of two laser-driven shock wave loading techniques: laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation. We characterize the flyer plate during flight and the dynamically loaded target with temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics. With transient imaging displacement interferometry, we demonstrate that the planarity (bow and tilt) of the loading induced by a spatially shaped laser pulse is within 2-7 mrad (with an average of 4{+-}1 mrad), similar to that in conventional techniques including gas gun loading. Plasma heating of target is negligible, in particular, when a plasma shield is adopted. For flyer plate loading, supported shock waves can be achieved. Temporal shaping of the drive pulse in confined laser ablation allows for flexible loading, e.g., quasi-isentropic, Taylor-wave, and off-Hugoniot loading. These techniques can be utilized to investigate such dynamic responses of materials as Hugoniot elastic limit, plasticity, spall, shock roughness, equation of state, phase transition, and metallurgical characteristics of shock-recovered samples.

  14. Evaluation of the cavity margins after Er:YAG laser ablation of the enamel and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Krejsa, Otakar; Jelinkova, Helena; Hamal, Karel

    1994-12-01

    This study investigates the checks of cavity margin after enamel and dentin ablation. The Er:YAG laser enamel and dentin ablation can be directly connected with the danger of cracks originating in the enamel near the cavity. This study evaluates the quality of the enamel edges after Er:YAG laser preparation. The enamel and dentin of buccal surfaces were ablated by the Er:YAG laser radiation. An Erbium:YAG laser system with the energy of 200 mJ was used to generate 200 microsecond(s) long pulses of mid-infrared 2.94 micrometers light in multimode configuration. The laser was operating in a free running mode, the repetition rate being 0.5 Hz with average laser power of 100 mW. Laser radiation was focused on the tooth tissue. Water cooling was used during the procedure in order to prevent tooth tissue destruction. The time of laser preparation was 5 minutes. A cavity of class V was prepared. The teeth were immersed into 0.5% basic fuchsin and then centrifuged at 6000 rev/min for 20 minutes. The microphotographs of the margins stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin were made and then the longitudinal section of the teeth were evaluated. The micrographs of the longitudinal section were checked and measured afterwards. The effect of the investigated laser irradiation on the origin of cracks was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. Micrographs of each tooth before and after the laser ablation were compared. Micrographs of the intact teeth after extraction present the cracks of the enamel. They depend on the pressure exerted during extraction. The influence of the laser ablation proper is it bears no signs of new cracks. The conclusions of this study demonstrate the non-invasive nature of the Er:YAG laser ablation of the hard dental tissues.

  15. Synthesis of Bimetallic Nanoalloy Layer using Simultaneous Laser Ablation of Monometallic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjali, Mansoureh; Ganjali, Monireh; Sangpour, Parvaneh

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed to synthesize silver-gold alloy nanoparticles by direct pulsed laser ablation of joined Ag and Au monometallic targets. To avoid utilizing a high-vacuum chamber, this pulsed laser-assisted technique is performed in an isolated beaker containing pure helium gas at atmospheric pressure. The structure and formation mechanism of the homogeneous Ag-Au nanoalloy particles on the Si substrate surface are discussed. Here, as in other works, the formation of the Ag-Au alloy nanoparticles was verified by the appearance of a surface plasmon absorption maximum at 442 nm between the surface plasmon resonance peaks of the corresponding monometallic particles, and by results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on data of UV-visible spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis, the atomic contents of Ag and Au are determined in the nanoalloy particles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the synthesized semispherical nanoalloy particles, 5-35 nm in diameter, with a narrow particle size distribution. The related morphology, structure, and chemical composition are also investigated using atomic force microscopy, lateral force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The suggested approach is affordable, fast, and inexpensive.

  16. Formation of rubrene nanocrystals by laser ablation in liquids utilizing MAPLE deposited thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Sean M.; Amin, Mitesh; Borchert, James; Jimenez, Richard; Steiner, Matt; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Bubb, Daniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of the organic semiconductor rubrene were formed utilizing the laser ablation in liquids (LAL) method. Thin-films deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) served as the ablation targets. We note in the case of amorphous films targets, the absorbed energy is below the threshold value needed for ablation; though polycrystalline films irradiated under the same LAL conditions result in ejecta. It is suggested this stems from an increase in the effective absorption through light trapping within crystalline domains. An observed red-shift in the absorption edge is attributed to the polar aqueous environment and to the crystalline phase.

  17. Effect of oblique force source induced by laser ablation on ultrasonic generation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuning; Yang, Dexing; Chang, Ying; Gao, Wei

    2014-01-13

    The effect of asymmetry caused by oblique line-shaped laser ablation on the generation of ultrasonic waves in metal, especially the effect of transverse component of the ablation force source on the ultrasonic waves is analyzed. Due to the oblique force source, the displacements of shear wave increase obviously by the enhanced shear force, the energy concentration area of longitudinal wave deflects to the small range centered on the incident direction while that of shear wave is approximately perpendicular to incident direction. In addition, surface wave enhances in the direction of transverse power flow. Furthermore, some ultrasonic characteristics under vortex laser ablation condition are inferred. PMID:24514978

  18. A model for thermal ablation of biological tissue using laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Partovi, F; Izatt, J A; Cothren, R M; Kittrell, C; Thomas, J E; Strikwerda, S; Kramer, J R; Feld, M S

    1987-01-01

    We present a theory of thermal laser ablation based on the heat equation and on an energy balance equation derived from it. Ablation is assumed to be brought about by the heating and evaporation of tissue water. The model is three-dimensional, and scattering and the water-steam phase transition are explicitly taken into account. The model predicts threshold parameters and a steady-state ablation velocity in terms of the optical and thermal properties of the tissue and the laser beam intensity and spot diameter. PMID:3613805

  19. Characterization of excimer laser ablation generated pepsin particles using multi-wavelength photoacoustic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Kecskeméti, G.; Smausz, T.; Ajtai, T.; Filep, A.; Utry, N.; Kohut, A.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2012-05-01

    Preparation of organic thin layers on various special substrates using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique is an important task from the point of view of bioengineering and biosensor technologies. Earlier studies demonstrated that particle ejection starts during the ablating laser pulse resulting in significant shielding effects which can influence the real fluence on the target surface and consequently the efficiency of layer preparation. In this study, we introduce a photoacoustic absorption measurement technique for in-situ characterization of ablated particles during PLD experiments. A KrF excimer laser beam ( ?=248 nm, FWHM=18 ns) was focused onto pepsin targets in a PLD chamber; the applied laser fluences were 440 and 660 mJ/cm2. We determined the wavelength dependence of optical absorption and mass specific absorption coefficient of laser ablation generated pepsin aerosols in the UV-VIS-NIR range. On the basis of our measurements, we calculated the absorbance at the ablating laser wavelength, too. We demonstrated that when the laser ablation generated pepsin aerosols spread through the whole PLD chamber the effect of absorptivity is negligible for the subsequent pulses. However, the interaction of the laser pulse and the just formed particle cloud generated by the same pulse is more significant.

  20. Initial stage of laser ablation of LiCaAlF6 single crystal under F2 laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Narazaki, A.; Sato, T.; Kurosaki, R.; Niino, H.; Sato, H.; Fukuda, T.

    Initial stage of F2 laser ablation of LiCaAlF6 single crystal was investigated for clarifying the possibility of applying this wide bandgap fluoride crystal to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) optical components. The ablation threshold, determined by the appearance of line emission from ablated species, was approximately 2 Jcm-2pulse-1, similar to that of VUV grade CaF2 single crystal. The laser-induced damage on the front surface of LiCaAlF6 was faint, though adhesion of aggregated particulates of several microns was observed.

  1. Fabrication of nanoparticles and nanostructures using ultrafast laser ablation of silver with Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Hamad, Syed; Ahamad Mohiddon, Md; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2015-03-01

    Ablation of silver targets immersed in double distilled water (DDW)/acetone was performed with first order, non-diffracting Bessel beams generated by focusing ultrashort Gaussian pulses (~2 and ~40?fs) through an Axicon. The fabricated Ag dispersions were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and the nanostructured Ag targets were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Ag colloids prepared with ~2?ps laser pulses at various input pulse energies of ~400, ~600, ~800 and ~1000?µJ demonstrated similar localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks appearing near 407?nm. Analogous behavior was observed for Ag colloids prepared in acetone and ablated with ~40?fs pulses, wherein the LSPR peak was observed near 412?nm prepared with input energies of ~600, ~800 and ~1000?µJ. Observed parallels in LSPR peaks, average size of NPs, plasmon bandwidths are tentatively explained using cavitation bubble dynamics and simultaneous generation/fragmentation of NPs under the influence of Bessel beam. Fabricated Ag nanostructures in both the cases demonstrated strong enhancement factors (>106) in surface enhanced Raman scattering studies of the explosive molecule CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-Hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) at 5??M concentration.

  2. Treatment planning for prostate focal laser ablation in the face of needle placement uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Cepek, Jeremy Fenster, Aaron; Lindner, Uri; Trachtenberg, John; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Haider, Masoom A.; Ghai, Sangeet

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To study the effect of needle placement uncertainty on the expected probability of achieving complete focal target destruction in focal laser ablation (FLA) of prostate cancer. Methods: Using a simplified model of prostate cancer focal target, and focal laser ablation region shapes, Monte Carlo simulations of needle placement error were performed to estimate the probability of completely ablating a region of target tissue. Results: Graphs of the probability of complete focal target ablation are presented over clinically relevant ranges of focal target sizes and shapes, ablation region sizes, and levels of needle placement uncertainty. In addition, a table is provided for estimating the maximum target size that is treatable. The results predict that targets whose length is at least 5 mm smaller than the diameter of each ablation region can be confidently ablated using, at most, four laser fibers if the standard deviation in each component of needle placement error is less than 3 mm. However, targets larger than this (i.e., near to or exceeding the diameter of each ablation region) require more careful planning. This process is facilitated by using the table provided. Conclusions: The probability of completely ablating a focal target using FLA is sensitive to the level of needle placement uncertainty, especially as the target length approaches and becomes greater than the diameter of ablated tissue that each individual laser fiber can achieve. The results of this work can be used to help determine individual patient eligibility for prostate FLA, to guide the planning of prostate FLA, and to quantify the clinical benefit of using advanced systems for accurate needle delivery for this treatment modality.

  3. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  4. Applications of lasers to the solution of environmental problems

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.; Pang, H.-M.; Edelson, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    This presentation will focus on current work in the Ames Laboratory where laser ablation is being used for both analytical sampling and metal surface cleaning. Examples will be presented demonstrating the utility of optical spectroscopy for monitoring laser ablation processes.

  5. Laser ablation of atherosclerotic blood vessel tissue under various irradiation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Esenaliev, R.O.; Oraevsky, A.A.; Letokhov, V.S.

    1989-12-01

    A quantitative analysis is presented of the destruction of normal wall and atherosclerotic plaque areas of blood vessels by laser radiation. Threshold laser radiant exposure values were measured experimentally in vitro, along with the ablation efficiency for various laser wavelengths and irradiation conditions. Correlations were found between the ablation efficiency and fluence thresholds on the one hand and the optical properties of the blood vessel tissues on the other. Fibrous plaque was demonstrated to be selectively destroyed by the second-harmonic output from a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at lambda = 532 nm.

  6. Study on the productivity of silicon nanoparticles by picosecond laser ablation in water: towards gram per hour yield.

    PubMed

    Intartaglia, Romuald; Bagga, Komal; Brandi, Fernando

    2014-02-10

    An investigation on the productivity of silicon nanoparticles by picosecond laser ablation in water is presented. A systematic experimental study is performed as function of the laser wavelength, fluence and ablation time. In case of ablation at 1064 nm silicon nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 40 nm are produced. Instead, ablation at 355 nm results in nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 9 nm for short ablation time while the mean diameter decreases to 3 nm at longer ablation time. An original model based on the in-situ ablation/photo-fragmentation physical process is developed, and it very well explains the experimental productivity findings. The reported phenomenological model has a general validity, and it can be applied to analyze pulsed laser ablation in liquid in order to optimize the process parameters for higher productivity. Finally, an outlook is given towards gram per hour yield of ultra-small silicon nanoparticles. PMID:24663602

  7. Laser Spectroscopy for Atmospheric and Environmental Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Fiddler, Marc N.; Begashaw, Israel; Mickens, Matthew A.; Collingwood, Michael S.; Assefa, Zerihun; Bililign, Solomon

    2009-01-01

    Lasers and laser spectroscopic techniques have been extensively used in several applications since their advent, and the subject has been reviewed extensively in the last several decades. This review is focused on three areas of laser spectroscopic applications in atmospheric and environmental sensing; namely laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), and photoluminescence (PL) techniques used in the detection of solids, liquids, aerosols, trace gases, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). PMID:22303184

  8. Transmission of 1064 nm laser radiation during ablation with an ultra-short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelle, Florian; Meister, Jörg; Oehme, Bernd; Frentzen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    During ablation of oral hard tissue with an USPL system a small amount of the incident laser power does not contribute to the ablation process and is being transmitted. Partial transmission of ultra-short laser pulses could potentially affect the dental pulp. The aim of this study was to assess the transmission during ablation and to deduce possible risks for the patient. The study was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser, emitting pulses with a duration of 8 ps at a wavelength of 1064 nm. A repetition rate of 500 kHz and an average power of 9 W were chosen to achieve high ablation efficiency. A scanner system created square cavities with an edge length of 1 mm. Transmission during ablation of mammoth ivory and dentin slices with a thickness of 2 mm and 5 mm was measured with a power meter, placed directly beyond the samples. Effects on subjacent blood were observed by ablating specimens placed in contact to pork blood. In a separate measurement the temperature increase during ablation was monitored using an infrared camera. The influence of transmission was assessed by tuning down the laser to the corresponding power and then directly irradiating the blood. Transmission during ablation of 2 mm specimens was about 7.7% (ivory) and 9.6% (dentin) of the incident laser power. Ablation of specimens directly in contact to blood caused coagulation at longer irradiation times (t~18s). Direct irradiation of blood with the transmitted power provoked bubbling and smoke formation. Temperature measurements identified heat generation as the main reason for the observed coagulation.

  9. Laser Ablation as Treatment Strategy for Medically Refractory Dominant Insular Epilepsy – Therapeutic and Functional Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Hogan, R. Edward; Werner, Nicole; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction to neurosurgery in 2008, laser ablative techniques have been largely confined to the management of unresectable tumors. Application of this technology for the management of focal epilepsy in the adult population has not been fully explored. Given that nearly 1,000,000 Americans live with medically refractory epilepsy and current surgical techniques only address a fraction of epileptic pathologies, additional therapeutic options are needed. We report the successful treatment of dominant insular epilepsy in a 53 year-old male with minimally-invasive laser ablation complicated by mild verbal and memory deficits. We also report neuropsychological test data on this patient before surgery and at 8-months after the ablation procedure. This account represents the first reported successful patient outcome of laser ablation as an effective treatment option for medically refractory post-stroke epilepsy in an adult. PMID:25359500

  10. Ablation and analysis of small cell populations and single cells by consecutive laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Nemes, Peter; Vertes, Akos

    2010-10-01

    Laser ablation of single cells through a sharpened optical fiber is used for the detection of metabolites by laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry (MS). Ablation of the same Allium cepa epidermal cell by consecutive pulses indicates the rupture of the cell wall by the second shot. Intracellular sucrose heterogeneity is detected by subsequent laser pulses pointing to rupturing the vacuolar membrane by the third exposure. Ion production by bursts of laser pulses shows that the drying of ruptured A. cepa cells occurs in ˜50 s at low pulse rates (10 pulses/s bursts) and significantly faster at high pulse rates (100 pulses/s bursts). These results point to the competing role of cytoplasm ejection and evaporative drying in diminishing the LAESI-MS signal in ˜50 s or 100 laser pulses, whichever occurs first.

  11. The effects of pulse duration on ablation pressure driven by laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Xiao-Ya Zhu, Wen-Jun; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Tang, Chang-Jian

    2015-03-28

    The effects of laser pulse duration on the ablation pressure induced by laser radiation are investigated using Al target. Numerical simulation results using one dimensional radiation hydro code for laser intensities from 5×10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} to 5×10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2} and pulse durations from 0.5?ns to 20?ns are presented. These results suggest that the laser intensity scaling law of ablation pressure differs for different pulse durations. And the theoretical analysis shows that the effects of laser pulse duration on ablation pressure are mainly caused by two regimes: the unsteady-state flow and the radiative energy loss to vacuum.

  12. Prediction of the ablation effect of ultrapulsed CO2 laser systems in clinical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; van Swol, Christiaan F. P.

    1997-06-01

    Despite the superficial penetration of the light, the continuous wave (cw) CO2 laser may induce a relatively large area of thermal damage in tissue next to the ablation crater. Ultra-pulsed laser systems, however, deliver pulse energies above the ablation threshold for tissue within a few hundred microsecond(s) , which instantly vaporize tissue. Since cw ablation models cannot be applied on pulsed ablation, a new model is introduced which is validated experimentally on phantom tissue. It discriminates between the cross section of the laser beam above the ablation threshold and the flanks of beam below threshold inducing thermal effects. Depending on pulse energy and beam diameter, the shape of the ablation crater in the tissue was calculated and validated experimentally in phantom tissue using a pulsed CO2 laser and an Erbium laser. The diameter of the spot varied from 0.1 to 2.5 mm and the pulse energy from 25 to 250 mJ, 10-100 mJ. In the experimental crater depths up to 40 mm could be obtained in one pulse. The theoretical model agreed within 10 to 50 percent with the experimental data for spot sizes form 0.5 to 0.1 mm for the CO2 laser. Although, the thermal effect of these pulses are minimal compared to cw lasers, the sub-threshold part of the laser beam can contribute to undesired thermal damage when repetitive pulses are applied within the thermal relaxation time. The model can serve as a good tool for predicting the depth of ablation for current clinical applications in dermatology, ENT and cardiac-surgery.

  13. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant materials.

  14. Compact And Robust Laser Impulse Measurement Device, With Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kremeyer, Kevin; Lapeyre, John; Hamann, Steven

    2008-04-28

    An impulse measurement device and analysis package was conceived, designed, constructed, tested, and demonstrated to be capable of: measuring nanoNewton-seconds to milliNewton-seconds of impulse due to laser-ablation; being transported as carry-on baggage; set-up and tear-down times of less than an hour; target exchange times of less than two minutes (targets can be ablated at multiple positions for thousands of shots); measurements in air and in vacuum; error of just a few percent; repeatability over a wide range of potential systematic error sources; and time between measurements, including ring-down and analysis, of less than 30 seconds. The instrument consists of a cantilever (i.e. leaf spring), whose time-dependent displacement/oscillation is measured and analyzed to determine the impulse imparted by a laser pulse to a target. These shapes are readily/commercially available, and any target material can be used, provided it can be fashioned in the form of a cantilever, or as a coating/film/tape, suitable for mounting on a cantilever of known geometry. The instrument was calibrated both statically and dynamically, and measurements were performed on brass, steel, and Aluminum, using laser pulses of {approx}7 ns, {approx}500 ps, and {approx}500 fs. The results agree well with those published in the literature, with surface effects, atmosphere, and pre-/post-pulses demonstrating interesting effects and indicating areas for further study. These parameters should be carefully controlled and held constant during a series of measurements. The impulse imparted by ablation due to laser filaments in air was also explored.

  15. Standard addition method for laser ablation ICPMS using a spinning platform.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Fanny; Malherbe, Julien; Bier, Naomi; Molloy, John L; Long, Stephen E

    2013-04-01

    A method has been developed for the fast and easy determination of Pb, Sr, Ba, Ni, Cu, and Zn, which are of geological and environmental interest, in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) using a spinning sample platform. The platform, containing a sample and a standard, is spun during the ablation, allowing the quasi-simultaneous ablation of both materials. The aerosols resulting from the ablation of sample and standard were mixed in the ablation cell allowing quantification of analytes by standard additions. The proportion of standard versus sample of the mixing can be increased by performing the ablation further from the axis of rotation. The ablated masses have been determined using a new strategy based on isotope dilution analysis. This spinning laser ablation method has been applied to the Allende meteorite and four powdered standard reference materials (SRMs) fused in lithium borate glasses: two sediments as well as a soil and a rock material. SRM 612 (Trace Elements in Glass) was also analyzed despite having a matrix slightly different from the glass standard obtained by lithium borate fusion. The deviation from the certified values was found to be less than 15% for most of the mass fractions for all the elements and samples studied, with an average precision of 10%. These results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method for the direct and fast analysis of solid samples of different matrixes by standard additions, using a single standard sample. PMID:23418996

  16. Synthesis and characterization of gold graphene composite with dyes as model substrates for decolorization: a surfactant free laser ablation approach.

    PubMed

    Sai Siddhardha, R S; Lakshman Kumar, V; Kaniyoor, Adarsh; Sai Muthukumar, V; Ramaprabhu, S; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, A M; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2014-12-10

    A facile surfactant free laser ablation mediated synthesis (LAMS) of gold-graphene composite is reported here. The material was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, powdered X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Zeta potential measurements and UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques. The as-synthesized gold-graphene composite was effectively utilized as catalyst for decolorization of 4 important textile and laser dyes. The integration of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with high surface area graphene has enhanced the catalytic activity of AuNPs. This enhanced activity is attributed to the synergistic interplay of pristine gold's electronic relay and ?-? stacking of graphene with the dyes. This is evident when the Rhodamine B (RB) reduction rate of the composite is nearly twice faster than that of commercial citrate capped AuNPs of similar size. In case of Methylene blue (MB) the rate of reduction is 17,000 times faster than uncatalyzed reaction. This synthetic method opens door to laser ablation based fabrication of metal catalysts on graphene for improved performance without the aid of linkers and surfactants. PMID:24967542

  17. Synthesis and characterization of gold graphene composite with dyes as model substrates for decolorization: A surfactant free laser ablation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Siddhardha, R. S.; Lakshman Kumar, V.; Kaniyoor, Adarsh; Sai Muthukumar, V.; Ramaprabhu, S.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, A. M.; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2014-12-01

    A facile surfactant free laser ablation mediated synthesis (LAMS) of gold-graphene composite is reported here. The material was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, powdered X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Zeta potential measurements and UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques. The as-synthesized gold-graphene composite was effectively utilized as catalyst for decolorization of 4 important textile and laser dyes. The integration of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with high surface area graphene has enhanced the catalytic activity of AuNPs. This enhanced activity is attributed to the synergistic interplay of pristine gold's electronic relay and ?-? stacking of graphene with the dyes. This is evident when the Rhodamine B (RB) reduction rate of the composite is nearly twice faster than that of commercial citrate capped AuNPs of similar size. In case of Methylene blue (MB) the rate of reduction is 17,000 times faster than uncatalyzed reaction. This synthetic method opens door to laser ablation based fabrication of metal catalysts on graphene for improved performance without the aid of linkers and surfactants.

  18. High Spatial Resolution Fe isotope analysis by femtosecond Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C.; Beard, B. L.; d'Abzac, F.

    2013-12-01

    In-situ isotopic analysis of geological samples has shown the importance of retrieving isotopic information on the micron scale from isolated mineral grains in complex samples or those that contain multiple isotopic components. Recent studies of magnetite, hematite, and pyrite using femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) report sampled volumes (Vs) down to ~6×103?m3, with internal and external reproducibility of ~0.12‰ (2SE) and ~0.20‰ (2SD) respectively [1-3]. We have improved the spatial resolution of fs-LA measurements by a factor of ~10 with the same analytical uncertainty as that cited above. These improvements were made by: (1) using a more efficient ablation cell and (2) improving the electronics of the Faraday detectors. Two cell geometries manufactured by Photon Machines (San Diego, CA, USA) have been studied for aerosol Particle Size Distribution (PSD) and Fe isotope composition under He gas flows of ~0.6L.min-1: the Frame cell (~20cc, ~2s washout time) and the two volumes HelEx cell (inner volume ~7cc, ~0.7s washout time). The measured PSDs are independent of the substrate (hematite, magnetite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, and siderite) or the laser wavelength (?=198 and 263nm). The Frame cell produced a monomodal PSD, centered on an aerodynamic diameter (da) of ~0.25?m, whereas the HelEx cell produced a bi-modal PSD with peaks at da<0.056?m and 0.14?m. The finer aerosols produced by the HelEx cell are interpreted to reflect its faster extraction, limiting collisions and agglomeration, as well as inhomogeneous transport losses and attendant incomplete ionization in the plasma torch. LA-MC-ICP-MS analyses of magnetite using the Frame cell (Vs~1.5×104?m3, 40×10s on peak integrations) yield internal and external precisions of 0.12‰ (2SE) and 0.25‰ (2SD, n=61) respectively [1]. In contrast, the HelEx cell (Vs~5.5×103mm3, 40×5s on peak integrations) provides internal and external precisions of 0.10‰ (2SE) and 0.20‰ (2SD, n=115). A new generation of high-ohm resistors boards (IsotopX, Middlewich, UK) for Faraday detectors has been evaluated, using a 1010ohm resistor for 56Fe and 1011ohm for 54Fe. The new setup improved internal precision for conventional analysis by ~33%, and precision is independent of the on-peak integration time between 1 and 10s. The same improvement is noted for fs-LA using the HelEx cell, where spatial resolution entirely depends on the acquisition time. Hence, we were able to reduce Vs to ~6×102?m3 by performing analyses over only 50s (1s on peak integration), which still yields internal and external precisions of 0.11‰ (2SE) and 0.28‰ (2SD, n=28). In conclusion, and considering similar internal and external precisions, reducing the particle residence time in the ablation cell improves the spatial resolution by a factor of ~3. On the other hand, being able to integrate the signal over only 1s cycles improves the spatial resolution by a factor of ~9 with the same precisions as the currently published data. 1. Czaja, A.D., et al., Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 2013. 363: p. 192-203. 2. Steinhoefel, G., et al., Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 2009. 73(18): p. 5343-5360. 3. Yoshiya, K., et al., Precambrian Research, 2012. 212-213: p. 169-193.

  19. Bone-ablation mechanism using CO2 lasers of different pulse duration and wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrer, M.; Frenz, M.; Romano, V.; Altermatt, H. J.; Weber, H. P.; Silenok, A.; Istomyn, M.; Konov, V. I.

    1993-02-01

    Bone ablation using different pulse parameters and four emission lines of 9.3, 9.6, 10.3, and 10.6 ?m of the CO2 laser exhibits effects which are caused by the thermal properties and the absorption spectrum of bone material. The ablation mechanism was investigated with light- and electron-microscopy at short laser-pulse durations of 0.9 and 1.8 ?s and a long pulse of 250 ?s. It is shown that different processes are responsible for the ablation mechanism either using the short or the long pulse durations. In the case of short pulse durations it is shown that, although the mineral components are the main absorber for CO2 radiation, water is the driving force for the ablation process. The destruction of material is based on explosive evaporation of water with an ablation energy of 1.3 kJ/cm3. Histological examination revealed a minimal zone of 10 15 ?m of thermally altered material at the bottom of the laser drilled hole. Within the investigated spectral range we found that the ablation threshold at 9.3 and 9.6 ?m is lower than at 10.3 and 10.6 ?m. In comparison the ablation with a long pulse duration is determined by two processes. On the one side, the heat lost by heat conduction leads to carbonization of a surface layer, and the absorption of the CO2 radiation in this carbonized layer is the driving force of the ablation process. On the other side, it is shown that up to 60% of the pulse energy is absorbed in the ablation plume. Therefore, a long pulse duration results in an eight-times higher specific ablation energy of 10 kJ/cm3.

  20. Gold fingerprinting by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watling, R. John; Herbert, Hugh K.; Delev, Dianne; Abell, Ian D.

    1994-02-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been applied to the characterization of the trace element composition "fingerprint" of selected gold samples from Western Australia and South Africa. By comparison of the elemental associations it is possible to relate gold to a specific mineralizing event, mine or bullion sample. This methodology facilitates identification of the provenance of stolen gold or gold used in salting activities. In this latter case, it is common for gold from a number of sources to be used in the salting process. Consequently, gold in the prospect being salted will not come from a single source and identification of multiple sources for this gold will establish that salting has occurred. Preliminary results also indicate that specific elemental associations could be used to identify the country of origin of gold. The technique has already been applied in 17 cases involving gold theft in Western Australia, where it is estimated that up to 2% of gold production is "relocated" each year as a result of criminal activities.

  1. Toward laser ablation Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. Pardo; F. G. Kondev; S. Kondrashev; C. Nair; T. Palchan; R. Scott; D. Seweryniak; R. Vondrasek; M. Paul; P. Collon; C. Deibel; M. Salvatores; G. Palmiotti; J. Berg; J. Fonnesbeck; G. Imel

    2013-01-01

    A project to measure neutron capture cross sections of a number of actinides in a reactor environment by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the ATLAS facility of Argonne National Laboratory is underway. This project will require the precise and accurate measurement of produced actinide isotopes in many (>30) samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory with neutron fluxes having different energy distributions. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highlycharged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac and mass-to-charge (m/q) measurement at the focus of the Fragment Mass Analyzer. Laser ablation was selected as the method of feeding the actinide material into the ion source because we expect it will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than either the oven or sputtering techniques, because of a much narrower angular distribution of emitted material. In addition, a new multi-sample holder/changer to allow quick change between samples and a computer-controlled routine allowing fast tuning of the accelerator for different beams, are being developed. An initial test run studying backgrounds, detector response, and accelerator scaling repeatability was conducted in December 2010. The project design, schedule, and results of the initial test run to study backgrounds are discussed.

  2. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Marcos S.; Schenk, Emily R.; Santos, Dário; Krug, Francisco José; Almirall, José R.

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg- 1 for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg- 1 for K but were generally below 6 mg kg- 1 for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ~ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ~ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis.

  3. One-step synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite coatings by novel laser adaptive ablation deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbezov, Valery; Sotirov, Sotir

    2013-03-01

    A novel approach for one-step synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite coatings by new modification of Pulsed Laser Deposition technology called Laser Adaptive Ablation Deposition (LAAD) is presented. Hybrid nanocomposite coatings including Mg- Rapamycin and Mg- Desoximetasone were produced by UV TEA N2 laser under low vacuum (0.1 Pa) and room temperature onto substrates from SS 316L, KCl and NaCl. The laser fluence for Mg alloy was 1, 8 J/cm2 and for Desoximetasone 0,176 J/cm2 and for Rapamycin 0,118 J/cm2 were respectively. The threedimensional two-segmented single target was used to adapt the interaction of focused laser beam with inorganic and organic material. Magnesium alloy nanoparticles with sizes from 50 nm to 250 nm were obtained in organic matrices. The morphology of nanocomposites films were studied by Bright field / Fluorescence optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements were applied in order to study the functional properties of organic component before and after the LAAD process. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) was used for identification of Mg alloy presence in hybrid nanocomposites coatings. The precise control of process parameters and particularly of the laser fluence adjustment enables transfer on materials with different physical chemical properties and one-step synthesis of complex inorganic- organic nanocomposites coatings.

  4. Quantitative solid sample analysis by ArF excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; von Oldershausen, Georg

    2005-06-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser Ablation in combination with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  5. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 ?J were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  6. Comparison between geometrically focused pulses versus filaments in femtosecond laser ablation of steel and titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Anthony; Munson, Chase; Porwitzky, Andrew; Weidman, Matthew; Richardson, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Kerr self-focusing of high-power ultrashort laser pulses in atmosphere may result in a structure or structures of high intensity that can propagate over long distances with little divergence. Filamentation has garnered significant interest in the nonlinear optics community due to its unique properties. Salient features of filaments include a central region of intense laser power (greater than the ionization threshold of the propagation medium) and a low temperature plasma column that lasts up to nanoseconds in duration after the passage of the laser pulse. Steel and titanium samples are ablated by filaments and by sharply focused sub-picosecond laser pulses. We then performed metrology on the samples to compare the ablation features in addition to modeling of the plasma ablation process. Ablation with filaments leads to a wider range of material responses as compared to ablation with sharply focused pulse. This results in potential complications for applications of filament ablation that depends on the rate of material removal and spectroscopic analysis.

  7. Submicron surface patterning by laser ablation with short UV pulses using a proximity phase mask setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchers, B.; Bekesi, J.; Simon, P.; Ihlemann, J.

    2010-03-01

    A new approach for the generation of large-area periodic surface structures on different materials, like polymers and semiconductors, by direct laser ablation is presented. The surfaces were illuminated with the interference pattern emerging in close proximity behind a laser irradiated phase mask. In the experiments, nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses at 248 nm were applied. To prevent contamination or damage of the phase mask caused by the ablated material, the mask is protected by a thin water film or a thin quartz plate. In addition we present a technique to eliminate a lateral variation of the generated structures due to insufficient alignment precision of the workpiece.

  8. Production of fullerene ions by combining of plasma sputtering with laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, K. Saitoh, Y.; Yokota, W.

    2014-02-15

    We have produced C{sub 60} ion beams by combining plasma sputtering and laser ablation. A C{sub 60} sample was placed in an electron cyclotron resonance type ion source, negatively biased and sputtered by argon plasma. The beam current of C{sub 60}{sup +} decreased rapidly, but it was transiently recovered by a single laser shot that ablates the thin sample surface on the sputtered area. Temporal variations in beam current are reported in response to laser shots repeated at intervals of a few minutes.

  9. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength ?= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  10. Ignition Characteristics of GH2/GOx Mixture Using Laser Ablation Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Koichi; Kusaka, Kazuo; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Niino, Masayuki; Kmetik, Viliam; Nakano, Masakatsu; Takahashi, Hideaki; Nakajima, Shoji; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    The characteristics of a laser ablation igniter were investigated systematically. This kind of igniter is expected to realize a lightweight rocket engine system that consists of many combustion chambers, such as the Reaction Control System (RCS), without having heavy spark igniters. In this igniter, ignition is accomplished utilizing a high-temperature metal vapor produced by focusing a high-intensity laser pulse transmitted through an optical fiber. The laser ablation igniter was tested in a GH2/GOx thruster (dia. 1 cm). As a result, the minimum ignition energy was found to be lower than 2 mJ, and the required ignition energy decreased with increasing pressure in the combustion chamber.

  11. Comparative study of excimer and erbium:YAG lasers for ablation of structural components of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Miller, J. M.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1991-05-01

    This study was designed to compare the efficiency and thermal effect of a 135 ns pulsed-stretched XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) and a free-running Erbium:YAG laser (2940 nm) with 200 microsecond(s) pulse duration for ablation of knee joint structures (hyaline and fibrous cartilage, tendon and bone). The radiant exposure used for tissue ablation ranged from 2 to 15 J/cm2 for the XeCl excimer and from 33 to 120 J/cm2 for Er:YAG. The excimer and Er:YAG lasers were operated at 4 and 5 Hz respectively. The ablative laser energy was delivered to tissue through fibers. Ablation rates of soft tissues (hyaline and fibrous cartilage, tendon) varied from 8.5 to 203 micrometers /pulse for excimer and from 8.2 to 273 micrometers /pulse for Er:YAG lasers. Ablation rates of soft tissues are linearly dependent on the radiant exposure. Within the range of parameters tested all the tissues except the bone could be rapidly ablated by both lasers. Bone ablation was much less efficient, requiring 15 J/cm2 and 110 J/cm2 radiant exposure for excimer and Er:YAG lasers to ablate 9.5 and 8.2 micrometers tissue per pulse. However, excimer laser ablation produced less thermal damage in the tissues studied compared to Er:YAG at the same laser parameters. The authors conclude that both lasers are capable of efficient knee joint tissue ablation. XeCl excimer laser requires an order of magnitude less energy than Er:YAG laser for comparable tissue ablation.

  12. Emission features and expansion dynamics of nanosecond laser ablation plumes at different ambient pressures

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    :YAG laser. The emission and expansion dynamics of the plasma plumes were studied by varying air ambient the aerosols to ICP torch in LA-ICP-MS,11 and to confine the plume which enhances the optical emission in LIBS.12 The interaction of a nanosecond laser ablation plume with an ambient gas has been studied

  13. Tissue ablation by holmium:YSGG laser pulses through saline and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; Borst, Cornelius

    1991-06-01

    The use of 2.09 micrometers Ho-YSGG laser pulses for intra-vascular non- contact ablation of tissue has been investigated. Therefore the transmission and the temporal shape of the laser pulse transmitted through saline was measured. Also the interaction between the laser pulses (200 microsecond(s) FWHM) and saline was studied by time resolved flash photography. Finally, porcine aorta was ablated (in vitro) through either blood or saline. The lesions and adjacent tissue were examined histologically. The penetration depth (the depth for a decrease to 1/e of the transmitted energy) of the laser pulses in saline depended on the power density (0.01 to 12.4 J/mm2) and varied from 0.33 to 2.2 mm, respectively. The photography showed the development of a transparent water vapor cavity around the fiber tip (320 micrometers ) during the laser pulse. The maximum dimensions of the cavity varied as function of the intensity. Within the vapor cavity the laser pulse was undisturbed. Due to this 'Moses effect in the microsecond region' porcine aorta could be ablated through up to 3 mm of saline and blood. Especially after successive laser pulses, histology showed large fissures in adjacent tissue, presumably due to the expanding vapor cavity and the layered structure of the aorta. In conclusion, the formation of a vapor cavity during Holmium laser irradiation in physiological media enables non- contact tissue ablation and induces fissures into adjacent tissue, that may be undesirable.

  14. Vitreoretinal Ablation With the 193-nm Excimer Laser in Fluid Media

    E-print Network

    Palanker, Daniel

    Vitreoretinal Ablation With the 193-nm Excimer Laser in Fluid Media Daniel Palanker,* Itzhak Hemo membranes using the 193-nm argon fluoride excimer laser in a fluid medium. Methods. A special delivery is exerted on the tissue, occasionally inducing damage to the inner retinal layers, iatrogenic tears

  15. Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization for Atmospheric Pressure, in Vivo, and Imaging Mass

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization for Atmospheric Pressure, in Vivo, and Imaging Mass. For example, atmospheric pressure infrared MALDI (AP IR-MALDI), capable of producing ions from small ionization (DESI),5 desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI),6 and matrix- assisted laser

  16. Optimization of the temporal shape of laser pulses for ablation , E. Lorina,b

    E-print Network

    Lorin, Emmanuel

    Optimization of the temporal shape of laser pulses for ablation P. Turbisb , E. Lorina,b , A pulse shape can be experimentally designed, up to a certain time resolution, which is called a bin the optimization of the temporal pulse shape in order to improve the performance of specific industrial laser

  17. Processing condition influence on the characteristics of gold nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikov, R. G.; Nikolov, A. S.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Alexandrov, M. T.; Karashanova, D. B.

    2013-06-01

    A study is presented of Au nanoparticles (NPs) created by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a solid target in double distilled water. The influence was examined of the laser wavelength on the size, shape and optical properties of the resulting NPs. Three different wavelengths: the fundamental (? = 1064 nm), second (?SHG = 532) and third (?THG = 355) harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at the same fluence were utilized to produce various colloids. Ablation at the wavelength of 532 nm was investigated in more detail to reveal the influence of self-absorption by the already created NPs on their characteristics. The colloid produced was irradiated by ?irrad = 532 nm (laser energy 40 mJ) at different times up to 25 min after the end of ablation. The initial structure of welded NPs forming wires was modified. Transmission electron microscopy and optical transmission measurements were used to evaluate the shape and size distribution of the NPs.

  18. Laser ablation of micro-photonic structures for efficient light collection and distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobing; Desmet, Andres; De Smet, Jelle; Joshi, Pankaj; Cuypers, Dieter; Van Put, Steven; Van Steenberge, Geert; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; De Smet, Herbert

    2015-06-01

    In this work we report the fabrication of polymer micro-photonic gratings for use in liquid-crystal based actively tunable electro-optic components. The gratings are produced by moving the sample surface sideways across a perpendicularly impinging KrF excimer laser beam (???=??248 nm), which is shaped by specially designed triangular and trapezoidal masks. To obtain correctly dimensioned and smooth grating surfaces, different materials (SU-8, polycarbonate, Epoclad and Epocore) are subjected to the laser ablation with optimized laser processing parameters. The resulting grating structures on Epocore exhibit the best surface roughness and dimensional fidelity. Optionally, spacers for maintaining the cell gap of the superimposed liquid crystal layer can also be fabricated in the same process. Two different methods were demonstrated: overlapping ablation and double mask ablation. Micro-grating structures were produced that deflect a monochromatic (543 nm) laser beam to the theoretically predicted 11th order with an angle of 7°.

  19. Dentin ablation-rate measurements in endodontics witj HF and CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Khabbaz, Marouan; Sykaras, Sotirios; Tsikrikas, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the ability of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy. The aim of this research is the experimental and theoretical study of the ablation rate of two infrared laser wavelengths on dentin. Thirty freshly extracted human teeth were longitudinally sectioned at thicknesses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mm, and irradiated on the root canal dentin. The measured ablation rates in dentinal wall of the root canal showed that the HF laser at 2.9 micrometer can more effectively penetrate into the tissue, whereas the carbon dioxide laser at 10.6 micrometer leads to high thermal damage of the ablation crater surroundings.

  20. Mechanisms of nanoparticle formation by ultra-short laser ablation of metals in liquid environment.

    PubMed

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E; Itina, Tatiana E; Levashov, Pavel R; Khishchenko, Konstantin V

    2013-03-01

    Laser ablation in liquids is now commonly used to produce colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) that have found numerous applications in different areas. In experiments, NPs of different materials can be rather easily obtained by using laser systems with various pulse durations, shapes, wavelengths, and fluences. In this paper, we focus our attention on metal (gold) NPs produced by ultra-short laser pulses. To better understand the mechanisms of the NPs formation, we perform modeling of femtosecond laser interactions with a gold target in the presence of liquid (water). Simulation of the ablation process over several nanoseconds shows that most of the primary NPs originate from the ablated metastable liquid layer, whereas only a minority is formed by condensation inside the cavitation bubble. These particles will further grow/evaporate, and coagulate during a much longer collision stage in the liquid colloid. PMID:23319115

  1. Comparison the efficacy of ablative CO2 laser and fractional CO2 laser on the healing of cutaneous leishmaniasis scars

    PubMed Central

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Minaravesh, Shahriar; Jaffary, Fariba; Siadat, Amir Hossein; Haftbaradaran, Elaheh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to compare ablative CO2 laser with fractional CO2 laser on healing of the wound and the size of cutaneous leishmaniasis scars. Materials and Methods: This prospective randomized clinical trial study was done on 120 patients in two groups evaluated in Sedigheh Tahereh Hospital in Isfahan. The patients in case group underwent one session ablative CO2 laser for treatment of leishmaniasis scars and the patients in control group underwent six 3-weeks interval sessions fractional CO2 laser for treatment of leishmaniasis scars. All cases were evaluated from size and other aspects of scar by a questionnaire, and before and 6 months after photos were evaluated by blinded dermatologist. The data collected in the check list was then analyzed by t-test and Chi-square with SPSS 20. Results: There were 60 people in case group and 60 in control group. The mean age was 27.21 ± 11.2. Our results show that fractional CO2 laser is better than ablative CO2 laser in various aspect of treatment of leishmaniasis scars (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Fractional CO2 laser is better than ablative CO2 laser in variants aspect of treatment of leishmaniasis scars. PMID:25625098

  2. Elemental fractionation in 785 nm picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2015-05-01

    Elemental fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse width laser beams originating from the same laser system. Femtosecond and picosecond laser beams at pulse widths of 130 fs and 110 ps, respectively, and wavelength of 785 nm were used to ablate NIST 610 synthetic glass and SRM 1107 Naval Brass B at the same spot for 800 to 1000 laser pulses at different repetition rates (5 to 50 Hz). Elemental fractionation was found to depend on repetition rate and showed a trend with femtosecond laser ablation that is opposite to that observed in picosecond laser ablation for most measured isotopes. ICP-MS signal intensity was higher in femtosecond than picosecond LA-ICP-MS in both NIST 610 and naval brass when ablation was conducted under the same fluence and repetition rate. The differences in signal intensity were partly related to differences in particle size distribution between particles generated by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses and the consequent differences in transport and ionization efficiencies. The main reason for the higher signal intensity resulting from femtosecond laser pulses was related to the larger crater sizes compared to those created during picosecond laser ablation. Elemental ratios measured using 66Zn/63Cu, 208Pb/238U, 232Th/238U, 66Zn/232Th and 66Zn/208Pb were found to change with the number of laser pulses with data points being more scattered in picosecond than femtosecond laser pulses. Reproducibility of replicate measurements of signal intensities, fractionation and elemental ratios was better for fs-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 3 to 6%) than ps-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 7 to 11%).

  3. Laser ablation and photo-dissociation of solid-nitrogen film by UV ps-laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Yabe, Akira

    2002-09-01

    Nitrogen solid film deposited on a copper plate at 10 K was irradiated with a picosecond UV laser at 263 nm in vacuum. Photo-dissociation of nitrogen molecule in the solid film was confirmed by the optical emissions, which were ascribed to atomic nitrogen, during the laser irradiation at the fluence of 5 J cm -2 pulse -1. This photolysis was discussed by the comparison with laser-induced breakdown of nitrogen gas. At the fluence over ca. 10 J cm -2 pulse -1, the ablation of the frozen nitrogen film was observed. Employing the ablation plume including a reactive species such as nitrogen atoms, the surface reaction of a graphite (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)) plate and silicon wafer was studied. XPS analysis indicated that nitrides were formed on the surfaces by the treatment. The ps-laser ablation of nitrogen solid film provides a novel technique for surface modification of materials.

  4. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J. Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J.

    2014-09-15

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  5. Simultaneous observation of nascent plasma and bubble induced by laser ablation in water with various pulse durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Ayaka; Matsumoto, Ayumu; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the effects of pulse duration on the dynamics of the nascent plasma and bubble induced by laser ablation in water. To examine the relationship between the nascent plasma and the bubble without disturbed by shot-to-shot fluctuation, we observe the images of the plasma and the bubble simultaneously by using two intensified charge coupled device detectors. We successfully observe the images of the plasma and bubble during the pulsed-irradiation, when the bubble size is as small as 20 ?m. The light-emitting region of the plasma during the laser irradiation seems to exceed the bubble boundary in the case of the short-pulse (30-ns pulse) irradiation, while the size of the plasma is significantly smaller than that of the bubble in the case of the long-pulse (100-ns pulse) irradiation. The results suggest that the extent of the plasma quenching in the initial stage significantly depends on the pulse duration. Also, we investigate how the plasma-bubble relationship in the very early stage affects the shape of the atomic spectral lines observed at the later delay time of 600 ns. The present work gives important information to obtain high quality spectra in the application of underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, as well as to clarify the mechanism of liquid-phase laser ablation.

  6. Simultaneous observation of nascent plasma and bubble induced by laser ablation in water with various pulse durations

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Ayaka Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Fukami, Kazuhiro

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the effects of pulse duration on the dynamics of the nascent plasma and bubble induced by laser ablation in water. To examine the relationship between the nascent plasma and the bubble without disturbed by shot-to-shot fluctuation, we observe the images of the plasma and the bubble simultaneously by using two intensified charge coupled device detectors. We successfully observe the images of the plasma and bubble during the pulsed-irradiation, when the bubble size is as small as 20??m. The light-emitting region of the plasma during the laser irradiation seems to exceed the bubble boundary in the case of the short-pulse (30-ns pulse) irradiation, while the size of the plasma is significantly smaller than that of the bubble in the case of the long-pulse (100-ns pulse) irradiation. The results suggest that the extent of the plasma quenching in the initial stage significantly depends on the pulse duration. Also, we investigate how the plasma-bubble relationship in the very early stage affects the shape of the atomic spectral lines observed at the later delay time of 600?ns. The present work gives important information to obtain high quality spectra in the application of underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, as well as to clarify the mechanism of liquid-phase laser ablation.

  7. Comparing ablation induced by fs, ps, and ns XUV-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Michal; Juha, Libor; Chvostova, Dagmar; Letal, Vit; Krasa, Josef; Otcenasek, Zdenek; Kozlova, Michaela; Polan, Jiri; Praeg, Ansgar R.; Rus, Bedrich; Stupka, Michal; Krzywinski, Jacek; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Pelka, Jerzy B.; Sobierajski, Ryszard; Feldhaus, Josef; Boody, Frederick P.; Grisham, Michael E.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2004-09-01

    Ablation thresholds, etch rates, and quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically if a conventional, UV-Vis-IR laser delivers radiation energy onto a material surface in a short (nanosecond) or ultra-short (picosecond/femtosecond) pulses. Various short-wavelength (? < 100 nm) lasers emitting pulses with durations ranging from ~ 10 fs to ~ 1 ns have recently been put into a routine operation. This makes possible to investigate how the ablation characteristics depends on the pulse duration in the XUV spectral region. 1.2-ns pulses of 46.9-nm radiation delivered from a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser, focused by a spherical Sc/Si multilayer-coated mirror were used for an ablation of organic polymers and silicon. Various materials were irradiated with an ellipsoidal-mirror-focused XUV radiation (? = 86 nm, ? = 30-100 fs) generated by the free-electron laser (FEL) operated at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF1 FEL) in Hamburg. The beam of the Ne-like Zn XUV laser (? = 21.2 nm, ? < 100 ps) driven by the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) was also successfully focused by a spherical Si/Mo multilayer-coated mirror to ablate various materials. Based on the results of the experiment the etch rates for three different pulse durations are compared using the XUV-ABLATOR code to compensate for the wavelength difference. Comparing the values of etch rates calculated for short pulses with the measured ones for ultrashort pulses we may study the influence of pulse duration on the XUV ablation efficiency.

  8. Imaging of laser-induced strain in biological tissue: pulsed holmium laser ablation of bovine cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacretaz, Guy P.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.; Beghuin, Didier

    1998-01-01

    Laser ablation of tissue can be accompanied by deleterious training. A polaroscopic technique was used to image induced strain. In a bovine cornea model, we demonstrate that strain induced by a cavitation bubble occurs over an area larger than the bubble. Further, although the bubble lifetime is only about 400 microseconds and the cornea tissue is strained greatly by the expanding and collapsing bubble, there is substantial strain for several milliseconds after the bubble collapse. The results indicate the utility of polaroscopic imaging as well as the magnitude and spatial extent of mechanical events at times long after the initiating mechanical insult.

  9. Mass Spectrometric Imaging Using Laser Ablation and Solvent Capture by Aspiration (LASCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Jonathan I.; Beech, Iwona B.; Sunner, Jan

    2015-09-01

    A novel interface for ambient, laser ablation-based mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) referred to as laser ablation and solvent capture by aspiration (LASCA) is presented and its performance demonstrated using selected, unaltered biological materials. LASCA employs a pulsed 2.94 ?m laser beam for specimen ablation. Ablated materials in the laser plumes are collected on a hanging solvent droplet with electric field-enhanced trapping, followed by aspiration of droplets and remaining plume material in the form of a coarse aerosol into a collection capillary. The gas and liquid phases are subsequently separated in a 10 ?L-volume separatory funnel, and the solution is analyzed with electrospray ionization in a high mass resolution Q-ToF mass spectrometer. The LASCA system separates the sampling and ionization steps in MSI and combines high efficiencies of laser plume sampling and of electrospray ionization (ESI) with high mass resolution MS. Up to 2000 different compounds are detected from a single ablation spot (pixel). Using the LASCA platform, rapid (6 s per pixel), high sensitivity, high mass-resolution ambient imaging of "as-received" biological material is achieved routinely and reproducibly.

  10. Synthesis of nickel oxide nanoparticles using pulsed laser ablation in liquids and their optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, M. A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Drmosh, Q. A.

    2012-07-01

    Nanomaterials are of great interest due to their applications in many fields. The structural and efficacy of nano-materials depend strongly on the method applied for their synthesis. In this work, nanosized nickel oxide (NiO) particles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) technique in 3% H2O2 aqueous solution The structural and optical properties of the NiO were investigated by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). XRD analysis confirms that the phase is pure nickel oxide with lattice parameter = 0.42033 nm and 8 nm grain size while photoluminescence emission spectrum showed strong peak at 3.62 eV attributed to the band edge transition. FT-IR spectra depicts a strong band at ˜450 cm-1 which corresponds to the bending vibration of Ni-O bond. This work demonstrates that PLA is an effective method to control the size, impurity and minimal chemical waste generation which is the major problem with other wet chemical methods.

  11. Understanding plume splitting of laser ablated plasma: A view from ion distribution dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Wei, Wenfu; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-11-15

    Plume splitting in low-pressure ambient air was understood in view of ion distribution dynamics from the laser ablated Al plasma (1064 nm 0.57 J/mm{sup 2}) by combining fast photography and spatially resolved spectroscopy. In the beginning, the spectral lines were mainly from the Al III ion. Then, the Bragg peak in stopping power of the ambient gas to Al III could be the dominant reason for the enhanced emission from the fast moving part, and the recombination of Al III to Al I-II ions near the target surface was response to the radiations from the slow moving/stationary part. As the ambient gas pressure increased, stopping distances of the Al III decreased, and radiation from the air ions became pronounced. The laser shadowgraph image at 1100 Pa indicated that the shock wave front located between the fast moving and slow moving parts. Electron densities of the fast moving plasma, which peaked at the plasma front, were on the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3}, and the electron temperatures were 2–3 eV.

  12. Using FT-IR Spectroscopy to Elucidate the Structures of Ablative Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The composition and structure of an ablative polymer has a multifaceted influence on its thermal, mechanical and ablative properties. Understanding the molecular level information is critical to the optimization of material performance because it helps to establish correlations with the macroscopic properties of the material, the so-called structure-property relationship. Moreover, accurate information of molecular structures is also essential to predict the thermal decomposition pathways as well as to identify decomposition species that are fundamentally important to modeling work. In this presentation, I will describe the use of infrared transmission spectroscopy (FT-IR) as a convenient tool to aid the discovery and development of thermal protection system materials.

  13. Direct femtosecond laser ablation of copper with an optical vortex beam

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K.; Rubano, A.; Marrucci, L.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Fittipaldi, R.; Vecchione, A.; Wang, X.; Paparo, D.

    2014-09-21

    Laser surface structuring of copper is induced by laser ablation with a femtosecond optical vortex beam generated via spin-to-orbital conversion of the angular momentum of light by using a q-plate. The variation of the produced surface structures is studied as a function of the number of pulses, N, and laser fluence, F. After the first laser pulse (N=1), the irradiated surface presents an annular region characterized by a corrugated morphology made by a rather complex network of nanometer-scale ridges, wrinkles, pores, and cavities. Increasing the number of pulses (2ablated area is gradually decorated by nanoparticles produced during laser ablation. At large number of pulses (2001000) and a deep crater is formed. The nanostructure variation with the laser fluence, F, also evidences an interesting dependence, with a coarsening of the structure morphology as F increases. Our experimental findings demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser ablation with optical vortex beams produces interesting patterns not achievable by the more standard beams with a Gaussian intensity profile. They also suggest that appropriate tuning of the experimental conditions (F, N) can allow generating micro- and/or nano-structured surface for any specific application.

  14. Surface roughness and wettability of dentin ablated with ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Lü, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and wettability of dentin following ultrashort pulsed laser ablation with different levels of fluence and pulse overlap (PO). Twenty-five extracted human teeth crowns were cut longitudinally into slices of approximately 1.5-mm thick and randomly divided into nine groups of five. Samples in groups 1 to 8 were ablated with an ultrashort pulsed laser through a galvanometric scanning system. Samples in group 9 were prepared using a mechanical rotary instrument. The surface roughness of samples from each group was then measured using a three-dimensional profile measurement laser microscope, and wettability was evaluated by measuring the contact angle of a drop of water on the prepared dentin surface using an optical contact angle measuring device. The results showed that both laser fluence and PO had an effect on dentin surface roughness. Specifically, a higher PO decreased dentin surface roughness and reduced the effect of high-laser fluence on decreasing the surface roughness in some groups. Furthermore, all ablated dentin showed a contact angle of approximately 0 deg, meaning that laser ablation significantly improved wettability. Adjustment of ultrashort pulsed laser parameters can, therefore, significantly alter dentin surface roughness and wettability.

  15. Femtosecond laser ablation of TiO2 films for two-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Iulia; Jipa, Florin; Andrei, Andreea; Simion, Sandel; Dabu, Razvan; Rizea, Adrian; Zamfirescu, Marian

    2013-11-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation of TiO2 thin films was studied as a function of laser pulse energy and number of pulses. The ablated holes were characterized by atomic force microscopy and the optimum irradiation conditions were chosen for producing a periodic structure of triangular lattice of air holes in the TiO2 films. A photonic structure with period of 1.5 ?m was designed to show photonic band gap in the near-infrared, at the telecommunication wavelengths. The plane wave expansion method was used to compute the photonic band gap of the laser ablated structure. The impact of limited laser processing accuracy on the photonic band gap has been studied as variation of the radius of the holes. The structure was produced by tightly focused femtosecond laser beam in multi-pulses ablation regime, using a Ti:Sapphire CPA laser system with pulse duration of 200 fs and energy per pulse of tens of nanojoule for a focusing optics with numerical aperture NA=0.5. The optimum irradiation conditions were found as following: number of pulse N=15 and laser beam energy E=58 nJ. The resulting periodic structure has an estimated photonic band gap centered at 1.53 ?m with a bandwidth of about 42 nm.

  16. Experimental scaling law for mass ablation rate from a Sn plasma generated by a 1064 nm laser

    SciTech Connect

    Burdt, Russell A.; Yuspeh, Sam; Najmabadi, Farrokh; Sequoia, Kevin L.; Tao Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S.

    2009-08-01

    The ablation depth in planar Sn targets irradiated with a pulsed 1064 nm laser was investigated over laser intensities from 3x10{sup 11} to 2x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. The ablation depth was measured by irradiating a thin layer of Sn evaporated onto a Si wafer, and looking for signatures of Si ions in the expanding plasma with spectroscopic and particle diagnostics. It was found that ablation depth scales with laser intensity to the (5/9)th power, which is consistent with analytical models of steady-state laser ablation, as well as empirical formulae from previous studies of mass ablation rate in overlapping parameter space. In addition, the scaling of mass ablation rate with atomic number of the target as given by empirical formulae in previous studies using targets such as C and Al, are shown to remain valid for the higher atomic number of the target (Z=50) used in these experiments.

  17. Production of nanometer-size GaAs nanocristals by nanosecond laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Abderrafi, Kamal; Jiménez, Ernesto; Ben, Teresa; Molina, Sergio I; Ibáñez, Rafael; Chirvony, Vladimir; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the formation and characterization of spherical GaAs quantum dots obtained by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in a liquid (ethanol or methanol). The produced bare GaAs nanoparticles demonstrate rather narrow size distribution which depends on the applied laser power density (from 4.25 to 13.9 J/cm2 in our experiments) and is as low as 2.5 nm for the highest power used. The absolute value of the average diameter also decreases significantly, from 13.7 to 8.7 nm, as the laser power increases in this interval. Due to the narrow nanoparticle size dispersion achieved at the highest laser powers two absorption band edges are clearly distinguishable at about 1.72 and 3.15 eV which are ascribed to E0 and E1 effective optical transitions, respectively. A comparison of the energies with those known for bulk GaAs allows one to conclude that an average diameter of the investigated GaAs nanoparticles is close to 10 nm, i.e., they are quantum dots. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images show that the bare GaAs nanoparticles are nanocrystalline, but many of them exhibit single/multiple twin boundary defects or even polycrystallinity. The formation of the GaAs crystalline core capped with a SiO2 shell was demonstrated by HRTEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Effective band edges can be better distinguished in SiO2 capped nanoparticles than in bare ones, In both cases the band edges are correlated with size quantum confinement effect. PMID:22962821

  18. Selective ablation of atheromas using a flashlamp-excited dye laser at 465 nm.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, M R; Deutsch, T F; Shapiro, A H; Margolis, R J; Oseroff, A R; Fallon, J T; Parrish, J A; Anderson, R R

    1986-01-01

    Ablation of human atheromas with laser pulses that had only a small effect on normal artery tissue was shown in vitro in air and under saline using 1-mu sec pulses at 465 nm from a flashlamp-excited dye laser. At this wavelength, there is preferential absorption in atheromas due to carotenoids. The threshold fluence for ablation was 6.8 +/- 2.0 J/cm2 for atheromas and 15.9 +/- 2.2 J/cm2 for normal aorta tissue. At a fluence of 18 J/cm2 per pulse, the ablated mass per unit of energy ranged from 161 to 370 micrograms/J for atheromas and from 50 to 74 micrograms/J for normal aorta tissue. Ablation products consisted of cholesterol crystals, shredded collagen fibers, and small bits of calcific material. Most debris was less than 100 micron in diameter, but a few pieces were as large as 300 micron. High-speed photography of ablation in air suggested explosive ejection of debris, caused by vapor formation, at speeds on the scale of 300 m/sec. Histological analysis showed minimal thermal damage to residual tissue. These data indicate that selective laser ablation of atheromas is possible in vitro. Images PMID:3462744

  19. Nd:YAG 1.44 laser ablation of human cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Robert S.; Prodoehl, John A.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Black, Johnathan D.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1993-07-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of a Neodymium:YAG 1.44 micrometers wavelength laser on human cartilage. This wavelength is strongly absorbed by water. Cadaveric meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage were harvested and placed in normal saline during the study. A 600 micrometers quartz fiber was applied perpendicularly to the tissues with a force of 0.098 N. Quantitative measurements were then made of the ablation rate as a function of fluence. The laser energy was delivered at a constant repetition rate of 5 Hz., 650 microsecond(s) pulsewidth, and energy levels ranging from 0.5 joules to 2.0 joules. Following the ablation of the tissue, the specimens were fixed in formalin for histologic evaluation. The results of the study indicate that the ablation rate is 0.03 mm/mj/mm2 for hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. Fibrocartilage was cut at approximately the same rate as hyaline cartilage. There was a threshold fluence projected to be 987 mj/mm2 for hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. Our results indicate that the pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.44 micrometers has a threshold fluence above which it will ablate human cartilage, and that its ablation rate is directly proportional to fluence over the range of parameters tested. Fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage demonstrated similar threshold fluence and ablation rates which is related to the high water content of these tissues.

  20. Rapid ablation of dental hard tissue using promoter-assisted pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederickson, Christopher J.; Lu, Quiang; Hayes, Donald J.; Wallace, David B.; Grove, Michael E.; Bell, Brent A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Rastegar, Sohi; Wright, C. G.; Arcoria, Charles J.

    1997-05-01

    Nd:YAG lasers have been used previously for selective removal of various material from teeth. To permit ablation of healthy enamel with the Nd:YAG laser, we have adopted a strategy in which micro-drops of photoabsorptive 'promoters' are placed on the enamel to enhance absorption of individual laser pulses. Ink-jet technology dispenses the micro-drops with micron- and millisecond-scale precision. Various promoters using drug and cosmetic dyes, indocyanine green, or carbon-black pigments have been studied. Typical ablation parameters are 1.064 micrometers ; 20-180 mJ per pulse; 100 microsecond(s) ; 10-30 pulses/sec; 0.2-2.0 nl drops. Recent results from the program include: (1) For a variety of promoters, a monotonic relationship obtains between absorption coefficient at 1.064 micrometers and the efficiency of ablation of enamel. (2) With different promoter volumes, the efficiency of ablation rises, plateaus, then falls with increasing volume. (3) At drilling rates of 30 pulses/sec, ablation efficiency approaches rates of 0.1 mm3/sec. LM and SEM observations show a glassy 'pebbled' crater surface indicative of hydroxyapatite that has cooled, condensed, and solidified on the crater walls. Together these results favor the view that a micro-drop promoter-assisted Nd:YAG drill can five clinically useful ablations hard dental tissue.

  1. Fabrication of a multilevel THz Fresnel lens by femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komlenok, M. S.; Volodkin, B. O.; Knyazev, B. A.; Kononenko, T. V.; Kononenko, V. V.; Konov, V. I.; Soifer, V. A.; Pavel'ev, V. S.; Tukmakov, K. N.; Choporova, Yu Yu

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of fabricating a silicon diffractive fourlevel THz Fresnel lens by laser ablation is studied. For a microrelief to be formed on the sample surface, use is made of a femtosecond Yb : YAG laser with a high pulse repetition rate (f = 200 kHz). Characteristics of the diffractive optical element are investigated in the beam of a 141-mm free-electron laser. The measured diffraction efficiency of the lens is in good agreement with the theoretical estimate.

  2. Laser ablation of single-crystalline silicon by radiation of pulsed frequency-selective fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the process of destruction of the surface of a single-crystalline silicon wafer scanned by the beam of a pulsed ytterbium-doped fiber laser radiation with a wavelength of ? = 1062 nm. It is established that the laser ablation can proceed without melting of silicon and the formation of a plasma plume. Under certain parameters of the process (radiation power, beam scan velocity, and beam overlap density), pronounced oxidation of silicon microparticles with the formation of a characteristic loose layer of fine powdered silicon dioxide has been observed for the first time. The range of lasing and beam scanning regimes in which the growth of SiO2 layer takes place is determined.

  3. Nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in a plasma by laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccogna, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    > Modelling the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in liquid-phase laser ablation is very important to optimize and control the size and the structure of nanoparticles. However, the detailed formation process of nanoparticles after laser ablation is still unclear. In the present study we investigated for the first time the kinetic growth of nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in water, emphasizing the leading role of the plasma medium and in particular the electrostatic agglomeration due to the charging of the nanoparticle in the plasma plume. The importance of the confining role of the liquid medium on the plasma plume is revealed, showing how an isothermal expansion is able to produce smaller nanoparticles compared to an adiabatic cooling.

  4. Analytical model of the laser ablation mechanism of lithium-ion battery coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    In Lithium-Ion battery production many different active material coatings are used to serve the individual needs of the final product. Furthermore laser processing becomes the method of choice in the production to allow a maximum degree of freedom and reduce tooling costs. The used electrode coatings and its different components highly influence the laser process and its results in terms of quality and efficiency. To achieve a better understanding of the ablation mechanism high speed video recording was used to allow a more detailed observation of the cutting and ablation mechanism, respectively. Based on these insights an analytical model was created and verified by time resolved shadowgraph imaging and experimental determined laser ablation thresholds.

  5. Microstructural and molecular considerations in the treatment of scars with ablative fractional lasers.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Cerrene N; Ozog, David

    2015-03-01

    Fractional ablative lasers have recently proven to be an effective modality for improving the clinical appearance and minimizing the morbidity associated with restrictivetype scars. Their tolerable safety profile on nonfacial sites and darker Fitzpatrick skin types provides an advantage over its fully ablative counterpart in treating facial rhytides, photodamaged skin, and acne scars. However, despite its increasing usage in clinical practice, the mechanism behind the observed clinical benefit remains complex and has yet to be fully elucidated. This paper reviews the work on the histological mechanism of action of ablative fractional lasers, and the molecular changes that occur posttreatment on restrictive scars, with an emphasis on mature burn and postsurgical scars. As the majority of research has been on the carbon dioxide laser, a natural focus on this wavelength is presented. PMID:25922951

  6. Endobronchial laser ablation in the management of epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma of the trachea

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, David; Wieboldt, Jason; Sidhu, Pushpinder; McManus, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    A 52 year old, never smoker presented to hospital with progressive shortness of breath and significant stridor over a five month period. He also described the feeling of needing to cough but being unable to expectorate. CT Thorax demonstrated a mass lesion in the trachea just distal to the larynx which was then confirmed on rigid bronchoscopy. Subsequent histology confirmed an epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma. Only a few case reports document these rare salivary gland tumours occurring in other locations such as the respiratory tract. After staging showed only local disease, the patient was managed with rigid bronchoscopy and laser ablation therapy. We present the first documented case to be treated with endobronchial laser ablation therapy with discussion of the incidence, presentation and characteristics of these tumours including the treatment options, as well as the use of laser ablation in the management of benign and malignant endobronchial lesions.

  7. Nanoparticle generation and transport resulting from femtosecond laser ablation of ultrathin metal films: Time-resolved measurements and molecular dynamics

    E-print Network

    Geohegan, David B.

    .2351/1.2402526 Nanoparticle generation in ultrafast pulsed laser ablation of nickel Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 044103 (2007); 10Nanoparticle generation and transport resulting from femtosecond laser ablation of ultrathin metal and redeposited nanoparticles J. Appl. Phys. 115, 124302 (2014); 10.1063/1.4869456 Impact of wavelength dependent

  8. Comparison of Solution-Based versus Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Larval Fish

    E-print Network

    Comparison of Solution-Based versus Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. In large part, this deficiency is due to unsuitable protocols for reliably processing and analyzing small otoliths of larvae. Herein, we evaluate the abilities of solution-based (SO) and laser ablation (LA

  9. Bone tissue heating and ablation by short and ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Rice, Colin E. W.; George, Thomas F.

    2010-02-01

    Biological hard tissues, such as those found in bone and teeth, are complex tissues that build a strong mineral structure over an organic matrix framework. The laser-matter interaction for bone hard tissues holds great interest to laser surgery and laser dentistry; the use of short/ultrashort pulses, in particular, shows interesting behaviors not seen in continuous wave lasers. High laser energy densities in ultrashort pulses can be focused on a small irradiated surface (spot diameter is 10-50 ?m) leading to rapid temperature rise and thermal ablation of the bone tissue. Ultrashort pulses, specifically those in the picosecond and femtosecond ranges, impose several challenges in modeling bone tissue response. In the present paper we perform time-dependent thermal simulations of short and ultrashort pulse laser-bone interactions in singlepulse and multipulse (set of ultrashort pulses) modes of laser heating. A comparative analysis for both radiation modes is discussed for laser heating of different types of the solid bone on the nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond time scales. It is shown that ultrashort laser pulses with high energy densities can ablate bone tissue without heating tissues bordering the ablation creator. This reaction is particularly desirable as heat accumulation and thermal damage are the main factors affecting tissue regrowth rates, and thus patient recovery times.

  10. Laser Ablation Production of Molecular Ions Marta Luengo-Kovac

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angles, University of

    for work ranging from quantum chemistry to quantum computing. Here we investigate the use of the technique , allowing the ion cloud to move towards the Channeltron, which was kept at ! "2500V . #12;Since the ablation

  11. The Effect of the Asphericity of Myopic Laser Ablation Profiles on the Induction of Wavefront Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Lana; Yoon, Geunyoung; MacRae, Scott; Kohnen, Thomas; Huxlin, Krystel R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the effects of laser profile asphericity on the induction of wavefront aberrations, susceptibility to decentration, and depth of focus in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) model. Methods. Four PMMA lenses received an excimer laser ablation of ?6 D with a 6-mm optical zone and different amounts of primary spherical aberration (Z40): 0, ?0.346, ?1.038, and ?2.076 ?m. The curvature of each lens was measured by using surface profilometry, and wavefront changes were computed from curvature differences. Changes in optical quality were compared by treatment simulation of 13 real myopic eyes. The influence of pupil diameter, ablation decentration, and defocus on retinal image quality was measured by using the optical transfer function–based visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF). Results. Aspheric ablation profiles induced significantly less primary but higher secondary spherical aberration (Z60) than did the standard profile; however, Z40 compensation was incomplete. Simulated treatments with aspheric profiles resulted in significantly better retinal image quality and higher decentration tolerance than did the standard profile. Optical depth of focus was not affected with a 3-mm pupil, whereas with a 6-mm pupil, there was a small but statistically significant decrease in depth of focus. Conclusions. Aspheric laser profiles showed theoretical optical benefits over standard ablation profiles for the treatment of myopia, including terms of decentration tolerance. However, there remained profound induction and thus, undercorrection of Z40, due to loss of laser ablation efficiency in the lens periphery. PMID:20042646

  12. Ultrafast imaging of vascular tissue ablation by an XeCl excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, Walter; Nyga, Ralf; Tischler, Christian; Haase, Karl K.; Karsch, Karl R.

    1991-05-01

    Ablation and tissue removal of normal and atherosclerotic arterial wall by pulses of ? = 308 nm laser radiation have been probed by visible pulsed dye laser radiation. Photographs have been taken where the samples are irradiated in saline solution. The pulsewidth of the ablating XeCl excimer laser is about ?? = 30 ns FWHM. The pulses have been transmitted through a fused silica fiber with a core diameter of 600 micrometers . The pulse energy was set to 20 mJ at the distal end of the fiber corresponding to a fluence of 7.5 J/cm2, which is well above the ablation threshold. Visible radiation of a dye laser operated at a wavelength of ? = 580 nm (?? ~ 10 ns FWHM) is used to illuminate the tissue surface and the ablation plume. The delay time of the probing pulses with respect to the 308 nm pulses is varied in the nanosecond range up to several hundred microseconds. The ablation process and the resulting plume above the tissue surface are recorded with a CCD camera attached to a PC-based image-processing system. All samples under investigation were fresh human cadaver aortic and femoral artery specimens (less than or equal to 48 h), which had been shock-frozen. The arterial segments showed different types of lipid rich and calcified plaques.

  13. Laser ablation and deposition of titanium dioxide with ultrashort pulses at 527 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallotti, D. K.; Ni, X.; Fittipaldi, R.; Wang, X.; Lettieri, S.; Vecchione, A.; Amoruso, S.

    2015-06-01

    We report an experimental analysis on laser ablation and deposition of TiO2 with ?300-fs, 527-nm ultrashort laser pulses. We particularly address the following: (1) the dependence of the deposition rate on the laser fluence, in high-vacuum conditions; (2) the effect of an oxygen background gas pressure on the expansion of the ablated species and on the deposition rate. Two different regimes are observed for the dependence of the deposition rate in high vacuum: The first one governed by two-photon absorption occurring close to the ablation threshold is, then, followed by the second, thermal dependence at larger fluences. The propagation of the atomic and nanoparticulate plumes produced in ultrashort laser ablation are influenced in a quite different way by the background gas pressure, which eventually reflects on the variation of the deposition rate with pressure. Moreover, it is observed that the ablated material is predominantly composed of nanoparticles (?70 %), similar to what was reported before in the case of elemental metallic targets. Finally, plume deposition results in the formation of nanoparticle-assembled films with a variation of the characteristics morphology with the background gas pressure.

  14. Feasibility of ablative fractional laser-assisted drug delivery with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Hsun; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Shen, Su-Chin; Ng, Chau Yee; Jung, Shih-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Fractional resurfacing creates hundreds of microscopic wounds in the skin without injuring surrounding tissue. This technique allows rapid wound healing owing to small injury regions, and has been proven as an effective method for repairing photodamaged skin. Recently, ablative fractional laser (AFL) treatment has been demonstrated to facilitate topical drug delivery into skin. However, induced fractional photothermolysis depends on several parameters, such as incident angle, exposure energy, and spot size of the fractional laser. In this study, we used fractional CO2 laser to induce microscopic ablation array on the nail for facilitating drug delivery through the nail. To ensure proper energy delivery without damaging tissue structures beneath the nail plate, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was implemented for quantitative evaluation of induced microscopic ablation zone (MAZ). Moreover, to further study the feasibility of drug delivery, normal saline was dripped on the exposure area of fingernail and the speckle variance in OCT signal was used to observe water diffusion through the ablative channels into the nail plate. In conclusion, this study establishes OCT as an effective tool for the investigation of fractional photothermolysis and water/drug delivery through microscopic ablation channels after nail fractional laser treatment. PMID:25426321

  15. Investigations of morphological features of picosecond dual-wavelength laser ablation of stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wanqin; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong; Jiang, Gedong; Liu, Bin

    2014-06-01

    Investigations on the morphological features of holes and grooves ablated on the surface of stainless steel using the picosecond dual-wavelength laser system with different powers combinations are presented based on the scarce researches on morphology of dual-wavelength laser ablation. The experimental results show the profiles of holes ablated by the visible beam appear V-shaped while those for the near-infrared have large openings and display U-shaped, which are independent of the ablation mechanism of ultrafast laser. For the dual-wavelength beam (a combination of visible beam and near-infrared), the holes resemble sunflower-like structures and have smoother ring patterns on the bottom. In general, the holes ablated by the dual-wavelength beam appear to have much flatter bottoms, linearly sloped side-walls and spinodal structures between the bottoms of the holes and the side-walls. Furthermore, through judiciously combining the powers of the dual-wavelength beam, high-quality grooves could be obtained with a flat worm-like structure at the bottom surface and less resolidified melt ejection edges. This study provides insight into optimizing ultrafast laser micromachining in order to obtain desired morphology.

  16. Orbit Modification of Earth-Crossing Asteroids/Comets Using Rendezvous Spacecraft and Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sang-Young; Mazanek, Daniel D.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the approach and results of an end-to-end simulation to deflect a long-period comet (LPC) by using a rapid rendezvous spacecraft and laser ablation system. The laser energy required for providing sufficient deflection DELTA V and an analysis of possible intercept/rendezvous spacecraft trajectories are studied in this analysis. These problems minimize a weighted sum of the flight time and required propellant by using an advanced propulsion system. The optimal thrust-vector history and propellant mass to use are found in order to transfer a spacecraft from the Earth to a targeted celestial object. One goal of this analysis is to formulate an optimization problem for intercept/rendezvous spacecraft trajectories. One approach to alter the trajectory of the object in a highly controlled manner is to use pulsed laser ablative propulsion. A sufficiently intense laser pulse ablates the surface of a near-Earth object (NEO) by causing plasma blowoff. The momentum change from a single laser pulse is very small. However, the cumulative effect is very effective because the laser can interact with the object over long periods of time. The laser ablation technique can overcome the mass penalties associated with other nondisruptive approaches because no propellant is required to generate the DELTA V (the material of the celestial object is the propellant source). Additionally, laser ablation is effective against a wide range of surface materials and does not require any landing or physical attachment to the object. For diverting distant asteroids and comets, the power and optical requirements of a laser ablation system on or near the Earth may be too extreme to contemplate in the next few decades. A hybrid solution would be for a spacecraft to carry a laser as a payload to a particular celestial body. The spacecraft would require an advanced propulsion system capable of rapid rendezvous with the object and an extremely powerful electrical generator, which is likely needed for the propulsion system as well. The spacecraft would station-keep with the object at a small standoff distance while the laser ablation is performed.

  17. Bacterial infections following non-ablative fractional laser treatment: a case series and discussion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lisa Y; Kilmer, Suzanne L; Ross, E Victor; Avram, Mathew M

    2015-02-01

    Non-ablative fractional laser procedures have become increasingly popular since their introduction in 2004. The fractional 1,927?nm thulium laser is a non-ablative device that penetrates up to 300??m in the skin and the 1,550?nm erbium:glass laser penetrates up to 1,400??m. These procedures are considered minimally invasive with a high safety profile; therefore, infectious complications are exceedingly rare. However, we report five recent cases of bacterial infection with both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms following treatment with the fractional 1550/1927?nm laser approximately 1 day to 1 week post-procedure. One patient had a rapidly progressing pustular eruption with symptoms of sepsis. These patients were seen immediately, cultures were obtained and empiric antibiotic therapy was initiated. They recovered without long-term complications. Rapid-onset bacterial infections following non-ablative laser resurfacing with the 1550/1927?nm laser have not been previously reported in the literature. The infections can progress quickly and lead to serious sequelae, including systemic illness and severe scarring, if not identified and appropriately treated. We present these cases to highlight the importance of close surveillance and when appropriate, rapid intervention, following non-ablative fractional procedures, especially when patients present with atypical symptoms and signs. PMID:25586939

  18. Investigations of the damage mechanisms during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Wick, Sebastian; Laible, Maike; Rapp, Stephan; Kuznetsova, Julia; Homann, Christian; Huber, Heinz P.; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    Several investigations of dental tissue ablation with ultrashort pulsed lasers suggest that these lasers enable precise and selective material removal and reduce the formation of micro cracks and thermal effects, when compared to ns-pulses. In this study, two damage mechanisms are presented occurring during ablation of dentin using a laser emitting pulses of a duration of 380 fs at a wavelength of 1040 nm. First, it was found that nano cracks appear around the craters after single fs-pulse ablation. These cracks are directed to the crater and cross the dentinal tubules. Transient investigation of the single fs-pulse ablation process by pump-probe microscopy suggest that the driving mechanism could be a pressure wave that is released after stress confinement. Second, squared ablation holes were created by moving the laser focus at scan speeds between 0.5 mm/s and 2.0 m/s and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. It was found that deep cracks appear at the edges of the squared holes, if the scan speed is about 0.5 m/s. The fluence has only a minor impact on the crack formation. The crack propagation was investigated in the depth using x-ray micro tomography and optical coherence tomography. It was found that these cracks appear in the depth down to the dental pulp. These findings suggest that fast scanning of the laser beam is the key for damage free processing using ultrashort pulse lasers. Then, ablation rates of about 2.5 - 3.5 mm3/min/W can be achieved in dentine with pulse durations of 380 fs.

  19. The Effects of Ablative Coating Thickness at Various Laser Intensities and Multiple Laser Pulses on Thin Copper Sheet Formability in High Strain Rate Laser Shock Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Balasubramanian; Castagne, Sylvie; Wang, Zhongke; Keat Lai, Choon; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu

    2011-05-01

    High strain rate metal forming using laser induced shockwave pressure is used for micro-scale deformation. Ablative coating is one of its significant process components as it generates shockwave pressure through vaporization into plasma by laser irradiation as well as impedes the shockwave propagation. The effect of ablative coating thickness on the forming behavior of thin copper foils is investigated in this paper. Various laser intensities have been used in parallel with changes in coating thickness to further study this effect. The amount of plastic deformation is analyzed with respect to coating thickness, laser intensity and the number of pulses. It is found that there is an optimum coating thickness for a given laser intensity to achieve maximum deformation depth at the center of the formed cavity. The deformation depth shows a monotonic relationship with the laser intensity. Multiple pulses improve the deformation characteristics by limiting the ablation of workpiece material.

  20. Investigation of plasmas produced by laser ablation using single and double pulses for food analysis demonstrated by probing potato skins.

    PubMed

    Beldjilali, S; Yip, W L; Hermann, J; Baba-Hamed, T; Belasri, A

    2011-06-01

    We report on investigations of plasmas produced by laser ablation of fresh potatoes using infrared nanosecond laser radiation. A twin laser system consisting of two Nd:YAG oscillators was used to generate single or double pulses of adjustable interpulse delay. The potatoes were irradiated under ambient air with moderate pulse energies of about 10 mJ. The expansion dynamics of the ablation plume was characterized using fast imaging with a gated camera. In addition, time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy was applied to study the spectral line emission of the various plasma species. The electron density was deduced from Stark broadening, and the plasma temperature was inferred from the relative emission intensities of spectral lines. The relative concentrations of metals were estimated from the comparison of the measured emission spectra to the spectral radiance computed for a plasma in local thermal equilibrium. It is shown that the plasma produced by double pulses has a larger volume and a lower density. These properties lead to an increase of the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 2 and thus to an improved measurement sensitivity. PMID:21461618

  1. Minimization of thermomechanical side effects and increase of ablation efficiency in IR ablation by use of multiply Q-switched laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Alfred; Schmidt, Peter; Flucke, Barbara

    2002-06-01

    Large thermal damage zones have been observed after application of free-running holmium laser pulses inside the human body as, for example, for arthroscopic surgery. The aim of our study is to reduce thermal damage by increasing the ablation efficiency, and to achieve a smooth surface of the ablated tissue. For that purpose we use a multiply Q- switched thulium laser ((lambda) equals 2.0 micrometers , acousto- optical QS) that emits pulse series consisting of a pre- pulse of 40 mJ energy and up to 6 ablation pulses of 100 mJ each, separated by time intervals of 60 microsecond(s) . Q-switched laser pulses explosively ablate the target material. In a liquid environment, this leads to the formation of cavitation bubbles and to mechanical damage of the surrounding tissue. The pre-pulse of 40 mJ serves to minimize the cavitation effects, as it produces a small cavity that is then filled by the ablation products created by the burst of 100-mJ pulses. The pre-pulse creates, furthermore, a channel between fiber tip and target that reduces absorption losses in the liquid. Reduction of cavitation effects and channel formation are demonstrated by time-resolved photography. The use of a thulium laser instead of a holmium laser contributed to the desired reduction of thermal damage, because the penetration depth of the thulium laser light in cartilage (approximately 170 micrometers ) is only half as large as with the holmium laser.

  2. Dense strongly coupled plasma in double laser pulse ablation of lithium: Experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ajai; Sivakumaran, V.; Ganesh, R.; Joshi, H. C.; Ashwin, J.

    2013-08-15

    In a simple method of low power nano-second double pulsed laser ablation experiment in collinear geometry, formation of high density strongly coupled plasma is demonstrated. Using time-resolved measurements of the Stark broadened line width and line intensity ratio of the emission lines, the density and temperature of the plasma were estimated respectively. In this experiment, it is shown that ions are strongly coupled (ion-ion coupling parameter comes out to be >4). For comparison, both single and double pulsed laser ablations are presented. For the estimated experimental plasma parameters, first principle Langevin dynamics simulation corroborates the existence of a strongly coupled regime.

  3. Experimental and Analytical Investigation of Cemented Tungsten Carbide Ultra-Short Pulse Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. P. Calderón; Daniel, C.; Emmelmann, C.

    Ultra-short pulse laser processing of hard materials, such as cemented tungsten carbide, requires an accurate and agile experimental and analytical investigation to obtain adequate information and setting parameters to maximize ablation rate. Therefore, this study presents a systematic approach which, first, experimentally searches for the variables with the most significant influence on the objective using a design of experiments method; and second, analyzes by means of existing ablation theory the interaction of the material and laser taking into account the Beer-Lambert law and incubation effect.Therefore, this places a basis for future analytical-experimental validation of the examined material.

  4. Codoping of boron and phosphorus in silicon nanowires synthesized by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukata, N.; Mitome, M.; Bando, Y.; Seoka, M.; Matsushita, S.; Murakami, K.; Chen, J.; Sekiguchi, T.

    2008-11-01

    Codoping of boron (B) and phosphorus (P) atoms was performed during the synthesis of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) by laser ablation. The observation of a local vibrational mode of B clearly showed B doping in codoped SiNWs, while Fano broadening due to heavy B doping disappeared, indicating compensation by P donors. The electrospin resonance signal of conduction electrons also disappeared due to compensation by B acceptors. These results indicate that codoping of B and P atoms was achieved in SiNWs during laser ablation.

  5. Equation of state for simulation of nanosecond laser ablation aluminium in water and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, R.; Antonov, V.; Kalinin, N.

    2015-11-01

    To analyze the physical processes at high energy densities, when laser is used, an adequate description the thermodynamic property of matter over a broad region of states including the normal conditions and plasma at high pressures and temperatures is required. For describing the thermodynamic properties of metals in nanoparticles production using laser ablation a semi-empirical equation of state model is proposed. To verify this model, an equation of state of aluminum was constructed. Using this equation was calculated ablation depths and crater profile for aluminum and compared with experimental data. Received results are in a good match with experiment.

  6. Laser ablation of energetic polymer solutions: effect of viscosity and fluence on the splashing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; Urech, Lukas; Lippert, Thomas; Phipps, Claude; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Wokaun, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    Laser plasma thrusters are a new kind of propulsion system for small satellites, and work with the thrust created by the laser ablation of a target. Liquid polymer solutions are very promising fuels for such systems, provided that no splashing of the target occurs, because ejection of droplets strongly decreases the performances of the system. We have investigated the nanosecond infrared laser ablation of glycidyl azide polymer solutions containing carbon nanoparticles as absorber. Shadowgraphy imaging revealed two cases, namely splashing regime and solid-like behavior. The transition between both regimes depends on the viscosity of the solution and on the laser fluence, and is explained by the recoil force acting on the target. Appropriate conditions to avoid splashing were identified, showing that this liquid polymer solution is a suitable fuel for laser plasma thrusters.

  7. Formation of nanoparticles during laser ablation of an iron target in a liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhov, I A; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A; Viau, G; Garcia, C

    2012-05-31

    Formation of nanoparticles during laser ablation of a bulk iron target in water and isopropyl alcohol by pulsed near-IR laser radiation has been experimentally investigated. The experiments were performed using a 3-ns neodymium laser and a 100-ns ytterbium fibre laser. A size distribution function is obtained for the nanoparticles, which is peaking near 15 nm. The diffraction patterns of the nanoparticles exhibit pronounced peaks of metallic iron. An analysis of the nanoparticles by transmission electron microscopy shows that in some cases they have a core - shell structure. The nanoparticles formed by laser ablation have pronounced magnetic properties. The absorption spectra of colloids with iron nanoparticles contain peaks, which presumably correspond to the electron plasmon resonance in these particles.

  8. IR-Laser Welding and Ablation of Biotissue Stained with Metal Nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Lalayan, A A

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biological tissue by the using of spherical metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation which spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. YAG:Nd laser with 1064 nm wavelength, 8 ns pulse duration, and operating in transverse electromagnetic modes TEM$_{00}$ was used for the synthesis of metal NPs. The Au,Ti Ni and Cu as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal NPs were formed in the liquid medium. Effectiveness of laser ablation in the case of the biotissue sample that stained with the metal NPs was approximately on 4-5 times larger than for the native sample. Also the scheme of a laser point welding for the deep-located biotissue layer selectively stained by the metal NPs has been demonstrated.

  9. Laser mass ablation efficiency measurements indicate bubble-driven dynamics dominates laser thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J.; Prahl, S.A.; Shangguan, H.Q.

    1998-03-01

    Mass removal experiments have been performed at the Oregon Medical Laser Center with 10 to 100 mJ 1 {micro}s laser pulses at optical wavelengths. Above the energy threshold for bubble formation, the laser mass ablation efficiency ({micro}g/mJ) for removal of gel surrogate thrombus is nearly constant for a given experimental geometry and gel absorption coefficient. The efficiency in contact experiments, in which the optical fiber delivering the energy is in close proximity to the absorbing gel, is approximately three times that of non-contact experiments, in which the optical fiber is {approximately}1 mm from the gel. Mass removal occurs hundreds of microseconds after the laser deposition. Experimental data and numerical simulations are consistent with the hypothesis that jet formation during bubble collapse plays a dominant role in mass removal. This hypothesis suggests a model in which the mass removed scales linearly with the maximum bubble volume and explains the distinctive features, including the magnitude, of the mass removal.

  10. New Combined Laser Ablation Platform Determines Cell Wall Chemistry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    NREL has designed and developed a combined laser ablation/pulsed sample introduction/mass spectrometry platform that integrates pyrolysis and/or laser ablation with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Using this apparatus, we can measure the cell wall chemical composition of untreated biomass materials. Understanding the chemical composition of untreated biomass is key to both the biochemical and thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels. In the biochemical conversion process, the new technique provides a better understanding of the chemistry of lignin and will improve accessibility to plant sugars. In thermochemical conversion, the information provided by the new technique may help to reduce the formation of unwanted byproducts during gasification. NREL validated the ability of the system to detect pyrolysis products from plant materials using poplar, a potentially high-impact bioenergy feedstock. In the technique, biomass vapors are produced by laser ablation using the 3rd harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser (355 nm). The resulting vapors are entrained in a free jet expansion of helium, then skimmed and introduced into an ionization region. REMPI is used to ionize the vapors because it is highly sensitive for detecting lignin and aromatic metabolites. The laser ablation method was used to selectively volatilize specific plant tissues and detect lignin-based products from the vapors with enhanced sensitivity. This will allow the determination of lignin distribution in future biomass studies.

  11. Tip-Enhanced Laser Ablation Sample Transfer for Biomolecule Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorai, Suman; Seneviratne, Chinthaka A.; Murray, Kermit K.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-enhanced laser ablation was used to transfer molecules from thin films to a suspended silver wire for off-line mass spectrometry using laser desorption ionization (LDI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). An AFM with a 30 nm radius gold-coated silicon tip was used to image the sample and to hold the tip 15 nm from the surface for material removal using a 355 nm Nd:YAG laser. The ablated material was captured on a silver wire that was held 300 ?m vertically and 100 ?m horizontally from the tip. For the small molecules anthracene and rhodamine 6G, the wire was cut and affixed to a metal target using double-sided conductive tape and analyzed by LDI using a commercial laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Approximately 100 fg of material was ablated from each of the 1 ?m ablation spots and transferred with approximately 3% efficiency. For larger polypeptide molecules angiotensin II and bovine insulin, the captured material was dissolved in saturated matrix solution and deposited on a target for MALDI analysis.

  12. One-dimensional model for a laser-ablated slab under acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, J.; Ramis, R.; Sanz, J.

    2004-06-01

    A one-dimensional model for a laser-ablated slab under acceleration g is developed. A characteristic value gc is found to separate two solutions: Lower g values allow sonic or subsonic flow at the critical surface; for higher g the sonic point approaches closer and closer to the slab surface. A significant reduction in the ablation pressure is found in comparison to the g = 0 case. A simple dependence law between the ablation pressure and the slab acceleration, from the initial value g0 to infinity, is identified. Results compared well with fully hydrodynamic computer simulations with Multi2D code. The model has also been found a key step to produce indefinitely steady numerical solutions to study Rayleigh Taylor instabilities in heat ablation fronts, and validate other theoretical analysis of the problem.

  13. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-02-14

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes.

  14. On the Properties of Plastic Ablators in Laser-Driven Material Dynamics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D C; Kraus, R G

    2007-11-15

    Radiation hydrodynamics simulations were used to study the effect of plastic ablators in laser-driven shock experiments. The sensitivity to composition and equation of state was found to be 5-10% in ablation pressure. As was found for metals, a laser pulse of constant irradiance gave a pressure history which decreased by several percent per nanosecond. The pressure history could be made more constant by adjusting the irradiance history. The impedance mismatch with the sample gave an increase o(100%) in the pressure transmitted into the sample, for a reduction of several tens of percent in the duration of the peak load applied to the sample, and structured the release history by adding a release step to a pressure close to the ablation pressure. Algebraic relations were found between the laser pulse duration, the ablator thickness, and the duration of the peak pressure applied to the sample, involving quantities calculated from the equations of state of the ablator and sample using shock dynamics.

  15. Wavelength dependence of boron nitride ablation by TEA CO{sub 2} lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sumiyoshi, T.; Tomita, H.; Takahashi, A.; Obara, M.; Ishii, K.

    1996-05-01

    Transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser ablation of boron nitride ceramics in both cubic and hexagonal phases (cBN, hBN) was demonstrated. A TEA CO{sub 2} laser oscillating at a wavelength of 9.2 {mu}m, which coincides with a TO-phonon spectrum of the cBN, could ablate the cBN ceramics more efficiently than with 10 {mu}m band radiation. The hBN samples were also ablated well with 9.2 {mu}m laser irradiation, however, the ablated site color changed to black due to a boron rich phase left on the surface. In the case of hBN sintered with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}, the ablation threshold fluence is determined by the one of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which is the highest threshold among the three elements. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Plasma spectroscopy using optical vortex laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Toda, Yasunori; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Shikano, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Laser spectroscopy is a useful tool for nonintrusive plasma diagnostics; it can provide many important quantities in a plasma such as temperature, density, and flow velocity of ions and neutrals from the spectrum obtained by scanning the frequency of narrow bandwidth laser. Obtainable information is, however, limited in principle to the direction parallel to the laser path. The aim of this study is to introduce a Laguerre-Gaussian beam, which is called as optical vortex, in place of a widely used Hermite-Gaussian beam. One of the remarkable properties of the Laguerre-Gaussian beam is that it carries an angular momentum in contrast to the Hermite-Gaussian beam. It follows that particles in the laser beam feel the Doppler effect even in the transverse direction of the laser path. Therefore it is expected that the limitation imposed by the laser path can be overcome by using an optical vortex laser. The concept of optical vortex spectroscopy, the development of the laser system, and some preliminary results of a proof-of-principle experiment will be presented. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25287152.

  17. The 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA' 05); Journal of Physics: Conference Series

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bauerle, Dieter W.; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-09-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11–16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications.

  18. Pulsed laser ablation of a continuously-fed wire in liquid flow for high-yield production of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Messina, Gabriele C; Wagener, Philipp; Streubel, René; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Santagata, Antonio; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2013-03-01

    Using wires of defined diameters instead of a planar target for pulsed laser ablation in liquid results in significant increase of ablation efficiency and nanoparticle productivity up to a factor of 15. We identified several competitive phenomena based on thermal conductivity, reflectivity and cavitation bubble shape that affect the ablation efficiency when the geometry of the target is changed. On the basis of the obtained results, this work represents an intriguing starting point for further developments related to the up-scaling of pulsed laser ablation in liquid environments at the industrial level. PMID:23247630

  19. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Andria; Lawhead, Carlos; Ujj, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition of materials. Recent technical developments resulted in equipment used on the MARS Rover by NASA. It is capable of measuring the emission spectra of laser induced plasma created by energetic laser pulses focused on the sample (rocks, metals, etc.). We have develop a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy setup and investigated the necessary experimental and methodological challenges needed to make such material identification measurements. 355 and 532 nm laser pulses with 5 ns temporal duration was used to generate micro-plasma from which compositions can be determined based on known elemental and molecular emission intensities and wavelengths. The performance of LIBS depends on several parameters including laser wavelength, pulse energy, pulse duration, time interval of observation, geometrical configuration of collecting optics, and the properties of ambient medium. Spectra recorded from alloys (e.g. US penny coin) and pure metals will be presented. Special thanks for the financial support of the Office of Undergraduate Research of UWF.

  20. Focal Laser Ablation for Localized Prostate Cancer: Principles, Clinical Trials, and Our Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ted; Mendhiratta, Neil; Sperling, Dan; Lepor, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Focal therapy of prostate cancer is an evolving treatment strategy that destroys a predefined region of the prostate gland that harbors clinically significant disease. Although long-term oncologic control has yet to be demonstrated, focal therapy is associated with a marked decrease in treatment-related morbidity. Focal laser ablation is an emerging modality that has several advantages, most notably real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility. This review presents the principles of laser ablation, the role of multiparametric MRI for delineating the site of significant prostate cancer, a summary of published clinical studies, and our initial experience with 23 patients, criteria for selecting candidates for focal prostate ablation, and speculation regarding future directions. PMID:25009445

  1. Eye/sensor protection against laser-irradiation ablative mirror devices: A materials assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, M.E.; Cozzens, R.F.; Chrisey, D.B.

    1992-04-17

    The potential of the ablative mirror concept as an eye/sensor protection system is assessed from a materials science perspective. Realistic operating parameters for the ablative mirror device are determined through examinations of the critical device components. Using these operational parameters and a derived model of laser-surface interactions, the response of different mirror materials is examined. Based on the measured material responses from research literature and our calculated values, we conclude that the ablative mirror concept is not a feasible method of eye protection using typical mirror materials (assuming a device optical gain of 105 and a minimum material reflectivity of 70%). Analysis of the interaction between laser irradiation and material surfaces resulted in the identification of a number of important material parameters that can be used to guide material development and identify promising new mirror materials. Areas for future research are also suggested.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation properties of transparent materials: impact of the laser process parameters on the machining throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matylitsky, V. V.; Hendricks, F.; Aus der Au, J.

    2013-03-01

    High average power, high repetition rate femtosecond lasers with ?J pulse energies are increasingly used for bio-medical and material processing applications. With the introduction of femtosecond laser systems such as the SpiritTM platform developed by High Q Lasers and Spectra-Physics, micro-processing of solid targets with femtosecond laser pulses have obtained new perspectives for industrial applications [1]. The unique advantage of material processing with subpicosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition, which leads to high ablation efficiency and accuracy in nearly all kinds of solid materials. The study on the impact of the laser processing parameters on the removal rate for transparent substrate using femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. In particular, examples of micro-processing of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) - bio-degradable polyester and XensationTM glass (Schott) machined with SpiritTM ultrafast laser will be shown.

  3. Pulsed nanosecond laser ablation of gold in deionized water and aqueous chitosan solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Matthew; Ding, Bo; Jung, Youngsoo; Reddy, B. V. K.; Phuoc, Tran X.; Chyu, Minking K.

    2014-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) are produced using a Nd:YAG laser in deionized water and aqueous chitosan solutions via 1064 nm nanosecond laser ablation and subsequent 532 nm nanosecond laser irradiation. AuNP produced in deionized water under single laser ablation and subsequent irradiation for 20-40 min time exhibited coalescence and the formation of nano-chains, with average particle diameters ranging from 34.3 to 18.8 nm and 37.2 to 27.3 nm, respectively. The introduction of chitosan as a bio-compatible surfactant yielded lesser average diameters and tighter size-distributions with a narrow range of UV-Vis absorption spectra values (514-525 nm). For instance, at 20 and 40 min, the single laser ablation and subsequent irradiation produced the average diameters of 12.3 and 5.3 nm and 5.7 and 4.3 nm, respectively. Increases in ablation and irradiation time decrease AuNP size. As time increased, the size-distributions of the AuNP produced in chitosan solution narrowed and the particle size monotonically decreased. Chitosan functionalized the AuNP surface, promoting hydrophobicity, preventing electrostatic attraction of the Au nanoparticles, thus inhibiting coalescence and agglomeration. UV-Vis absorption spectra, TEM and HR-TEM images are used to verify AuNP size distributions. X-ray diffraction measurements of AuNP produced in chitosan confirmed crystallite size and the absence of gold-oxide despite the high-energy laser ablation. Furthermore, samples prepared in chitosan solution showed minimal agglomeration after 24 months.

  4. Characterization of Ultrafast Laser-Ablation Plasma Plumes at Various Ar Ambient Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Phillips, Mark C.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-07-28

    Expansion dynamics and internal plume structures of fs laser ablated brass plasma in Ar at various pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric were studied using multitude of diagnostic tools including time resolved and time integrated 2-dimensional imaging, optical time of flight measurements and visible emission spectroscopy. Temporal evolution of excited Cu and Zn species in the plume were imaged using band pass interference filters and compared its hydrodynamic expansion features with spectrally integrated images of the plume. 2D imaging coupled with monochromatic line selection showed several interesting features at various pressure levels which include velocity differences among the plume species, emission intensity distribution, plasma temperature, electron density etc. Plume confinement, enhanced signal intensity, and dual peak structures in time-of-flight profiles were observed at intermediate pressure range of ~10 Torr. Optimum signal to background ratio was also observed in this pressure range. Possible mechanisms for observed changes in plume shape, optical emission intensity and dual peak structures in time-of-flight profiles were discussed.

  5. Characterization of Carbon Nitride Nanoparticles Prepared by Laser Ablation in Liquid for Optoelectronic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashan, Khawla S.; Mohsin, Mayyadah H.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, carbon nitride (C3N4) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by pulse laser ablation of graphite in ammonium solution, and deposited on silicon substrates by spray. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-visible spectrophotometer and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study bonding, absorption, size and morphology of the produce NPs. The FTIR absorption peaks at 2121.6, 1631.7 and 1384 cm-1 stretching vibration bond, it is inferred for the C?N, C=N and C-N, respectively. Bonds suggests the formation, C3N4 NPs. UV absorption peaks coincide with the electronic transitions corresponding to the formation, C3N4 NPs with 3.98 eV optical bandgap. The TEM show the aggregation of the C3N4 NPs with size ranges from 4 to 83 nm, and also the leaf-like structure are shown in the structure of C3N4 suspension. High performance rectifying C3N4/Si heterojunction with a rectifying ratio exceeding 345 at V = 5V was obtained, with high photoresponsivity of 2.33 A/W at 600 nm.The results show that C3N4 NPs on silicon substrates will act as very good candidates for making high efficiency photodiodes.

  6. Optical transmission and laser ablation of pathologically changed eye lens capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamidov, A. A.; Bolshunov, A. V.; Yuzhakov, A. V.; Shcherbakov, E. M.; Baum, O. I.; Sobol, E. N.

    2015-02-01

    Optical transmission and ablation mechanisms in the secondary cataract films under the impact of 1.06-mm laser radiation are studied. The comparison of incident and transmitted (paraxial) radiation power at different values of the power density is carried out for two types of the eye lens capsule tissue (hard and soft) possessing different optical and mechanical properties. It is found that the effective attenuation coefficient for soft films is almost five times as large as that for the hard ones. The obtained measurement data on the transparency variation in the process of laser action allow the temperature evaluation and the determination of dominant mechanism of laser ablation, as well as the development of recommendations, providing the prevention or reduction of possible side effects. The obtained results can be used to optimise the regimes of laser impact in the process of the opacified lens capsule removal.

  7. Krypton fluoride excimer laser ablation of tooth tissues: precision tissue machining.

    PubMed

    Moss, J P; Patel, B C; Pearson, G J; Arthur, G; Lawes, R A

    1994-10-01

    A variety of lasers using different wavelengths have been used to remove dental hard tissue. The infrared lasers produce their effects photothermally whereas ultraviolet excimer lasers remove tissue in a controlled and precise manner by photoablation. This study investigates the use of 248 nm laser radiation in the precision removal of both enamel and dentine using diffraction limited ultraviolet optics. The data showed that enamel and dentine were machined to a high level of precision (1-2 micron tolerances). The rate of removal was greater in dentine than enamel at a range of energy densities between 1.15 and 2.2 J/cm2. The method of removal of both tissues appears to be by the preferential ablation of the organic phases of each, exposing the anatomical details of their structure. An explanation of the possible method of ablation is proposed for these tissues. PMID:7841289

  8. Early plume expansion in atmospheric pressure midinfrared laser ablation of water-rich targets Zhaoyang Chen and Akos Vertes*

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Early plume expansion in atmospheric pressure midinfrared laser ablation of water-rich targets laser pulses at atmospheric pressure. To describe the laser-target interaction and the plume expansion applications 19,23 . For example, atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization AP

  9. Dynamics of the plumes produced by ultrafast laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T.; Lunney, J. G.; Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Wang, X.; Ni, X.

    2010-08-15

    We have analyzed ultrafast laser ablation of a metallic target (Nickel) in high vacuum addressing both expansion dynamics of the various plume components (ionic and nanoparticle) and basic properties of the ultrafast laser ablation process. While the ion temporal profile and ion angular distribution were analyzed by means of Langmuir ion probe technique, the angular distribution of the nanoparticulate component was characterized by measuring the thickness map of deposition on a transparent substrate. The amount of ablated material per pulse was found by applying scanning white light interferometry to craters produced on a stationary target. We have also compared the angular distribution of both the ionic and nanoparticle components with the Anisimov model. While the agreement for the ion angular distribution is very good at any laser fluence (from ablation threshold up to {approx_equal}1 J/cm{sup 2}), some discrepancies of nanoparticle plume angular distribution at fluencies above {approx_equal}0.4 J/cm{sup 2} are interpreted in terms of the influence of the pressure exerted by the nascent atomic plasma plume on the initial hydrodynamic evolution of the nanoparticle component. Finally, analyses of the fluence threshold and maximum ablation depth were also carried out, and compared to predictions of theoretical models. Our results indicate that the absorbed energy is spread over a length comparable with the electron diffusion depth L{sub c} ({approx_equal}30 nm) of Ni on the timescale of electron-phonon equilibration and that a logarithmic dependence is well-suited for the description of the variation in the ablation depth on laser fluence in the investigated range.

  10. Spatio-temporal mapping of ablated species in ultrafast laser-produced graphite plasmas

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Spatio-temporal mapping of ablated species in ultrafast laser-produced graphite plasmas K. F. Al pressures. Plasmas were generated by irradiating planar graphite targets using 40 fs pulses of 800 nm species popu- lations, emission, and kinetics. In recent years, graphite based nanomaterials (graphene

  11. SiOx Nanodandelion by Laser Ablation for Anode of Lithium-Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Hongjun; Pan, Wei; Gong, Jianghong; Khalid, Bilal; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Silicon-based nanoparticles with unique "nanodandelion" structures are synthesized by a simple and efficient laser ablation method. Such material can be used as a stable anode for Li-ion batteries with a high capacity of ?1500 mAh g(-1) and for more than 800 electrochemical cycles without obvious capacity decay. PMID:26449629

  12. Laser-ablated titania nanoparticles for aqueous processed hybrid solar cells.

    PubMed

    Körstgens, V; Pröller, S; Buchmann, T; Moseguí González, D; Song, L; Yao, Y; Wang, W; Werhahn, J; Santoro, G; Roth, S V; Iglev, H; Kienberger, R; Müller-Buschbaum, P

    2015-02-21

    Titania nanoparticles are produced by laser ablation in liquid in order to initiate functionalization of titania with the polymer for the active layer. By combining these titania nanoparticles and water-soluble poly[3-(potassium-6-hexanoate)thiophene-2,5-diyl] (P3P6T) hybrid solar cells are realized. PMID:25623567

  13. Low-cost facile fabrication of flexible transparent copper electrodes by nanosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Paeng, Dongwoo; Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Yeo, Junyeob; Lee, Daeho; Kim, Eunpa; Ko, Seung Hwan; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2015-05-01

    Low-cost Cu flexible transparent conducting electrodes (FTCEs) are fabricated by facile nanosecond laser ablation. The fabricated Cu FTCEs show excellent opto-electrical properties (transmittance: 83%, sheet resistance: 17.48 ? sq(-1)) with outstanding mechanical durability. Successful demonstration of a touch-screen panel confirms the potential applicability of Cu FTCEs to the flexible optoelectronic devices. PMID:25821011

  14. Laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) high temperature superconductor coplanar waveguide resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valco, G. J.; Blemker, A. R.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1992-05-01

    Several 8.8-GHz coplanar waveguide resonators are fabricated and tested that are made from laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films on LaAlO3 substrates. A quality factor of 1250 at 77 K was measured. A correlation between the microwave performance of the resonators and the critical temperature and morphology of the films was observed.

  15. Note: Laser ablation technique for electrically contacting a buried implant layer in single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, M. P.; Baldwin, J. W.; Butler, J. E.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2011-05-15

    The creation of thin, buried, and electrically conducting layers within an otherwise insulating diamond by annealed ion implantation damage is well known. Establishing facile electrical contact to the shallow buried layer has been an unmet challenge. We demonstrate a new method, based on laser micro-machining (laser ablation), to make reliable electrical contact to a buried implant layer in diamond. Comparison is made to focused ion beam milling.

  16. Treatment of Striae Distensae with Nonablative Fractional Laser versus Ablative CO2 Fractional Laser: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yang, You Jin

    2011-01-01

    Background Striae distensae are atrophic dermal scars with overlying epidermal atrophy causing significant cosmetic concern. Although a variety of laser and light sources have been used for the treatment of striae distensae, to date no definite 'gold standard' treatment modality has been determined. Objective To assess and compare the efficacy and safety of nonablative fractional photothermolysis and ablative CO2 fractional laser resurfacing in the treatment of striae distensae. Methods Twenty-four ethnic South Korean patients with varying degrees of atrophic striae alba in the abdomen were enrolled in a randomized blind split study. The patients were treated with 1,550 nm fractional Er:Glass laser and ablative fractional CO2 laser resurfacing. Each half of the abdominal lesion was randomly selected and treated three times at intervals of 4-weeks using the same parameters. Digital photography was conducted and skin elasticity and the width of the widest striae in each subject were measured at the baseline and 4 weeks after the final treatment. Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing pre- and post-treatment clinical photographs by two blinded physicians and participant satisfaction rates were evaluated. Skin biopsies were taken from three participants. All adverse effects were reported during the study. Results Although they do not statistically differ, both treatments with nonablative fractional laser and ablative CO2 fractional laser showed a significant clinical and histopathologic improvement of striae distensae over pretreatment sites. Conclusion These results support the use of nonablative fractional laser and ablative CO2 fractional laser as effective and safe treatment modalities for striae distensae of Asian skin. However, neither treatment showed any greater clinical improvement than the other treatment. PMID:22148016

  17. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    SciTech Connect

    Clouthier, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  18. Effects of Yb:KYW thin-disk femtosecond laser ablation on enamel surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively evaluate the surface roughness of enamel following ablation with a Yb:KYW thin-disk femtosecond pulsed laser at different fluences (F), scanning speeds and scanning line spacings. Thirty human extracted teeth were sectioned into crowns and roots along the cementum-enamel junction, and then the crowns were cut longitudinally into sheets about 1.5 mm thick. The samples were randomly divided into ten groups (n=3). Samples of groups 1-8 were irradiated with a femtosecond pulsed laser. These enamel samples were fixed on a stage at focus plane, and a laser beam irradiated onto the samples through a galvanometric scanning system, with which rectangular movement could be achieved. Samples of groups 9 and 10 were prepared with grinding instruments. Following ablation and preparation, the samples were examined for surface roughness with a three-dimensional laser profile measurement microscope. The results showed that scanning speed and scanning line spacing had little influence on the surface roughness of femtosecond pulsed laser-ablated enamel, except when F=4 J/cm2. When a lower fluence was used, the enamel surface roughness was higher, and vice versa. This study showed that various laser fluences, scanning speeds and scanning line spacings can affect and alter enamel surface roughness. Therefore, adequate parameters should be chosen to achieve the proper therapeutic benefits.

  19. The use of ablative lasers in the treatment of facial melasma*

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Orlando Oliveira; Lemos, Érica Freitas Lima; Sousa, Márcia Carolline dos Santos; Gomes, Ciro Martins; Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho; de Paula, Carmen Déa Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Melasma represents a pigmentary disorder that is difficult to treat. This study aims to broadly review the use of ablative lasers (Er:YAG and CO2) in the treatment of melasma, presenting the level of evidence of studies published to date. A total of 75 patients were enrolled in four case series studies (n=39), one controlled clinical trial (n=6) and one randomized controlled clinical trial (n=30). Studies on the Er:YAG laser showed better results with the use of short square-shaped pulses, which determined low rates of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation and long-lasting maintenance of results. Likewise, studies on the CO2 laser proved the benefits of short pulse duration along with low-density energy. Post-treatment maintenance with the use of antipigmenting creams was necessary and effective to sustain long-term results. Ablative lasers may represent another useful and effective tool against melasma. Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and difficulty in sustaining long-term results still represent the main limitations to a broader use of ablative lasers. Based on actual evidence, the use of this technology should be restricted to patients with recalcitrant disease. Further studies will help establish optimal laser parameters and treatment regimens. PMID:23739704

  20. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J.; Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-06-28

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ?50 fs, 800?nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (?90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (?10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.