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Sample records for laser desorption ionisation

  1. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  2. Study of the mechanism of direct laser desorption/ionisation for some small organic molecules (M < 400 Daltons).

    PubMed

    Benazouz; Hakim; Debrun; Strivay; Weber

    1999-12-15

    Aspects of direct laser desorption/ionisation have been studied for three molecules, aminotriazole (positive ion), dinoterb and ioxynil (negative ion). The samples are deposited on metallic substrates, and a nitrogen laser is used for desorption/ionisation; ion yields are measured with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Previous work had shown that ion yields can strongly vary from one substrate to another, and that this variation does not reflect the (calculated) metal surface temperatures. New results obtained in this work indicate that the desorption/ionisation mechanism is linked to the physical state of the substrate surface. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10567927

  3. Beer fingerprinting by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Márová, Ivana; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2012-11-15

    A method allowing parallel fingerprinting of proteins and maltooligosaccharides directly from untreated beer samples is presented. These two classes of compounds were detected by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of beer mixed with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid solution. The maltooligosaccharide profiles acquired from the MALDI sample spot center were not found characteristic for beers of different source and technology. On the other hand, according to profiles containing protein signals acquired from crystals formed on the border of the MALDI sample spot, we were able to distinguish beer samples of the same brand produced by different breweries. The discriminatory abilities of the method were further examined on a set of 17 lager beers, where the fingerprints containing protein signals enabled resolution of majority of examined brands. We propose MALDI-TOF-MS profiling as a rapid tool for beer brewing technology process monitoring, quality control, and determination of beer authenticity. PMID:22868116

  4. In situ analysis of Titan's tholins by Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Gazeau, M.; Mahjoub, A.; Szopa, C.; Schwell, M.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of the whole project developed in collaboration (LISA/LATMOS) is to provide a better understanding of the chemical composition of Titan aerosols laboratory analogs, called tholins, and thereby of their formation pathways. The tholins are produced in the PAMPRE reactor (French acronyme for Aerosols Microgravity Production by Reactives Plasmas) developed at LATMOS. These tholins are generated in levitation (wall effects are thus limited) in a low pressure radiofrequency plasma. Up to now, the determination of the physical and chemical properties of these tholins was achieved after their collection and ex-situ analysis by several methods. Their bulk composition was then determined but their insoluble part is still unknown. Other studies were performed after the transfer of the soluble part of the aerosols to different analytical instruments. Therefore, possible artifacts could have influenced the results. We present the SMARD (a French acronym for Mass Spectrometry of Aerosols by InfraRed Laser Desorption) program. A challenging issue of our work is to perform the soluble and unsoluble parts of PAMPRE tholins' analysis in real time and in situ. The coupling of the PAMPRE reactor to a unique instrument (Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry) developed at LISA should allow determining in real time and in situ the characteristics (chemical composition together with granulometry) of the nanometric aerosols. The later are introduced in the analytical instrument using an aerodynamic lens device. Their detection and aerodynamic diameter are determined using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Then, the L2DI (Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation) technique is used in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles: they are vaporized using a 10 μm CO2 pulsed laser and the gas produced is then ionized by a 248 nm KrF Excimer laser. Finally, the molecular ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass

  5. Matrix-free mass spectrometric imaging using laser desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Richard J A; Pitt, Andrew R; Harrison, David; Weidt, Stefan K; Langridge-Smith, Pat R R; Barrett, Michael P; Logan Mackay, C

    2011-04-15

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool in metabolomics and proteomics for the spatial localization and identification of pharmaceuticals, metabolites, lipids, peptides and proteins in biological tissues. However, sample preparation remains a crucial variable in obtaining the most accurate distributions. Common washing steps used to remove salts, and solvent-based matrix application, allow analyte spreading to occur. Solvent-free matrix applications can reduce this risk, but increase the possibility of ionisation bias due to matrix adhesion to tissue sections. We report here the use of matrix-free MSI using laser desorption ionisation performed on a 12 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. We used unprocessed tissue with no post-processing following thaw-mounting on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI) indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates. The identification and distribution of a range of phospholipids in mouse brain and kidney sections are presented and compared with previously published MALDI time-of-flight (TOF) MSI distributions. PMID:21416534

  6. Solvent Separating Secondary Metabolites Directly from Biosynthetic Tissue for Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioactive metabolites are often heterogeneously expressed in tissues both spatially and over time. Therefore, traditional solvent extraction methods benefit from an understanding of the in situ sites of biosynthesis and storage to deal with heterogeneity and maximize yield. Recently, surface-assisted mass spectrometry (MS) methods namely nanostructure-assisted laser desorption ionisation (NALDI) and desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) surfaces have been developed to enable the direct detection of low molecular weight metabolites. Since direct tissue NALDI-MS or DIOS-MS produce complex spectra due to the wide variety of other metabolites and fragments present in the low mass range, we report here the use of “on surface” solvent separation directly from mollusc tissue onto nanostructured surfaces for MS analysis, as a mechanism for simplifying data annotation and detecting possible artefacts from compound delocalization during the preparative steps. Water, ethanol, chloroform and hexane selectively extracted a range of choline esters, brominated indoles and lipids from Dicathais orbita hypobranchial tissue imprints. These compounds could be quantified on the nanostructured surfaces by comparison to standard curves generated from the pure compounds. Surface-assisted MS could have broad utility for detecting a broad range of secondary metabolites in complex marine tissue samples. PMID:25786067

  7. Thermally annealed gold nanoparticles for surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    PubMed

    Pilolli, Rosa; Ditaranto, Nicoletta; Di Franco, Cinzia; Palmisano, Francesco; Cioffi, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Metal nanomaterials have an emerging role in surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) providing a useful tool to overcome some limitations intrinsically related to the use of conventional organic matrices in matrix-assisted LDI-MS. In this contribution, the possibility to use a stainless-steel-supported gold nanoparticle (AuNP) film as a versatile platform for SALDI-MS was assessed. A sacrificial anode electrosynthetic route was chosen in order to obtain morphologically controlled core-shell AuNPs; the colloidal AuNPs were, thereafter, drop cast onto a stainless-steel sample plate and the resulting AuNP film was thermally annealed in order to improve its effectiveness as LDI-MS promoter. Spectroscopic characterization of the nanostructured film by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was crucial for understanding how annealing induced changes in the surface chemistry and influenced the performance of AuNPs as desorption/ionisation promoter. In particular, it was demonstrated that the post-deposition treatments were essential to enhance the AuNP core/analyte interaction, thus resulting in SALDI-MS spectra of significantly improved quality. The AuNP films were applied to the detection of three different classes of low molecular weight (LMW) analytes, i.e. amino acids, peptides and LMW polymers, in order to demonstrate the versatility of this nanostructured material. PMID:22825677

  8. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging and its development for plant protein imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) uses the power of high mass resolution time of flight (ToF) mass spectrometry coupled to the raster of lasers shots across the cut surface of tissues to provide new insights into the spatial distribution of biomolecules within biological tissues. The history of this technique in animals and plants is considered and the potential for analysis of proteins by this technique in plants is discussed. Protein biomarker identification from MALDI-MSI is a challenge and a number of different approaches to address this bottleneck are discussed. The technical considerations needed for MALDI-MSI are reviewed and these are presented alongside examples from our own work and a protocol for MALDI-MSI of proteins in plant samples. PMID:21726462

  9. Thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry using particle suspension matrices.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anna; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S; Parr, Vic

    2002-06-01

    Particle suspension matrices have been successfully utilized for the analysis of tetracycline antibiotics by thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS). Particles of different materials and sizes have been investigated (Co-UFP, TiN, TiO2, Graphite and Silicon) by applying particle suspensions to eluted TLC plates. Mass spectra and mass chromatograms have been recorded directly from the TLC plates. Strong cationization by sodium and potassium was obtained in the positive ion mode, with [M+Na-NH3]+ ions being the predominant signals. The TLC-MALDI mass spectra recorded from graphite suspensions showed the lowest background noise and the highest peak intensities from the range of suspension matrices studied. The mass accuracy from graphite films was improved by adding the peptide Phe-Phe to the graphite suspensions. This allowed internal recalibration of the TLC-MALDI mass spectra acquired during a run. One major potential advantage of TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS has been demonstrated in the analysis of chlortetracycline and tetracycline in a mixture of oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, tetracycline and minocycline. Examination of the TLC plate prior to MALDI analysis showed only an unresolved spot for chlortetracycline and tetracycline. However by investigation of the MALDI mass spectra and plotting of single ion chromatograms separate peaks for chlortetracycline and tetracycline could be obtained. PMID:12134822

  10. Determination of agrochemical compounds in soya plants by imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Alexander K; Clench, Malcolm R; Crosland, Susan; Sharples, Kate R

    2005-01-01

    Detection and imaging of the herbicide mesotrione (2-(4-mesyl-2-nitrobenzoyl)cyclohexane-1,3-dione) and the fungicide azoxystrobin (methyl (E)-2-{2-[6-(2-cyanophenoxy)pyrimidin-4-yloxy]phenyl}-3-methoxyacrylate), on the surface of the soya leaf, and the detection and imaging of azoxystrobin inside the stem of the soya plant, have been achieved using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In leaf analysis experiments, the two pesticides were deposited onto the surface of individual soya leaves on growing plants. The soya leaves were removed and prepared for direct and indirect (following blotting onto matrix-coated cellulose membranes) imaging analysis at different periods after initial pesticide application. In stem analysis experiments, azoxystrobin was added to the nutrient solution of a soya plant growing in a hydroponics system. The plant was left for 48 h, and then horizontal and vertical stem sections were prepared for direct imaging analysis. The images obtained demonstrate the applicability of MALDI imaging to the detection and imaging of small organic compounds in plant tissue and further extend the analytical repertoire of the versatile MALDI technique. PMID:16106343

  11. Rapid assignment of malting barley varieties by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - Time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Kořán, Michal; Jakešová, Michaela; Mikulíková, Renata; Boháč, Michal; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2016-09-01

    A method for discriminating malting barley varieties based on direct matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) fingerprinting of proteins was developed. Signals corresponding to hordeins were obtained by simple mixing of powdered barley grain with a MALDI matrix solution containing 12.5mgmL(-1) of ferulic acid in an acetonitrile:water:formic acid 50:33:17 v/v/v mixture. Compared to previous attempts at MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of barley proteins, the extraction and fractionation steps were practically omitted, resulting in a significant reduction in analytical time and costs. The discriminatory power was examined on twenty malting barley varieties and the practicability of the method was tested on sixty barley samples acquired from Pilsner Urquell Brewery. The method is proposed as a rapid tool for variety assignment and purity determination of malting barley that may replace gel electrophoresis currently used for this purpose. PMID:27041307

  12. Determination of pharmaceutical compounds in skin by imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Josephine; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S

    2004-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOFMS) has been used to detect and image the distribution of a xenobiotic substance in skin. Porcine epidermal tissue was treated with 'Nizoral', a medicated shampoo containing ketoconazole (+/-)-1-acetyl-4-[p-[[(2R,4S)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl]methoxy]phenyl]piperazine) as active ingredient. Following incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C all excess formulation was washed from the surface. A cross-section of the drug-treated tissue was then blotted onto a cellulose membrane, precoated in matrix (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA)), by airspray deposition. In separate experiments the tissue surface was treated with Nizoral within a triangular former, and subsequently blotted onto a matrix-coated membrane. Sample membranes were then mounted into the recess of specialised MALDI targets with adhesive tape. All samples were analysed by MALDI-TOFMS using an Applied Biosystem 'Q-star Pulsar i' hybrid Q-TOF mass spectrometer fitted with an orthagonal MALDI ion source and imaging software. Detection of the protonated molecule was readily achievable by this technique. Treatment of the tissue within a template gave rise to images depicting the expected distribution of the drug, demonstrating that this technique is capable of producing spatially useful data. Ion images demonstrating the permeation of the applied compound into the skin were achieved by imaging a cross-sectional imprint of treated tissue. A calibration graph for the determination of ketoconazole was prepared using the sodium adduct of the matrix ion as an internal standard. This enabled construction of a quantitative profile of drug in skin. Conventional haematoxylin and eosin staining and microscopy methods were employed to obtain a histological image of the porcine epidermal tissue. Superimposing the mass spectrometric and histological images appeared to indicate drug

  13. Investigation of colloidal graphite as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    PubMed

    Warren, Alexander D; Conway, Ulric; Arthur, Christopher J; Gates, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of low molecular weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry is problematic due to the interference and suppression of analyte ionisation by the matrices typically employed - which are themselves low molecular weight compounds. The application of colloidal graphite is demonstrated here as an easy to use matrix that can promote the ionisation of a wide range of analytes including low molecular weight organic compounds, complex natural products and inorganic complexes. Analyte ionisation with colloidal graphite is compared with traditional organic matrices along with various other sources of graphite (e.g. graphite rods and charcoal pencils). Factors such as ease of application, spectra reproducibility, spot longevity, spot-to-spot reproducibility and spot homogeneity (through single spot imaging) are explored. For some analytes, considerable matrix suppression effects are observed resulting in spectra completely devoid of matrix ions. We also report the observation of radical molecular ions [M(-●) ] in the negative ion mode, particularly with some aromatic analytes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27434807

  14. 2B or not 2B, that is the question: further investigations into the use of pencil as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Langley, G John; Herniman, Julie M; Townell, Marc S

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of pencil as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) for the study of actinides has previously been demonstrated (Black et al., Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2006; 20: 1053). Here, the scope of the types of molecules amenable to analysis by this method has been extended, establishing that approximately 90% of a library containing 50 diverse small molecules can be successfully analysed by this technique. Further, the role played by the bulk materials present in the different pencil leads has been investigated and a simple one-step deposition of matrix and calibration materials has been achieved through the fabrication of different calibration pencils (Cali-Pens). PMID:17171774

  15. Identification of N-glycans from Ebola virus glycoproteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight and negative ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Gayle; Harvey, David J.; Stroeher, Ute; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Royle, Louise; Dwek, Raymond A.; Rudd, Pauline M.

    2012-01-01

    The larger fragment of the transmembrane glycoprotein (GP1) and the soluble glycoprotein (sGP) of Ebola virus were expressed in human embryonic kidney cells and the secreted products were purified from the supernatant for carbohydrate analysis. The N-glycans were released with PNGase F from within sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels. Identification of the glycans was made with normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, negative ion electrospray ionisation fragmentation mass spectrometry and exoglycosidase digestion. Most glycans were complex bi-, tri-and tetra-antennary compounds with reduced amounts of galactose. No bisected compounds were detected. Triantennary glycans were branched on the 6-antenna; fucose was attached to the core GlcNAc residue. Sialylated glycans were present on sGP but were largely absent from GP1, the larger fragment of the transmembrane glycoprotein. Consistent with this was the generally higher level of processing of carbohydrates found on sGP as evidenced by a higher percentage of galactose and lower levels of high-mannose glycans than were found on GP1. These results confirm and expand previous findings on partial characterisation of the Ebola virus transmembrane glycoprotein. They represent the first detailed data on carbohydrate structures of the Ebola virus sGP. PMID:20131323

  16. Structural characterisation of tyrosine-nitrated peptides by ultraviolet and infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petre, Brínduşa-Alina; Youhnovski, Nikolay; Lukkari, Juho; Weber, Reinhold; Przybylski, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins may occur in cells upon oxidative stress and inflammation processes mediated through generation of reactive nitroxyl from peroxynitrite. Tyrosine nitration from oxidative pathways may generate cytotoxic species that cause protein dysfunction and pathogenesis. A number of protein nitrations in vivo have been reported and some specific Tyrosine nitration sites have been recently identified using mass spectrometric methods. High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI) FT-ICR-MS) is shown here to be a highly efficient method in the determination of protein nitrations. Following the identification of nitration of the catalytic site Tyr-430 residue of bovine prostacyclin synthase, we synthesised several model peptides containing both unmodified tyrosine and 3-nitro-tyrosine residues, using solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The structures of the nitrotyrosine peptides were characterised both by ESI- and by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI)-FT-ICR-MS, using a standard ultraviolet (UV) nitrogen nitrogen laser and a 2.97 microm Nd-YAG infrared laser. Using UV-MALDI-MS, 3-nitrotyrosyl-peptides were found to undergo extensive photochemical fragmentation at the nitrophenyl group, which may hamper or prevent the unequivocal identification of Tyr-nitrations in cellular proteins. In contrast, infrared-MALDI-FT-ICR-MS did not produce fragmentation of molecular ions of Tyr-nitrated peptides. PMID:16322657

  17. A novel matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging based methodology for the identification of sexual assault suspects.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Robert; Wolstenholme, Rosalind; Blackledge, Robert D; Clench, Malcolm R; Ferguson, Leesa S; Francese, Simona

    2011-02-15

    An increase in the use of condoms by sexual offenders has been observed. This is likely to be due both to the risk of sexually transmitted diseases and to prevent the transfer of DNA evidence. In this scenario the detection of condom lubricants at a crime scene could aid in proving corpus delicti. Here we show a novel application of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) for mapping the fingermark ridge pattern simultaneously to the detection of the condom lubricant within the fingermark itself. Two condom brands have been investigated to prove the concept. Condoms were handled producing lubricant-contaminated fingermarks. Images of the ridge pattern were obtained simultaneously to the detection of two lubricants, even several weeks after the fingermark deposition. The results therefore show the potential of MALDI MSI to link the suspect (identification through fingermark ridge pattern) to the crime (detection of condom lubricant) in one analysis. This would enable forensic scientists to provide evidence with stronger support in alleged cases of sexual assault. PMID:21213360

  18. Analysis of the bovine plasma proteome by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Henning, Ann-Kristin; Groschup, Martin H; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Karger, Axel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the bovine plasma proteome was analysed using a three step protocol: (1) plasma was treated with a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) to assimilate the differences in concentrations of different proteins in raw plasma; (2) CPLL-treated material was fractionated by three standard electrophoretic separation techniques, and (3) samples were analysed by nano-liquid chromatography (nLC) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) time-of-flight tandem (TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry. The efficiencies of three fractionation protocols for plasma proteome analysis were compared. After size fractionation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), resolution of proteins was better and yields of identified proteins were higher than after charge-based fractionation by preparative gel-free isoelectric focussing. For proteins with isoelectric points >6 and molecular weights ⩾ 63 kDa, the best results were obtained with a 'shotgun' approach, in which the CPLL-treated plasma was digested and the peptides, rather than the proteins, were fractionated by gel-free isoelectric focussing. However, the three fractionation techniques were largely complementary, since only about one-third of the proteome was identified by each approach. PMID:24268478

  19. Increasing sensitivity and decreasing spot size using an inexpensive, removable hydrophobic coating for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation plates.

    PubMed

    Owen, Stacey J; Meier, Felix S; Brombacher, Stephan; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2003-01-01

    Spot size reduction and increased detection sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) of small molecules are accomplished by using an inexpensive and removable hydrophobic coating for MALDI targets, based on 3M Scotch Gard surface treatment. Several variations in sample preparation were explored, such as surface coating technique, identity of the matrix, solvent composition, and the type of metal support plate used. These were investigated on both uncoated and coated surfaces and their impact on spot size, crystal coverage, and sensitivity is presented here. Additionally, crystallisation behaviour obtained on coated plates is compared with that on uncoated plates using scanning electron microscope analysis. To demonstrate the potential of the new coating technique, erythromycin A and valinomycin are studied to determine the increase in detection sensitivity of coated plates in comparison to uncoated plates, and to reveal the suitability of the plates for application in combined high-performance liquid chromatography/MALDI (HPLC/MALDI), where widely varying solvent compositions and droplet volumes are observed. It is shown that enhancements in detection sensitivities correlate very well with the achieved spot size reduction. The versatility of the coated plates is also exhibited by the ease of removing the surface layer, after which the plates can be rigorously cleaned without worry about damaging the hydrophobic surface, followed by a quick reapplication of new hydrophobic coating material. This makes the non-polar coating superior to more expensive commercial hydrophobic-coated targets, which are much more delicate to clean. Furthermore, cleaning and reapplication eliminate potential carry-over effects and the easy application procedure also makes the fabrication of inexpensive, disposable MALDI targets readily possible. PMID:14587091

  20. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry: rapid identification of bacteria isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Baillie, S; Ireland, K; Warwick, S; Wareham, D; Wilks, M

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research into the diagnosis and management of cystic fibrosis (CF) over the past decades, sufferers still have a median life expectancy of less than 37 years. Respiratory tract infections have a significant role in increasing the morbidity and mortality of patients with CF via a progressive decline in lung function. Rapid identification of organisms recovered from CF sputum is necessary for effective management of respiratory tract infections; however, standard techniques of identification are slow, technically demanding and expensive. The aim of this study is to asses the suitability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in identifying bacteria isolated from the respiratory tract of patients with CF, and is assessed by testing the accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS in identifying samples from a reference collection of rare CF strains in conjunction with comparing MALDI-TOF MS and standard techniques in identifying clinical isolates from sputum samples of CF patients. MALDI-TOF MS accurately identified 100% of isolates from the reference collection of rare CF pathogens (EuroCare CF collection). The isolate identification given by MALDI-TOF MS agreed with that given by standard techniques for 479/481 (99.6%) clinical isolates obtained from respiratory samples provided by patients with CE In two (0.4%) of 481 samples there was a discrepancy in identification between MALDI-TOF MS and standard techniques. One organism was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by MALDI-TOF but could only be identified by the laboratory's standard methods as of the Pseudomonas genus. The second organism was identified as P. beteli by MALDI-TOF MS and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia by standard methods. This study shows that MALDI-TOF MS is superior to standard techniques in providing cheap, rapid and accurate identification of CF sputum isolates. PMID:24400425

  1. Oral brush biopsy analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry profiling--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Remmerbach, Torsten W; Maurer, Katja; Janke, Sebastian; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Eschrich, Klaus; Bertolini, Julia; Hofmann, Herbert; Rupf, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) often present as advanced tumours requiring aggressive local and regional therapy and result in significant functional impairment. The objective is to develop pre-symptomatic screening detection of OSCC by a brush biopsy method which is less invasive than the conventional biopsy for histology. Given the molecular heterogeneity of oral cancer, it is unlikely that even a panel of tumour markers would provide accurate diagnosis. Therefore, approaches such as the matrix-assisted-laser-desorption/ionisation-time-of-flight-mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) allow several biomarkers or peptide profile patterns to be simultaneously assessed. Brush biopsies from 27 patients with histology-proven OSCCs plus 40 biopsies from 10 healthy controls were collected. MALDI-TOF-MS profiling was performed and additional statistical analysis of the data was used to classify the disease status according to the biological behaviour of the lesion. For classification a support vector machine algorithm was trained using spectra of brush biopsy samples to distinguish healthy control patients from patients with histology-proven OSCC. MALDI-TOF-MS was able to distinguish between healthy patients and OSCC patients with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 93%. In summary, MALDI-TOF-MS in combination with sophisticated bioinformatic methods can distinguish OSCC patients from non-cancer controls with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Further improvement and validation of this approach is necessary to determine its feasibility to assist the pre-symptomatic detection of head and neck cancer screening in routine daily practice. PMID:21354855

  2. A quick and easy method to identify bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pennanec, Xaviera; Dufour, Alain; Haras, Dominique; Réhel, Karine

    2010-02-01

    Concerns with water quality have increased in recent years, in part due to the more frequent contamination of water by pathogens like E. coli and L. pneumophila. Current methods for the typing of bacteria in water samples are based on culture of samples on specific media. These techniques are time-consuming, subject to the impact of interferents and do not totally meet all the requirements of prevention. There is a need for accurate and rapid identification of these microorganisms. This report deals with the detection of bacteria, more precisely of Legionella spp., and the development of an analytical strategy for a rapid and unambiguous identification of these pathogens in water from diverse origins. Therefore, a protein mass mapping using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) of whole bacteria combined with a home-made database of bacteria spectra is applied. A large variety of different bacteria and microorganisms is used to approach the actual composition of samples with numerous interferents. The objective is to propose a universal method for sampling preparation before MALDI MS analysis and optimised spectrometric conditions for reproducible intense peaks. Several experimental factors known to influence signal quality such as time and media of culture have been studied. The proposed method gives promising results for a sure differentiation of Legionella species and subspecies and a rapid identification of bacteria which are the most dangerous or difficult to eradicate. This method is easy to perform with an excellent reproducibility. The analytical protocol and the corresponding database were validated on samples from different origins (cooling tower, plumbing hot water). PMID:20049880

  3. Homogeneous sample preparation for automated high throughput analysis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Onnerfjord, P; Ekström, S; Bergquist, J; Nilsson, J; Laurell, T; Marko-Varga, G

    1999-01-01

    This work presents a simple method for obtaining homogeneous sample surfaces in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) for the automated analysis of peptides and proteins. The sample preparation method is based on applying the sample/matrix mixture onto a pre-deposited highly diluted matrix spot. The pre-deposited crystals act as seeds for the new sample containing crystals which become much smaller in size and more evenly distributed than with conventional methods. This 'seed-layer' method was developed, optimised and compared with the dried-droplet method using peptides and proteins in the 1000-20,000 Da range. The seed-layer method increases the surface homogeneity, spot to spot reproducibility and sample washability as compared with the commonly used dried-droplet method. This methodology is applicable to alpha-cyanohydroxycinnamic acid, sinapinic acid and ferulic acid, which all form homogeneous crystal surfaces. Within-spot variation and between-spot variation was investigated using statistics at a 95% confidence level (n = 36). The statistical values were generated from more than 5000 data points collected from 500 spectra. More than 90% of the sample locations results in high intensity spectra with relatively low standard deviations (RSDs). Typically obtained data showed an RSD of 19-35% within a sample spot as well as in-between spots for proteins, and an RSD of < or = 50% for peptides. Linear calibration curves were obtained within one order of magnitude using internal calibration with a point-RSD of 3% (n = 10). The sample homogeneity allows mass spectra (average of 16 laser shots) to be obtained on each individual sample within 15 sec, whereby a 100 spot target plate can be run in 25 min. High density target plates using the seed-layer method were prepared by spotting approximately 100 picoliter droplets onto the target, resulting in sample spots < or = 500 microns in diameter using a flow

  4. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS analysis being faster than

  5. A peptidomic approach for monitoring and characterising peptide cyanotoxins produced in Italian lakes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferranti, Pasquale; Nasi, Antonella; Bruno, Milena; Basile, Adriana; Serpe, Luigi; Gallo, Pasquale

    2011-05-15

    In recent years, the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic freshwaters has been described all over the world, including most European countries. Blooms of cyanobacteria may produce mixtures of toxic secondary metabolites, called cyanotoxins. Among these, the most studied are microcystins, a group of cyclic heptapeptides, because of their potent hepatotoxicity and activity as tumour promoters. Other peptide cyanotoxins have been described whose structure and toxicity have not been thoroughly studied. Herein we present a peptidomic approach aimed to characterise and quantify the peptide cyanotoxins produced in two Italian lakes, Averno and Albano. The procedure was based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis for rapid detection and profiling of the peptide mixture complexity, combined with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of- flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) which provided unambiguous structural identification of the main compounds, as well as accurate quantitative analysis of microcystins. In the case of Lake Averno, a novel variant of microcystin-RR and two novel anabaenopeptin variants (Anabaenopeptins B(1) and Anabaenopeptin F(1)), presenting homoarginine in place of the commonly found arginine, were detected and characterised. In Lake Albano, the peculiar peptide patterns in different years were compared, as an example of the potentiality of the peptidomic approach for fast screening analysis, prior to fine structural analysis and determination of cyanotoxins, which included six novel aeruginosin variants. This approach allows for wide range monitoring of cyanobacteria blooms, and to collect data for evaluating possible health risks to consumers, through the panel of the compounds produced along different years. PMID:21488115

  6. Characterisation of ship diesel primary particulate matter at the molecular level by means of ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry coupled to laser desorption ionisation--comparison of feed fuel, filter extracts and direct particle measurements.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Schwemer, Theo; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    In this study, positive-mode laser desorption-ionisation ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LDI-FT-ICR-MS) was applied to study combustion aerosol samples obtained from a ship diesel engine as well as the feed fuel, used to operate the engine. Furthermore, particulate matter was sampled from the exhaust tube using an impactor and analysed directly from the impaction foil without sample treatment. From the high percentage of shared sum formula as well as similarities in the chemical spread of aerosol and heavy fuel oil, results indicate that the primary aerosol mainly consists of survived, unburned species from the feed fuel. The effect of pyrosynthesis could be observed and was slightly more pronounced for the CH-class compared to other compound classes, but in summary not dominant. Alkylation pattern as well as the aromaticity distribution, using the double bond equivalent, revealed a shift towards lower alkylation state for the aerosol. The alkylation pattern of the most dominant series revealed a higher correlation between different aerosol samples than between aerosol and feed samples. This was confirmed by cluster analysis. Overall, this study shows that LDI-FT-ICR-MS can be successfully applied for the analysis of combustion aerosol at the molecular level and that sum formula information can be used to identify chemical differences between aerosol and fuel as well as between different size fractions of the particulate matter. PMID:25585886

  7. Characterisation of intact recombinant human erythropoietins applied in doping by means of planar gel electrophoretic techniques and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation linear time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stübiger, Gerald; Marchetti, Martina; Nagano, Marietta; Reichel, Christian; Gmeiner, Günter; Allmaier, Günter

    2005-01-01

    Our experiments show that it is possible to detect different types of recombinant human erythropoietins (rhEPOs), EPO-alpha, EPO-beta and novel erythropoesis stimulating protein (NESP), based on exact molecular weight (MW) determination by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) applying a high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass analyser in the linear mode. Detection limits for the highly purified, intact glycoproteins were achievable in the low fmol range (25-50 fmol) using a sample preparation method applying a hydrophobic sample support (DropStop) as MALDI target surface. These results are very promising for the development of highly sensitive detection methods for a direct identification of rhEPO after enrichment from human body fluids. During our investigation we were able to differentiate EPO-alpha, EPO-beta and NESP based on distinct molecular substructures at the protein level by specific enzymatic reactions. MW determination of the intact molecules by high resolving one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate /polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D SDS-PAGE) and isoform separation by planar isoelectric focusing (IEF) was compared with MALDI-MS data. Migration differences between the rhEPOs were observed from gel electrophoresis, whereby MWs of 38 kDa in the case of EPO-alpha/beta and 49 kDa for NESP could be estimated. In contrast, an exact MW determination by MALDI-MS based on internal calibration revealed average MWs of 29.8 +/- 0.3 kDa for EPO-alpha/beta and 36.8 +/- 0.4 kDa for NESP. IEF separation of the intact rhEPOs revealed the presence of four to eight distinct isoforms in EPO-alpha and EPO-beta, while four isoforms, which appeared in the more acidic area of the gels, were detected by immunostaining in NESP. A direct detection of the different N- or O-glycoform pattern from rhEPOs using MALDI-MS was possible by de-sialylation of the glycan structures and after de-N-glycosylation of the intact molecules. Thereby, the

  8. Forensic applications of desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Morelato, Marie; Beavis, Alison; Kirkbride, Paul; Roux, Claude

    2013-03-10

    Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an emerging analytical technique that enables in situ mass spectrometric analysis of specimens under ambient conditions. It has been successfully applied to a large range of forensically relevant materials. This review assesses and highlights forensic applications of DESI-MS including the analysis and detection of illicit drugs, explosives, chemical warfare agents, inks and documents, fingermarks, gunshot residues and drugs of abuse in urine and plasma specimens. The minimal specimen preparation required for analysis and the sensitivity of detection achieved offer great advantages, especially in the field of forensic science. PMID:23498998

  9. The effect of electrospray solvent composition on desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) efficiency and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Green, F M; Salter, T L; Gilmore, I S; Stokes, P; O'Connor, G

    2010-04-01

    In desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) the interaction between the electrospray and the surface is key to two important analytical parameters, the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. We evaluate the effect of the electrospray solvent type, organic solvent fraction with water, analyte solubility and substrate wettability on DESI erosion diameter and material transferral into useful ion signal. To do this five amino acids, glycine, alanine, valine, leucine and phenylalanine are prepared as thin films on three substrates, UV/ozone treated glass, glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Four different solvents, acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and propan-2-ol (IPA), are used with organic solvent fractions with water varying from 0.1 to 1. These model systems allow the solubility or wettability to be kept constant as other parameters are varied. Additionally, comparison with electrospray ionisation (ESI) allows effects of ionisation efficiency to be determined. It is shown that the DESI efficiency is linearly dependent on the solubility (for these materials at least) and for analytes with solubilities below 1.5 g kg(-1), additional strategies may be required for DESI to be effective. We show that the DESI erosion diameter improves linearly with organic solvent fraction, with an organic solvent fraction of 0.9 instead of 0.5 leading to a 2 fold improvement. Furthermore, this leads to a 35 fold increase in DESI efficiency, defined as the molecular ion yield per unit area. It is shown that these improvements correlate with smaller droplet sizes rather than surface wetting or ionisation. PMID:20349538

  10. Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of low molecular weight synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anthony T; Williams, Jonathan P; Scrivens, James H

    2006-01-01

    A range of low molecular weight synthetic polymers has been characterised by means of desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) combined with both mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Accurate mass experiments were used to aid the structural determination of some of the oligomeric materials. The polymers analysed were poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(alpha-methyl styrene). An application of the technique for characterisation of a polymer used as part of an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical tablet is described. The mass spectra and tandem mass spectra of all of the polymers were obtained in seconds, indicating the sensitivity of the technique. PMID:16912984

  11. High throughput volatile fatty acid skin metabolite profiling by thermal desorption secondary electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Helen J; Reynolds, James C; Riazanskaia, Svetlana; Thomas, C L Paul

    2014-09-01

    The non-invasive nature of volatile organic compound (VOC) sampling from skin makes this a priority in the development of new screening and diagnostic assays. Evaluation of recent literature highlights the tension between the analytical utility of ambient ionisation approaches for skin profiling and the practicality of undertaking larger campaigns (higher statistical power), or undertaking research in remote locations. This study describes how VOC may be sampled from skin and recovered from a polydimethylsilicone sampling coupon and analysed by thermal desorption (TD) interfaced to secondary electrospray ionisation (SESI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for the high throughput screening of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from human skin. Analysis times were reduced by 79% compared to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods (GC-MS) and limits of detection in the range 300 to 900 pg cm(-2) for VFA skin concentrations were obtained. Using body odour as a surrogate model for clinical testing 10 Filipino participants, 5 high and 5 low odour, were sampled in Manilla and the samples returned to the UK and screened by TD-SESI-MS and TD-GC-MS for malodour precursors with greater than >95% agreement between the two analytical techniques. Eight additional VFAs were also identified by both techniques with chains 4 to 15 carbons long being observed. TD-SESI-MS appears to have significant potential for the high throughput targeted screening of volatile biomarkers in human skin. PMID:24992564

  12. Quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slutsky, M. S.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    A quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption (LSDE) is presented and critically analyzed. It is shown how LSDE depends on laser-pulse characteristics and surface-lattice dynamics. Predictions of the theory for a Debye model of the lattice dynamics are compared to recent experimental results.

  13. Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Ya

    2006-04-30

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  14. Laser-desorption mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and the mechanism of desorption ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zakett, D.; Schoen, A.E.; Cooks, R.G.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1981-03-11

    This paper reports sucrose mass spectra obtained by combining laser desorption with mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Remarkable similarities in fragmentation behavior with secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) provide evidence for mechanistic similarities between SIMS and laser desorption (LD). Attachment of alkali metals to organic molecules (cationization) is a common feature of desorption ionization. This process also occurs during laser desorption of involatile compounds which further indicates the existence of underlying similarities between LD and SIMS. Steady ion currents (several thousand ions per laser pulse) of cationized sucrose are obtained for relatively long periods (minutes).

  15. Ambient pressure laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption ion mobility spectrometry detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Sven; Walte, Andreas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-11-19

    The development of fast, mobile, and sensitive detection systems for security-relevant substances is of enormous importance. Because of the low vapor pressures of explosives and improvised explosive devices, adequate sampling procedures are crucial. Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) are fast and sensitive instruments that are used as detection systems for explosives. Ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD) and ambient pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption (AP-LIAD) are new tools suitable to evaporate explosives in order to detect them in the vapor phase. Indeed, the most important advantage of APLD or AP-LIAD is the capability to sample directly from the surface of interest without any transfer of the analyte to other surfaces such as wipe pads. A much more gentle desorption, compared to classical thermal-based desorption, is possible with laser-based desorption using very short laser pulses. With this approach the analyte molecules are evaporated in a very fast process, comparable to a shock wave. The thermal intake is reduced considerably. The functionality of APLD and AP-LIAD techniques combined with a hand-held IMS system is shown for a wide range of common explosives such as EGDN (ethylene glycol dinitrate), urea nitrate, PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine), RDX (hexogen), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), and TNT (trinitrotoluene). Detection limits down to the low nanogram range are obtained. The successful combination of IMS detection and APLD/AP-LIAD sampling is shown. PMID:24116702

  16. Infrared Laser Desorption: Mechanisms and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, Claude Ricketts

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L^2MS), a combination of infrared (IR) laser desorption with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, to investigate (1) the mechanism of IR laser desorption, (2) the composition of aromatic molecules in extraterrestrial samples, and (3) the measurement of compound-specific carbon isotope ratios. First, a description of the mechanism of IR laser desorption of monolayer and submonolayer coverages of molecules adsorbed to an insulator surface is presented. The vibrational and translational energy distributions of aniline-d7 molecules desorbed from single-crystal sapphire (Al_2 O_3) are recorded using L ^2MS. The energy distributions are found to be in equilibrium with each other and with the temperature of the surface at the time of desorption. The translational and angular distributions of monolayer coverages are altered by the collisions of desorbing molecules with each other. Second, spatial and chemical analyses of the carbonaceous components in chondritic meteorites are presented. A microprobe L^2MS instrument (mu L^2MS) capable of analyzing samples with a spatial resolution of 40 mu m and zeptomole (10^{-21} mole) sensitivity is described and used to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in small particles and heterogeneous samples. PAH distributions are used to distinguish between samples from different meteorite classes, and the effects of thermal processing within a given meteorite class are observed. Sliced wafers of meteorite are found to contain an inhomogeneous distribution of PAHs. muL^2MS studies of meteorite samples are coordinated with scanning electron microscopy studies, and the abundances of aromatic compounds across the surface of a sample are consistent with gross structural features but not with elemental or mineralogical features. Third, a description of a method for performing compound-specific carbon isotope

  17. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  18. Rapid screening of illicit additives in weight loss dietary supplements with desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wu, Y; Zhao, Y; Sun, W; Ding, L; Guo, B; Chen, B

    2012-08-01

    Desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI), the relatively novel ambient mass spectrometry (MS) technique, was utilised to screen for illicit additives in weight-loss food. The five usually abused chemicals - fenfluramine, N-di-desmethyl sibutramine, N-mono-desmethyl sibutramine, sibutramine and phenolphthalein - were detected with the proposed DCBI-MS method. Fast single-sample and high-throughput analysis was demonstrated. Semi-quantification was accomplished based on peak areas in the ion chromatograms. Four illicit additives were identified and semi-quantified in commercial samples. As there was no tedious sample pre-treatment compared with conventional HPLC methods, high-throughput analysis was achieved with DCBI. The results proved that DCBI-MS is a powerful tool for the rapid screening of illicit additives in weight-loss dietary supplements. PMID:22784191

  19. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some methylated xanthines and the laser desorption of caffeine and theophylline from thin layer chromatography plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption/laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and xanthine are reported. These mass spectra are compared with published spectra obtained using electron impact ionization. Mass spectra of caffeine and theophylline obtained by IR laser desorption from thin layer chromatography plates are also described. The laser desorption of materials from thin layer chromatography plates is discussed.

  20. Charge Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Jorabchi, Kaveh; Westphall, Michael S.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    We propose and evaluate a new mechanism to account for analyte ion signal enhancement in ultraviolet-laser desorption mass spectrometry of droplets in the presence of corona ions. Our new insights are based on timing control of corona ion production, laser desorption, and peptide ion extraction achieved by a novel pulsed corona apparatus. We demonstrate that droplet charging rather than gas-phase ion-neutral reactions is the major contributor to analyte ion generation from an electrically isolated droplet. Implications of the new mechanism, termed charge assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI), are discussed and contrasted to those of the laser desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization method (LD-APCI). It is also demonstrated that analyte ion generation in CALDI occurs with external electric fields about one order of magnitude lower than those needed for atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization or electrospray ionization of droplets. PMID:18387311

  1. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  2. Multiphoton ionisation and dissociation of NO 2 by 50 fs laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, R. P.; Kilic, H. S.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Kosmidis, C.; McCanny, T.; Langley, A. J.; Shaikh, W.

    1996-04-01

    Multiphoton ionisation and dissociation of NO 2 has been studied experimentally at 375 nm for laser pulse widths of 10 ns and 50 fs. The parent NO 2 ion peak is not seen in the ns data. In all spectra, the main peak observed is due to the ionisation of the NO molecule which results from the dissociation of excited NO 2 formed after absorbing a 375 nm photon. The intensity dependencies of both NO and NO 2 ion peaks have also been measured. The data has been analysed within the context of a rate equation model using published cross-sections and dissociation rates except for the two-photon ionisation cross-section for NO 2 which was chosen to reproduce the NO 2/NO ion signal ratios at 50 fs. The rate equation model provides a good description of the complete set of data. Indirectly, it may be concluded that coherence effects do not play an important role in the multiphoton excitation/ionisation of NO 2. The data also rules out the importance of above-ionisation dissociation in NO 2 — a conclusion which is consistent with previous data at 496 and 248 nm for laser pulse widths ⩾ 300 fs.

  3. Hydrogen retention in tungsten materials studied by Laser Induced Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobinski, M.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Huber, A.; Reinhart, M.; Möller, S.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.; 't Hoen, M. H. J.; Manhard, A.; Schmid, K.; Textor Team

    2013-07-01

    Development of methods to characterise the first wall in ITER and future fusion devices without removal of wall tiles is important to support safety assessments for tritium retention and dust production and to understand plasma wall processes in general. Laser based techniques are presently under investigation to provide these requirements, among which Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is proposed to measure the deuterium and tritium load of the plasma facing surfaces by thermal desorption and spectroscopic detection of the desorbed fuel in the edge of the fusion plasma. The method relies on its capability to desorb the hydrogen isotopes in a laser heated spot. The application of LID on bulk tungsten targets exposed to a wide range of deuterium fluxes, fluences and impact energies under different surface temperatures is investigated in this paper. The results are compared with Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and a diffusion model.

  4. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption of Natural and Functionalized Biochromophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) has recently been established as a tool for analytical chemistry. It is capable of launching intact, neutral, or low charged molecules into a high vacuum environment. This makes it ideally suited to mass spectrometry. LIAD can be used with fragile biomolecules and very massive compounds alike. Here, we apply LIAD time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) to the natural biochromophores chlorophyll, hemin, bilirubin, and biliverdin and to high mass fluoroalkyl-functionalized porphyrins. We characterize the variation in the molecular fragmentation patterns as a function of the desorption and the VUV postionization laser intensity. We find that LIAD can produce molecular beams an order of magnitude slower than matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD), although this depends on the substrate material. Using titanium foils we observe a most probable velocity of 20 m/s for functionalized molecules with a mass m = 10 000 Da. PMID:25946522

  5. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some indole derivatives and alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1992-06-01

    The laser desorption and laser ionization mass spectra of some indole derivatives and alkaloids are described with particular reference to their modes of fragmentation. Mass spectra of yohimbine, reserpine, quinine and quinidine are presented. Full experimental details are given.

  6. LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION OF ULTRAFINE AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-line analysis of ultrafine aerosol particle in the 12 to 150 nm size range is performed by
    laser desorption/ionization. Particles are size selected with a differential mobility analyzer and then
    sent into a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer where they are ablated w...

  7. Quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Heinrich; Hunsucker, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the essential characteristics of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), especially as they relate to its applications in quantitative analysis. Approaches to quantification by MALDI-TOF MS are presented and published applications are critically reviewed. PMID:19106161

  8. LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION OF SIZE RESOLVED LIQUID MICRODROPLETS. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectra of single micrometer-size glycerol droplets containing organic and inorganic analytes were obtained by on-line laser desorption ionization. Aerosol droplets entered the mass spectrometer through an inlet where they were detected by light scattering of a continuous la...

  9. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds. PMID:25601688

  10. Suppression of the contribution of short trajectories into above-threshold ionisation spectra by a two-colour laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Zheltukhin, A. N.; Silaev, A. A.; Knyazeva, D. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Flegel', A. V.; Frolov, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied spectra of above-threshold ionisation of atoms by a two-colour laser field with collinear linearly polarised components. We have found a sharp (gap-like) dependence of the length of the high-energy plateau in above-threshold ionisation spectra on the relative phase of the two-colour field at comparable intensities of the field components. Using the quasi-classical analysis we have shown that this effect results from the suppression of partial above-threshold ionisation amplitudes, associated with closed classical trajectories of an electron in the laser field, within a certain range of relative phase values.

  11. Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry imaging of biological targets.

    PubMed

    Akhmetov, Artem; Bhardwaj, Chhavi; Hanley, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Laser desorption photoionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) utilizes two separate light sources for desorption and photoionization of species from a solid surface. This technique has been applied to study a wide variety of molecular analytes in biological systems, but is not yet available in commercial instruments. For this reason, a generalized protocol is presented here for the use of LDPI-MS imaging to detect small molecules within intact biological samples. Examples are provided here for LDPI-MS imaging of an antibiotic within a tooth root canal and a metabolite within a coculture bacterial biofilm. PMID:25361678

  12. Laser desorption in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.C.; Cisper, M.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption in a ion-trap mass spectrometer shows significant promise for both qualitative and trace analysis. Several aspects of this methodology are discussed in this work. We previously demonstrated the generation of both negative and positive ions by laser desorption directly within a quadrupole ion trap. In the present work, we explore various combinations of d.c., r.f., and time-varying fields in order to optimize laser generated signals. In addition, we report on the application of this method to analyze samples containing compounds such as amines, metal complexes, carbon clusters, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. In some cases the ability to rapidly switch between positive and negative ion modes provides sufficient specificity to distinguish different compounds of a mixture with a single stage of mass spectrometry. In other experiments, we combined intensity variation studies with tandem mass spectrometry experiments and positive and negative ion detection to further enhance specificity.

  13. Investigations into ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Heise, T.W.

    1993-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) is a technique for converting large biomolecules into gas phase ions. Some characteristics of the commonly used uv matrices are determined. Solubilities in methanol range from 0.1 to 0.5 M. Solid phase absorption spectra are found to be similar to solution, but slightly red-shifted. Acoustic and quartz crystal microbalance signals are investigated as possible means of uv-MALD quantitation. Evidence for the existence of desorption thresholds is presented. Threshold values are determined to be in the range of 2 to 3 MW/cm{sup 2}. A transient imaging technique based on laser-excited fluorescence for monitoring MALD plumes is described. Sensitivity is well within the levels required for studying matrix-assisted laser desorption, where analyte concentrations are significantly lower than those in conventional laser desorption. Results showing the effect of film morphology, particularly film thickness, on plume dynamics are presented. In particular, MALD plumes from thicker films tend to exhibit higher axial velocities. Fluorescent labeling of protein and of DNA is used to allow imaging of their uv-MALD generated plumes. Integrated concentrations are available with respect to time, making it possible to assess the rate of fragmentation. The spatial and temporal distributions are important for the design of secondary ionization schemes to enhance ion yields and for the optimization of ion collection in time-of-flight MS instruments to maximize resolution. Such information could also provide insight into whether ionization is closely associated with the desorption step or whether it is a result of subsequent collisions with the matrix gas (e.g., proton transfer). Although the present study involves plumes in a normal atmosphere, adaptation to measurements in vacuum (e.g., inside a mass spectrometer) should be straightforward.

  14. Laser-induced iodine desorption from impregnated polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Filho, A.; Leite, N. F.; Miranda, L. C. M.; Stempniak, R. A.

    1989-07-01

    The Ar+ laser-stimulated desorption of iodine molecules from an impregnated polystyrene film was investigated. The photoprocess induces a color change (from red to the transparent) and leaves in the film a marked print, which is related to the laser beam characteristics. The experimental data was fitted using a set of differential equations relating the time dependence of the film temperature and absorption coefficient. At low-power levels (<25 mW), the time evolution of the laser transmitted power could be well matched to the experimental data. The wavelength dependence of the marking process was also studied and the relative contribution of photodissociative and photothermal processes was inferred.

  15. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of vacuum UV photo-processed methanol ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, D. M.; Bossa, J.-B.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol in the interstellar medium mainly forms upon sequential hydrogenation of solid CO. With typical abundances of up to 15% (with respect to water) it is an important constituent of interstellar ices where it is considered as a precursor in the formation of large and complex organic molecules (COMs), e.g. upon vacuum UV (VUV) photo-processing or exposure to cosmic rays. Aims: This study aims at detecting novel complex organic molecules formed during the VUV photo-processing of methanol ice in the laboratory using a technique more sensitive than regular surface diagnostic tools. In addition, the formation kinetics of the main photo-products of methanol are unravelled for an astronomically relevant temperature (20 K) and radiation dose. Methods: The VUV photo-processing of CH3OH ice is studied by applying laser desorption post-ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDPI TOF-MS), and analysed by combining molecule-specific fragmentation and desorption features. Results: The mass spectra correspond to fragment ions originating from a number of previously recorded molecules and from new COMs, such as the series (CO)xH, with x = 3 and y < 3x-1, to which prebiotic glycerin belongs. The formation of these large COMs has not been reported in earlier photolysis studies and suggests that such complex species may form in the solid state under interstellar conditions.

  16. Laser Desorption of Explosives Traces with Low Vapors Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmalov, A. E.; Chistyakov, A. A.; Kotkovskii, G. E.

    In this work comparison of the desorption effectiveness of picosecond and nanosecond laser sources (λ = 266, 532 nm) were carried out to investigate the possibility of creating a non-contact sampling device for detectors of explosives on the principles of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). The results of mass spectrometric studies of TNT (2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), RDX (1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane) laser desorption from a quartz substrate are presented. It is shown that the most effective laser source is a Nd:YAG3+ laser (λ = 266 nm; E = 1 mJ; τ = 5-10 ns; q = 108 W/cm2). The typical desorbed mass is 2 ng for RDX, 4-6 ng for TNT and 0.02 ng HMX per single laser pulse. The results obtained make it possible to create a non-contact portable laser sampling device operating in frequency mode with high efficiency.

  17. Laser ablation and ionisation by laser plasma radiation in the atmospheric-pressure mass spectrometry of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pento, A V; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Grechnikov, A A; Alimpiev, S S

    2013-01-31

    A new method was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of organic and bioorganic compounds, which involves laser ablation with the ionisation of its products by laser-plasma radiation and enables analysing gaseous, liquid, and solid substances at atmospheric pressure without sample preparation. The capabilities of this method were demonstrated by the examples of fast pharmaceutical composition screening, real-time atmosphere composition analysis, and construction of the mass spectrometric images of organic compound distributions in biological materials. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  18. Desorption Dynamics, Internal Energies and Imaging of Organic Molecules from Surfaces with Laser Desorption and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2011-04-05

    There is enormous interest in visualizing the chemical composition of organic material that comprises our world. A convenient method to obtain molecular information with high spatial resolution is imaging mass spectrometry. However, the internal energy deposited within molecules upon transfer to the gas phase from a surface can lead to increased fragmentation and to complications in analysis of mass spectra. Here it is shown that in laser desorption with postionization by tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, the internal energy gained during laser desorption leads to minimal fragmentation of DNA bases. The internal temperature of laser-desorbed triacontane molecules approaches 670 K, whereas the internal temperature of thymine is 800 K. A synchrotron-based VUV postionization technique for determining translational temperatures reveals that biomolecules have translational temperatures in the range of 216-346 K. The observed low translational temperatures, as well as their decrease with increased desorption laser power is explained by collisional cooling. An example of imaging mass spectrometry on an organic polymer, using laser desorption VUV postionization shows 5 mu m feature details while using a 30 mu m laser spot size and 7 ns duration. Applications of laser desorption postionization to the analysis of cellulose, lignin and humic acids are briefly discussed.

  19. Laser Stimulated Desorption from Compound Semiconductors, Dimerization Enhanced Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, Akira; Cho, Seiji; Ichige, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    Laser stimulated desorption (LSD) of neutral particles has been investigated in compound semiconductors MX of GaN, GaP, GaAs and CdS. No effects of crystallographic orientations on the characteristics of LSD, desorption yields, mean kinetic energies, and speed ratios have been recognized among (111) and (100) orientations in GaP and GaAs. This fact suggests that LSD does not follow the unimolecular dissociation of locally excited surface bonds, but occurs via a bulky event involving a phase transtion. The threshold laser powers for LSD were correlated to the crystal bond ionicities fi, which are good measures for the structural stability of tetrahedral covalent solids. It was found that with increasing fi of the solids, threshold laser powers tend to decrease. The dominant species ejected from MX were found to be in the forms of monomer M and X as well as dimer X2. The ratio of the yields of X2 to those of X increases as the single-bond energy of X2 increases. Considering these experimental results, we propose a model of a non-local electronic excitation mechanism for LSD; namely, LSD occurs via the dimerization enhanced phase transition in a high-density electron-hole plasma.

  20. Characterization of polymer decomposition products by laser desorption mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallix, Joan B.; Lincoln, Kenneth A.; Miglionico, Charles J.; Roybal, Robert E.; Stein, Charles; Shively, Jon H.

    1993-01-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been used to characterize the ash-like substances formed on the surfaces of polymer matrix composites (PMC's) during exposure on LDEF. In an effort to minimize fragmentation, material was removed from the sample surfaces by laser desorption and desorbed neutrals were ionized by electron impact. Ions were detected in a time-of-flight mass analyzer which allows the entire mass spectrum to be collected for each laser shot. The method is ideal for these studies because only a small amount of ash is available for analysis. Three sets of samples were studied including C/polysulfone, C/polyimide and C/phenolic. Each set contains leading and trailing edge LDEF samples and their respective controls. In each case, the mass spectrum of the ash shows a number of high mass peaks which can be assigned to fragments of the associated polymer. These high mass peaks are not observed in the spectra of the control samples. In general, the results indicate that the ash is formed from decomposition of the polymer matrix.

  1. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  2. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, A V; Mavritskii, O B; Egorov, A N; Pechenkin, A A; Savchenkov, D V

    2014-12-31

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Adjustable fragmentation in laser desorption/ionization from laser-induced silicon microcolumn arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Vertes, Akos

    2006-08-15

    Laser-induced silicon microcolumn arrays (LISMA) were developed as matrix-free substrates for soft laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SLDI-MS). When low-resistivity silicon wafers were irradiated in air, sulfur hexafluoride, or water environment with multiple pulses from a 3 x omega mode-locked Nd:YAG laser, columnar structures were formed on the surface. The radii of curvature of the column tips varied with the processing environment, ranging from approximately 120 nm in water, to <1 mum in SF6, and to approximately 2 mum in air. In turn, these microcolumn arrays were used as matrix-free soft laser desorption substrates. In SLDI-MS experiments with a nitrogen laser, the microcolumn arrays obtained in water environment readily produced molecular ions for peptides and synthetic polymers at low laser fluence. These surfaces demonstrated the best ion yield among the three arrays. The threshold laser fluence and ion yield were comparable to those observed in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization. Low-femtomole sensitivity and approximately 6000 Da mass range were achieved. At elevated laser fluence, efficient in-source decay was observed and extensive peptide sequence information was extracted from the resulting mass spectra. The versatility of LISMA was attributed to confinement effects due to the submicrometer morphology and to the surface, thermal, and optical properties of processed silicon. PMID:16906730

  4. Laser desorption and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of 29-kDa Au:SR cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Schaaff, T Gregory

    2004-11-01

    Positive and negative ions generated by laser-based ionization methods from three gold:thiolate cluster compounds are mass analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The three compounds have similar inorganic core masses ( approximately 29 kDa, approximately 145 Au atoms) but different n-alkanethiolate ligands associated with each cluster compound (Au:SR, R = butane, hexane, dodecane). Irradiation of neat films (laser desorption/ionization) and films generated by dilution of the cluster compounds in an organic acid matrix (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization) with a nitrogen laser (337 nm) produced distinct ion abundances that are relevant to different structural aspects of the cluster compound. Laser desorption/ionization of neat Au:SR compound films produces ions consistent with the inorganic core mass (i.e., devoid of original hydrocarbon content). Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization produces either ions with m/z values consistent with the core mass of the cluster compounds or ions with m/z values consistent with the approximate molecular weight of the cluster compounds, depending on ionization conditions. The ion abundances, and ionization conditions under which they are detected, provide insight into desorption/ionization processes for these unique cluster compounds as well as other analytes typically studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization. PMID:15516109

  5. Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry: Sensitive and Quantitative Chemical Depth Profiling of Solid Materials.

    PubMed

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Direct quantitative and sensitive chemical analysis of solid materials with high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction is of high importance in various fields of analytical research, ranging from in situ space research to the semiconductor industry. Accurate knowledge of the chemical composition of solid materials allows a better understanding of physical and chemical processes that formed/altered the material and allows e.g. to further improve these processes. So far, state-of-the-art techniques such as SIMS, LA-ICP-MS or GD-MS have been applied for chemical analyses in these fields of research. In this report we review the current measurement capability and the applicability of our Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (instrument name LMS) for the chemical analysis of solids with high spatial resolution. The most recent chemical analyses conducted on various solid materials, including e.g. alloys, fossils and meteorites are discussed. PMID:27131112

  6. The Application of Ultrafast Laser Pulses to Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yang

    Ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses display exceptional performance for the selective ablation of materials, includes metals, semiconductors, and biological tissues. They do not damage the remaining unablated portion of a sample, which permits the possibility of depth profiling by repeat sampling at the same location. With sufficiently micro-focused fs laser pulse length beam, high lateral resolution mass spectrometry imaging is possible, while sample damage may degrade ultimate lateral resolution in some other methods. Combining imaging and depth profiling could ultimately leads to tomographical mass spectrometry or 3D imaging MS. Laser postionization, a "soft" ionization method, was combined with ultrafast laser desorption for enhanced molecular analysis. A customized femtosecond laser desorption/ablation postionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed and built. The construction and performance of both phases including the VUV source are detailed. Instrument control software was written to operate this instrument, and many automated experiments were successfully demonstrated by this software. Elemental and molecular analysis was carried out on the instrument and demonstrated exceptional performance for fs laser pulse sampling of small areas. Studies demonstrated the imaging and depth profiling capability of fs-LDPI on metals, semiconductors and intact biofilm tissues. Attempts were made to reach the limit of lateral resolution of imaging by fs-LDPI-MS. The results showed similar lateral resolution of <2 mum for both fs 800 nm and 400 nm desorption beams. To improve the repetition rate for high speed imaging application, an alternative LDPI scheme was designed and constructed. The fs 800 beam was tripled to 267 nm and delivered into the ion source as an ionization laser, while a ns 349 nm pulse laser was used for desorption. Preliminary data showed certain intact molecular ions can be detected. Fragmentation tendency was measured against various

  7. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry for DNA Sequencing and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Golovlev, V. V.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    1998-03-01

    Rapid DNA sequencing and/or analysis is critically important for biomedical research. In the past, gel electrophoresis has been the primary tool to achieve DNA analysis and sequencing. However, gel electrophoresis is a time-consuming and labor-extensive process. Recently, we have developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) to achieve sequencing of ss-DNA longer than 100 nucleotides. With LDMS, we succeeded in sequencing DNA in seconds instead of hours or days required by gel electrophoresis. In addition to sequencing, we also applied LDMS for the detection of DNA probes for hybridization LDMS was also used to detect short tandem repeats for forensic applications. Clinical applications for disease diagnosis such as cystic fibrosis caused by base deletion and point mutation have also been demonstrated. Experimental details will be presented in the meeting. abstract.

  8. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA analysis and sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been considered as a potential new method for fast DNA sequencing. Our approach is to use matrix-assisted laser desorption to produce parent ions of DNA segments and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to identify the sizes of DNA segments. Thus, the approach is similar to gel electrophoresis sequencing using Sanger`s enzymatic method. However, gel, radioactive tagging, and dye labeling are not required. In addition, the sequencing process can possibly be finished within a few hundred microseconds instead of hours and days. In order to use mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing, the following three criteria need to be satisfied. They are (1) detection of large DNA segments, (2) sensitivity reaching the femtomole region, and (3) mass resolution good enough to separate DNA segments of a single nucleotide difference. It has been very difficult to detect large DNA segments by mass spectrometry before due to the fragile chemical properties of DNA and low detection sensitivity of DNA ions. We discovered several new matrices to increase the production of DNA ions. By innovative design of a mass spectrometer, we can increase the ion energy up to 45 KeV to enhance the detection sensitivity. Recently, we succeeded in detecting a DNA segment with 500 nucleotides. The sensitivity was 100 femtomole. Thus, we have fulfilled two key criteria for using mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing. The major effort in the near future is to improve the resolution. Different approaches are being pursued. When high resolution of mass spectrometry can be achieved and automation of sample preparation is developed, the sequencing speed to reach 500 megabases per year can be feasible.

  9. Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Vertes, Akos; Chen, Yong

    2011-12-27

    The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

  10. Numerical simulation of impurity desorption induced by nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Yinsheng; Lin Xiaohui; Chen Minhua; Chen Yunfei

    2006-08-01

    A model based on a stochastic process was developed to study the impurity molecule desorption from a substrate induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers. The dynamics of adsorbed molecules irradiated by the laser pulses can be considered to be a Brownian motion in the bath of excited energy carriers. A two-step model was used to describe the nonequilibrium heating process induced by the femtosecond laser pulses. The difference between the desorption processes induced by nanosecond and femtosecond lasers was discussed based on the numerical results for the desorption of CO molecules from a Ru surface. Results indicate that the femtosecond laser is a much better tool for desorption than the nanosecond laser.

  11. Two-laser infrared and ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark W; Kim, Jae-Kuk; Murray, Kermit K

    2003-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was performed using two pulsed lasers with wavelengths in the IR and UV regions. A 10.6 micro m pulsed CO(2) laser was used to irradiate a MALDI target, followed after an adjustable delay by a 337 nm pulsed nitrogen laser. The sample consisted of a 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid matrix and bovine insulin guest molecule. The pulse energy for both of the lasers was adjusted so that the ion of interest, either the matrix or guest ion, was not produced by either of the lasers alone. The delay time for maximum ion yield occurs at 1 micro s for matrix and guest ions and the signal decayed to zero in approximately 400 micro s. A mechanism is presented for enhanced UV MALDI ion yield following the IR laser pulse based on transient heating. PMID:12898657

  12. Photochemical Reactions of Aminonaphthols Caused by Laser Desorption/Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Nagoshi, Keishiro; Inatomi, Kazuma; Osaka, Issey; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    The formation of monomeric and dimeric ions of seven different aminonaphthols (ANLs) has been studied by using laser desorption/ionization (LDI) with a nitrogen laser. The positive-ion data of all the ANLs merely showed molecular ion M·+ without protonated molecule [M+H]+, while 1-amino-2-naphthol (1,2-ANL) and 2-amino-1-naphthol (2,1-ANL) showed an intense dimeric ion [2 M−2H2O+H]+. The negative-ion data showed deprotonated molecule [M−H]− in common, while the spectra of 1,2-ANL, 2,1-ANL and 8-amino-2-naphthol (8,2-ANL) accompanied an intense peak corresponding to negative molecular ion M·− and the 8,2-ANL and 4-amino-1-naphthol (4,1-ANL) accompanied dehydrogenated anion [M−2H]·−. The formation of monomeric ions was discussed from the standpoints of thermochemical properties such as ionization energy, gas-phase acidity, electron affinity, and bond dissociation energy. The formation of dimeric ions [2 M−2H2O+H]+ observed in the 1,2-ANL and 2,1-ANL could be explained by the radical combination in the amino groups. An isomer 5-amino-1-naphthol (1-ANL) did not give any dimeric ions in the both positive- and negative-ion spectra. The influence of laser fluence upon the appearance of the monomeric ions such as M·+, [M+H]+, [M−H]− and [M−2H]·− of the 5,1-ANL has been examined. PMID:27563510

  13. Photochemical Reactions of Aminonaphthols Caused by Laser Desorption/Ionization.

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Keishiro; Inatomi, Kazuma; Osaka, Issey; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    The formation of monomeric and dimeric ions of seven different aminonaphthols (ANLs) has been studied by using laser desorption/ionization (LDI) with a nitrogen laser. The positive-ion data of all the ANLs merely showed molecular ion M(·+) without protonated molecule [M+H](+), while 1-amino-2-naphthol (1,2-ANL) and 2-amino-1-naphthol (2,1-ANL) showed an intense dimeric ion [2 M-2H2O+H](+). The negative-ion data showed deprotonated molecule [M-H](-) in common, while the spectra of 1,2-ANL, 2,1-ANL and 8-amino-2-naphthol (8,2-ANL) accompanied an intense peak corresponding to negative molecular ion M(·-) and the 8,2-ANL and 4-amino-1-naphthol (4,1-ANL) accompanied dehydrogenated anion [M-2H](·-). The formation of monomeric ions was discussed from the standpoints of thermochemical properties such as ionization energy, gas-phase acidity, electron affinity, and bond dissociation energy. The formation of dimeric ions [2 M-2H2O+H](+) observed in the 1,2-ANL and 2,1-ANL could be explained by the radical combination in the amino groups. An isomer 5-amino-1-naphthol (1-ANL) did not give any dimeric ions in the both positive- and negative-ion spectra. The influence of laser fluence upon the appearance of the monomeric ions such as M(·+), [M+H](+), [M-H](-) and [M-2H](·-) of the 5,1-ANL has been examined. PMID:27563510

  14. Ambient Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanosecond Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of <100 fs to enable matrix-free laser vaporization with little or no fragmentation. When coupled to electrospray ionization, femtosecond laser vaporization provides a universal, rapid mass spectral analysis method requiring no sample workup. Remarkably, laser pulses with intensities exceeding 1013 W cm-2 desorb intact macromolecules, such as proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  15. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Ch`ang, L.Y.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K.J.

    1995-09-01

    During the past few years, major effort has been directed toward developing mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biomedical research. Hellenkamp and his co-workers were the first to report that large polypeptide molecules can be ionized and detected without significant fragmentation when a greater number of nicotinic acid molecules are used as a matrix. This method is now well known as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Since then, various groups have reported measurements of very large proteins by MALDI. Reliable protein analysis by MALDI is more or less well established. However, the application of MALDI to nucleic acids analysis has been found to be much more difficult. Most research on the measurement of nucleic acid by MALDI were stimulated by the Human Genome Project. Up to now, the only method for reliable routine analysis of nucleic acid is gel electrophoresis. Different sizes of nucleic acids can be separated in gel medium when a high electric field is applied to the gel. However, the time needed to separate different sizes of DNA segments usually takes from several minutes to several hours. If MALDI can be successfully used for nucleic acids analysis, the analysis time can be reduced to less than I millisecond. In addition, no tagging with radioactive materials or chemical dyes is needed. In this work, we will review recent progress related to MALDI for DNA analysis.

  16. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Sample-matrix effects in infrared laser neutral desorption, multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavis, R. C.; Lindner, J.; Grotemeyer, J.; Schlag, E. W.

    1988-05-01

    Sample-matrix effects in laser evaporation of intact neutral molecules (LEIM) prior to multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (MUPI MS) are studied. The results show that a strong influence exists in adding matrix materials to the sample upon the desorption step. Using sugars as matrix leads to a suppression of pyrolysis products in small peptides by the laser desorption. As a result mass spectrometric signals due to the pyrolysis products are avoided.

  19. Estimation of useful yield in surface analysis using single photon ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Moore, J. F.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Savina, M. R.; Tripa, C. E.

    2003-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and laser desorption photoionisation (LDPI) have been used to investigate the desorption of molecules from self-assembled monolayers of phenylsulphides. LDPI, using an F 2 excimer laser to single photon ionise gave the lowest fragmentation. A useful yield greater than 0.5% was found for analysis of diphenyldisulphide self-assembled monolayers. It is shown that using a free electron laser to postionise will lead, in the future, to analysis of many atoms and molecules with useful yields approaching 30%.

  20. Ionisation and fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by femtosecond laser pulses at wavelengths resonant with cation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, L.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Tasker, A. D.; McKenna, P.; McCanny, T.; Kosmidis, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Jones, D. R.; Issac, R. C.; Jamieson, S.

    2002-07-01

    When femtosecond laser pulses irradiate hydrocarbon molecules, then many fragmentation channels evident in nanosecond irradiation are bypassed, providing a strong analytically useful parent ion. However a number of molecules show only a very small or indeed no parent ions and recent papers suggest that those that do not produce parent peaks have cation transitions in resonance with the femtosecond laser wavelength. This Letter shows that this resonance effect is not universal and some aromatic molecules not only show strong parent peaks but also doubly and triply ionised entities when their cation absorption spectrum is strongly resonant at either the 800 or 400 nm or indeed both.

  1. Laser Desorption Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy of Hydrated Tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Hikari; Shimozono, Yoko; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Carcabal, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    The structure of tyrosine (tyr) consists of amino-acid chain and phenol, and it has roughly two possible binding sites for water, amino-acid site and phenolic OH site. Investigating how water molecule binds to tyr will give fundamental information for hydrations of peptide and protein. Resonance enhanced multi photon ionization (REMPI) spectrum of tyr-water 1:1 cluster has already been reported by de Vries and co-workers, however, no analysis on the hydrated structures has been reported. In the REMPI spectrum, two clusters of bands are observed; one appears at ˜35600 cm^{-1} energy region which is the almost same with 0-0 transitions of tyr monomer, and another is observed at ˜300 cm^{-1} lower than the former. Based on the electronic transition energy of phenylalanine and the hydrated clusters, the former is expected to be derived from a structure that water binds to amino acid site. On the other hand, it is plausibly predicted that the latter originates from a structure that water binds to phenolic OH group, because the electronic transition of mono hydrated phenol is ˜300 cm^{-1} red-shifted from the monomer. We applied IR dip spectroscopy which can measure conformer selective IR spectra to the tyr-(H_{2}O)_{1} clusters by using laser desorption supersonic jet technique to confirm the assignments. Especially in the phenolic OH bound isomer, it was found that the intra molecular hydrogen bond within amino-acid chain, which is far from the water molecule and cannot interact directly with each other, is strengthened by the hydration. A. Abio-Riziq et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 6077 (2011). Y. Shimozono, et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., (2013) DOI: 10.1039/c3cp43573c. T. Ebata et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 4783 (2006). T. Watanabe et al., J. Chem. Phys., 105, 408 (1996).

  2. Electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct ambient analysis of solids.

    PubMed

    Shiea, Jentaie; Huang, Min-Zon; Hsu, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Chi-Yang; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Beech, Iwona; Sunner, Jan

    2005-01-01

    A new method of electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) mass spectrometry, which combines laser desorption with post-ionization by electrospray, was applied to rapid analysis of solid materials under ambient conditions. Analytes were desorbed from solid metallic and insulating substrata using a pulsed nitrogen laser. Post-ionization produced high-quality mass spectra characteristic of electrospray, including protein multiple charging. For the first time, mass spectra of intact proteins were obtained using laser desorption without adding a matrix. Bovine cytochrome c and an illicit drug containing methaqualone were chosen in this study to demonstrate the applicability of ELDI to the analysis of proteins and synthetic organic compounds. PMID:16299699

  3. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC

  4. Polarization dependent fragmentation of ions produced by laser desorption from nanopost arrays.

    PubMed

    Stolee, Jessica A; Vertes, Akos

    2011-05-28

    Tailored silicon nanopost arrays (NAPA) enable controlled and resonant ion production in laser desorption ionization experiments and have been termed nanophotonic ion sources (Walker et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2010, 114, 4835-4840). As the post dimensions are comparable to or smaller than the laser wavelength, near-field effects and localized electromagnetic fields are present in their vicinity. In this contribution, we explore the desorption and ionization mechanism by studying how surface derivatization affects ion yields and fragmentation. We demonstrate that by increasing the laser fluence on derivatized NAPA with less polar surfaces that have decreased interaction energy between the structured silicon substrate and the adsorbate, the spectrum changes from exhibiting primarily molecular ions to showing a growing variety and abundance of fragments. The polarization angle of the laser beam had been shown to dramatically affect the ion yields of adsorbates. For the first time, we report that by rotating the plane of polarization of the desorption laser, the internal energy of the adsorbate can also be modulated resulting in polarization dependent fragmentation. This polarization effect also resulted in selective fragmentation of vitamin B(12). To explore the internal energy of NAPA generated ions, the effect of the post aspect ratios on the laser desorption thresholds and on the internal energy of a preformed ion was studied. Elevated surface temperatures and enhanced near fields in the vicinity of high aspect ratio posts are thought to contribute to desorption and ionization from NAPA. Comparison of the fluence dependence of the internal energies of ions produced from nanoporous silicon and NAPA substrates indicates that surface restructuring or transient melting by the desorption laser is a prerequisite for the former but not for the latter. PMID:21437297

  5. Excitation of low-frequency residual currents at combination frequencies of an ionising two-colour laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Kostin, V. A.; Laryushin, I. D.; Silaev, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the processes of excitation of low-frequency residual currents in a plasma produced through ionisation of gases by two-colour laser pulses in laser-plasma schemes for THz generation. We have developed an analytical approach that allows one to find residual currents in the case when one of the components of a two-colour pulse is weak enough. The derived analytical expressions show that the effective generation of the residual current (and hence the effective THz generation) is possible if the ratio of the frequencies in the two-colour laser pulse is close to a rational fraction with a not very big odd sum of the numerator and denominator. The results of numerical calculations (including those based on the solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation) agree well with the analytical results.

  6. Graphene matrix for signal enhancement in ambient plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cuilan; Li, Xianjiang; Bai, Yu; Xu, Gege; Feng, Baosheng; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2013-09-30

    In this work, the signal intensity of ambient plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (PALDI-MS) was significantly increased with graphene as matrix. The graphene functions as a substrate to trap analytes, absorb energy from the visible laser irradiation and transfer energy to the analytes to facilitate the laser desorption process. The desorbed analytes are further ionized by helium plasma and analyzed by MS. Compared with a traditional organic matrix, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), graphene exhibited much higher desorption efficiency for most of the compounds benefitting from the strong optical absorption at 532nm. The performance has been confirmed by the facile analysis of more than forty compounds with various structures. Additionally, this method was successfully applied to distinguish three kinds of Chinese tea leaves by detecting the endogenous caffeine and theanine, which proved the utility, facility and convenience of this method for rapid screening of main components in real samples. PMID:23953441

  7. A novel experimental system of high stability and lifetime for the laser-desorption of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, Mehran; Riese, Mikko; BenYezzar, Mohammed; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    2010-06-01

    A novel laser desorption system, with improved signal stability and extraordinary long lifetime, is presented for the study of jet-cooled biomolecules in the gas phase using vibrationally resolved photoionization spectroscopy. As a test substance tryptophane is used to characterize this desorption source. A usable lifetime of above 1 month (for a laser desorption repetition rate of 20 Hz) has been observed by optimizing the pellets (graphite/tryptophane, 3 mm diameter and 6 mm length) from which the substance is laser-desorbed. Additionally, the stability and signal-to-noise ratio has been improved by averaging the signal over the entire sample pellet by synchronizing the data acquisition with the rotation of the sample rod. The results demonstrate how a combination of the above helps to produce stable and conclusive spectra of tryptophane using one-color and two-color resonant two-photon ionization studies. PMID:20590219

  8. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques. PMID:24916100

  9. Silica-fiber microextraction for laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cisper, M.E.; Earl, W.L.; Nogar, N.S.; Hemberger, P.H. )

    1994-06-01

    We have coupled sample collection by solid-phase microextraction on disposable fused silica optical fibers with analysis by laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry for rapid screening of organic contaminants in complex matrices. Because the silica-fiber probe serves as both the sampling medium and the sample support for laser desorption, traditional methods of sample preparation are eliminated with the expected gains in speed and simplicity. Pyrene was the benchmark compound in these experiments but we show that the technique is also applicable to other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semivolatile compounds, laser dyes, pesticides, and peptides. Derivatizing the silica fiber improves the analyte collection efficiency, and firing the laser during a ring electrode rf ramp promotes dependable trapping of laser-desorbed ions. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Simultaneous detection of phosphatidylcholines and glycerolipids using matrix-enhanced surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry with sputter-deposited platinum film.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Osaka, Issey; Ihozaki, Taisuke; Hamada, Satoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Murakami, Tatsuya; Miyazato, Akio; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) allows for the simultaneous detection and imaging of several molecules in brain tissue. However, the detection of glycerolipids such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and triacylglycerol (TAG) in brain tissues is hindered in MALDI-IMS because of the ion suppression effect from excessive ion yields of phosphatidylcholine (PC). In this study, we describe an approach that employs a homogeneously deposited metal nanoparticle layer (or film) for the detection of glycerolipids in rat brain tissue sections using IMS. Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionisation IMS with sputter-deposited Pt film (Pt-SALDI-IMS) for lipid analysis was performed as a solvent-free and organic matrix-free method. Pt-SALDI produced a homogenous layer of nanoparticles over the surface of the rat brain tissue section. Highly selective detection of lipids was possible by MALDI-IMS and Pt-SALDI-IMS; MALDI-IMS detected the dominant ion peak of PC in the tissue section, and there were no ion peaks representing glycerolipids such as DAG and TAG. In contrast, Pt-SALDI-IMS allowed the detection of these glycerolipids, but not PC. Therefore, using a hybrid method combining MALDI and Pt-SALDI (i.e., matrix-enhanced [ME]-Pt-SALDI-IMS), we achieved the simultaneous detection of PC, PE and DAG in rat brain tissue sections, and the sensitivity for the detection of these molecules was better than that of MALDI-IMS or Pt-SALDI alone. The present simple ME-Pt-SALDI approach for the simultaneous detection of PC and DAG using two matrices (sputter-deposited Pt film and DHB matrix) would be useful in imaging analyses of biological tissue sections. PMID:26505771

  11. Ambient diode laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry of nonvolatile chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Schilling, Michael; Ahlmann, Norman; Michels, Antje; Hayen, Heiko; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F; Franzke, Joachim

    2013-03-19

    In this work, the combined use of desorption by a continuous wave near-infrared diode laser and ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge-based probe (laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry (LD-DBDI-MS)) is presented as an ambient ionization method for the mass spectrometric detection of nonvolatile chemicals on surfaces. A separation of desorption and ionization processes could be verified. The use of the diode laser is motivated by its low cost, ease of use, and small size. To achieve an efficient desorption, the glass substrates are coated at the back side with a black point (target point, where the sample is deposited) in order to absorb the energy offered by the diode laser radiation. Subsequent ionization is accomplished by a helium plasmajet generated in the dielectric barrier discharge source. Examples on the application of this approach are shown in both positive and negative ionization modes. A wide variety of multiclass species with low vapor pressure were tested including pesticides, pharmaceuticals and explosives (reserpine, roxithromycin, propazine, prochloraz, spinosad, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, enrofloxacin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, spinosad, cyclo-1,3,5,7-tetramethylene tetranitrate (HMX), and cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene trinitramine (RDX)). A comparative evaluation revealed that the use of the laser is advantageous, compared to just heating the substrate surface. PMID:23419061

  12. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  13. Speciation of arsenic oxides using laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Allen, T M; Bezabeh, D Z; Smith, C H; McCauley, E M; Jones, A D; Chang, D P; Kennedy, I M; Kelly, P B

    1996-11-15

    Positive and negative ion mass spectra of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) and arsenic pentaoxide (As2O5) have been obtained by single-step laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Pulsed UV radiation at 266 nm was used for the simultaneous desorption and ionization of the solid sample. High-mass cluster ions that are unique to the oxidation state of each oxide sample appear in the negative ion mass spectra. The As2O3 produces As3O5-, while the As2O5 yields As3O8-. The formation of unique negative cluster ions presents the capability for arsenic oxidation state speciation by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The ability of time-of-flight mass spectrometry to examine the relative amounts of each arsenic oxide present in a series of mixtures is discussed. Application of our speciation technique to a model incinerator sample is demonstrated. PMID:8916457

  14. Laser desorption with corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct surface detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Sabo, M; Malásková, M; Matejčík, S

    2014-10-21

    We present a new highly sensitive technique for the detection of explosives directly from the surface using laser desorption-corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry (LD-CD-IMS). We have developed LD based on laser diode modules (LDM) and the technique was tested using three different LDM (445, 532 and 665 nm). The explosives were detected directly from the surface without any further preparation. We discuss the mechanism of the LD and the limitations of this technique such as desorption time, transport time and desorption area. After the evaluation of experimental data, we estimated the potential limits of detection of this method to be 0.6 pg for TNT, 2.8 pg for RDX and 8.4 pg for PETN. PMID:25118619

  15. Strong ionisation in carbon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaymak, V.; Pukhov, A.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Rocca, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Surfaces covered with nanostructures, such as nanowire arrays, are shown to facilitate a significantly higher absorption of laser energy as compared to flat surfaces. Due to the efficient coupling of the laser energy, highly energetic electrons are produced, which in turn can emit intense ultrafast X-ray pulses. Full three dimensional PIC simulations are used to analyse the behaviour of arrays of carbon nanowires 400 nm in diameter, irradiated by a 400-nm laser pulse of 60-fs duration at FWHM and a vector potential of α0 = 18. We analyse the ionisation dynamics of the nanowires. The difference of the ionisation strength and structure between linearly and circularly polarised laser beam is investigated. The nanowires are found to be fully ionised after about 30 laser cycles. Circularly polarised light reveals a slightly stronger ionisation effect.

  16. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry for High Throughput DNA Analysis and Its Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, S.L.; Chen, C.H.; Golovlev, V.V.; Isola, N.R.; Matteson, K.J.; Potter, N.T.; Taranenko, N.I.

    1999-01-23

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been developed for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and DNA Fingerprinting for forensic applications. With LDMS, the speed of DNA analysis can be much faster than conventional gel electrophoresis. No dye or radioactive tagging to DNA segments for detection is needed. LDMS is emerging as a new alternative technology for DNA analysis.

  17. Identification of Bacteria Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kedney, Mollie G.; Strunk, Kevin B.; Giaquinto, Lisa M.; Wagner, Jennifer A.; Pollack, Sidney; Patton, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS or simply MALDI) has become ubiquitous in the identification and analysis of biomacromolecules. As a technique that allows for the molecular weight determination of otherwise nonvolatile molecules, MALDI has had a profound impact in the molecular…

  18. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.W.; Martin, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer which can be broadly used for biomedical research. Tasks include: pulsed ion extraction to improve resolution; two-component matrices to enhance ionization; and solid phase DNA purification.

  19. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for high-throughput DNA analysis and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Golovlev, Valeri V.; Taranenko, N. I.; Allman, S. L.; Isola, Narayana R.; Potter, N. T.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, Linus Y.

    1999-05-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been developed for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and DNA fingerprinting for forensic applications. With LDMS, the speed of DNA analysis can be much faster than conventional gel electrophoresis. No dye or radioactive tagging to DNA segments for detection is needed. LDMS is emerging as a new alternative technology for DNA analysis.

  20. Interaction of extreme ultraviolet laser radiation with solid surface: ablation, desorption, nanostructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Frolov, Oleksandr; Juha, Libor; Chalupsky, Jaromir

    2015-02-01

    The area, where interaction of focused XUV laser radiation with solid surface takes place, can be divided according to local fluency into desorption region (if fluency is larger than zero and smaller than ablation threshold) and ablation region (if fluency is equal or larger than this threshold). It turned out that a direct nanostructuring (e.g. imprinting diffraction pattern created on edges of windows of proximity standing grid) is possible in the desorption region only. While for femtosecond pulses the particle (atom/molecule) removal-efficiency η in the desorption region is very small (η < 10%), and hence, it can be easily distinguished from the ablation region with η ~ 100%, for nanosecond pulses in desorption region this η rises at easily ablated materials from 0% at the periphery up to ~90% at the ablation contour and, therefore, the boundary between these two regions can be found with the help of nanostructuring only. This rise of removal efficiency could be explained by gradually increased penetration depth (due to gradually removed material) during laser pulse. This is a warning against blind using crater shape for fluency mapping in the case of long laser pulses. On the other hand it is a motivation to study an ablation plum (or ablation jet) and to create a knowledge bank to be used at future numerical modeling of this process.

  1. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, Alexander V.; Veryovkin, Igor V.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2009-03-17

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  2. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, A. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Materials Science Division

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  3. Requirements for laser-induced desorption/ionization on submicrometer structures.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Shoji; Arakawa, Ryuichi; Okamoto, Kazumasa; Matsui, Yoshinori; Seki, Shu; Kozawa, Takahiro; Tagawa, Seiichi; Wada, Yoshinao

    2005-08-15

    Laser-induced and matrix-free desorption/ionization on various submicrometer structures was investigated. First, to examine the effect of surface roughness on ionization, a silicon wafer or stainless steel was scratched with sandpaper. The fluences of a 337-nm nitrogen laser, required for ionization of synthetic polymers and reserpine, were markedly reduced on the scratched stainless steel or silicon as compared to the corresponding untreated surface. Next, arrays of submicrometer grooves, which had been lithographically fabricated on a silicon wafer, yielded protonated angiotensin, and the morphologic orientation demonstrated the positive relation between the laser and groove directions for promoting ionization. The fabricated structure also suggested the submicrometer, but not smaller, or nanometer, structures to be a key factor in direct desorption/ionization on rough surfaces. Finally, submicrometer porous structures of alumina or polyethylene yielded intense molecular ion signals of angiotensin and insulin, in response to direct UV irradiation, when the surface was coated with Au or Pt. The coating provided the additional advantage of prolonged activity for a porous alumina chip, exceeding a month even when the chip was left in the open air. These results indicate that laser-induced desorption/ionization of organic compounds can be implemented on submicrometer structures with an Au- or Pt-coated surface irrespective of the basal materials. PMID:16097781

  4. Laser-driven acoustic desorption of organic molecules from back-irradiated solid foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, A. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Moore, J. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Materials Science Division; Mass Think

    2007-11-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the single-photon ionization method combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have examined the neutral component of the desorbed flux in LIAD and compared it to that from direct laser desorption. These basic studies of LIAD, conducted for molecules of various organic dyes (rhodamine B, fluorescein, anthracene, coumarin, BBQ), have demonstrated detection of intact parent molecules of the analyte even at its surface concentrations corresponding to a submonolayer coating. In some cases (rhodamine B, fluorescein, BBQ), the parent molecular ion peak was accompanied by a few fragmentation peaks of comparable intensity, whereas for others, only peaks corresponding to intact parent molecules were detected. At all measured desorbing laser intensities (from 100 to 500 MW/cm{sup 2}), the total amount of desorbed parent molecules depended exponentially on the laser intensity. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules, determined for the first time in this work, were of the order of hundreds of meters per second, less than what has been observed in our experiments for direct laser desorption, but substantially greater than the possible perpendicular velocity of the substrate foil surface due to laser-generated acoustic waves. Moreover, these velocities did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of a more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. Also, the total flux of desorbed intact molecules as a function of the total number of desorbing laser pulses, striking the same point on the target, decayed following a power law rather than an exponential function, as would have been predicted by the shake-off model. To summarize, the

  5. Molecular Imaging of Biological Samples on Nanophotonic Laser Desorption Ionization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Stopka, Sylwia A; Rong, Charles; Korte, Andrew R; Yadavilli, Sridevi; Nazarian, Javad; Razunguzwa, Trust T; Morris, Nicholas J; Vertes, Akos

    2016-03-24

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a comprehensive tool for the analysis of a wide range of biomolecules. The mainstream method for molecular MSI is matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, however, the presence of a matrix results in spectral interferences and the suppression of some analyte ions. Herein we demonstrate a new matrix-free MSI technique using nanophotonic ionization based on laser desorption ionization (LDI) from a highly uniform silicon nanopost array (NAPA). In mouse brain and kidney tissue sections, the distributions of over 80 putatively annotated molecular species are determined with 40 μm spatial resolution. Furthermore, NAPA-LDI-MS is used to selectively analyze metabolites and lipids from sparsely distributed algal cells and the lamellipodia of human hepatocytes. Our results open the door for matrix-free MSI of tissue sections and small cell populations by nanophotonic ionization. PMID:26929010

  6. Development of Laser Desorption Imaging Mass Spectrometry Methods to Investigate the Molecular Composition of Latent Fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauzon, Nidia; Dufresne, Martin; Chauhan, Vinita; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    For a century, fingermark analysis has been one of the most important and common methods in forensic investigations. Modern chemical analysis technologies have added the potential to determine the molecular composition of fingermarks and possibly identify chemicals a suspect may have come into contact with. Improvements in analytical detection of the molecular composition of fingermarks is therefore of great importance. In this regard, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and laser desorption ionization (LDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) have proven to be useful technologies for fingermark analysis. In these analyses, the choice of ionizing agent and its mode of deposition are critical steps for the identification of molecular markers. Here we propose two novel and complementary IMS approaches for endogenous and exogenous substance detection in fingermarks: sublimation of 2-mercaptobenzothiazol (2-MBT) matrix and silver sputtering.

  7. Laser desorption mass spectrometry: Technical limitations, fundamentals, and application to coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Objective of this study is to assess scope and limitations of laser desorption (LD) and matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALDI) as applied to coals. LD and MALDI mass spectrometry are increasingly used to detect intact molecular species, such as proteins with masses from 1000 to 100,000 amu and beyond. MALDI is also being used for high molecular weight polymers. A good example, related to coal-type systems, is the report on lignin mass spectrometry by MALDI. The mass spectrum shows a wide molecular distribution of several hundred to larger than 16000, with the center of gravity of the distribution around 2600. Results are interpreted in terms of oligomeric lignin molecules. Thus, if there are indeed large molecular species in a polymeric content in coals or coal extracts, MALDI is an attractive technique.

  8. Fossil fuel characterization using laser desorption mass spectrometry: Applications and limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Laser desorption mass spectroscopy (LDMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI) are applicable to the high molecular weight compounds in fossil fuels which resist intact ionization. LD or MALDI of coals and extracts do not show reproducible ion intensity over mass 2000. This paper describes the scope and limitations of LD and MALD in time-of-flight mass spectrometers applied to high molecular weight molecules such as proteins and polymers. Coal was also analyzed. It is concluded that the sample preparation step is perhaps the most important part in MALDI. Observed high mass ions in coal may be from contaminant proteins. Optimal matrices must be found. Finally, the mass spectrum is senstive to number average molecular weight; a low value, however, does not preclude presence of high molecular weight species.

  9. Development of laser desorption imaging mass spectrometry methods to investigate the molecular composition of latent fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Lauzon, Nidia; Dufresne, Martin; Chauhan, Vinita; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    For a century, fingermark analysis has been one of the most important and common methods in forensic investigations. Modern chemical analysis technologies have added the potential to determine the molecular composition of fingermarks and possibly identify chemicals a suspect may have come into contact with. Improvements in analytical detection of the molecular composition of fingermarks is therefore of great importance. In this regard, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and laser desorption ionization (LDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) have proven to be useful technologies for fingermark analysis. In these analyses, the choice of ionizing agent and its mode of deposition are critical steps for the identification of molecular markers. Here we propose two novel and complementary IMS approaches for endogenous and exogenous substance detection in fingermarks: sublimation of 2-mercaptobenzothiazol (2-MBT) matrix and silver sputtering. PMID:25846823

  10. Recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted great interest over past decades owing to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this article, we review recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS). Various types of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon nanodots, nanodiamond, nanofibers, nanohorns, and their derivative forms, are involved. The applications of these materials as new matrices or probes in matrix-assisted or surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI or SELDI MS) are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges and give our perspectives on the future of applications of carbon nanomaterials in LDI MS. Graphical Abstract Carbon nanomaterials (e.g., fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamond, etc.) can be used as novel matrices or probes in MALDI or SELDI MS. PMID:26753968

  11. High-resolution atmospheric pressure infrared laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schäfer, Karl Christian; Guenther, Sabine; Wang, Zheng; Köstler, Martin; Leisner, Arne; Paschke, Carmen; Schramm, Thorsten; Spengler, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    An atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging ion source has been developed that combines high spatial resolution and high mass resolution for the in situ analysis of biological tissue. The system is based on an infrared laser system working at 2.94 to 3.10 μm wavelength, employing a Nd:YAG laser-pumped optical parametrical oscillator. A Raman-shifted Nd:YAG laser system was also tested as an alternative irradiation source. A dedicated optical setup was used to focus the laser beam, coaxially with the ion optical axis and normal to the sample surface, to a spot size of 30 μm in diameter. No additional matrix was needed for laser desorption/ionization. A cooling stage was developed to reduce evaporation of physiological cell water. Ions were formed under atmospheric pressure and transferred by an extended heated capillary into the atmospheric pressure inlet of an orbital trapping mass spectrometer. Various phospholipid compounds were detected, identified, and imaged at a pixel resolution of up to 25 μm from mouse brain tissue sections. Mass accuracies of better than 2 ppm and a mass resolution of 30,000 at m/z = 400 were achieved for these measurements. PMID:23877173

  12. Competing ion decomposition channels in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanghong; Marginean, Ioan; Ye, Louise; Vertes, Akos

    2008-06-12

    We gauged the internal energy transfer for two dissociative ion decomposition channels in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) using the benzyltriphenylphosphonium (BTP) thermometer ion [PhCH 2PPh 3] (+). Common MALDI matrixes [alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (sinapinic acid, SA), and 2,5-dihydroxycinnamic acid (DHB)] were studied with nitrogen laser (4 ns pulse length) and mode-locked 3 x omega Nd:YAG laser (22 ps pulse length) excitation. Despite the higher fluence required to initiate fragmentation, BTP ions indicated lower internal energy transfer with the picosecond laser in all three matrixes. These differences can be rationalized in terms of phase explosion induced by the nanosecond laser vs a stress-confinement-driven desorption mechanism for the picosecond laser. For the two ion production channels of the BTP thermometer ion, breaking a single bond can result in the formation of benzyl/tropylium ions, F1, or triphenylphosphine ions, F2. In SA and DHB, as well as in CHCA at low fluence levels, the efficiency of these channels (expressed by the branching ratio I F1/ I F2) is moderately in favor of producing tropylium ions, 1 < I F1/ I F2 < 6. As the laser fluence is increased, for CHCA, there is a dramatic shift in favor of the tropylium ion production, with I F1/ I F2 approximately 30 for the nanosecond and the picosecond laser, respectively. This change is correlated with the sudden increase in the BTP internal energies in CHCA in the same laser fluence range. The large changes observed in internal energy deposition for CHCA with laser fluence can account for its ability to induce fragmentation in peptides more readily than SA and DHB. PMID:18489138

  13. Matrix-assisted laser desorption fourier transform mass spectrometry for biological compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hettich, R.; Buchanan, M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent development of matrix-assisted UV laser desorption (LD) mass spectrometry has made possible the ionization and detection of extremely large molecules (with molecular weights exceeding 100,000 Daltons). This technique has generated enormous interest in the biological community for the direct examination of large peptides and oligonucleotides. Although this matrix-assisted ionization method has been developed and used almost exclusively with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers, research is currently in progress to demonstrate this technique with trapped ion mass spectrometers, such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTMS). The potential capabilities of FTMS for wide mass range, high resolution measurement, and ion trapping experiments suggest that this instrumental technique should be useful for the detailed structural characterization of large ions generated by the matrix-assisted technique. We have recently demonstrated that matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption can be successfully used with FTMS for the ionization of small peptides. The objective of this report is to summarize the application and current limitations of matrix-assisted laser desorption FTMS for the characterization of peptides and oligonucleotides at the isomeric level. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drosophila Brain Using Matrix Sublimation versus Modification with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Phan, Nhu T N; Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is used to image brain lipids in the fruit fly, Drosophila, a common invertebrate model organism in biological and neurological studies. Three different sample preparation methods, including sublimation with two common organic matrixes for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) using gold nanoparticles, are examined for sample profiling and imaging the fly brain. Recrystallization with trifluoroacetic acid following matrix deposition in MALDI is shown to increase the incorporation of biomolecules with one matrix, resulting in more efficient ionization, but not for the other matrix. The key finding here is that the mass fragments observed for the fly brain slices with different surface modifications are significantly different. Thus, these approaches can be combined to provide complementary analysis of chemical composition, particularly for the small metabolites, diacylglycerides, phosphatidylcholines, and triacylglycerides, in the fly brain. Furthermore, imaging appears to be beneficial using modification with gold nanoparticles in place of matrix in this application showing its potential for cellular and subcellular imaging. The imaging protocol developed here with both MALDI and SALDI provides the best and most diverse lipid chemical images of the fly brain to date with LDI. PMID:26705612

  15. Mass spectrometric imaging and laser desorption ionization (LDI) with ice as a matrix using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Jamal Ihsan

    The desorption of biomolecules from frozen aqueous solutions on metal substrates with femtosecond laser pulses is presented for the first time. Unlike previous studies using nanosecond pulses, this approach produces high quality mass spectra of biomolecules repeatedly and reproducibly. This novel technique allows analysis of biomolecules directly from their native frozen environments. The motivation for this technique stems from molecular dynamics computer simulations comparing nanosecond and picosecond heating of water overlayers frozen on Au substrates which demonstrate large water cluster formation and ejection upon substrate heating within ultrashort timescales. As the frozen aqueous matrix and analyte molecules are transparent at the wavelengths used, the laser energy is primarily absorbed by the substrate, causing rapid heating and explosive boiling of the ice overlayer, followed by the ejection of ice clusters and the entrained analyte molecule. Spectral characteristics at a relatively high fluence of 10 J/cm 2 reveal the presence of large molecular weight metal clusters when a gold substrate is employed, with smaller cluster species observed from frozen aqueous solutions on Ag, Cu, and Pb substrates. The presence of the metal clusters is indicative of an evaporative cooling mechanism which stabiles cluster ion formation and the ejection of biomolecules from frozen aqueous solutions. Solvation is necessary as the presence of metal clusters and biomolecular ion signals are not observed from bare metal substrates in absence of the frozen overlayer. The potential for mass spectrometric imaging with femtosecond LDI of frozen samples is also presented. The initial results for the characterization of peptides and peptoids linked to combinatorial beads frozen in ice and the assay of frozen brain tissue from the serotonin transporter gene knockout mouse via LDI imaging are discussed. Images of very good quality and resolution are obtained with 400 nm, 200 fs pulses

  16. Characterisation of an inexpensive sonic spray ionisation source using laser-induced fluorescence imaging and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stindt, Arne; Warschat, Carsten; Bierstedt, Andreas; Panne, Ulrich; Riedel, Jens

    2014-01-01

    A commercially available airbrush gun as a new source for spray ionisation is presented. It is best operated employing moderate stagnation pressures, resulting in a sonic gas flow. A mass spectrometric investigation on the amino acid Lysine and several peptides reveals that this inexpensive approach results in reproducible mass spectra. The ion patterns strongly resemble the results from other studies obtained with custom-made sonic spray vaporisers. The patterns also resemble the mass spectra recorded with electrospray devices. For a better understanding of the vaporisation process, the mass spectrometry experiments are accompanied by laser-induced fluorescence experiments. Inverse Abel Transform of the obtained fluorescence maps allows the determination of the full three-dimensional distribution of the spray cone. Furthermore, via exploitation of the solvatochromism of the used dye the solvation-state distribution can be visualised. In addition, expansion parameters, such as droplet size and velocity, are obtained by laser stroboscopy. The experiments demonstrate that the analyte hardly desolvates throughout the expansion. This indicates a subsequent vaporisation of the residual solvent in the intermediate pressure region of the mass spectrometer. PMID:24881452

  17. The Need for Speed in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has emerged as a powerful analytical tool enabling the direct molecular mapping of many types of tissue. Specifically, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization (MALDI) represents one of the most broadly applicable IMS technologies. In recent years, advances in solid state laser technology, mass spectrometry instrumentation, computer technology, and experimental methodology have produced IMS systems capable of unprecedented data acquisition speeds (>50 pixels/second). In applications of this technology, throughput is an important consideration when designing an IMS experiment. As IMS becomes more widely adopted, continual improvements in experimental setups will be important to address biologically and clinically relevant time scales.

  18. Chemical speciation in laser-desorption and impact-induced vapor in minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, A. H.; Dundas, C. M.; Ahrens, T. J.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2002-12-01

    Knowledge of the chemical species in vapors produced by hypervelocity impact on spacecraft impact detectors as well as planetary surfaces have applications ranging from determination of the composition of cosmic dust to the effects on atmospheres and climates of large impactors. Direct study of resulting atomic, molecular and ionic species is best accomplished via mass spectrometry. Pulsed laser desorption can be used to approximate small impacts on solid surfaces. We conducted pulsed laser desorption-ionization experiments using two different instruments: (1) a Caltech-built Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TOFMS) similar to that on board the Cassini spacecraft and (2) a commercial Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization TOFMS made by Applied Biosystems (Model, Voyager-DE Pro). Minerals included in this study were calcite, dolomite, gypsum, anhydrite, olivine, kamacite, brucite, serpentine, and pyrrhotite. We collected only positive ions. A nitrogen laser (337 nm wavelength, 4 μsec pulse width, and 300 mJ) with power density ranging from 1.0x107 to 1.3x109 W/cm2 induced vaporization and ionization. The results can be summarized as: (1) from kamacite and pyrrhotite, only 54Fe+, 56Fe+, 57Fe+ (both kamacite and pyrrhotite) and 58Ni+, 60Ni+ (kamacite only) as well as contamination ions such as 23Na+ and 39K+, 41K+were observed; (2) Ca-containing minerals (calcite, dolomite, gypsum and anhydrite) produced vapors containing 40Ca+ ions, and, at higher laser power, both 40Ca+ as well as CaO+ ions; (3) Mg-containing minerals (dolomite, olivine, brucite and serpentine) produced vapors containing MgO+ ion; (4) for all hydrous minerals, neither H+ nor H3O+ were observed in the vapor; (5) in the vapors of silicate minerals (olivine and serpentine), SiO+ was observed only from serpentine but not from olivine.

  19. Structure of neat and hydrated liquid nicotine and laser resonant desorption of clusters from nicotine-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihesan, Claudia; Ziskind, Michael; Focsa, Cristian; Seydou, Mahamadou; Lecomte, Frédéric; Schermann, Jean Pierre

    2008-11-01

    The microscopic structures of neat liquid nicotine and nicotine-water mixtures are examined through infrared spectroscopy and laser resonant desorption mass-spectroscopy. The infrared spectra of the solutions are analyzed using DFT calculations of homogenous and mixed hydrogen-bonded clusters. Neat nicotine and hydrated nicotine cluster are experimentally observed through IR laser resonant desorption of a nicotine/water ice mixture followed by laser ionization mass-spectrometry. A sizable fraction of those cluster ions is the result of laser ionization of small neutral clusters already present in the sample.

  20. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization mass spectrometry of proteins using a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, R.; Hillenkamp, F.; Haglund, R.

    1995-12-31

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the most promising techniques for spectral fingerprinting large molecules, such as proteins, oligonucleotides and carbohydrates. In the usual implementation of this technique, the analyte molecule is dissolved in an aromatic liquid matrix material which resonantly absorbs ultraviolet laser light. Resonant absorption by {pi}-{pi}* transitions volatilizes the matrix and initiates subsequent charge transfer to the analyte molecules, which are detected by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Recent MALDI-MS studies with Er:YAG (2.94 {mu}m) and CO{sub 2}{sup 4} (9.4-10.6 {mu}m) lasers suggest that them is significant unexplored potential for mass spectrometry of macromolecules, including oligonucleotide, in the mid-infrared. Preliminary experiments show that it is possible to capitalize on the rich rovibronic absorption spectrum of virtually all organics to initiate resonant desorption in matrix material over the entire range of pH values. However, the mechanism of charge transfer is particularly problematic for infrared MALDI because of the low photon energy. In this paper, we report the results of MALI-MS studies on small proteins using the Vanderbilt FEL and several matrix materials. Proteins with masses up to roughly 6,000 amu were detected with high resolution in a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By varying the pulse duration using a broadband Pockels cell, we have been able to compare the results of relatively long (5 {mu}s) and short (0.1 {mu}s) irradiation on the desorption and ionization processes. Compared to uv-MALDI spectra of identical analytes obtained with a nitrogen laser (337 nm) in the same time-of-flight spectrometer, the infrared results appear to show that the desorption and ionization process goes on over a somewhat longer time scale.

  1. A comparative study on detection of organic surface modifiers on mineral grains by TOF-SIMS, VUV SALI TOF-SIMS and VUV SALI with laser desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimov, S. S.; Chryssoulis, S. L.

    2004-06-01

    Results from a comparative study on the detection of organic collectors by TOF-SIMS, vacuum ultraviolet surface analysis by laser ionization with TOF-SIMS detection (VUV SALI TOF-SIMS) and VUV SALI with laser desorption (VUV TOF-LIMS) are reported. The study was carried out on a PHI 7200 TOF-SIMS instrument upgraded with two lasers: one for laser desorption and another one for VUV laser postionization. A systematic analysis of the laser desorption process lead to a set of optimized desorption parameters and desorption of molecules with a controlled level of fragmentation. The recorded spectra of organic collectors by VUV SALI with laser desorption are characterized by strong parent peaks and simpler fragmentation patterns, which allow for easy molecular identification. Advantages and limitations of the three techniques for analysis of organic collectors on mineral grains are discussed.

  2. Efficient ionisation of calcium, strontium and barium by resonant laser pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient ionization has been observed when an atomic vapor of strontium, barium or calcium was illuminated with a long pulse tunable laser at the frequency of the atomic resonance line. The variation in the degree of ionization with neutral density and laser intensity has been measured using the 'hook' method. The maximum ionization observed was 94%. Excited state populations were measured yielding an excitation temperature (depending on exact experimental conditions) in the region of 0.4 eV. The decay of ion density after the laser pulse was monitored and the recombination coefficients determined. The results are interpreted in terms of an electron heating model.

  3. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    University of Illinois at Chicago; Blaze, Melvin M. T.; Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-03-14

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 ? 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by≤8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~;;8.3?0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at≤8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3 + secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. The negative ion SIMS depended strongly on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte?s condensed phase environment.

  4. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Melvin Blaze, M.T.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald L.; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-01-01

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 – 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by ≤8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~8.3±0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at ≤8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3+ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. However, the negative ion SIMS appeared strongly dependent on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte’s condensed phase environment. PMID:21548612

  5. Role of the support material on laser desorption/ionization mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Gruszecka, A; Szymanska-Chargot, M; Smolira, A; Cytawa, J; Michalak, L

    2008-04-01

    We report the results of experimental studies on the effects of sample supports in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). LDI time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra obtained for C(60) and insulin samples deposited onto standard stainless steel substrate and/or onto some non-metallic materials (glass, scotch tape, floppy disc foil, Teflon foil, photocopy film), all recorded under identical, typical experimental conditions, have been compared with regard to their intensity and quality. The LDI investigations show that compared with stainless steel, glass and floppy disc foil sample supports boost (2-3.5 times) ion yields for C(60)(+) and C(60)(-) ions, respectively. The stainless steel and scotch tape sample supports are the best for the mass resolution of positive ions and the formation of (C(60))(n)(-) (n laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) we did not observe significant differences in sensitivity for the support materials tested. A mechanism of ion formation in the desorption plume is suggested. PMID:18302166

  6. UV laser-induced desorption mechanism analyzed through two-layer alkali halide samples.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Lima, F A; Ponciano, C R; da Silveira, E F

    2008-05-01

    Time of flight-mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) is used to analyze positive and negative desorbed ions generated by UV laser ablation of several alkali (X) halide (Y) salts. Most of the observed desorbed cluster ions have the structure (XY)(n)X(+) or (XY)(n)Y(-). Their desorption yields decrease as exp(-kn), where k approximately 2 for both series, suggesting that the neutral component (XY)(n) plays the dominant role in the desorption process. Mass spectrum measurements were performed for compound samples in which two salts (out of CsI, RbI, KBr, KCl and KI) are homogeneously mixed or disposed in two superposed layers. The detection of small new ion species and large cluster ions of the original salts supports the scenario that the uppermost layers are completely atomized while deep layers are emitted colder and fragmented: It is proposed that ns-pulsed laser induced desorption of ionic salts occurs via two sequential mechanisms: (1) ejection of cations and anions in the hot plume, followed by recombination into new cluster ions and (2) ejection of relatively cold preformed species originated from deep layers or from periphery of the irradiated region. PMID:18095386

  7. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  8. Internal energy deposition with silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Hua, Yimin; Boday, Dylan J.; Somogyi, Arpad; Wysocki, Ronald J.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2009-06-01

    The use of silicon nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization (LDI) is a new appealing matrix-less approach for the selective and sensitive mass spectrometry of small molecules in MALDI instruments. Chemically modified silicon nanoparticles (30 nm) were previously found to require very low laser fluence in order to induce efficient LDI, which raised the question of internal energy deposition processes in that system. Here we report a comparative study of internal energy deposition from silicon nanoparticles to previously explored benzylpyridinium (BP) model compounds during LDI experiments. The internal energy deposition in silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) with different fluorinated linear chain modifiers (decyl, hexyl and propyl) was compared to LDI from untreated silicon nanoparticles and from the organic matrix, [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). The energy deposition to internal vibrational modes was evaluated by molecular ion survival curves and indicated that the ions produced by SPALDI have an internal energy threshold of 2.8-3.7 eV. This is slightly lower than the internal energy induced using the organic CHCA matrix, with similar molecular survival curves as previously reported for LDI off silicon nanowires. However, the internal energy associated with desorption/ionization from the silicon nanoparticles is significantly lower than that reported for desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The measured survival yields in SPALDI gradually decrease with increasing laser fluence, contrary to reported results for silicon nanowires. The effect of modification of the silicon particle surface with semifluorinated linear chain silanes, including fluorinated decyl (C10), fluorinated hexyl (C6) and fluorinated propyl (C3) was explored too. The internal energy deposited increased with a decrease in the length of the modifier alkyl chain. Unmodified silicon particles exhibited the highest analyte internal energy

  9. Target Plate Material Influence on Fullerene-C60 Laser Desorption/Ionization Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zeegers, Guido P; Günthardt, Barbara F; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-04-01

    Systematic laser desorption/ionization (LDI) experiments of fullerene-C60 on a wide range of target plate materials were conducted to gain insight into the initial ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The positive and negative ion signal intensities of precursor, fragment, and cluster ions were monitored, varying both the laser fluence (0-3.53 Jcm(-2)) and the ion extraction delay time (0-950 ns). The resulting species-specific ion signal intensities are an indication for the ionization mechanisms that contribute to LDI and the time frames in which they operate, providing insight in the (MA)LDI primary ionization. An increasing electrical resistivity of the target plate material increases the fullerene-C60 precursor and fragment anion signal intensity. Inconel 625 and Ti90/Al6/V4, both highly electrically resistive, provide the highest anion signal intensities, exceeding the cation signal intensity by a factor ~1.4 for the latter. We present a mechanism based on transient electrical field strength reduction to explain this trend. Fullerene-C60 cluster anion formation is negligible, which could be due to the high extraction potential. Cluster cations, however, are readily formed, although for high laser fluences, the preferred channel is formation of precursor and fragment cations. Ion signal intensity depends greatly on the choice of substrate material, and careful substrate selection could, therefore, allow for more sensitive (MA)LDI measurements. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26894888

  10. Target Plate Material Influence on Fullerene-C60 Laser Desorption/Ionization Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeegers, Guido P.; Günthardt, Barbara F.; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-04-01

    Systematic laser desorption/ionization (LDI) experiments of fullerene-C60 on a wide range of target plate materials were conducted to gain insight into the initial ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The positive and negative ion signal intensities of precursor, fragment, and cluster ions were monitored, varying both the laser fluence (0-3.53 Jcm-2) and the ion extraction delay time (0-950 ns). The resulting species-specific ion signal intensities are an indication for the ionization mechanisms that contribute to LDI and the time frames in which they operate, providing insight in the (MA)LDI primary ionization. An increasing electrical resistivity of the target plate material increases the fullerene-C60 precursor and fragment anion signal intensity. Inconel 625 and Ti90/Al6/V4, both highly electrically resistive, provide the highest anion signal intensities, exceeding the cation signal intensity by a factor ~1.4 for the latter. We present a mechanism based on transient electrical field strength reduction to explain this trend. Fullerene-C60 cluster anion formation is negligible, which could be due to the high extraction potential. Cluster cations, however, are readily formed, although for high laser fluences, the preferred channel is formation of precursor and fragment cations. Ion signal intensity depends greatly on the choice of substrate material, and careful substrate selection could, therefore, allow for more sensitive (MA)LDI measurements.

  11. Organic chemical analysis on a microscopic scale using two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalenko, L. J.; Philippoz, J.-M.; Bucenell, J. R.; Zenobi, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of PAHs in the Allende meteorite has been measured using two-step laser desorption and laser multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry. This method enables in situ analysis (with a spatial resolution of 1 mm or better) of selected organic molecules. Results show that PAH concentrations are locally high compared to the average concentration found by analysis of pulverized samples, and are found primarily in the fine-grained matrix; no PAHs were detected in the interiors of individual chondrules at the detection limit (about 0.05 ppm).

  12. Infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging analysis of biospecimens.

    PubMed

    Bokhart, M T; Muddiman, D C

    2016-09-21

    Infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a technique well suited for analysis of biological specimens. This tutorial review focuses on recent advancements and applications of IR-MALDESI MSI to better understand key biological questions. Through optimization of user-defined source parameters, comprehensive and quantitative MSI data can be obtained for a variety of analytes. The effect of an ice matrix layer is well defined in the context of desorption dynamics and resulting ion abundance. Optimized parameters and careful control of conditions affords quantitative MSI data which provides valuable information for targeted, label-free drug distribution studies and untargeted metabolomic datasets. Challenges and limitations of MSI using IR-MALDESI are addressed in the context of the bioimaging field. PMID:27484166

  13. Analytical laser induced liquid beam desorption mass spectrometry of protonated amino acids and their non-covalently bound aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvat, A.; Lugovoj, E.; Faubel, M.; Abel, B.

    2002-09-01

    We have used analytical laser induced liquid beam desorption in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry (m/Δ mgeq 1 000) for the study of protonated amino acids (ornithine, citrulline, lysine, arginine) and their non-covalently bound complexes in the gas phase desorbed from water solutions. We report studies in which the desorption mechanism has been investigated. The results imply that biomolecule desorption at our conditions is a single step process involving laser heating of the solvent above its supercritical temperature, a rapid expansion, ion recombination and finally isolation and desorption of only a small fraction of preformed ions and charged aggregates. In addition, we report an investigation of the aqueous solution concentration and pH-dependence of the laser induced desorption of protonated species (monomers and dimers). The experimental findings suggest that the desorption process depends critically upon the proton affinity of the molecules, the concentration of other ions, and of the pH value of the solution. Therefore the ion concentrations measured in the gas phase very likely reflect solution properties (equilibrium concentrations). Arginine self-assembles large non-covalent singly protonated multimers (n=1...8) when sampled by IR laser induced water beam desorption mass spectrometry. The structures of these aggregates may resemble those of the solid state and may be preformed in solution prior to desorption. A desorption of mixtures of amino acids in water solution enabled us to study (mixed) protonated dimers, one of the various applications of the present technique. Reasons for preferred dimerization leading to simple cases of molecular recognition as well as less preferred binding is discussed in terms of the number of specific H-bonds that can be established in the clusters.

  14. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using nanosecond laser desorption/femtosecond ionization laser mass spectrometry (FLMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, L.; Tasker, A. D.; Hankin, S. M.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Singhal, R. P.; Fang, X.; McCanny, T.; Kosmidis, C.; Tzallas, P.; Langley, A. J.; Taday, P. F.; Divall, E. J.

    2001-08-01

    Nanosecond laser desorption/femtosecond ionization laser mass spectrometry (LD/FLMS) allows ultra-sensitive detection and trace analysis of atoms and molecules. In this study, we have applied the LD/FLMS technique to the characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using high intensity femtosecond laser pulses (1013-1015 W/cm2) at λ˜395 nm and 790nm coupled to a reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer a series of PAHs have been investigated. In particular, anthracene, tetracene and pentacene are discussed. The spectra presented show intact parent ion at both wavelengths, with little fragmentation at lower ionization laser intensities. This initial data suggests that the optimum wavelength to operate FLMS for PAHs may be 395 nm and not 790 nm for maximum parent ion production. Comparative studies adopting nanosecond ionization are also discussed.

  15. Cobalt coated substrate for matrix-free analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Talat; Li, Liang

    2009-12-01

    Small molecule analysis is one of the most challenging issues in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. We have developed a cobalt coated substrate as a target for matrix-free analysis of small molecules in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Cobalt coating of 60-70 nm thickness has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. This target facilitates hundreds of samples to be spotted and analyzed without mixing any matrices, in a very short time. This can save a lot of time and money and can be a very practical approach for the analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  16. Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotic-Treated Bacterial Biofilms using Tunable Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Gerald L.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moore, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) with 8.0 – 12.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation is used to single photon ionize antibiotics and extracellular neutrals that are laser desorbed both neat and from intact bacterial biofilms. Neat antibiotics are optimally detected using 10.5 eV LDPI-MS, but can be ionized using 8.0 eV radiation, in agreement with prior work using 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation also postionizes laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotics and extracellular material from within intact bacterial biofilms. Different extracellular material is observed by LDPI-MS in response to rifampicin or trimethoprim antibiotic treatment. Once again, 10.5 eV LDPI-MS displays the optimum trade-off between improved sensitivity and minimum fragmentation. Higher energy photons at 12.5 eV produce significant parent ion signal, but fragment intensity and other low mass ions are also enhanced. No matrix is added to enhance desorption, which is performed at peak power densities insufficient to directly produce ions, thus allowing observation of true VUV postionization mass spectra of antibiotic treated biofilms. PMID:20712373

  17. Laser desorption ionization of small molecules assisted by tungsten oxide and rhenium oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Matthew C; Wysocki, Vicki H; Dagan, Shai

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic metal oxides have shown potential as matrices for assisting in laser desorption ionization with advantages over the aromatic acids typically used. Rhenium and tungsten oxides are attractive options due to their high work functions and relative chemical inertness. In this work, it is shown that ReO3 and WO3 , in microparticle (μP) powder forms, can efficiently facilitate ionization of various types of small molecules and provide minimized background contamination at analyte concentrations below 1 ng/µL. This study shows that untreated inorganic WO3 and ReO3 particles are valid matrix options for detection of protonatable, radical, and precharged species under laser desorption ionization. Qualitatively, the WO3 μP showed improved detection of apigenin, sodiated glucose, and precharged analyte choline, while the ReO3 μP allowed better detection of protonated cocaine, quinuclidine, ametryn, and radical ions of polyaromatic hydrocarbons at detection levels as low as 50 pg/µL. For thermometer ion survival yield experiments, it was also shown that the ReO3 powder was significantly softer than α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnaminic acid. Furthermore, it provided higher intensities of cocaine and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, at laser flux values equal to those used with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnaminic acid. PMID:26349643

  18. 337 nm matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization of single aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    He, L; Murray, K K

    1999-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra were obtained from single particles injected directly into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Aerosol particles were generated at atmospheric pressure using a piezoelectric single-particle generator or a pneumatic nebulizer and introduced into the mass spectrometer through a series of narrow-bore tubes. Particles were detected by light scattering that was used to trigger a 337 nm pulsed nitrogen laser and the ions produced by laser desorption were mass separated in a two-stage reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. MALDI mass spectra of single particles containing bradykinin, angiotensin II, gramicidin S, vitamin B(12) or gramicidin D were obtained at mass resolutions greater than 400 FWHM. For the piezoelectric particle generator, the efficiency of particle delivery was estimated to be approximately 0.02%, and 50 pmol of sample were consumed for each mass spectrum. For the pneumatic nebulizer, mass spectra could be obtained from single particles containing less than 100 amol of analyte, although the sample consumption for a typical mass spectrum was over 400 pmol. PMID:10491586

  19. Electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization and tandem mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ivory X; Shiea, Jentaie; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Loo, Joseph A

    2007-01-01

    We have constructed an electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) source which utilizes a nitrogen laser pulse to desorb intact molecules from matrix-containing sample solution droplets, followed by electrospray ionization (ESI) post-ionization. The ELDI source is coupled to a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and allows sampling under ambient conditions. Preliminary data showed that ELDI produces ESI-like multiply charged peptides and proteins up to 29 kDa carbonic anhydrase and 66 kDa bovine albumin from single-protein solutions, as well as from complex digest mixtures. The generated multiply charged polypeptides enable efficient tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS)-based peptide sequencing. ELDI-MS/MS of protein digests and small intact proteins was performed both by collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and by nozzle-skimmer dissociation (NSD). ELDI-MS/MS may be a useful tool for protein sequencing analysis and top-down proteomics study, and may complement matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-based measurements. PMID:17639579

  20. Direct protein detection from biological media through electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Zong; Hsu, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Jen-Yih; Jeng, Jingyueh; Shiea, Jentaie

    2006-05-01

    We report here using a novel technology-electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization (ELDI)/mass spectrometry-for the rapid and sensitive detection of the major proteins that exist in dried biological fluids (e.g., blood, tears, saliva, serum), bacterial cultures, and tissues (e.g., porcine liver and heart) under ambient conditions. This technique required essentially no sample pretreatment. The proteins in the samples were desorbed using a pulsed nitrogen laser without the assistance of an organic matrix. The desorbed protein molecules were then post-ionized through their fusion into the charged solvent droplets produced from the electrospray of an acidic methanol solution; electrospray ionization (ESI) proceeded from the newly formed droplets to generate the ESI-like protein ions. This new ionization approach combines some of the features of electrospray ionization with those of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), that is, sampling of a solid surface with spatial resolution, generating ESI-like mass spectra of the desorbed proteins, and operating under ambient conditions. PMID:16674100

  1. Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotic-Treated Bacterial Biofilms using Tunable Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gasper, Gerald L; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moore, Jerry F; Hanley, Luke

    2010-08-04

    Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) with 8.0 ? 12.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation is used to single photon ionize antibiotics andextracellular neutrals that are laser desorbed both neat and from intact bacterial biofilms. Neat antibiotics are optimally detected using 10.5 eV LDPI-MS, but can be ionized using 8.0 eV radiation, in agreement with prior work using 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation also postionizes laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotics and extracellular material from within intact bacterial biofilms. Different extracellular material is observed by LDPI-MS in response to rifampicin or trimethoprim antibiotic treatment. Once again, 10.5 eV LDPI-MS displays the optimum trade-off between improved sensitivity and minimum fragmentation. Higher energy photons at 12.5 eV produce significant parent ion signal, but fragment intensity and other low mass ions are also enhanced. No matrix is added to enhance desorption, which is performed at peak power densities insufficient to directly produce ions, thus allowing observation of true VUV postionization mass spectra of antibiotic treated biofilms.

  2. Exploring the high-mass components of humic acid by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chilom, Gabriela; Chilom, Ovidiu; Rice, James A

    2008-05-01

    Leonardite and Elliot soil humic acids have been analyzed by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) in the m/z 4000-200,000 range. Positive ion mass spectra for each humic acid obtained under optimum conditions showed a broad high-mass distribution between m/z 20,000 and 80,000. The dependence of the mass distribution on instrumental parameters and solution conditions was used to investigate the nature of the high-mass peaks from humic acid spectra. Our data suggests that macromolecular ions and humic acid aggregates have the same probability of occurrence while cluster ion formation has a low probability of occurrence. PMID:18421699

  3. Resonant infrared laser-induced desorption of methane condensed on NaCl(100): isotope mixture experiments.

    PubMed

    Redlich, Britta; Zacharias, Helmut; Meijer, Gerard; von Helden, Gert

    2006-01-28

    Resonantly enhanced infrared laser-induced desorption of methane condensed on a single-crystal NaCl(100) surface is observed after excitation with the widely tunable infrared laser output of the free-electron laser at the free-electron laser for infrared experiments facility using mass spectroscopic detection and time-of-flight analysis. Desorption of methane is observed only when the exciting light is in resonance with an internal vibrational mode of the molecule. Different intramolecular modes of the three methane isotopologues under study--CH(4), CD(4), and CD(3)H--are excited; the degenerate deformation mode nu(4) is observed for CH(4) and CD(4) at 7.69 and 10.11 microm, respectively, as well as the nu(2) and nu(4) modes of CD(3)H at 7.79, 9.75, and 9.98 microm. The desorption signals for the pure layers of these different methane isotopologues as well as for different mixtures of two of these are investigated as a function of the infrared wavelength and the laser fluence. The desorption behavior for pure and mixed layers is compared and the underlying desorption mechanism is discussed. PMID:16460197

  4. Measurement Of Ultrafast Ionisation From Intense Laser Interactions With Gas-Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gizzi, Leonida A.; Galimberti, Marco; Giulietti, Antonio; Giulietti, Danilo; Koester, Petra; Labate, Luca; Tomassini, Paolo; Martin, Philippe; Ceccotti, Tiberio; De Oliveira, Pascal; Monot, Pascal

    2006-04-07

    Interaction of an intense, ultrashort laser pulse with a gas-jet target is investigated through femtosecond optical interferometry to study the dynamics of ionization of the gas. Experimental results are presented in which the propagation of the pulse in the gas and the consequent plasma formation is followed step by step with high temporal and spatial resolution. We demonstrate that, combining the phase shift with the measurable depletion of fringe visibility associated with the transient change of refractive index in the ionizing region and taking into account probe travel time can provide direct information on gas ionization dynamics.

  5. Investigation of thin ZnO layers in view of laser desorption-ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnikov, A. A.; Georgieva, V. B.; Alimpiev, S. S.; Borodkov, A. S.; Nikiforov, S. M.; Simanovsky, Ya O.; Dimova-Malinovska, D.; Angelov, O. I.

    2010-04-01

    Thin zinc oxide films (ZnO) were developed as a matrix-free platform for surface assisted laser desorption-ionization (SALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The ZnO films were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering of ZnO ceramic targets in Ar atmospheres on monocrystalline silicon. The generation under UV (355 nm) laser irradiation of positive ions of atenolol, reserpine and gramicidin S from the ZnO layers deposited was studied. All analytes tested were detected as protonated molecules with no or very structure-specific fragmentation. The mass spectra obtained showed low levels of chemical background noise. All ZnO films studied exhibited high stability and good reproducibility. The detection limits for test analytes are in the 10 femtomol range.

  6. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry: In Situ Molecular Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a relatively new imaging modality that allows mapping of a wide range of biomolecules within a thin tissue section. The technology uses a laser beam to directly desorb and ionize molecules from discrete locations on the tissue that are subsequently recorded in a mass spectrometer. IMS is distinguished by the ability to directly measure molecules in situ ranging from small metabolites to proteins, reporting hundreds to thousands of expression patterns from a single imaging experiment. This article reviews recent advances in IMS technology, applications, and experimental strategies that allow it to significantly aid in the discovery and understanding of molecular processes in biological and clinical samples. PMID:23259809

  7. Investigation of molecule-adsorption kinetics by a pulsed laser desorption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varakin, V. N.; Lozovskii, A. D.; Panesh, A. M.; Simonov, A. P.

    1987-02-01

    The laser thermal desorption technique is used to measure the adsorption kinetics of SO2 and CO molecules on stainless steel with the aim of investigating the initial stage of oxidation of the steel by adsorbed CO molecules. Attention is given to the dependence of the rate of establishment of the equilibrium concentration of adsorbed molecules on SO2-gas pressure; CO adsorption kinetics on stainless steel at a gas pressure of 9 x 10 to the -8th torr; and the dependence of the concentration of adsorbed CO molecules on exposure in the gas at a pressure of 9 x 10 to the -8th torr under irradiation by laser pulses with repetition periods of 1-2, 2-4, 3-6, and 4-8 min.

  8. Highly Reproducible Laser Beam Scanning Device for an Internal Source Laser Desorption Microprobe Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Jill Rennee; Tremblay, Paul Leland

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (~5 µm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ~9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  9. Highly reproducible laser beam scanning device for an internal source laser desorption microprobe Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (˜5 μm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ˜9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  10. An improvement of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using an infrared tunable free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Yasuhide; Yoshihashi-Suzuki, Sachiko; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) is a powerful yet robust tool for protein identification, due to its high sensitivity and theoretically unlimited detectable mass range. A large part of functional proteins, such as membrane proteins, are insoluble as native forms in a matrix solution without a strong denaturing condition, hence are not amenable to the conventional MALDI-TOFMS analysis. Aiming at overcoming this difficulty, we have developed a novel MALDI technique (UV/FEL-MALDI). An infrared free electron laser (IR-FEL) has a wide tunability in a mid-IR range and is quite attractive as a source of selective vibrational excitation. The FEL wavelength can be tuned to activate a denaturant, which impedes the conventional MALDI process, without an excess heating of analyte molecules. This scheme lets a dense denaturant to be used for the MALDI sample preparation of insoluble proteins. A simultaneous use of the FEL with a nitrogen pulse laser for MALDI achieves spatially and temporally defined desorption, which is essential to TOFMS detection, while specificity and selectivity owing to an FEL wavelength can be conserved. Some attractive features of the protein clustering have been found in the application of UV/FEL-MALDI to hair keratins, which was chosen as a model of insoluble proteins.

  11. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of lipids using etched silver substrates.

    PubMed

    Schnapp, Andreas; Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Koch, Annika; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2016-07-15

    Silver-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry can be used for the analysis of small molecules. For example, adduct formation with silver cations enables the molecular analysis of long-chain hydrocarbons, which are difficult to ionize via conventional matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). Here we used highly porous silver foils, produced by etching with nitric acid, as sample substrates for LDI mass spectrometry. As model system for the analysis of complex lipid mixtures, cuticular extracts of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) and worker bees (Apis mellifera) were investigated. The mass spectra obtained by spotting extract onto the etched silver substrates demonstrate the sensitive detection of numerous lipid classes such as long-chain saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, fatty acyl alcohols, wax esters, and triacylglycerols. MS imaging of cuticular surfaces with a lateral resolution of a few tens of micrometers became possible after blotting, i.e., after transferring lipids by physical contact with the substrate. The examples of pheromone-producing male hindwings of the squinting bush brown butterfly (Bicyclus anynana) and a fingermark are shown. Because the substrates are also easy to produce, they provide a viable alternative to colloidal silver nanoparticles and other so far described silver substrates. PMID:26827933

  12. Identification of Microalgae by Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Multiple Nanomatrices.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lung-Hsiang; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Shih, Chi-Yu; Hsiung, Tung-Ming; Chang, Jeng; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Chiu, Tai-Chia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a simple method to identify microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) using three different substrates: HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe nanostructures. The fragmentation/ionization processes of complex molecules in algae varied according to the heat absorption and transfer efficiency of the nanostructured matrices (NMs). Therefore, the mass spectra obtained for microalgae showed different patterns of m/z values for different NMs. The spectra contained both significant and nonsignificant peaks. Constructing a Venn diagram with the significant peaks obtained for algae when using HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe NMs in m/z ratio range 100-1000, a unique relationship among the three sets of values was obtained. This unique relationship of sets is different for each species of microalgae. Therefore, by observing the particular relationship of sets, we successfully identified different algae such as Isochrysis galbana, Emiliania huxleyi, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nannochloris sp., Skeletonema cf. costatum, and Tetraselmis chui. This simple and cost-effective SALDI-MS analysis method coupled with multi-nanomaterials as substrates may be extended to identify other microalgae and microorganisms in real samples. Graphical Abstract Identification of microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry coupled with three different mercury-based nanosubstrates. PMID:26842733

  13. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and small angle neutron scattering of heavy fossil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-09-01

    The determination of the structural building blocks and the molecular weight range of heavy hydrocarbon materials is of crucial importance in research on their reactivity and for their processing. The chemically and physically heterogenous nature of heavy hydrocarbon materials, such as coals, heavy petroleum fractions, and residues, dictates that their structure and reactivity patterns be complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the molecular structure and molecular weight distribution of these materials is not dependent on a single molecule, but on a complex mixture of molecules which vary among coals and heavy petroleum samples. Laser Desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is emerging as a technique for molecular weight determination having found widespread use in biological polymer research, but is still a relatively new technique in the fossil fuel area. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides information on the size and shape of heavy fossil materials. SANS offers the advantages of high penetration power even in thick cells at high temperatures and high contrast for hydrocarbon systems dispersed in deuterated solvents. LDMS coupled with time of flight has the advantages of high sensitivity and transmission and high mass range. We have used LDMS to examine various heavy fossil-derived materials including: long chain hydrocarbons, asphaltenes from petroleum vacuum resids, and coals. This paper describes the application of laser desorption and small angle neutron scattering techniques to the analysis of components in coals, petroleum resids and unsaturated polymers.

  14. Detection of Biosignatures by Geomatrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (GALDI) Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jill R. Scott; Beizhan Yan; Daphne L. Stoner; J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman

    2007-04-01

    Identification of mineral-associated biosignatures is of significance for retrieving biochemical information from geological records here on Earth and detecting signs of life on other planets, such as Mars. The importance of the geomatrix for identifying amino acids (e.g., histidine, threonine, and cysteine) and small proteins (e.g., gramicidin S) was investigated by laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry. The investigated geomatrices include analogues of Fe-bearing minerals such as hematite and Na-bearing evaporites (e.g., halite). Samples were prepared by two methods: 1) application of analyte to the geomatrix surface and 2) production of homogenous analyte:geomatrix mixtures. Comparison of the two sample preparation methods revealed that the mixing method produces a better signal/noise ratio than surface application for the analyses of amino acids. The composition of the geomatrix has a profound influence on the detection of biomolecules. Peaks corresponding to the cation-attached biomolecular ions were observed for the Na-bearing evaporite analogue. No detectable peaks for the biomolecular ion species were observed when the biomolecules were associated with Fe-bearing minerals. Instead, only minor peaks were observed that may correspond to ions from fragments of the biomolecules. Depending on the underlying mineral composition, geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization shows promise for directly identifying biosignatures associated with minerals.

  15. Assessment of Laser-Induced Thermal Load on Silicon Nanostructures Based on Ion Desorption Yields

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett N; Stolee, Jessica A; Pickel, Deanna L; Retterer, Scott T; Vertes, Akos

    2010-01-01

    Laser heating of macroscopic objects follows the Fourier law of diffusive heat conduction. However, when the dimensions of a structure approach the mean free path of the phonons, heat transport is properly described by the equations of ballistic-diffusive or ballistic transport. Due to the coexistence of these different mechanisms in most nanostructures, the description of their rapid laser heating becomes complex. Experimental assessment of the thermal load on these structures through IR imaging is currently too slow and lacks the spatial resolution to be useful. In this paper, we introduce a method based on measuring the laser-induced yields of quasimolecular ions that enables the comparison of the thermal loads on different structures. Due to the difference in the activation energies of the desorption processes, sodiated and potassiated peptide ion intensities become equal at a certain surface temperature. The laser fluences at which these ion yields are equal for two different structures correspond to equivalent thermal loads. As an example, we compare the nanosecond laser heating of silicon nanopost arrays (NAPA) with diverse post diameters and periodicities. Assessment of the thermal load through ion yield measurements can also be used to verify model assumptions for heat transport regimes of nanostructures.

  16. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 25th ANNIVERSARY OF THE A.M. PROKHOROV GENERAL PHYSICS INSTITUTE: Femtosecond laser optical gas breakdown microplasma: the ionisation and postionisation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukin, V. V.; Garnov, S. V.; Malyutin, A. A.; Strelkov, V. V.

    2007-10-01

    The formation and evolution dynamics of the laser plasma produced in the microvolumes of gases (air, nitrogen, argon, and helium) upon their multiple ionisation by high-intensity (4×1016 W cm-2) tightly focused (to a region 1.7 μm in diameter) 400-nm, 100-fs second-harmonic pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser is studied. The spatiotemporal distribution profiles of the refractive index and electron microplasma density were recorded by ultrahigh-speed interferometry. The postionisation of a femtosecond laser plasma, i.e. the growth of the electron density known after the end of the exciting laser pulse, is detected for the first time. A theoretical model is proposed, which describes the mechanism of plasma postionisation by hot photoelectrons. The results of electron density calculations are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Heavy resid asphaltene characterization using high resolution and laser desorption mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Kim, Y.; Winans, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Resid is the nondistillable portion of crude oil, generally thought to consist largely of unsaturated molecules of considerable size and ring number. Such molecules must be upgraded to more saturated compounds if they are to be used as fuel sources. Current processing of resid is performed though coking, thermal and catalytic cracking, deasphalting and hydroprocessing. Thermal treatments, however, produce large quantities of low-value coke and hydroprocessing is expensive. Asphaltenes comprise the most process resistant portion of the resid. They contain high concentrations of heteroatoms and a high degree of unsaturation. Because these undesirable characteristics are concentrated in asphaltenes, finding an improved method of upgrading asphaltenes is a prerequisite to improving the upgrading of whole resid to viable fuel. Asphaltenes have, at present, only an operational definition. They are insoluble in straight chain saturated hydrocarbons. Very little is known about the structure of compounds in asphaltenes. They are a highly diverse group of compounds that are resistant to analysis by conventional methods. Conclusions about the structures of asphaltenes tends to be speculative. In this study desorption electron impact (HREIMS), chemical ionization high resolution mass spectrometry (HRCIMS), and laser desorption mass spectrometry (LD) have been applied to deasphalted oils (DAO) and asphaltenes derived from heavy Maya resid. LD data should yield information on the high molecular weight aromatic compounds, while HRMS can provide molecular characterization.

  18. Molecular-weight distributions of coal and petroleum asphaltenes from laser desorption/ionization experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ana R. Hortal; Paola Hurtado; Bruno Martinez-Haya; Oliver C. Mullins

    2007-09-15

    Molecular-weight distributions (MWDs) of asphaltenes extracted from coal and petroleum have been measured in laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric experiments. The dried-droplet and solvent-free sample preparation methods are compared. The coal asphaltenes have a relatively narrow MWD (full width 150 amu) with an average molecular weight of 340 amu. The petroleum asphaltenes display a broader MWD (full width 300 amu) and are heavier on average (680 amu). The LDI spectra also provide evidence for the formation of noncovalent clusters of the two types of asphaltenes during the desorption process. Petroleum and coal asphaltenes exhibit aggregation as do large model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with five or more fused rings also included in the study. Smaller PAHs (pyrene) exhibit less aggregation, especially when alkane-chain substituents are incorporated to the molecular structure. This indicates that asphaltenes possess large PAHs and, according to the relatively small molecular weights observed, that there is a preponderance of asphaltene molecules with only a single fused ring system. The coal asphaltenes present a significantly smaller propensity toward aggregation than their crude oil counterparts. This finding, coupled with the fact that (1) alkanes inhibit aggregation in LDI and (2) petroleum asphaltenes possess much more alkane carbon, indicates that coal asphaltenes have smaller PAHs on average than petroleum asphaltenes. This is further corroborated by the stronger ultraviolet absorbance of the coal asphaltenes at wavelengths shorter than 400 nm. 32 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Detection of trace ink compounds in erased handwritings using electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yi-Ying; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cheng, Chu-Nian; Shiea, Jentaie; Ho, Hsiu-O

    2014-06-01

    Writings made with erasable pens on paper surfaces can either be rubbed off with an eraser or rendered invisible by changing the temperature of the ink. However, trace ink compounds still remain in the paper fibers even after rubbing or rendering. The detection of these ink compounds from erased handwritings will be helpful in knowing the written history of the paper. In this study, electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry was used to characterize trace ink compounds remaining in visible and invisible ink lines. The ink compounds were desorbed from the paper surface by irradiating the handwritings with a pulsed laser beam; the desorbed analytes were subsequently ionized in an electrospray plume and detected by a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry mass analyzer. Because of the high spatial resolution of the laser beam, electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry analysis resulted in minimal damage to the sample documents. PMID:24913397

  20. Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of peptides on a hybrid CHCA organic-inorganic matrix.

    PubMed

    Fleith, Clément; Cantel, Sonia; Subra, Gilles; Mehdi, Ahmad; Ciccione, Jeremie; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2014-08-01

    We report applications of new hybrid organic-inorganic silica based materials as laser desorption/ionization (LDI)-promoting surfaces for high-throughput identification of peptides. The driving force of our work was to design a new material composed of a conventional MALDI matrix covalently attached to silica with a high organic/inorganic ratio in order to improve the UV absorption by such LDI hybrid matrices. Amorphous CHCA-functionalized silica presenting an organic content up to 1.3 mmol g(-1) (around 40% in weight from TGA and elementary analysis measurements) gave very interesting LDI performances in terms of detection sensitivity as well as relative ionization discrepancy (spectral suppression) through the analyses of small synthetic peptide mixtures (550-1300 Da) taking CHCA and amorphous silica as model matrices for control experiments. PMID:24910856

  1. Direct Surface Analysis of Fungal Species by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B. ); Wahl, Jon H. ); Kingsley, Mark T. ); Wahl, Karen L. )

    2001-12-01

    Intact spores and/or hyphae of Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus oryzae, Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). This study investigates various methods of sample preparation and matrices to determine optimum collection and analysis criteria for fungal analysis by MALDI-MS. Fungi are applied to the MALDI sample target as untreated, sonicated, acid/heat treated, or blotted directly from the fungal culture with double-stick tape. Ferulic acid or sinapinic acid matrix solution is layered over the dried samples and analyzed by MALDI-MS. Statistical analysis of the data show that simply using double stick tape to collect and transfer to a MALDI sample plate typically worked as well as the other preparation methods, but requires the least sample handling.

  2. Ammonium Ion Exchanged Zeolite for Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Phosphorylated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mengrui; Fujino, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), an organic matrix molecule for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, was adsorbed to NH4+-type zeolite surface, and this new matrix was used for the detection of low-molecular-weight compounds. It was found that this matrix could simplify the mass spectrum in the low-molecular-weight region and prevent interference from fragments and alkali metal ion adducted species. CHCA adsorbed to NH4+-type ZSM5 zeolite (CHCA/NH4ZSM5) was used to measure atropine and aconitine, two toxic alkaloids in plants. In addition, CHCA/NH4ZSM5 enabled us to detect phosphorylated peptides; peaks of the protonated peptides had higher intensities than the peaks observed using CHCA only. PMID:26448749

  3. Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization of Low Molecular Organic Substances on Oxidized Porous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmigol, I. V.; Alekseev, S. A.; Lavrynenko, O. Yu.; Zaitsev, V. N.; Barbier, D.; Pokrovskiy, V. A.

    Desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS) mass spectra of methylene blue (MB+Cl-) were studied using p+-type oxidized monofunctional porous silicon (PS-OX mono ) free layers. Reduction/protonation processes of methylene blue (MB) dye were investigated. It was shown that SiH x terminal sites on oxidized surface of porous silicon (PS-OX) are not the rate-determining factor for the reduction/protonation in DIOS. Tunneling of electron through the dielectric layer of nanostructures on silicon surface under effect of local electrostatic and electromagnetic fields is considered to be the most significant factor of adsorbate-adsorbent electron exchange and further laser-induced ion formation.

  4. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis of hyaluronan oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Shinobu; Hirano, Kana; Toyoda, Hidenao; Linhardt, Robert J.; Toida, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    A new method is presented for the identification of oligosaccharides obtained by enzymatic digestion of hyaluronan (HA) with bacterial hyaluronidase (E.C. 4.2.2.1, from Streptomyces hyalurolyticus) using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). Mixtures containing HA oligosaccharides of tetrasaccharide (4-mer)–34-mer were analyzed using this method. The carboxyl groups of the glucuronate residues in the prepared HA oligomers, were modified as the acidic form (—COOH), sodium salts (—COONa), organic ammonium salts, or methylesters before MALDI-TOFMS measurement. Among these samples, the methylester form of glucuronate residues in HA oligosaccharides, prepared by methylation using trimethylsilyl diazomethane, afforded high sensitivity for spectra. This simple modification method for carboxyl group methylation of acidic polysaccharides [Hirano et al., Carbohydr. Res., 340, (2005) 2297–2304] provides samples suitable for MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis throughout a significantly enhanced range of masses. PMID:17543609

  5. Comparison of different substrates for laser-induced electron transfer desorption/ionization of metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnikov, A. A.; Georgieva, V. B.; Donkov, N.; Borodkov, A. S.; Pento, A. V.; Raicheva, Z. G.; Yordanov, Tc A.

    2016-03-01

    Four different substrates, namely, graphite, tungsten, amorphous silicon (α-Si) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) films, were compared in view of the laser-induced electron transfer desorption/ionization (LETDI) of metal coordination complexes. A rhenium complex with 8-mercaptoquinoline, a copper complex with diphenylthiocarbazone and chlorophyll A were studied as the test analytes. The dependencies of the ion yield and the surface temperature on the incident radiation fluence were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The temperature was estimated using the numerical solution of a one-dimensional heat conduction problem with a heat source distributed in time and space. It was found that at the same temperature, the ion yield from the different substrates varies in the range of three orders of magnitude. The direct comparison of all studied substrates revealed that LETDI from the TiO2 and α-Si films offer a better choice for producing molecular ions of metal coordination complexes.

  6. Miniaturizing sample spots for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Tingting; Gross, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The trend of miniaturization in bioanalytical chemistry is shifting from technical development to practical application. In matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), progress in miniaturizing sample spots has been driven by the needs to increase sensitivity and speed, to interface with other analytical microtechnologies, and to develop miniaturized instrumentation. We review recent developments in miniaturizing sample spots for MALDI-MS. We cover both target modification and microdispensing technologies, and we emphasize the benefits with respect to sensitivity, throughput and automation. We hope that this review will encourage further method development and application of miniaturized sample spots for MALDI-MS, so as to expand applications in analytical chemistry, protein science and molecular biology. PMID:20161086

  7. Development of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for plant metabolite analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, Andrew R

    2014-12-01

    This thesis presents efforts to improve the methodology of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) as a method for analysis of metabolites from plant tissue samples. The first chapter consists of a general introduction to the technique of MALDI-MSI, and the sixth and final chapter provides a brief summary and an outlook on future work.

  8. Direct Laser Desorption Ionization of Endogenous and Exogenous Compounds from Insect Cuticles: Practical and Methodologic Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yew, Joanne Y.; Soltwisch, Jens; Pirkl, Alexander; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2011-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that ultraviolet laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UV-LDI o-TOF MS) could be used for the matrix-free analysis of cuticular lipids (unsaturated aliphatic and oxygen-containing hydrocarbons and triacylglycerides) directly from individual Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies (Yew, J. Y.; Dreisewerd, K.; Luftmann, H.; Pohlentz, G.; Kravitz, E. A., Curr. Biol. 2009, 19, 1245-1254). In this report, we show that the cuticular hydrocarbon, fatty acid, and triglyceride profiles of other insects and spiders can also be directly analyzed from intact body parts. Mandibular pheromones from the jaw of a queen honey bee are provided as one example. In addition, we describe analytical features and examine mechanisms underlying the methodology. Molecular ions of lipids can be generated by direct UV-LDI when non-endogenous compounds are applied to insect wings or other body parts. Current sensitivity limits are in the 10 pmol range. We show also the dependence of ion signal intensity on collisional cooling gas pressure in the ion source, laser wavelength (varied between 280-380 nm and set to 2.94 μm for infrared LDI), and laser pulse energy.

  9. Free-electron-laser (FEL)-induced desorption of ions from tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Seiji; Awazu, Kunio; Tomimasu, Takio

    1997-05-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) with the wide wavelength tunability has been developed and used for various applications. The FEL gives high efficiency for the photo- induced ablation when the laser is tuned to an absorption maximum of the target. This study investigates the FEL induced desorption of ions from tooth dentine to find new possibility for laser dentistry. The FEL was tuned to 9.4 (Mu) m, which is an absorption maximum of phosphoric acid ion known as major component of dentine. The FEL pulse length was several ps. The output average power was varied from 5 to 20mW by filters. A time-of-flight mass spectroscopy systems were developed for the purpose of analyzing the desorbed ions of varying masses. After the 9.4 micrometers FEL irradiation, the dentine surface was ablated, and visible light emission was observed. As a result, positive ions which correspond to Na+ and many phosphoric acid ions were measured. The positive ions, however were not observed when the FEL was not tuned to the absorption peak of the target. Therefore, this wavelength dependence points to resonant multiphoton vibrational excitation of molecules by the 9.4 micrometers FEL irradiation.

  10. Detection of malaria parasites in blood by laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Demirev, P A; Feldman, A B; Kongkasuriyachai, D; Scholl, P; Sullivan, D; Kumar, N

    2002-07-15

    A novel method for the in vitro detection of the protozoan Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria, has been developed. It comprises a protocol for cleanup of whole blood samples, followed by direct ultraviolet laser desorption (LD) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Intense ion signals are observed from intact ferriprotoporphyrin IX (heme), sequestered by malaria parasites during their growth in human red blood cells. The LD mass spectrum of the heme is structure-specific, and the signal intensities are correlated with the sample parasitemia (number of parasites per unit volume of blood). Parasitemia levels on the order of 10 parasites/microL blood can be unambiguously detected by this method. Consideration of laser beam parameters (spot size, rastering across the sample surface) and actual sample consumption suggests that the detection limits can be further improved by at least an order of magnitude. The influence of experimental factors, such as desorbed ion polarity, laser exposure and fluence, sample size, and parasite growth stage, on the threshold for parasite detection is also addressed. PMID:12139027

  11. Two-photon ionization thresholds of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization matrix clusters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q; Knochenmuss, R

    2001-01-01

    Direct two-photon ionization of the matrix has been considered a likely primary ionization mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. This mechanism requires that the vertical ionization threshold of matrix materials be below twice the laser photon energy. Because dimers and larger aggregates may be numerous in the early stages of the MALDI plume expansion, their ionization thresholds are important as well. We have used two-color two-photon ionization to determine the ionization thresholds of jet cooled clusters of an important matrix, 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid (DHB), and mixed clusters with the thermal decomposition product of DHB, hydroquinone. The thresholds of the clusters were reduced by only a few tenths of an eV compared to the monomers, to an apparent limit of 7.82 eV for pure DHB clusters. None of the investigated clusters can be directly ionized by two nitrogen laser photons (7.36 eV), and the ionization efficiency at the thresholds is low. PMID:11507754

  12. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Intact Proteins Larger than 100 kDa

    PubMed Central

    Signor, Luca; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Effectively determining masses of proteins is critical to many biological studies (e.g. for structural biology investigations). Accurate mass determination allows one to evaluate the correctness of protein primary sequences, the presence of mutations and/or post-translational modifications, the possible protein degradation, the sample homogeneity, and the degree of isotope incorporation in case of labelling (e.g. 13C labelling). Electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is widely used for mass determination of denatured proteins, but its efficiency is affected by the composition of the sample buffer. In particular, the presence of salts, detergents, and contaminants severely undermines the effectiveness of protein analysis by ESI-MS. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS is an attractive alternative, due to its salt tolerance and the simplicity of data acquisition and interpretation. Moreover, the mass determination of large heterogeneous proteins (bigger than 100 kDa) is easier by MALDI-MS due to the absence of overlapping high charge state distributions which are present in ESI spectra. Here we present an accessible approach for analysing proteins larger than 100 kDa by MALDI-time of flight (TOF). We illustrate the advantages of using a mixture of two matrices (i.e. 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) and the utility of the thin layer method as approach for sample deposition. We also discuss the critical role of the matrix and solvent purity, of the standards used for calibration, of the laser energy, and of the acquisition time. Overall, we provide information necessary to a novice for analysing intact proteins larger than 100 kDa by MALDI-MS. PMID:24056304

  13. Electron-ion dynamics in laser-assisted desorption of hydrogen atoms from H-Si(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Varga, Kalman

    2011-09-15

    In the framework of real time real space time-dependent density functional theory we have studied the electron-ion dynamics of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface H-Si(111) subjected to intense laser irradiation. Two surface fragments of different sizes have been used in the simulations. When the intensity and duration of the laser exceed certain levels (which depend on the wavelength) we observe the desorption of the hydrogen atoms, while the underlying silicon layer remains essentially undamaged. Upon further increase of the laser intensity, the chemical bonds between silicon atoms break as well. The results of the simulations suggest that with an appropriate choice of laser parameters it should be possible to remove the hydrogen layer from the H-Si(111) surface in a matter of a few tens of femtoseconds. We have also observed that at high laser field intensities (2-4 V/A in this work) the desorption occurs even when the laser frequency is smaller than the optical gap of the silicon surface fragments. Therefore, nonlinear phenomena must play an essential role in such desorption processes.

  14. Non-traditional applications of laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpin, Casey R.

    Seven studies were carried out using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) to develop enhanced methodologies for a variety of analyte systems by investigating analyte chemistries, ionization processes, and elimination of spectral interferences. Applications of LDI and matrix assisted laser/desorption/ionization (MALDI) have been previously limited by poorly understood ionization phenomena, and spectral interferences from matrices. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization MS is well suited to the analysis of proteins. However, the proteins associated with bacteriophages often form complexes which are too massive for detection with a standard MALDI mass spectrometer. As such, methodologies for pretreatment of these samples are discussed in detail in the first chapter. Pretreatment of bacteriophage samples with reducing agents disrupted disulfide linkages and allowed enhanced detection of bacteriophage proteins. The second chapter focuses on the use of MALDI MS for lipid compounds whose molecular mass is significantly less than the proteins for which MALDI is most often applied. The use of MALDI MS for lipid analysis presented unique challenges such as matrix interference and differential ionization efficiencies. It was observed that optimization of the matrix system, and addition of cationization reagents mitigated these challenges and resulted in an enhanced methodology for MALDI MS of lipids. One of the challenges commonly encountered in efforts to expand MALDI MS applications is as previously mentioned interferences introduced by organic matrix molecules. The third chapter focuses on the development of a novel inorganic matrix replacement system called metal oxide laser ionization mass spectrometry (MOLI MS). In contrast to other matrix replacements, considerable effort was devoted to elucidating the ionization mechanism. It was shown that chemisorption of analytes to the metal oxide surface produced acidic adsorbed species which then

  15. Formation of Metal-Related Ions in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chuping; Lu, I-Chung; Hsu, Hsu Chen; Lin, Hou-Yu; Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2016-09-01

    In a study of the metal-related ion generation mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), crystals of matrix used in MALDI were grown from matrix- and salt-containing solutions. The intensities of metal ion and metal adducts of the matrix ion obtained from unwashed crystals were higher than those from crystals washed with deionized water, indicating that metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions are mainly generated from the surface of crystals. The contributions of preformed metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions inside the matrix crystals were minor. Metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ion intensities generated from a mixture of dried matrix, salt, and analyte powders were similar to or higher than those generated from the powder of dried droplet crystals, indicating that the contributions of the preformed metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ions were insignificant. Correlation between metal-related ion intensity fluctuation and protonated ion intensity fluctuation was observed, indicating that the generation mechanism of the metal-related ions is similar to that of the protonated ions. Because the thermally induced proton transfer model effectively describes the generation of the protonated ions, we suggest that metal-related ions are mainly generated from the salt dissolution in the matrix melted by the laser. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27306427

  16. Identification of organic pigments in automotive coatings using laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stachura, Sylwia; Desiderio, Vincent J; Allison, John

    2007-05-01

    When one looks at an automotive coating, one sees color due to pigments. Modern organic pigments, with high molar absorptivities, may be only minor components of the mixture. Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been shown to be a useful tool for the analysis of colorants such as pen ink dyes. Here, LDMS is used to determine its utility for the identification of pigments, in simple media and in more complex paints. Small paint chips can be introduced into the LDMS instrument, and when an ultraviolet laser is focused on a portion of a chip, ions representative of the pigment(s) are selectively formed. Some pigments such as quinacridones and copper phthalocyanine are very stable and are desorbed and ionized intact. In contrast, benzimidazolones, which contain some single-skeletal bonds, form fragment ions. This method proves to be sensitive and convenient, as no sample preparation is required. The presence of inorganic pigments in addition to modern organic pigments can be determined, and pigments can be directly identified in actual automotive paint chip samples. PMID:17456087

  17. Selective detection of homocysteine by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Su, Chih-Lin; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the use of 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) as a selective probe for the determination of homocysteine (HCys) via fluorescence measurement and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). The derivatives of three aminothiols-HCys, glutathione (GSH), and gamma-glutamylcysteine (gamma-Glu-Cys)-with NDA under alkaline conditions possess different fluorescence emission characteristics, which allow us to identify them from amines, amino acids, and thiols. By selecting appropriate pH and excitation wavelengths, the limits of detection (LODs) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 5.2, 1.4 and 16 nM for HCys, GSH and gamma-Glu-Cys, respectively. Additionally, strong UV absorption of the NDA-HCys derivative was further observed at 331 nm; it could be directly detected by LDI-MS with a 337-nm nitrogen laser. Selective detection of HCys has been achieved by conducting the LDI-MS of the NDA-HCys derivative, which was found at m/z 406.9. The lowest detectable concentration of the NDA-HCys derivative in this approach was 500 nM. Quantitative determination of HCys in urine samples was accomplished by LDI-MS. Also, a calibration curve was created from plasma samples spiked with standard HCys (20-100 microM). The experimental results suggest that our proposed methods have great potential in clinical diagnosis and metabolomics application. PMID:17044125

  18. Identification of colorants in pigmented pen inks by laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papson, Kaitlin; Stachura, Sylwia; Boralsky, Luke; Allison, John

    2008-01-01

    Pigments are rapidly replacing dyes as colorants in pen and printer inks, due to their superior colors and stability. Unfortunately, tools commonly used in questioned document examination for analyzing pen inks, such as TLC, cannot be used for the analysis of insoluble pigments on paper. Laser desorption mass spectrometry is demonstrated here as a tool for analyzing pigment-based pen inks. A pulsed nitrogen laser can be focused onto a pen stroke from a pigmented ink pen on paper, and positive and negative ions representative of the pigment can be generated for subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. Targeted pens for this work were a set of Uni-ball 207 pigmented ink pens containing blue, light blue, orange, green, violet, red, pink, and black inks. Copper phthalocyanine was identified as the pigment used to make both blue inks. A mixture of halogenated copper phthalocyanines were identified in the green ink. Unexpectedly, the pink ink was found to contain a red pigment, Pigment Red 12, treated with a mixture of water-soluble dyes. Each sample yielded ions representative of the pigments present. PMID:18279246

  19. Formation of Metal-Related Ions in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chuping; Lu, I.-Chung; Hsu, Hsu Chen; Lin, Hou-Yu; Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2016-06-01

    In a study of the metal-related ion generation mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), crystals of matrix used in MALDI were grown from matrix- and salt-containing solutions. The intensities of metal ion and metal adducts of the matrix ion obtained from unwashed crystals were higher than those from crystals washed with deionized water, indicating that metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions are mainly generated from the surface of crystals. The contributions of preformed metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions inside the matrix crystals were minor. Metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ion intensities generated from a mixture of dried matrix, salt, and analyte powders were similar to or higher than those generated from the powder of dried droplet crystals, indicating that the contributions of the preformed metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ions were insignificant. Correlation between metal-related ion intensity fluctuation and protonated ion intensity fluctuation was observed, indicating that the generation mechanism of the metal-related ions is similar to that of the protonated ions. Because the thermally induced proton transfer model effectively describes the generation of the protonated ions, we suggest that metal-related ions are mainly generated from the salt dissolution in the matrix melted by the laser.

  20. Laser Desorption Ionization of small molecules assisted by Tungsten oxide and Rhenium oxide particles

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Matthew; Wysocki, Vicki; Dagan, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic metal oxides have shown potential as matrices for assisting in laser desorption ionization (LDI) with advantages over the aromatic acids typically used. Rhenium and tungsten oxides are an attractive option due to their high work functions and relative chemical inertness. In this work, it is shown that ReO3 and WO3, in microparticle (μP) powder forms, can efficiently ionize various types of small molecules and provide minimized background contamination at analyte concentrations below 1 ng/μL. This study shows that untreated inorganic WO3 and ReO3 particles are valid matrix options for detection of protonatable, radical, and precharged species under LDI. Qualitatively, the WO3 μP showed an improved detection of apigenin, sodiated glucose, and the precharged analyte choline, while the ReO3 μP allowed detection of protonated cocaine, quinuclidine, ametryn, and radical ions of polyaromatic hydrocarbons at detection levels as low as 50 pg/μL. For thermometer ion survival yield experiments, it was also shown that the ReO3 powder was significantly softer than CCA. Furthermore, it provided higher intensities of cocaine and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, at laser flux values equal to that used with CCA. PMID:26349643

  1. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of diesel particulate matter with charge-transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Carré, Vincent; Vernex-Loset, Lionel; Krier, Gabriel; Manuelli, Pascal; Muller, Jean-François

    2004-07-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are often associated with complex matrixes such as exhaust diesel particulate matter (DPM), which complicates their study. In that case, laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry is one of the techniques which ensures their direct analysis in the solid state. We demonstrate in this paper that the use of charge-transfer pi-complexing agents allows us to selectively detect by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry PAHs adsorbed on diesel particles with high sensitivity. 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone and 7,7',8,8'-tetracyanoquinodimethane pi-acceptor compounds form charge-transfer complexes with PAHs and prevent their evaporation in the mass spectrometer during analysis. Moreover, the production of PAH molecular ions is dramatically increased by laser irradiation of these complexes at short wavelength (221.7 nm) and low power density (5 x 10(6) W cm(-)(2)). This methodology is applied for the first time to the examination of DPM collected during the new European driving cycle for light-duty vehicles. Differentiation criteria may coherently be assigned to engine operating mode (engine temperature, driving conditions). DPM samples can also be easily distinguished in negative ions according to the high sensitivity of this detection mode to sulfate compounds. PMID:15253632

  2. Formation of Metal-Related Ions in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chuping; Lu, I.-Chung; Hsu, Hsu Chen; Lin, Hou-Yu; Liang, Sheng-Ping; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2016-09-01

    In a study of the metal-related ion generation mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), crystals of matrix used in MALDI were grown from matrix- and salt-containing solutions. The intensities of metal ion and metal adducts of the matrix ion obtained from unwashed crystals were higher than those from crystals washed with deionized water, indicating that metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions are mainly generated from the surface of crystals. The contributions of preformed metal ions and metal adducts of the matrix ions inside the matrix crystals were minor. Metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ion intensities generated from a mixture of dried matrix, salt, and analyte powders were similar to or higher than those generated from the powder of dried droplet crystals, indicating that the contributions of the preformed metal adducts of the matrix and analyte ions were insignificant. Correlation between metal-related ion intensity fluctuation and protonated ion intensity fluctuation was observed, indicating that the generation mechanism of the metal-related ions is similar to that of the protonated ions. Because the thermally induced proton transfer model effectively describes the generation of the protonated ions, we suggest that metal-related ions are mainly generated from the salt dissolution in the matrix melted by the laser.

  3. Whole-body Mass Spectrometry Imaging by Infrared Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization (IR-MALDESI).

    PubMed

    Nazari, Milad; Bokhart, Mark T; Muddiman, David C

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization sources for mass spectrometry (MS) have been the subject of much interest in the past decade. Matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (MALDESI) is an example of such methods, where features of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) (e.g., pulsed nature of desorption) and electrospray ionization (ESI) (e.g., soft-ionization) are combined. One of the major advantages of MALDESI is its inherent versatility. In MALDESI experiments, an ultraviolet (UV) or infrared (IR) laser can be used to resonantly excite an endogenous or exogenous matrix. The choice of matrix is not analyte dependent, and depends solely on the laser wavelength used for excitation. In IR-MALDESI experiments, a thin layer of ice is deposited on the sample surface as an energy-absorbing matrix. The IR-MALDESI source geometry has been optimized using statistical design of experiments (DOE) for analysis of liquid samples as well as biological tissue specimens. Furthermore, a robust IR-MALDESI imaging source has been developed, where a tunable mid-IR laser is synchronized with a computer controlled XY translational stage and a high resolving power mass spectrometer. A custom graphical user interface (GUI) allows user selection of the repetition rate of the laser, number of shots per voxel, step-size of the sample stage, and the delay between the desorption and scan events for the source. IR-MALDESI has been used in variety of applications such as forensic analysis of fibers and dyes and MSI of biological tissue sections. Distribution of different analytes ranging from endogenous metabolites to exogenous xenobiotics within tissue sections can be measured and quantified using this technique. The protocol presented in this manuscript describes major steps necessary for IR-MALDESI MSI of whole-body tissue sections. PMID:27077488

  4. Electroless plating of silver nanoparticles on porous silicon for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong; Xu, Ning; Huang, Wen-Yi; Han, Huan-Mei; Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2009-03-01

    An improved DIOS (desorption ionization on porous silicon) method for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) by electroless plating of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on porous silicon (PSi) was developed. By addition of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) into the AgNO3 plating solution, the plating speed can be slowed down and simultaneously 4-ATP self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on AgNPs (4-ATP/AgNPs) were formed. Both AgNPs and 4-ATP/AgNPs coated PSi substrates present much higher stability, sensitivity and reproducibility for LDI MS than the un-treated porous silicon ones. Their shelf life in air was tested for several weeks to a month and their mass spectra still displayed the same high quality and sensitivity as the freshly prepared ones. And more 4-ATP SAMs partly play a role of matrix to increase the ionization efficiency. A small organic molecule of tetrapyridinporphyrin (TPyP), oligomers of polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 and 2300), and a peptide of oxytocin were used as examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the silver-plated PSi as a matrix-free-like method for LDI MS. This approach can obtain limits of detection to femtomoles for TPyP, subpicomoles for oxytocin, and picomoles for PEG 400 and 2300, comparable to the traditional matrix method and much better than the DIOS method. It simplifies the sample preparation as a matrix-free-like method without addition of matrix molecules and homogenizes the sample spread over the spot for better and more even mass signals.

  5. Ultraviolet photodegradation of tris(8-hydroxy-quinolinate) aluminum (Alq3) thin films studied by electron and laser stimulated desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, W. R.; Quirino, W. G.; Legnani, C.; Ponciano, C. R.; Cremona, M.; Rocco, M. L. M.

    2012-11-01

    Alq3 has been the reference material used widely in the fabrication and characterization of efficient OLEDs due to its good properties as electroluminescent and electron transporting layer. Although the inclusion of these devices in commercial displays and lighting devices represents many benefits, the knowledge about the progressive loss of performance and efficiency with time for such devices is still limited. Therefore, it is an incentive to understand the mechanisms of Alq3 degradation when it is subjected to the influence of various extrinsic factors such as UV radiation. In the present work the degradation processes of Alq3 thin films as a result of 254 nm UV light irradiation are presented and discussed. The degradation products produced by the action of UV light were evaluated by time-of-flight mass spectrometry using electron stimulated ion desorption and laser desorption ionization techniques. Strong evidence for carboxylic acid formation after photodegradation was observed by the electron desorption technique.

  6. Transmission geometry laser desorption atmospheric pressure photochemical ionization mass spectrometry for analysis of complex organic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Nyadong, Leonard; Mapolelo, Mmilili M; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2014-11-18

    We present laser desorption atmospheric pressure photochemical ionization mass spectrometry (LD/APPCI MS) for rapid throughput analysis of complex organic mixtures, without the need for matrix, electric discharge, secondary electrospray, or solvents/vaporizers. Analytes dried on a microscope slide are vaporized in transmission geometry by a laser beam aligned with the atmospheric pressure inlet of the mass spectrometer. The laser beam initiates a cascade of reactions in the region between the glass slide and MS inlet, leading to generation of reagent ions for chemical ionization of vaporized analyte. Positive analyte ions are generated predominantly by proton transfer, charge exchange, and hydride abstraction, whereas negative ions are generated by electron capture or proton transfer reactions, enabling simultaneous analysis of saturated, unsaturated, and heteroatom-containing hydrocarbons. The absence of matrix interference renders LD/APPCI MS particularly useful for analysis of small molecules (<2000 Da) such as those present in petroleum crude oil and petroleum deposits. [M + H](+) and M(+•) dominate the positive-ion mass spectra for olefins and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, whereas saturated hydrocarbons are observed mainly as [M - H](+) and/or M(+•). Heteroatom-containing hydrocarbons are observed predominantly as [M + H](+). [M - H](-) and M(-•) are the dominant negative ions observed for analytes of lower gas-phase basicity or higher electron affinity than O2. The source was coupled with a 9.4 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR MS) to resolve and identify thousands of peaks from Athabasca bitumen heavy vacuum gas oil distillates (400-425 and 500-538 °C), enabling simultaneous characterization of their polar and nonpolar composition. We also applied LD/APPCI FTICR MS for rapid analysis of sodium and calcium naphthenate deposits with little to no sample pretreatment to provide mass spectral fingerprints that enable

  7. Non-volatile analysis in fruits by laser resonant ionization spectrometry: application to resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) in grapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, C.; Orea, J. M.; Soledad Muñoz, M.; Lobo, R. F. M.; González Ureña, A.

    A laser desorption (LD) coupled with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation (REMPI) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) technique for non-volatile trace analysis compounds is presented. Essential features are: (a) an enhanced desorption yield due to the mixing of metal powder with the analyte in the sample preparation, (b) a high resolution, great sensitivity and low detection limit due to laser resonant ionisation and mass spectrometry detection. Application to resveratrol content in grapes demonstrated the capability of the analytical method with a sensitivity of 0.2 pg per single laser shot and a detection limit of 5 ppb.

  8. Laser mass spectrometry of biological molecular ions produced by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, W. J.; Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Scott, C. T. J.; Singhal, R. P.

    1996-10-01

    A tandem reflectron laser mass spectrometer is used for investigations of the photo fragmentation of molecular ions. The observed fragmentation patterns for 2,5-dihydrobenzoic acid and its fragments ions are analysed. PTH-trytophan and PTH-valine ions, generated by MALDI, are photodissociated and their fragmentation pattern is discussed.

  9. Development of matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for the structural analysis of glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chevrier, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes the design, construction and characterization of an ultraviolet laser desorption time-of-flight [TOF] mass spectrometer and its subsequent application to glycoprotein structural analysis utilizing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization [MALDI] mass spectrometry. At the inception of this work, commercial mass spectrometers utilizing MALDI were not available, and most reports of the phenomena utilized the 266 nm wavelength provided by frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG lasers. This work involved the design and construction of a high-voltage-extraction linear TOF mass analyzer equipped with a multiple sample inlet system and a 337 manometer, 600 picosecond pulsed nitrogen laser. In MALDI the [open quotes]matrix[close quotes], a strong absorber of a laser wavelength, is co-crystallized with the analyte. The laser photons absorbed by the matrix lead to ionization of the analyte and subsequent desorption from the surface into the gas phase. While nicotinic acid and caffeic acid were reported as effective matrices at 266 and 355 nm, respectively, several other matrices were examined for their efficiency at 337 nm, including [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid and gentisic acid, which proved to be advantageous for glycoconjugate analysis. Glycoproteins, phosphoproteins, nucleic acids, and proteolytic digests were all successfully analyzed using the pulsed nitrogen laser. Analysis of numerous peptides and proteins demonstrated femtomolar sensitivity, mass range in excess of 350 kiloDaltons, mass resolution circa 700, and mass accuracy better than 0.1%. The completed instrument was utilized to analyze glycopeptides for carbohydrate sites and microheterogeneity, by performing MALDI mass spectrometry [MALDI/MS] following enzymatic and chemical reactions. In many cases, unfractionated or partially fractionated mixtures were analyzed directly thereby reducing preparative chromatography.

  10. The Effect of Culture Conditions on Microorganism Identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Wunschel, David S.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been used to identify bacteria based upon protein signatures. This research shows that while some different proteins are produced by vegetative bacteria when they are cultured in different growth media, positive identification with MALDI-TOF MS is still possible with the protocol established at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(11). A core set of small proteins remain constant under at least four different culture media conditions including minimal medium -M9, rich media - tryptic soy broth (TSB) or Luria-Bertani (LB) broth and blood agar plates such that analysis of the intact cells by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry allows for consistent identification.

  11. Nanostructured silicon surface modifications for as a selective matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsao, C W; Lin, C H; Cheng, Y C; Chien, C C; Chang, C C; Chen, W Y

    2012-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry is an established soft ionization method that is widely applied to analyze biomolecules. The UV-absorbing organic matrix is essential for biomolecule ionization; however, it also creates matrix background interference, which results in problematic analyses of biomolecules of less than 700 Da. Therefore, this study investigates hydrophilic, hydrophobic cationic, anionic and immobilized metal ion surface chemical modifications to advance nanostructured silicon mass spectrometry performance (nSi-MS). This investigation provides information required for a possible novel mass spectroscopy that combines surface-enhanced and nanostructured silicon surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for the selective detection of specific compounds of a mixture. PMID:22531330

  12. Direct Analysis of Gold Nanoparticles from Dried Droplets Using Substrate-Assisted Laser Desorption Single Particle-ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Benešová, Iva; Dlabková, Kristýna; Zelenák, František; Vaculovič, Tomáš; Kanický, Viktor; Preisler, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICPMS) has been generally accepted as a powerful tool in the field of nanoanalysis. The method has usually been restricted to direct nanoparticle (NP) introduction using nebulization or microdroplet generation systems. In this work, AuNPs are introduced into ICPMS by substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) directly from a suitable absorbing plastic surface using a commercial ablation cell for the first time. In SALD, desorption of individual NPs is mediated using a frequency-quintupled Nd:YAG laser (213 nm) operated at a rather low laser fluence. Conditions including laser fluence, laser beam scan rate, and carrier gas flow rate were optimized in order to gain the highest AuNP transport efficiency and avoid AuNP disintegration within the laser irradiation. The method was demonstrated on a well-characterized reference material, 56 nm AuNPs with a transport efficiency of 61% and commercially available 86 nm AuNPs. Feasibility of our technique for NP detection and characterization is discussed here, and the results are compared with an established technique, nebulizer SP-ICPMS. PMID:26859790

  13. System and method of infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry in polyacrylamide gels

    DOEpatents

    Haglund, Jr., Richard F.; Ermer, David R.; Baltz-Knorr, Michelle Lee

    2004-11-30

    A system and method for desorption and ionization of analytes in an ablation medium. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of preparing a sample having analytes in a medium including at least one component, freezing the sample at a sufficiently low temperature so that at least part of the sample has a phase transition, and irradiating the frozen sample with short-pulse radiation to cause medium ablation and desorption and ionization of the analytes. The method further includes the steps of selecting a resonant vibrational mode of at least one component of the medium and selecting an energy source tuned to emit radiation substantially at the wavelength of the selected resonant vibrational mode. The medium is an electrophoresis medium having polyacrylamide. In one embodiment, the energy source is a laser, where the laser can be a free electron laser tunable to generate short-pulse radiation. Alternatively, the laser can be a solid state laser tunable to generate short-pulse radiation. The laser can emit light at various ranges of wavelength.

  14. Ambient mass spectrometry imaging: plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging and its applications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Baosheng; Zhang, Jialing; Chang, Cuilan; Li, Liping; Li, Min; Xiong, Xingchuang; Guo, Chengan; Tang, Fei; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2014-05-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been widely used in many research areas for the advantages of providing informative molecular distribution with high specificity. Among the recent progress, ambient MSI has attracted increasing interests owing to its characteristics of ambient, in situ, and nonpretreatment analysis. Here, we are presenting the ambient MSI for traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) and authentication of work of art and documents using plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (PALDI-MS). Compared with current ambient MSI methods, an excellent average resolution of 60 μm × 60 μm pixel size was achieved using this system. The feasibility of PALDI-based MSI was confirmed by seal imaging, and its authentication applications were demonstrated by imaging of printed Chinese characters. Imaging of the Radix Scutellariae slice showed that the two active components, baicalein and wogonin, mainly were distributed in the epidermis of the root, which proposed an approach for distinguishing TCMs' origins and the distribution of active components of TCMs and exploring the environmental effects of plant growth. PALDI-MS imaging provides a strong complement for the MSI strategy with the enhanced spatial resolution, which is promising in many research fields, such as artwork identification, TCMs' and botanic research, pharmaceutical applications, etc. PMID:24670045

  15. Laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bezabeth, D.Z.; McCauley, E.M.; Kelly, P.B.; Jones, A.D.

    1994-12-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) are of interest to the environmental community due to their ubiquitous presence and the carcinogenic activity of many members of this class of compounds. Recent attention has been focused on nitro-substituted PAH (nitro-PAH) because of their demonstrated mutagenic and carcinogenic activities. Nitro-PAH are found in diesel exhaust, urban air particulates, coal fly ash, and cigarette smoke. The concentration of nitro-PAH in the environment is typically one to two orders of magnitude less than the unsubstituted PAH. However, the biological activity of nitro-PAH is several orders of magnitude greater than the unsubstituted PAH. Hence, there is a need for an analytical technique which combines sensitivity as well as selectivity for nitro-PAH to allow detection of nitro-PAH over the large background of PAH in the environment. This laboratory is presently investigating the use of laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry as a screening method for nitro-PAH. Previous work in this laboratory examined the positive ion spectra of several nitro-PAH. Weak molecular ion peaks were observed, however, the majority of the detected ions were low mass fragments. The unsubstituted PAH were also found to produce intense positive molecular ion signals in contrast to the very weak molecular signals from the nitro-PAH. Thus, identification of the individual nitro-PAH in an environmental sample would be difficult using only the positive ion spectra.

  16. Bimetallic silver-gold clusters by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

    PubMed

    Kéki, Sándor; Nagy, Lajos; Deák, György; Zsuga, Miklós

    2004-10-01

    Pure gold clusters (Aun+) were produced up to the cluster size of n = 100 by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The mass spectrum of the resulting clusters showed alteration in the ion intensity at odd-even clusters size. On the other hand, intensity drops at cluster size predicted by the jellium model theory was also observed. Positively and negatively charged bimetallic silver-gold clusters were produced under MALDI conditions from the mixture of HAuCl4/silver trifluoroacetate and the 2-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzoic acid (HABA) matrix. A linear correlation was found between the intensity ratio of AunAgm+ to Au(n+1)Ag(m-1)+ cluster ions and the molar ratio of the gold to silver salt. It was observed that the composition and the distribution of the clusters can be varied with the molar ratio of the silver and gold salts. It was also found that the resulting cluster sizes obey the lognormal distribution. PMID:15465358

  17. New strategies for characterizing ancient proteins using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrom, Peggy H.; Schall, Michael; Gandhi, Hasand; Shen, Tun-Li; Hauschka, Peter V.; Strahler, John R.; Gage, Douglas A.

    2000-03-01

    Structural characterization of ancient proteins is confounded by the small quantity of material remaining in fossils, difficulties in purification, and the inability to obtain sequence information by classical Edman degradation. We present a microbore reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (rpHPLC) method for partial purification of small quantities (picomoles) of the bone protein osteocalcin (OC) and subsequent characterization of this material by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The presence of OC in the modern and ancient samples was suggested by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and radioimmunoassay (RIA). The SDS-PAGE of material isolated from 800 yr BP and 10,000 yr BP bones demonstrates a band consistent with the molecular weight of OC and the RIA indicated OC in concentrations of 0.2 to 450ng/mg of bone for samples between 800 and 53,000 yr BP. In modern samples, we demonstrate the use of MALDI-MS to confirm the molecular weight of intact OC and to sequence OC via peptide mass mapping and a novel derivatization approach with post-source decay analysis. MALDI-MS data for three ancient samples with RIA-confirmed osteocalcin (800 yr BP, 10,000 yr BP and 53,000 yr BP) indicate peaks with a molecular mass within the range of modern OC.

  18. Sequence analysis of chitooligosaccharides by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization postsource decay mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bahrke, Sven; Einarsson, Jon M; Gislason, Johannes; Haebel, Sophie; Letzel, Matthias C; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Peter, Martin G

    2002-01-01

    Chitin/chitosan oligosaccharides composed of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucopyranose (GlcNAc) and/or 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucopyranose (GlcN) were prepared by chemical degradation of chitin or chitosan and separated by gel permeation chromatography. Oligosaccharides obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis of chitosan [F(A) 0.19] with a fungal chitinase were derivatized by reductive amination with 2-aminoacridone and sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight postsource decay (PSD) mass spectrometry (MS). The sequence of a trimer, D1A2, was established as D-A-A. The composition of a hexamer D3A3 was ca. 65% D-A-D-D-A-A and 35% D-D-A-D-A-A. The PSD MS of a nonamer D5A4-amac revealed four isobaric species D-X-Y-D-X-Y-D-A-A, where A is GlcNAc, D is GlcN, and X and Y (X not equal Y) are mutually either D or A. This structure motif was also observed in a dodecamer D7A5 which was composed of eight isobaric sequences of the general formula (D-X-Y)(3)-D-A-A. PMID:12099813

  19. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. From the four APCI reagent systems tested, neat carbon disulfide provided the best results. The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar but minor amount of fragmentation was observed for these two reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent (nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to predominantly form stable molecular ions.

  20. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of ultraviolet photo-processed ices

    SciTech Connect

    Paardekooper, D. M. Bossa, J.-B.; Isokoski, K.; Linnartz, H.

    2014-10-01

    A new ultra-high vacuum experiment is described that allows studying photo-induced chemical processes in interstellar ice analogues. MATRI²CES - a Mass Analytical Tool to study Reactions in Interstellar ICES applies a new concept by combining laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the ultimate goal to characterize in situ and in real time the solid state evolution of organic compounds upon UV photolysis for astronomically relevant ice mixtures and temperatures. The performance of the experimental setup is demonstrated by the kinetic analysis of the different photoproducts of pure methane (CH₄) ice at 20 K. A quantitative approach provides formation yields of several new species with up to four carbon atoms. Convincing evidence is found for the formation of even larger species. Typical mass resolutions obtained range from M/ΔM ~320 to ~400 for CH₄ and argon, respectively. Additional tests show that the typical detection limit (in monolayers) is ⩽0.02 ML, substantially more sensitive than the regular techniques used to investigate chemical processes in interstellar ices.

  1. Properties of matrix-assisted laser desorption. Measurements with a time-to-digital converter.

    PubMed

    Ens, W; Mao, Y; Mayer, F; Standing, K G

    1991-03-01

    Some properties of matrix-assisted laser desorption have been studied using single-ion-counting methods and a time-to-digital converter. The methods allow examination of the process for irradiances near the reported threshold for observation with a transient recorder. All measurements were made using bovine insulin as a test compound. We present direct evidence that an irradiance threshold near 10(6) W cm-2 exists for ion production, and that the process is a collective effect, either involving a large number of molecular ions (approximately 10(4) in a successful event or none at all. Above the threshold, the yield is found to scale with a high power (4th to 6th) of the irradiance. Measurements of initial velocity distributions indicate an axial velocity spread corresponding to approximately 50 eV and a radial velocity spread corresponding to approximately 2.4 eV. Thus the ejection or extraction mechanism appears to be strongly asymmetric. PMID:1804409

  2. Rapid drug detection in oral samples by porous silicon assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Rachel D; Guild, Georgia E; Harpas, Peter; Kirkbride, Paul; Hoffmann, Peter; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Kobus, Hilton

    2009-11-01

    The demand for analysis of oral fluid for illicit drugs has arisen with the increased adoption of roadside testing, particularly in countries where changes in legislation allow random roadside testing of drivers for the presence of a palette of illicit drugs such as methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Oral samples are currently tested for such drugs at the roadside using an immunoassay-based commercial test kit. Positive roadside tests are sent for confirmatory laboratory analysis, traditionally by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). We present here an alternative rapid analysis technique, porous silicon assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (pSi LDI-MS), for the high-throughput analysis of oral fluids. This technique alleviates the need for sample derivatization, requires only sub-microliter sample volumes and allows fast analysis (of the order of seconds). In this study, the application of the technique is demonstrated with real samples from actual roadside testing. The analysis of oral samples resulted in detection of MA and MDMA with no extraction and analysis of THC after ethyl acetate extraction. We propose that, subject to miniaturization of a suitable mass spectrometer, this technique is well suited to underpin the deployment of oral fluid testing in the clinic, workplace and on the roadside. PMID:19844964

  3. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. Four APCI reagent systems were tested: the traditionally used mixture of methanol and water, neat benzene, neat carbon disulfide, and nitrogen gas (no liquid reagent). The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar amount of fragmentation was observed for these reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent(nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to form stable molecular ions. PMID:21472571

  4. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization matrices for negative mode metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Fagerer, Stephan R; Nielsen, Simone; Ibáñez, Alfredo; Zenobi, Renato

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has been shown to be highly sensitive for analyzing low-mass compounds such as metabolites if the right matrix is used. 9-aminoacridine (9AA) is the most commonly employed matrix for negative mode MALDI-MS in metabolomics. However, matrix interferences and the strongly varying sensitivity for different metabolites make a search for alternative matrices desirable, in order to identify compounds with a different chemical background and/or favoring a different range of analytes. We tested the performance of a series of potential negative mode MALDI matrices with a mix of 29 metabolites containing amino acids, nucleotide phosphates and Krebs cycle intermediates. While ethacridine lactate was found to provide limits of detection (LODs) in the low femtomole range for nucleotide phosphates, amino acids and Krebs cycle intermediates in the low picomole range, 4-amino-2-methylquinoline showed LODs in the picomole range for most metabolites, but is capable of ionizing a broader range of analytes than both 9AA and ethacridine. PMID:23841224

  5. Analysis of mainstream and sidestream cigarette smoke particulate matter by laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Sébastien; Carré, Vincent; Scheffler, Jean-Luc; Aubriet, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LDI-FTICRMS) was used to investigate particulate matter (PM) associated with mainstream (MSS) and sidestream cigarette smokes (SSS). The high mass resolution and the high mass measurement accuracy allowed a molecular formula for each detected signal in the 150-500 m/z range to be assigned. The high number of peaks observed in mass spectra required additional data processing to extract information. In this context, Kendrick maps and Van Krevelen diagrams were drawn. These postacquisition treatments were used to more easily compare different cigarette smokes: (i) MSS from different cigarettes and (ii) MSS and SSS from the same cigarette. In both ion detection modes, most of the detected species were found to be attributed to C(6-31)H(2-35)N(0-7)O(0-9) compounds. The compounds observed in the study of SSS appeared to be more unsaturated and less oxygenated than those observed when MSS of the same cigarette was investigated. PMID:21126024

  6. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging identifies markers of ageing and osteoarthritic cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cartilage protein distribution and the changes that occur in cartilage ageing and disease are essential in understanding the process of cartilage ageing and age related diseases such as osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to investigate the peptide profiles in ageing and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage sections using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Methods The distribution of proteins in young, old and OA equine cartilage was compared following tryptic digestion of cartilage slices and MALDI-MSI undertaken with a MALDI SYNAPT™ HDMS system. Protein identification was undertaken using database searches following multivariate analysis. Peptide intensity differences between young, ageing and OA cartilage were imaged with Biomap software. Analysis of aggrecanase specific cleavage patterns of a crude cartilage proteoglycan extract were used to validate some of the differences in peptide intensity identified. Immunohistochemistry studies validated the differences in protein abundance. Results Young, old and OA equine cartilage was discriminated based on their peptide signature using discriminant analysis. Proteins including aggrecan core protein, fibromodulin, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein were identified and localised. Fibronectin peptides displayed a stronger intensity in OA cartilage. Age-specific protein markers for collectin-43 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein were identified. In addition potential fibromodulin and biglycan peptides targeted for degradation in OA were detected. Conclusions MALDI-MSI provided a novel platform to study cartilage ageing and disease enabling age and disease specific peptides in cartilage to be elucidated and spatially resolved. PMID:24886698

  7. Towards monitoring of protein purification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Haebel, Sophie; Andersen, Svend Olav; Roepstorff, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate if Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) Mass Spectrometry (MS) can be used as a general method for monitoring protein purification procedures. With this aim, the compatibility of MALDI/MS with protein samples containing various buffers, salts and detergents commonly used in protein purification is examined. The pH value of the sample during the crystallization process is found to be the critical point. As long as the pH value is kept below 2 by the addition of sufficiently concentrated trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), spectra can be obtained from solutions containing high concentrations of buffer or salts and up to 0.2% of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Reference spectra can be obtained by MALDI/MS of proteins electroeluted from electrophoretic gels as demonstrated using 2D-PAGE and further specificity obtained by preparing mass spectrometric peptide maps from the eluate. The value of the concept is demonstrated by relating the proteins purified from an extract of meal worm cuticle proteins with 2D-PAGE of the total extract. Finally a general strategy for monitoring protein purification by MALDI/MS is outlined and discussed.

  8. Analysis of insect cuticular hydrocarbons using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cvacka, Josef; Jiros, Pavel; Sobotník, Jan; Hanus, Robert; Svatos, Ales

    2006-02-01

    Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) were probed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry with a lithium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate matrix. CHC profiles were obtained for 12 species of diverse insect taxa (termites, ants, a cockroach, and a flesh fly). MALDI spectra revealed the presence of high molecular weight CHCs on the insect cuticle. Hydrocarbons with more than 70 carbon atoms, both saturated and unsaturated, were detected. When compared with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), MALDI-TOF covered a wider range of CHCs and enabled CHCs of considerably higher molecular weight to be detected. Good congruity between GC/MS and MALDI-TOF was observed in the overlapping region of molecular weights. Moreover, a number of previously undiscovered hydrocarbons were detected in the high mass range beyond the analytical capabilities of current GC/MS instruments. MALDI was shown to hold potential to become an alternative analytical method for insect CHC analyses. The ability of MALDI to discriminate among species varying in the degree of their relatedness was found to be similar to GC/MS. However, neither MALDI-MS nor GC/MS data were able to describe the phylogenetic relationships. PMID:16555131

  9. Quantum dots assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection of carbohydrates: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Aisha; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-04-01

    A quantum dots (QDs) assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (QDA-LDI-MS) strategy was proposed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a series of carbohydrates. The adsorption of carbohydrates on the modified surface of different QDs as the matrices depended mainly on the formation of hydrogen bonding, which led to higher MS intensity than those with conventional organic matrix. The effects of QDs concentration and sample preparation method were explored for improving the selective ionization process and the detection sensitivity. The proposed approach offered a new dimension to the application of QDs as matrices for MALDI-MS research of carbohydrates. It could be used for quantitative measurement of glucose concentration in human serum with good performance. The QDs served as a matrix showed the advantages of low background, higher sensitivity, convenient sample preparation and excellent stability under vacuum. The QDs assisted LDI-MS approach has promising application to the analysis of carbohydrates in complex biological samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27041659

  10. Black phosphorus-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of low-molecular-weight compounds in biofluids.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Mei; Ding, Jun; Yu, Lei; Hussain, Dilshad; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of small molecules by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been a challenging task due to matrix-derived interferences in low m/z region and poor reproducibility of MS signal response. In this study, we developed an approach by applying black phosphorus (BP) as a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) matrix for the quantitative analysis of small molecules for the first time. Black phosphorus-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (BP/ALDI-MS) showed clear background and exhibited superior detection sensitivity toward quaternary ammonium compounds compared to carbon-based materials. By combining stable isotope labeling (SIL) strategy with BP/ALDI-MS (SIL-BP/ALDI-MS), a variety of analytes labeled with quaternary ammonium group were sensitively detected. Moreover, the isotope-labeled forms of analytes also served as internal standards, which broadened the analyte coverage of BP/ALDI-MS and improved the reproducibility of MS signals. Based on these advantages, a reliable method for quantitative analysis of aldehydes from complex biological samples (saliva, urine, and serum) was successfully established. Good linearities were obtained for five aldehydes in the range of 0.1-20.0 μM with correlation coefficients (R (2)) larger than 0.9928. The LODs were found to be 20 to 100 nM. Reproducibility of the method was obtained with intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 10.4 %, and the recoveries in saliva samples ranged from 91.4 to 117.1 %. Taken together, the proposed SIL-BP/ALDI-MS strategy has proved to be a reliable tool for quantitative analysis of aldehydes from complex samples. Graphical Abstract An approach for the determination of small molecules was developed by using black phosphorus (BP) as a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) matrix. PMID:27382971

  11. Rapid Detection of OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oviaño, Marina; Barba, Maria José; Fernández, Begoña; Ortega, Adriana; Aracil, Belén; Oteo, Jesús; Campos, José; Bou, Germán

    2016-03-01

    A rapid and sensitive (100%) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect OXA-48-type producers, using 161 previously characterized clinical isolates. Ertapenem was monitored to detect carbapenem resistance, and temocillin was included in the assay as a marker for OXA-48-producers. Structural analysis of temocillin is described. Data are obtained within 60 min. PMID:26677247

  12. Jarosite as a Storage Mineral for Small Organic Molecules: Investigations of Natural Samples Using an 'In Situ' Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, J. M.; Hinman, N. W.; Yan, B.; Stoner, D. L.; Scott, J. R.

    2007-03-01

    The use of laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry has revealed the presence of organic matter in several jarosite samples from various locations worldwide including jarosite precipitated in the lab by acidothiobacillus ferroxidans.

  13. Detection of native protein ions in aqueous solution under ambient conditions by electrospray laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shiea, Jentaie; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Ma, Ya-Lin; Tseng, Wei-Lung; Chang, Hui-Chiu; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2008-07-01

    Liquid electrospray laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) mass spectrometry allows desorption and ionization of proteins directly from aqueous solutions and biological fluids under ambient conditions. Native protein ions such as those of myoglobin, cytochrome c, and hemoglobin were obtained. A droplet (ca. 5 microL) containing the protein molecules and micrometer-sized particles (e.g., carbon graphite powder) is irradiated with a pulsed UV laser. The laser energy adsorbed by the inert particles is transferred to the surrounding solvent and protein molecules, leading to their desorption; the desorbed gaseous molecules are then postionized within an electrospray (ESI) plume to generate the ESI-like protein ions. With the use of this technique, we detected only the protonated protein ions in various biological fluids (including human tears, cow milk, serum, and bacterial extracts) without interference from their corresponding sodiated or potassiated adduct ions. In addition, we rapidly quantified the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin present in drops of whole blood obtained from diabetic patients without the need of sample pretreatment. PMID:18510347

  14. Gold nanoparticles assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and applications: from simple molecules to intact cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2016-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (GALDI-MS) provided new horizons and offered many functions for various applications. This review summarized AuNPs applications for analytical, biotechnology and proteomics. AuNPs efficiently absorbed the laser radiation and transferred the energy to the analyte for the desorption/ionization process. The unique features of AuNPs such as large surface area and high absorption coefficient lead not only to high resolution, low interference and low limit of detection, but also offered selective detection for certain species. AuNPs provided an excellent surface for the analysis of several species such as small molecules, biomarkers, proteins and cells (pathogenic bacteria or cancer cells). AuNPs played many roles such as surface for LDI-MS, probe and stationary phase for separation or preconcentration. AuNPs modified various surface chemistry was applied for a wide range of different wavelength. AuNPs severed as a source of Au(+) ions that were suitable for analyte cationisation. Characterization of Au nanoclusters (AuNCs) by mass spectrometry, pros and cons were also highlighted. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of the analysis by Gold Nanoparticles Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (GALDI-MS). PMID:26973236

  15. Developments and Applications of Electrophoresis and Small Molecule Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-sensitive native fluorescence detection of proteins with miniaturized one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was achieved with laser side-entry excitation, which provides both high excitation power and low background level. The detection limit for R-phycoerythrin protein spots in 1-D SDS-PAGE was as low as 15 fg, which corresponds to 40 thousand molecules only. The average detection limit of six standard native proteins was 5 pg per band and the dynamic range spanned more than 3 orders of magnitude. Approximately 150 protein spots from 30 ng of total Escherichia coli extraction were detected on a 0.8 cm x 1 cm gel in two-dimensional separation. Estrogen-DNA adducts as 4-OHE1(E2)-1-N3Ade and 4-OHEI(E2)-2-NacCys were hypothesized as early risk assessment of prostate and breast cancers. Capillary electrophoresis, luminescence/absorption spectroscopy and LC-MS were used to characterize and detect these adducts. Monoclonal antibodies against each individual adduct were developed and used to enrich such compounds from urine samples of prostate and breast cancer patients as well as healthy people. Adduct 4-OHE1-1-N3Ade was detected at much higher level in urine from subjects with prostate cancer patients compared to healthy males. The same adduct and 4-OHEI-2-NacCys were also detected at a much higher level in urine from a woman with breast carcinoma than samples from healthy controls. These two DNA adducts may serve as novel biomarkers for early diagnostic of cancers. The adsorption properties of R-phycoerythrin (RPE), on the fused-silica surface were studied using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and single molecule spectroscopy. The band shapes and migration times were measured in CE. Adsorption and desorption events were recorded at the single-molecule level by imaging of the evanescent-field layer using total internal reflection. The adsorbed RPE molecules on the fused-silica prism surface were

  16. Enhanced capabilities for imaging gangliosides in murine brain with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled to ion mobility separation.

    PubMed

    Škrášková, Karolina; Claude, Emmanuelle; Jones, Emrys A; Towers, Mark; Ellis, Shane R; Heeren, Ron M A

    2016-07-15

    The increased interest in lipidomics calls for improved yet simplified methods of lipid analysis. Over the past two decades, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been established as a powerful technique for the analysis of molecular distribution of a variety of compounds across tissue surfaces. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI is widely used to study the spatial distribution of common lipids. However, a thorough sample preparation and necessity of vacuum for efficient ionization might hamper its use for high-throughput lipid analysis. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is a relatively young MS technique. In DESI, ionization of molecules occurs under ambient conditions, which alleviates sample preparation. Moreover, DESI does not require the application of an external matrix, making the detection of low mass species more feasible due to the lack of chemical matrix background. However, irrespective of the ionization method, the final information obtained during an MSI experiment is very complex and its analysis becomes challenging. It was shown that coupling MSI to ion mobility separation (IMS) simplifies imaging data interpretation. Here we employed DESI and MALDI MSI for a lipidomic analysis of the murine brain using the same IMS-enabled instrument. We report for the first time on the DESI IMS-MSI of multiply sialylated ganglioside species, as well as their acetylated versions, which we detected directly from the murine brain tissue. We show that poly-sialylated gangliosides can be imaged as multiply charged ions using DESI, while they are clearly separated from the rest of the lipid classes based on their charge state using ion mobility. This represents a major improvement in MSI of intact fragile lipid species. We additionally show that complementary lipid information is reached under particular conditions when DESI is compared to MALDI MSI. PMID:26922843

  17. On the role of defects and surface chemistry for surface-assisted laser desorption ionization from silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimpiev, S.; Grechnikov, A.; Sunner, J.; Karavanskii, V.; Simanovsky, Ya.; Zhabin, S.; Nikiforov, S.

    2008-01-01

    The generation of ions from silicon substrates in surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) has been studied using silicon substrates prepared and etched by a variety of different methods. The different substrates were compared with respect to their ability to generate peptide mass spectra using standard liquid sample deposition. The desorption/ionization processes were studied using gas-phase analyte deposition. Mass spectra were obtained from compounds with gas-phase basicities above 850kJ/mol and with molecular weights up to 370Da. UV, VIS, and IR lasers were used for desorption. Ionization efficiencies were measured as a function of laser fluence and accumulated laser irradiance dose. Solvent vapors were added to the ion source and shown to result in fundamental laser-induced chemical and physical changes to the substrate surfaces. It is demonstrated that both the chemical properties of the substrate surface and the presence of a highly disordered structure with a high concentration of "dangling bonds" or deep gap states are required for efficient ion generation. In particular, amorphous silicon is shown to be an excellent SALDI substrate with ionization efficiencies as high as 1%, while hydrogen-passivated amorphous silicon is SALDI inactive. Based on the results, a novel model for SALDI ion generation is proposed with the following reaction steps: (1) the adsorption of neutral analyte molecules on the SALDI surface with formation of a hydrogen bond to surface Si-OH groups, (2) the electronic excitation of the substrate to form free electron/hole pairs (their relaxation results in trapped positive charges in near-surface deep gap states, causing an increase in the acidity of the Si-OH groups and proton transfer to the analyte molecules), and (3) the thermally activated dissociation of the analyte ions from the surface via a "loose" transition state.

  18. Laser-induced desorption of atomic and molecular fragments from a tin dioxide surface modified by a thin organic covering of copper phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Komolov, A. S. Komolov, S. A.; Lazneva, E. F.; Turiev, A. M.

    2012-01-15

    The systematic features of laser-induced desorption from an SnO{sub 2} surface exposed to 10-ns pulsed neodymium laser radiation are studied at the photon energy 2.34 eV, in the range of pulse energy densities 1 to 50 mJ/cm{sup 2}. As the threshold pulse energy 28 mJ/cm{sup 2} is achieved, molecular oxygen O{sub 2} is detected in the desorption mass spectra from the SnO{sub 2} surface; as the threshold pulse energy 42 mJ/cm{sup 2} is reached, tin Sn, and SnO and (SnO){sub 2} particle desorption is observed. The laser desorption mass spectra from the SnO{sub 2} surface coated with an organic copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) film 50 nm thick are measured. It is shown that laser irradiation causes the fragmentation of CuPc molecules and the desorption of molecular fragments in the laser pulse energy density range 6 to 10 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Along with the desorption of molecular fragments, a weak desorption signal of the substrate components O{sub 2}, Sn, SnO, and (SnO){sub 2} is observed in the same energy range. Desorption energy thresholds of substrate atomic components from the organic film surface are approximately five times lower than thresholds of their desorption from the atomically clean SnO{sub 2} surface, which indicates the diffusion of atomic components of the SnO{sub 2} substrate to the bulk of the deposited organic film.

  19. Surface-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry on titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube layers.

    PubMed

    Piret, Gaëlle; Kim, Doohun; Drobecq, Hervé; Coffinier, Yannick; Melnyk, Oleg; Schmuki, Patrik; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2012-07-01

    The paper reports on the use of a titanium oxide (TiO(2)) nanotube layer as a sensitive substrate for surface-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) of peptides and small molecules. The nanotube layers were prepared by electrochemical anodization of titanium foil. The optimized TiO(2) nanotubes morphology coupled to a controlled surface chemistry allowed desorption-ionization (D/I) of a peptide mixture (Mix1) with a detection limit of 10 femtomoles for the neurotensin peptide. The performance of the TiO(2) nanotubes for the D/I of small molecules was also tested for the detection of sutent, a small tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and verapamil. A detection limit of 50 fmol was obtained for these molecules, as compared to 500 fmol using classical matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Both amorphous and anatase TiO(2) layers displayed a comparable performance for D/I of analyte molecules. In a control experiment, we have performed D/I of analyte molecules on a flat TiO(2) layer. The absence of signal emphasizes the role of the nanostructured substrate in the D/I process. PMID:22624145

  20. Atmospheric pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometry for analysis of saturated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Nyadong, Leonard; Quinn, John P; Hsu, Chang S; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2012-08-21

    We present atmospheric pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption chemical ionization (AP/LIAD-CI) with O(2) carrier/reagent gas as a powerful new approach for the analysis of saturated hydrocarbon mixtures. Nonthermal sample vaporization with subsequent chemical ionization generates abundant ion signals for straight-chain, branched, and cycloalkanes with minimal or no fragmentation. [M - H](+) is the dominant species for straight-chain and branched alkanes. For cycloalkanes, M(+•) species dominate the mass spectrum at lower capillary temperature (<100 °C) and [M - H](+) at higher temperature (>200 °C). The mass spectrum for a straight-chain alkane mixture (C(21)-C(40)) shows comparable ionization efficiency for all components. AP/LIAD-CI produces molecular weight distributions similar to those for gel permeation chromatography for polyethylene polymers, Polywax 500 and Polywax 655. Coupling of the technique to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) for the analysis of complex hydrocarbon mixtures provides unparalleled mass resolution and accuracy to facilitate unambiguous elemental composition assignments, e.g., 1754 peaks (rms error = 175 ppb) corresponding to a paraffin series (C(12)-C(49), double-bond equivalents, DBE = 0) and higher DBE series corresponding to cycloparaffins containing one to eight rings. Isoabundance-contoured plots of DBE versus carbon number highlight steranes (DBE = 4) of carbon number C(27)-C(30) and hopanes of C(29)-C(35) (DBE = 5), with sterane-to-hopane ratio in good agreement with field ionization (FI) mass spectrometry analysis, but performed at atmospheric pressure. The overall speciation of nonpolar, aliphatic hydrocarbon base oil species offers a promising diagnostic probe to characterize crude oil and its products. PMID:22881221

  1. High-throughput proteomics using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Rainer; Gobom, Johan; Nordhoff, Eckhard

    2005-06-01

    It has become evident that the mystery of life will not be deciphered just by decoding its blueprint, the genetic code. In the life and biomedical sciences, research efforts are now shifting from pure gene analysis to the analysis of all biomolecules involved in the machinery of life. One area of these postgenomic research fields is proteomics. Although proteomics, which basically encompasses the analysis of proteins, is not a new concept, it is far from being a research field that can rely on routine and large-scale analyses. At the time the term proteomics was coined, a gold-rush mentality was created, promising vast and quick riches (i.e., solutions to the immensely complex questions of life and disease). Predictably, the reality has been quite different. The complexity of proteomes and the wide variations in the abundances and chemical properties of their constituents has rendered the use of systematic analytical approaches only partially successful, and biologically meaningful results have been slow to arrive. However, to learn more about how cells and, hence, life works, it is essential to understand the proteins and their complex interactions in their native environment. This is why proteomics will be an important part of the biomedical sciences for the foreseeable future. Therefore, any advances in providing the tools that make protein analysis a more routine and large-scale business, ideally using automated and rapid analytical procedures, are highly sought after. This review will provide some basics, thoughts and ideas on the exploitation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization in biological mass spectrometry - one of the most commonly used analytical tools in proteomics - for high-throughput analyses. PMID:16000086

  2. Dermatophyte Identification Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry ▿

    PubMed Central

    Theel, Elitza S.; Hall, Leslie; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Wengenack, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) for the identification of dermatophytes from clinical cultures was compared to that of dermatophyte identification using 28S rRNA gene sequencing. The MALDI Biotyper library (MBL; version 3.0) was used alone and in combination with a supplemented library containing an additional 20 dermatophyte spectra (S-MBL). Acquired spectra were interpreted using both the manufacturer-recommended scores (genus, ≥1.7; species, ≥2.0) and adjusted cutoff values established by this study (genus, ≥1.5; species, ≥1.7); identifications required a minimum 10% difference in scores between the top two different organisms to be considered correct. One hundred well-characterized, archived dermatophyte isolates and 71 fresh dermatophyte cultures were evaluated using both libraries and both sets of cutoff criteria. Collectively, the S-MBL significantly outperformed the MBL at both the genus (93% versus 37.4%; P < 0,0001) and species (59.6% versus 20.5%; P < 0.0001) levels when using the adjusted score criteria. Importantly, application of the lowered cutoff values significantly improved genus (P = 0.005)- and species (P < 0.0001)-level identification for the S-MBL, without leading to an increase in misidentifications. MALDI-TOF MS is a cost-effective and rapid alternative to traditional or molecular methods for dermatophyte identification, provided that the reference library is supplemented to sufficiently encompass clinically relevant, intraspecies strain diversity. PMID:21956979

  3. Depth profiling of inks in authentic and counterfeit banknotes by electrospray laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yi-Ying; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cheng, Chu-Nian; Shiea, Jentaie

    2016-01-01

    Electrospray laser desorption ionization is an ambient ionization technique that generates neutrals via laser desorption and ionizes those neutrals in an electrospray plume and was utilized to characterize inks in different layers of copy paper and banknotes of various currencies. Depth profiling of inks was performed on overlapping color bands on copy paper by repeatedly scanning the line with a pulsed laser beam operated at a fixed energy. The molecules in the ink on a banknote were desorbed by irradiating the banknote surface with a laser beam operated at different energies, with results indicating that different ions were detected at different depths. The analysis of authentic $US100, $100 RMB and $1000 NTD banknotes indicated that ions detected in 'color-shifting' and 'typography' regions were significantly different. Additionally, the abundances of some ions dramatically changed with the depth of the aforementioned regions. This approach was used to distinguish authentic $1000 NTD banknotes from counterfeits. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26757068

  4. Nanoscale silicon surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: environment stability and activation by simple vacuum oven desiccation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chia-Wen; Lin, Yuan-Jing; Chen, Pi-Yu; Yang, Yu-Liang; Tan, Say Hwa

    2016-08-01

    Nanoscale silicon surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) is an emerging matrix-free, highly sensitive MS analysis method. An important challenge in using nanoscale silicon SALDI-MS analysis is the aging and stability of silicon after storage in various environments. No proper nanoscale silicon SALDI-MS activation procedure has been reported to solve this issue. This study investigated the sensitivity, wettability, and surface oxidation behavior of nanoscale silicon surface SALDI-MS in a room, an inert gas atmosphere, and a vacuum environment. A simple vacuum oven desiccation was proposed to activate the SALDI-MS surface, and the limit of detection was further enhanced 1000 times to a 500 attomole level using this approach. The long-term stability and desorption/ionization mechanism were also investigated. PMID:27315049

  5. High-Resolution Live-Cell Imaging and Analysis by Laser Desorption/Ionization Droplet Delivery Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Jansson, Erik T; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    We have developed a new ambient-ionization mass spectrometric technique named laser desorption/ionization droplet delivery mass spectrometry (LDIDD-MS). LDIDD-MS permits high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging of tissue samples as well as measurements of both single-cell apoptosis and live-cell exocytosis. A pulsed (15 Hz) UV laser beam (266 nm) is focused on a surface covered with target analytes to trigger their desorption and ionization. A spray of liquid droplets is simultaneously directed onto the laser-focused surface region to capture the ionized analytes and deliver them to a mass spectrometer. The approach of rapid and effective capturing of molecules after laser desorption/ionization allows the limit of detection for the amino acid lysine to be as low as 2 amol under ambient ionization conditions. Two-dimensional maps of the desorbed/ionized species are recorded by moving the sample on an XY translational stage. The spatial resolution for imaging with LDIDD-MS was determined to be 2.4 μm for an ink-printed pattern and 3 μm for mouse brain tissue. We applied LDIDD-MS to single-cell analysis of apoptotic HEK cells. Differences were observed in the profiles of fatty acids and lipids between healthy HEK cells and those undergoing apoptosis. We observed upregulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) with a relatively shorter carbon chain length and downregulation of PC with a relatively longer carbon chain length. We also applied LDIDD-MS for a real-time direct measurements of live-cell exocytosis. The catecholamine dopamine and trace amines (phenethylamine and tyramine) were detected from live PC12 cells without damaging them. PMID:27110027

  6. A miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation analyser for investigation of elemental/isotopic composition with the sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of the elemental and isotopic composition of solar system objects imposes critical constraints on models describing the origin of our solar system and can provide insight to chemical and physical processes taking place during the planetary evolution. So far, the investigation of chemical composition of planetary surfaces could be conducted almost exclusively by remotely controlled spectroscopic instruments from orbiting spacecraft, landers or rovers. With some exceptions, the sensitivity of these techniques is, however, limited and often only abundant elements can be investigated. Nevertheless, the spectroscopic techniques proved to be successful for global chemical mapping of entire planetary objects such as the Moon, Mars and asteroids. A combined afford of the measurements from orbit, landers and rovers can also yield the determination of local mineralogy. New instruments including Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (LIMS), have been recently included for several landed missions. LIBS is thought to improve flexibility of the investigations and offers a well localised chemical probing from distances up to 10-13 m. Since LIMS is a mass spectrometric technique it allows for very sensitive measurements of elements and isotopes. We will demonstrate the results of the current performance tests obtained by application of a miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation mass spectrometer, a LIMS instrument, developed in Bern for the chemical analysis of solids. So far, the only LIMS instrument on a spacecraft is the LAZMA instrument. This spectrometer was a part of the payload for PHOBOS-GRUNT mission and is also currently selected for LUNA-RESURCE and LUNA-GLOB missions to the lunar south poles (Managadze et al., 2011). Our LIMS instrument has the dimensions of 120 x Ø60 mm and with a weight of about 1.5 kg (all electronics included), it is the lightest mass analyser designed for in situ chemical

  7. Signal enhancement in electrospray laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry by using a black oxide-coated metal target and a relatively low laser fluence.

    PubMed

    Kononikhin, Alexey; Huang, Min-Zong; Popov, Igor; Kostyukevich, Yury; Kukaev, Evgeny; Boldyrev, Alexey; Spasskiy, Alexander; Leypunskiy, Ilya; Shiea, Jentaie; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    The electrospray Laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) method is actively used for direct sample analysis and ambient mass spectrometry imaging. The optimizing of Laser desorption conditions is essential for this technology. In this work, we propose using a metal target with a black oxide (Fe3O4) coating to increase the signal in ELDI-MS for peptides and small proteins. The experiments were performed on an LTQ-FT mass spectrometer equipped with a home-made ELDI ion source. A cutter blade with black oxide coating was used as a target. A nitrogen laser was used with the following parameters: 337 nm, pulse duration 4ns, repetition rate 10 Hz, fluence to approximately 700 Jm(-2). More than a five times signal increase was observed for a substance P peptide when a coated and a non-coated metal target were compared. No ion signal was observed for proteins if the same fluence and the standard stainless steel target were used. With the assistance of the Fe3O4 coated metal target and a relatively low laser fluence < or =700 Jm(-2)), proteins such as insulin, ubiquitin and myoglobin were successfully ionized. It was demonstrated that the Fe3O4-coated metal target can be used efficiently to assist laser desorption and thus significantly increase the analyte signal in ELDI-MS. A relatively low laser fluence (< or = 700 Jm(-2)) was enough to desorb peptides and proteins (up to 17 kDal with the assistance of the Fe3O4-coated metal target under ambient conditions. PMID:24575623

  8. Novel Galvanic Nanostructures of Ag and Pd for Efficient Laser Desorption/Ionization of Low Molecular Weight Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silina, Yuliya E.; Meier, Florian; Nebolsin, Valeriy A.; Koch, Marcus; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2014-05-01

    A simple approach for synthesis of palladium and silver nanostructures with readily adjustable morphologies was developed using galvanic electrochemical deposition, for application to surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) of small biological molecules. A range of fatty acids, triglycerides, carbohydrates, and antibiotics were investigated to assess the performance of the new materials. Intense analyte cations were generated from the galvanic surfaces upon UV laser irradiation such as potassium adducts for a film thickness <100 nm (originating from impurities of the electrolyte solution) and Pd and Ag cluster ions for films with a thickness >120 nm. Possible laser desorption/ionization mechanisms of these galvanic structures are discussed. The films exhibited self-organizing abilities and adjustable morphologies by changing electrochemical parameters. They did not require any stabilizing agents and were inexpensive and very easy to produce. SALDI analysis showed that the materials were stable under ambient conditions and analytical results with excellent measurement reproducibility and detection sensitivity similar to MALDI were obtained. Finally, we applied the galvanic surfaces to fast screening of natural oils with minimum sample preparation.

  9. A new approach for detection of explosives based on ion mobility spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzishchin, Yury; Kotkovskii, Gennadii; Martynov, Igor; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Chistyakov, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new way for detection ultralow concentration of explosives in this study. It combines an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and a promising method of laser desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The DIOS is widely used in mass spectrometry due to the possibility of small molecule detection and high sensitivity. It is known that IMS based on laser ion source is a power method for the fast detection of ultralow concentration of organic molecules. However requirement of using high energy pulse ultraviolet laser increases weight and size of the device. The use of DIOS in an ion source of IMS could decrease energy pulse requirements and allows one to construct both compact and high sensitive device for analyzing gas and liquid probes. On the other hand mechanisms of DIOS in gas media is poorly studied, especially in case of nitroaromatic compounds. The investigation of the desorption/ionization on porous silicon (pSi) surface of nitroaromatic compounds has been carried out for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) using IMS and mass spectrometry (MS). It has been demonstrated that TNT ion formation in a gas medium is a complicated process and includes both an electron emission from the pSi surface with subsequent ion-molecular reactions in a gas phase and a proton transfer between pSi surface and TNT molecule.

  10. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  11. A Compact, Solid-State UV (266 nm) Laser System Capable of Burst-Mode Operation for Laser Ablation Desorption Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arevalo, Ricardo, Jr.; Coyle, Barry; Paulios, Demetrios; Stysley, Paul; Feng, Steve; Getty, Stephanie; Binkerhoff, William

    2015-01-01

    Compared to wet chemistry and pyrolysis techniques, in situ laser-based methods of chemical analysis provide an ideal way to characterize precious planetary materials without requiring extensive sample processing. In particular, laser desorption and ablation techniques allow for rapid, reproducible and robust data acquisition over a wide mass range, plus: Quantitative, spatially-resolved measurements of elemental and molecular (organic and inorganic) abundances; Low analytical blanks and limits-of-detection ( ng g-1); and, the destruction of minimal quantities of sample ( g) compared to traditional solution and/or pyrolysis analyses (mg).

  12. Few layer graphene matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cho, Donghyun; Hong, Sangsu; Shim, Sangdeok

    2013-08-01

    We present the employment of few layer graphene (FLG) as a matrix for the analysis of low molecular weight polymeric compounds using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The practicality of FLG as a matrix for MALDI experiments is demonstrated by analyzing low molecular weight polymers, polar polyethylene glycol (PEG) of 1000 Da and nonpolar polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of 650 Da. The high quality MS spectra without low-mass interference signals without any further sampling procedure were acquired. PMID:23882840

  13. Rapid characterization of polyalcohols by silylation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Adeuya, Anthony; Price, Neil

    2007-01-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry method for rapidly enumerating hydroxyl groups in analytes is described, and applied to some common polyalcohols (erythritol, mannitol and xylitol). Polyalcohols were derivatized with trimethylsilylimidazole (TMSI) either separately or as mixtures, and were analyzed, without chromatographic separation or purification. The mass spectra revealed consecutive peaks that are separated by 72 m/z units as a consequence of displacement of one hydroxyl hydrogen atom by one TMS group. The number of observed peaks was used to confirm the number of hydroxyl groups in each analyte. PMID:17994528

  14. Ion Yields in the Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics Model of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knochenmuss, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics (CPCD) model of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization has been restricted to relative rather than absolute yield comparisons because the rate constant for one step in the model was not accurately known. Recent measurements are used to constrain this constant, leading to good agreement with experimental yield versus fluence data for 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Parameters for alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid are also estimated, including contributions from a possible triplet state. The results are compared with the polar fluid model, the CPCD is found to give better agreement with the data.

  15. Analysis of fatty acids by graphite plate laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Kim, H J

    2001-01-01

    Fatty acids obtained from triglycerides (trioelin, tripalmitin), foods (milk, corn oil), and phospholipids (phosphotidylcholine, phosphotidylserine, phosphatidic acid) upon alkaline hydrolysis were observed directly without derivatization by graphite plate laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GPLDI-TOFMS). Mass-to-charge ratios predicted for sodium adducts of expected fatty acids (e.g. palmitic, oleic, linoleic and arachidonic acids) were observed without interference. Although at present no quantitation is possible, the graphite plate method enables a simple and rapid qualitative analysis of fatty acids. PMID:11507764

  16. Effects of matrix structure/acidity on ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gimon-Kinsel, M.; Preston-Schaffter, L.M.; Kinsel, G.R.; Russell, D.H.

    1997-03-12

    The involvement of ground and excited state proton transfer reactions in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) of bradykinin and bovine insulin is examined using a series of p-substituted aniline compounds as matrices. Semiempirical calculations of ground and excited state acidity of the p-substituted aniline and anilinium ions are presented. A linear correlation between log (analyte [A + H]{sup +} ion yield) and matrix acidity is obtained. The behavior of the seven p-substituted anilines is discussed in terms of the relationship between matrix compound structure, reactivity, and ability to act as a MALDI matrix. 44 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry experiments for peptide mass fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, David; Wasselin, Thierry; Carré, Vincent; Chaimbault, Patrick; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Maunit, Benoît; Muller, Jean-François

    2011-07-15

    Peptide Mass Fingerprinting (PMF) is still of significant interest in proteomics because it allows a large number of complex samples to be rapidly screened and characterized. The main part of post-translational modifications is generally preserved. In some specific cases, PMF suffers from ambiguous or unsuccessful identification. In order to improve its reliability, a combined approach using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICRMS) was evaluated. The study was carried out on bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. The influence of several important parameters (the matrix, the sample preparation method, the amount of the analyte) on the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage were evaluated to allow the identification of specific effects. A careful investigation of the sequence coverage obtained by each kind of experiment ensured the detection of specific peptides for each experimental condition. Results highlighted that DHB-FTICRMS and DHB- or CHCA-TOFMS are the most suited combinations of experimental conditions to achieve PMF analysis. The association (convolution) of the data obtained by each of these techniques ensured a significant increase in the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage. PMID:21638364

  18. Surface Electronic Properties and Site-Specific Laser Desorption Processes of Highly Structured Nanoporous MgO Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Henyk, Matthias; Beck, Kenneth M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Dickinson, J T.

    2005-11-20

    The surface electronic properties of metal oxides critically depends on low-coordinated sites, such as kinks, corners and steps [1]. In order to characterize experimentally those surface states as well as their role for laser desorption processes, we prepare defect enriched surfaces by growing thin MgO films using reactive ballistic deposition [2] on crystalline dielectric substrates. With samples held at room temperature, the resulting MgO films are highly textured and consist of porous columns with column lengths ranging from tens of nanometers up to six micrometers. Measurements by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are carried out in-situ for MgO films, vacuum-cleaved MgO crystals, and water vapor exposed samples. In the case of thin films, we observe O 1s spectra with a significant shoulder feature at 2.3 eV higher binding energy (HBE) than the corresponding peak at 530.0 eV representing regular lattice oxygen. We evaluate this feature in terms of non-stoichiometric oxygen and formation of an oxygen-rich layer at the topmost surface of the MgO columns. In contrast, no HBE-features are detectable from clean single crystal MgO surfaces, while the hydroxyl O 1s band peaks at 531.6 eV. Under excitation with 266-nm-laser-pulses, known to be resonant with low-coordinated surface anions [3], we observe preferential depletion of defective oxygen-states (HBE signal) and temporary restoration of ideal surface stoichiometry. Furthermore, auxiliary signals are observed on several micrometer thick films, acting like satellites to major photoelectron-peaks (O 1s, Mg 2s, and Mg 2p) but shifted by approximately 4 eV towards lower kinetic energy. These features are depleted by UV-light exposure, pointing to the occurrence of surface-charge imbalance, accompanied by photon stimulated charge-transfer reactions. These results are in line with desorption experiments of neutrals, stimulated by laser excitation at 266 nm. According to the low-coordination nature of nanoporous Mg

  19. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry on nanostructured semiconductor substrates: DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, K. P.

    2010-02-01

    In the era of systems biology, new analytical platforms are under demand. Desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) is a promising high throughput laser mass spectrometry approach that has attracted a lot of attention, and has been commercialized. Another substrate material manufactured by physical method has also been made commercially available under the trade name of QuickMass(TM). These two commercial substrates, DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM), were investigated independently from the manufacturers and were characterized by a number of advanced surface techniques. This work determined (1) the correlation between the substrate physicochemical properties and their LDI activity, (2) the feasibility of metabolic profiling from complex biological matrices and (3) the laser desorption/ionization mechanism. The DIOS(TM) substrate was characterized with a thick nano-sized porous layer, a high surface concentration of fluorocarbon and silicon oxides and super-hydrophobicity. In contrast, the QuickMass(TM) substrate consisted of a non-porous germanium thin-film. The relatively high ionization efficiency obtained from the DIOS(TM) substrate was contributed to the fluorosilane manufacturing processes and its porous morphology. Despite the QuickMass(TM) substrate being less effective, it was noted that the use of germanium affords a self-cleaning mechanism and suppresses background interference of mass spectra. The suitability of DIOS(TM) substrates for metabolic profiling of complex biological matrices was demonstrated. DIOS mass spectra of human blood plasma, human urine and animal liver tissue extracts were produced. Suitable extraction methods were found to be important, but relatively simplified approaches were sufficient. Further investigations of the DIOS desorption/ionization mechanism were carried out. The previously proposed sub-surface state reaction could be a molten-solid interfacial state reaction of the substrate and this had a significant

  20. Ion-to-Neutral Ratios and Thermal Proton Transfer in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization.

    PubMed

    Lu, I-Chung; Chu, Kuan Yu; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Wu, Shang-Yun; Dyakov, Yuri A; Chen, Jien-Lian; Gray-Weale, Angus; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2015-07-01

    The ion-to-neutral ratios of four commonly used solid matrices, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), sinapinic acid (SA), and ferulic acid (FA) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) at 355 nm are reported. Ions are measured using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with a time-sliced ion imaging detector. Neutrals are measured using a rotatable quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion-to-neutral ratios of CHCA are three orders of magnitude larger than those of the other matrices at the same laser fluence. The ion-to-neutral ratios predicted using the thermal proton transfer model are similar to the experimental measurements, indicating that thermal proton transfer reactions play a major role in generating ions in ultraviolet-MALDI. PMID:25851654

  1. Ion-to-Neutral Ratios and Thermal Proton Transfer in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, I.-Chung; Chu, Kuan Yu; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Wu, Shang-Yun; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Chen, Jien-Lian; Gray-Weale, Angus; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2015-07-01

    The ion-to-neutral ratios of four commonly used solid matrices, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), sinapinic acid (SA), and ferulic acid (FA) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) at 355 nm are reported. Ions are measured using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with a time-sliced ion imaging detector. Neutrals are measured using a rotatable quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion-to-neutral ratios of CHCA are three orders of magnitude larger than those of the other matrices at the same laser fluence. The ion-to-neutral ratios predicted using the thermal proton transfer model are similar to the experimental measurements, indicating that thermal proton transfer reactions play a major role in generating ions in ultraviolet-MALDI.

  2. Cellular-level mass spectrometry imaging using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) by oversampling.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Milad; Muddiman, David C

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) allows for the direct and simultaneous analysis of the spatial distribution of molecular species from sample surfaces such as tissue sections. One of the goals of MSI is monitoring the distribution of compounds at the cellular resolution in order to gain insights about the biology that occurs at this spatial level. Infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) imaging of cervical tissue sections was performed using a spot-to-spot distance of 10 μm by utilizing the method of oversampling, where the target plate is moved by a distance that is less than the desorption radius of the laser. In addition to high spatial resolution, high mass accuracy (±1 ppm) and high mass resolving power (140,000 at m/z = 200) were achieved by coupling the IR-MALDESI imaging source to a hybrid quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Ion maps of cholesterol in tissues were generated from voxels containing <1 cell, on average. Additionally, the challenges of imaging at the cellular level in terms of loss of sensitivity and longer analysis time are discussed. PMID:25486925

  3. Exploring Biosignatures Associated with Thenardite by Geomatrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (GALDI-FTMS)

    SciTech Connect

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Timothy R. McJunkin; Jill R. Scott

    2008-07-01

    Geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in conjunction with a Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS) has been employed to determine how well bio/organic molecules associated with the mineral thenardite (Na2SO4) can be detected. GALDI is based on the ability of the mineral host to assist desorption and ionization of bio/organic molecules without additional sample preparation. When glycine was mixed with thenardite, glycine was deprotonated to produce C2H4NO2 at m/z 74.025. The combination of stearic acid with thenardite produced a complex cluster ion at m/z 390.258 in the negative mode, which was assigned a composition of C18H39O7Na . A natural sample of thenardite from Searles Lake in California also produced a peak at m/z 390.260. The bio/organic signatures in both the laboratory-based and natural samples were heterogeneously dispersed as revealed by chemical imaging. The detection limits for the stearic acid and thenardite combination was estimated to be 3 parts per trillion or ~7 zeptomoles per laser spot. Attempts to improve the signal-to-noise ratio by co-adding FTMS data predetermined to contain the biosignatures of interest revealed problems due to a lack of phase coherence between data sets.

  4. A high resolving power multiple reflection matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Piyadasa, C K; Håkansson, P; Ariyaratne, T R

    1999-01-01

    Two electrostatic mirrors, mounted symmetrically on the same optical axis facing each other, are used to increase the time-of-flight of molecular ions produced in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The mirrors, which are used in the non-compensating mode, are located between a MALDI ion source and a stop detector. The source is operated at 10.5 kV acceleration voltage using the delayed extraction technique. The high voltage for the mirror arrangement is switched on after the desorption event when the molecular ions have drifted into the region between the mirrors. The ions are trapped by successive reflections of the opposite electrostatic fields in the mirrors until the electric fields are switched off. The number of reflections depends on the speed of the ions when they enter the mirror trap and the ontime of the mirrors. When the electric fields are removed during the motion of the ions towards the stop detector, the ions penetrate the grids of the mirror and reach that detector. The extension of the flight path due to the number of reflections is used to increase the resolving power in time-of-flight spectra. Values of 55,000 for substance-P (MW 1346.7) and 31,000 for bovine insulin (MW 5734) were obtained for single laser shot spectra. PMID:10230069

  5. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sangwon

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

  6. Cellular Level Mass Spectrometry Imaging using Infrared Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization (IR-MALDESI) by Oversampling

    PubMed Central

    Nazari, Milad; Muddiman, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) allows for the direct and simultaneous analysis of the spatial distribution of molecular species from sample surfaces such as tissue sections. One of the goals of MSI is monitoring the distribution of compounds at the cellular resolution in order to gain insights about the biology that occurs at this spatial level. Infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) imaging of cervical tissue sections was performed using a spot-to-spot distance of 10 μm by utilizing the method of oversampling; where the target plate is moved by a distance that is less than the desorption radius of the laser. In addition to high spatial resolution, high mass accuracy (± 1 ppm) and high mass resolving power (140,000 at m/z=200) was achieved by coupling the IR-MALDESI imaging source to a hybrid quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Ion maps of cholesterol in tissues were generated from voxels containing <1 cell, on average. Additionally, the challenges of imaging at the cellular level in terms of loss of sensitivity and longer analysis time are discussed. PMID:25486925

  7. Detection of trace organics in Mars analog samples containing perchlorate by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Danell, Ryan M; Brinckerhoff, William B; Pinnick, Veronica T; van Amerom, Friso; Arevalo, Ricardo D; Getty, Stephanie A; Mahaffy, Paul R; Steininger, Harald; Goesmann, Fred

    2015-02-01

    Evidence from recent Mars missions indicates the presence of perchlorate salts up to 1 wt % level in the near-surface materials. Mixed perchlorates and other oxychlorine species may complicate the detection of organic molecules in bulk martian samples when using pyrolysis techniques. To address this analytical challenge, we report here results of laboratory measurements with laser desorption mass spectrometry, including analyses performed on both commercial and Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) breadboard instruments. We demonstrate that the detection of nonvolatile organics in selected spiked mineral-matrix materials by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry is not inhibited by the presence of up to 1 wt % perchlorate salt. The organics in the sample are not significantly degraded or combusted in the LDI process, and the parent molecular ion is retained in the mass spectrum. The LDI technique provides distinct potential benefits for the detection of organics in situ on the martian surface and has the potential to aid in the search for signs of life on Mars. PMID:25622133

  8. Development of a RILIS ionisation scheme for gold at ISOLDE, CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. A.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Kosuri, P.

    2006-07-01

    At the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility, the resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) can be used to ionise reaction products as they effuse from the target. The RILIS process of laser step-wise resonance ionisation of atoms in a hot metal cavity provides a highly element selective stage in the preparation of the radioactive ion beam. As a result, the ISOLDE mass separators can provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. With the addition of a new three-step ionisation scheme for gold, the RILIS is now capable of ionising 26 of the elements. The optimal scheme was determined during an extensive study of the atomic energy levels and auto-ionising states of gold, carried out by means of in-source resonance ionisation spectroscopy. Details of the ionisation scheme and a summary of the spectroscopy study are presented.

  9. Development of a RILIS ionisation scheme for gold at ISOLDE, CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. A.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Kosuri, P.

    At the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility, the resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) can be used to ionise reaction products as they effuse from the target. The RILIS process of laser step-wise resonance ionisation of atoms in a hot metal cavity provides a highly element selective stage in the preparation of the radioactive ion beam. As a result, the ISOLDE mass separators can provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. With the addition of a new three-step ionisation scheme for gold, the RILIS is now capable of ionising 26 of the elements. The optimal scheme was determined during an extensive study of the atomic energy levels and auto-ionising states of gold, carried out by means of in-source resonance ionisation spectroscopy. Details of the ionisation scheme and a summary of the spectroscopy study are presented.

  10. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for direct visualization of plant metabolites in situ.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Drew; Lee, Young-Jin; Chapman, Kent D

    2016-02-01

    Direct visualization of plant tissues by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has revealed key insights into the localization of metabolites in situ. Recent efforts have determined the spatial distribution of primary and secondary metabolites in plant tissues and cells. Strategies have been applied in many areas of metabolism including isotope flux analyses, plant interactions, and transcriptional regulation of metabolite accumulation. Technological advances have pushed achievable spatial resolution to subcellular levels and increased instrument sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. It is anticipated that MALDI-MSI and other MSI approaches will bring a new level of understanding to metabolomics as scientists will be encouraged to consider spatial heterogeneity of metabolites in descriptions of metabolic pathway regulation. PMID:26613199