Science.gov

Sample records for laser light diffraction

  1. Near-field diffraction of laser light by dielectric corner step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafeev, S.; Kotlyar, V.; Kovalev, A.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction of a linearly polarized plane wave by a corner dielectric microstep of height equals of two incident wavelengths was studied using finite-difference time domain method and near-field scanning optical microscopy. It was shown that the corner step generates an elongated region of enhanced intensity, termed as a curved laser microjet. The curved laser microjet has a length of about DOF = 9.5λ and the smallest diameter FWHM = (1.94+/-0.15)λ at distance z = 5.5λ.

  2. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  3. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  4. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  5. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  6. Light by light diffraction in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, Daniele; Michinel, Humberto

    2010-07-15

    We show that a laser beam can be diffracted by a more concentrated light pulse due to quantum vacuum effects. We compute analytically the intensity pattern in a realistic experimental configuration, and discuss how it can be used to measure the parameters describing photon-photon scattering in vacuum. In particular, we show that the quantum electrodynamics prediction can be detected in a single-shot experiment at future 100-PW lasers such as ELI or HIPER. On the other hand, if carried out at one of the present high-power facilities, such as OMEGA EP, this proposal can lead either to the discovery of nonstandard physics or to substantial improvement in the current limits by PVLAS collaboration on the photon-photon cross section at optical wavelengths. This example of manipulation of light by light is simpler to realize and more sensitive than existing, alternative proposals, and can also be used to test Born-Infeld theory or to search for axionlike or minicharged particles.

  7. Secondary diffraction of diffracted Gaussian beam of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'Ev, Yu. V.; Kozar', A. V.; Matyunin, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    The diffraction of a narrow Gaussian beam of laser radiation on mutually perpendicular edges of crossed, superimposed sharp wedge-shaped blades (safety razors) has been studied. The diffraction pattern observed on a flat screen behind the blades comprises a very bright central spot, which exhibits the structure of a "light network" with rectangular cells, and four groups of narrow bright bands that expand from the central spot toward the periphery and form a rectangular cross. The spatial frequency of light-field modulation on the screen can be controlled by varying the distance from the blades to screen.

  8. Efficient concept for generation of diffraction-limited green light by sum-frequency generation of spectrally combined tapered diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-09-15

    In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power significantly. By combining two distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase in power and a maximum of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light. At this power level, green diode laser systems have a high application potential, e.g., within the biomedical field. Our concept can be expanded combining multiple diode lasers to increase the power even further. PMID:23041848

  9. Generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser in a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anders K.; Jensen, Ole B.; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Andersen, Peter E.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-02-01

    Many applications, e.g., within biomedicine stand to benefit greatly from the development of diode laser-based multi- Watt efficient compact green laser sources. The low power of existing diode lasers in the green area (about 100 mW) means that the most promising approach remains nonlinear frequency conversion of infrared tapered diode lasers. Here, we describe the generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser, itself yielding 10 W at 1063 nm. This SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two PPMgO:LN crystals with re-focusing and dispersion compensating optics between the two nonlinear crystals. In the low-power limit, such a cascade of two crystals has the theoretical potential for generation of four times as much power as a single crystal without adding significantly to the complexity of the system. The experimentally achieved power of 3.5 W corresponds to a power enhancement greater than 2 compared to SHG in each of the crystals individually and is the highest visible output power generated by frequency conversion of a single diode laser. Such laser sources provide the necessary pump power for biophotonics applications, such as optical coherence tomography or multimodal imaging devices, e.g., FTCARS-OCT, based on a strongly pumped ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser.

  10. Diffraction gratings for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Hugo J.; de Boer, Dick K. G.; Tukker, Teus

    2013-09-01

    Sub-micron diffraction gratings have been used for two LED illumination applications. One is to create a transparent see through luminaire which can be used to illuminate and read a paper document or e-book. A second is a light sensor that can be used in a feedback loop to control a multicolor LED lamp. Optical design and experimental proof-of-principle are presented.

  11. Atomic diffraction by light gratings with very short wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-06-01

    Lasers with wavelengths of the order of the atomic size are becoming available. We explore the behavior of light-matter interactions in this emergent field by considering the atomic Kapitza-Dirac effect. We derive the diffraction patterns, which are in principle experimentally testable. From a fundamental point of view, our proposal provides an example of system where the periodicity of the diffraction grating is comparable to the size of the diffracted object.

  12. A comparative study of ultrasound and laser light diffraction techniques for particle size determination in dairy beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S.; Berrut, S.; Goodenough, T. I. J.; Rajendram, V. S.; Pinfield, V. J.; Povey, M. J. W.

    2006-02-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of milkfat droplets of raw and homogenized milk was determined by a diagnostic ultrasound technique that was initially calibrated with colloidal silica. The quality of the fit between ultrasound theory and experiment is discussed and provides a basis for comparison with the reference laser light scattering technique. The predicted ultrasonic attenuation was determined from the ECAH (Epstein P S and Carhart R R 1953 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 25 553-65, Allegra J R and Hawley S A 1972 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51 1545-64) model using thermophysical data for milkfat and milk serum. New thermophysical properties of milkfat were established. The experimental data were obtained with the Ultrasizer spectrometer. Both techniques were affected by the milk proteins and could provide only qualitative milkfat PSD for the raw and the homogenized milk samples. Therefore, they showed their limitations to characterize multiple emulsions. However, preliminary results are shown for the ultrasound technique that account for the impact of the protein on the measured data and hence obtain quantitative results for the milkfat size distributions.

  13. Diffractive acoustic elements for laser ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.; Sharples, S. D.; Somekh, M. G.

    2000-05-01

    In a laser based surface acoustic wave (SAW) system the initial wavefront of the SAW is determined by the distribution of generating light on the sample surface. In our usual system the generating light is focussed into an arc or concentric arcs which spatially focus and temporally filter the SAWs. We have developed acoustic diffractive elements (DAEs) which, like diffractive optical elements, can shape the SAW distribution by diffraction. These DAEs are, like their optical analogues, highly dispersive and special consideration has to be made at the design stage in order to accommodate and utilize this dispersion. We demonstrate DAEs that produce well controlled multiple focii, frequency suppression and frequency selection. We also show that these complex acoustic elements can be accurately modelled using a simple angular spectrum technique. The DAEs are produced by computer generated holograms which control the generating distribution of light. These DAEs have applications in multi-frequency acoustic, harmonic acoustic imaging, SAW wavefront control and imaging on curved surfaces.

  14. Optical laue diffraction on photonic structures designed by laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals with square symmetry C 4v were obtained using the laser lithography method. The structure of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Optical Laue diffraction for monochromatic light was studied experimentally depending on the incidence angle of laser beam and lattice constant. Interpretation of the observed diffraction patterns is given in the framework of the Laue diffraction mechanism for an one-dimensional chain of scattering elements. Red thresholds for different diffraction orders were determined experimentally and theoretically. The results of calculations are in an excellent agreement with experiment.

  15. Degree of polarization of light diffracted from resting striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Leung, A F

    1987-04-01

    A laser light diffractometer has been developed to measure directly the total degree of polarization of (alpha t) of light diffracted and randomly scattered from striated muscle fibers. From alpha t the degree of polarization (alpha d) of light diffracted from the periodically arranged contractile filaments is determined. Measurements on single muscle fibers and small fiber bundles indicate that both alpha t and alpha d of the first-order diffraction decrease monotonically with sarcomere length. For the second-order diffraction, alpha t and alpha d exhibit a peak at sarcomere length of about 3.0 micron. A proposed theory based on the anisotropic light scattering efficiencies of the thick and thin filaments can account for the measurements. The comparison between the theory and measurements indicates that the A-band, as well as the I-band, are optically anisotropic. PMID:2443248

  16. White-Light Diffraction with a CD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov; Nikolaev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Various wave optics experiments can be carried out using an ordinary compact disc. The CD is suitable for use as a diffraction grating. For instance, a standard CD (700 MB) has 625 lines/mm. In this article, the authors describe two white-light diffraction demonstrations for a large audience, realizable using a CD (as reflection or transmission…

  17. Diffractively Coupled, Refractively Guided Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Cser, Jim; Marshall, William K.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor-laser arrays more reliable, more powerful, and easier to make. Improved design intended to eliminate undesired electromagnetic modes and mode shifts sometimes occuring in gain-guided variety. Reflected from mirror/window at end of common resonator section of laser, energy refracted from each laser enters adjacent laser. Mutual coupling establishes phase relationships among lasers. Monolithic laser array made by standard epitaxial techniques. Made in part with polymeric materials to mitigate some deleterious effects of all-expitaxial processing. Potential applications include optical communications, ranging, printing, and recording.

  18. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2008-01-23

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

  19. Remote Laser Diffraction PSD Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Batcheller; G. M. Huestis; S. M. Bolton

    2000-06-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of radioactive slurry samples were obtained using a modified off-the-shelf classical laser light scattering particle size analyzer. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model La-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a hot cell (gamma radiation) environment. The general details of the modifications to this analyzer are presented in this paper. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not achievable - making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used previously. Remote deployment and utilization of this technology is in an exploratory stage. The risk of malfunction in this radiation environment is countered by gaining of this tremendously useful fundamental engineering data. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  20. Remote Laser Diffraction PSD Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2000-06-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of radioactive slurry samples were obtained using a modified "off-the-shelf" classical laser light scattering particle size analyzer. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model La-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a "hot cell" (gamma radiation) environment. The general details of the modifications to this analyzer are presented in this paper. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not achievable - making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used previously. Remote deployment and utilization of this technology is in an exploratory stage. The risk of malfunction in this radiation environment is countered by gaining of this tremendously useful fundamental engineering data. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  1. Light-scattering theory of diffraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei

    2010-03-01

    Since diffraction is a scattering process in principle, light propagation through one aperture in a screen is discussed in the light-scattering theory. Through specific calculation, the expression of the electric field observed at an observation point is obtained and is used not only to explain why Kirchhoff's diffraction theory is a good approximation when the screen is both opaque and sufficiently thin but also to demonstrate that the mathematical and physical problems faced by Kirchhoff's theory are avoided in the light-scattering theory. PMID:20208939

  2. Explosively pumped laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Piltch, M.S.; Michelott, R.A.

    1991-09-24

    This patent describes a single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  3. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  4. Laser-written nanoporous silicon diffraction gratings for biosensors.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jinan; Giovannozzi, Andrea M; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Rossi, Andrea M

    2013-12-20

    Surface-relief diffraction gratings and planar diffraction gratings directly written on nanoporous silicon layers using 514 nm continuous-wave lasers at very low power (less than 20 mW) were demonstrated. Diffraction-based biosensing application to detect arachidonic acid was experimentally demonstrated at incident light wavelength of 632.8 nm. A comparison in sensing applications was made between the two types of gratings to show the distinct advantage of the planar grating with selective functionalization. Laser-written planar gratings enable directly immobilizing biomolecules in the laser oxidized area of nanoporous silicon, resulting in a new patterned functionalization technique for biosensing applications. The functionalization technique can not only simplify the functionalization procedure in biosensing but also it has potential to increase the sensitivity of sensors by accurately defining grating patterns using the laser direct writing technique. PMID:24513946

  5. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza-Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light-matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt's number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  6. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  7. Verification of the Uncertainty Principle by Using Diffraction of Light Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, D.; Nesic, Lj

    2011-01-01

    We described a simple idea for experimental verification of the uncertainty principle for light waves. We used a single-slit diffraction of a laser beam for measuring the angular width of zero-order diffraction maximum and obtained the corresponding wave number uncertainty. We will assume that the uncertainty in position is the slit width. For the…

  8. Integrated high-order surface diffraction gratings for diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotarev, V. V.; Leshko, A. Yu; Pikhtin, N. A.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Sokolova, Z. N.; Lubyanskiy, Ya V.; Voronkova, N. V.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    High-order surface diffraction gratings acting as a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) in mesa stripe semiconductor lasers (λ = 1030 nm) have been studied theoretically and experimentally. Higher order interfering radiation modes (IRMs), which propagate off the plane of the waveguide, have been shown to have a crucial effect on the reflection and transmission spectra of the DBR. The decrease in the reflectivity of the DBR in response to the increase in the diffraction efficiency of these modes may reach 80% and more. According to theoretical analysis results, the intensity of the higher order IRMs is determined by the geometry of the DBR groove profile. Experimental data demonstrate that the noncavity modes are responsible for parasitic light leakage losses in the laser cavity. It has been shown that, in the case of nonoptimal geometry of the grating groove profile, the overall external differential quantum efficiency of the parasitic laser emission may exceed 45%, which is more than half of the laser output power. The optimal geometry of the DBR groove profile is trapezoidal, with the smallest possible lower base. Experimental evidence has been presented that this geometry considerably reduces the power of the higher order IRMs and minimises the parasitic light leakage loss.

  9. Study on the reversibility of the diffraction light path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiping; Wan, Lingyu; Liu, Yun; Dong, Jianjie; Shen, Xiaoming

    2009-08-01

    of grating. First, we studied the reversibility of optical path of grating illuminated by monochromatic light, and then illuminated by polychromatic light. We found that the optical path of diffraction of grating has partial reversibility. Using the partial reversibility of optical path of diffraction of grating, we analyzed the spectral combination characteristic of grating and the bi-grating diffraction imaging effect.

  10. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  11. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-08-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  12. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Wei, Hui; Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Lu, Ruifeng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. With picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement. PMID:26503116

  13. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Chao; Wei, Hui; Wang, Xu; Le, Anh -Thu; Lu, Ruifeng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-10-27

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. Lastly, with picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement.

  14. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2013-12-17

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  15. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2014-11-11

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  16. Hair treatment device for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, Bruce E.; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2016-01-26

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  17. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P.A.; Larsson, J.; Chang, Z.

    1997-09-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si(111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb(111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or camshaft operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

  18. Micron-Accurate Laser Fresnel-Diffraction Ranging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehner, David; Campbell, Jonathan; Smith, Kelly; Sanders, Alvin; Allison, Stephen; Smaley, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Two versions of an optoelectronic system undergoing development are depicted. The system is expected to be capable of measuring a distance between 2 and 10 m with an error of no more than 1 micrometer. The system would be designed to exploit Fresnel diffraction of a laser beam. In particular, it would be designed to take advantage of the fact that a Fresnel diffraction pattern is ultrasensitive to distance. The two versions would differ in the following respects: In version 1, the focus of the telescope would be in the Fresnel region, and the telescope would have a small depth of focus. As a consequence, the Fresnel pattern would be imaged directly onto the photodetector array; in version 2, a multielement lens module would displace the Fresnel region from the vicinity of the pinhole to the vicinity of the optical receiver. As the distance to be measured varied, the location of the receiver relative to the displaced Fresnel-diffraction region would vary, thereby causing the Fresnel diffraction pattern on the focal plane to vary. The multielement lens module would also correct for aberrations. The processing of the digitized Fresnel diffraction pattern in the computer might be accelerated by using only parts of the pattern or even only one small part - the central pixel. As the distance from the pinhole increased, the central pixel would rapidly cycle between maximum and minimum light intensity. This in itself would not be sufficient to uniquely determine the distance. However, by varying the size of the pinhole or the wavelength of the laser, one could obtain a second cycle of variation of intensity that, in conjunction with the first cycle, could enable a unique determination of distance. Alternatively, for a single wavelength and a single pinhole size, it should suffice to consider the data from only two different key pixels in the Fresnel pattern.

  19. Laser diffraction particle sizing: Instrument probe volume relocation and elongation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert C.; Buchele, Donald R.; Hovenac, Edward A.; Lock, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The effective probe volume of laser diffraction particle sizing instruments depends on many instrument parameters. In particular the probe volume axial boundaries and its location along laser beam are essentially defined by the onset of a vignetting effect where light scattered at large angles from small particles misses the transform lens. This vignetting effect results in a probe volume that must be inconveniently close to the lens in order to detect smaller diameter particles (less than 100 micrometers). With the addition of an appropriately designed Keplerian telescope, the probe volume may be relocated and elongated. The theory of operation of this supplemental optical system is described. Design considerations for these supplemental optical systems are described, including recommendations for lens specifications, assembly and use. An image transfer system is described which has been designed for use on a Malvern 2600HSD instrument. Experimental validation of this image transfer system is described.

  20. CW laser light condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhurahov, Michael; Bekker, Alexander; Levit, Boris; Weill, Rafi; Fischer, Baruch

    2016-03-21

    We present a first experimental demonstration of classical CW laser light condensation (LC) in the frequency (mode) domain that verifies its prediction (Fischer and Weill, Opt. Express20, 26704 (2012)). LC is based on weighting the modes in a noisy environment in a loss-gain measure compared to an energy (frequency) scale in Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). It is characterized by a sharp transition from multi- to single-mode oscillation, occurring when the spectral-filtering (loss-trap) has near the lowest-loss mode ("ground-state") a power-law dependence with an exponent smaller than 1. An important meaning of the many-mode LC system stems from its relation to lasing and photon-BEC. PMID:27136845

  1. Investigation of diffractive optical element femtosecond laser machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrol, Grégoire R.; Ciceron, Adline; Twardowski, Patrice; Pfeiffer, Pierre; Flury, Manuel; Mermet, Frédéric; Lecler, Sylvain

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an explorative study on the machining of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in transparent materials using a femtosecond laser source. A simple form of DOE, a binary phase grating with a period of 20.85 μm (σ = 0.5 μm), a groove depth and width of 0.7 μm (σ = 0.2 μm) and 8.8 μm (σ = 0.5 μm) respectively, was successfully machined in BK7. The topographic characteristics were measured by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The processing was carried out on high precision stages with an ultrafast fibre laser (350 fs) emitting a 343 nm pulse focused onto the sample with a stationary microscope objective. A diffracted efficiency of 27%, obtained with a spectro goniometer, was corroborated by the theoretical results obtained by the Fourier modal method (FMM), taking into account the measured topographic values. These encouraging results demonstrate that high-speed femtosecond laser manufacturing of DOE in bulk glasses can be achieved, opening the way to rapid prototyping of multi-layered-DOEs.

  2. Lasers for ultrashort light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, J.; Wilhelmi, B.

    1987-01-01

    The present rapid expansion of research work on picosecond lasers and their application makes it difficult to survey and comprehend the large number of publications in this field. This book aims to provide an introduction to the field starting with the very basic and moving on to an advanced level. Contents: Fundamentals of the interaction between light pulses and matter; Fundamentals of lasers for ultrashort light pulses; Methods of measurement; Active modelocking; Synchronously pumped lasers; Passive modelocking of dye lasers; Passive modelocking of solid state lasers; Nonstationary nonlinear optical processes; Ultrafast spectroscopy.

  3. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-15

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza–Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light–matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects. - Highlights: • Kapitza–Dirac diffraction of entangled particles shows multiparticle interference. • There is a discontinuity in the set of joint detection patterns of entangled states. • We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. • Symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  4. X-Ray Diffraction Simulation Using Laser Pointers and Printers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a laser pointer to demonstrate the analogy between optical and X-ray diffraction and a laser printer with 600 or 1200 dot resolution to create and modify arrays, print them on transparencies, and illuminate them with laser pointers. Includes 14 references. (Author/YDS)

  5. Erythrocyte shape analysis by means of laser diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Rainer; Schauf, Burkhard; Guenther, Bernd

    1992-05-01

    In quite a large number of disorders, reduced flexibility of red blood cells (RBC) can be detected. In cardiovascular diseases it is supposed that rigidification of RBC may be regarded as a pathogenetic factor aggravating ischemia by disturbing capillary perfusion. Most methods established so far to estimate RBC deformability are hard to standardize and include large measurement errors. We present a low-cost system to determine RBC shape and flexibility. It combines laser diffraction of RBC in Couette flow with automated computer assisted image analysis. Effortless handling allows the system to be used for RBC elongation measurements even in routine diagnostics. Analysis of the whole information content of diffraction patterns reduces errors due to noisy diffraction patterns of working a little off axis. The system allows detection of very small changes in flexibility (less than 5%). The accuracy of measurement is not affected by variation of hematocrit or the intensity of transmitted light. Using the newly developed system it is demonstrated (1) that mechanically induced RBC rigidification may occur without hemolysis; (2) that in photodynamic therapy (e.g., pheophorbide A) RBC rigidification occurs during irridation; and (3) that in-vitro aging of conserved blood may partly be inhibited by calmodulin antagonists (e.g., fendiline).

  6. Laser technology in automotive lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altingöz, Ceren

    2014-03-01

    The last few years have seen something of a revolution in automotive lighting facilitated by a range of new photonics advances. The lighting industry as a whole is moving rapidly from the incandescent and gas discharge based technologies that dominated the 20th century to solid state technology in the form of Light Emitting Diodes (LED) which are a point source light, Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED) which are an area source light and at the edge the increasing use of lasers with different functional applications. In this paper I will focus on this edge technology of lasers as they are still trying to find their right place in automotive lighting. To better analyze their potential, the working principle of a laser will be explained, laser types used in automotive lighting, their application methods, advantages and disadvantages of their usage will be declared, application examples from the current trials of some leading automotive industry research groups will be given and finalization will be with an overall view of the possible future laser applications in the field of automotive lighting.

  7. Fraunhofer Diffraction Patterns from Apertures Illuminated with Nonparallel Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, Paul E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several aspects of Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from apertures illuminated by diverging light. Develops a generalization to apertures of arbitrary shape which shows that the sizes of the pattern are related by a simple scale factor. Uses the Abbe theory of image formation by diffraction to discuss the intensity of illumination of the…

  8. Light diffraction by acoustically induced domains in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustina, O. A.

    2006-05-15

    The phenomenon of light diffraction by a system of linear domains formed in planar layers of nematic liquid crystals in an oscillating Couette flow, acoustically induced at sound frequencies, is investigated.

  9. Diffraction-Coupled, Phase-Locked Semiconductor Laser Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Yariv, Amnon; Margalit, Shlomo

    1988-01-01

    Stable, narrow far field produced. Array of lasers fabricated on single chip. Individual laser waveguides isolated from each other except in end portions, where diffraction coupling takes place. Radiation pattern far from laser array has single, sharp central lobe when all lasers operate in phase with each other. Shape of lobe does not vary appreciably with array current. Applications include recording, printing, and range finding.

  10. Measurement of sarcomere shortening in skinned fibers from frog muscle by white light diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Y E

    1987-01-01

    A new optical-electronic method has been developed to detect striation spacing of single muscle fibers. The technique avoids Bragg-angle and interference-fringe effects associated with laser light diffraction by using polychromatic (white) light. The light is diffracted once by an acousto-optical device and then diffracted again by the muscle fiber. The double diffraction reverses the chromatic dispersion normally obtained with polychromatic light. In frog skinned muscle fibers, active and passive sarcomere shortening were smooth when observed by white light diffraction, whereas steps and pauses occurred in the striation spacing signals obtained with laser illumination. During active contractions skinned fibers shortened at high rates (3-5 microns/s per half sarcomere, 0-5 degrees C) at loads below 5% of isometric tension. Compression of the myofibrillar lateral filament spacing using osmotic agents reduced the shortening velocity at low loads. A hypothesis is presented that high shortening velocities are observed with skinned muscle fibers because the cross-bridges cannot support compressive loads when the filament lattice is swollen. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:3496924

  11. Inquiry with Laser Printer Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The pages of "The Physics Teacher" have featured several clever designs for homemade diffraction gratings using a variety of materials--cloth, lithographic film, wire, compact discs, parts of aerosol spray cans, and pseudoliquids and pseudosolids. A different and inexpensive method I use to make low-resolution diffraction gratings takes advantage…

  12. Measurements of fine particle size using image processing of a laser diffraction image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of fine particle size is important in spray systems, minimum quantity lubrication, and weather observation. Introducing the recent progress of imaging techniques, the authors developed a portable measurement system. To overcome the large light intensity difference between the incident laser light and diffracted light and the limitation of the dynamic range of imaging devices, the event correlation was adopted. The growth of droplets in fog was experimentally measured.

  13. Diffraction modelling of laser ablation using transmission masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, P. E.; Mackay, J.; Walton, C. D.

    2004-10-01

    We present an analysis of near-field diffraction effects in ablation with transmission masks, based on coupling a simplified form of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral with basic models for material removal. Modelling for square, hexagonal and circular proximity masks is described and compared with previously reported experiments on glass, silicon and polyimide using excimer, femtosecond and CO2 lasers. The model has general applicability and can provide useful insight into the effect of near-field diffraction in ablation patterning.

  14. Mode control of semiconductor laser with diffraction and dispersion feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Tsuji, R.; Fujii, K.; Nakayama, S.; Amano, M.; Kiyono, H.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tokita, Y.; Hanasawa, Y.; Mirov, S.B.; McCutcheon, M.J.; Whinnery, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    We have constructed two kinds of external cavity semiconductor laser. The first one is a diffraction feedback system consisting of a collimating lens, a diffraction grating and a mirror controlled by a PZT element. The second one is a dispersion feedback system in which the diffraction grating is replaced with a prism. Changing the angle of the external mirror by controlling the voltage to be supplied to the PZT, we have succeeded to tune the longitudinal mode of semiconductor laser continuously in the range of about 1 GHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Design concept for diffractive elements shaping partially coherent laser beams.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, D

    2001-11-01

    A new two-step design algorithm for the calculation of a diffractive phase element (DPE) for use with partially coherent laser beams is presented. The optical reconstruction of the DPE is modeled by the convolution of a coherent diffraction pattern and the far-field intensity distribution of a partially coherent laser beam. Numerical deconvolution is applied to derive a suitable amplitude pattern as signal input to a standard iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA). Theory and numerical results are presented. Compared with a single-step IFTA design, this new approach yields nearly equal diffraction efficiencies and a relative improvement of 15% in signal reconstruction error. PMID:11688882

  16. Diffractive optical element with same diffraction pattern for multicolor light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengzhu; Wang, Qixia; Gu, Huarong; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The wavelength-division multiplexing technique can be utilized in visible light communication to increase the channel capacity when a multicolor mixed white LED is used as light source. In such an application, the illumination area of LEDs should be invariant to the incident wavelength, so as to decrease interference within the adjacent regions. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be used in the optical transmitter system to shape the diffraction patterns into polygons. However, traditional DOEs illuminated by a multicolor mixed white LED would result into diffraction patterns with unequal sizes. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm which combines particle swarm optimization with a genetic algorithm is proposed for multicolor oriented DOEs design. A DOE is designed and fabricated for blue and red LEDs, and experimental results show that diffraction patterns with rather good uniformity as well as quasi-equal size for red and blue LEDs are obtained. PMID:26835636

  17. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-05-15

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO{sub 2} molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  18. Diffraction of light by an opaque sphere. 1: Description and properties of the diffraction pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G.E. ); Weaver, H.J. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper we discuss the diffraction pattern resulting from the propagation of light past an opaque obstacle with a circular cross section. A mathematical description of the diffraction pattern is obtained in the Fresnel region using scalar diffraction theory and is presented in terms of the Lommel functions. This description is shown experimentally to be quite accurate, not only for near axis points within the shadow region but also well past the shadow's edge into the directly illuminated region. The mathematical description is derived for spherical wave illumination and an isomorphic relation is developed relating it to plane wave illumination. The size of the central bright spot (as well as the subsequent diffraction rings), the axial intensity, and the intensity along the geometric shadow are characterized in terms of point source location and the distance of propagation past the circular obstacle. Key words: Spherical diffraction, isomorphic propagation theory, Lommel functions.

  19. THE STUDY OF WHEAT STARCH SIZE DISTRIBUTION USING IMAGE ANALYSIS AND LASER DIFFRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is the most abundant storage reserve in the wheat caryopsis yet little is known about its influence on end-use properties. Starch was isolated from wheats of four different classes and analyzed using digital image analysis (IA) coupled to a light microscope and several laser diffraction sizi...

  20. Time-dependent dynamic behavior of light diffraction in ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Min-Feng; Chou, S. E.; Fu, Chao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    The time-dependent dynamic behavior of diffraction patterns induced by external magnetic field in a suspension of nano-sized magnetic particles (Fe3O4) in a water-based magnetic fluid was investigated. It was observed that the diffraction pattern changed with time as the magnetic field was applied. In the absence of applied magnetic field, there was no diffraction pattern in the screen. When the magnetic field was applied, the transmitted light was perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the diffraction pattern was unstable. There were many small lines and points moving with time. After one minute, the diffraction pattern turned stable, and the small lines became longer. This time-dependent behavior helps us to understand the evolution of the forming chains of magnetic nanoparticles. Moreover, we have measured the other diffraction pattern, the transmitted light propagating parallel to the applied field. These time-dependent diffraction patterns give a new point to understand the dynamic three-dimensional structure of magnetic fluid under a dc magnetic field.

  1. Structure light with laser speckle for object contour reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Ting-Xuan; Chen, Cheng-Huan; Tsai, Augustine; Liu, Wen-Kai

    2012-02-01

    Invisible grid-pattern structure light has often been used for being shined on objects for contour reconstruction based on the distortion of grid pattern, for vehicle collision prevention etc. However, the structure light can be easily disturbed by surrounding nature light even if infra-red (IR) light source is used because natural light contains quite an amount of IR spectrum. In this paper, it is proposed that the structure light is provided from a highly coherent laser source, so that the structure light pattern reflected from the target object will contain not only the distorted irradiance distribution of grid pattern, but also laser speckle associated with it. The laser speckle pattern depends on the surface roughness of the target object, which provides extra information for extracting the distorted grid pattern from the background irradiance of surrounding natural light. The laser speckle pattern therefore helps to improve the immunity for surrounding light disturbance, and hence the robustness and reliability of contour reconstruction system. A binary surface relief phase-type diffractive optical element(DOE) has been proposed for generating desired pattern directly at far field when working together with laser light source. The design process is based on iterative Fourier transform algorithm(IFTA) in scalar diffraction theory.

  2. Diffraction Properties of Periodic Lattices under Free Electron Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajkovic, I.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Quevedo, W.; Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A.; Tschentscher, T.; Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Tolkiehn, M.; Techert, S.

    2010-03-26

    In this Letter, we report the pioneering use of free electron laser radiation for the investigation of periodic crystalline structures. The diffraction properties of silver behenate single nanocrystals (5.8 nm periodicity) with the dimensions of 20 nmx20 nmx20 {mu}m and as powder with grain sizes smaller than 200 nm were investigated with 8 nm free electron laser radiation in single-shot modus with 30 fs long free electron laser pulses. This work emphasizes the possibility of using soft x-ray free electron laser radiation for these crystallographic studies on a nanometer scale.

  3. Note: Design of a laser feedback interferometer with double diffraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Dongmei Wang, Ming

    2015-09-15

    A novel laser feedback interferometer with double diffraction system is proposed in this paper. A beam emitted from the laser is incident onto a transmission grating. The mth order beam is vertically reflected by a mirror and diffracted again by the grating. The double-diffracted beam returns into the laser cavity and mixes with the light inside the active cavity, thus generating a modulation of both the amplitude and the frequency of the lasing field. Theoretical analysis and experimental observations show that the output signal of the proposed system depends on the grating pitch and the direction of the phase movement can be obtained from inclination of the interference signal. It provides a potential displacement sensor with high stability and quite a compact configuration.

  4. Diffraction of light by an opaque sphere. 1: Description and properties of the diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Sommargren, G E; Weaver, H J

    1990-11-01

    In this paper we discuss the diffraction pattern resulting from the propagation of light past an opaque obstacle with a circular cross section. A mathematical description of the diffraction pattern is obtained in the Fresnel region using scalar diffraction theory and is presented in terms of the Lommel functions. This description is shown experimentally to be quite accurate, not only for near axis points within the shadow region but also well past the shadow's edge into the directly illuminated region. The mathematical description is derived for spherical wave illumination and an isomorphic relation is developed relating it to plane wave illumination. The size of the central bright spot (as well as the subsequent diffraction rings), the axial intensity, and the intensity along the geometric shadow are characterized in terms of point source location and the distance of propagation past the circular obstacle. PMID:20577447

  5. Diffraction effects in length measurements by laser interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sasso, C P; Massa, E; Mana, G

    2016-03-21

    High-accuracy dimensional measurements by laser interferometers require corrections because of diffraction, which makes the effective fringe-period different from the wavelength of a plane (or spherical) wave λ0. By using a combined X-ray and optical interferometer as a tool to investigate diffraction across a laser beam, we observed wavelength variations as large as 10-8λ0. We show that they originate from the wavefront evolution under paraxial propagation in the presence of wavefront- and intensity-profile perturbations. PMID:27136842

  6. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Fabrication of synthetic diffractive elements using advanced matrix laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, M.; Svoboda, J.; Květoň, M.; Fiala, P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a matrix laser writing device based on a demagnified projection of a micro-structure from a computer driven spatial light modulator. The device is capable of writing completely aperiodic micro-structures with resolution higher than 200 000 DPI. An optical system is combined with ultra high precision piezoelectric stages with an elementary step ~ 4 nm. The device operates in a normal environment, which significantly decreases the costs compared to competitive technologies. Simultaneously, large areas can be exposed up to 100 cm2. The capabilities of the constructed device will be demonstrated on particular elements fabricated for real applications. The optical document security is the first interesting field, where the synthetic image holograms are often combined with sophisticated aperiodic micro-structures. The proposed technology can easily write simple micro-gratings creating the color and kinetic visual effects, but also the diffractive cryptograms, waveguide couplers, and other structures recently used in the field of optical security. A general beam shaping elements and special photonic micro-structures are another important applications which will be discussed in this paper.

  8. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Song, Shuangqi

    2015-12-22

    A hair treatment process for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction including (a) coating the hair with a material comprising a polymer, (b) pressing the hair with a pressing device including one or more surfaces, and (c) forming a secondary nanostructured surface pattern on the hair that is complementary to the primary nanostructured surface pattern on the one or more surfaces of the pressing device. The secondary nanostructured surface pattern diffracts light into dispersed colors that are visible on the hair. The section of the hair is pressed with the pressing device for from about 1 to 55 seconds. The polymer has a glass transition temperature from about 55.degree. C. to about 90.degree. C. The one or more surfaces include a primary nanostructured surface pattern.

  9. Two-Photon Microscopy with Diffractive Optical Elements and Spatial Light Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S.; Woodruff, Alan; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy is often performed at slow frame rates due to the need to serially scan all points in a field of view with a single laser beam. To overcome this problem, we have developed two optical methods that split and multiplex a laser beam across the sample. In the first method a diffractive optical element (DOE) generates a fixed number of beamlets that are scanned in parallel resulting in a corresponding increase in speed or in signal-to-noise ratio in time-lapse measurements. The second method uses a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate any arbitrary spatio-temporal light pattern. With an SLM one can image or photostimulate any predefined region of the image such as neurons or dendritic spines. In addition, SLMs can be used to mimic a large number of optical transfer functions including light path corrections as adaptive optics. PMID:20859526

  10. Computation of Diffractive Beam Propagation of Monochromatic Light

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-02-20

    Computation of diffractive beam propagation of monochromatic light through a l-dimensional (slab) structure defined by a piecewise continuous complex index of refraction. Finite difference equations are fourth-order-accurate in the lateral grid size and include discontinuities of higher-order field derivatives at dielectric interfaces. Variable grid spacing is allowed, and all dielectric interfaces are assumed to coincide with grid points.

  11. Optical fiber alignment using cleaved-edge diffracted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Louis C.; Bergeron, Patrick; Duguay, Michel A.; Ouellette, Francois; Tetu, Michel

    1993-08-01

    We describe a simple technique for aligning optical fibers prior to fusion splicing. The technique relies on the fact that well-cleaved fiber ends have extremely sharp edges. By making the narrow pencil of light emerging from one fiber scan laterally over the entrance face of a second fiber, and by monitoring the light diffracted past its sharp edges, we can locate precisely the geometric center of the output fiber. With this technique, we have aligned fiber cores with a mean lateral offset of 0.81 micrometers , the major part of this offset caused by the eccentricity of the core relative to the cladding's circular perimeter.

  12. 100-watt fiber-based green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Brar, Khush; Yilmaz, Tolga; Honea, Eric

    2010-02-01

    An air-cooled, light-weight, fiber-based, high power green laser has been prototyped. The system consists of an all-fibercoupled IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser operates in QCW mode, with 10 MHz pulse repetition frequency and 3-5 ns pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser can produce more than 200 W in a linearlypolarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The converter module has an input telescope and an oven with a nonlinear crystal to efficiently convert the 1064-nm IR fiber laser output to 532-nm green output. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. The beam quality of the 532 nm output remains near diffraction-limited, with M2<1.4. Up to 101 W of 532 nm output was demonstrated and multi-hour runs were characterized at 75 W output. The weights of the IR laser package and doubler are 69 lbs and 14 lbs respectively. An overview of the system and full characterization results will be presented. Such compact, highbrightness green laser sources are expected to enable various scientific, defense and industrial applications.

  13. Uniformity of reshaped beam by diffractive optical elements with light-emitted diode illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mengzhu; Gu, Huarong; Wang, Qixia; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Due to its low energy consumption, high efficiency and fast switching speed, light-emitted diode (LED) has been used as a new light source in optical wireless communication. To ensure uniform lighting and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) during the data transmission, diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be employed as optical antennas. Different from laser, LED has a low temporal and spatial coherence. And its impacts upon the far-field diffraction patterns of DOEs remain unclear. Thus the mathematical models of far-field diffraction intensity for LED with a spectral bandwidth and source size are first derived in this paper. Then the relation between source size and uniformity of top-hat beam profile for LEDs either considering the spectral bandwidth or not are simulated. The results indicate that when the size of LED is much smaller than that of reshaped beam, the uniformity of reshaped beam obtained by light source with a spectral bandwidth is significantly better than that by a monochromatic light. However, once the size is larger than a certain threshold value, the uniformity of reshaped beam of two LED models are almost the same, and the influence introduced by spectral bandwidth can be ignored. Finally the reshaped beam profiles are measured by CCD camera when the areas of LED are 0.5×0.5mm2 and 1×1mm2. And the experimental results agree with the simulations.

  14. Design and fabrication of diffraction imaging elements for common Gaussian laser beam in terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfeng; Gong, Jinhui; Liu, Kan; Zhang, Xinyu; Xie, Changsheng

    2011-11-01

    A special software is constructed effectively for reconstructing the fine phase distribution of the diffracted Gaussian laser beams in the terahertz frequency range, according to common diffraction theory. The fine surface microrelief patterns of the elements, which originate from the simple patterns in photomask and further etched onto the surface of {100}- oriented silicon wafer by a low cost and rapid method, are created by the software above according to the phase distribution designed. Being different with the traditional silicon diffractive lenses fabricated by multiple level processes, the elements produced by the method introduced by us can transfer common Gaussian beams into desired images through created fine patterns over the surface of the elements. Two typical type of diffractive elements, which are used to transform common Gaussian laser beams in terahertz frequency into highly focused spot or so-called common focus, and the desired figure of the "umber one", are designed and fabricated. For testing the element, the LASER SIEIR 50 of Coherent Company is used to generate common Gaussian laser beams (the diameter of the beams is 10mm), and the PYROCAM THERE of Spiricon Company is also used to display the images acquired. Experimental results show that the elements can be used to form needed light fields and expected images, respectively.

  15. Diffraction coupled phase-locked semiconductor laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1983-01-01

    A new monolithic, diffraction coupled phase-locked semiconductor laser array has been fabricated. Stable narrow far-field patterns (approximately 3 deg) and peak power levels of 1 W have been obtained for 100-micron-wide devices with threshold currents as low as 250 mA. Such devices may be useful in applications where high power levels and stable radiation patterns are needed.

  16. Ultrafast large-area micropattern generation in nonabsorbing polymer thin films by pulsed laser diffraction.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ankur; Sharma, Ashutosh; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2011-03-21

    An ultrafast, parallel, and beyond-the-master micropatterning technique for ultrathin (30-400 nm) nonabsorbing polymer films by diffraction of laser light through a 2D periodic aperture is reported. The redistribution of laser energy absorbed by the substrate causes self-organization of polymer thin films in the form of wrinklelike surface relief structures caused by localized melting and freezing of the thin film. Unlike conventional laser ablation and laser writing processes, low laser fluence is employed to only passively swell the polymer as a pre-ablative process without loss of material, and without absorption/reaction with incident radiation. Self-organization in the thin polymer film, aided by the diffraction pattern, produces microstructures made up of thin raised lines. These regular microstructures have far more complex morphologies than the mask geometry and very narrow line widths that can be an order of magnitude smaller than the openings in the mask. The microstructure morphology is easily modulated by changing the film thickness, aperture size, and geometry, and by changing the diffraction pattern. PMID:21290600

  17. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  18. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  19. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  20. Diffractive beam shaping for enhanced laser polymer welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenberger, J.; Vogler, D.; Raab, C.; Gubler, U.

    2015-03-01

    Laser welding of polymers increasingly finds application in a large number of industries such as medical technology, automotive, consumer electronics, textiles or packaging. More and more, it replaces other welding technologies for polymers, e. g. hot-plate, vibration or ultrasonic welding. At the same rate, demands on the quality of the weld, the flexibility of the production system and on processing speed have increased. Traditionally, diode lasers were employed for plastic welding with flat-top beam profiles. With the advent of fiber lasers with excellent beam quality, the possibility to modify and optimize the beam profile by beam-shaping elements has opened. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) can play a crucial role in optimizing the laser intensity profile towards the optimal M-shape beam for enhanced weld seam quality. We present results on significantly improved weld seam width constancy and enlarged process windows compared to Gaussian or flat-top beam profiles. Configurations in which the laser beam diameter and shape can be adapted and optimized without changing or aligning the laser, fiber-optic cable or optical head are shown.

  1. 5-Femtosecond Laser-Electron Synchronization for Pump-Probe Crystallography and Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbran, Matthew; Gliserin, Alexander; Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon; Baum, Peter

    2015-10-01

    For improving the temporal resolution in ultrafast pump-probe electron or x-ray diffraction, we report a laser-electron synchronization concept via direct microwave extraction from the laser frequency comb combined with phase detection by fiber-loop interferometry, in situ drift correction via electron-energy analysis, and laser-electron streaking for final timing metrology. We achieve a laser-electron jitter below 5 fs (rms) integrated between 8 min and Nyquist period (400 ns). Slower drifts are also below 5 fs (rms) after active compensation. This result helps advance femtosecond crystallography with electrons or x rays to the regime of fundamental atomic-scale dynamics and light-matter interaction.

  2. Identification of source of oscillations in apparent sarcomere length measured by laser diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, K; Huxley, A F

    1995-01-01

    The most widely used technique for dynamic estimates of sarcomere length in muscle is laser light diffraction. We have identified conditions under which artifactual oscillations can arise in apparent sarcomere length measured by this technique and report methods to reduce the effect. Altringham et al. (1984) first reported that the diffraction angle can exhibit one cycle of oscillation for each sarcomere length displacement of the illuminated portion of the fiber. We find that the amplitude of similar oscillations is strongly dependent on the intensity of light scattered from objects near the fiber and on the spacing between fiber and scatterer. The oscillations can be eliminated by minimizing scattered light and positioning the fiber a few millimeters from sources of scattering. A theoretical description shows that oscillations of this kind are expected from interference of scattered and diffracted light. Interference fringes were observed along the meridian of the pattern, and these moved during translation of either a fiber or a grating. The movement of fringes across the diffraction order shifts the centroid back and forth and, when associated with steady shortening, can give rise to "steps" and "pauses" in apparent striation spacing. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7647247

  3. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  4. Nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction of femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Vyunishev, A M; Slabko, V V; Baturin, I S; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya

    2014-07-15

    We study the nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction (NRND) of femtosecond laser pulses in a 1D periodic nonlinear photonic structure. The calculated second-harmonic spectra represent frequency combs for different orders of transverse phase matching. These frequency combs are in close analogy with the well-known spectral Maker fringes observed in single crystals. The spectral intensity of the second harmonic experiences a redshift with a propagation angle, which is opposite the case of Čerenkov nonlinear diffraction. We analyze how NRND is affected by the group-velocity mismatch between fundamental and second-harmonic pulses and by the parameters of the structure. Our experimental results prove the theoretical predictions. PMID:25121694

  5. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, M.S.

    1993-05-18

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  6. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1993-01-01

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  7. Performance comparison of Malvern instruments laser diffraction drop size analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Dodge, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of ten laser diffraction particle sizing instruments (Malvern models 2200 and 2600) has been evaluated using a synthetic particle size reference standard in a round-robin test at nine independent laboratories. A calibration reticle consisting of a two-dimensional array of opaque, circular particle images photoetched in chrome thin film deposited on a glass substrate was used as the reference. Mean diameters (e.g., D32) for the reticle measured by the ten unmodified instruments varied by 27 percent. In contrast, data from six instruments with individually calibrated photodetector correction factors demonstrated much better agreement and were within 2.6 percent of the actual reticle properties.

  8. Sub-diffraction Laser Synthesis of Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James I.; Zhou, Nan; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate synthesis of silicon nanowires of tens of nanometers via laser induced chemical vapor deposition. These nanowires with diameters as small as 60 nm are produced by the interference between incident laser radiation and surface scattered radiation within a diffraction limited spot, which causes spatially confined, periodic heating needed for high resolution chemical vapor deposition. By controlling the intensity and polarization direction of the incident radiation, multiple parallel nanowires can be simultaneously synthesized. The nanowires are produced on a dielectric substrate with controlled diameter, length, orientation, and the possibility of in-situ doping, and therefore are ready for device fabrication. Our method offers rapid one-step fabrication of nano-materials and devices unobtainable with previous CVD methods. PMID:24469704

  9. Lasers in light skin interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Benny L.; Jutamulia, Suganda

    2010-11-01

    Lasers used in dermatological treatments are presented. Commercially available semiconductor lasers (laser diodes) are also presented for comparison. Potential applications of semiconductor lasers to noninvasive information processing or diagnosis as well as medical treatment are discussed. In addition, the current application of LEDs to dermatology is also included in the paper.

  10. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  11. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  12. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  13. Exploring the Diffraction Grating Using a He-Ne Laser and a CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2002-01-01

    A compact disc (CD) serves as a diffraction grating for the study of the dependence of angles of diffracted beams on that of the incident beam from a laser. The demonstration/experiment illustrates the occurrence of different orders of diffraction. Knowledge of the wavelength of the laser permits determination of the groove spacing within ~1% by…

  14. Laser light propagation in adipose tissue and laser effects on adipose cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efraín; Rebolledo, Aldo; Gutierrez, Oscar; Criollo, William; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, José; Ramírez, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    Recently Neira et al. have presented a new liposuction technique that demonstrated the movement of fat from inside to outside of the cell, using a low-level laser device during a liposuction procedure with Ultrawet solution. The clinical observations, allowed this new surgical development, started a set of physical, histological and pharmacological studies aimed to determine the mechanisms involved in the observed fat mobilization concomitant to external laser application in liposuction procedures. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, studies show that the cellular arrangement of normal adipose tissue changes when laser light from a diode laser: 10 mW, 635 nm is applied. Laser exposures longer than 6 minutes cause the total destruction of the adipocyte panicles. Detailed observation of the adipose cells show that by short irradiation times (less than four minutes) the cell membrane exhibits dark zones, that collapse by longer laser exposures. Optical measurements show that effective penetration length depends on the laser intensity. Moreover, the light scattering is enhanced by diffraction and subsequent interference effects, and the tumescent solution produces a clearing of the tissue optical medium. Finally, isolate adipose cell observation show that fat release from adipocytes is a concomitant effect between the tumescent solution (adrenaline) and laser light, revealing a synergism which conduces to the aperture, and maybe the disruption, of the cell membrane. All these studies were consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from inside the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides a strong modification of the cellular membranes.

  15. Combined Hydrodynamic and Diffraction Simulations of Femtosecond X-ray Scattering from Laser-Shocked Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Milathianaki, Despina; Gleason, Arianna

    2014-05-01

    We describe a simple hydrocode based on a two-step integration scheme that models the evolution of elastic and plastic strains in crystals subject to rapid laser-shock loading. By monitoring the elastic strains during plastic flow we track the rotation and spacing of lattice planes within the polycrystalline sample, and can thus predict the signal that would be produced by x-ray diffraction in a variety of experimental geometries. By employing a simple Taylor-Orowan dislocation model we simulate diffraction patterns in a Debye-Scherrer geometry to track the orthogonal strain states within a laser-shocked sample. The yielding rate is approximately matched to those observed in multi-million atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, allowing movies to be made of the diffraction images that would be seen in a real experimental geometry, and illustrating the pertinent experimental requirements, including target texture. Judicious choice of geometry allows clear demarcation of the initial elastic response of the target to be made from the subsequent plastic relaxation. We discuss the simulations in the context of the novel experimental capabilities that have recently become available with the advent of 4th generation light sources, which allow single-shot diffraction with sub-100-fsec resolution.

  16. Combined Hydrodynamic and Diffraction Simulations of Femtosecond X-Ray Scattering from Laser-Shocked Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Justin; Higginbotham, Andrew; Milathianaki, Despina; Gleason, Arianna

    2013-06-01

    We describe a simple hydrocode based on a two-step integration scheme that models the evolution of elastic and plastic strains in crystals subject to rapid laser-shock loading. By monitoring the elastic strains during plastic flow we track the rotation and spacing of lattice planes within the polycrystalline sample, and can thus predict the signal that would be produced by X-ray diffraction in a variety of experimental geometries. By employing a simple Taylor-Orowan dislocation model we simulate diffraction patterns from in a Debye-Scherrer geometry to track the orthogonal strain states within a laser-shocked sample. The yielding rate is approximately matched to those observed in multi-million atom MD simulations, allowing movies to be made of the diffraction images that would be seen in a real experimental geometry, and illustrating the pertinent experimental requirements, including target texture. Judicious choice of geometry allows clear demarcation of the initial elastic response of the target to be made from the subsequent plastic relaxation. We discuss the simulations in the context of the novel experimental capabilities that have recently become available with the advent of 4th generation light sources, which allow single-shot diffraction with sub-100-fs resolution.

  17. On the problem of the diffraction pattern visibility in laser diffractometry of red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Priezzhev, A V

    2011-01-24

    We consider the problem of the visibility of the diffraction pattern that is observed in scattering laser radiation on the erythrocyte suspension in ectacytometer. The theoretical estimates show that 10% variation in the particle size reduces the diffraction pattern visibility by 1% only. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  18. Theoretical analysis of a collimated hollow-laser-beam generated by a single axicon using diffraction integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yong; Wang, Yuzhu

    2004-04-01

    A novel method to generate a collimated hollow-laser-beam (HLB) by only a single axicon is proposed. With some reasonable assumptions, the radial light intensity distribution is calculated in detail by diffraction integral theory. The result of numerical simulation shows that this method is valid. Compared with other methods of generating HLB, this scheme is extraordinarily simple in principle and can be utilized experimentally to construct a light trap in atomic fountain for convenience.

  19. Observation of the temporal Bragg-diffraction-induced laser-pulse splitting in a linear photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svyakhovskiy, S. E.; Kompanets, V. O.; Maydykovskiy, A. I.; Murzina, T. V.; Chekalin, S. V.; Skorynin, A. A.; Bushuev, V. A.; Mantsyzov, B. I.

    2012-07-01

    Temporal Bragg-diffraction-induced laser-pulse splitting into two pulses propagating with different group velocities is observed in multilayered linear photonic crystals (PCs). This phenomenon originates from spatially inhomogeneous light localization within the PCs at the Laue scheme of the dynamical Bragg diffraction. In a homogeneous medium at the PC output each pulse is spatially separated into two pulses, propagating in the transmission and diffraction directions, respectively. The experiments are carried out for a one-dimensional porous silicon-based PC consisting of 375 spatial periods of 800 nm thickness using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser as a probe. A linear dependence of the time splitting of each pair of transmitted and diffractively reflected pulses on the crystal thickness is demonstrated and is supported by theoretical estimations.

  20. Method and apparatus for reducing diffraction-induced damage in high power laser amplifier systems

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Newnam, Brian E.; Shapiro, Stanley L.; Terrell, Jr., N. James

    1976-01-01

    Self-focusing damage caused by diffraction in laser amplifier systems may be minimized by appropriately tailoring the input optical beam profile by passing the beam through an aperture having a uniform high optical transmission within a particular radius r.sub.o and a transmission which drops gradually to a low value at greater radii. Apertures having the desired transmission characteristics may readily be manufactured by exposing high resolution photographic films and plates to a diffuse, disk-shaped light source and mask arrangement.

  1. Improvement of Laser Damage Resistance and Diffraction Efficiency of Multilayer Dielectric Diffraction Gratings by HF-Etchback Linewidth Tailoring

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H T; Larson, C C; Britten, J A

    2010-10-28

    Multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings for Petawatt-class laser systems possess unique laser damage characteristics. Details of the shape of the grating lines and the concentration of absorbing impurities on the surface of the grating structures both have strong effects on laser damage threshold. It is known that electric field enhancement in the solid material comprising the grating lines varies directly with the linewidth and inversely with the line height for equivalent diffraction efficiency. Here, they present an overview of laser damage characteristics of MLD gratings, and describe a process for post-processing ion-beam etched grating lines using very dilute buffered hydrofluoric acid solutions. This process acts simultaneously to reduce grating linewidth and remove surface contaminants, thereby improving laser damage thresholds through two pathways.

  2. Electronic Rotator For Sheet Of Laser Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, John M.; Rhodes, David B.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Jones, Stephen B.

    1989-01-01

    Primary flow-visualization system in Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) at NASA Langley Research Center is sheet of laser light generated by 5-W argon-ion laser and two-axis mirror galvanometer scanner. Generates single and multiple sheets of light, which remain stationary or driven to sweep out volume. Sine/cosine potentiometer used to orient two galvanometer/mirror devices simultaneously and yields desired result at reasonable cost and incorporated into prototype in 1 day.

  3. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Piltch, M.S.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  4. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema

    Claire Gmachl

    2010-09-01

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  5. Volume Bragg semiconductor lasers with near diffraction limited divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venus, George; Glebov, Leonid; Rotar, Vasile; Smirnov, Vadim; Crump, Paul; Farmer, Jason

    2006-05-01

    The problem of high-brightness, narrow line semiconductor lasers sources is important for different kinds of applications. The proposed solution of the problem is the use of an external cavity with volume Bragg grating for effective angular and spectral selection. High-efficient volume Bragg gratings provide complete selection directly in space of wave vectors and serve as a diaphragm in angular space. The condition of effective selection is the provision of a substantial difference in losses for a selected mode by matching angular selectivity of a Bragg grating with divergence of the selected mode. It was proposed off-axis construction of an external cavity with a transmitting volume Bragg grating as an angular selective element and a reflecting volume Bragg grating as a spectral selective feedback. In such external cavity broad area laser diodes have shown stable near-diffraction limited generation in the wide range of pumping current. For LD with 0.5% AR-coated mirror and 150 μm stripe it was achieved 1.7 W output power with divergence of 0.62° at current exceeding six thresholds. Total LD slope efficiency in the considered external cavity is less then slope efficiency of free running diodes by 3-5% only. Spectral width of such locked LD emission was narrowed down to 250 pm in the whole range of pumping current.

  6. Femtosecond laser processing and spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paivasaari, Kimmo; Silvennoinen, Martti; Kaakkunen, Jarno; Vahimaa, Pasi

    2014-03-01

    The use of the femtosecond laser enables generation of small spot sizes and ablation features. Ablation of the small features usually requires only a small amount of laser power to be delivered to the ablation spot. When using only a one beam for the ablation of the small features this process is bound to be time consuming. The spatial light modulator (SLM) together with the computer generated holograms (CGH) can be used for manipulating and shaping of the laser beam in various applications. In laser micromachining, when using laser with relatively high power, the original beam can be divided up to hundreds beams and still have the energy of the individual beam above the ablation threshold of the material. This parallel laser processing enables more efficient use of the laser power regardless of the machining task.

  7. Polarization gating enables sarcomere length measurements by laser diffraction in fibrotic muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Kevin W.; Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Lieber, Richard L.

    2014-11-01

    Sarcomere length is a key parameter commonly measured in muscle physiology since it dictates striated muscle active force. Laser diffraction (LD)-based measurements of sarcomere length are time-efficient and sample a greater number of sarcomeres compared with traditional microscopy-based techniques. However, a limitation to LD techniques is that signal quality is severely degraded by scattering events as photons propagate through tissue. Consequently, sarcomere length measurements are unattainable when the number of scattering events is sufficiently large in muscle tissue with a high scattering probability. This occurs in fibrotic skeletal muscle seen in muscular dystrophies and secondary to tissue trauma, thus eliminating the use of LD to study these skeletal muscle ailments. Here, we utilize polarization gating to extract diffracted signals that are buried in noise created by scattering. Importantly, we demonstrate that polarization-gated laser diffraction (PGLD) enables sarcomere length measurements in muscles from chronically immobilized mice hind limbs; these muscles have a substantial increase of intramuscular connective tissue that scatter light and disable sarcomere length measurements by traditional LD. Further, we compare PGLD sarcomere lengths to those measured by bright field (BF) and confocal microscopy as positive controls and reveal a significant bias of BF but not of confocal microscopy.

  8. Reinjection of transmitted laser light into laser-produced plasma for efficient laser ignition.

    PubMed

    Endo, Takuma; Takenaka, Yuhei; Sako, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Tomohisa; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Namba, Shinichi

    2016-02-10

    For improving the laser absorption efficiency in laser ignition, the transmitted laser light was returned to the laser-produced plasma by using a corner cube. In the experiments, the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma at different times. The laser absorption efficiency was found to be substantially improved when the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma after adequate plasma expansion. Furthermore, through visualization experiments on gas-dynamics phenomena, it was found that the reinjection of the transmitted light affected not only the laser absorption efficiency but also the gas dynamics after breakdown, and thereby the initial flame kernel development. PMID:26906388

  9. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  10. Stimulated light forces using picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Immanuel; Goepfert, A.; Haubrich, D.; Lison, F.; Schuetze, R.; Wynands, Robert; Meschede, Dieter

    1997-05-01

    Using the stimulated force exerted by counterpropagating picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser we were able to focus a beam of laser-cooled cesium atoms along one dimension to about 57% of its original width in the detection zone. The force profile was measured outside and inside the overlap region of the pulses and found to be in agreement with an earlier theoretical prediction. A brief theoretical account of the interaction of atoms with pulsed laser light based on the optical Bloch equations is given.

  11. [Dermatological laser- and light treatments of scars].

    PubMed

    Karmisholt, Katrine; Borch, Jakob E; Omland, Silje Haukali; Hædersdal, Merete

    2016-08-01

    Many patients struggle with tender, rigid and erythematous scars. Various modalities are used to treat cutaneous scars and in recent years, laser treatments are emerging as promising procedures. This article describes laser systems used for scar treatment according to scar type, evaluates the highest available level of evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and introduces a guideline for laser treatment of scars. Twelve RCTs documented effect on acne, burn and surgical scars. It is recommended that laser- and light-based treatments are considered according to the scar type. PMID:27507028

  12. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  13. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-09-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography.As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc.Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity.Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care.

  14. Improved tumour response by laser light treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graschew, Georgi; Smith, Janice; Rakowsky, Stefan; Roelofs, Theo A.; Schlag, Peter M.; Stein, Ulrike

    2008-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious barrier to the efficacy of clinical treatment of human cancers with chemotherapeutic drugs. This barrier might be reduced and eventually overcome by the simultaneous application of two or more treatment modalities. This study reports on the synergetic effect of combined application of laser light and cytostatic drugs to induce an improved tumour response in MDR cancer cells. The MDR breast cancer cell line MaTu/ADR, resistant to the drug adriamycin (ADR), was treated with a combination of ADR (125-1000 ng/ml) and laser light (488 nm with a total light dose between 6-18 J/cm2). This combined treatment leads to an additional reduction of the cell vitality by a factor of 2-3 as compared to treatment with ADR alone, suggesting that combined application of laser light and other treatment modalities might constitute a promising strategy for improvements in the tumour response.

  15. Photoelectron diffraction from laser-aligned molecules with X-ray free-electron laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kyo; Teramoto, Takahiro; Akagi, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Takashi; Majima, Takuya; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Ogawa, Kanade; Sakai, Hirofumi; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Tsuru, Shota; Wada, Ken; Yabashi, Makina; Yagishita, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of deep inner-shell 2p X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) patterns from laser-aligned I2 molecules using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. The XPD patterns of the I2 molecules, aligned parallel to the polarization vector of the XFEL, were well matched with our theoretical calculations. Further, we propose a criterion for applying our molecular-structure-determination methodology to the experimental XPD data. In turn, we have demonstrated that this approach is a significant step toward the time-resolved imaging of molecular structures. PMID:26369428

  16. Coherent EUV light from high-order harmonic generation: Enhancement and applications to lensless diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Ariel J.

    2007-12-01

    The first half of this thesis presents the first demonstration of quasi-phase matching in the coherent high-order harmonic conversion of ultrafast laser pulses into the EUV region of the spectrum. To achieve this quasi-phase matching, a novel method of fabricating hollow waveguides with a modulated inner diameter was developed. This technique lead to significant enhancements of EUV flux at wavelengths shorter than were previously accessible by known phase-matching techniques. In the second half of this thesis, the first tabletop demonstration of lensless diffractive imaging with EUV light is presented using HHG in a gas-filled hollow waveguide to provide coherent illumination. This tabletop microscope shows a spatial resolution of ˜ 200 nm and a large depth of field. Furthermore, the technique is easily scalable to shorter wavelengths of interest to biological imaging.

  17. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  18. Diffraction using laser-driven broadband electron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Zhang, Kaikai; Lai, Yu Hang; Lin, C. D.; Miller, Terry A.; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis F.

    2014-08-01

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometre spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  19. Diffraction using laser-driven broadband electron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Zhang, Kaikai; Lai, Yu Hang; Lin, C. D.; Miller, Terry A.; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis F.

    2015-05-01

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometer spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  20. How Monochromatic Is Laser Light?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen F.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two derivations of the fundamental laser linewidth that have been used successfully in introductory physics courses. The cause of the finite linewidth is identified with phase fluctuations in the electric field due to spontaneous emissions. A factor of 2 discrepancy between the energy and field analysis is explained. (Author/GA)

  1. Zeeman effect induced by intense laser light.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2014-08-22

    We analyze spectral line shapes of hydrogenlike species subjected to fields of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the magnetic component of an electromagnetic wave may significantly influence the spectra. In particular, the Zeeman effect induced by a visible or infrared light can be experimentally observed using present-day powerful lasers. In addition, the effect may be used for diagnostics of focused beam intensities achieved at existing and newly built laser facilities. PMID:25192094

  2. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuyu

    2012-12-31

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the

  3. Application of the maximum entropy technique in tomographic reconstruction from laser diffraction data to determine local spray drop size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongyingsakthavorn, Pisit; Vallikul, Pumyos; Fungtammasan, Bundit; Dumouchel, Christophe

    2007-03-01

    This work proposes a new deconvolution technique to obtain local drop size distributions from line-of-sight intensity data measured by laser diffraction technique. The tomographic reconstruction, based on the maximum entropy (ME) technique, is applied to forward scattered light signal from a laser beam scanning horizontally through the spray on each plane from the center to the edge of spray, resulting in the reconstructed scattered light intensities at particular points in the spray. These reconstructed intensities are in turn converted to local drop size distributions. Unlike the classical method of the onion peeling technique or other mathematical transformation techniques that yield unrealistic negative scattered light intensity solutions, the maximum entropy constraints ensure positive light intensity. Experimental validations to the reconstructed results are achieved by using phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The results from the PDPA measurements agree very well with the proposed ME tomographic reconstruction.

  4. Lasers and Intense Pulsed Light Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Saunte, Ditte M; Lapins, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment are useful for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Carbon dioxide lasers are used for cutting or vaporization of the affected area. It is a effective therapy for the management of severe and recalcitrant HS with persistent sinus tract and scarring, and can be performed under local anesthesia. HS has a follicular pathogenesis. Lasers and IPL targeting the hair have been found useful in treating HS by reducing the numbers of hairs in areas with HS. The methods have few side effects, but the studies are preliminary and need to be repeated. PMID:26617364

  5. Linearly aligned superradiant Bose-Einstein condensates diffracted by a single short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inano, Ichiro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Morinaga, Atsuo

    2013-04-01

    Multiorder bidirectional superradiant Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) were generated in a straight line by an irradiation of a single unidirectional short laser pulse along the long axis of a cigar-shaped sodium BEC in a magnetic trap. The probabilities of the diffracted BECs as a function of the laser intensity were well explained by the square of the Bessel functions and it was estimated that the intensity of the end-fire beam was 25% of the laser intensity. The backward diffractions disappeared at pulse duration longer than 5 μs because of energy conservation. The probability for the +first-order diffraction grew exponentially with pulse duration when the backward diffractions disappeared. We observed the linearly aligned diffracted BECs along the propagation direction of the laser beam, regardless of the aspect ratio of the condensates. This fact indicates that the end-fire beam is triggered by the small backreflection from the vacuum window.

  6. Efficient IR Transmission Diffraction Grating for Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Helen; Chambers, Diana

    1999-01-01

    Numerical methods, using rigorous coupled wave theory, are used to design rectangular relief diffraction gratings for an infrared application which requires comparable first order efficiencies in the TE and TM polarization states. The depth, period, and fill factor of the grating are varied to identify optimal two level binary lamellar grating profiles which predict efficiencies for individual TM and TE polarizations above 75 percent, while keeping the difference between the two efficiencies within 10 percent. The application at hand is a rotating, transmissive diffractive scanner for space-based coherent lidar. The operating wavelength is 2.0 microns. A collimated, circularly polarized beam is incident on the diffractive scanner at the Bragg angle; 30 and 45 degree beam deflection angles being studied. Fused silica is the substrate material of choice. Selected designs are fabricated on 3 inch fused silica substrates using lithographic methods. The performance of the test pieces is measured and compared to theoretical predictions.

  7. Laser-Modified Black Titanium Oxide Nanospheres and Their Photocatalytic Activities under Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Zhao, Dongxu; Liu, Kewei; Wang, Chunrui; Liu, Lei; Li, Binghui; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Shen, Dezhen

    2015-07-29

    A facile pulse laser ablation approach for preparing black titanium oxide nanospheres, which could be used as photocatalysts under visible light, is proposed. The black titanium oxide nanospheres are prepared by pulsed-laser irradiation of pure titanium oxide in suspended aqueous solution. The crystalline phases, morphology, and optical properties of the obtained nanospheres are characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. It is shown that high-energy laser ablation of titanium oxide suspended solution benefited the formation of Ti(3+) species and surface disorder on the surface of the titanium oxide nanospheres. The laser-modified black titanium oxide nanospheres could absorb the full spectrum of visible light, thus exhibiting good photocatalytic performance under visible light. PMID:26132217

  8. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOEpatents

    Bishop, Kenneth P.; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Gaspar, Susan M.; Hickman, Kirt C.; McNeil, John R.; Naqvi, S. Sohail H.; Stallard, Brian R.; Tipton, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  9. The global light system laser station prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Patrick R.

    We describe the design and fabrication of a prototype Global Light System (GLS) laser station for the JEM-EUSO project. The GLS will consist of a network of ground-based Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and steered lasers to monitor and calibrate the cosmic ray detector planned for install on the International Space Station (ISS). The GLS units will generate optical signatures in the atmosphere that are comparable to tracks from cosmic ray extensive air showers (EASs). Unlike an EAS, the number, time, energy, location and direction (for lasers) of GLS events can be specified as JEM-EUSO passes 400 km overhead. Laser tracks from the GLS prototype will be recorded by prototype detectors in ground-to-ground tests. Distant tracks with low angular speed are of particular interest because these are the types of EAS tracks that will be measured by JEM-EUSO. To do these ground-to-ground tests, the prototype detectors will need to measure the laser through the atmosphere at low elevation viewing angles. The beam energy can be adjusted from 1 to 90 mJ to compensate for this additional atmospheric attenuation. The frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser produces 355 nm (7 ns pulse) light. This wavelength is near the center of the UV EAS fluorescence spectrum. The system is housed in a utility trailer that can be transported by a small truck for domestic campaigns or shipped in an industry standard 20 foot container for global deployment. In operation mode, the laser platform inside the trailer is isolated mechanically to maintain beam pointing accuracy. A retractable two stage steering head can point in any direction above the horizon. A slip ring eliminates cable wrap problems. The GLS prototype will be used to test the EUSO-TA detector and will also be used in preflight tests of the EUSO-balloon payload planned for a super pressure balloon mission.

  10. Repeatability and Precision of Laser Diffraction Measurements of Small Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Scott C.; Mudry, R.

    2006-12-01

    In this poster we’ll present results of using diffraction measurements to infer the size of small objects such as the diameter of a human hair. We’ll compare the diffraction results with visual measurements through a microscope, and we’ll discuss repeatability of the diffraction measurements across semesters, which can enable the use of hair samples as an unknown in a diffraction laboratory. Finally, we’ll show that there are large variations in the diameter of human hair even from a single spot of an individual’s head.

  11. Bragg diffraction of light by ultrasonic waves in planargyrotrophic optical waveguides in an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, G.V.

    1995-09-01

    Features of Bragg diffraction of light by two-partial surface ultrasonic waves in planar gyrotropic optical waveguides placed in an external electric field are considered. General expressions for complex vector amplitudes of diffracted fields are presented. It is shown that the diffracted waves have elliptic polarization, the ellipticity being determined by the linear anisotropy of the waveguide structure, the anisotropy induced by an external electric field, the anisotropy of photoelasticity, and the crystal gyrotropy. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Spatial optical modulator (SOM): high-density diffractive laser projection display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, SangKyeong; Song, JongHyeong; Yeo, InJae; Choi, YoonJoon; Yurlov, Victor; An, SeungDo; Park, HeungWoo; Yang, HaengSeok; Lee, YeongGyu; Han, KyuBum; Shyshkin, Ihar; Lapchuk, Anatoliy; Oh, KwanYoung; Ryu, SeungWon; Jang, JaeWook; Park, ChangSu; Kim, ChunGi; Kim, SunKi; Kim, EungJu; Woo, KiSuk; Yang, JeongSuong; Kim, EuiJoong; Kim, JooHong; Byun, SungHo; Lee, SeungWoo; Lim, OhkKun; Cheong, JongPil; Hwang, YoungNam; Byun, GiYoung; Kyoung, JeHong; Yoon, SangKee; Lee, JaeKwang; Lee, TaeWon; Hong, SeokKee; Hong, YoonShik; Park, DongHyun; Kang, JungChul; Shin, WooChul; Lee, SungIl; Oh, SungKyung; Song, ByungKi; Kim, HeeYeoun; Koh, ChongMann; Ryu, YungHo; Lee, HyunKee; Baek, YoungKi

    2007-02-01

    A new type of diffractive spatial optical modulators, named SOM, has been developed by Samsung Electro-Mechanics for laser projection display. It exhibit inherent advantages of fast response time and high-performance light modulation, suitable for high quality embedded laser projection displays. The calculated efficiency and contrast ratio are 75 % and 800:1 respectively in case of 0 th order, 67 % and 1000:1 respectively in case of +/-1st order. The response time is as fast as 0.7 μs. Also we get the displacement of 400 nm enough to display full color with single panel in VGA format, as being 10 V driven. Optical module with VGA was successfully demonstrated for its potential applications in mobile laser projection display such as cellular phone, digital still camera and note PC product. Electrical power consumption is less than 2 W, volume is less than 13 cc. Brightness is enough to watch TV and movie in the open air, being variable up to 6 lm. Even if it's optimal diagonal image size is 10 inch, image quality does not deteriorate in the range of 5 to 50 inch because of the merit of focus-free. Due to 100 % fill factor, the image is seamless so as to be unpleasant to see the every pixel's partition. High speed of response time can make full color display with 24-bit gray scale and cause no scan line artifact, better than any other devices.

  13. OH measurement by laser light absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perner, D.

    1986-01-01

    Since the first attempt to measure atmospheric hydroxyl radicals by optical absorption in 1975 (Perner et al., 1976) this method has been continuously developed further and its major obstacles and limitations are known today. The laser beam needs to be expanded in order to reduce the beam divergence. At the same time the energy density of the laser beam which produces OH via ozone photolysis is reduced to such an extent that the self-produced OH concentration ranges well below the atmospheric value. Atmospheric absorptions should be observed over a wide spectral range so that not only the OH radicals are properly identified by several rotational lines but their absorption can be corrected for interfering absorptions from other air constituents as SO2, CH2O, CS2, etc., which can be identified in a wide spectral range with more confidence. Air turbulence demands fast spectral scanning or probing on and off the absorption line. Energy requirements should be kept small in field operations. In the experiment frequency doubled dye laser pulses at 308 nm are produced. The picosecond light pulses are expected to show a smooth profile (light intensity against wavelength) which will be broadened to the required spectral width according to the uncertainty principle. The pump laser will be an optoacoustically modulated Nd:YAG laser.

  14. Pixel Detectors For Diffraction Experiments At The Swiss Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Huelsen, G.; Eikenberry, E.F.; Schmitt, B.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Tomizaki, T.; Stampanoni, M.; Willmott, P.; Patterson, B.; Broennimann, Ch.; Horisberger, R.; Toyokawa, H.; Borchert, G. L.

    2004-05-12

    The PILATUS detector (Pixel Apparatus for the SLS) is a large, quantum-limited area X-ray detector for protein crystallography which is currently under construction. Its basic units are modules with 16 CMOS chips bump-bonded to a large, continuously sensitive silicon sensor with 157x366 pixels of 217x217 {mu}m2, leading to an active area of 34x80 mm2. With a counting circuit in each pixel, X-rays are detected in single photon counting mode, leading to excellent, noise-free data. The main properties of the detector are an energy range of 6 to 30 keV, no back-ground due to leakage current or readout-noise, fast read-out time of 6.7 ms, a rate/pixel >104/s and a PSF of one pixel. PILATUS detectors are installed at the SLS X06SA protein crystallography beamline, and at both the surface diffraction (SD) station and the radiography and tomography (XTM) station of beamline X04SA. The detectors are operated at room temperature and thus are very easy to use. Experiments benefit from the ability to detect very weak diffraction spots with high precision. At the SD station and at the XTM station, which is equipped with a Bragg magnifier, diffraction, radiography and tomography experiments showed promising results. At beamline X06SA, a three-module array (1120x157 pixels) with a readout time of 6.7 ms was tested. This system was used to collect fine phi-sliced protein crystal data in continuous sample rotation mode in which the crystal was continuously rotated with a slow angular velocity of 0.04 deg./s without any shutter operation. Exposure time per frame ranged from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the crystal. These initial experiments show the potential of this method.

  15. Critical femtosecond laser parameters for the fabrication of optimal reflecting diffraction gratings on Invar36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Hossein, Goudarzi; Meng-Jyun, Lin; Ji-Bin, Horng; Jeng-Ywan, Jeng

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses the effect of femtosecond laser parameters on Invar36, and the efficiency of reflecting diffraction gratings on the alloy. Several gratings were made with different laser parameters in two regimes: constant repetition rates and constant average laser power on the Invar surface. The efficiency of diffraction gratings is measured in an off-plane configuration by determining the power of diffracted points. With the constant average power technique, an increase in laser influence decreased the ablation depth of lines and increased the line widths. The discoloration of line edges from increasing the laser influence more than 0.57 J /cm2 decreased the grating efficiency by over 49%. It was also found that increasing the repetition rate enhanced the grating efficiency and increasing the average power decreased the efficiency. In addition, the ablation threshold of Invar is 0.122 J /cm2 when the number of pulses (NOP) equals 389.

  16. CD, DVD, and Blu-Ray Disc Diffraction with a Laser Ray Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeerd, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    A compact disc (CD) can be used as a diffraction grating, even though its track consists of a series of pits, not a continuous groove. Previous authors described how to measure the track spacing on a CD using an incident laser beam normal to the surface or one at an oblique angle. In both cases, the diffraction pattern was projected on a screen…

  17. Power analysis of light source in laser projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jingyuan; Shi, Ancun; Zhang, Yunfang; Fang, Qing; Liu, Yuliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we design a high power and small volume laser projector using the red laser diode, green laser diode, blue laser diode and green fluorescence as light source, which could improve the performance of the projector significantly with longer lifetime than lamps, higher reliability, and larger color gamut. According to the requirement of CIE Standard Illuminant D65 and light output, the power of red laser diode, green laser diode, blue laser diode and green fluorescence were calculated. The energy efficiency of four base-color optical path was also analyzed. It could be concluded that the blue laser and red laser have higher power requirements.

  18. New laser serves red light, straight up

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, I.

    1993-05-28

    Researchers have been trying to develop lasers that direct their light up through the top of a chip instead of out the side. But they've had little success in turning such lasers into efficient, practical emitters of the visible light prized for many applications. Now, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have fashioned tiny surface-emitters that just may pass technological muster. In the 13 May issue of Electronics Letters, Sandia materials scientists Richard Schneider and James A. Lott report a new wrinkle on a technology familiar in the optoelectronics world-that of the so-called vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VSCELs). To make their VSCEL, the Sandia scientists relied on a fabrication technique known as metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, which enables them to build up complex multilayered constructions, molecular layer by molecular layer. The light-emitting heart of these constructions is the optical cavity, composed of several 10-nanometer-thick layers of the semiconductor indium-aluminum-gallium-phosphide. The cavity's quantum mechanical properties, which depend partly on the precise thicknesses of its layers, the specific semiconductors used, and the mechanical strain between adjacent layers, turn it into so-called quantum well in which electric charges approaching from the layers above and below it get trapped and recombine to emit red light. Bounding the cavity are complex mirrors made up of alternating sublayers of aluminum arsenide and aluminum gallium arsenide. The mirrors reflect and amplify the emitted light and pave a low resistance pathway into the cavity for electrons and holes - mobile positive charges. The electrical current that drives the laser enters through metal electrodes that are deposited onto the very top and bottom of the multilayered structure.

  19. Investigation of Stimulated Raman Scattering Using Short-Pulse Diffraction Limited Laser Beam near the Instability Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Yin, L.; Flippo, K. A.; Albright, B. J.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Rose, H. A.; Rousseaux, C.; Tassin, V.; Baton, S. D.; Amiranoff, F.; Hardin, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and > 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using PIC codes to validate our understanding. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser and the LULI to investigate SRS near the threshold of the instability using 527 and 1064 nm laser light respectively with 1.5 -- 3 ps pulses. In the case of both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gasjet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k?D were completed at the Trident laser. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Details of the experimental results will be presented.

  20. The calculation of the diffraction of the laser beams with a phase singularity on the micro-axicons with using high-performance computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Savelyev D.; N, Khonina S.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze the diffraction of the laser beam with a vortex phase singularity on the basis of the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD). It is shown that, when incident beam has phase singularity, increase of the micro-axicon radius leads to extension of the light needle consisting of longitudinal electric field component. The numerical investigations held of the near-field diffraction for the most common and easily implemented types of polarization of the incident beam - linear and circular.

  1. Chromatic compensation of broadband light diffraction: ABCD-matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Lancis, Jésus; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Climent, Vicent; Andrés, Pedro; Caraquitena, José

    2004-10-01

    Compensation of chromatic dispersion for the optical implementation of mathematical transformations has proved to be an important tool in the design of new optical methods for full-color signal processing. A novel approach for designing dispersion-compensated, broadband optical transformers, both Fourier and Fresnel, based on the collimated Fresnel number is introduced. In a second stage, the above framework is fully exploited to achieve the optical implementation of the fractional Fourier transform (FRT) of any diffracting screen with broadband illumination. Moreover, we demonstrate that the amount of shift variance of the dispersion-compensated FRT can be tuned continuously from the spatial domain, which is totally space variant, to the spectral domain, which is totally space invariant, with the chromatic correction remaining unaltered. PMID:15497415

  2. High-order diffraction gratings for high-power semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'eva, V. V.; Vinokurov, D. A.; Zolotarev, V. V.; Leshko, A. Yu.; Petrunov, A. N.; Pikhtin, N. A.; Rastegaeva, M. G.; Sokolova, Z. N. Shashkin, I. S.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2012-02-15

    A deep diffraction grating with a large period ({approx}2 {mu}m) within one of the cladding layers is proposed for the implementation of selective feedback in a semiconductor laser. Frequency dependences of reflectance in the 12th diffraction order for rectangular, triangular, and trapezoidal diffraction gratings are calculated. It is shown that the maximum reflectance of the waveguide mode is attained using a rectangular or trapezoidal grating {approx}2 {mu}m deep in the laser structure. Deep trapezoidal diffraction gratings with large periods are fabricated in the Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As cladding layer of a GaAs/AlGaAs laser structure using photolithography and reactive ion etching.

  3. Design and fabrication of diffractive microlens arrays with continuous relief for parallel laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiubin; Shan, Mingguang; Zhao, Chenguang; Liu, Jian

    2008-04-01

    Diffractive microlens arrays with continuous relief are designed, fabricated, and characterized by using Fermat's principle to create an array of spots on the photoresist-coated surface of a substrate for parallel laser direct writing. Experimental results indicate that a diffraction efficiency of 71.4% and a spot size of 1.97 microm (FWHM) can be achieved at normal incidence and a writing laser wavelength of 441.6 nm with an array of F/4 fabricated on fused silica, and the developed array can be used to improve the utilization ratio of writing laser energy. PMID:18382568

  4. Cryogenic, high power, near diffraction limited, Yb:YAG slab laser.

    PubMed

    Ganija, Miftar; Ottaway, David; Veitch, Peter; Munch, Jesper

    2013-03-25

    A cryogenic slab laser that is suitable for scaling to high power, while taking full advantage of the improved thermo-optical and thermo-mechanical properties of Yb:YAG at cryogenic temperatures is described. The laser uses a conduction cooled, end pumped, zigzag slab geometry resulting in a near diffraction limited, robust, power scalable design. The design and the initial characterization of the laser up to 200W are presented. PMID:23546080

  5. Sub-diffraction limited structuring of solid targets with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Korte, F; Adams, S; Egbert, A; Fallnich, C; Ostendorf, A; Nolte, S; Will, M; Ruske, J P; Chichkov, B; Tuennermann, A

    2000-07-17

    Possibilities to produce sub-diffraction limited structures in thin metal films and bulk dielectric materials using femtosecond laser pulses are investigated. The physics of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solids is outlined. Results on the fabrication of sub-micrometer structures in 100-200 nm chrome-coated surfaces by direct ablative writing are reported. Polarization maintaining optical waveguides produced by femtosecond laser pulses inside crystalline quartz are demonstrated. PMID:19404368

  6. Kinetic Effects of Laser Light on Rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chuan

    1995-01-01

    In part one of this dissertation, a derivation of the semi-classical kinetic theory of laser-atom interaction for a general multilevel atom is presented, followed by a complete algorithm for the calculation of the force and diffusion as functions of atomic velocity. In contrast to previous numerical methods, the excited states of the atom are not eliminated in this algorithm. Velocity dependent Raman resonances (Ramanons) in a three level Lambda-system are calculated using the general algorithm and physical origin of these resonances is discussed. In part two of the thesis, two novel experiments on the kinetic effects of laser light on rubidium atoms are reported. Transient effects in laser cooling are reported and studied in detail. A semiclassical simulation based on the physical interpretation of these effects agrees well with both the experimental data and results from the quantum calculations, indicating a good understanding of the phenomena. Results of systematic study of a new cooling scheme using a standing wave laser field of two frequencies are presented. In this scheme, sub-Doppler cooling is achieved without either a polarization gradient or a B-field. In addition to cooling and heating, deflection of atoms by a rectified dipole force is observed for certain laser parameters.

  7. Light coupling into an optical microcantilever by an embedded diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, K; Dominguez, C; Plaza, J A; Cadarso, V; Lechuga, L M

    2006-01-10

    By measuring the excitation efficiency of an optical waveguide on a diffraction grating one can accurately register the changes in the incidence angle of the exciting light beam. This phenomenon was applied to detect ultrasmall deflections of silicon dioxide cantilevers of submicrometer thickness that were fabricated with corrugation on top to act as diffraction grating couplers. The power of light coupled into the cantilevers was monitored with a conventional photodetector and modulated using mechanical vibration of the cantilever, thus changing the spatial orientation of the coupler with respect to the incident light beam. The technique can be considered as an alternative to the methods known for detection of cantilever deflection. PMID:16422154

  8. Employing partially coherent, compact gas-discharge sources for coherent diffractive imaging with extreme ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bußmann, J.; Odstrčil, M.; Bresenitz, R.; Rudolf, D.; Miao, Jianwei; Brocklesby, W. S.; Grützmacher, D.; Juschkin, L.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) and related techniques enable a new type of diffraction-limited high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy. Here, we demonstrate CDI reconstruction of a complex valued object under illumination by a compact gas-discharge EUV light source emitting at 17.3 nm (O VI spectral line). The image reconstruction method accounts for the partial spatial coherence of the radiation and allows imaging even with residual background light. These results are a first step towards laboratory-scale CDI with a gas-discharge light source for applications including mask inspection for EUV lithography, metrology and astronomy.

  9. Temporal pulse cleaning by a self-diffraction process for ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Na; Zhou, Kainan; Sun, Li; Wang, Xiaodong; Guo, Yi; Li, Qing; Su, Jingqin

    2014-11-01

    Applying the self-diffraction process to clean ultrashort laser pulses temporally is a recently developed effective way to temporal contrast enhancement. In this paper, we attempt to clean ultrashort laser pulses temporally by the self-diffraction process. Experiments were carried out to study the temporal contrast improvement in the front-end system of an ultraintense and ultrashort laser facility, i.e. the super intense laser for experiment on the extremes (SILEX-I). The results show that the maximum conversion efficiency of the first-order self-diffraction (SD1) pulse is 11%. The temporal contrast of the SD1 signal is improved by two orders of magnitude, i.e. to 103, for a 2.4-ns prepulse with initial contrast of ~10. For a 5.5 -ns prepulse with initial contrast of 2×103, the temporal contrast of the SD1 signal is improved by more than three orders of magnitude.

  10. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-09-01

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  11. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2016-06-21

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  12. The nature of light: a description of photon diffraction based upon virtual particle exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2005-08-01

    Any discussion of the nature of light must include a reminder that whenever we make the observation of light (photons), we only observe particle-like properties. This paper provides a reiteration that we don"t need wave-like properties to scattered photons to describe phenomena such as diffraction or refraction of light. This paper updates the original ideas of Duane, later revived by Lande, which provided a description of light diffraction without making reference to a wave nature. These are updated using terminology more common to quantum electrodynamics which describes the interaction of particles in terms of the exchange of virtual photons. Diffraction is described in terms of an ensemble of distinct, probability weighted paths for the scattered photons. The scattering associated with each path results from the quantized momentum exchange with the scattering lattice attributed to the exchange or reflection of virtual photons. The probability for virtual particle exchange/reflection is dependent upon the allowed momentum states of the lattice determined by a Fourier analysis of the lattice geometry. Any scattered photon will exhibit an apparent wavelength inversely proportional to its momentum. Simplified, particle-like descriptions are developed for Young"s double slit diffraction, Fraunhofer diffraction and Fresnel diffraction. This description directly accounts for the quantization of momentum transferred to the scattering lattice and the specific eigenvalues of the lattice based upon the constraints to virtual photon exchange set by the Uncertainty Principle, Δπi = h/ζi.

  13. Light emission: A temperature-tunable random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, Diederik S.; Cavalieri, Stefano

    2001-12-01

    Random lasers have fascinating emission properties that lie somewhere between those of a conventional laser and a common light-bulb. We have created a random laser that can be brought above and below its threshold for laser emission by small changes in its temperature, thereby creating a light source with a temperature-tunable colour spectrum. As a single random laser can be made as small as a grain of tens of micrometres in diameter, we expect our device to find application in photonics, temperature-sensitive displays and screens, and in remote temperature sensing.Lasers are now commonplace - for example, they are used in industry and in hospitals, in bar-code scanners and compact-disc players. Conventional lasers are based on an optically active material and some sort of laser cavity that traps light for long enough for laser action to occur. A new type of laser source, known as a random laser, has been discovered that does not require a regular cavity but instead depends on a diffusive material such as a fine powder. In a random laser, light waves are trapped by multiple light scattering (that is, light diffusion), which takes over the role of the cavity in a regular laser (Fig. 1). The emission of a random-laser source has a well defined colour spectrum and can be pulsed, just like a regular laser, although its emission is in several directions because of the intrinsic randomness of the system.

  14. Diffraction by cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, F.; Gomer, V.; Schadwinkel, H.; Ueberholz, B.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed diffraction of a laser probe beam by a trapped sample of cold atoms. The effect is only visible in the vicinity of a resonance line. The observed diffraction pattern arises from interference of the incident and scattered light wave, allowing reconstruction of geometric properties of the trapped sample from the holographic record.

  15. Effect of spectral correlations on spectral switches in the diffraction of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro; Lü, Baida

    2003-10-01

    The subject is the spectral characteristics of partially coherent light whose spectral degree of coherence satisfies or violates the scaling law in diffraction by a circular aperture. Three kinds of spectral correlations of the incident light are considered. It is shown that no matter whether the partially coherent light satisfies or violates the scaling law, a spectral switch defined as a rapid transition of spectral shifts is always found in the diffraction field. Different spectral correlations of the incident field in the aperture result in different points at which the spectral switch occurs. With an increment in the correlations, the position at which the spectral switch takes place moves toward the point at which the phase of the center frequency component omega0 becomes singular for illumination by spatially fully coherent light. For light that satisfies the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to the diffraction-induced spectral changes; for partially coherent light that violates the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to both the diffraction-induced spectral changes and the correlation-induced spectral changes. PMID:14570106

  16. Dual light field and polarization imaging using CMOS diffractive image sensors.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Suren; Sivaramakrishnan, Sriram; Chuang, Ellen; Guruaribam, Debashree; Wang, Albert; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first integrated CMOS image sensor that can simultaneously perform light field and polarization imaging without the use of external filters or additional optical elements. Previous work has shown how photodetectors with two stacks of integrated metal gratings above them (called angle sensitive pixels) diffract light in a Talbot pattern to capture four-dimensional light fields. We show, in addition to diffractive imaging, that these gratings polarize incoming light and characterize the response of these sensors to polarization and incidence angle. Finally, we show two applications of polarization imaging: imaging stress-induced birefringence and identifying specular reflections in scenes to improve light field algorithms for these scenes. PMID:26393758

  17. Investigation of correlation properties of light fields by Fresnel diffraction from a step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. R.; Tavassoly, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new method, based on Fresnel diffraction of light from a step, for the study of correlation properties (temporal and spatial) of optical fields. The method renders to measure wavelength, coherence length, and coherence width by recording the visibility of the diffraction fringes versus optical path difference and spacing of the interfering beams. In addition, the method permits to specify the spectral line shape, particularly, of lights with short coherence lengths and the spatial coherence behavior of the lights with short coherence widths. Since, in the introduced method the optical path difference can be varied by changing the light incident angle, practically, in an interval of 90º, a large volume of data is acquired which leads to reliable and accurate study of the subject. The method can be applied easily using modest equipment. We have applied the method to the study of correlation properties of the lights emitted by LED, incandescent bulb, and Hg lamp.

  18. Minimization of diffraction peaks of spatial light modulators using Voronoi diagrams.

    PubMed

    Benoît-Pasanau, Céline; Goudail, Francois; Chavel, Pierre; Cano, Jean-Paul; Ballet, Jérôme

    2010-07-01

    It is possible to reduce the diffraction peaks of a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) by breaking the periodicity of the pixels shape. We propose a theoretical investigation of a SLM that would be based on a Voronoi diagram, obtained by deforming a regular grid, and show that for a specific deformation parameter the diffraction peaks disappear and are replaced with a speckle-like diffraction halo. We also develop a simple model to determine the shape and the level of this halo. PMID:20640008

  19. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2016-02-12

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced reduction of the mirror loss and slow-light enhancement of disorder-induced losses. PMID:26918991

  20. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced reduction of the mirror loss and slow-light enhancement of disorder-induced losses.

  1. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  2. Spectral characteristics of multimode semiconductor lasers with a high-order surface diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotarev, V V; Leshko, A Yu; Pikhtin, N A; Lyutetskiy, A V; Slipchenko, S O; Bakhvalov, K V; Lubyanskiy, Ya V; Rastegaeva, M G; Tarasov, I S

    2014-10-31

    We have studied the spectral characteristics of multimode semiconductor lasers with high-order surface diffraction gratings based on asymmetric separate-confinement heterostructures grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (λ = 1070 nm). Experimental data demonstrate that, in the temperature range ±50 °C, the laser emission spectrum is ∼5 Å in width and contains a fine structure of longitudinal and transverse modes. A high-order (m = 15) surface diffraction grating is shown to ensure a temperature stability of the lasing spectrum dλ/dT = 0.9 Å K{sup -1} in this temperature range. From analysis of the fine structure of the lasing spectrum, we have evaluated the mode spacing and, thus, experimentally determined the effective length of the Bragg diffraction grating, which was ∼400 μm in our samples. (lasers)

  3. Diffraction and Transmission Synchrotron Imaging at the German Light Source ANKA--Potential Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, Alexander; Weitkamp, Timm; Helfen, Lukas; Simon, Rolf; Luebbert, Daniel; Baumbach, Tilo

    2009-03-10

    Diffraction and transmission synchrotron imaging methods have proven to be highly suitable for investigations in materials research and non-destructive evaluation. The high flux and spatial coherence of X-rays from modern synchrotron light sources allows one to work using high resolution and different contrast modalities. This article gives a short overview of different transmission and diffraction imaging methods with high potential for industrial applications, now available for commercial access via the German light source ANKA (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe) and its new department ANKA Commercial Service (ANKA COS, http://www.anka-cos.de)

  4. Generating A Strobed Laser Light Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Franke, John M.; Rhodes, David B.; Jones, Stephen B.

    1994-01-01

    An optoelectronic system generating synchronous, strobed sheet of laser light developed for use in making visible flow of air about model helicopter rotor. Used in wind-tunnel tests to determine actual locations of vortices for comparison with locations predicted by mathematical models to validate models. Each blade tip produces vortex. By establishing successive vortex locations, researcher determines trajectory of vortex pattern. Light-sheet strobe circuits provide selection of blade positions, strobe-pulse durations, and multiple pulses per revolution for rotors having two to nine blades. To make flow visible, vaporizing propylene glycol injected upstream of model. System also provides calibrated trigger delay of strobe pulses, adjustable strobe-pulse durations, selectable number of blades, and slip-sync mode to make flow visible as though in slow motion.

  5. 70-Watt green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Madasamy, Pratheepan; Mead, Roy; Honea, Eric

    2009-02-01

    A 70-Watt green laser with M2<1.4 has been demonstrated. This green laser consists of an all-fiber-based IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser produces up to 150 Watts in a polarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The IR laser is operating under QCW mode, e.g. 10 MHz with 3~5 ns pulse width or 700 MHz with 50 ps pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a 5-mm stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. Both the IR laser and converter module are run through embedded software that controls laser operations such as warm up and shut down. System overview and full characterization results will be presented. Such a high power green laser with near diffraction-limited output in a compact configuration will enable various scientific as well as industrial applications.

  6. Polarization-independent light-dispersing device based on diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, J.; Fujii, E.

    2015-03-01

    We report a light-dispersing device comprised of two transmission gratings and a wave plate. The gratings split the light incident at the Bragg angle into two orthogonally polarized components. The wave plate, which is placed between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique illumination. Appropriate assembly of these optical parts results in efficient diffraction of the unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device with a grating period of 400 nm for the spectral range of 680 ± 50 nm. We verified the proposed polarization-independent light-dispersing concept from the evaluation of this device.

  7. CD, DVD, and Blu-Ray Disc Diffraction with a Laser Ray Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.

    2016-05-01

    A compact disc (CD) can be used as a diffraction grating, even though its track consists of a series of pits, not a continuous groove. Previous authors described how to measure the track spacing on a CD using an incident laser beam normal to the surface or one at an oblique angle. In both cases, the diffraction pattern was projected on a screen and distance measurements allowed the track spacing to be calculated. I propose an alternative method using a laser ray box, which is also applied to a DVD and a Blu-ray disc.

  8. Green laser light activates the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Balster, Sven; Zhang, Kaiyin; Lim, Hubert H.; Reich, Uta; Massow, Ole; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The hearing performance with conventional hearing aids and cochlear implants is dramatically reduced in noisy environments and for sounds more complex than speech (e. g. music), partially due to the lack of localized sensorineural activation across different frequency regions with these devices. Laser light can be focused in a controlled manner and may provide more localized activation of the inner ear, the cochlea. We sought to assess whether visible light with parameters that could induce an optoacoustic effect (532 nm, 10-ns pulses) would activate the cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded preoperatively in anesthetized guinea pigs to confirm normal hearing. After opening the bulla, a 50-μm core-diameter optical fiber was positioned in the round window niche and directed toward the basilar membrane. Optically induced ABRs (OABRs), similar in shape to those of acoustic stimulation, were elicited with single pulses. The OABR peaks increased with energy level (0.6 to 23 μJ/pulse) and remained consistent even after 30 minutes of continuous stimulation at 13 μJ, indicating minimal or no stimulation-induced damage within the cochlea. Our findings demonstrate that visible light can effectively and reliably activate the cochlea without any apparent damage. Further studies are in progress to investigate the frequency-specific nature and mechanism of green light cochlear activation.

  9. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction ina diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk,Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-29

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radialx-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup ofALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a samplein a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser whileprobing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cellis placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to thebeam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while thesample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparentboron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of(Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observedabove 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  10. Multi-level diffractive optical elements produced by excimer laser ablation of sol-gel.

    PubMed

    Neiss, Estelle; Flury, Manuel; Mager, Loïc; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Fort, Alain; Montgomery, Paul; Gérard, Philippe; Fontaine, Joël; Robert, Stéphane

    2008-09-01

    Material ablation by excimer laser micromachining is a promising approach for structuring sol-gel materials as we demonstrate in the present study. Using the well-known direct etching technique, the behaviour of different hybrid organic/inorganic self-made sol-gel materials is examined with a KrF* laser. Ablated depths ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 microm are obtained with a few laser pulses at low fluence (< 1 J/cm(2)). The aim is to rapidly transfer surface relief multi-level diffractive patterns in such a substrate, without intermediate steps. The combination with the 3D profilometry technique of coherence probe microscopy permits to analyse the etching process with the aim of producing multi-level Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). Examples of four-level DOEs with 10 microm square elementary cells are presented, as well as their laser reconstructions in the infrared. PMID:18773015

  11. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  12. APPLICATION OF LASERS AND LASER-OPTICAL METHODS IN LIFE SCIENCES On the problem of the diffraction pattern visibility in laser diffractometry of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Lugovtsov, Andrei E.; Priezzhev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of the visibility of the diffraction pattern that is observed in scattering laser radiation on the erythrocyte suspension in ectacytometer. The theoretical estimates show that 10% variation in the particle size reduces the diffraction pattern visibility by 1% only.

  13. Observation of light diffraction by time-resolved femtosecond correlation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zeylikovich, I; Bai, G; Alfano, R R

    1995-07-15

    We demonstrate time development of the diffraction of light waves from objects for what is to our knowledge the f irst time by using a new femtosecond correlation interferometry. This new dynamical optics method allows for the conversion of temporal information to space information with femtosecond resolution and has the potential to produce a time-resolved femtosecond movie for the visualization of light-wave propagation in space for scientific, biological, and medical applications. PMID:19862089

  14. X-ray Diffraction of Permalloy Nanoparticles Fabricated by Laser Ablation in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O.; Midgley, A; Muthu, D; Wrobel, J; Kruger, M

    2009-01-01

    Permalloy (NiFeMo) nanoparticles were fabricated by laser ablation of bulk material in water with a UV pulsed laser. Transmission electron microscope images showed that approximately spherical particles about 50 nm in diameter were formed in the ablation process. All diffraction peaks corresponding to the bulk material were present in the nanoparticles. In addition to these peaks several new peaks were observed in the nanoparticles, which were attributed to nickel oxide.

  15. Small bore ceramic laser tube inspection light table

    DOEpatents

    Updike, Earl O.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for inspecting small bore ceramic laser tubes, which includes a support base with one or more support rollers. A fluorescent light tube is inserted within the laser tube and the laser tube is supported by the support rollers so that a gap is maintained between the laser tube and the fluorescent tube to enable rotation of the laser tube. In operation, the ceramic tube is illuminated from the inside by the fluorescent tube to facilitate visual inspection. Centering the tube around the axial light of the fluorescent tube provides information about straightness and wall thickness of the laser tube itself.

  16. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-29

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  17. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5–12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  18. Polarization sensitivity of light diffraction for periodic array of anisotropic gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ming-shan Liu, Tung-kai; Tsen, Chun-yu; Ting, Chen-ching

    2015-06-15

    This article aims to analyze the first order diffraction intensity of the incident polarized light which is diffracted by the gold nanoparticles array in terms of the surface plasmon effect. The inspected gold nanoparticles array films are built in grating pattern with stripe thickness of 4 μm and diameters of gold nanoparticles ca. 10–56 nm, which are formed by annealing at temperatures of 400, 450, 500, and 550 °C, respectively. The probing light is linearly polarized with wavelengths of 450–800 nm and counterclockwise turns its polarization direction from 0° to 90° during measurements. The results show that the diffraction intensity depends on the anisotropic configuration samples which gold nanoparticles are orientated by analyzing the scanning electron microscope images. It results that the localized surface plasmon effect induced by incident field depends on orientation and causes the sample polarization-sensitive.

  19. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs.

  20. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  1. Parallelized genetic optimization of spatial light modulator addressing for diffractive applications.

    PubMed

    Haist, Tobias; Lingel, Christian; Adler, Rodolfo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We describe a new technique for optimizing the addressing of spatial light modulators in dynamic holographic applications. The method utilizes 200 times parallelization using imaging of subholograms in combination with genetic optimization. Compared to a fixed linear addressing curve for all different gratings, the diffraction efficiency can be improved by up to 25% for a Holoeye Pluto LCoS modulator. PMID:24663371

  2. Direct-write diffracting tubular optical components using femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Ben; Bellouard, Yves

    2014-03-01

    Over the last decade, femtosecond lasers have been used extensively for the fabrication of optical elements via direct writing and in combination with chemical etching. These processes have been an enabling technology for manufacturing a variety of devices such as waveguides, fluidic channels, and mechanical components. Here, we present high quality micro-scale optical components buried inside various glass substrates such as soda-lime glass or fused silica. These components consist of high-precision, simple patterns with tubular shapes. Typical diameters range from a few microns to one hundred microns. With the aid of high-bandwidth, high acceleration flexure stages, we achieve highly symmetric pattern geometries, which are particularly important for achieving homogeneous stress distribution within the substrate. We model the optical properties of these structures using beam propagation simulation techniques and experimentally demonstrate that such components can be used as cost-effective, low-numerical aperture lenses. Additionally, we investigate their capability for studying the stress-distribution induced by the laser-affected zones and possible related densification effects.

  3. Non-digitized diffractive beam splitters for high-throughput laser materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, J.; Fujii, E.

    2014-03-01

    We report a non-digitized diffractive beam splitter with a split count of 45, a 95% splitting efficiency, and a 0.90 splitting uniformity. The splitter was iteratively designed and was created on fused silica by laser writing lithography. Antireflection coatings were added to the splitter to ensure high efficiency. This splitter was applied to the manufacture of inkjet printer heads, in which silicon wafers were drilled with a 532-nm, nanosecond pulse laser with an average output of 10 W and were wet-etched to produce microfluidic channels. We also discuss large beam arrays for process throughput and subwavelength structures formed on the splitter for efficient laser power use.

  4. Beat the diffraction limit in 3D direct laser writing in photosensitive glass.

    PubMed

    Bellec, Matthieu; Royon, Arnaud; Bousquet, Bruno; Bourhis, Kevin; Treguer, Mona; Cardinal, Thierry; Richardson, Martin; Canioni, Lionel

    2009-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) femtosecond laser direct structuring in transparent materials is widely used for photonic applications. However, the structure size is limited by the optical diffraction. Here we report on a direct laser writing technique that produces subwavelength nanostructures independently of the experimental limiting factors. We demonstrate 3D nanostructures of arbitrary patterns with feature sizes down to 80 nm, less than one tenth of the laser processing wavelength. Its ease of implementation for novel nanostructuring, with its accompanying high precision will open new opportunities for the fabrication of nanostructures for plasmonic and photonic devices and for applications in metamaterials. PMID:19506684

  5. Measuring Particle Size Distribution using Laser Diffraction: Implications for Predicting Soil Hydraulic Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to predict soil hydraulic properties frequently require information on the particle size distribution (PSD). The objectives of this study were to investigate various protocols for rapidly measuring PSD using the laser diffraction technique, compare the obtained PSDs with those determined usi...

  6. Note: Laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Abhijit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2014-04-15

    In this work we describe laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator. Commercially available ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulators are capable of displaying 85 colored images in 1 s using a time dithering technique. Each colored image, in fact, comprises 24 single bit (black and white) images displayed sequentially. We have used each single bit image to write a binary phase hologram. For a collimated laser beam incident on the hologram, one of the diffracted beams can be made to travel along a user defined direction. We have constructed a beam scanner employing the above arrangement and demonstrated its use to scan a single laser beam in a laser scanning optical sectioning microscope setup.

  7. Two-mirrored galvanometer laser light sheet generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, B. D.; Franke, J. M.; Jones, S. B.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    Light sheets generated with either laser or noncoherent sources have found widespread application to flow visualization. Previous light sheet generating systems were usually dedicated to a specific viewing geometry. The technique with the most flexibility is the galvanometer mirror based laser light sheet system. A two-mirrored system was designed and developed to provide flexibility and adaptability to a wide range of applications. The design includes the capability to control the size and location of the laser light sheet in real time, to generate horizontal or vertical sheets, to sweep the sheet repeatedly through a volume, to generate multiple sheets with controllable separation and to rotate single or multiple laser light sheets. The system is capable of producing up to 12 sheets of laser light at an angular divergence of + or - 20 degrees. Maximum scan rate of any one line is 500 Hertz. This system has proven to be uniquely versatile and a patent has been applied for.

  8. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence, John C. H.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump–probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  9. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  10. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  11. Laser light scattering in eye lens model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionova, Nadezhda L.; Maksimova, Irina L.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.

    2000-11-01

    Theoretical investigations of laser light radiation scattered by eye lens model as a system of spheres with various parameters were performed on the base of Mie theory of electromagnetic scattering by a single sphere. The calculations were performed for systems of particles whose coordinates were specifically realized in random fashion according to the specified probabilities defined by the approximation of hard spheres. The modeling of lens biotissue was carried out by using of medical data about internal structure of lens of human and some animals. In general the researchable model presents the system of homogeneous spherical particles those are randomly distributed in the layer of thickness. We study the optical properties such as scattering effective cross-section and function of correlation in different models.

  12. Improved optics for laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, H. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Laser light scattering experiments contemplated for use in a microgravity environment must conform to a number of operational constraints which do not apply on Earth. In particular, the use of index matching fluid to control flare is unacceptable. Work to eliminate index matching fluids by the use of high spatial resolution receiving optics is described. By increasing on-axis spatial resolution flare from the sample cell walls (both the cell sample and cell air interfaces) can be effectively prevented from reaching the photodetector. In general, improving the on-axis discrimination degrades the angular resolution of a receiving optical train. Several different possible configurations of receiving optics are compared for their spatial resolution and angular resolution. For cylinder symmetric optics, the dual lens, fourier transform pair, receiving train with a center mask located between the lenses gives the best on-axis spatial resolution.

  13. Robotic visible-light laser adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-12-01

    Robo-AO is the first autonomous laser adaptive optics system and science instrument operating on sky. With minimal human oversight, the system robotically executes large scale surveys, monitors long-term astrophysical dynamics and characterizes newly discovered transients, all at the visible diffraction limit. The adaptive optics setup time, from the end of the telescope slew to the beginning of an observation, is a mere ~50-60 s, enabling over 200 observations per night. The first of many envisioned systems has finished 58 nights of science observing at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch (1.5 m) telescope, with over 6,400 robotic observations executed thus far. The system will be augmented in late 2013 with a low-noise wide field infrared camera, which doubles as a tip-tilt sensor, to widen the spectral bandwidth of observations and increase available sky coverage while also enabling deeper visible imaging using adaptive-optics sharpened infrared tip-tilt guide sources. Techniques applicable to larger telescope systems will also be tested: the infrared camera will be used to demonstrate advanced multiple region-of-interest tip-tilt guiding methods, and a visitor instrument port will be used for evaluation of other instrumentation, e.g. single-mode and photonic fibers to feed compact spectrographs.

  14. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D.; Nelson, Garrett; James, Daniel; Calero, Guillermo; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also permit an analysis

  15. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D.; et al

    2015-08-19

    We report that the advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles canmore » be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ~4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. Ultimately, this method

  16. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D.; Nelson, Garrett; James, Daniel; Calero, Guillermo; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-08-19

    We report that the advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ~4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. Ultimately, this method will also

  17. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Bahige G; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Dörner, Katerina; Sierra, Raymond G; Stevenson, Hilary P; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Grant, Thomas D; Nelson, Garrett; James, Daniel; Calero, Guillermo; Wachter, Rebekka M; Spence, John C H; Weierstall, Uwe; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors) lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10-100 mg of protein) for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also permit an analysis of

  18. Diffuse Reflection of Laser Light From Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Davis, A.; McGill, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light reflected from an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution defines the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing retrieval of that important quantity. We describe a laboratory simulation of G, useful in design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness. Clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The size distribution extends from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, roughly lognormal, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so photon mean-free-path is about 10 cm, 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a Nd:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting PMTs, with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls position and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider,and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns. Step size is selectable. Far from the beam, the rate of exponential increase in the beam direction scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, independent of particle size. Nearer the beam the signal increases faster than exponential and depends on particle size. Results verify 3D Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate detectability of remotely sensed offbeam returns, without filters at night, with narrow bandpass filter in day.

  19. LIGHT MODULATION: Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdich, L. N.; Yushkov, K. B.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2009-04-01

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 μm.

  20. Bragg diffraction for normal and obliquely circularly polarized light due a new chiral mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Manzanares-Martinez, J.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Rosas-Burgos, A.; Lizola, Josue; Clark, Marielena; Palma, Lillian

    2015-09-01

    We have found experimentally the transmittance of normal incident circularly polarized light due to new chiral mixture that was distorted by electric field. The chiral mixture was achieved by mixtures of two nematic liquid crystals (5OCB and 5CB) and S-1-bromo-2-methylbutane. We have found a regime of circular Bragg diffraction for certain values of concentrations and thickness. Optical diffraction phenomenon have received particular attention in research for optical and electro-optical applications, such as low -voltage modulators, reflective phase gratings and smart reflectors.

  1. Fraunhofer diffraction of Laguerre-Gaussian laser beam by helical axicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topuzoski, S.

    2014-11-01

    In this article we present a theoretical study for Fraunhofer diffraction of a Laguerre-Gaussian laser beam with “0” radial mode number and “l” azimuthal mode number (LG0l) by helical axicon. Analytical expressions describing the diffracted wave field amplitude and intensity distributions in the back focal plane of a convergent lens are derived in a form of product of a Gauss-doughnut function and a sum of hypergeometric Kummer functions. Also, the diffracted LG beam by axicon only, as well as by spiral phase plate only, and the diffracted Gaussian beam by helical axicon, are described mathematically in the back focal plane of a convergent lens. Different possibilities for obtaining output vortex beam with reduced or increased topological charge compared to that of the incident beam, or for obtaining chargeless beam are analyzed.

  2. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  3. Twin-Mirrored-Galvanometer Laser-Light-Sheet Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, David B.; Franke, John M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1991-01-01

    Multiple, rotating laser-light sheets generated to illuminate flows in wind tunnels. Designed and developed to provide flexibility and adaptability to wide range of applications. Design includes capability to control size and location of laser-light sheet in real time, to generate horizontal or vertical sheets, to sweep sheet repeatedly through volume, to generate multiple sheets with controllable separation, and to rotate single or multiple laser-light sheets. Includes electronic equipment and laser mounted on adjustable-height platform. Twin-mirrored galvanometer unit supported by tripod to reduce vibration. Other possible applications include use in construction industry to align beams of building. Artistic or display applications also possible.

  4. Light pollution generated by laser guide star at Canarian Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueca, Sergio; Fuensalida, Jesus J.

    2004-11-01

    A new generation of instrument using a launching laser is been developed to correct the atmospheric image blurring and to establish optical communication with space. Then, light pollution generated by laser will be a serious operational problem in next years. This laser could affect astronomical works of adjacent telescopes when the laser lay across the field of view of the observing telescope, this is a kind of light pollution. This could be avoided with an adequate operational politic to detect possible interference between the laser and the astronomical telescopes. In this paper is analysed the mathematical probability of a cross-event happen.

  5. Polarization-independent light-dispersing optical device consisting of two diffraction gratings and a waveplate.

    PubMed

    Amako, J; Fujii, E

    2014-06-10

    We report on a light-dispersing device consisting of two transmission gratings and a waveplate. The gratings separate two orthogonal polarization components of light incident at the Bragg angle. The waveplate, which is sandwiched between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique light incidence. With these optical parts suitably integrated, the resulting device efficiently diffracts unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device for a wavelength range of 680±50  nm with a 400 nm grating period. From the characterization of this optical device, we validated the proposed polarization-independent, light-dispersing concept. PMID:24921129

  6. Hybrid proton acceleration scheme using relativistic intense laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.; Platonov, K. Yu.; Schnuerer, M.; Prasad, R.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-03-15

    Ion acceleration phenomena at relativistic intense laser interaction with thin foil targets are studied to find an efficient laser-target interaction concept at the conditions, where neither the ponderomotive pressure of the laser light nor the hot electron pressure is negligible. Particle in cell simulations and the analytical model are allowing to predict optimum laser-target parameters and suggesting a significant increase of proton energy if a hybrid proton acceleration scheme is used. In the proposed scenario, the laser polarisation is changed during the acceleration process: First with circularly polarised laser light the target is accelerated as a whole by the ponderamotive pressure, and then with linearly polarised laser light the electrons are heated which additionally increases the accelerating field. The calculations are in good agreement with experimental findings.

  7. Laser microfluidics: fluid actuation by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delville, Jean-Pierre; de Saint Vincent, Matthieu Robert; Schroll, Robert D.; Chraïbi, Hamza; Issenmann, Bruno; Wunenburger, Régis; Lasseux, Didier; Zhang, Wendy W.; Brasselet, Etienne

    2009-03-01

    The development of microfluidic devices is still hindered by the lack of robust fundamental building blocks that constitute any fluidic system. An attractive approach is optical actuation because light field interaction is contactless and dynamically reconfigurable, and solutions have been anticipated through the use of optical forces to manipulate microparticles in flows. Following the concept of an 'optical chip' advanced from the optical actuation of suspensions, we propose in this survey new routes to extend this concept to microfluidic two-phase flows. First, we investigate the destabilization of fluid interfaces by the optical radiation pressure and the formation of liquid jets. We analyze the droplet shedding from the jet tip and the continuous transport in laser-sustained liquid channels. In the second part, we investigate a dissipative light-flow interaction mechanism consisting in heating locally two immiscible fluids to produce thermocapillary stresses along their interface. This opto-capillary coupling is implemented in adequate microchannel geometries to manipulate two-phase flows and propose a contactless optical toolbox including valves, droplet sorters and switches, droplet dividers or droplet mergers. Finally, we discuss radiation pressure and opto-capillary effects in the context of the 'optical chip' where flows, channels and operating functions would all be performed optically on the same device.

  8. Integrated RGB laser light module for autostereoscopic outdoor displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitterer, Jörg; Fidler, Franz; Hambeck, Christian; Saint Julien-Wallsee, Ferdinand; Najda, Stephen; Perlin, Piotr; Stanczyk, Szymon; Czernecki, Robert; McDougall, Stewart D.; Meredith, Wyn; Vickers, Garrie; Landles, Kennedy; Schmid, Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    We have developed highly compact RGB laser light modules to be used as light sources in multi-view autostereoscopic outdoor displays and projection devices. Each light module consists of an AlGaInP red laser diode, a GaInN blue laser diode, a GaInN green laser diode, as well as a common cylindrical microlens. The plano-convex microlens is a so-called "fast axis collimator", which is widely used for collimating light beams emitted from high-power laser diode bars, and has been optimized for polychromatic RGB laser diodes. The three light beams emitted from the red, green, and blue laser diodes are collimated in only one transverse direction, the so-called "fast axis", and in the orthogonal direction, the so-called "slow axis", the beams pass the microlens uncollimated. In the far field of the integrated RGB light module this produces Gaussian beams with a large ellipticity which are required, e.g., for the application in autostereoscopic outdoor displays. For this application only very low optical output powers of a few milliwatts per laser diode are required and therefore we have developed tailored low-power laser diode chips with short cavity lengths of 250 μm for red and 300 μm for blue. Our RGB laser light module including the three laser diode chips, associated monitor photodiodes, the common microlens, as well as the hermetically sealed package has a total volume of only 0.45 cm³, which to our knowledge is the smallest RGB laser light source to date.

  9. Adaptability of laser diffraction measurement technique in soil physics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Gyöngyi; Szabó, József; Rajkai, Kálmán; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor; László, Péter; Hauk, Gabriella; Makó, András

    2016-04-01

    There are intentions all around the world to harmonize soils' particle size distribution (PSD) data by the laser diffractometer measurements (LDM) to that of the sedimentation techniques (pipette or hydrometer methods). Unfortunately, up to the applied methodology (e. g. type of pre-treatments, kind of dispersant etc.), PSDs of the sedimentation methods (due to different standards) are dissimilar and could be hardly harmonized with each other, as well. A need was arisen therefore to build up a database, containing PSD values measured by the pipette method according to the Hungarian standard (MSZ-08. 0205: 1978) and the LDM according to a widespread and widely used procedure. In our current publication the first results of statistical analysis of the new and growing PSD database are presented: 204 soil samples measured with pipette method and LDM (Malvern Mastersizer 2000, HydroG dispersion unit) were compared. Applying usual size limits at the LDM, clay fraction was highly under- and silt fraction was overestimated compared to the pipette method. Subsequently soil texture classes determined from the LDM measurements significantly differ from results of the pipette method. According to previous surveys and relating to each other the two dataset to optimizing, the clay/silt boundary at LDM was changed. Comparing the results of PSDs by pipette method to that of the LDM, in case of clay and silt fractions the modified size limits gave higher similarities. Extension of upper size limit of clay fraction from 0.002 to 0.0066 mm, and so change the lower size limit of silt fractions causes more easy comparability of pipette method and LDM. Higher correlations were found between clay content and water vapor adsorption, specific surface area in case of modified limit, as well. Texture classes were also found less dissimilar. The difference between the results of the two kind of PSD measurement methods could be further reduced knowing other routinely analyzed soil parameters

  10. Experimental Analysis of Classical Arago Point with White-Light Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Suzuki, Masahiro; Fujii, Kan-ichi

    2001-08-01

    The Arago point is a bright spot that appears at the center portion of the shadow of an obstacle such as a ball or a disk as the result of diffraction. Using this Arago point, we can judge the sphericity of a ball and the circularity of a disk, but it is difficult to distinguish the ball or the disk. To solve this problem, it is also necessary to observe the z coordinate component. As a method for doing this, we rotated the disk and observed its diffraction pattern as a function of the rotation angle. By employing the white-light laser as the light source and a three charge coupled device (3-CCD) camera as the detector, we have observed novel phenomena, for instance the deformation of the Arago point and the distortion of the circular fringes. Also, the color (wavelength) dependence of the diffraction angle could be directly understood in a visible sense.

  11. Scattering of white light from levitated oblate water drops near rainbows and other diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H J; Marston, P L

    1991-08-20

    Oblate drops of water illuminated perpendicular to their symmetry axis generate a hyperbolic-umbilic diffraction catastrophe near the primary rainbow [P. L. Marston and E. H. Trinh, Nature London 312, 529-531 (1984)]. Observations were made of this diffraction catastrophe generated by white-light illumination of acoustically levitated drops of water in air. The observations suggest what generalized rainbows would look like if they were produced in nature when sunlight illuminates large raindrops. Unlike the usual rainbow arc, the transverse cusp of the unfolded catastrophe is not distinctly colored. The hyperbolic-umbilic focal section is distinctly colored as is another diffraction catastrophe generated in the rainbow region when the drop is highly oblate. PMID:20706412

  12. Creation of vector beams from a polarization diffraction grating using a programmable liquid crystal spatial light modulator and a q-plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badham, Katherine Emily

    This thesis presents the ability of complete polarization control of light to create a polarization diffraction grating (PDG). This system has the ability to create diffracted light with each order having a separate high-order polarization state in one location on the optical axis. First, an external Excel program is used to create a grating phase profile from userspecified target diffraction orders. High-order vector beams in this PDG are created using a combination of two devices---a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) manufactured by Seiko Epson, and a tunable q -plate from Citizen Holdings Co. The transmissive SLM is positioned in an optical setup with a reflective architecture allowing control over both the horizontal and vertical components of the laser beam. The SLM has its LC director oriented vertically only affecting the vertically polarized state, however, the optical setup allows modulation of both vertical and horizontal components by the use of a quarter-wave plate (QWP) and a mirror to rotate the polarizations 90 degrees. Each half of the SLM is encoded with an anisotropic phase-only diffraction grating which are superimposed to create a select number of orders with the desired polarization states and equally distributed intensity. The technique of polarimetry is used to confirm the polarization state of each diffraction order. The q-plate is an inhomogeneous birefringent waveplate which has the ability to convert zero-order vector beams into first-order vector beams. The physical placement of this device into the system converts the orders with zero-order polarization states to first-order polarization states. The light vector patterns of each diffraction order confirm which first-order polarization state of is produced. A specially made PDG sextuplicator is encoded onto the SLM to generate six diffraction orders with separate states of polarization.

  13. Light pressure acceleration with frequency-tripled laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Ji, Liangliang; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Zhang, Lingang

    2014-08-15

    Light pressure acceleration of ions in the interaction of the frequency-tripled (3ω) laser pulse and foil target is studied, and a promising method to increase accelerated ion energy is shown. Results show that at a constant laser energy, much higher ion energy peak value is obtained for 3ω laser compared with that using the fundamental frequency laser. The effect of energy loss during frequency conversion on ion acceleration is considered, which may slightly decrease the acceleration effect.

  14. Analysis of beam steering by diffraction and the scattering of light by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Jing M.

    This thesis addresses two problems. The first is the performance of non-mechanical beam steering devices based on diffractive optics, and the second is the problem of the scattering of light by turbulence. Two beam steering devices namely holographic optical elements and optical phased arrays are analyzed. Of particular interest are the wavelength selectivity of the uniform volume holographic grating and the impact of dispersion on the spatial and temporal fidelity of an optically transmitted communication signal through both beamsteering devices. Longitudinal refractive index modulation (apodization) in photosensitive glass is used to improve sidelobe. Theoretical methods are developed to model both devices. For uniform grating, it is shown that the temporal dispersion due to the diffraction increase with beam diameter yielding a higher power penalty for large diffraction angles and aperture sizes. For an optical phased array, it is shown the power penalty increase as the diffraction angles and diameters increase. In addition, the scattering of light in turbulent medium is investigated. Of particular interest is to determine region of validity of the Born approximation which is used to compute the scattering field. Pade approximants are used to analyze the propagation through a media having strong turbulent intensity. It is shown that the region of convergence of Born approximation increases as the outer scale of the turbulence decreases. In the case of the strong turbulence, the Born approximation does not capture the correct angular distribution of the scattering intensity.

  15. Axial resolution of laser opto-acoustic imaging: influence of acoustic attenuation and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Alma, Herve; Tittel, Frank K.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    1998-05-01

    Laser optoacoustic imaging can be applied for characterization of layered and heterogeneous tissue structures in vivo. Accurate tissue characterization may provide: (1) means for medical diagnoses, and (2) pretreatment tissue properties important for therapeutic laser procedures. Axial resolution of the optoacoustic imaging is higher than that of optical imaging. However, the resolution may degrade due to either attenuation of high-frequency ultrasonic waves in tissue, or/and diffraction of low-frequency acoustic waves. The goal of this study was to determine the axial resolution as a function of acoustic attenuation and diffraction upon propagation of laser-induced pressure waves in water with absorbing layer, in breast phantoms, and in biological tissues. Acoustic pressure measurements were performed in absolute values using piezoelectric transducers. A layer or a small sphere of absorbing medium was placed within a medium with lower optical absorption. The distance between the acoustic transducer and the absorbing object was varied, so that the effects of acoustic attenuation and diffraction could be observed. The location of layers or spheres was measured from recorded optoacoustic pressure profiles and compared with real values measured with a micrometer. The experimental results were analyzed using theoretical models for spherical and planar acoustic waves. Our studies demonstrated that despite strong acoustic attenuation of high-frequency ultrasonic waves, the axial resolution of laser optoacoustic imaging may be as high as 20 micrometers for tissue layers located at a 5-mm depth. An axial resolution of 10 micrometers to 20 micrometers was demonstrated for an absorbing layer at a distance of 5 cm in water, when the resolution is affected only by diffraction. Acoustic transducers employed in optoacoustic imaging can have either high sensitivity or fast temporal response. Therefore, a high resolution may not be achieved with sensitive transducers utilized in

  16. Reconstruction of three-dimensional molecular structure from diffraction of laser-aligned molecules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Makhija, Varun; Kumarappan, Vinod; Centurion, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Diffraction from laser-aligned molecules has been proposed as a method for determining 3-D molecular structures in the gas phase. However, existing structural retrieval algorithms are limited by the imperfect alignment in experiments and the rotational averaging in 1-D alignment. Here, we demonstrate a two-step reconstruction comprising a genetic algorithm that corrects for the imperfect alignment followed by an iterative phase retrieval method in cylindrical coordinates. The algorithm was tested with simulated diffraction patterns. We show that the full 3-D structure of trifluorotoluene, an asymmetric-top molecule, can be reconstructed with atomic resolution. PMID:26798781

  17. High efficiency single-mode-multimode-single-mode fiber laser with diffraction-limited beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiaqi; He, Bing; Feng, Yan; Gu, Xijia

    2014-08-20

    We designed and tested an all-fiber, high efficiency Yb-doped laser operating at 1088 nm with a single-mode-multimode-single-mode (SMS) structure. A larger-mode-area gain fiber of 1.5 m length, with 20/130 μm core/cladding diameters was used to increase the absorption, and a diffraction-limited Gaussian output beam was obtained from the single-mode output fiber. Using a 976 nm laser diode as the pump source, the laser generated an output power up to 38.5 W with a slope efficiency of 70%. The output beam qualities, with and without SMS structure, were compared and showed that the fiber laser with the SMS structure can achieve high gain, short fiber length, and excellent beam quality. PMID:25321133

  18. Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Katsev, I L; Prikhach, A S; Kazak, N S; Kroening, M

    2006-04-30

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable. (light beams)

  19. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guijun; Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2014-06-01

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400-800 nm) and bottom (800-1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  20. LIGHT BEAMS: Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsev, I. L.; Prikhach, A. S.; Kazak, N. S.; Kroening, M.

    2006-04-01

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable.

  1. Reflection of femtosecond laser light in multipulse ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo Chunlei

    2011-08-15

    The shot-to-shot reflectance of high-intensity laser light is studied as a function of both the number of laser shots and laser fluence in multipulse ablation of a metal when the irradiated surface undergoes structural changes from an initially smooth surface to a deep crater. Our study shows that the reflectance of the irradiated surface significantly decreases due to the high intensity of laser pulses and the laser-induced surface structures in ablation regimes typically used for femtosecond laser processing of materials. The high-intensity effect dominates in the reflection reduction at low numbers of laser shots when laser-induced surface structures do not cause the reflectance to decrease noticeably. With increasing the number of laser shots, the structural effect comes into play, and both high-intensity and structural effects quickly reduce the reflectance of the sample to a low value.

  2. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuta; Wang, Chuncheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Okunishi, Misaki; Ding, Dajun; Lin, C D; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    We have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatial resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a "molecular movie" of the dynamic system may be created with sub-Ångström spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions. PMID:27462650

  3. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuta; Wang, Chuncheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Okunishi, Misaki; Ding, Dajun; Lin, C. D.; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatial resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-Ångström spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions. PMID:27462650

  4. Extracting conformational structure information of benzene molecules via laser-induced electron diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ito, Yuta; Wang, Chuncheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Okunishi, Misaki; Ding, Dajun; Lin, C. D.; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Here, we have measured the angular distributions of high energy photoelectrons of benzene molecules generated by intense infrared femtosecond laser pulses. These electrons arise from the elastic collisions between the benzene ions with the previously tunnel-ionized electrons that have been driven back by the laser field. Theory shows that laser-free elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) can be extracted from these photoelectrons, and the DCS can be used to retrieve the bond lengths of gas-phase molecules similar to the conventional electron diffraction method. From our experimental results, we have obtained the C-C and C-H bond lengths of benzene with a spatialmore » resolution of about 10 pm. Our results demonstrate that laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) experiments can be carried out with the present-day ultrafast intense lasers already. Looking ahead, with aligned or oriented molecules, more complete spatial information of the molecule can be obtained from LIED, and applying LIED to probe photo-excited molecules, a “molecular movie” of the dynamic system may be created with sub-A°ngstrom spatial and few-ten femtosecond temporal resolutions.« less

  5. Near-diffraction-limited laser focusing with a near-critical density plasma lens.

    PubMed

    Shou, Yinren; Lu, Haiyang; Hu, Ronghao; Lin, Chen; Wang, Hongyong; Zhou, Meilin; He, Xiantu; Chen, Jia Erh; Yan, Xueqing

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the feasibility of focusing relativistic laser pulses toward diffraction limit by near-critical density plasma lenses. A theoretical model is developed to estimate the focal length of the plasma lens. Particle-in-cell simulations with various pulse parameters, such as pulse duration, beam waist, and intensity, are performed to show the robustness of plasma lenses. The results prove that the near-critical density plasma lenses can be deployed to obtain higher laser peak intensities with sub-wavelength focal spots in experiments. PMID:26696178

  6. Determining the size distribution of core-shell spheres and other complex particles by laser diffraction.

    PubMed

    Lagasse, R R; Richards, D Wayne

    2003-11-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the size distribution of hollow glass spheres by laser diffraction, an experiment which involves measuring angle-dependent scattering of light from particles dispersed in a liquid. The proprietary software supplied with commercial instruments is not strictly applicable to our two-layer, glass-shell, hollow-core spheres because it requires that the particles have spatially homogeneous properties. We therefore developed Fortran code to compute the scattering from core-shell spherical particles. The results show that the scattering from representative hollow glass particles diverges from homogeneous sphere scattering when the radius decreases from 10 to 3 microm. Additionally, scattering measurements on two core-shell hollow glass powders were analyzed using the exact core-shell optical model and homogeneous sphere approximations. In both cases, the size distribution determined using the exact core-shell model differs from that determined using the homogeneous-sphere approximation when the distribution covers radii smaller than about 10 microm, as expected. The size distribution based on the exact core-shell optical model was determined using a new algorithm. Although the basic equations used in the algorithm have been published previously, they are developed here in a different form, which can be implemented using Fortran and MatLab routines available commercially and in the public domain. This algorithm could be used to determine the size distribution of other kinds of particles, such as cylindrical rods, as long as their angle-dependent scattering could be computed. PMID:14554168

  7. Large-Optics white light interferometer for laser wavefront test: apparatus and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Zhu; Liu, Liren; Wang, Lijuan; Liu, De'an

    2008-08-01

    There is transmitting optics of 250mm aperture with about 8 microradians in SILEX system. This is often large aperture and diffraction-limited laser beam in the laser communications. Large-Optics white light interferometer using double-shearing structure has been submitted to analysis the laser wavefront before. Six optical plates of 490 millimeters apertures are manufactured now one of which is also aperture-divided so that the precision of measured wave front is higher than the full aperture design. It is suitable for measurement of minimum diffraction-limited laser wave front and any wavelength. The interference is happened between equal optical path of the reflection and the other. The plates are the basic structures which are precisely parallel or perpendicular needed for either two plates. There are several tools equipped with the interferometer including white light test source and collimators and so on to confirm the precision of several seconds angle. The apparatus and application is explained in detail in this paper. The adjustment is important for the realization of white light test.

  8. Shape and Size of Microfine Aggregates: X-ray Microcomputed Tomgraphy vs. Laser Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan,S.; Garboczi, E.; Fowler, D.

    2007-01-01

    Microfine rock aggregates, formed naturally or in a crushing process, pass a No. 200 ASTM sieve, so have at least two orthogonal principal dimensions less than 75 {mu}m, the sieve opening size. In this paper, for the first time, we capture true 3-D shape and size data of several different types of microfine aggregates, using X-ray microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) with a voxel size of 2 {mu}m. This information is used to generate shape analyses of various kinds. Particle size distributions are also generated from the {mu}CT data and quantitatively compared to the results of laser diffraction, which is the leading method for measuring particle size distributions of sub-millimeter size particles. By taking into account the actual particle shape, the differences between {mu}CT and laser diffraction can be qualitatively explained.

  9. Practice and Educational Gaps in Light, Laser, and Energy Treatments.

    PubMed

    Alam, Murad; Waldman, Abigail; Nouri, Keyvan; Council, M Laurin; Cartee, Todd V

    2016-07-01

    This article discusses current practice in laser dermatology, the gaps in practice, and recommendations for improvement. As is the case with other areas of cosmetic dermatology, there is a rapid development of new laser and light devices with limited epidemiologic data available to inform best practice. The high fixed cost associated with new laser devices, limited space available in some practices, and inconsistent training may limit the adoption of needed therapies. Improving research in this area; training opportunities for physicians, residents, and staff; and cost-effective laser/light device rentals programs could improve quality of current practice. PMID:27363892

  10. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Thomas, A. G.; Mangles, S. P.D.; Banerjee, S.; Corde, S.; Flacco, A.; Litos, M.; Neely, D.; Viera, J.; Najmudin, Z.; Bingham, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  11. LIGHT SOURCE: TW Laser system for Thomson scattering X-ray light source at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li-Xm; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Hua, Jian-Fei; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    A TW (Tera Watt) laser system based on Ti:sapphire mainly for the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray light source (TTX) is being built. Both UV (ultraviolet) laser pulse for driving the photocathode radio-frequency (RF) gun and the IR (infrared) laser pulse as the electron-beam-scattered-light are provided by the system. Efforts have also been made in laser pulse shaping and laser beam transport to optimize the high-brightness electron beam production by the photocathode RF gun.

  12. Design, realization, and applications of diffractive structures for laser beam manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, Marek; Fiala, Pavel; Květoň, Milan; Nývlt, Martin

    2010-12-01

    This paper deals with the design, fabrication, and applications of the synthetic diffractive elements. Selected design algorithms such as the Iterative Fourier Transform Algorithm and others have been researched and improved to give better results for particular applications. Interesting fabrication technologies such as the matrix laser lithography are also presented. Finally, several applications are described that have been solved at the Department of Physical Electronics of the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering.

  13. Characterisation of Residual Stresses Generated by Laser Shock Peening by Neutron and Synchrotron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Alexander Dominic; King, Andrew; Pirling, Thilo; Peyre, Patrice; Withers, Phillip John

    The fatigue behaviour of engineering alloys can be significantly improved through the application of mechanical surface treatments. These processes generate significant compressive residual stresses near surface by inhomogeneous plastic deformation. In the case of mechanical surface treatments such as laser shock peening, certain burnishing and rolling techniques and ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT), the compressive residual stress layer can extend to a depth of the order of millimeters, with balancing tensile stresses located deeper. Techniques to characterise the residual stresses generated by such mechanical surface treatments non-destructively are mainly limited to diffraction methods using penetrating neutron and synchrotron X-ray radiations. The application of these radiation sources is illustrated here by the characterisation of residual strain distributions in a two types of specimens treated with laser shock peening (LSP). Analyses of diffraction peak broadening provide qualitative information concerning the depth to which the plastic deformation of the treatments extends. Two case studies of laser shock peening of titanium and aluminium alloys is presented to demonstrate the capabilities of neutron and synchrotron diffraction techniques in the field of residual stress characterisation of surface engineered material non-destructively.

  14. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  15. The MYTHEN detector for X-ray powder diffraction experiments at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Cervellino, Antonio; Dinapoli, Roberto; Gozzo, Fabia; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Kraft, Philipp; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian

    2010-01-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting silicon microstrip detector has been developed at the Swiss Light Source for time-resolved powder diffraction experiments. An upgraded version of the detector has been installed at the SLS powder diffraction station allowing the acquisition of diffraction patterns over 120° in 2θ in fractions of seconds. Thanks to the outstanding performance of the detector and to the calibration procedures developed, the quality of the data obtained is now comparable with that of traditional high-resolution point detectors in terms of FWHM resolution and peak profile shape, with the additional advantage of fast and simultaneous acquisition of the full diffraction pattern. MYTHEN is therefore optimal for time-resolved or dose-critical measurements. The characteristics of the MYTHEN detector together with the calibration procedures implemented for the optimization of the data are described in detail. The refinements of two known standard powders are discussed together with a remarkable application of MYTHEN to organic compounds in relation to the problem of radiation damage. PMID:20724787

  16. Improvement of the diffraction efficiency and kinetics of holographic gratings in photochromic media by auxiliary light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Norbert; Juchem, Thorsten

    2004-12-01

    Holographic gratings recorded in photochromic media often do not obtain the maximally achievable diffraction efficiency because of diminishing the fringe contrast caused, e.g., by a photochemically active readout beam or unequal intensities of object and reference waves. For nonreversible materials this problem causes a decrease in diffraction efficiency that is proportional to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, in nonlinear materials such as photochromic media, for which saturation effects need to be considered, an out-of-proportion decrease in the SNR results. It is shown that an overshooting peak during hologram growth, which then decays to a lower permanent level of diffraction, is an indicator for such a situation. Even a weak readout beam may cause such effects, which significantly affect the hologram kinetics. The observed overshooting diffraction efficiency may even be misinterpreted to be dependent on material properties. Experimental and theoretical proof that with low levels of auxiliary light this type of problem can be eliminated completely is presented. Throughout this research bacteriorhodopsin films were used, but the results are valid for photochromic media in general.

  17. Differential near-edge coherent diffractive imaging using a femtosecond high-harmonic XUV light source.

    PubMed

    Weise, Fabian; Neumark, Daniel M; Leone, Stephen R; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-11-19

    Element-specific contrast enhancement in tabletop coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is demonstrated by employing an ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source with tunable photon energy. By combining two measurements performed at energies below and above the Al L(2,3) absorption edge, the spatial autocorrelation function of a micron-scale double pinhole in a 300 nm thick aluminum foil is retrieved despite a dominant background signal from directly transmitted light across the entire range of detectable diffraction angles. The fringe visibility in the diffraction patterns is 0 below the Al L(2,3) edge, 0.53 ± 0.06 above the edge, and 0.73 ± 0.08 in the differential image that combines the two measurements. The proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that the variations of XUV optical constants in the vicinity of an inner-shell absorption edge can be utilized to improve the chemical sensitivity and image reconstruction quality of laboratory-based ultrafast imaging experiments. PMID:23187472

  18. Multi-point laser spark generation for internal combustion engines using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Elliott; Kuang, Zheng; Cheng, Hua; Page, Vincent; Shenton, Tom; Dearden, Geoff

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique demonstrating for the first time successful multi-point laser-induced spark generation, which is variable in three dimensions and derived from a single laser beam. Previous work on laser ignition of internal combustion engines found that simultaneously igniting in more than one location resulted in more stable and faster combustion - a key potential advantage over conventional spark ignition. However, previous approaches could only generate secondary foci at fixed locations. The work reported here is an experimental technique for multi-point laser ignition, in which several sparks with arbitrary spatial location in three dimensions are created by variable diffraction of a pulsed single laser beam source and transmission through an optical plug. The diffractive multi-beam arrays and patterns are generated using a spatial light modulator on which computer generated holograms are displayed. A gratings and lenses algorithm is used to accurately modulate the phase of the input laser beam and create multi-beam output. The underpinning theory, experimental arrangement and results obtained are presented and discussed.

  19. Imaging live cell in micro-liquid enclosure by X-ray laser diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Shibuya, Akemi; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sangsoo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Tairo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Emerging X-ray free-electron lasers with femtosecond pulse duration enable single-shot snapshot imaging almost free from sample damage by outrunning major radiation damage processes. In bioimaging, it is essential to keep the sample close to its natural state. Conventional high-resolution imaging, however, suffers from severe radiation damage that hinders live cell imaging. Here we present a method for capturing snapshots of live cells kept in a micro-liquid enclosure array by X-ray laser diffraction. We place living Microbacterium lacticum cells in an enclosure array and successively expose each enclosure to a single X-ray laser pulse from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser. The enclosure itself works as a guard slit and allows us to record a coherent diffraction pattern from a weakly-scattering submicrometre-sized cell with a clear fringe extending up to a 28-nm full-period resolution. The reconstructed image reveals living whole-cell structures without any staining, which helps advance understanding of intracellular phenomena. PMID:24394916

  20. Diffractive/refractive hybrid f-theta lens for laser drilling of multilayer printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Keiji; Okada, Takeshi; Ebata, Keiji

    2003-02-01

    A new type of f-theta lens has recently been developed for microvia laser drilling of multilayer printed circuit boards. It employs a diffractive/refractive hybrid lens which has a blazed surface-relief microstructure on an aspheric surface. By introducing that hybrid lens for CO2 laser system, and by stopping the use of germanium that is optically much sensitive to temperature, the f-theta lens that consists of all zinc selenide lenses is obtained with its optical performance stable on temperature. Achromatic properties against the wavelength fluctuations of actual lasers are also achieved. A prototype is fabricated through the development of single point diamond turning of hybrid surfaces. The performance of the lens is first examined by measuring wavefront error with a tunable infrared interferometer. The results show diffraction-limited performance at all conditions, including different temperatures (up to 50°C) and wavelengths. The temperature dependence of the focal length of the lens is also measured and found to be 5 times as insensitive to temperature as that of a conventional one. Laser drilling experiments are performed for a polymide film on copper foil. The result shows good uniformity of hole size and circularity all over the 50×50 mm2 scan field.

  1. Low-cost lithography for fabrication of one-dimensional diffraction gratings by using laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghui; Zhu, Xiangwen; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Huanhuan; Ni, Kai

    2015-08-01

    A low-cost lithography technology is presented in this paper for fabrication of sub-micron order one-dimensional diffraction gratings. A Lloyd's mirror interferometer which can generate stable interference fringes is used as fabrication tool. The Lloyd's mirror interferometer is composed of a mirror and a substrate coated by photoresist, which are placed by nighty degrees. A plane wave is projected onto the Lloyd's mirror and divided into two halves, one of which is directly projected onto the substrate and the other one reaches the substrate after being reflected by the mirror. These two beam interfere with each other and generate interference fringes, which are exposed onto the photoresist. After being developed, the exposed photoresist shows a one-dimensional surface-relief grating structures. In conventional lithography system based on the principle mentioned above, gas lasers, such as He-Cd laser are widely employed. The cost and footprint of such laser sources, however, are always high and bulky. A low-cost system by using cost-efficient 405 nm laser diodes is then proposed for solving these problems. A key parameter, coherence length that determines one-dimensional grating width is systematically studied. A fabrication system based on the interference lithography principle and 405 nm laser diodes is constructed for evaluation of the feasibility of using laser didoes as laser source. Gratings with 570 nm pitch are fabricated and evaluated by an atomic force microscope. Experiments results show that low-cost 405 nm laser diode is an effective laser source for one-dimensional grating fabrication.

  2. Collimation of diode laser beams with a single holographic diffractive element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miler, Miroslav; Koudela, Ivo; Aubrecht, Ivo

    1999-07-01

    Holographic diffractive optical elements collimating highly divergent, elliptical and astigmatic edge emitted diode laser beams are analyzed. Elements are recorded using only divergent beams with spherical wavefronts while off-axis astigmatism and coma of the holographic recording arrangement are compensated in a narrow beam approximation. Because of the very asymmetrical recording setup, significant blazing properties are present. Two types of the collimators are proposed: one for obliquely and the other for perpendicularly incident laser beam. Astigmatic properties of the output beams were measured in the reverse setup, i.e. when the collimated laser beams impinge on elements from their back side. Comparison of the advantages and drawbacks of both arrangements is presented.

  3. Detailed optical characterization of a near diffraction limited xenon fluoride laser

    SciTech Connect

    Londono, C. ); Smith, M.J.; Trainor, D.W.; Itzkan, I. ); Berggren, R. ); Fulghum, S.F. )

    1988-12-01

    A 1 m gain length, electron beam pumped xenon fluoride laser (lambda = 353, 351 nm) utilizing two laser mixtures of lean and rich NF/sub 3/, with Xe and balance Ne, was operated with a confocal unstable resonator with magnification of 2.24. The resultant beam quality was diagnosed with both shearing interferometry to measure near-field phase and far-field focal spot evaluation techniques. These measurements resulted in a beam quality of <1.15 times the diffraction limit with no evidence of the wide angle energy loss. This laser device was fully characterized with regard to electron beam deposition uniformity, transient refractive index effects, and optical quality of the resonator and diagnostic components.

  4. Femtosecond laser induced tunable surface transformations on (111) Si aided by square grids diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei Liu, Yang

    2015-12-21

    We report an extra freedom to modulate the femtosecond laser energy distribution to control the surface ablated structures through a copper-grid mask. Due to the reduced deposited pulse energy by changing the scanning speed or the pulse fluence, a sequential evolution of three distinctly different surface patterns with periodic distributions is formed, namely, striped ripple lines, ripple microdots, and surface modification. By changing the scanning speed, the number of the multiple dots in a lattice can be modulated. Moreover, by exploring the ablation process through the copper grid mask, it shows an abnormal enhanced ablation effect with strong dependence of the diffraction-aided fs laser ablated surface structures on polarization direction. The sensitivity shows a quasi-cosinusoid-function with a periodicity of π/2. Particularly, the connection process of striped ripple lines manifests a preferential formation direction with the laser polarization.

  5. Interferometer combines laser light source and digital counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Measurement of small linear displacements in digital readouts with extreme accuracy and sensitivity is achieved by an interferometer. The instrument combines a digital electro-optical fringe-counting system and a laser light source.

  6. Proton displacement damage in light-emitting and laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of proton displacement damage on light-emitting diodes and laser diodes are discussed, comparing the radiation sensitivity of current technology devices with older devices for which data exists in the literature.

  7. Diffusion filter eliminates fringe effects of coherent laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsasky, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion filter comprised of small particles in colloidal suspension reduces the coherence of a laser beam used as a photographic light source. Interference patterns which obscure details in photographic film are eliminated, the intensity and collimation are moderately affected.

  8. Visible light surface emitting semiconductor laser

    DOEpatents

    Olbright, Gregory R.; Jewell, Jack L.

    1993-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is disclosed comprising a laser cavity sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser cavity comprises a pair of spacer layers surrounding one or more active, optically emitting quantum-well layers having a bandgap in the visible which serve as the active optically emitting material of the device. The thickness of the laser cavity is m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer, .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the laser radiation and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the cavity. Electrical pumping of the laser is achieved by heavily doping the bottom mirror and substrate to one conductivity-type and heavily doping regions of the upper mirror with the opposite conductivity type to form a diode structure and applying a suitable voltage to the diode structure. Specific embodiments of the invention for generating red, green, and blue radiation are described.

  9. Design and application of a new modular adapter for laser diffraction characterization of inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H; Gjaltema, D; Hagedoorn, P; Schaller, M; Witt, W; Frijlink, H W

    2002-12-01

    An inhaler adapter has been designed for the characterization of the aerosol clouds from medical aerosol generators such as nebulizers, dry powder inhalers (dpis) and metered dose inhalers (mdis) with laser diffraction technology. The adapter has a pre-separator, for separation of large particles (i.e. carrier crystals) from the aerosol cloud before it is exposed to the laser beam. It also has a fine particle collector for measuring the emitted mass fraction of fines by chemical detection methods after laser diffraction sizing. The closed system enables flow control through the aerosol generators and all test conditions, including ambient temperature and relative humidity, are automatically recorded. Counter flows minimize particle deposition onto the two windows for the laser beam, which make successive measurements without cleaning of these windows possible. The adapter has successfully been tested for nebulizers, mdis and dpis. In a comparative study with ten nebulizers it was found that these devices differ considerably in droplet size (distribution) of the aerosol cloud for the same 10% aqueous tobramycin solution (volume median diameters ranging from 1.25 to 3.25 microm) when they are used under the conditions recommended by the manufacturers. The droplet size distribution generated by the Sidestream (with PortaNeb compressor) is very constant during nebulization until dry running of the device. Comparative testing of dpis containing spherical pellet type of formulations for the drug (e.g. the AstraZeneca Turbuhaler) with the adapter is fast and simple. But also formulations containing larger carrier material could successfully be measured. Disintegration efficiency of a test inhaler with carrier retainment (acting as a pre-separator) could be measured quite accurately both for a colistin sulfate formulation with 16.7% of a lactose fraction 106-150 microm and for a budesonide formulation with a carrier mixture of Pharmatose 325 and 150 M. Therefore, it is

  10. Ultrafast laser parallel microdrilling using multiple annular beams generated by a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Zheng; Perrie, Walter; Edwardson, Stuart P.; Fearon, Eamonn; Dearden, Geoff

    2014-03-01

    Ultrafast laser parallel microdrilling using diffractive multiple annular beam patterns is demonstrated in this paper. The annular beam was generated by diffractive axicon computer generated holograms (CGHs) using a spatial light modulator. The diameter of the annular beam can be easily adjusted by varying the radius of the smallest ring in the axicon. Multiple annular beams with arbitrary arrangement and multiple annular beam arrays were generated by superimposing an axicon CGH onto a grating and lenses algorithm calculated multi-beam CGH and a binary Dammann grating CGH, respectively. Microholes were drilled through a 0.03 mm thick stainless steel foil using the multiple annular beams. By avoiding huge laser output attenuation and mechanical annular scanning, the processing is ˜200 times faster than the normal single beam processing.