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Sample records for laser microdissected vascular

  1. Laser capture microdissection of kidney tissue.

    PubMed

    Woroniecki, Robert P; Bottinger, Erwin P

    2009-01-01

    Kidney tissue laser capture microdissection (LCM) is of great clinical relevance since genome wide studies on total kidney messenger RNA (mRNA) potentially miss important factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease in glomeruli and tubules. This technique is readily applicable to study mRNA from isolated glomeruli and tubules of human kidney biopsy material. In this chapter we present a "cook-book" practical approach of utilizing LCM in combination with RNA isolation technique in downstream applications in nephrology. PMID:19148600

  2. Laser capture microdissection for gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Bidarimath, Mallikarjun; Edwards, Andrew K; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is an excellent and perhaps the only platform to isolate homogeneous cell populations from specific microscopic regions of heterogeneous tissue section, under direct microscopic visualization. The basic operations of the LCM system are based on (a) microscopic visualization of phenotypically identified cells of interest, (b) selective adherence of cells to a melting thermolabile film/membrane using a low-energy infrared laser (IR system) or photovolatization of cells within a selected region (UV system), (c) capturing or catapulting of structurally intact cells from a stained tissue section. RNA/DNA or protein can be extracted from the cell or tissue fragments for downstream applications to quantitatively study gene expression. This method can be applied to many downstream analyses including but not limited to quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), microarray, DNA genotyping, RNA transcript profiling, generation of cDNA library, mass spectrometry analysis, and proteomic discovery.The application of LCM is described here to specifically and reliably obtain a homogeneous cell population in order to extract RNA to study microRNA expression by quantitative real-time PCR. PMID:25308266

  3. Purity and Enrichment of Laser-Microdissected Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Amanda L.; Day, Trevor A.; Dayas, Christopher V.; Smith, Doug W.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to microdissect individual cells from the nervous system has enormous potential, as it can allow for the study of gene expression in phenotypically identified cells. However, if the resultant gene expression profiles are to be accurately ascribed, it is necessary to determine the extent of contamination by nontarget cells in the microdissected sample. Here, we show that midbrain dopamine neurons can be laser-microdissected to a high degree of enrichment and purity. The average enrichment for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression in the microdissected sample relative to midbrain sections was approximately 200-fold. For the dopamine transporter (DAT) and the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (Vmat2), average enrichments were approximately 100- and 60-fold, respectively. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (Gad65) expression, a marker for GABAergic neurons, was several hundredfold lower than dopamine neuron-specific genes. Glial cell and glutamatergic neuron gene expression were not detected in microdissected samples. Additionally, SN and VTA dopamine neurons had significantly different expression levels of dopamine neuron-specific genes, which likely reflects functional differences between the two cell groups. This study demonstrates that it is possible to laser-microdissect dopamine neurons to a high degree of cell purity. Therefore gene expression profiles can be precisely attributed to the targeted microdissected cells. PMID:23984404

  4. Laser capture microdissection in the tissue biorepository.

    PubMed

    Liu, Angen

    2010-09-01

    An important need of many cancer research projects is the availability of high-quality, appropriately selected tissue. Tissue biorepositories are organized to collect, process, store, and distribute samples of tumor and normal tissue for further use in fundamental and translational cancer research. This, in turn, provides investigators with an invaluable resource of appropriately examined and characterized tissue specimens and linked patient information. Human tissues, in particular, tumor tissues, are complex structures composed of heterogeneous mixtures of morphologically and functionally distinct cell types. It is essential to analyze specific cell types to identify and define accurately the biologically important processes in pathologic lesions. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is state-of-the-art technology that provides the scientific community with a rapid and reliable method to isolate a homogeneous population of cells from heterogeneous tissue specimens, thus providing investigators with the ability to analyze DNA, RNA, and protein accurately from pure populations of cells. This is particularly well-suited for tumor cell isolation, which can be captured from complex tissue samples. The combination of LCM and a tissue biorepository offers a comprehensive means by which researchers can use valuable human biospecimens and cutting-edge technology to facilitate basic, translational, and clinical research. This review provides an overview of LCM technology with an emphasis on the applications of LCM in the setting of a tissue biorepository, based on the author's extensive experience in LCM procedures acquired at Fox Chase Cancer Center and Hollings Cancer Center. PMID:20808641

  5. Laser capture microdissection for the investigative pathologist.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; McDowell, T L; Hanson, N E; Tang, X; Fujimoto, J; Rodriguez-Canales, J

    2014-01-01

    An important step in translational research is the validation of molecular findings from in vitro experiments using tissue specimens. However, tissue specimens are complex and contain a multitude of diverse cell populations that interfere with the molecular profiling data of a specific cell type. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) alleviates this issue by providing a valuable tool for the enrichment of a specific cell type within complex tissue samples. However, LCM and molecular analysis from tissue specimens can be complex and challenging due to numerous issues related with the tissue processing and its impact on the integrity of biomolecules in the specimen. The intricate nature of this application highlights the essential role a pathologist plays in translational research by contributing an expertise in histopathology, tissue handling, tissue analysis techniques, and clinical correlation of biological findings. The present review examines key practical aspects in tissue handling, specimen selection, quality control, and sample preparation for LCM and downstream molecular analyses that are a primary objective of the investigative pathologist. PMID:24227008

  6. Laser capture microdissection of nematode feeding cells.

    PubMed

    Ithal, Nagabhushana; Mitchum, Melissa G

    2011-01-01

    Obligate plant-parasitic nematodes, such as cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) and root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), form specialized feeding cells in host plant roots. These feeding cells provide the sole source of nutrition for the growth and reproduction of the nematode to complete its life cycle. Feeding cell formation involves complex physiological and morphological changes to normal root cells and is accompanied by dramatic changes in plant gene expression. The distinct features of feeding cells suggest that their formation entails a unique gene expression profile, a better understanding of which will assist in building models to explain signaling pathways that modulate transcriptional changes in response to nematodes. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to design strategies to develop resistance against nematodes in crop plants. Feeding cells comprise a small fraction of the total root cell population, and identification of plant gene expression changes specific to these cells is difficult. Until recently, the specific isolation of nematode feeding cells could be accomplished only by manual dissection or microaspiration. These approaches are limited in that only mature feeding cells can be isolated. These limitations in tissue accessibility for macromolecule isolation at different stages of feeding cell development can be overcome through the use of laser microdissection (LM), a technique that enables the specific isolation of feeding cells from early to late stages for RNA isolation, amplification, and downstream analysis. PMID:21359812

  7. Analysis of gene expression in skin using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Briana; Geyfman, Mikhail; Andersen, Bogi; Dai, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression analysis is a useful tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying skin development and homeostasis. Here we describe a method that utilizes laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate RNAs from localized areas of skin, allowing the characterization of gene expression by RT-PCR and microarray technologies. PMID:23483391

  8. Improved RNA preservation for immunolabeling and laser microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Amanda L.; Smith, Doug W.

    2009-01-01

    Microdissection techniques have the potential to allow for transcriptome analyses in specific populations of cells that are isolated from heterogeneous tissues such as the nervous system and certain cancers. Problematically, RNA is not stable under the labeling conditions usually needed to identify the cells of interest for microdissection. We have developed an immunolabeling method that utilizes a high salt buffer to stabilize RNA during prolonged antibody incubations. We first assessed RNA integrity by three methods and found that tissue incubated in high salt buffer for at least 20 h yielded RNA of similar quality to that for RNA extracted from fresh-frozen tissue, which is considered highest quality. Notably, the integrity was superior to that for RNA extracted from tissue processed using rapid immunolabeling procedures (5 min total duration). We next established that high salt buffer was compatible with immunolabeling, as demonstrated by immunofluorescent detection of dopamine neurons in the brain. Finally, we laser microdissected dopamine neurons that were immunolabeled using high salt buffer and demonstrated that RNA integrity was preserved. Our described method yields high quality RNA from immunolabeled microdissected cells, an essential requirement for meaningful genomics investigations of normal and pathological cells isolated from complex tissues. PMID:19850907

  9. [Laser microdissection in the molecular oncology of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Wernert, N

    2004-06-01

    Nearly all diseases, including prostate cancer (PCA), occur in mixed tissues with different cell types interconnected by multiple interactions. Laser microdissection permits a separate analysis of specific cell types necessary to understand tumorigenesis. Microdissection can be combined with different molecular methods for analyses at the levels of the genome, the transcriptome or the proteome. With respect to the molecular pathogenesis of PCA, normal glands can be compared to preneoplasias, and these in turn to the carcinoma. Different malignancy grades, as well as intra- and extraprostatic tumor parts, can be specifically analysed and molecular markers of aggressiveness can be identified. The molecular signatures obtained provide the basis for functional studies. New prognostic markers and therapeutic targets can be expected from such approaches in the near future. A far reaching goal is the computer representation of multiple molecular components and their interactions, "E-cell in cyberspace", in which prognostic behaviour and therapeutic responsiveness can be approximately predicted. PMID:15098090

  10. Laser Capture Microdissection as a Tool to Study Tumor Stroma.

    PubMed

    Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (or LCM) allows for isolation of cells from specific tissue compartments, which can then be followed by DNA, RNA, and/or protein isolation and downstream characterization. Unlike other methods for cell isolation, LCM can be directed towards cells situated in specific anatomical contexts, and is therefore of significant value when investigating the tumor microenvironment, where localization is often key to function. Here, we present a summary of ways in which LCM can be utilized, as well as protocols for the isolation of tumor and tumor-associated stromal elements from frozen breast cancer samples, with a focus on preparation of samples for RNA characterization. PMID:27581011

  11. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: the role for laser microdissection and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepika; Green, Jamie A; Bastacky, Sheldon; Theis, Jason D; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-02-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is increasingly recognized as a common cause of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN); however, establishing this diagnosis can be challenging. We report the case of a 58-year-old asymptomatic woman who presented with proteinuria with protein excretion of 5,000mg/d, microscopic hematuria, and normal kidney function. Kidney biopsy was consistent with MPGN pattern of injury. Immunofluorescence studies were positive for nonspecific segmental immunoglobulin M (IgM) and C3 staining. Electron microscopy showed subendothelial, subepithelial, and mesangial electron-dense deposits. The workup excluded an infectious or autoimmune disease, but IgG κ monoclonal protein was detected in serum at a concentration of 0.4mg/dL. Because there was a mismatch between the serum monoclonal protein (IgG κ) and immunofluorescence staining pattern (nonspecific IgM, no light chain restriction), laser microdissection and mass spectrometry were performed on the kidney biopsy tissue. This identified the deposits as monoclonal IgG κ, thereby leading to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy-associated MPGN. Our case emphasizes the importance of searching for an underlying cause of MPGN, reviews the technique of laser microdissection-mass spectrometry, and highlights its application as a pathology tool for the evaluation of monoclonal gammopathy-related glomerulonephritis. PMID:24145022

  12. Laser capture microdissection of gonads from juvenile zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Investigating gonadal gene expression is important in attempting to elucidate the molecular mechanism of sex determination and differentiation in the model species zebrafish. However, the small size of juvenile zebrafish and correspondingly their gonads complicates this type of investigation. Furthermore, the lack of a genetic sex marker in juvenile zebrafish prevents pooling gonads from several individuals. The aim of this study was to establish a method to isolate the gonads from individual juvenile zebrafish allowing future investigations of gonadal gene expression during sex determination and differentiation. Methods The laser capture microdissection technique enables isolation of specific cells and tissues and thereby removes the noise of gene expression from other cells or tissues in the gene expression profile. A protocol developed for laser microdissection of human gonocytes was adjusted and optimised to isolate juvenile zebrafish gonads. Results The juvenile zebrafish gonad is not morphologically distinguishable when using dehydrated cryosections on membrane slides and a specific staining method is necessary to identify the gonads. The protocol setup in this study allows staining, identification, isolation and subsequent RNA purification and amplification of gonads from individual juvenile zebrafish thereby enabling gonadal gene expression profiling. Conclusion The study presents a protocol for isolation of individual juvenile zebrafish gonads, which will enable future investigations of gonadal gene expression during the critical period of sex differentiation. Furthermore, the presented staining method is applicable to other species as it is directed towards alkaline phosphatase that is expressed in gonocytes and embryonic stem cells, which is conserved among vertebrate species. PMID:19747405

  13. Automatic detection of spermatozoa for laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Van Hoofstat, David; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter

    2009-03-01

    In sexual assault crimes, differential extraction of spermatozoa from vaginal swab smears is often ineffective, especially when only a few spermatozoa are present in an overwhelming amount of epithelial cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) enables the precise separation of spermatozoa and epithelial cells. However, standard sperm-staining techniques are non-specific and rely on sperm morphology for identification. Moreover, manual screening of the microscope slides is time-consuming and labor-intensive. Here, we describe an automated screening method to detect spermatozoa stained with Sperm HY-LITER. Different ratios of spermatozoa and epithelial cells were used to assess the automatic detection method. In addition, real postcoital samples were also screened. Detected spermatozoa were isolated using LCM and DNA analysis was performed. Robust DNA profiles without allelic dropout could be obtained from as little as 30 spermatozoa recovered from postcoital samples, showing that the staining had no significant influence on DNA recovery. PMID:18661142

  14. Laser capture microdissection: Big data from small samples

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Soma; Malhotra, Lavina; Dickerson, Ryan; Chaffee, Scott; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2015-01-01

    Any tissue is made up of a heterogeneous mix of spatially distributed cell types. In response to any (patho) physiological cue, responses of each cell type in any given tissue may be unique and cannot be homogenized across cell-types and spatial co-ordinates. For example, in response to myocardial infarction, on one hand myocytes and fibroblasts of the heart tissue respond differently. On the other hand, myocytes in the infarct core respond differently compared to those in the peri-infarct zone. Therefore, isolation of pure targeted cells is an important and essential step for the molecular analysis of cells involved say in the progression of disease. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is powerful to obtain a pure targeted cell subgroup, or even a single cell, quickly and precisely under the microscope, successfully tackling the problem of tissue heterogeneity in molecular analysis. This review presents an overview of LCM technology, the principles, advantages and limitations and its down-stream applications in the fields of proteomics, genomics and transcriptomics. With powerful technologies and appropriate applications, this technique provides unprecedented insights into cell biology from cells grown in their natural tissue habitat as opposed to those cultured in artificial petri dish conditions. PMID:25892148

  15. Laser capture microdissection in forensic research: a review

    PubMed Central

    Vandewoestyne, Mado

    2010-01-01

    In forensic sciences, short tandem repeat (STR) analysis has become the prime tool for DNA-based identification of the donor(s) of biological stains and/or traces. Many traces, however, contain cells and, hence, DNA, from more than a single individual, giving rise to mixed genotypes and the subsequent difficulties in interpreting the results. An even more challenging situation occurs when cells of a victim are much more abundant than the cells of the perpetrator. Therefore, the forensic community seeks to improve cell-separation methods in order to generate single-donor cell populations from a mixed trace in order to facilitate DNA typing and identification. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) offers a valuable tool for precise separation of specific cells. This review summarises all possible forensic applications of LCM, gives an overview of the staining and detection options, including automated detection and retrieval of cells of interest, and reviews the DNA extraction protocols compatible with LCM of cells from forensic samples. PMID:20680318

  16. Tissue Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Rabien, Anja; Kristiansen, Glen

    2016-01-01

    The new opportunities of modern assays of molecular biology can only be exploited fully if the results can be accurately correlated to the tissue phenotype under investigation. This is a general problem of non-in situ techniques, whereas results from in situ techniques are often difficult to quantify. The use of bulk tissue, which is not precisely characterized in terms of histology, has long been the basis for molecular analysis. It has, however, become apparent, that this simple approach is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of molecular alterations, which might be restricted to a specific tissue phenotype (e.g., tumor or normal tissue, stromal or epithelial cells). Microdissection is a method to provide minute amounts of histologically characterized tissues for molecular analysis with non-in situ techniques and has become an indispensable research tool. If tissue diversity is moderate and negligible, manual microdissection can be an easy and cost-efficient method of choice. In contrast, the advantage of laser microdissection is a very exact selection down to the level of a single cell, but often with a considerable time exposure to get enough material for the following analyses. The latter issue and the method of tissue preparation needed for laser microdissection are the main problems to solve if RNA, highly sensitive to degradation, shall be analyzed. This chapter focuses on optimized procedures for manual microdissection and laser microdissection to analyze RNA of malignant and nonmalignant prostate tissue. PMID:26667453

  17. Anatomy of the temporomandibular joint in the cat: a study by microdissection, cryosection and vascular injection.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Jorge; Agut, Amalia; Rodríguez, María Jesús; Sarriá, Ricardo; Latorre, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    The minute anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is of great clinical relevance in cats owing to a high number of lesions involving this articulation. However, the precise anatomy is poorly documented in textbooks and scientific articles. The aim of this study was to describe, in detail, the TMJ anatomy and its relationship with other adjacent anatomical structures in the cat. Different anatomical preparations, including vascular and articular injection, microdissection, cryosection and plastination, were performed in 12 cadaveric cats. All TMJ anatomical structures were identified and described in detail. A thorough understanding of the TMJ anatomy is essential to understand the clinical signs associated with TMJ disorders, to locate lesions precisely and to accurately interpret the results in all diagnostic imaging techniques. PMID:23015066

  18. Optimizing Frozen Sample Preparation for Laser Microdissection: Assessment of CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®.

    PubMed

    Golubeva, Yelena G; Smith, Roberta M; Sternberg, Lawrence R

    2013-01-01

    Laser microdissection is an invaluable tool in medical research that facilitates collecting specific cell populations for molecular analysis. Diversity of research targets (e.g., cancerous and precancerous lesions in clinical and animal research, cell pellets, rodent embryos, etc.) and varied scientific objectives, however, present challenges toward establishing standard laser microdissection protocols. Sample preparation is crucial for quality RNA, DNA and protein retrieval, where it often determines the feasibility of a laser microdissection project. The majority of microdissection studies in clinical and animal model research are conducted on frozen tissues containing native nucleic acids, unmodified by fixation. However, the variable morphological quality of frozen sections from tissues containing fat, collagen or delicate cell structures can limit or prevent successful harvest of the desired cell population via laser dissection. The CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®, a commercial device that improves cryosectioning outcomes on glass slides has been reported superior for slide preparation and isolation of high quality osteocyte RNA (frozen bone) during laser dissection. Considering the reported advantages of CryoJane for laser dissection on glass slides, we asked whether the system could also work with the plastic membrane slides used by UV laser based microdissection instruments, as these are better suited for collection of larger target areas. In an attempt to optimize laser microdissection slide preparation for tissues of different RNA stability and cryosectioning difficulty, we evaluated the CryoJane system for use with both glass (laser capture microdissection) and membrane (laser cutting microdissection) slides. We have established a sample preparation protocol for glass and membrane slides including manual coating of membrane slides with CryoJane solutions, cryosectioning, slide staining and dissection procedure, lysis and RNA extraction that facilitated

  19. Laser Capture Microdissection for Protein and NanoString RNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Golubeva, Yelena; Salcedo, Rosalba; Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance A.; Espina, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) allows the precise procurement of enriched cell populations from a heterogeneous tissue, or live cell culture, under direct microscopic visualization. Histologically enriched cell populations can be procured by harvesting cells of interest directly, or isolating specific cells by ablating unwanted cells. The basic components of laser microdissection technology are a) visualization of cells via light microscopy, b) transfer of laser energy to a thermolabile polymer with either the formation of a polymer-cell composite (capture method) or transfer of laser energy via an ultraviolet laser to photovolatize a region of tissue (cutting method), and c) removal of cells of interest from the heterogeneous tissue section. The capture and cutting methods (instruments) for laser microdissection differ in the manner by which cells of interest are removed from the heterogeneous sample. Laser energy in the capture method is infrared (810nm), while in the cutting mode the laser is ultraviolet (355nm). Infrared lasers melt a thermolabile polymer that adheres to the cells of interest, whereas ultraviolet lasers ablate cells for either removal of unwanted cells or excision of a defined area of cells. LCM technology is applicable to an array of applications including mass spectrometry, DNA genotyping and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis, RNA transcript profiling, cDNA library generation, proteomics discovery, and signal kinase pathway profiling. This chapter describes laser capture microdissection using an ArcturusXT instrument for protein LCM sample analysis, and using a mmi CellCut Plus® instrument for RNA analysis via NanoString technology. PMID:23027006

  20. Beyond laser microdissection technology: follow the yellow brick road for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Legres, Luc G; Janin, Anne; Masselon, Christophe; Bertheau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Normal biological tissues harbour different populations of cells with intricate spacial distribution patterns resulting in heterogeneity of their overall cellular composition. Laser microdissection involving direct viewing and expertise by a pathologist, enables access to defined cell populations or specific region on any type of tissue sample, thus selecting near-pure populations of targeted cells. It opens the way for molecular methods directed towards well-defined populations, and provides also a powerful tool in studies focused on a limited number of cells. Laser microdissection has wide applications in oncology (diagnosis and research), cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry and forensics for tissue selection, but other areas have been gradually opened up to these new methodological approaches, such as cell cultures and cytogenetics. In clinical oncology trials, molecular profiling of microdissected samples can yield global “omics” information which, together, with the morphological analysis of cells, can provide the basis for diagnosis, prognosis and patient-tailored treatments. This remarkable technology has brought new insights in the understanding of DNA, RNA, and the biological functions and regulation of proteins to identify molecular disease signatures. We review herein the different applications of laser microdissection in a variety of fields, and we particularly focus attention on the pre-analytical steps that are crucial to successfully perform molecular-level investigations. PMID:24482735

  1. A laser microdissection-based workflow for FFPE tissue microproteomics: Important considerations for small sample processing.

    PubMed

    Longuespée, Rémi; Alberts, Deborah; Pottier, Charles; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Baiwir, Dominique; Kriegsmann, Mark; Herfs, Michael; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Delvenne, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-07-15

    Proteomic methods are today widely applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for several applications in research, especially in molecular pathology. To date, there is an unmet need for the analysis of small tissue samples, such as for early cancerous lesions. Indeed, no method has yet been proposed for the reproducible processing of small FFPE tissue samples to allow biomarker discovery. In this work, we tested several procedures to process laser microdissected tissue pieces bearing less than 3000 cells. Combined with appropriate settings for liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis, a citric acid antigen retrieval (CAAR)-based procedure was established, allowing to identify more than 1400 proteins from a single microdissected breast cancer tissue biopsy. This work demonstrates important considerations concerning the handling and processing of laser microdissected tissue samples of extremely limited size, in the process opening new perspectives in molecular pathology. A proof of the proposed method for biomarker discovery, with respect to these specific handling considerations, is illustrated using the differential proteomic analysis of invasive breast carcinoma of no special type and invasive lobular triple-negative breast cancer tissues. This work will be of utmost importance for early biomarker discovery or in support of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging for microproteomics from small regions of interest. PMID:26690073

  2. Amplification of multiple genomic loci from single cells isolated by laser micro-dissection of tissues

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Harmelin, Alon; Rechavi, Gideon; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    Background Whole genome amplification (WGA) and laser assisted micro-dissection represent two recently developed technologies that can greatly advance biological and medical research. WGA allows the analysis of multiple genomic loci from a single genome and has been performed on single cells from cell suspensions and from enzymatically-digested tissues. Laser micro-dissection makes it possible to isolate specific single cells from heterogeneous tissues. Results Here we applied for the first time WGA on laser micro-dissected single cells from stained tissue sections, and developed a protocol for sequentially performing the two procedures. The combined procedure allows correlating the cell's genome with its natural morphology and precise anatomical position. From each cell we amplified 122 genomic and mitochondrial loci. In cells obtained from fresh tissue sections, 64.5% of alleles successfully amplified to ~700000 copies each, and mitochondrial DNA was amplified successfully in all cells. Multiplex PCR amplification and analysis of cells from pre-stored sections yielded significantly poorer results. Sequencing and capillary electrophoresis of WGA products allowed detection of slippage mutations in microsatellites (MS), and point mutations in P53. Conclusion Comprehensive genomic analysis of single cells from stained tissue sections opens new research opportunities for cell lineage and depth analyses, genome-wide mutation surveys, and other single cell assays. PMID:18284708

  3. Laser-assisted microdissection for real-time PCR sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Pinzani, P; Orlando, C; Pazzagli, M

    2006-01-01

    Laser-assisted microdissection (LMD) has been developed to procure precisely the cells of interest in a tissue specimen, in a rapid and practical manner. Together with real-time PCR and RT-PCR techniques, it is now feasible to study genetic alterations, gene expression features and proteins in defined cell populations from complex normal and diseased tissues. The process that brings from sample collection to the final quantitative results is articulated in several steps, each of which requires optimal choices in order to end up with high-quality nucleic acid or protein that allows successful application of the final quantitative assays. This review will describe shortly the development of LMD technologies and the principles they are based on. Trying to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of LMD, the main problems related to specimens collection and processing, section preparation and extraction of bio-molecules from microdissected tissue samples have been analysed. PMID:16480765

  4. Laser capture microdissection to identify septum-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Fischer, Reinhard; Teichert, Ines; Kück, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    To spatially resolve genetic differences at the cellular level, the laser-capture microdissection technique was developed. With this method cells can be cut from tissues with a laser beam and analyzed for DNA, RNA or protein composition. Here we adapted the technique to isolate septal microtubule-organizing center (MTOC)-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans About 3000 septa were collected and subjected to peptide fingerprinting by mass-spectrometric analysis. We identified the microtubule polymerase AlpA and found it interacts with ApsB specifically at sMTOCs, suggesting that AlpA might be involved in the assembly or the functioning of this protein complex. PMID:26951366

  5. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  6. Optimised laser microdissection of the human ocular surface epithelial regions for microarray studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The most important challenge of performing insitu transcriptional profiling of the human ocular surface epithelial regions is obtaining samples in sufficient amounts, without contamination from adjacent tissue, as the region of interest is microscopic and closely apposed to other tissues regions. We have effectively collected ocular surface (OS) epithelial tissue samples from the Limbal Epithelial Crypt (LEC), limbus, cornea and conjunctiva of post-mortem cadaver eyes with laser microdissection (LMD) technique for gene expression studies with spotted oligonucleotide microarrays and Gene 1.0 ST arrays. Methods Human donor eyes (4 pairs for spotted oligonucleotide microarrays, 3 pairs for Gene 1.0 ST arrays) consented for research were included in this study with due ethical approval of the Nottingham Research Ethics Committee. Eye retrieval was performed within 36 hours of post-mortem period. The dissected corneoscleral buttons were immersed in OCT media and frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at −80°C till further use. Microscopic tissue sections of interest were taken on PALM slides and stained with Toluidine Blue for laser microdissection with PALM microbeam systems. Optimisation of the laser microdissection technique was crucial for efficient and cost effective sample collection. Results The starting concentration of RNA as stipulated by the protocol of microarray platforms was taken as the cut-off concentration of RNA samples in our studies. The area of LMD tissue processed for spotted oligonucleotide microarray study ranged from 86,253 μm2 in LEC to 392,887 μm2 in LEC stroma. The RNA concentration of the LMD samples ranged from 22 to 92 pg/μl. The recommended starting concentration of the RNA samples used for Gene 1.0 ST arrays was 6 ng/5 μl. To achieve the desired RNA concentration the area of ocular surface epithelial tissue sample processed for the Gene 1.0 ST array experiments was approximately 100,0000 μm2 to 130,0000 μm2. RNA

  7. Tissue-specific laser microdissection of the Brassica napus funiculus improves gene discovery and spatial identification of biological processes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ainsley C; Khan, Deirdre; Girard, Ian J; Becker, Michael G; Millar, Jenna L; Sytnik, David; Belmonte, Mark F

    2016-05-01

    The three primary tissue systems of the funiculus each undergo unique developmental programs to support the growth and development of the filial seed. To understand the underlying transcriptional mechanisms that orchestrate development of the funiculus at the globular embryonic stage of seed development, we used laser microdissection coupled with RNA-sequencing to produce a high-resolution dataset of the mRNAs present in the epidermis, cortex, and vasculature of the Brassica napus (canola) funiculus. We identified 7761 additional genes in these tissues compared with the whole funiculus organ alone using this technology. Differential expression and enrichment analyses were used to identify several biological processes associated with each tissue system. Our data show that cell wall modification and lipid metabolism are prominent in the epidermis, cell growth and modification occur in the cortex, and vascular tissue proliferation and differentiation occur in the central vascular strand. We provide further evidence that each of the three tissue systems of the globular stage funiculus are involved in specific biological processes that all co-ordinate to support seed development. The identification of genes and gene regulators responsible for tissue-specific developmental processes of the canola funiculus now serves as a valuable resource for seed improvement research. PMID:27194740

  8. Tissue-specific laser microdissection of the Brassica napus funiculus improves gene discovery and spatial identification of biological processes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ainsley C.; Khan, Deirdre; Girard, Ian J.; Becker, Michael G.; Millar, Jenna L.; Sytnik, David; Belmonte, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    The three primary tissue systems of the funiculus each undergo unique developmental programs to support the growth and development of the filial seed. To understand the underlying transcriptional mechanisms that orchestrate development of the funiculus at the globular embryonic stage of seed development, we used laser microdissection coupled with RNA-sequencing to produce a high-resolution dataset of the mRNAs present in the epidermis, cortex, and vasculature of the Brassica napus (canola) funiculus. We identified 7761 additional genes in these tissues compared with the whole funiculus organ alone using this technology. Differential expression and enrichment analyses were used to identify several biological processes associated with each tissue system. Our data show that cell wall modification and lipid metabolism are prominent in the epidermis, cell growth and modification occur in the cortex, and vascular tissue proliferation and differentiation occur in the central vascular strand. We provide further evidence that each of the three tissue systems of the globular stage funiculus are involved in specific biological processes that all co-ordinate to support seed development. The identification of genes and gene regulators responsible for tissue-specific developmental processes of the canola funiculus now serves as a valuable resource for seed improvement research. PMID:27194740

  9. Laser Microdissection of Grapevine Leaves Reveals Site-Specific Regulation of Transcriptional Response to Plasmopara viticola.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Luisa; Caruso, Carla; Bianchedi, Pier Luigi; Pertot, Ilaria; Perazzolli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine is one of the most important fruit crops in the world, and it is highly susceptible to downy mildew caused by the biotrophic oomycete Plasmopara viticola. Gene expression profiling has been used extensively to investigate the regulation processes of grapevine-P. viticola interaction, but all studies to date have involved the use of whole leaves. However, only a small fraction of host cells is in contact with the pathogen, so highly localized transcriptional changes of infected cells may be masked by the large portion of non-infected cells when analyzing the whole leaf. In order to understand the transcriptional regulation of the plant reaction at the sites of pathogen infection, we optimized a laser microdissection protocol and analyzed the transcriptional changes in stomata cells and surrounding areas of grapevine leaves at early stages of P. viticola infection. The results indicate that the expression levels of seven P. viticola-responsive genes were greater in microdissected cells than in whole leaves, highlighting the site-specific transcriptional regulation of the host response. The gene modulation was restricted to the stomata cells and to the surrounding areas of infected tissues, indicating that the host response is mainly located at the infection sites and that short-distance signals are implicated. In addition, due to the high sensitivity of the laser microdissection technique, significant modulations of three genes that were completely masked in the whole tissue analysis were detected. The protocol validated in this study could greatly increase the sensitivity of further transcriptomic studies of the grapevine-P. viticola interaction. PMID:26546320

  10. Improved protocol for laser microdissection of human pancreatic islets from surgical specimens.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Dorothée; Marselli, Lorella; Ehehalt, Florian; Richter, Daniela; Distler, Marius; Kersting, Stephan; Grützmann, Robert; Bokvist, Krister; Froguel, Philippe; Liechti, Robin; Jörns, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Baretton, Gustavo Bruno; Saeger, Hans-Detlev; Schulte, Anke M; Marchetti, Piero; Solimena, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Laser microdissection (LMD) is a technique that allows the recovery of selected cells and tissues from minute amounts of parenchyma. The dissected cells can be used for a variety of investigations, such as transcriptomic or proteomic studies, DNA assessment or chromosomal analysis. An especially challenging application of LMD is transcriptome analysis, which, due to the lability of RNA, can be particularly prominent when cells are dissected from tissues that are rich of RNases, such as the pancreas. A microdissection protocol that enables fast identification and collection of target cells is essential in this setting in order to shorten the tissue handling time and, consequently, to ensure RNA preservation. Here we describe a protocol for acquiring human pancreatic beta cells from surgical specimens to be used for transcriptomic studies. Small pieces of pancreas of about 0.5-1 cm(3) were cut from the healthy appearing margins of resected pancreas specimens, embedded in Tissue-Tek O.C.T. Compound, immediately frozen in chilled 2-Methylbutane, and stored at -80 °C until sectioning. Forty serial sections of 10 μm thickness were cut on a cryostat under a -20 °C setting, transferred individually to glass slides, dried inside the cryostat for 1-2 min, and stored at -80 °C. Immediately before the laser microdissection procedure, sections were fixed in ice cold, freshly prepared 70% ethanol for 30 sec, washed by 5-6 dips in ice cold DEPC-treated water, and dehydrated by two one-minute incubations in ice cold 100% ethanol followed by xylene (which is used for tissue dehydration) for 4 min; tissue sections were then air-dried afterwards for 3-5 min. Importantly, all steps, except the incubation in xylene, were performed using ice-cold reagents - a modification over a previously described protocol. utilization of ice cold reagents resulted in a pronounced increase of the intrinsic autofluorescence of beta cells, and facilitated their recognition. For microdissection, four

  11. IgD Heavy-Chain Deposition Disease: Detection by Laser Microdissection and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Virginie; Quint, Patrick; Leblanc, Martine; LeBlanc, Richard; Duncanson, Garrett F.; Perrizo, Robert L.; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Kurtin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal Ig deposition disease (MIDD) is a rare complication of monoclonal gammopathy characterized by deposition of monoclonal Ig light chains and/or heavy chains along the glomerular and tubular basement membranes. Here, we describe a unique case of IgD deposition disease. IgD deposition is difficult to diagnose, because routine immunofluorescence does not detect IgD. A 77-year-old man presented with proteinuria and renal failure, and kidney biopsy analysis showed a nodular sclerosing GN with extensive focal global glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Immunofluorescence was negative for Ig deposits, although electron microscopy showed deposits in the glomeruli and along tubular basement membranes. Laser microdissection of glomeruli and mass spectrometry of extracted peptides showed a large spectra number for IgD, and immunohistochemistry showed intense glomerular and tubular staining for IgD. Together, these findings are consistent with IgD deposition disease. Bone marrow biopsy analysis showed 5% plasma cells, which stained for IgD. The patient was treated with bortezomib and dexamethasone, which resulted in improvement of hematologic parameters but no improvement of renal function. The diagnosis of IgD deposition disease underscores the value of laser microdissection and mass spectrometry in further evaluating renal biopsies when routine assessment fails to reach an accurate diagnosis. PMID:25194005

  12. Laser microdissection and DNA typing of cells from single hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, D; Giuffrè, G; Staiti, N; Simone, A; Todaro, P; Saravo, L

    2004-12-01

    Isolation and identification of single cells from tissue samples or smears assume a great relevance in pathological and forensic applications; in this latter field, the possibility to identify a specific genetic profile can be obtained by short tandem repeat (STR) typing, allowing to achieve a scientific proof important in law courts. It is well known that DNA extraction may be performed from several tissue fragments, blood traces, spermatozoa as well as telogen hair. However, in the last case, few follicle cells are coupled to a great amount of keratin reducing the efficiency of DNA amplification. Recently, the introduction of laser microdissection technique has greatly improved the capability to select single cells without any cross-contamination. In the present report, we have performed a laser microdissection using a Leica AS LMD (Leica Microsystems, Germany), utilized on cutting the telogen hair in order to exclusively collect the lower part of the follicle and reduce keratin contamination. In this way we can accurately extract an adequate amount of DNA, successfully typed by STR profile. PMID:15639565

  13. Cell-Type-Specific Genome-wide Expression Profiling after Laser Capture Microdissection of Living Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Manohar, C F

    2005-02-09

    The purpose of this technical feasibility study was to develop and evaluate robust microgenomic tools for investigations of genome-wide expression of very small numbers of cells isolated from whole tissue sections. Tissues contain large numbers of cell-types that play varied roles in organ function and responses to endogenous and exogenous toxicants whether bacterial, viral, chemical or radiation. Expression studies of whole tissue biopsy are severely limited because heterogeneous cell-types result in an averaging of molecular signals masking subtle but important changes in gene expression in any one cell type(s) or group of cells. Accurate gene expression analysis requires the study of specific cell types in their tissue environment but without contamination from surrounding cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technology to isolate morphologically distinct cells from tissue sections. Alternative methods are available for isolating single cells but not yet for their reliable genome-wide expression analyses. The tasks of this feasibility project were to: (1) Develop efficient protocols for laser capture microdissection of cells from tissues identified by antibody label, or morphological stain. (2) Develop reproducible gene-transcript analyses techniques for single cell-types and determine the numbers of cells needed for reliable genome-wide analyses. (3) Validate the technology for epithelial and endothelial cells isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

  14. Laser capture microdissection in Ectocarpus siliculosus: the pathway to cell-specific transcriptomics in brown algae.

    PubMed

    Saint-Marcoux, Denis; Billoud, Bernard; Langdale, Jane A; Charrier, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) facilitates the isolation of individual cells from tissue sections, and when combined with RNA amplification techniques, it is an extremely powerful tool for examining genome-wide expression profiles in specific cell-types. LCM has been widely used to address various biological questions in both animal and plant systems, however, no attempt has been made so far to transfer LCM technology to macroalgae. Macroalgae are a collection of widespread eukaryotes living in fresh and marine water. In line with the collective effort to promote molecular investigations of macroalgal biology, here we demonstrate the feasibility of using LCM and cell-specific transcriptomics to study development of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus. We describe a workflow comprising cultivation and fixation of algae on glass slides, laser microdissection, and RNA amplification. To illustrate the effectiveness of the procedure, we show qPCR data and metrics obtained from cell-specific transcriptomes generated from both upright and prostrate filaments of Ectocarpus. PMID:25713580

  15. Laser capture microdissection in Ectocarpus siliculosus: the pathway to cell-specific transcriptomics in brown algae

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Marcoux, Denis; Billoud, Bernard; Langdale, Jane A.; Charrier, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) facilitates the isolation of individual cells from tissue sections, and when combined with RNA amplification techniques, it is an extremely powerful tool for examining genome-wide expression profiles in specific cell-types. LCM has been widely used to address various biological questions in both animal and plant systems, however, no attempt has been made so far to transfer LCM technology to macroalgae. Macroalgae are a collection of widespread eukaryotes living in fresh and marine water. In line with the collective effort to promote molecular investigations of macroalgal biology, here we demonstrate the feasibility of using LCM and cell-specific transcriptomics to study development of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus. We describe a workflow comprising cultivation and fixation of algae on glass slides, laser microdissection, and RNA amplification. To illustrate the effectiveness of the procedure, we show qPCR data and metrics obtained from cell-specific transcriptomes generated from both upright and prostrate filaments of Ectocarpus. PMID:25713580

  16. Gene expression in a pure population of odontoblasts isolated by laser-capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, M; Olson, K; Cavender, A; Pasqualini, R; Gaikwad, J; D'Souza, R N

    2001-11-01

    Studies of odontoblast differentiation and function have been limited due to difficulties in obtaining sufficient numbers of intact cells. We describe a novel approach of laser-capture microdissection to obtain homogenous populations of pre-odontoblasts and odontoblasts from tissue sections of mouse molar cusp tips. Fixation, processing, and staining conditions were assessed for the optimal retrieval of total RNA from microdissected odontoblasts. Fluorometric assays and RT-PCR analysis of alpha1(I) collagen, dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp), and osteocalcin (OC) confirmed that the total RNA from three-day-old captured odontoblasts was sufficient in quantity and quality. Odontoblast-specific gene expression was studied by RT-PCR analysis performed in a single streptavidin-coated tube. At E15.5, Days 0 and 3, gene expression in laser-captured odontoblasts resembled that seen in vivo by in situ hybridization. The use of LCM is thus a valuable means of retrieving quality RNA from discrete populations of odontoblasts at different stages of dentinogenesis. PMID:11759003

  17. Gene Expression of Purified β-Cell Tissue Obtained from Human Pancreas with Laser Capture Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Marselli, Lorella; Thorne, Jeffrey; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Omer, Abdulkadir; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Libermann, Towia; Otu, Hasan H.; Sharma, Arun; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Human β-cell gene profiling is a powerful tool for understanding β-cell biology in normal and pathological conditions. Assessment is complicated when isolated islets are studied because of contamination by non-β-cells and the trauma of the isolation procedure. Objective: The objective was to use laser capture microdissection (LCM) of human β-cells from pancreases of cadaver donors and compare their gene expression with that of handpicked isolated islets. Design: Endogenous autofluorescence of β-cells facilitated procurement of purified β-cell tissue from frozen pancreatic sections with LCM. Gene expression profiles of three microdissected β-cell samples and three isolated islet preparations were obtained. The array data were normalized using DNA-Chip Analyzer software (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA), and the lower confidence bound evaluated differentially expressed genes. Real-time PCR was performed on selected acinar genes and on the duct cell markers, carbonic anhydrase II and keratin 19. Results: Endogenous autofluorescence facilitates the microdissection of β-cell rich tissue in human pancreas. When compared with array profiles of purified β-cell tissue, with lower confidence bound set at 1.2, there were 4560 genes up-regulated and 1226 genes down-regulated in the isolated islets. Among the genes up-regulated in isolated islets were pancreatic acinar and duct genes, chemokine genes, and genes associated with hypoxia, apoptosis, and stress. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of acinar gene transcripts and the duct marker carbonic anhydrase II in isolated islets. Conclusion: LCM makes it possible to obtain β-cell enriched tissue from human pancreas sections without the trauma and ischemia of islet isolation. PMID:18073315

  18. Age-related gene expression analysis in enteric ganglia of human colon after laser microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Hetz, Susan; Acikgoez, Ali; Moll, Corinna; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg; Robitzki, Andrea A.; Metzger, Roman; Metzger, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) poses the intrinsic innervation of the gastrointestinal tract and plays a critical role for all stages of postnatal life. There is increasing scientific and clinical interest in acquired or age-related gastrointestinal dysfunctions that can be manifested in diseases such as gut constipation or fecal incontinence. In this study, we sought to analyze age-dependent changes in the gene expression profile of the human ENS, particularly in the myenteric plexus. Therefore, we used the laser microdissection technique which has been proven as a feasible tool to analyze distinct cell populations within heterogeneously composed tissues. Full biopsy gut samples were prepared from children (4–12 months), middle aged (48–58 years) and aged donors (70–95 years). Cryosections were histologically stained with H&E, the ganglia of the myenteric plexus identified and RNA isolated using laser microdissection technique. Quantitative PCR was performed for selected neural genes, neurotransmitters and receptors. Data were confirmed on protein level using NADPH-diaphorase staining and immunohistochemistry. As result, we demonstrate age-associated alterations in site-specific gene expression pattern of the ENS. Thus, in the adult and aged distal parts of the colon a marked decrease in relative gene expression of neural key genes like NGFR, RET, NOS1 and a concurrent increase of CHAT were observed. Further, we detected notable regional differences of RET, CHAT, TH, and S100B comparing gene expression in aged proximal and distal colon. Interestingly, markers indicating cellular senescence or oxidative stress (SNCA, CASP3, CAT, SOD2, and TERT) were largely unchanged within the ENS. For the first time, our study also describes the age-dependent expression pattern of all major sodium channels within the ENS. Our results are in line with previous studies showing spatio-temporal differences within the mammalian ENS. PMID:25360110

  19. Subtissue-Specific Evaluation of Promoter Efficiency by Quantitative Fluorometric Assay in Laser Microdissected Tissues of Rapeseed[W

    PubMed Central

    Jasik, Jan; Schiebold, Silke; Rolletschek, Hardy; Denolf, Peter; Van Adenhove, Katrien; Altmann, Thomas; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2011-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase (GUS) is a useful reporter for the evaluation of promoter characteristics in transgenic plants. Here, we introduce an original technique to quantify the strength of promoters at subtissue resolution of cell clusters. The method combines cryotomy, laser microdissection, and improved fluorometric analysis of GUS activity using 6-chloro-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide as an efficient fluorogenic substrate for kinetic studies in plants. The laser microdissection/6-chloro-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide method is robust and reliable in a wide range of GUS expression levels and requires extremely low (few cells) tissue amounts. Suitability of the assay was demonstrated on rapeseed (Brassica napus) plants transformed with a P35S2::GUS construct. GUS expression patterns were visualized and quantified in approximately 30 tissues of vegetative and generative organs. Considerable differences in promoter activity within the tissues are discussed in relation to the cell type and developmental state. PMID:21825109

  20. Identification of Site-Specific Stroke Biomarker Candidates by Laser Capture Microdissection and Labeled Reference Peptide.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tingting; Qu, Daixin; Zhao, Xu; Yu, Lixia; Gao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The search to date for accurate protein biomarkers in acute ischemic stroke has taken into consideration the stage and/or the size of infarction, but has not accounted for the site of stroke. In the present study, multiple reaction monitoring using labeled reference peptide (LRP) following laser capture microdissection (LCM) is used to identify site-specific protein biomarker candidates. In middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat models, both intact and infarcted brain tissue was collected by LCM, followed by on-film digestion and semi-quantification using triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Thirty-four unique peptides were detected for the verification of 12 proteins in both tissue homogenates and LCM-captured samples. Six insoluble proteins, including neurofilament light polypeptide (NEFL), alpha-internexin (INA), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), myelin basic protein (MBP), myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) and 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP), were found to be site-specific. Soluble proteins, such as neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1), and some insoluble proteins, including neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and tubulin β-3 chain (TUBB3), were found to be evenly distributed in the brain. Therefore, we conclude that some insoluble protein biomarkers for stroke are site-specific, and would make excellent candidates for the design and analysis of relevant clinical studies in the future. PMID:26110384

  1. Identification of Site-Specific Stroke Biomarker Candidates by Laser Capture Microdissection and Labeled Reference Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Tingting; Qu, Daixin; Zhao, Xu; Yu, Lixia; Gao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The search to date for accurate protein biomarkers in acute ischemic stroke has taken into consideration the stage and/or the size of infarction, but has not accounted for the site of stroke. In the present study, multiple reaction monitoring using labeled reference peptide (LRP) following laser capture microdissection (LCM) is used to identify site-specific protein biomarker candidates. In middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat models, both intact and infarcted brain tissue was collected by LCM, followed by on-film digestion and semi-quantification using triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Thirty-four unique peptides were detected for the verification of 12 proteins in both tissue homogenates and LCM-captured samples. Six insoluble proteins, including neurofilament light polypeptide (NEFL), alpha-internexin (INA), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), myelin basic protein (MBP), myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) and 2′,3′-cyclic-nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNP), were found to be site-specific. Soluble proteins, such as neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1), and some insoluble proteins, including neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and tubulin β-3 chain (TUBB3), were found to be evenly distributed in the brain. Therefore, we conclude that some insoluble protein biomarkers for stroke are site-specific, and would make excellent candidates for the design and analysis of relevant clinical studies in the future. PMID:26110384

  2. Laser-capture microdissection of hyperlipidemic/ApoE⁻/⁻ mouse aorta atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Beer, Michael; Doepping, Sandra; Hildner, Markus; Weber, Gabriele; Grabner, Rolf; Hu, Desheng; Mohanta, Sarajo Kumar; Srikakulapu, Prasad; Weih, Falk; Habenicht, Andreas J R

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a transmural chronic inflammatory condition of small and large arteries that is associated with adaptive immune responses at all disease stages. However, impacts of adaptive immune reactions on clinically apparent atherosclerosis such as intima lesion (plaque) rupture, thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and aneurysm largely remain to be identified. It is increasingly recognized that leukocyte infiltrates in plaque, media, and adventitia are distinct but that their specific roles have not been defined. To map these infiltrates, we employed laser-capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate the three arterial wall laminae using apoE⁻/⁻ mouse aorta as a model. RNA from LCM-separated tissues was extracted and large-scale, whole-genome expression microarrays were prepared. We observed that the quality of the resulting gene expression maps was compromised by tissue RNA carried over from adjacent laminae during LCM. To account for these flaws, we established quality controls and algorithms to improve the predictive power of LCM-derived microarray data. Our approach creates robust transcriptome atlases of normal and atherosclerotic aorta. Assessing LCM transcriptomes for immunity-related mRNAs indicated markedly distinctive gene expression patterns in the three laminae of the atherosclerotic aorta. These mouse mRNA expression data banks can now be mined to address a wide range of questions in cardiovascular biology. PMID:21761324

  3. Optimization of spermatozoa detection using immunofluorescent staining and laser micro-dissection.

    PubMed

    Ping, Yueh Shyang; Chan, Xavier Liang Shun; Goh, Sze Kae; Syn, Christopher Kiu Choong

    2015-10-01

    The present study evaluated the use of an immunofluorescence-based assay for the microscopic detection of human spermatozoa, following which the fluorescence-labelled spermatozoa could be excised with a laser micro-dissection system. The Sperm Hy-Liter™ PI kit was able to detect spermatozoa from as little as 20nL of semen. No interference or non-specificity were observed when the kit was used on semen mixed with various body fluids such as blood and urine, as well as when semen was spiked onto different types of fabric. Good results could also be obtained with rectal samples which contain auto-fluorescent fecal materials through the use of dual FITC/PI filters. We also developed a method for concurrent testing of two protein biomarkers of semen (semenogelin and prostate-specific antigen) and detection of spermatozoa. This approach would maximize the evidential value from a single piece of sexual assault exhibit. The results also showed that staining by Sperm Hy-Liter™ PI does not interfere with DNA recovery, facilitating the generation of clear male DNA profiles from dissected spermatozoa, thereby making profile interpretation less complex. In summary, Sperm Hy-Liter™ PI staining was demonstrated to be sensitive, robust and specific. PMID:26338669

  4. The advantage of laser-capture microdissection over whole tissue analysis in proteomic profiling studies.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Tommaso; Braakman, Rene B H; Stingl, Christoph; van Duijn, Martijn M; Smid, Marcel; Foekens, John A; Luider, Theo M; Martens, John W M; Umar, Arzu

    2016-05-01

    Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) offers a reliable cell population enrichment tool and has been successfully coupled to MS analysis. Despite this, most proteomic studies employ whole tissue lysate (WTL) analysis in the discovery of disease biomarkers and in profiling analyses. Furthermore, the influence of tissue heterogeneity in WTL analysis, nor its impact in biomarker discovery studies have been completely elucidated. In order to address this, we compared previously obtained high resolution MS data from a cohort of 38 breast cancer tissues, of which both LCM enriched tumor epithelial cells and WTL samples were analyzed. Label-free quantification (LFQ) analysis through MaxQuant software showed a significantly higher number of identified and quantified proteins in LCM enriched samples (3404) compared to WTLs (2837). Furthermore, WTL samples displayed a higher amount of missing data compared to LCM both at peptide and protein levels (p-value < 0.001). 2D analysis on co-expressed proteins revealed discrepant expression of immune system and lipid metabolisms related proteins between LCM and WTL samples. We hereby show that LCM better dissected the biology of breast tumor epithelial cells, possibly due to lower interference from surrounding tissues and highly abundant proteins. All data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD002381 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002381). PMID:27030549

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis using samples obtained with laser microdissection and saturation dye labelling.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kate E; Marouga, Rita; Prime, John E; Pashby, D Paul; Orange, Paul R; Crosier, Steven; Keith, Alexander B; Lathe, Richard; Mullins, John; Estibeiro, Peter; Bergling, Helene; Hawkins, Edward; Morris, Christopher M

    2005-10-01

    Comparative proteomic methods are rapidly being applied to many different biological systems including complex tissues. One pitfall of these methods is that in some cases, such as oncology and neuroscience, tissue complexity requires isolation of specific cell types and sample is limited. Laser microdissection (LMD) is commonly used for obtaining such samples for proteomic studies. We have combined LMD with sensitive thiol-reactive saturation dye labelling of protein samples and 2-D DIGE to identify protein changes in a test system, the isolated CA1 pyramidal neurone layer of a transgenic (Tg) rat carrying a human amyloid precursor protein transgene. Saturation dye labelling proved to be extremely sensitive with a spot map of over 5,000 proteins being readily produced from 5 mug total protein, with over 100 proteins being significantly altered at p < 0.0005. Of the proteins identified, all showed coherent changes associated with transgene expression. It was, however, difficult to identify significantly different proteins using PMF and MALDI-TOF on gels containing less than 500 mug total protein. The use of saturation dye labelling of limiting samples will therefore require the use of highly sensitive MS techniques to identify the significantly altered proteins isolated using methods such as LMD. PMID:16145713

  6. Recovery of high-quality RNA from laser capture microdissected human and rodent pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Alexandra E.; Matveyenko, Aleksey V.; Kirakossian, David; Park, Johanna; Gurlo, Tatyana; Butler, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a powerful method to isolate specific populations of cells for subsequent analysis such as gene expression profiling, for example, microarrays or ribonucleic (RNA)-Seq. This technique has been applied to frozen as well as formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens with variable outcomes regarding quality and quantity of extracted RNA. The goal of the study was to develop the methods to isolate high-quality RNA from islets of Langerhans and pancreatic duct glands (PDG) isolated by LCM. We report an optimized protocol for frozen sections to minimize RNA degradation and maximize recovery of expected transcripts from the samples using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) by adding RNase inhibitors at multiple steps during the experiment. This technique reproducibly delivered intact RNA (RIN values 6–7). Using quantitative RT-PCR, the expected profiles of insulin, glucagon, mucin6 (Muc6), and cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) mRNA in PDGs and pancreatic islets were detected. The described experimental protocol for frozen pancreas tissue might also be useful for other tissues with moderate to high levels of intrinsic ribonuclease (RNase) activity. PMID:27231405

  7. Gene expression profiling of reproductive meristem types in early rice inflorescences by laser microdissection.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Thomas W R; Ud Din, Israr; Gregis, Veronica; Osnato, Michela; Jouannic, Stefan; Adam, Hélène; Kater, Martin M

    2016-04-01

    In rice, inflorescence architecture is established at early stages of reproductive development and contributes directly to grain yield potential. After induction of flowering, the complexity of branching, and therefore the number of seeds on the panicle, is determined by the activity of different meristem types and the timing of transitions between them. Although some of the genes involved in these transitions have been identified, an understanding of the network of transcriptional regulators controlling this process is lacking. To address this we used a precise laser microdissection and RNA-sequencing approach in Oryza sativa ssp. japonica cv. Nipponbare to produce quantitative data that describe the landscape of gene expression in four different meristem types: the rachis meristem, the primary branch meristem, the elongating primary branch meristem (including axillary meristems), and the spikelet meristem. A switch in expression profile between apical and axillary meristem types followed by more gradual changes during transitions in axillary meristem identity was observed, and several genes potentially involved in branching were identified. This resource will be vital for a mechanistic understanding of the link between inflorescence development and grain yield. PMID:26932536

  8. Laser Microdissection of the Alveolar Duct Enables Single-Cell Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert D.; Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Belle, Janeil M.; Wagner, Willi L.; Konerding, Moritz A.; Blainey, Paul C.; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Complex tissues such as the lung are composed of structural hierarchies such as alveoli, alveolar ducts, and lobules. Some structural units, such as the alveolar duct, appear to participate in tissue repair as well as the development of bronchioalveolar carcinoma. Here, we demonstrate an approach to conduct laser microdissection of the lung alveolar duct for single-cell PCR analysis. Our approach involved three steps. (1) The initial preparation used mechanical sectioning of the lung tissue with sufficient thickness to encompass the structure of interest. In the case of the alveolar duct, the precision-cut lung slices were 200 μm thick; the slices were processed using near-physiologic conditions to preserve the state of viable cells. (2) The lung slices were examined by transmission light microscopy to target the alveolar duct. The air-filled lung was sufficiently accessible by light microscopy that counterstains or fluorescent labels were unnecessary to identify the alveolar duct. (3) The enzymatic and microfluidic isolation of single cells allowed for the harvest of as few as several thousand cells for PCR analysis. Microfluidics based arrays were used to measure the expression of selected marker genes in individual cells to characterize different cell populations. Preliminary work suggests the unique value of this approach to understand the intra- and intercellular interactions within the regenerating alveolar duct. PMID:25309876

  9. Feasibilty of exterior vascular laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong; Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Li, Buhong; Chen, Yanjiao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chen, Huifang; Xia, Xiangnan; Lin, Aizhen

    1998-08-01

    In order to study the exterior vascular laser irradiation therapy for replacing the intravascular laser irradiation therapy, we measure the distribution of radiant fluence rate in exterior vascular laser irradiation in vivo and imitative intravascular laser irradiation. The result shows that the average radiant fluence rate of exterior vascular and intravascular is 1.11 and 10.81 respectively, which is ten times between them. In order to get the radiant fluence rate corresponding to the intravascular laser irradiation, we suggest that about 20 mW HeNe laser could be used in exterior vascular laser irradiation therapy, and the laser must irradiate on the vascular perpendicularly. The suitable patient with exposed vascular must be chosen, and the diameter of the irradiated vascular is about 6 mm. Our experiment result, especially the data measured in vivo, will be useful for the research of light transport in human tissue.

  10. FAST-FISH with laser beam microdissected DOP-PCR probe distinguishes the sex chromosomes of Silene latifolia.

    PubMed

    Hobza, Roman; Lengerova, Martina; Cernohorska, Halina; Rubes, Jiri; Vyskot, Boris

    2004-01-01

    We present an improved FISH strategy for differentiating the sex chromosomes of the dioecious model plant, Silene latifolia. Fixed mitotic protoplasts were dropped on a polyethylene naphthalate membrane, the X or Y chromosomes were isolated using nitrogen laser beam microdissection, catapulted by laser pressure, and amplified by DOP-PCR. A modified FAST-FISH protocol based on a short hybridization time combined with a low concentration of probe was used. The success of this approach is demonstrated by the differential labeling of the X and Y chromosomes and it could represent a quick method for comparing organization of plant genomes. PMID:15125638

  11. Laser Capture Microdissection of Embryonic Cells and Preparation of RNA for Microarray Assays

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Latasha C.; Pang, Christopher J.; Dumur, Catherine; Haar, Jack L.; Lloyd, Joyce A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to compare the global gene expression profiles of different embryonic cell types, it is first necessary to isolate the specific cells of interest. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a step-by-step protocol to perform laser capture microdissection (LCM) on embryo samples and obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for microarray hybridizations. Using the LCM/microarray strategy on mouse embryo samples has some challenges, because the cells of interest are available in limited quantities. The first step in the protocol is to obtain embryonic tissue, and immediately cryoprotect and freeze it in a cryomold containing Optimal Cutting Temperature freezing media (Sakura Finetek), using a dry ice–isopentane bath. The tissue is then cryosectioned, and the microscope slides are processed to fix, stain, and dehydrate the cells. LCM is employed to isolate specific cell types from the slides, identified under the microscope by virtue of their morphology. Detailed protocols are provided for using the currently available ArcturusXT LCM instrument and CapSure® LCM Caps, to which the selected cells adhere upon laser capture. To maintain RNA integrity, upon removing a slide from the final processing step, or attaching the first cells on the LCM cap, LCM is completed within 20 min. The cells are then immediately recovered from the LCM cap using a denaturing solution that stabilizes RNA integrity. RNA is prepared using standard methods, modified for working with small samples. To ensure the validity of the microarray data, the quality of the RNA is assessed using the Agilent bioanalyzer. Only RNA that is of sufficient integrity and quantity is used to perform microarray assays. This chapter provides guidance regarding troubleshooting and optimization to obtain high-quality RNA from cells of limited availability, obtained from embryo samples by LCM. PMID:24318813

  12. Tissue-specific transcriptome profiling of the citrus fruit epidermis and subepidermis using laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Matas, Antonio J.; Agustí, Javier; Tadeo, Francisco R.; Talón, Manuel; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.

    2010-01-01

    Most studies of the biochemical and regulatory pathways that are associated with, and control, fruit expansion and ripening are based on homogenized bulk tissues, and do not take into consideration the multiplicity of different cell types from which the analytes, be they transcripts, proteins or metabolites, are extracted. Consequently, potentially valuable spatial information is lost and the lower abundance cellular components that are expressed only in certain cell types can be diluted below the level of detection. In this study, laser microdissection (LMD) was used to isolate epidermal and subepidermal cells from green, expanding Citrus clementina fruit and their transcriptomes were compared using a 20k citrus cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. The results show striking differences in gene expression profiles between the two cell types, revealing specific metabolic pathways that can be related to their respective organelle composition and cell wall specialization. Microscopy provided additional evidence of tissue specialization that could be associated with the transcript profiles with distinct differences in organelle and metabolite accumulation. Subepidermis predominant genes are primarily involved in photosynthesis- and energy-related processes, as well as cell wall biosynthesis and restructuring. By contrast, the most epidermis predominant genes are related to the biosynthesis of the cuticle, flavonoids, and defence responses. Furthermore, the epidermis transcript profile showed a high proportion of genes with no known function, supporting the original hypothesis that analysis at the tissue/cell specific levels can promote gene discovery and lead to a better understanding of the specialized contribution of each tissue to fruit physiology. PMID:20519339

  13. Microarray Cluster Analysis of Irradiated Growth Plate Zones Following Laser Microdissection

    SciTech Connect

    Damron, Timothy A. Zhang Mingliang; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Middleton, Frank A.; Horton, Jason A.; Margulies, Bryan M.; Strauss, Judith A.; Farnum, Cornelia E.; Spadaro, Joseph A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Genes and pathways involved in early growth plate chondrocyte recovery after fractionated irradiation were sought as potential targets for selective radiorecovery modulation. Materials and Methods: Three groups of six 5-week male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent fractionated irradiation to the right tibiae over 5 days, totaling 17.5 Gy, and then were killed at 7, 11, and 16 days after the first radiotherapy fraction. The growth plates were collected from the proximal tibiae bilaterally and subsequently underwent laser microdissection to separate reserve, perichondral, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones. Differential gene expression was analyzed between irradiated right and nonirradiated left tibia using RAE230 2.0 GeneChip microarray, compared between zones and time points and subjected to functional pathway cluster analysis with real-time polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected results. Results: Each zone had a number of pathways showing enrichment after the pattern of hypothesized importance to growth plate recovery, yet few met the strictest criteria. The proliferative and hypertrophic zones showed both the greatest number of genes with a 10-fold right/left change at 7 days after initiation of irradiation and enrichment of the most functional pathways involved in bone, cartilage, matrix, or skeletal development. Six genes confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction to have early upregulation included insulin-like growth factor 2, procollagen type I alpha 2, matrix metallopeptidase 9, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, fibromodulin, and aggrecan 1. Conclusions: Nine overlapping pathways in the proliferative and hypertrophic zones (skeletal development, ossification, bone remodeling, cartilage development, extracellular matrix structural constituent, proteinaceous extracellular matrix, collagen, extracellular matrix, and extracellular matrix part) may play key roles in early growth plate radiorecovery.

  14. Laser-assisted Microdissection (LAM) as a Tool for Transcriptional Profiling of Individual Cell Types.

    PubMed

    Florez Rueda, Ana Marcela; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schmidt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of developmental processes at the molecular level requires insights into transcriptional regulation, and thus the transcriptome, at the level of individual cell types. While the methods described here are generally applicable to a wide range of species and cell types, our research focuses on plant reproduction. Plant cultivation and seed production is of crucial importance for human and animal nutrition. A detailed understanding of the regulatory networks that govern the formation of the reproductive lineage (germline) and ultimately of seeds is a precondition for the targeted manipulation of plant reproduction. In particular, the engineering of apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) into crop plants promises great improvements, as it leads to the formation of clonal seeds that are genetically identical to the mother plant. Consequently, the cell types of the female germline are of major importance for the understanding and engineering of apomixis. However, as the corresponding cells are deeply embedded within the floral tissues, they are very difficult to access for experimental analyses, including cell-type specific transcriptomics. To overcome this limitation, sections of individual cells can be isolated by laser-assisted microdissection (LAM). While LAM in combination with transcriptional profiling allows the identification of genes and pathways active in any cell type with high specificity, establishing a suitable protocol can be challenging. Specifically, the quality of RNA obtained after LAM can be compromised, especially when small, single cells are targeted. To circumvent this problem, we have established a workflow for LAM that reproducibly results in high RNA quality that is well suitable for transcriptomics, as exemplified here by the isolation of cells of the female germline in apomictic Boechera. In this protocol, procedures are described for tissue preparation and LAM, also with regard to RNA extraction and quality control

  15. Combining laser microdissection and RNA-seq to chart the transcriptional landscape of fungal development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During sexual development, filamentous ascomycetes form complex, three-dimensional fruiting bodies for the protection and dispersal of sexual spores. Fruiting bodies contain a number of cell types not found in vegetative mycelium, and these morphological differences are thought to be mediated by changes in gene expression. However, little is known about the spatial distribution of gene expression in fungal development. Here, we used laser microdissection (LM) and RNA-seq to determine gene expression patterns in young fruiting bodies (protoperithecia) and non-reproductive mycelia of the ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. Results Quantitative analysis showed major differences in the gene expression patterns between protoperithecia and total mycelium. Among the genes strongly up-regulated in protoperithecia were the pheromone precursor genes ppg1 and ppg2. The up-regulation was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy of egfp expression under the control of ppg1 regulatory sequences. RNA-seq analysis of protoperithecia from the sterile mutant pro1 showed that many genes that are differentially regulated in these structures are under the genetic control of transcription factor PRO1. Conclusions We have generated transcriptional profiles of young fungal sexual structures using a combination of LM and RNA-seq. This allowed a high spatial resolution and sensitivity, and yielded a detailed picture of gene expression during development. Our data revealed significant differences in gene expression between protoperithecia and non-reproductive mycelia, and showed that the transcription factor PRO1 is involved in the regulation of many genes expressed specifically in sexual structures. The LM/RNA-seq approach will also be relevant to other eukaryotic systems in which multicellular development is investigated. PMID:23016559

  16. Evaluation of two-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry for tissue-specific protein profiling of laser-microdissected plant samples

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, Martina; Lipton, Mary S.; Giavalisco, Patrick; Smith, Richard D.; Kehr, Julia

    2005-07-14

    Laser microdissection (LM) allows the collection of homogeneous tissue- and cell specific plant samples. The employment of this technique with subsequent protein analysis has thus far not been reported for plant tissues, probably due to the difficulties associated with defining a reasonable cellular morphology and, in parallel, allowing efficient protein extraction from tissue samples. The relatively large sample amount needed for successful proteome analysis is an additional issue that complicates protein profiling on a tissue- or even cell-specific level. In contrast to transcript profiling that can be performed from very small sample amounts due to efficient amplification strategies, there is as yet no amplification procedure for proteins available. In the current study, we compared different tissue preparation techniques prior to LM/laser pressure catapulting (LMPC) with respect to their suitability for protein retrieval. Cryosectioning was identified as the best compromise between tissue morphology and effective protein extraction. After collection of vascular bundles from Arabidopsis thaliana stem tissue by LMPC, proteins were extracted and subjected to protein analysis, either by classical two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), or by high-efficiency liquid chromatography (LC) in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Our results demonstrate that both methods can be used with LMPC collected plant material. But because of the significantly lower sample amount required for LC-MS/MS than for 2-DE, the combination of LMPC and LC-MS/MS has a higher potential to promote comprehensive proteome analysis of specific plant tissues.

  17. Optimizing staining protocols for laser microdissection of specific cell types from the testis including carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Si Brask; Dalgaard, Marlene D; Nielsen, John Erik; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Gjerdrum, Lise Mette; Leffers, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Microarray and RT-PCR based methods are important tools for analysis of gene expression; however, in tissues containing many different cells types, such as the testis, characterization of gene expression in specific cell types can be severely hampered by noise from other cells. The laser microdissection technology allows for enrichment of specific cell types. However, when the cells are not morphologically distinguishable, it is necessary to use a specific staining method for the target cells. In this study we have tested different fixatives, storage conditions for frozen sections and staining protocols, and present two staining protocols for frozen sections, one for fast and specific staining of fetal germ cells, testicular carcinoma in situ cells, and other cells with embryonic stem cell-like properties that express the alkaline phosphatase, and one for specific staining of lipid droplet-containing cells, which is useful for isolation of the androgen-producing Leydig cells. Both protocols retain a morphology that is compatible with laser microdissection and yield RNA of a quality suitable for PCR and microarray analysis. PMID:19436754

  18. Unambiguous Detection of Multiple TP53 Gene Mutations in AAN-Associated Urothelial Cancer in Belgium Using Laser Capture Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Selda; Dekairelle, Anne-France; Ambroise, Jérôme; Durant, Jean-François; Heusterspreute, Michel; Guiot, Yves

    2014-01-01

    In the Balkan and Taiwan, the relationship between exposure to aristolochic acid and risk of urothelial neoplasms was inferred from the A>T genetic hallmark in TP53 gene from malignant cells. This study aimed to characterize the TP53 mutational spectrum in urothelial cancers consecutive to Aristolochic Acid Nephropathy in Belgium. Serial frozen tumor sections from female patients (n = 5) exposed to aristolochic acid during weight-loss regimen were alternatively used either for p53 immunostaining or laser microdissection. Tissue areas with at least 60% p53-positive nuclei were selected for microdissecting sections according to p53-positive matching areas. All areas appeared to be carcinoma in situ. After DNA extraction, mutations in the TP53 hot spot region (exons 5–8) were identified using nested-PCR and sequencing. False-negative controls consisted in microdissecting fresh-frozen tumor tissues both from a patient with a Li-Fraumeni syndrome who carried a p53 constitutional mutation, and from KRas mutated adenocarcinomas. To rule out false-positive results potentially generated by microdissection and nested-PCR, a phenacetin-associated urothelial carcinoma and normal fresh ureteral tissues (n = 4) were processed with high laser power. No unexpected results being identified, molecular analysis was pursued on malignant tissues, showing at least one mutation in all (six different mutations in two) patients, with 13/16 exonic (nonsense, 2; missense, 11) and 3/16 intronic (one splice site) mutations. They were distributed as transitions (n = 7) or transversions (n = 9), with an equal prevalence of A>T and G>T (3/16 each). While current results are in line with A>T prevalence previously reported in Balkan and Taiwan studies, they also demonstrate that multiple mutations in the TP53 hot spot region and a high frequency of G>T transversion appear as a complementary signature reflecting the toxicity of a cumulative dose of aristolochic acid ingested over a

  19. Ensuring good quality rna for quantitative real-time pcr isolated from renal proximal tubular cells using laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to provide gene expression profiles of different cell types, the primary step is to isolate the specific cells of interest via laser capture microdissection (LCM), followed by extraction of good quality total RNA sufficient for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. This LCM-qPCR strategy has allowed numerous gene expression studies on specific cell populations, providing valuable insights into specific cellular changes in diseases. However, such strategy imposed challenges as cells of interests are often available in limited quantities and quality of RNA may be compromised during long periods of time spent on collection of cells and extraction of total RNA; therefore, it is crucial that protocols for sample preparation should be optimised according to different cell populations. Findings We made several modifications to existing protocols to improve the total RNA yield and integrity for downstream qPCR analyses. A modified condensed hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining protocol was developed for the identification of rat renal proximal tubular cells (PTCs). It was then determined that a minimal of eight thousands renal PTCs were required to meet the minimal total RNA yield required for downstream qPCR. RNA integrity was assessed using at every progressive step of sample preparation. Therefore, we decided that the shortened H&E staining, together with microdissection should be performed consecutively within twenty minutes for good quality for gene expression analysis. These modified protocols were later applied on six individual rat samples. A panel of twenty rat renal drug transporters and five housekeeping genes showed Ct values below thirty-five, confirming the expression levels of these drug transporters can be detected. Conclusions We had successfully optimized the protocols to achieve sufficient good quality total RNA from microdissected rat renal PTCs for gene expression profiling via qPCR. This protocol may be

  20. Laser Capture Microdissection Revisited as a Tool for Transcriptomic Analysis: Application of an Excel-Based qPCR Preparation Software (PREXCEL-Q)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to reliably analyze cellular and molecular profiles of normal or diseased tissues is frequently obfuscated by the inherent heterogeneous nature of tissues. Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) is an innovative technique that allows the isolation and enrichment of pure subpopulations of c...

  1. DETECTION OF K-RAS AND P53 MUTATIONS IN SPUTUM SAMPLES OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS USING LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION MICROSCOPE AND MUTATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of K-ras and p53 Mutations in Sputum Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Using Laser Capture Microdissection Microscope and Mutation Analysis

    Phouthone Keohavong a,*, Wei-Min Gao a, Kui-Cheng Zheng a, Hussam Mady b, Qing Lan c, Mona Melhem b, and Judy Mumford d.
    <...

  2. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) and comparative microarray expression analysis of syncytial cells isolated from incompatible and compatible soybean roots infected by soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Syncytial cells in soybean (Glycine max cultivar [cv.] Peking) roots infected by incompatible (I) and compatible (C) populations of soybean cyst nematode [SCN] (Heterodera glycines) were collected using laser capture microdissection. Gene transcript abundance was assayed using an Affymetrix® soybean...

  3. Laser microdissection coupled with RNA-seq analysis of porcine enterocytes infected with an obligate intracellular pathogen (Lawsonia intracellularis)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiologic agent of proliferative enteropathy. The disease is endemic in pigs, emerging in horses and has been described in various other species including nonhuman primates. Cell proliferation is associated with bacterial replication in enterocyte cytoplasm, but the molecular basis of the host-pathogen interaction is unknown. We used laser capture microdissection coupled with RNA-seq technology to characterize the transcriptional responses of infected enterocytes and the host-pathogen interaction. Results Proliferative enterocytes was associated with activation of transcription, protein biosynthesis and genes acting on the G1 phase of the host cell cycle (Rho family). The lack of differentiation in infected enterocytes was demonstrated by the repression of membrane transporters related to nutrient acquisition. The activation of the copper uptake transporter by infected enterocytes was associated with high expression of the Zn/Cu superoxide dismutase by L. intracellularis. This suggests that the intracellular bacteria incorporate intracytoplasmic copper and express a sophisticated mechanism to cope with oxidative stress. Conclusions The feasibility of coupling microdissection and RNA-seq was demonstrated by characterizing the host-bacterial interactions from a specific cell type in a heterogeneous tissue. High expression of L. intracellularis genes encoding hypothetical proteins and activation of host Rho genes infers the role of unrecognized bacterial cyclomodulins in the pathogenesis of proliferative enteropathy. PMID:23800029

  4. Dlx1 and Rgs5 in the ductus arteriosus: vessel-specific genes identified by transcriptional profiling of laser-capture microdissected endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bökenkamp, Regina; van Brempt, Ronald; van Munsteren, Jacoba Cornelia; van den Wijngaert, Ilse; de Hoogt, Ronald; Finos, Livio; Goeman, Jelle; Groot, Adriana Cornelia Gittenberger-de; Poelmann, Robert Eugen; Blom, Nicolaas Andreas; DeRuiter, Marcus Cornelis

    2014-01-01

    Closure of the ductus arteriosus (DA) is a crucial step in the transition from fetal to postnatal life. Patent DA is one of the most common cardiovascular anomalies in children with significant clinical consequences especially in premature infants. We aimed to identify genes that specify the DA in the fetus and differentiate it from the aorta. Comparative microarray analysis of laser-captured microdissected endothelial (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from the DA and aorta of fetal rats (embryonic day 18 and 21) identified vessel-specific transcriptional profiles. We found a strong age-dependency of gene expression. Among the genes that were upregulated in the DA the regulator of the G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Rgs5) and the transcription factor distal-less homeobox 1 (Dlx1) exhibited the highest and most significant level of differential expression. The aorta showed a significant preferential expression of the Purkinje cell protein 4 (Pcp4) gene. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry. Our study confirms vessel-specific transcriptional profiles in ECs and SMCs of rat DA and aorta. Rgs5 and Dlx1 represent novel molecular targets for the regulation of DA maturation and closure. PMID:24489801

  5. Fertilization of C57BL/6 mouse sperm collected from cauda epididymides after preservation or transportation at 4 degrees C using laser-microdissected oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takehito; Fukumoto, Kiyoko; Haruguchi, Yukie; Kondo, Tomoko; Machida, Hiromi; Koga, Mika; Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Tsuchiyama, Shuuji; Saiki, Kiyora; Noshiba, Shiho; Nakagata, Naomi

    2009-08-01

    The C57BL/6 mouse is commonly used to produce transgenic and knockout strains for biomedical research. However, the motility and fertility of its sperm decrease markedly with freezing. Short-term preservation of sperm without freezing can avoid this. Furthermore, such samples can be transported safety without the special skills or equipment needed for the transportation of live animals or frozen products. We evaluated the motility and fertility of sperm collected from cauda epididymides after preservation or transportation at 4 degrees C. Oocytes with the zona pellucida subjected to laser-microdissection were used to assist fertilization in vitro. Although the motility of sperm gradually decreased with storage (P<0.05), no disruption of the sperm plasma membrane was seen. The proportion of zona-intact oocytes fertilized with sperm preserved for 0, 24, 48 and 72h were 70, 14, 5 and 1%, respectively. On the other hand, 45, 20 and 14% of laser-microdissected oocytes were fertilized by sperm preserved for 24, 48 and 72h, respectively (P<0.05). The fertility of sperm collected from cauda epididymides of two transgenic strains after transportation at 4 degrees C were also significantly increased using laser-microdissected oocytes rather than zona-intact oocytes (57 and 68% vs. 5%, P<0.05). Efficient production of offspring from sperm preserved or transported at 4 degrees C was achieved using laser-microdissected oocytes. Thus the fertility of sperm preserved or transported at 4 degrees C could be maintained, although motility gradually decreased with storage. Laser-microdissected oocytes will contribute to the efficient production of embryos and offspring using such preserved sperm samples. PMID:19394323

  6. STUDY OF THE HUMAN CHRONIC WOUND TISSUE: ADDRESSING LOGISTIC BARRIERS AND PRODUCTIVE USE OF LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2015-01-01

    Direct procurement of tissue samples from clinically presented chronic human wounds is a powerful approach to understand mechanism at play in an actual problem wound. While such approach suffers from limitations related to lack of reproducible conditions across wounds, something that we are used to the laboratory while studying wounds on experimental animals, the direct study of human wound tissue helps recognize the right questions to ask in the laboratory. Going back and forth between human wound and experimental animal studies helps steer studies on experimental wounds in a clinically relevant direction. In this article, we describe critical factors that need to be considered prior to planning a study involving human wound samples. In addition, we describe an approach to capture wound hyperproliferative epithelium (HE) from chronic human wound biopsies using laser capture microdissection (LCM). LCM is a new technology applicable to a broad range of clinical research and represents a catalyst of sophisticated translational research. PMID:24029938

  7. Laser-capture microdissection of plasma cells from subacute sclerosing panencephalitis brain reveals intrathecal disease-relevant antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Burgoon, Mark P.; Keays, Kathryne M.; Owens, Gregory P.; Ritchie, Alanna M.; Rai, Pradeep R.; Cool, Carlyne D.; Gilden, Donald H.

    2005-01-01

    Increased IgG and oligoclonal bands are found in cerebrospinal fluid of humans with chronic infectious CNS disease. Studies have shown that these oligoclonal bands are antibodies directed against the agent that causes disease. Laser-capture microdissection was used to isolate individual CD38+ plasma cells from the brain of a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and single-cell RT-PCR was used to analyze individual IgG heavy and light chains expressed by each cell. Based on overrepresented IgG sequences, we constructed functional recombinant antibodies (recombinant IgGs) and determined their specificities. Five of eight recombinant IgGs recognized measles virus, the cause of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. These results demonstrate that overrepresented IgG sequences in postmortem brains can be used to produce functional recombinant antibodies that recognize their target antigens. This strategy can be used to identify disease-relevant antigens in CNS inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. PMID:15883366

  8. K-ras mutation at codon 12 in stage I pancreatic adenocarcinoma: analysis by laser capture microdissection and direct sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chang, M C; Chang, Y T; Wu, M S; Shun, C T; Tien, Y W; Lin, J T

    2001-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has been reported to carry a rate mutation high in codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene. To avoid the pitfalls of conventional methods of tissue dissection that might affect the sensitivity and specificity of detecting K-ras mutation, laser capture microdissection (LCM) technique was used. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues were obtained from 15 patients who underwent Whipple's procedure. Selected tissues procured by LCM were analyzed by direct sequencing after polymerase chain reaction amplification of K-ras sequences at codon 12. K-ras mutation was noted in nine patients. All mutations showed G to A substitution at codon 12. The mutational pattern (GGT to GAT) is similar in both western and eastern reports. LCM is a feasible method to effectively obtain pure tumor cells from a surgical specimen. It remains to be determined whether this low mutation rate is a result of relatively early stage of disease or different carcinogenesis in different geographic regions. PMID:11432318

  9. Laser welding--suitable for vascular anastomosis?

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, W; Gruber, G; Iversen, S; Oelert, H

    1994-12-01

    Carotid arteries of 21 piglets were transsected and reanastomosed either by laser welding (Neodym:YAG laser) or by conventional suture anastomosis. Histological specimens of the anastomoses obtained 2 to 32 days after the operation showed less foreign body reaction and intimal hyperplasia after laser welding than after suturing. There was, however, no significant difference when comparing occurrence of thrombosis, patency rate, or growth of the anastomosis in growing animals. Neither our study nor a review of the literature of laser-assisted vascular anastomosis in microvessels and large arteries up to 5 mm diameter could establish a definite clinical application for laser welding in vascular anastomosis. PMID:7534952

  10. Pathway-Focused PCR Array Profiling of Enriched Populations of Laser Capture Microdissected Hippocampal Cells after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Deborah R.; Micci, Maria-Adelaide; Taglialatela, Isabella G.; Hellmich, Judy L.; Weisz, Harris A.; Bi, Min; Prough, Donald S.; DeWitt, Douglas S.; Hellmich, Helen L.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are associated with irreversible neurodegeneration in brain regions such as the hippocampus. Comparative gene expression analysis of dying and surviving neurons could provide insight into potential therapeutic targets. We used two pathway-specific PCR arrays (RT2 Profiler Apoptosis and Neurotrophins & Receptors PCR arrays) to identify and validate TBI-induced gene expression in dying (Fluoro-Jade-positive) or surviving (Fluoro-Jade- negative) pyramidal neurons obtained by laser capture microdissection (LCM). In the Apoptosis PCR array, dying neurons showed significant increases in expression of genes associated with cell death, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress compared with adjacent, surviving neurons. Pro-survival genes with pleiotropic functions were also significantly increased in dying neurons compared to surviving neurons, suggesting that even irreversibly injured neurons are able to mount a protective response. In the Neurotrophins & Receptors PCR array, which consists of genes that are normally expected to be expressed in both groups of hippocampal neurons, only a few genes were expressed at significantly different levels between dying and surviving neurons. Immunohistochemical analysis of selected, differentially expressed proteins supported the gene expression data. This is the first demonstration of pathway-focused PCR array profiling of identified populations of dying and surviving neurons in the brain after TBI. Combining precise laser microdissection of identifiable cells with pathway-focused PCR array analysis is a practical, low-cost alternative to microarrays that provided insight into neuroprotective signals that could be therapeutically targeted to ameliorate TBI-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:26016641

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Trout Gill Ionocytes in Fresh Water and Sea Water Using Laser Capture Microdissection Combined with Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leguen, Isabelle; Le Cam, Aurélie; Montfort, Jérôme; Peron, Sandrine; Fautrel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Fish gills represent a complex organ composed of several cell types that perform multiple physiological functions. Among these cells, ionocytes are implicated in the maintenance of ion homeostasis. However, because the ionocyte represents only a small percent of whole gill tissue, its specific transcriptome can be overlooked among the numerous cell types included in the gill. The objective of this study is to better understand ionocyte functions by comparing the RNA expression of this cell type in freshwater and seawater acclimated rainbow trout. To realize this objective, ionocytes were captured from gill cryosections using laser capture microdissection after immunohistochemistry. Then, transcriptome analyses were performed on an Agilent trout oligonucleotide microarray. Gene expression analysis identified 108 unique annotated genes differentially expressed between freshwater and seawater ionocytes, with a fold change higher than 3. Most of these genes were up-regulated in freshwater cells. Interestingly, several genes implicated in ion transport, extracellular matrix and structural cellular proteins appeared up-regulated in freshwater ionocytes. Among them, several ion transporters, such as CIC2, SLC26A6, and NBC, were validated by qPCR and/or in situ hybridization. The latter technique allowed us to localize the transcripts of these ion transporters in only ionocytes and more particularly in the freshwater cells. Genes involved in metabolism and also several genes implicated in transcriptional regulation, cell signaling and the cell cycle were also enhanced in freshwater ionocytes. In conclusion, laser capture microdissection combined with microarray analysis allowed for the determination of the transcriptional signature of scarce cells in fish gills, such as ionocytes, and aided characterization of the transcriptome of these cells in freshwater and seawater acclimated trout. PMID:26439495

  12. Laser Capture Microdissection and Real-Time PCR for Measuring mRNA in Giant Cells Induced by Meloidogyne javanica.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Magill, C; Starr, J L

    2005-09-01

    The techniques of laser capture microdissection and quantitative RT-PCR were investigated as methods for measuring mRNA in giant cells induced by Meloidogyne javanica. Laser capture microdissection allowed precise sampling of giant cells at 1 to 3 weeks after inoculation. The expression of three genes (a water channel protein gene Rb7, a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (LHA4), and a hexose kinase (HXK1) was measured based on mRNA extracted from tissue samples and quantitated using reversetranscription real-time PCR. These genes were chosen arbitrarily to represent different aspects of primary metabolism. The amount of HXK1 mRNA in giant cells was not different from that in root meristem or cortical cells when compared on the basis of number of molecules per unit tissue volume, and was similar at all sample times. Amount of mRNA for LHA4 and Rb7 was much greater in giant cells than in cortical cells, but only Rb7 was also greater in giant cells than in root meristem cells. Numbers of mRNA molecules of LHA4 increased linearly in giant cells from 1 to 3 weeks after inoculation, whereas the amount of Rb7 mRNA was similar at 1 and 2 weeks after inoculation but increased at 3 weeks after inoculation. The amount of mRNA for these two genes was similar at all sample times in cortical and root-tip cells. Apparent up regulation of some genes in giant cells may be due primarily to the increased number of copies of the gene in giant cells, whereas for other genes up regulation may also involve increased transcription of the increased number of copies of the gene. PMID:19262878

  13. Oral vascular malformations: laser treatment and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Rocchetti, F.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.; Lo Giudice, G.

    2016-03-01

    Vascular malformations are a very heterogeneous group of circulatory system's diseases that can involve different kind of vessels: arterial, venous or lymphatic ones. Many treatments, such as conventional surgery, embolization, steroid therapy and laser therapy, are available for vascular lesions. The laser approach relies more therapeutic techniques: the transmucosal thermophotocoagulation, intralesional photocoagulation, the excisional biopsy. Today laser is demonstrated to be the gold standard technique to treat vascular lesions that allows a safe and efficient treatment and a lower post-operative healing time. The only disadvantage is the risk of carbonization that could be avoided by using the multiple-spot single pulsed wave technique.

  14. Application of laser microdissection ICP-MS for high resolution elemental mapping in mouse brain tissue: a comparative study with laser ablation ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Sussulini, Alessandra; Becker, J Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Mapping of elements in biological tissue by laser induced mass spectrometry is a fast growing analytical methodology in life sciences. This method provides a multitude of useful information of metal, nonmetal, metalloid and isotopic distribution at major, minor and trace concentration ranges, usually with a lateral resolution of 12-160 µm. Selected applications in medical research require an improved lateral resolution of laser induced mass spectrometric technique at the low micrometre scale and below. The present work demonstrates the applicability of a recently developed analytical methodology - laser microdissection associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LMD ICP-MS) - to obtain elemental images of different solid biological samples at high lateral resolution. LMD ICP-MS images of mouse brain tissue samples stained with uranium and native are shown, and a direct comparison of LMD and laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS imaging methodologies, in terms of elemental quantification, is performed. PMID:25476347

  15. Distribution of toxic alkaloids in tissues from three herbal medicine Aconitum species using laser micro-dissection, UHPLC-QTOF MS and LC-MS/MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Yogini; Liang, Zhitao; Ho, Alan; Wong, LaiLai; Yong, Peng; Chen, Hubiao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2014-11-01

    Aconite poisoning continues to be a major type of poisoning caused by herbal drugs in many countries. Nevertheless, despite its toxic characteristics, aconite is used because of its valuable therapeutic benefits. The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of toxic alkaloids in tissues of aconite roots through chemical profiling. Three species were studied, all being used in traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and traditional Indian medicine (Ayurveda), namely: Aconitum carmichaelii, Aconitum kusnezoffii and Aconitum heterophyllum. Laser micro-dissection was used for isolation of target microscopic tissues, such as the metaderm, cortex, xylem, pith, and phloem, with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography equipped with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS) employed for detection of metabolites. Using a multi-targeted approach through auto and targeted LC-MS/MS, 48 known compounds were identified and the presence of aconitine, mesaconitine and hypaconitine that are the biomarkers of this plant was confirmed in the tissues. These results suggest that the three selected toxic alkaloids were exclusively found in A. carmichaelii and A. kusnezoffii. The most toxic components were found in large A. carmichaelii roots with more lateral root projections, and specifically in the metaderm, cork and vascular bundle tissues. The results from metabolite profiling were correlated with morphological features to predict the tissue specific distribution of toxic components and toxicity differences among the selected species. By careful exclusion of tissues having toxic diester diterpenoid alkaloids, the beneficial effects of aconite can still be retained and the frequency of toxicity occurrences can be greatly reduced. Knowledge of tissue-specific metabolite distribution can guide users and herbal drug manufacturers in prudent selection of relatively safer and therapeutically more effective parts of the root. The information provided from

  16. [Comparison of gene expression profile of cementoblasts with periodontal ligament cells in mouse mandible with laser capture microdissection].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yoshiko

    2008-03-01

    Cementum is an essential tissue to maintain tooth function and should be closely correlated to tooth root development and periodontal tissue regeneration. However, detailed features of the periodontium including cementum and specific markers for cementoblasts are unknown. Moreover, the molecular mechanism of periodontal tissue development, homeostasis and regeneration remains unknown. Previous studies have usually examined cementum or periodontalligament (PDL) tissue obtained by manual curettage, resulting in difficulties in isolating pure cementum or PDL. We employed laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate cementoblasts and PDL cells from undecalcified frozen sections of murine mandible and to obtain RNA of good quality for subsequent genetic analysis. Over 500 cementoblasts and PDL cells were separately laser captured under microscopy. A bioanalyzer detected peaks of 18S and 28S rRNA both in the laser-dissected cementoblasts and in PDL cells, suggesting that the RNA was of sufficient quality. The RNA samples were amplified due to their small amount and a comparative analysis of mRNA expression by GeneChip showed that about 2,000 genes were differentially expressed between cementoblasts and PDL cells. Both cementoblast-positive and PDL cell-negative genes were serially analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR using RNA samples obtained from mandibles and femurs. Several genes were expressed at higher levels in the mandible than in the femur, suggesting that some might be cementoblast-specific markers. We established a novel experimental system with which to isolate target tissues from single cells in undecalcified frozen sections and to obtain intact RNA. These methodologies could be useful for further investigation of mineralized tissues and to explore tissue-specific factors. PMID:18421948

  17. Laser capture microdissection of intestinal tissue from sea bass larvae using an optimized RNA integrity assay and validated reference genes.

    PubMed

    Schaeck, M; De Spiegelaere, W; De Craene, J; Van den Broeck, W; De Spiegeleer, B; Burvenich, C; Haesebrouck, F; Decostere, A

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for a sustainable larviculture has promoted research regarding environmental parameters, diseases and nutrition, intersecting at the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract of fish larvae. The combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and gene expression experiments allows cell specific expression profiling. This study aimed at optimizing an LCM protocol for intestinal tissue of sea bass larvae. Furthermore, a 3'/5' integrity assay was developed for LCM samples of fish tissue, comprising low RNA concentrations. Furthermore, reliable reference genes for performing qPCR in larval sea bass gene expression studies were identified, as data normalization is critical in gene expression experiments using RT-qPCR. We demonstrate that a careful optimization of the LCM procedure allows recovery of high quality mRNA from defined cell populations in complex intestinal tissues. According to the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms, ef1a, rpl13a, rps18 and faua were the most stable genes to be implemented as reference genes for an appropriate normalization of intestinal tissue from sea bass across a range of experimental settings. The methodology developed here, offers a rapid and valuable approach to characterize cells/tissues in the intestinal tissue of fish larvae and their changes following pathogen exposure, nutritional/environmental changes, probiotic supplementation or a combination thereof. PMID:26883391

  18. Single Cell Multiplex Protein Measurements through Rare Earth Element Immunolabeling, Laser Capture Microdissection and Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liba, Amir; Wanagat, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Complex diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, and aging are the primary causes of death in the US. These diseases cause heterogeneous conditions among cells, conditions that cannot be measured in tissue homogenates and require single cell approaches. Understanding protein levels within tissues is currently assayed using various molecular biology techniques (e.g., Western blots) that rely on milligram to gram quantities of tissue homogenates or immunofluorescent (IF) techniques that are limited by spectral overlap. Tissue homogenate studies lack references to tissue structure and mask signals from individual or rare cellular events. Novel techniques are required to bring protein measurement sensitivity to the single cell level and offer spatiotemporal resolution and scalability. We are developing a novel approach to protein quantification by exploiting the inherently low concentration of rare earth elements (REE) in biological systems. By coupling REE-antibody immunolabeling of cells with laser capture microdissection (LCM) and ICP-QQQ, we are achieving multiplexed protein measurement in histological sections of single cells. This approach will add to evolving single cell techniques and our ability to understand cellular heterogeneity in complex biological systems and diseases.

  19. Use of laser microdissection in the investigation of facial motoneuron and neuropil molecular phenotypes after peripheral axotomy

    PubMed Central

    Mesnard, Nichole A.; Alexander, Thomas D.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motoneuron loss is not fully understood, but appears to involve molecular changes within the injured motoneuron and the surrounding local microenvironment (neuropil). The mouse facial nucleus consists of six subnuclei which respond differentially to facial nerve transection at the stylomastoid foramen. The ventromedial (VM) subnucleus maintains virtually full facial motoneuron (FMN) survival following axotomy, whereas the ventrolateral (VL) subnucleus results in significant FMN loss with the same nerve injury. We hypothesized that distinct molecular phenotypes of FMN existed within the two subregions, one responsible for maintaining cell survival and the other promoting cell death. In this study, we used laser microdissection to isolate VM and VL facial subnuclear regions for molecular characterization. We discovered that, regardless of neuronal fate after injury, FMN in either subnuclear region respond vigorously to injury with a characteristic “regenerative” profile and additionally, the surviving VL FMN appear to compensate for the significant FMN loss. In contrast, significant differences in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA in the surrounding neuropil response were found between the two subnuclear regions of the facial nucleus that support a causative role for glial and/or immune-derived molecules in directing the contrasting responses of the FMN to axonal transection. PMID:20570589

  20. Laser microdissection and microarray analysis of Tuber melanosporum ectomycorrhizas reveal functional heterogeneity between mantle and Hartig net compartments.

    PubMed

    Hacquard, Stéphane; Tisserant, Emilie; Brun, Annick; Legué, Valérie; Martin, Francis; Kohler, Annegret

    2013-06-01

    The ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbiosis, a mutualistic plant-fungus association, plays a fundamental role in forest ecosystems by enhancing plant growth and by providing host protection from root diseases. The cellular complexity of the symbiotic organ, characterized by the differentiation of structurally specialized tissues (i.e. the fungal mantle and the Hartig net), is the major limitation to study fungal gene expression in such specific compartments. We investigated the transcriptional landscape of the ECM fungus Tuber melanosporum during the major stages of its life cycle and we particularly focused on the complex symbiotic stage by combining the use of laser capture microdissection and microarray gene expression analysis. We isolated the fungal/soil (i.e. the mantle) and the fungal/plant (i.e. the Hartig net) interfaces from transverse sections of T. melanosporum/Corylus avellana ectomycorrhizas and identified the distinct genetic programmes associated with each compartment. Particularly, nitrogen and water acquisition from soil, synthesis of secondary metabolites and detoxification mechanisms appear to be important processes in the fungal mantle. In contrast, transport activity is enhanced in the Hartig net and we identified carbohydrate and nitrogen-derived transporters that might play a key role in the reciprocal resources' transfer between the host and the symbiont. PMID:23379715

  1. Laser capture microdissection of intestinal tissue from sea bass larvae using an optimized RNA integrity assay and validated reference genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaeck, M.; De Spiegelaere, W.; De Craene, J.; Van den Broeck, W.; De Spiegeleer, B.; Burvenich, C.; Haesebrouck, F.; Decostere, A.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for a sustainable larviculture has promoted research regarding environmental parameters, diseases and nutrition, intersecting at the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract of fish larvae. The combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and gene expression experiments allows cell specific expression profiling. This study aimed at optimizing an LCM protocol for intestinal tissue of sea bass larvae. Furthermore, a 3′/5′ integrity assay was developed for LCM samples of fish tissue, comprising low RNA concentrations. Furthermore, reliable reference genes for performing qPCR in larval sea bass gene expression studies were identified, as data normalization is critical in gene expression experiments using RT-qPCR. We demonstrate that a careful optimization of the LCM procedure allows recovery of high quality mRNA from defined cell populations in complex intestinal tissues. According to the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms, ef1a, rpl13a, rps18 and faua were the most stable genes to be implemented as reference genes for an appropriate normalization of intestinal tissue from sea bass across a range of experimental settings. The methodology developed here, offers a rapid and valuable approach to characterize cells/tissues in the intestinal tissue of fish larvae and their changes following pathogen exposure, nutritional/environmental changes, probiotic supplementation or a combination thereof. PMID:26883391

  2. Analysis of Transcription Factor mRNAs in Identified Oxytocin and Vasopressin Magnocellular Neurons Isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Lubelski, Daniel; Rashid, Omar M.; Salinas, Yasmmyn D.; Shi, YiJun; Ponzio, Todd; Fields, Raymond; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Gainer, Harold

    2013-01-01

    The oxytocin (Oxt) and vasopressin (Avp) magnocellular neurons (MCNs) in the hypothalamus are the only neuronal phenotypes that are present in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), and are characterized by their robust and selective expression of either the Oxt or Avp genes. In this paper, we take advantage of the differential expression of these neuropeptide genes to identify and isolate these two individual phenotypes from the rat SON by laser capture microdissection (LCM), and to analyze the differential expression of several of their transcription factor mRNAs by qRT-PCR. We identify these neuronal phenotypes by stereotaxically injecting recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral (rAAV) vectors which contain cell-type specific Oxt or Avp promoters that drive expression of EGFP selectively in either the Oxt or Avp MCNs into the SON. The fluorescent MCNs are then dissected by LCM using a novel Cap Road Map protocol described in this paper, and the purified MCNs are extracted for their RNAs. qRT-PCR of these RNAs show that some transcription factors (RORA and c-jun) are differentially expressed in the Oxt and Avp MCNs. PMID:23894472

  3. Towards the finer mapping of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy at 4q35: Construction of a laser microdissection library

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Osborn, M.; Maynard, J.

    1995-06-19

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder which has been mapped to the 4q35 region. In order to saturate this distal 4q region with DNA markers, a laser-based chromosomal microdissection and microcloning procedure was used to construct a genomic library from the distal 20% of chromosome 4, derived from a single human metaphase spread. Of the 100 microclones analyzed from this library, 94 clones contained inserts sized from 80-800 bp, with an average size of 340 bp. Less than 20% of these clones hybridized to human repeat sequences. Seventy-two single-copy clones were further characterized by Southern blot hybridization against a DNA panel of somatic cell hybrids, containing various regions of chromosome 4. Forty-two clones mapped to chromosome 4, of which 8 clones mapped into the relevant 4q35 region. Twenty of these chromosome 4-specific clones were screened against {open_quotes}zoo-blots{close_quotes}; 11 clones, of which 3 mapped to 4q35, identified conserved sequences. This is the first report to describe the isolation of potential expressed sequences derived from the FSHD region. These chromosome region-specific microclones will be useful in the construction of the physical map of the region, the positional cloning of potential disease-associated genes, and the identification of additional polymorphic markers from within the distal 4q region. 47 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Laser microdissection and genetic manipulation technologies to probe lignin heterogeneity and configuration in plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Corea, Oliver R A; Ki, Chanyoung; Cardenas, Claudia L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-01-01

    Single and multiple T-DNA knockouts of genes encoding arogenate dehydratases (ADTs) in Arabidopsis were obtained in homozygous form. These were analyzed for potential differences in lignin contents and compositions, as well as for distinct phenotypes over growth and development. Of these different lines, distinct reductions in lignin contents were obtained, with those having different G:S ratios depending upon the combination of ADT genes being knocked out. Results from pyrolysis GC/MS analyses indicated that differential carbon flux occurred into the vascular bundles (vb) and interfascicular fibers (if). These results provide additional new insight into factors controlling lignin heterogeneity and configuration. PMID:22843403

  5. Analysis of cannabinoids in laser-microdissected trichomes of medicinal Cannabis sativa using LCMS and cryogenic NMR.

    PubMed

    Happyana, Nizar; Agnolet, Sara; Muntendam, Remco; Van Dam, Annie; Schneider, Bernd; Kayser, Oliver

    2013-03-01

    Trichomes, especially the capitate-stalked glandular hairs, are well known as the main sites of cannabinoid and essential oil production of Cannabis sativa. In this study the distribution and density of various types of Cannabis sativa L. trichomes, have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, glandular trichomes were isolated over the flowering period (8 weeks) by laser microdissection (LMD) and the cannabinoid profile analyzed by LCMS. Cannabinoids were detected in extracts of 25-143 collected cells of capitate-sessile and capitate stalked trichomes and separately in the gland (head) and the stem of the latter. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid [THCA (1)], cannabidiolic acid [CBDA (2)], and cannabigerolic acid [CBGA (3)] were identified as most-abundant compounds in all analyzed samples while their decarboxylated derivatives, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC (4)], cannabidiol [CBD (5)], and cannabigerol [CBG (6)], co-detected in all samples, were present at significantly lower levels. Cannabichromene [CBC (8)] along with cannabinol (CBN (9)) were identified as minor compounds only in the samples of intact capitate-stalked trichomes and their heads harvested from 8-week old plants. Cryogenic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was used to confirm the occurrence of major cannabinoids, THCA (1) and CBDA (2), in capitate-stalked and capitate-sessile trichomes. Cryogenic NMR enabled the additional identification of cannabichromenic acid [CBCA (7)] in the dissected trichomes, which was not possible by LCMS as standard was not available. The hereby documented detection of metabolites in the stems of capitate-stalked trichomes indicates a complex biosynthesis and localization over the trichome cells forming the glandular secretion unit. PMID:23280038

  6. The application of laser microdissection to in planta gene expression profiling of the maize anthracnose stalk rot fungus Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihua; Coughlan, Sean; Crane, Edmund; Beatty, Mary; Duvick, Jon

    2006-11-01

    Laser microdissection (LM) offers a potential means for deep sampling of a fungal plant-pathogen transcriptome during the infection process using whole-genome DNA microarrays. The use of a fluorescent protein-expressing fungus can greatly facilitate the identification of fungal structures for LM sampling. However, fixation methods that preserve both tissue histology and protein fluorescence, and that also yield RNA of suitable quality for microarray applications, have not been reported. We developed a microwave-accelerated acetone fixation, paraffin-embedding method that fulfills these requirements and used it to prepare mature maize stalk tissues infected with an Anemonia majano cyan fluorescent protein-expressing isolate of the anthracnose stalk rot fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. We successfully used LM to isolate individual maize cells associated with C. graminicola hyphae at an early stage of infection. The LM-derived RNA, after two-round linear amplification, was of sufficient quality and quantity for global expression profiling using a fungal microarray. Comparing replicated LM samples representing an early stage of stalk cell infection with samples from in vitro-germinated conidia, we identified 437 and 370 C. graminicola genes showing significant up- or downregulation, respectively. We confirmed the differential expression of several representative transcripts by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and documented extensive overlap of this dataset with a PCR-subtraction library enriched for C. graminicola transcripts in planta. Our results demonstrate that LM is feasible for in planta pathogen expression profiling and can reveal clues about fungal genes involved in pathogenesis. The method in this report may be advantageous for visualizing a variety of cellular features that depend on a high degree of histochemical preservation and RNA integrity prior to LM. PMID:17073306

  7. In vivo gene expression profiling of human intestinal epithelial cells: analysis by laser microdissection of formalin fixed tissues

    PubMed Central

    George, Michael D; Wehkamp, Jan; Kays, Robert J; Leutenegger, Christian M; Sabir, Sadiah; Grishina, Irina; Dandekar, Satya; Bevins, Charles L

    2008-01-01

    Background The small intestinal epithelium mediates vital functions of nutrient absorption and host defense. The spatial organization of the epithelial cells along the crypt-villus axis segregates them into regions of specialized function. However, the differences in transcriptional programming and the molecular machinery that governs the migration, adhesion, and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cell lineages in humans remain under-explored. To increase our understanding of these mechanisms, we have evaluated gene expression patterns of ileal epithelial cells isolated by laser capture microdissection from either the villus epithelial or crypt cell regions of healthy human small intestinal mucosa. Expression profiles in villus and crypt epithelium were determined by DNA microarray, quantitative real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry based methods. The expression levels of selected epithelial biomarkers were also compared between gastrointestinal tissues. Results Previously established biomarkers as well as a novel and distinct set of genes believed to be linked to epithelial cell motility, adhesion, and differentiation were found to be enriched in each of the two corresponding cell populations (GEO accession: GSE10629). Additionally, high baseline expression levels of innate antimicrobials, alpha defensin 5 (HD5) and regenerating islet-derived 3 alpha (Reg3A), were detected exclusively within the small bowel crypt, most notably in the ileum in comparison to other sites along the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion The elucidation of differential gene expression patterns between crypt and villus epithelial cell lineages in human ileal tissue provides novel insights into the molecular machinery that mediates their functions and spatial organization. Moreover, our findings establish an important framework of knowledge for future investigations of human gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:18457593

  8. Gene Expression Analysis of Neurons and Astrocytes Isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection from Frozen Human Brain Tissues.

    PubMed

    Tagliafierro, Lidia; Bonawitz, Kirsten; Glenn, Omolara C; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types and multiple cellular connections characterize the human brain. Gene expression analysis using a specific population of cells is more accurate than conducting analysis of the whole tissue homogenate, particularly in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, where a specific subset of cells is affected by the different pathology. Due to the difficulty of obtaining homogenous cell populations, gene expression in specific cell-types (neurons, astrocytes, etc.) has been understudied. To leverage the use of archive resources of frozen human brains in studies of neurodegenerative diseases, we developed and calibrated a method to quantify cell-type specific-neuronal, astrocytes-expression profiles of genes implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Archive human frozen brain tissues were used to prepare slides for rapid immunostaining using cell-specific antibodies. The immunoreactive-cells were isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM). The enrichment for a particular cell-type of interest was validated in post-analysis stage by the expression of cell-specific markers. We optimized the technique to preserve the RNA integrity, so that the RNA was suitable for downstream expression analyses. Following RNA extraction, the expression levels were determined digitally using nCounter Single Cell Gene Expression assay (NanoString Technologies®). The results demonstrated that using our optimized technique we successfully isolated single neurons and astrocytes from human frozen brain tissues and obtained RNA of a good quality that was suitable for mRNA expression analysis. We present here new advancements compared to previous reported methods, which improve the method's feasibility and its applicability for a variety of downstream molecular analyses. Our new developed method can be implemented in genetic and functional genomic research of neurodegenerative diseases and has the potential to significantly

  9. Gene Expression Analysis of Neurons and Astrocytes Isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection from Frozen Human Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tagliafierro, Lidia; Bonawitz, Kirsten; Glenn, Omolara C.; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types and multiple cellular connections characterize the human brain. Gene expression analysis using a specific population of cells is more accurate than conducting analysis of the whole tissue homogenate, particularly in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, where a specific subset of cells is affected by the different pathology. Due to the difficulty of obtaining homogenous cell populations, gene expression in specific cell-types (neurons, astrocytes, etc.) has been understudied. To leverage the use of archive resources of frozen human brains in studies of neurodegenerative diseases, we developed and calibrated a method to quantify cell-type specific—neuronal, astrocytes—expression profiles of genes implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Archive human frozen brain tissues were used to prepare slides for rapid immunostaining using cell-specific antibodies. The immunoreactive-cells were isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM). The enrichment for a particular cell-type of interest was validated in post-analysis stage by the expression of cell-specific markers. We optimized the technique to preserve the RNA integrity, so that the RNA was suitable for downstream expression analyses. Following RNA extraction, the expression levels were determined digitally using nCounter Single Cell Gene Expression assay (NanoString Technologies®). The results demonstrated that using our optimized technique we successfully isolated single neurons and astrocytes from human frozen brain tissues and obtained RNA of a good quality that was suitable for mRNA expression analysis. We present here new advancements compared to previous reported methods, which improve the method's feasibility and its applicability for a variety of downstream molecular analyses. Our new developed method can be implemented in genetic and functional genomic research of neurodegenerative diseases and has the potential to

  10. Cell type-specific transcriptome of Brassicaceae stigmatic papilla cells from a combination of laser microdissection and RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Masaaki; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakazono, Satomi; Masuko-Suzuki, Hiromi; Maeda, Shunsuke; Sewaki, Misato; Sone, Mikako; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakazono, Mikio; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Yano, Kentaro; Lim, Yong Pyo; Suzuki, Go; Suwabe, Keita; Watanabe, Masao

    2013-11-01

    Pollination is an early and critical step in plant reproduction, leading to successful fertilization. It consists of many sequential processes, including adhesion of pollen grains onto the surface of stigmatic papilla cells, foot formation to strengthen pollen-stigma interaction, pollen hydration and germination, and pollen tube elongation and penetration. We have focused on an examination of the expressed genes in papilla cells, to increase understanding of the molecular systems of pollination. From three representative species of Brassicaceae (Arabidopsis thaliana, A. halleri and Brassica rapa), stigmatic papilla cells were isolated precisely by laser microdissection, and cell type-specific gene expression in papilla cells was determined by RNA sequencing. As a result, 17,240, 19,260 and 21,026 unigenes were defined in papilla cells of A. thaliana, A. halleri and B. rapa, respectively, and, among these, 12,311 genes were common to all three species. Among the17,240 genes predicted in A. thaliana, one-third were papilla specific while approximately half of the genes were detected in all tissues examined. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that genes related to a wide range of reproduction and development functions are expressed in papilla cells, particularly metabolism, transcription and membrane-mediated information exchange. These results reflect the conserved features of general cellular function and also the specific reproductive role of papilla cells, highlighting a complex cellular system regulated by a diverse range of molecules in these cells. This study provides fundamental biological knowledge to dissect the molecular mechanisms of pollination in papilla cells and will shed light on our understanding of plant reproduction mechanisms. PMID:24058146

  11. Laser speckle analysis of retinal vascular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Neganova, Anastasiia Y; Postnov, Dmitry D; Jacobsen, Jens Christian B.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vascular responses are usually performed on isolated vessels or on single vessels in vivo. This allows for precise measurements of diameter or blood flow. However, dynamical responses of the whole microvascular network are difficult to access experimentally. We suggest to use full-field laser speckle imaging to evaluate vascular responses of the retinal network. Image segmentation and vessel recognition algorithms together with response mapping allow us to analyze diameter changes and blood flow responses in the intact retinal network upon systemic administration of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II, the vasodilator acetylcholine or on the changing level of anesthesia in in vivo rat preparations.

  12. Direct PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from single microbial cells isolated from an Antarctic iceberg using laser microdissection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagihara, Katsuhiko; Niki, Hironori; Baba, Tomoya

    2011-09-01

    Here, we describe a technique that allows the genetic linage analysis of 16S rRNA genes in bacteria observed under a microscope. The technique includes the isolation of microbial cells using a laser microdissection microscope, lysis of the cells, and amplification of the 16S rRNA genes in the isolated cells without interference by bacterial DNA contamination from the experimental environment or reagents. Using this technique, we successfully determined 15 16S rRNA gene sequences in cells isolated from an Antarctic iceberg. These sequences showed 94%-100% identity to their closest strains, which included bacteria that occur in aqueous, marine, and soil environments.

  13. Tissue-specific metabolite profiling of Turmeric by using laser micro-dissection, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of fight-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Yogini; Liang, Zhitao; Ho, Alan; Chen, Hubiao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Curcuma longa L. is recognized for its therapeutic and culinary uses both in Ayurveda and traditional Chinese medicine and is considered to be a boon to mankind. It has been extensively studied for its benefits and still continues to be an important drug with continued potential for further exploration and research. We studied the tissue-specific distribution of secondary metabolites to establish the validity of the use of rhizome samples from India and China, as substitutes for each other, based upon their metabolite profiles and curcumin contents. Laser microdissection was used for the isolation of microscopic tissues, such as cork, cortex and leaf-trace vascular bundles from rhizomes. Metabolite profiling was carried out by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of fight-mass spectrometry and curcumin content was estimated by a method validated as per the Harmonized Tripartite Guidelines. The cortex and cork revealed the presence of a higher number of secondary metabolites than in the leaf-trace vascular bundles. The curcumin contents in rhizome samples from both the countries, estimated with the help of a precise and accurate validated method, were found to be comparable. Based on the results, we conclude that turmeric rhizomes grown in India and China are qualitatively and quantitatively indistinguishable and therefore can be used as substitutes. The developed method can be widely applied for microscopic identification, authentication and analysis of the distribution of phytoconstituents in other botanical species of interest or of species with a significant commercial and therapeutic value. PMID:25707128

  14. Cytogenetic Characterization of the TM4 Mouse Sertoli Cell Line. II. Chromosome Microdissection, FISH, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Guttenbach, Martina; Steinlein, Claus; Wanner, Gerhard; Houben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomes and interphase cell nuclei of the permanent mouse Sertoli cell line TM4 were examined by chromosome microdissection, FISH, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The already known marker chromosomes m1-m5 were confirmed, and 2 new large marker chromosomes m6 and m7 were characterized. The minute heterochromatic marker chromosomes m4 and m5 were microdissected and their DNA amplified by DOP-PCR. FISH of this DNA probe on TM4 metaphase chromosomes demonstrated that the m4 and m5 marker chromosomes have derived from the centromeric regions of normal telocentric mouse chromosomes. Ectopic pairing of the m4 and m5 marker chromosomes with the centromeric region of any of the other chromosomes (centromeric associations) was apparent in ∼60% of the metaphases. Scanning electron microscopy revealed DNA-protein bridges connecting the centromeric regions of normal chromosomes and the associated m4 and m5 marker chromosomes. Interphase cell nuclei of TM4 Sertoli cells did not exhibit the characteristic morphology of Sertoli cells in the testes of adult mice as shown by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:26900862

  15. Biomarker discovery and identification in laser microdissected head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with ProteinChip technology, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, tandem mass spectrometry, and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Gunther; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Koscielny, Sven; Wiesner, Andreas; Bogumil, Ralf; Moller, Ursula; Osterloh, Dirk; Halbhuber, Karl-Jurgen; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2003-07-01

    Head and neck cancer is a frequent malignancy with a complex, and up to now not clear etiology. Therefore, despite of improvements in diagnosis and therapy, the survival rate with head and neck squamous-cell carcinomas is poor. For a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the process of tumorigenesis and tumor progression, we have analyzed changes of protein expression between microdissected normal pharyngeal epithelium and tumor tissue by ProteinChip technology. For this, cryostat sections from head and neck tumors (n = 57) and adjacent mucosa (n = 44) were laser-microdissected and analyzed on ProteinChip arrays. The derived mass spectrometry profiles exhibited numerous statistical differences. One peak significantly higher expressed in the tumor (p = 0.000029) was isolated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified as annexin V by in-gel proteolytic digestion, peptide mapping, tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and immuno-deplete assay. The relevance of this single marker protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Annexin-positive tissue areas were re-analyzed on ProteinChip arrays to confirm the identity of this protein. In this study, we could show that biomarker in head and neck cancer can be found, identified, and assessed by combination of ProteinChip technology, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and immunohistochemistry. In our experience, however, such studies only make sense if a relatively pure microdissected tumor tissue is used. Only then minute changes in protein expression between normal pharyngeal epithelium and tumor tissue can be detected, and it will become possible to educe a tumor-associated protein pattern that might be used as a marker for tumorigenesis and progression. PMID:12824440

  16. Laser microdissection-based analysis of the Y sex chromosome of the Antarctic fish Chionodraco hamatus (Notothenioidei, Channichthyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cocca, Ennio; Petraccioli, Agnese; Morescalchi, Maria Alessandra; Odierna, Gaetano; Capriglione, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Microdissection, DOP-PCR amplification and microcloning were used to study the large Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus, an Antarctic fish belonging to the Notothenioidei, the dominant component of the Southern Ocean fauna. The species has evolved a multiple sex chromosome system with digametic males showing an X1YX2 karyotype and females an X1X1X2X2 karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, performed with a painting probe made from microdissected Y chromosomes, allowed a deeper insight on the chromosomal rearrangement, which underpinned the fusion event that generated the Y. Then, we used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning of the whole Y chromosome of Chionodraco hamatus for searching sex-linked sequences. One clone provided preliminary information on the presence on the Y chromosome of the CHD1 gene homologue, which is sex-linked in birds but in no other vertebrates. Several clones from the Y-chromosome mini-library contained microsatellites and transposable elements, one of which mapped to the q arm putative fusion region of the Y chromosome. The findings confirm that interspersed repetitive sequences might have fostered chromosome rearrangements and the emergence of the Y chromosome in Chionodraco hamatus. Detection of the CHD1 gene in the Y sex-determining region could be a classical example of convergent evolution in action. PMID:25893071

  17. Redistribution of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors Detected by Laser Microdissection of the Rat Dentate Gyrus 48 h following LTP Induction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kennard, Jeremy T. T.; Guévremont, Diane; Mason-Parker, Sara E.; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Williams, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistence and input specificity of long-term potentiation (LTP) make it attractive as a mechanism of information storage. In its initial phase, both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that LTP is associated with increased membrane localization of AMPA receptor subunits, but the molecular basis of LTP maintenance over the long-term is still unclear. We have previously shown that expression of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits is elevated in whole homogenates prepared from dentate gyrus 48 h after LTP induction in vivo. In the present study, we utilized laser microdissection (LMD) techniques to determine whether AMPA and NMDA receptor upregulation occurs specifically in the stimulated regions of the dentate gyrus dendritic arbor. Receptor proteins GluN1, GluA1 and GluA2, as well as postsynaptic density protein of 95 kDa and tubulin were detected by Western blot analysis in microdissected samples. Gradients of expression were observed for GluN1 and GluA2, decreasing from the inner to the outer zones of the molecular layer, and were independent of LTP. When induced at medial perforant path synapses, LTP was associated with an apparent specific redistribution of GluA1 and GluN1 to the middle molecular layer that contains these synapses. These data indicate that glutamate receptor proteins are delivered specifically to dendritic regions possessing LTP-expressing synapses, and that these changes are preserved for at least 48 h. PMID:24667777

  18. Use of laser microdissection for the construction of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 (Cannabaceae) sex chromosome-specific DNA library and cytogenetics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yakovin, Nickolay A.; Divashuk, Mikhail G.; Razumova, Olga V.; Soloviev, Alexander A.; Karlov, Gennady I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dioecy is relatively rare among plant species, and distinguishable sex chromosomes have been reported in few dioecious species. The multiple sex chromosome system (XX/XY1Y2) of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 differs from that of other members of the family Cannabaceae, in which the XX/XY chromosome system is present. Sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus were isolated from meiotic chromosome spreads of males by laser microdissection with the P.A.L.M. MicroLaser system. The chromosomal DNA was directly amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR). Fast fluorescence in situ hybridization (FAST-FISH) using a labeled, chromosome-specific DOP-PCR product as a probe showed preferential hybridization to sex chromosomes. In addition, the DOP-PCR product was used to construct a short-insert, Humulus japonicus sex chromosomes-specific DNA library. The randomly sequenced clones showed that about 12% of them have significant homology to Humulus lupulus and 88% to Cannabis sativa Linnaeus, 1753 sequences from GenBank database. Forty-four percent of the sequences show homology to plant retroelements. It was concluded that laser microdissection is a useful tool for isolating the DNA of sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus and for the construction of chromosome-specific DNA libraries for the study of the structure and evolution of sex chromosomes. The results provide the potential for identifying unique or sex chromosome-specific sequence elements in Humulus japonicus and could aid in the identification of sex chromosome-specific repeat and coding regions through chromosome isolation and genome complexity reduction. PMID:25610546

  19. Laser Capture Microdissection Revisited as a Tool for Transcriptomic Analysis: Application of an Excel-Based qPCR Preparation Software (PREXCEL-Q)

    PubMed Central

    Sow, Fatoumata B.; Gallup, Jack M.; Sacco, Randy E.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to reliably analyze cellular and molecular profiles of normal or diseased tissues is frequently complicated by the inherent heterogeneous nature of tissues. Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) is an innovative technique that allows the isolation and enrichment of pure subpopulations of cells from tissues under direct microscopic examination. Material obtained by LCM can be used for downstream assays including gene microarrays, western blotting, cDNA library generation and DNA genotyping. We describe a series of LCM protocols for cell collection, RNA extraction and qPCR gene expression analysis. Using reagents we helped develop commercially, we focus on two LCM approaches: laser cutting and laser capture. Reagent calculations have been pre-determined for 10 samples using the new PREXCEL-Q assay development and project management software. One can expect the entire procedure for laser cutting coupled to qPCR to take approximately 12.5-15 h, and laser capture coupled to qPCR to take approximately 13.5-17.5 h. PMID:20556230

  20. STR profiling of epithelial cells identified by X/Y-FISH labelling and laser microdissection using standard and elevated PCR conditions.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Laura; Gamblin, Amelia; Vintiner, Sue; Simons, Joanne L

    2015-05-01

    During the investigation of allegations of sexual assault, samples are frequently encountered that contain DNA from a female and a male donor. These may represent contributions of DNA from the complainant and potentially, the offender. Many semen stained samples successfully undergo DNA analysis and interpretation using a differential extraction method that separates sperm from the epithelial cells present in the stain. However, for those mixed cell samples that contain only epithelial cells, separation of any male cells from female cells is problematic. This paper describes the application of fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) for the gender identification of epithelial cells and subsequent recovery of target cells using laser microdissection (LMD). The profiling results obtained from samples of known cell numbers using the Identifiler™ multiplex at standard 28-cycle PCR conditions and, when cell numbers are low, the SGM Plus™ multiplex at elevated 34-cycle PCR conditions (also known as Low Copy Number DNA analysis (LCN)) are described. PMID:25555139

  1. Incestuous paternity detected by STR-typing of chorionic villi isolated from archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded abortion material using laser microdissection.

    PubMed

    Robino, Carlo; Barilaro, Maria Rosa; Gino, Sarah; Chiarle, Roberto; Palestro, Giorgio; Torre, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Microscopic examination of a blood clot expelled by a physically and mentally disabled woman taken to the emergency room because of genital bleeding revealed the presence of chorionic villi encircled by decidua, hemorrhage, and necrosis. In order to identify the father of the product of conception, sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded abortion material were subjected to laser microdissection: DNA extraction from chorionic villi selectively isolated from the surrounding tissues allowed successful STR-typing of fetal cells, which was otherwise prevented by excess maternal DNA. The large number of homozygous genotypes in the fetal profile suggested incestuous paternity. Analysis of reference DNA samples from male relatives excluded the woman's father, paternal grandfather, and maternal grandfather, whereas the obligate paternal alleles of the fetus were constantly present in the genotypes of the woman's brother, clearly demonstrating brother-sister incest (probability of paternity > 99.99999%). PMID:16423229

  2. Laser treatment of oral vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Gaimari, G.; Mohsen, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral Vascular Malformations (OVM) are congenital anomalies characterized by morph-structural and/or functional changes of nature in severity and extension. OVM can affect any type of vessels arterial, venous or lymphatic and any capillary or anatomical. They are divided into two categories: low and high flow. In this study were treated 40 patients with OVM with a range size from 2 mm to 44 mm; they were subjected to clinical examination supported by Colour-Doppler Ultrasound instrumental examination and only for doubt cases the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was prescribed. Only low flow venous and capillary malformations were treated by GaAlAs laser (Wiser®, Lambda, Brindole,Italy, 980nm) and KTP laser (SmartLite®, DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) with two different techniques: the Transmucosal Thermophotocoagulation (TMT) and the Intralesional Photocoagulation (ILP). These techniques permitted a good control of haemostasis, avoiding bleeding both during surgery and in the postoperative. It is obtained an excellent and good healing respectively in 10% and 60% of cases, a moderate and poor resolution respectively in 22.5% and 7.5% of cases. A clear diagnosis allowed the management of Venous malformations (VM) by laser devices with wavelengths highly absorbed in haemoglobin in safety and efficacy and according to the principles of minimal invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to verify if the laser is effective in the treatment of OVM for the purpose of the clinical findings and the postoperative course. The Authors concluded that the laser can be considered the "gold standard" for treating OVM.

  3. Non-Laser Capture Microscopy Approach for the Microdissection of Discrete Mouse Brain Regions for Total RNA Isolation and Downstream Next-Generation Sequencing and Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Norman; Miller, Charlie M.; Owens, Joseph R.; Turek, Fred W.

    2011-01-01

    As technological platforms, approaches such as next-generation sequencing, microarray, and qRT-PCR have great promise for expanding our understanding of the breadth of molecular regulation. Newer approaches such as high-resolution RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq)1 provides new and expansive information about tissue- or state-specific expression such as relative transcript levels, alternative splicing, and micro RNAs2-4. Prospects for employing the RNA-Seq method in comparative whole transcriptome profiling5 within discrete tissues or between phenotypically distinct groups of individuals affords new avenues for elucidating molecular mechanisms involved in both normal and abnormal physiological states. Recently, whole transcriptome profiling has been performed on human brain tissue, identifying gene expression differences associated with disease progression6. However, the use of next-generation sequencing has yet to be more widely integrated into mammalian studies. Gene expression studies in mouse models have reported distinct profiles within various brain nuclei using laser capture microscopy (LCM) for sample excision7,8. While LCM affords sample collection with single-cell and discrete brain region precision, the relatively low total RNA yields from the LCM approach can be prohibitive to RNA-Seq and other profiling approaches in mouse brain tissues and may require sub-optimal sample amplification steps. Here, a protocol is presented for microdissection and total RNA extraction from discrete mouse brain regions. Set-diameter tissue corers are used to isolate 13 tissues from 750-μm serial coronal sections of an individual mouse brain. Tissue micropunch samples are immediately frozen and archived. Total RNA is obtained from the samples using magnetic bead-enabled total RNA isolation technology. Resulting RNA samples have adequate yield and quality for use in downstream expression profiling. This microdissection strategy provides a viable option to existing sample collection

  4. UV-laser microdissection system - A novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records (δ13C/δ18O) from tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollaen, Karina; Helle, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Intra-annual stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) studies of tree rings at various incremental resolutions have been attempting to extract valuable seasonal climatic and environmental information or assessing plant ecophysiological processes. For preparing high-resolution isotope samples normally wood segments or cores are mechanically divided in radial direction or cut in tangential direction. After mechanical dissection, wood samples are ground to a fine powder and either cellulose is extracted or bulk wood samples are analyzed. Here, we present a novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records from tree rings using an UV-laser microdissection system. Firstly, tree-ring cellulose is directly extracted from wholewood cross-sections largely leaving the wood anatomical structure intact and saving time as compared to the classical procedure. Secondly, micro-samples from cellulose cross-sections are dissected with an UV-Laser dissection microscope. Tissues of interest from cellulose cross-sections are identified and marked precisely with a screen-pen and dissected via an UV-laser beam. Dissected cellulose segments were automatically collected in capsules and are prepared for stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) analysis. The new techniques facilitate inter- and intra-annual isotope analysis on tree-ring and open various possibilities for comparisons with wood anatomy in plant eco-physiological studies. We describe the design and the handling of this novel methodology and discuss advantages and constraints given by the example of intra-annual oxygen isotope analysis on tropical trees.

  5. Olfactory Neurons Obtained through Nasal Biopsy Combined with Laser-Capture Microdissection: A Potential Approach to Study Treatment Response in Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Soumya; McLean, Charlee; Sawa, Akira; Lin, Sandra Y.; Rai, Narayan; Hipolito, MariaMananita S.; Cascella, Nicola; Nurnberger, John J.I.; Koko, Ishizuka; Nwulia, Evaristus A.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder with poorly understood pathophysiology and typically treated with the mood stabilizer, lithium carbonate. Animal studies as well as human genetic studies indicate that lithium affects molecular targets that are involved in neuronal growth, survival and maturation, and notably molecules involved in Wnt signaling. Given the ethical challenge to obtaining brain biopsies for investigating dynamic molecular changes associated with lithium-response in the central nervous system (CNS), one may consider the use of neurons obtained from olfactory tissues to achieve this goal.The olfactory epithelium contains olfactory receptor neurons at different stages of development and glial-like supporting cells. This provides a unique opportunity to study dynamic changes in the CNS of patients with neuropsychiatric diseases, using olfactory tissue safely obtained from nasal biopsies. To overcome the drawback posed by substantial contamination of biopsied olfactory tissue with non-neuronal cells, a novel approach to obtain enriched neuronal cell populations was developed by combining nasal biopsies with laser-capture microdissection. In this study, a system for investigating treatment-associated dynamic molecular changes in neuronal tissue was developed and validated, using a small pilot sample of BD patients recruited for the study of the molecular mechanisms of lithium treatment response. PMID:25549156

  6. Adaptation of Laser Microdissection Technique for the Study of a Spontaneous Metastatic Mammary Carcinoma Mouse Model by NanoString Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Karen L.; Anver, Miriam R.; Salomon, David S.; Golubeva, Yelena G.

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of tissue is an established tool in medical research for collection of distinguished cell populations under direct microscopic visualization for molecular analysis. LCM samples have been successfully analyzed in a number of genomic and proteomic downstream molecular applications. However, LCM sample collection and preparation procedure has to be adapted to each downstream analysis platform. In this present manuscript we describe in detail the adaptation of LCM methodology for the collection and preparation of fresh frozen samples for NanoString analysis based on a study of a model of mouse mammary gland carcinoma and its lung metastasis. Our adaptation of LCM sample preparation and workflow to the requirements of the NanoString platform allowed acquiring samples with high RNA quality. The NanoString analysis of such samples provided sensitive detection of genes of interest and their associated molecular pathways. NanoString is a reliable gene expression analysis platform that can be effectively coupled with LCM. PMID:27077656

  7. Distributive and Quantitative Analysis of the Main Active Saponins in Panax notoginseng by UHPLC-QTOF/MS Combining with Fluorescence Microscopy and Laser Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quanlan; Liang, Zhitao; Brand, Eric; Chen, Hubiao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2016-02-01

    The distribution of the secondary metabolites in different tissues of Panax notoginseng has not yet been investigated. Furthermore, there is no scientific evidence available for the quality assessment of P. notoginseng. This is the first study on the tissue-specific chemicals to identify and determinate the main secondary metabolite profiling of P. notoginseng in order to provide more information for quality evaluation. In this study, the ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry approach combined with fluorescence microscopy and laser microdissection was developed and validated for distributive and quantitative analyses of the main active saponins of different tissues from P. notoginseng. The results showed that the total content of notoginsenoside R1, ginsenoside Rg1, ginsenoside Rb1, and ginsenoside Rd in the xylem were higher than those in the cork, phloem, and cortex. There was no significant difference in the distribution of saponins between the main roots and the branch roots of the fresh unprocessed materials, nor was there a significant difference in their distribution between the main roots from the fresh unprocessed vs. the dried processed commercial materials. This method illustrated the distribution pattern of the main saponins in the tissues of P. notoginseng, which could help to explain the relationship between its anatomical structures, morphological characteristics, and quality. In summary, this study has significance for the procurement, collection, cultivation, effective management, and quality control of P. notoginseng. PMID:26824619

  8. Mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations are concomitant with ragged red regions of individual, aged muscle fibers: analysis by laser-capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengjin; Wanagat, Jonathan; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2001-01-01

    Laser-capture microdissection was coupled with PCR to define the mitochondrial genotype of aged muscle fibers exhibiting mitochondrial enzymatic abnormalities. These electron transport system (ETS) abnormalities accumulate with age, are localized segmentally along muscle fibers, are associated with fiber atrophy and may contribute to age-related fiber loss. DNA extracted from single, 10 µm thick, ETS abnormal muscle fibers, as well as sections from normal fibers, served as templates for PCR-based deletion analysis. Large mitochondrial (mt) DNA deletion mutations (4.4–9.7 kb) were detected in all 29 ETS abnormal fibers analyzed. Deleted mtDNA genomes were detected only in the regions of the fibers with ETS abnormalities; adjacent phenotypically normal portions of the same fiber contained wild-type mtDNA. In addition, identical mtDNA deletion mutations were found within different sections of the same abnormal region. These findings demonstrate that large deletion mutations are associated with ETS abnormalities in aged rat muscle and that, within a fiber, deletion mutations are clonal. The displacement of wild-type mtDNAs with mutant mtDNAs results in concomitant mitochondrial enzymatic abnormalities, fiber atrophy and fiber breakage. PMID:11691938

  9. Concordance of KRAS mutation status between luminal and peripheral regions of primary colorectal cancer. A laser-capture microdissection-based study.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, M; Hybiak, J; Domagala, W

    2016-03-01

    The presence of KRAS mutation in colorectal cancer (CRC) is a marker of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. However, there are conflicting reports concerning intratumoral heterogeneity of KRAS mutations. The aim of this study was to determine whether within primary CRCs with KRAS mutations intratumoral KRAS mutation heterogeneity can be detected between two strictly defined areas, i.e. the luminal (mucosa/submucosa) and peripheral invasive front of the tumor. Using laser-capture microdissection, from every tumor about 400-500 nests of cancer cells were excised from each of the examined areas (luminal and peripheral) and PNAClamp, a high-sensitivity real-time PCR-based diagnostic assay for KRAS mutation testing, was used for molecular analysis. KRAS mutations were detected in codon 12 in both luminal and peripheral regions in all tumors examined. We conclude that from the point of view of practical KRAS mutation testing for predictive purposes in patients with CRC (i.e. testing mutations in codons 12 and 13) sampling errors are unlikely to occur if in CRCs with KRAS mutations only the luminal (as in biopsy tissue) or peripheral region is examined, provided a sensitive system of detection is applied and an appropriate number of tumor cells with minimal contamination by benign cells is analyzed. PMID:27179269

  10. Laser application to occlusive vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Berns, M.W.; Mirhoseini, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Effect of laser radiation on tissue during laser angioplasty; Optical properties of human blood vessel wall and plaque; Modeling of coronary laser-angioplasty; and Absence of distal emboli during in vivo laser recanalization.

  11. Comprehensive Network Analysis of Anther-Expressed Genes in Rice by the Combination of 33 Laser Microdissection and 143 Spatiotemporal Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Shiono, Katsuhiro; Yano, Kentaro; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Nakazono, Mikio; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Matsuoka, Makoto; Watanabe, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Co-expression networks systematically constructed from large-scale transcriptome data reflect the interactions and functions of genes with similar expression patterns and are a powerful tool for the comprehensive understanding of biological events and mining of novel genes. In Arabidopsis (a model dicot plant), high-resolution co-expression networks have been constructed from very large microarray datasets and these are publicly available as online information resources. However, the available transcriptome data of rice (a model monocot plant) have been limited so far, making it difficult for rice researchers to achieve reliable co-expression analysis. In this study, we performed co-expression network analysis by using combined 44 K agilent microarray datasets of rice, which consisted of 33 laser microdissection (LM)-microarray datasets of anthers, and 143 spatiotemporal transcriptome datasets deposited in RicexPro. The entire data of the rice co-expression network, which was generated from the 176 microarray datasets by the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) method with the mutual rank (MR)-based cut-off, contained 24,258 genes and 60,441 genes pairs. Using these datasets, we constructed high-resolution co-expression subnetworks of two specific biological events in the anther, “meiosis” and “pollen wall synthesis”. The meiosis network contained many known or putative meiotic genes, including genes related to meiosis initiation and recombination. In the pollen wall synthesis network, several candidate genes involved in the sporopollenin biosynthesis pathway were efficiently identified. Hence, these two subnetworks are important demonstrations of the efficiency of co-expression network analysis in rice. Our co-expression analysis included the separated transcriptomes of pollen and tapetum cells in the anther, which are able to provide precise information on transcriptional regulation during male gametophyte development in rice. The co-expression network

  12. The use of laser microdissection in the identification of suitable reference genes for normalization of quantitative real-time PCR in human FFPE epithelial ovarian tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Li, Tao; Huang, Bangxing; Cheng, Henghui; Ding, Hui; Dong, Weihong; Xiao, Man; Liu, Ling; Wang, Zehua

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is a powerful and reproducible method of gene expression analysis in which expression levels are quantified by normalization against reference genes. Therefore, to investigate the potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for epithelial ovarian cancer by qPCR, it is critical to identify stable reference genes. In this study, twelve housekeeping genes (ACTB, GAPDH, 18S rRNA, GUSB, PPIA, PBGD, PUM1, TBP, HRPT1, RPLP0, RPL13A, and B2M) were analyzed in 50 ovarian samples from normal, benign, borderline, and malignant tissues. For reliable results, laser microdissection (LMD), an effective technique used to prepare homogeneous starting material, was utilized to precisely excise target tissues or cells. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and nonparametric (Kruskal-Wallis) tests were used to compare the expression differences. NormFinder and geNorm software were employed to further validate the suitability and stability of the candidate genes. Results showed that epithelial cells occupied a small percentage of the normal ovary indeed. The expression of ACTB, PPIA, RPL13A, RPLP0, and TBP were stable independent of the disease progression. In addition, NormFinder and geNorm identified the most stable combination (ACTB, PPIA, RPLP0, and TBP) and the relatively unstable reference gene GAPDH from the twelve commonly used housekeeping genes. Our results highlight the use of homogeneous ovarian tissues and multiple-reference normalization strategy, e.g. the combination of ACTB, PPIA, RPLP0, and TBP, for qPCR in epithelial ovarian tissues, whereas GAPDH, the most commonly used reference gene, is not recommended, especially as a single reference gene. PMID:24776823

  13. Comprehensive network analysis of anther-expressed genes in rice by the combination of 33 laser microdissection and 143 spatiotemporal microarrays.

    PubMed

    Aya, Koichiro; Suzuki, Go; Suwabe, Keita; Hobo, Tokunori; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Shiono, Katsuhiro; Yano, Kentaro; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Nakazono, Mikio; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Matsuoka, Makoto; Watanabe, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Co-expression networks systematically constructed from large-scale transcriptome data reflect the interactions and functions of genes with similar expression patterns and are a powerful tool for the comprehensive understanding of biological events and mining of novel genes. In Arabidopsis (a model dicot plant), high-resolution co-expression networks have been constructed from very large microarray datasets and these are publicly available as online information resources. However, the available transcriptome data of rice (a model monocot plant) have been limited so far, making it difficult for rice researchers to achieve reliable co-expression analysis. In this study, we performed co-expression network analysis by using combined 44 K agilent microarray datasets of rice, which consisted of 33 laser microdissection (LM)-microarray datasets of anthers, and 143 spatiotemporal transcriptome datasets deposited in RicexPro. The entire data of the rice co-expression network, which was generated from the 176 microarray datasets by the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) method with the mutual rank (MR)-based cut-off, contained 24,258 genes and 60,441 genes pairs. Using these datasets, we constructed high-resolution co-expression subnetworks of two specific biological events in the anther, "meiosis" and "pollen wall synthesis". The meiosis network contained many known or putative meiotic genes, including genes related to meiosis initiation and recombination. In the pollen wall synthesis network, several candidate genes involved in the sporopollenin biosynthesis pathway were efficiently identified. Hence, these two subnetworks are important demonstrations of the efficiency of co-expression network analysis in rice. Our co-expression analysis included the separated transcriptomes of pollen and tapetum cells in the anther, which are able to provide precise information on transcriptional regulation during male gametophyte development in rice. The co-expression network data

  14. Generation of Aorta Transcript Atlases of Wild-Type and Apolipoprotein E-null Mice by Laser Capture Microdissection-Based mRNA Expression Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yin, Changjun; Mohanta, Sarajo; Ma, Zhe; Weber, Christian; Hu, Desheng; Weih, Falk; Habenicht, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a transmural chronic inflammatory disease of medium and large arteries. Though it is well recognized that immune responses contribute to atherosclerosis, it remains unclear whether these responses are carried out in secondary lymphoid organs such as the spleen and lymph nodes and/or within the arterial wall. Arteries are composed of three major layers, i.e., the laminae intima, media, and adventitia. However, each of these layers may play different roles in arterial wall biology and atherogenesis. We identified well-structured artery tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs) in the abdominal aorta adventitia but not in the intima of aged apolipoprotein E-null (ApoE(-/-)) mice. These observations suggested that disease-associated immune responses are highly territorialized within the arterial wall and that the adventitia may play distinct and hitherto unrecognized roles. Here, we set out to apply laser capture microdissection (LCM) to dissect plaque, media, adventitia, and adjacent aorta-draining lymph nodes (LN) in aged ApoE(-/-) mice in attempts to establish the territoriality of atherosclerosis immune responses. Using whole-genome mRNA expression microarrays of arterial wall tissues, we constructed robust transcript atlases of wild-type and ApoE(-/-) mouse aortas. Data were deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information's gene expression omnibus (GEO) and are accessible to the public through the Internet. These transcript atlases are anticipated to prove valuable to address a wide scope of issues ranging from atherosclerosis immunity and inflammation to the role of single genes in regulating arterial wall remodeling. This chapter presents protocols for LCM of mouse aorta and microarray expression analysis from LCM-isolated aorta laminae. PMID:26445797

  15. Biochemical mechanisms of laser vascular tissue fusion.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, C R; Murray, L W; Kopchok, G E; Rosenbaum, D; White, R A

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the biochemical changes that occur in argon laser-fused canine veins compared with control segments of vein. Laser fusions were formed using 0.5 W argon laser energy (1100-1500 J/cm2). Immediately following tissue fusion, blood flow was reestablished to test the integrity of the welds. 1-mm3 sections of the anastomoses and control sections were minced and protein extraction was performed by solubilizing the tissue in hot SDS Laemmli gel sample buffer. The proteins were separated electrophoretically on 5 and 10% polyacylamide SDS gels and silver stained. The analysis demonstrated significant biochemical differences between control and lased veins. We noted increases in several proteins after laser welding: the putative beta chain of type V collagen (5/5 gels), the putative gamma chain of type I collagen (4/5 gels), a 156-kDa protein (based on collagen molecular weight standards) 7/7 gels), an 82-kDa protein (8/9 gels), and several proteins of lower molecular weight (3/8 gels). The increases may be due to crosslinking of lower molecular weight proteins, degradation of higher molecular weight proteins, or increased solubility of certain proteins. These findings suggest that laser welding may occur by formation of crosslinks or by denaturation and reannealment of structural proteins. PMID:1863584

  16. Vascular Welding Using The Argon Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rodney A.; Donayre, Carlos; Kopchok, George; White, Geoffrey; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley; Dwyer, Richard; Uitto, Jouni

    1987-03-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas. Bilateral femoral, carotid or jugular vessels were studied with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralatral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks for each type of repair and evaluated histologically by hematoxylineosin, elastin and trichrome stains, biochemically by the formation of [3H] hyaroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis, ana mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welaing may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large diameter venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas, as they heal comparable to suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively.

  17. A roadmap for zinc trafficking in the developing barley grain based on laser capture microdissection and gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tauris, Birgitte; Borg, Søren; Gregersen, Per L.; Holm, Preben B.

    2009-01-01

    Nutrients destined for the developing cereal grain encounter several restricting barriers on their path towards their final storage sites in the grain. In order to identify transporters and chelating agents that may be involved in transport and deposition of zinc in the barley grain, expression profiles have been generated of four different tissue types: the transfer cells, the aleurone layer, the endosperm, and the embryo. Cells from these tissues were isolated with the ‘laser capture microdissection’ technology and the extracted RNA was subjected to three rounds of T7-based amplification. The amplified RNA was subsequently hybridized to Affymetrix 22K Barley GeneChips. Due to the short average length of the amplified transcripts and the positioning of numerous probe sets at locations more than 400 base pairs (bp) from the poly(A)-tail, a normalization approach was used where the probe positions were taken into account. On the basis of the expression levels of a number of metal homeostasis genes, a working model is proposed for the translocation of zinc from the phloem to the storage sites in the developing grain. PMID:19297552

  18. Comparative transcriptional survey between laser-microdissected cells from laminar abscission zone and petiolar cortical tissue during ethylene-promoted abscission in citrus leaves

    PubMed Central

    Agustí, Javier; Merelo, Paz; Cercós, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R; Talón, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Background Abscission is the cell separation process by which plants are able to shed organs. It has a great impact on the yield of most crop plants. At the same time, the process itself also constitutes an excellent model to study cell separation processes, since it occurs in concrete areas known as abscission zones (AZs) which are composed of a specific cell type. However, molecular approaches are generally hampered by the limited area and cell number constituting the AZ. Therefore, detailed studies at the resolution of cell type are of great relevance in order to accurately describe the process and to identify potential candidate genes for biotechnological applications. Results Efficient protocols for the isolation of specific citrus cell types, namely laminar abscission zone (LAZ) and petiolar cortical (Pet) cells based on laser capture microdissection (LCM) and for RNA microextraction and amplification have been developed. A comparative transcriptome analysis between LAZ and Pet from citrus leaf explants subjected to an in-vitro 24 h ethylene treatment was performed utilising microarray hybridization and analysis. Our analyses of gene functional classes differentially represented in ethylene-treated LAZ revealed an activation program dominated by the expression of genes associated with protein synthesis, protein fate, cell type differentiation, development and transcription. The extensive repertoire of genes associated with cell wall biosynthesis and metabolism strongly suggests that LAZ layers activate both catabolic and anabolic wall modification pathways during the abscission program. In addition, over-representation of particular members of different transcription factor families suggests important roles for these genes in the differentiation of the effective cell separation layer within the many layers contained in the citrus LAZ. Preferential expression of stress-related and defensive genes in Pet reveals that this tissue is likely to be reprogrammed to

  19. Laser capture microdissection as a tool to evaluate human papillomavirus genotyping and methylation as biomarkers of persistence and progression of anal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cornall, Alyssa M; Roberts, Jennifer M; Molano, Monica; Machalek, Dorothy A; Phillips, Samuel; Hillman, Richard J; Grulich, Andrew E; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I Mary; Templeton, David J; Garland, Suzanne M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Anal squamous cell carcinoma is preceded by persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and the cancer precursor, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). Detection of specific HPV genotypes and HPV-related biomarkers may be an option for primary anal screening. However, more data on the natural history of HPV-related anal lesions are required. The outcomes from this study will enhance our understanding of the clinical and biological behaviour of HPV-related anal lesions and inform the development of future HPV genotype and/or biomarker screening tests. Methods and analysis HIV-negative and HIV-positive men who have sex with men, aged 35 years and over, recruited from community-based settings in Sydney, Australia, attend 6 clinic visits over 3 years. At the first 5 visits, participants undergo a digital anorectal examination, an anal swab for HPV genotyping and anal cytology, and high-resolution anoscopy with directed biopsy of any visible abnormalities that are suggestive of any abnormality suspicious of SIL. Tissue sections from participants diagnosed with histologically confirmed HSIL at the baseline clinic visit will undergo laser capture microdissection, HPV detection and genotyping, and quantitation of CpG methylation in baseline and follow-up biopsies. Histological and cytological findings in combination with HPV genotyping data will be used to identify persistent HSIL. HSIL will be stratified as non-persistent and persistent based on their status at 12 months. The performance of HPV genotype and methylation status in predicting disease persistence at 12 months will be assessed, along with associations with HIV status and other covariates such as age. Ethics and dissemination The St Vincent's Hospital Ethics Committee granted ethics approval for the study. Written informed consent is obtained from all individuals before any study-specific procedures are performed. Findings from this study will be disseminated

  20. Comedones Induced by Vascular Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Gulsen Tukenmez; Mansur, Ayse Tulin; Gulec, Ayse Tulin

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old female presented with acne-like blackheads on brownish areas located on the cheek. She had been treated with neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG) laser (1071 nm), 160 j/cm2, three months ago for erythema and telangiectasia of her face. Afterwards, she developed atrophic, slightly depressed, hyperpigmented, 3-4 mm scars with superimposed tiny comedones within the treated areas. Topical treatment with tretinoin 0.05% cream on alternate days, and Sun Protection Factor (SPF) 50 sunscreen daily were commenced. After 2 months, comedones and hyperpigmentation mostly resolved but mild superficial atrophy persisted. According to our knowledge, this is the first case of atrophic scars studded with open comedones, developing shortly after laser therapy used for facial telangiectasia. PMID:27081249

  1. Comedones Induced by Vascular Laser Therapy.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Gulsen Tukenmez; Mansur, Ayse Tulin; Gulec, Ayse Tulin

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old female presented with acne-like blackheads on brownish areas located on the cheek. She had been treated with neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG) laser (1071 nm), 160 j/cm(2), three months ago for erythema and telangiectasia of her face. Afterwards, she developed atrophic, slightly depressed, hyperpigmented, 3-4 mm scars with superimposed tiny comedones within the treated areas. Topical treatment with tretinoin 0.05% cream on alternate days, and Sun Protection Factor (SPF) 50 sunscreen daily were commenced. After 2 months, comedones and hyperpigmentation mostly resolved but mild superficial atrophy persisted. According to our knowledge, this is the first case of atrophic scars studded with open comedones, developing shortly after laser therapy used for facial telangiectasia. PMID:27081249

  2. In Situ Staining and Laser Capture Microdissection of Lymph Node Residing SIV Gag-Specific CD8+ T cells—A Tool to Interrogate a Functional Immune Response Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tjernlund, Annelie; Burgener, Adam; Lindvall, Jessica M.; Peng, Tao; Zhu, Jia; Öhrmalm, Lars; Picker, Louis J.; Broliden, Kristina; McElrath, M. Juliana; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    While a plethora of data describes the essential role of systemic CD8+ T cells in the control of SIV replication little is known about the local in situ CD8+ T cell immune responses against SIV at the intact tissue level, due to technical limitations. In situ staining, using GagCM9 Qdot 655 multimers, were here combined with laser capture microdissection to detect and collect SIV Gag CM9 specific CD8+ T cells in lymph node tissue from SIV infected rhesus macaques. CD8+ T cells from SIV infected and uninfected rhesus macaques were also collected and compared to the SIV GagCM9 specific CD8+ T cells. Illumina bead array and transcriptional analyses were used to assess the transcriptional profiles and the three different CD8+ T cell populations displayed unique transcriptional patterns. This pilot study demonstrates that rapid and specific immunostaining combined with laser capture microdissection in concert with transcriptional profiling may be used to elucidate phenotypic differences between CD8+ T cells in SIV infection. Such technologies may be useful to determine differences in functional activities of HIV/SIV specific T cells. PMID:26986062

  3. In Situ Staining and Laser Capture Microdissection of Lymph Node Residing SIV Gag-Specific CD8+ T cells--A Tool to Interrogate a Functional Immune Response Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tjernlund, Annelie; Burgener, Adam; Lindvall, Jessica M; Peng, Tao; Zhu, Jia; Öhrmalm, Lars; Picker, Louis J; Broliden, Kristina; McElrath, M Juliana; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    While a plethora of data describes the essential role of systemic CD8+ T cells in the control of SIV replication little is known about the local in situ CD8+ T cell immune responses against SIV at the intact tissue level, due to technical limitations. In situ staining, using GagCM9 Qdot 655 multimers, were here combined with laser capture microdissection to detect and collect SIV Gag CM9 specific CD8+ T cells in lymph node tissue from SIV infected rhesus macaques. CD8+ T cells from SIV infected and uninfected rhesus macaques were also collected and compared to the SIV GagCM9 specific CD8+ T cells. Illumina bead array and transcriptional analyses were used to assess the transcriptional profiles and the three different CD8+ T cell populations displayed unique transcriptional patterns. This pilot study demonstrates that rapid and specific immunostaining combined with laser capture microdissection in concert with transcriptional profiling may be used to elucidate phenotypic differences between CD8+ T cells in SIV infection. Such technologies may be useful to determine differences in functional activities of HIV/SIV specific T cells. PMID:26986062

  4. Laser ablation of upper gastrointestinal vascular ectasias: long term results.

    PubMed Central

    Sargeant, I R; Loizou, L A; Rampton, D; Tulloch, M; Bown, S G

    1993-01-01

    Forty one patients with bleeding vascular ectasias of the upper gastrointestinal tract who required blood transfusion were treated with endoscopic Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation and followed for 34 months (median). Four distinct groups of patients were identified. There was a sustained reduction in transfusion requirements after laser treatment in all those with single (nine patients) and multiple (seven patients) angiodysplasia, in 12 of 16 (75%) patients with watermelon stomachs, and in six of nine (66%) patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Overall, 25 patients (61%) required minimal or no transfusion after treatment and nine (22%) whose bleeding was controlled initially, later developed recurrent bleeding which was controlled with further laser (total 34 of 41, 83%). Surgery succeeded in a further three patients (7%) in whom laser had failed (in one case possibly because of laser induced haemorrhage). Five more cases of possible laser induced haemorrhage resolved with conservative treatment. One patient sustained a treatment related perforation and died: one patient with cirrhosis died of encephalopathy within one month of starting laser treatment. In two patients transfusion requirements were unchanged despite laser. Nd:YAG laser is a safe and effective treatment for most patients with upper gastrointestinal angiodysplasia. PMID:8491392

  5. Preliminary experience with laser reinforcement of vascular anastomoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Mehmet C.; Bass, Lawrence S.; Williams, Matthew R.; Benvenisty, Alan I.; Hardy, Mark A.; Libutti, Steven K.; Eaton, Alexander M.; Treat, Michael R.; Nowygrod, Roman

    1991-06-01

    Laser tissue soldering techniques allow reinforcement of sutured repairs and may be a useful adjunct in reducing anastomotic bleeding. Initial results of our clinical trial with laser solder reinforcement are reported. Twenty-one patients underwent standard polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) graft arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation. In 11 patients thrombin soaked gelatin sponges were placed around the anastomoses and in 10 laser reinforcement was accomplished. Three lasers were used: KTP (532 nm, power density 4.1 W/cm2, spot size .5 cm), CO2 (10,600 nm, power density 14.1 W/cm2, spot size .3 cm), and diode (805 nm, power density 9.6 W/cm2, spot size .2 cm). The solder consisting of 0.4 cc hyaluronate, 0.2 cc albumin, and 3 drops of the appropriate laser enhancing dye (fluorescein for KTP, indocyanine green for the diode, water for CO2) was applied to the target tissues prior to laser exposure. The laser was directed over the tissue in a sweeping motion until the solder had desiccated. Several lessons are evident from our experience. First, over exposure to the laser results in solder charring and ineffective reinforcement. Greater laser exposure with less undesired solder damage is achieved if dye is added to the solder. Second, the solder should be spread over the target in a thin layer to facilitate controlled desiccation and tissue bonding. Additional layers can be applied as required. Although improvements in the solder and laser technique are required, these early results demonstrate a potential clinical use for laser soldered reinforcement during vascular anastomoses.

  6. Fabrication of microfluidic vascular phantoms by laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Scott A.; Luu, Long; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-06-01

    Imaging of capillary structures and monitoring of blood flow within vasculature is becoming more common in clinical settings. However, very few dynamic phantoms exist which mimic capillary structures. We report the fabrication and testing of microfluidic, vascular phantoms aimed at the study of blood flow. These phantoms are fabricated using low-cost, off-the-shelf materials and require no lithographic processing, stamping, or embossing. Using laser micromachining, complex microfluidic structures can be fabricated in under an hour. The laser system is capable of producing microfluidic features with sizes on the order of tens of microns, over an area of several square centimeters. Because the laser micromachining system is computer controlled and accepts both vector and raster files, the microfluidic structure can be simple, rectilinear patterns or complex, anatomically correct patterns. The microfluidic devices interface with simple off the shelf syringe pumps. The microfluidic devices fabricated with this technique were used for non-invasive monitoring of flow using speckle based techniques.

  7. Online, absolute quantitation of propranolol from spatially distinct 20-μm and 40-μm dissections of brain, liver, and kidney thin tissue sections by laser microdissection – liquid vortex capture – mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Vavrek, Marissa; Freddo, Carol; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Cahill, John F.; Weiskittel, Taylor M.

    2016-05-23

    Here, spatial resolved quantitation of chemical species in thin tissue sections by mass spectrometric methods has been constrained by the need for matrix-matched standards or other arduous calibration protocols and procedures to mitigate matrix effects (e.g., spatially varying ionization suppression). Reported here is the use of laser cut and drop sampling with a laser microdissection-liquid vortex capture electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LMD-LVC/ESI-MS/MS) system for online and absolute quantitation of propranolol in mouse brain, kidney, and liver thin tissue sections of mice administered with the drug at a 7.5 mg/kg dose, intravenously. In this procedure either 20 μm x 20more » μm or 40 μm x 40 μm tissue microdissections were cut and dropped into the flowing solvent of the capture probe. During transport to the ESI source drug related material was completely extracted from the tissue into the solvent, which contained a known concentration of propranolol-d7 as an internal standard. This allowed absolute quantitation to be achieved with an external calibration curve generated from standards containing the same fixed concentration of propranolold-d7 and varied concentrations of propranolol. Average propranolol concentrations determined with the laser cut and drop sampling method closely agreed with concentration values obtained from 2.3 mm diameter tissue punches from serial sections that were extracted and quantified by HPLC/ESI-MS/MS measurements. In addition, the relative abundance of hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites were recorded and found to be consistent with previous findings.« less

  8. Online, Absolute Quantitation of Propranolol from Spatially Distinct 20- and 40-μm Dissections of Brain, Liver, and Kidney Thin Tissue Sections by Laser Microdissection-Liquid Vortex Capture-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cahill, John F; Kertesz, Vilmos; Weiskittel, Taylor M; Vavrek, Marissa; Freddo, Carol; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2016-06-01

    Spatial resolved quantitation of chemical species in thin tissue sections by mass spectrometric methods has been constrained by the need for matrix-matched standards or other arduous calibration protocols and procedures to mitigate matrix effects (e.g., spatially varying ionization suppression). Reported here is the use of laser "cut and drop" sampling with a laser microdissection-liquid vortex capture electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LMD-LVC/ESI-MS/MS) system for online and absolute quantitation of propranolol in mouse brain, kidney, and liver thin tissue sections of mice administered with the drug at a 7.5 mg/kg dose, intravenously. In this procedure either 20 μm × 20 μm or 40 μm × 40 μm tissue microdissections were cut and dropped into the flowing solvent of the capture probe. During transport to the ESI source drug related material was completely extracted from the tissue into the solvent, which contained a known concentration of propranolol-d7 as an internal standard. This allowed absolute quantitation to be achieved with an external calibration curve generated from standards containing the same fixed concentration of propranolol-d7 and varied concentrations of propranolol. Average propranolol concentrations determined with the laser "cut and drop" sampling method closely agreed with concentration values obtained from 2.3 mm diameter tissue punches from serial sections that were extracted and quantified by HPLC/ESI-MS/MS measurements. In addition, the relative abundance of hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites were recorded and found to be consistent with previous findings. PMID:27214103

  9. Laser therapy and sclerotherapy in the treatment of oral and maxillofacial hemangioma and vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crişan, Bogdan; BǎciuÅ£, Mihaela; BǎciuÅ£, Grigore; Crişan, Liana; Bran, Simion; Rotar, Horatiu; Moldovan, Iuliu; Vǎcǎraş, Sergiu; Mitre, Ileana; Barbur, Ioan; Magdaş, Andreea; Dinu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Hemangioma and vascular malformations in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery is a pathology more often found in recent years in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the laser photocoagulation performed with a diode laser (Ga-Al-As) 980 nm wavelength in the treatment of vascular lesions which are located on the oral and maxillofacial areas, using color Doppler ultrasonography for evaluation of the results. We also made a comparison between laser therapy and sclerotherapy in order to establish treatment protocols and recommendations associated with this pathology. We conducted a controlled study on a group of 92 patients (38 male and 54 female patients, with an average age of 36 years) having low flow hemangioma and vascular malformations. Patients in this trial received one of the methods of treatment for vascular lesions such as hemangioma and vascular malformations: laser therapy or sclerotherapy. After laser therapy we have achieved a reduction in size of hemangioma and vascular malformations treated with such a procedure, and the aesthetic results were favorable. No reperfusion or recanalization of laser treated vascular lesions was observed after an average follow-up of 6 to 12 months. In case of sclerotherapy a reduction in the size of vascular lesions was also obtained. The 980 nm diode laser has been proved to be an effective tool in the treatment of hemangioma and vascular malformations in oral and maxillofacial area. Laser therapy in the treatment of vascular lesions was more effective than the sclerotherapy procedure.

  10. Present status and new perspectives in laser welding of vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Esposito, G; Rossi, F; Matteini, P; Puca, A; Albanese, A; Sabatino, G; Maira, G; Pini, R

    2011-01-01

    The laser welding of biological tissues is a particular use of lasers in surgery. The technique has been proposed since the 1970s for surgical applications, such as repairing blood vessels, nerves, tendons, bronchial fistulae, skin and ocular tissues. In vascular surgery, two procedures have been tested and optimized in animal models, both ex vivo and in vivo, in order to design different approaches for blood vessels anastomoses and for the repair of vascular lesions: the laser-assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA) and the laser-assisted vessel repair (LAVR). Sealing tissues by laser may overcome the problems related to the use of conventional closuring methods that are generally associated with various degrees of vascular wall damage that can ultimately predispose to vessel thrombosis and occlusion. In fact, the use of a laser welding technique provides several advantages such as simplification of the surgical procedure, reduction of the operative time, suppression of bleeding, and may guarantee an optimal healing process of vascular structures, very similar to restitutio ad integrum. Despite the numerous preclinical studies performed by several research groups, the clinical applications of laser-assisted anastomosis or vessel repair are still far off. Substantial breakthrough in the laser welding of biological tissues may come from the advent of nanotechnologies. Herein we describe the present status and the future perspectives in laser welding of vascular structures. PMID:21880202

  11. Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation of benign oral vascular lesions: a case series.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Rui; Silva, Igor Henrique; Carvalho, Alessandra Tavares; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino

    2015-11-01

    Vascular anomalies of the head and neck are common lesions usually associated with functional and/or aesthetic limitations. The aim of the present paper was to report a case series of oral vascular malformations treated with Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation, highlighting the clinical evolution and post-surgical complications. Fifteen patients diagnosed with oral vascular malformations were treated with Nd:YAG laser followed by three sessions of biostimulation. None of the patients presented post-surgical pain, but 6 of 15 patients (40%) experienced minimal post-surgical complications. All cases presented complete resolution of the lesions after laser treatment. More importantly, 12 out of 15 (80%) resolved after a single session. Low morbidity, minimal patient discomfort, and satisfactory aesthetic results point Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation as a promising option for the management of benign oral vascular lesions. PMID:25962368

  12. Pulsed dye laser application in ablation of vascular ectasias of the larynx: a preliminary animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Peak; Wang, Zhi; Perrault, Donald F., Jr.; McMillan, Kathleen; Pankratov, Michail M.

    1995-05-01

    Vascular ectasias (dilatation) and vascular lesions of the larynx are difficult to treat with exciting modalities. Varix (enlarged vessel) of the vocal folds, vocal fold hemorrhage, vascular polyp, hemangioma, intubation or contact granuloma are common problems which disturb voice. Current applications of CO2 laser and cautery often damage the delicate vocal fold cover. The 585 nm dermatologic pulsed dye laser may be an ideal substitute. Two adult canines were examined under anesthesia via microlaryngoscopy technique. Pulsed dye laser (SPTL-1a, Candela Laser Corp., Wayland, MA) energy was delivered via the micromanipulator with the 3.1-mm spot size in single pulses of 6, 8, and 10 Joules/cm2 and applied to the vessels of the vocal folds, epiglottis, and arytenoid cartilage. Endoscopic examination was carried out immediately after the treatment and at 4 weeks postoperatively. The animals were sacrificed at 3 weeks, larynges excised, and whole organ laryngeal section were prepared for histology. Pulsed dye laser thrombosed vessels of the vocal fold using 6 or 8 Joules/cm2. Vascular break and leakage occurred at 10 Joules/cm2. Follow up examination showed excellent vessel obliteration or thrombosis without scarring or injury to the overlying tissues. Histologic examination shows vascular thrombosis without inflammation and fibrosis in the vocal fold cover. Pulsed dye laser may have promise in treatment of vascular lesions of the larynx and upper airway.

  13. Comparison of the treatment of vascular lesions with the copper-vapor laser and flashlamp-pumped dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Waner, Milton; McGrew, Ben; Colvin, G. B.; Montague, Donna

    1992-08-01

    Vascular lesions such as port-wine stains and telangiectases are sometimes treated with carbon-dioxide lasers, argon lasers or argon-pumped dye lasers; however these lasers are non- specific in their thermal effect on tissues and as a result often cause significant scarring. Recently, evidence has accumulated that the flashlamp-pumped dye (585 nm) and copper- vapor (578 nm) lasers, which produce pulsed light that is efficiently absorbed by hemoglobin, are more selective in coagulating abnormal vascular tissue and as a result give a superior clinical result. It is not yet clear what the most important physical and biological mechanisms are during the light-tissue interaction mediated by these two lasers. The post-treatment sequence of events is different for tissue irradiated by each laser; most significantly, the flashlamp-pumped dye laser causes significant transient purpura, whereas the copper vapor laser causes blanching and eschar formation. The clinical outcome, that is regression of the lesion, is equally successful with either laser although some evidence has accumulated showing that the flashlamp-pumped dye laser is best suited to the treatment of small vessel disease while the copper-vapor laser is better for the treatment of large vessel disease. In this paper, we will discuss our observations of the treatment of vascular lesions on humans with the copper-vapor and flashlamp-pumped dye lasers using empirically derived efficacious treatment parameters. Mathematical models of light and heat propagation and in vivo experiments involving mice ears and rat skin flaps will be used to elucidate what we feel are the important underlying mechanisms of this vascular lesion laser therapy.

  14. New cell biological applications of the laser microbeam technique: the microdissection and skinning of muscle fibers and the perforation and fusion of sarcolemma vesicles.

    PubMed

    Veigel, C; Steubing, R W; Harim, A; Weber, C; Greulich, K O; Fink, R H

    1994-02-01

    In a novel approach, the laser microbeam technique was used to selectively perforate the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers, to prepare fragments of myofibrillar bundles of very small dimensions, and to induce fusion of sarcolemma vesicles. Using a highly focused UV laser microbeam with an effective beam diameter of down to 0.5 micron, very small (< 3 microns) myofibrillar fragments with an intact sarcomere striation pattern were obtained. When small amounts of Ca2+ were released in the vicinity of such a fragment by laser-photolysis of the photolabile compound Ca(2+)-nitr-7 the bundle shortened due to the development of calcium-activated force. We also show that very small selected areas from myopathic single muscle cells can be dissected with a precision unmatched by other current techniques. The microbeam was also used to remove very small patches of the sarcolemma of murine skeletal muscle fibers so giving diffusional access to the myoplasmic interior and thus resulting in a "skinning" of the fiber. To ensure that such laser-skinned fiber segments were physiologically intact we determined the Ca(2+)-activated force and caffeine-induced Ca(2+)-release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The fibers showed normal characteristics for force production, Ca(2+)-release and uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. To test the effects of the laser microbeam on the muscle membrane directly, we prepared sarcolemma vesicles of skeletal muscle fibers. The vesicles could be selectively perforated with single laser pulses to allow entry of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran as a fluorescent marker. Adjacent vesicles were caused to fuse by a few pulses at low intensity of the laser microbeam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7516289

  15. Microdissection, mRNA amplification and microarray: a study of pleural mesothelial and malignant mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Steve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Lannes, Béatrice; Neuville, Agnès; Bellocq, Jean-Pierre; Keith, Gérard; Rihn, Bertrand Henri

    2004-01-01

    The studies of molecular alterations in tumor cells with microarrays are often hampered by inherent tissue heterogeneity. The emergence of Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) allowed us to overcome this challenge since it gives selective access to cancer cells that are isolated from their native tissue environment. In this report, we microdissected mesothelial cells and malignant mesothelioma cells of ex vivo resected specimens using LCM. Amplified RNA from mesothelial and mesothelioma microdissected cells allowed us to measure global gene expression with 10 K-microarrays in four independent experiments. We screened 9850 annotated human genes, 1275 of which have satisfied our data analysis requirements. They included 302 overexpressed genes and 160 downregulated genes in mesothelioma microdissected cells as compared to mesothelial microdissected cells. Among them, the expression levels of eight genes, namely BF, FTL, IGFBP7, RARRES1, RARRES2, RBP1, SAT, and TXN according to HUGO nomenclature, were increased, whereas six: ALOX5AP, CLNS1A, EIF4A2, ELK3, REQ and SYPL, were found to be underexpressed in mesothelioma microdissected cells. The ferritin light polypeptide (FTL) gene overexpression was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR. Our approach allowed a comprehensive in situ examination of mesothelioma and provided an accurate way to find new marker genes that may be useful for diagnosis and treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. PMID:14987796

  16. Production of high quality brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) RNA from isolated populations of rat spinal cord motor neurons obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Prachi; Premkumar, Brian; Morris, Renée

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is composed of multiple cellular elements, making it challenging to segregate one particular cell type to study their gene expression profile. For instance, as motor neurons represent only 5-10% of the total cell population of the spinal cord, meaningful transcriptional analysis on these neurons is almost impossible to achieve from homogenized spinal cord tissue. A major challenge faced by scientists is to obtain good quality RNA from small amounts of starting material. In this paper, we used Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) techniques to identify and isolate spinal cord motor neurons. The present analysis revealed that perfusion with paraformaldehyde (PFA) does not alter RNA quality. RNA integrity numbers (RINs) of tissue samples from rubrospinal tract (RST)-transected, intact spinal cord or from whole spinal cord homogenate were all above 8, which indicates intact, high-quality RNA. Levels of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or for its tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) were not affected by rubrospinal tract (RST) transection, a surgical procedure that deprive motor neurons from one of their main supraspinal input. The isolation of pure populations of neurons with LCM techniques allows for robust transcriptional characterization that cannot be achieved with spinal cord homogenates. Such preparations of pure population of motor neurons will provide valuable tools to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying spinal cord injury and neuromuscular diseases. In the near future, LCM techniques might be instrumental to the success of gene therapy for these debilitating conditions. PMID:27260986

  17. Laser treatment of 13 benign oral vascular lesions by three different surgical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Umberto; Del Vecchio, Alessandro; Russo, Claudia; Gaimari, Gianfranco; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; España, Antoni J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Benign Oral Vascular Lesions (BOVLs) are a group of vascular diseases characterized by congenital, inflammatory or neoplastic vascular dilations clinically evidenced as more or less wide masses of commonly dark bluish color. If traumatized BOVLs are characterized by a great risk of hemorrhage and their treatment usually requires great caution to prevent massive bleeding. In the last decades lasers have dramatically changed the way of treatment of BOVLs permitting the application of even peculiar techniques that gave interesting advantages in their management reducing hemorrhage risks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capabilities and disadvantages of three laser assisted techniques in the management of BOVLs. Study design: In this study 13 BOVLs were treated by three different laser techniques: the traditional excisional biopsy (EB), and two less invasive techniques, the transmucosal thermocoagulation (TMT) and the intralesional photocoagulation (ILP). Two different laser devices were adopted in the study: a KTP laser (DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) and a GaAlAs laser (Laser Innovation, Castelgandolfo, Italy, 808nm) selected since their great effectiveness on hemoglobin. Results: In each case, lasers permitted safe treatments of BOVLs without hemorrhages, both during the intervention and in the post-operative period. The minimally invasive techniques (TMT and ILP) permitted even the safe resolution of big lesions without tissue loss. Conclusions: Laser devices confirm to be the gold standard in BOVLs treatment, permitting even the introduction of minimal invasive surgery principles and reducing the risks of hemorrhage typical of these neoplasms. As usual in laser surgery, it is necessary a clear knowledge of the devices and of the laser-tissue interaction to optimize the results reducing risks and disadvantages. Key words:Oral vascular diseases, laser, photocoagulation. PMID:23385496

  18. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in fractional laser resurfacing with the carbon dioxide laser.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Ge, Hongmei; Zhou, Chuanqing; Chai, Xinyu; Ren, Qiu Shi

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mechanisms of cutaneous remodeling induced by fractional CO(2) laser treatment. The dorsal skin of Kunming mice was exposed to a single-pass fractional CO(2) laser treatment. Biopsies were taken 1 h, and 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 days after treatment. Skin samples VEGF expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, fibroblasts by hematoxylin-eosin staining, and types I and III collagen by ELISA. Staining for VEGF was found in many types of cell including fibroblasts. The amount of VEGF in the skin of laser-treated areas had increased significantly compared to that in the control areas on days 1 and 3 (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, respectively), then decreased by day 7 after treatment and returned to the baseline level. The number of fibroblasts in the skin of the laser-treated areas had increased significantly compared to that in control areas on days 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 after irradiation (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01, respectively). The amount of type I collagen was significantly higher in the skin of the laser-treated areas compared to that in control areas from day 28 to day 56 (P < 0.05, respectively), and type III collagen was significantly higher from day 3 to day 56 (P < 0.05, P < 0.05, P < 0.05, P < 0.05, P < 0.01, respectively). There was a positive correlation between the level of VEGF and fibroblast proliferation early stage after laser treatment (r = 0.853, P < 0.01), but there was no correlation after the first week (r = -0.124, P > 0.05). The amounts of type I and III collagen showed no significant correlations with the expression of VEGF in the late stages after laser treatment (r = 0.417, P > 0.05 and r = 0.340, P > 0.05, respectively). The results suggest that VEGF might be mainly involved in the early stages of wound healing, including the stages

  19. Fiber laser micromachining of thin NiTi tubes for shape memory vascular stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Dong Bo; Tong, Yi Fei; Zhu, Yu Fu

    2016-07-01

    Nickel titanium (NiTi) alloy has widely been used in the vascular stent manufacturing due to its excellent properties. Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser is commonly used for the preparation of metal vascular stents. Recently, fiber lasers have been used for stent profiling for better cutting quality. To investigate the cutting-kerf characters of NiTi vascular stents fabricated by fiber laser cutting, laser cutting experiments with thin NiTi tubes were conducted in this study, while NiTi sheets were used in other fiber laser cutting studies. Different with striation topography, new topographies such as layer topography and topography mixed with layers and striations were observed, and the underlying reason for new topographies was also discussed. Comparative research on different topographies was conducted through analyzing the surface roughness, kerf width, heat-affected zone (HAZ) and dross formation. Laser cutting process parameters have a comprehensive influence on the cutting quality; in this study, the process parameters' influences on the cutting quality were studied from the view of power density along the cutting direction. The present research provides a guideline for improving the cutting quality of NiTi vascular stents.

  20. Selective disruption of vascular endothelium of zebrafish embryos by ultrafast laser microsurgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Suk-Yi; Moon, Heh-Young; Kim, Tag Gyum; Lee, Heung Soon; Sidhu, Mehra S.; Kim, Changho; Jeon, Jae-Phil; Jeoung, Sae Chae

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that ultrafast laser irradiation could selectively disrupt vascular endothelium of zebrafish embryos in vivo. Ultrafast lasers minimize the collateral damage in the vicinity of the laser focus and eventually reduce coagulation in the tissues. We have also found that the threshold fluence for lesion formation of the vascular endothelium strongly depends on the developmental stage of the embryos. The threshold laser fluence required to induce apparent lesions in the vascular structure for Somite 14, 20 and 25 stages is about 5 J/cm2 ~7 J/cm2, which is much lower than that for the later development stages of Prim 16 and Prim 20 of 30 J/cm2 ~50 J/cm2. The proposed method for treating the vascular cord of zebrafish embryos in the early stage of development has potential as a selective and effective method to induce a fatal lesion in the vascular endothelium without damaging the developed blood vessels. PMID:26713187

  1. The Chromosome Microdissection and Microcloning Technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Xin; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Zan-Min

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome microdissection followed by microcloning is an efficient tool combining cytogenetics and molecular genetics that can be used for the construction of the high density molecular marker linkage map and fine physical map, the generation of probes for chromosome painting, and the localization and cloning of important genes. Here, we describe a modified technique to microdissect a single chromosome, paint individual chromosomes, and construct single-chromosome DNA libraries. PMID:27511173

  2. Optical diagnostics of vascular reactions triggered by weak allergens using laser speckle-contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu L; Kalchenko, V V; Astaf'eva, N G; Meglinski, I V

    2014-08-31

    The capability of using the laser speckle contrast imaging technique with a long exposure time for visualisation of primary acute skin vascular reactions caused by a topical application of a weak contact allergen is considered. The method is shown to provide efficient and accurate detection of irritant-induced primary acute vascular reactions of skin. The presented technique possesses a high potential in everyday diagnostic practice, preclinical studies, as well as in the prognosis of skin reactions to the interaction with potentially allergenic materials. (laser biophotonics)

  3. Excimer laser phototherapy for the dissolution of vascular obstruction

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1984-01-09

    Removal of abnormal human tissue with reduced thermal damage is achieved by selecting a laser having a wavelength in the order of 290 to 400 nm, orienting a laser-transmitting glass member toward the abnormal tissue and directing the laser through the glass member at power densities, pulse rates, and times sufficient to cause multiphoton absorption and bond breaking by Coulomb repulsion rather than thermal destruction. 2 figures.

  4. Effect of dye laser pulse duration on selective cutaneous vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, J.M.; Tan, O.T.; Kerschmann, R.; Boll, J.; Furumoto, H.; Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.

    1986-11-01

    The pulsed dye laser at 577 nm, a wavelength well absorbed by oxyhemoglobin, causes highly selective thermal injury to cutaneous blood vessels. Confinement of thermal damage to microvessels is, in theory, related to the laser exposure time (pulsewidth) on selective vascular injury. This study investigates the effect of 577 nm dye laser pulsewidth on selective vascular injury. Nine Caucasian, normal volunteers received 577 nm dye laser exposures at pulsewidths of 1.5-350 microseconds to their skin. Clinical purpura threshold exposure doses were determined in each volunteer, and biopsies of threshold and suprathreshold doses were examined in each volunteer. The laser exposure dose required to produce purpura increased as pulsewidth increased in all 9 subjects (p less than 0.001). This finding corresponds to laser pulsewidths equal to or exceeding the thermal relaxation times for dermal blood vessels. Histologically, vessel damage was selectively, but qualitatively, different for short vs long pulsewidths. Pulsewidths shorter than 20 microseconds caused vessel wall fragmentation and hemorrhage, whereas longer pulsewidths caused no significant hemorrhage. The purpura noted clinically appears to be due to a coagulum of intralumenal denatured erythrocytes. At 24 h, there was marked vessel wall necrosis at all pulsewidths. The short pulsewidths may cause erythrocyte vaporization, rapid thermal expansion, and mechanical vessel rupture with hemorrhage. Long pulsewidths appear to cause thermal denaturation with less mechanical vessel damage. The selective, nonhemorrhagic, vascular necrosis caused by the long-pulsewidth dye laser may lead to a more desirable clinical outcome in the therapy of blood vessel disease processes.

  5. Initial trial of argon ion laser endarterectomy for peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene, J.; Ott, R.A.; Baribeau, Y.; McColgan, S.J.; Berns, M.W.; Mason, G.R. )

    1990-08-01

    In the initial of open laser endarterectomy, 16 patients underwent 18 reconstructions for claudication (13 patients), rest pain (3 patients), and gangrene (2 patients). The mean (+/- SD) preoperative ankle arm index was 0.53 +/- 0.18. The laser endarterectomies were aorto-bi-iliac (1 patient), iliac (1 patient), superficial femoral (7 patients), profunda femoral (7 patients), and popliteal-posterior tibial (2 patients). All operations included surgical exposure, vascular control, administration of heparin, and an arteriotomy. Atheromas were dissected from arteries with argon ion laser radiation (power, 1.0 W). End points were welded with laser light. Arteries were closed primarily. The laser endarterectomies were 6 to 60 cm long and required 168 J to 2447.5 J. All patients had symptomatic relief, with a postoperative ankle arm index of 0.97 +/- 0.10. There were no arterial perforations from laser radiation. Surgical complications included early thrombosis requiring thrombectomy (3 patients) and hematoma requiring evacuation (1 patient). The laser endarterectomies have an 88% patency at 1 year. Open endarterectomy can be performed with laser radiation. A larger clinical trial is necessary to define the indications for laser endarterectomy in peripheral vascular disease.

  6. CpG Methylation Analysis of HPV16 in Laser Capture Microdissected Archival Tissue and Whole Tissue Sections from High Grade Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions: A Potential Disease Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Molano, Monica; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Roberts, Jennifer M; Machalek, Dorothy A; Phillips, Samuel; Chandler, David; Hillman, Richard J; Grulich, Andrew E; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I Mary; Templeton, David J; Cornall, Alyssa M

    2016-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of anal cancer are increasing globally. More than 90% of anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC) are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Studies on HPV-related anogenital lesions have shown that patterns of methylation of viral and cellular DNA targets could potentially be developed as disease biomarkers. Lesion-specific DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from existing or prospective patient cohorts may constitute a valuable resource for methylation analysis. However, low concentrations of DNA make these samples technically challenging to analyse using existing methods. We therefore set out to develop a sensitive and reproducible nested PCR-pyrosequencing based method to accurately quantify methylation at 10 CpG sites within the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in the viral upstream regulatory region of HPV16 genome. Methylation analyses using primary and nested PCR-pyrosequencing on 52 FFPE tissue [26 paired whole tissue sections (WTS) and laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues] from patients with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions was performed. Using nested PCR, methylation results were obtained for the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in 86.4% of the WTS and 81.8% of the LCM samples. Methylation patterns were strongly correlated within median values of matched pairs of WTS and LCM sections, but overall methylation was higher in LCM samples at different CpG sites. High grade lesions showed low methylation levels in the E2BS1 and E2BS2 regions, with increased methylation detected in the E2BS,3,4/Sp1 regions, showing the highest methylation at CpG site 37. The method developed is highly sensitive in samples with low amounts of DNA and demonstrated to be suitable for archival samples. Our data shows a possible role of specific methylation in the HPV16 URR for detection of HSIL. PMID:27529629

  7. CpG Methylation Analysis of HPV16 in Laser Capture Microdissected Archival Tissue and Whole Tissue Sections from High Grade Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions: A Potential Disease Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Molano, Monica; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Roberts, Jennifer M.; Machalek, Dorothy A.; Phillips, Samuel; Chandler, David; Hillman, Richard J.; Grulich, Andrew E.; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I. Mary; Templeton, David J.; Cornall, Alyssa M.

    2016-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of anal cancer are increasing globally. More than 90% of anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC) are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Studies on HPV-related anogenital lesions have shown that patterns of methylation of viral and cellular DNA targets could potentially be developed as disease biomarkers. Lesion-specific DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from existing or prospective patient cohorts may constitute a valuable resource for methylation analysis. However, low concentrations of DNA make these samples technically challenging to analyse using existing methods. We therefore set out to develop a sensitive and reproducible nested PCR-pyrosequencing based method to accurately quantify methylation at 10 CpG sites within the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in the viral upstream regulatory region of HPV16 genome. Methylation analyses using primary and nested PCR-pyrosequencing on 52 FFPE tissue [26 paired whole tissue sections (WTS) and laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues] from patients with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions was performed. Using nested PCR, methylation results were obtained for the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in 86.4% of the WTS and 81.8% of the LCM samples. Methylation patterns were strongly correlated within median values of matched pairs of WTS and LCM sections, but overall methylation was higher in LCM samples at different CpG sites. High grade lesions showed low methylation levels in the E2BS1 and E2BS2 regions, with increased methylation detected in the E2BS,3,4/Sp1 regions, showing the highest methylation at CpG site 37. The method developed is highly sensitive in samples with low amounts of DNA and demonstrated to be suitable for archival samples. Our data shows a possible role of specific methylation in the HPV16 URR for detection of HSIL. PMID:27529629

  8. Laser speckle contrast imaging: monitoring blood flow dynamics and vascular structure of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Zhou, Sibo; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a noninvasive optical image technique that has been developed for imaging in vivo blood flow dynamics and vascular structure with high spatial and temporal resolution. It records the full-field spatio-temporal characteristics of microcirculation in real time without the need of laser beam flying. In this paper applications of this technique for monitoring changes of blood flow and vascular structure following photodynamic therapy (PDT) in vivo model were demonstrated. In this study, an in vivo model of chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) at embryo age (EA) of 10~13 days, was observed following PDT irradiated by a power tunable laser diode (λ = 656.5 nm). Laser intensity incident on the treatment site was maintained at 40 mW/cm2 and photosensitizer of Pyropheophorbide Acid (Pyro-Acid) was used. CAM was adopted in PDT since it is a transparent in vivo model and the irradiated lights of laser can penetrate tumor with greater depth. The laser delivered through fiber bundle to the treatment site in PDT also acted as the coherent light source of LSCI. This study shows that LSCI can be used to assess the efficacy of peripheral vessels damage of tumor in PDT by monitoring changes of blood flow and vascular structure.

  9. Statistical characteristics of surface integrity by fiber laser cutting of Nitinol vascular stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C. H.; Liu, J. F.; Guo, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Nitinol alloys have been widely used in manufacturing of vascular stents due to the outstanding properties such as superelasticity, shape memory, and superior biocompatibility. Laser cutting is the dominant process for manufacturing Nitinol stents. Conventional laser cutting usually produces unsatisfactory surface integrity which has a significant detrimental impact on stent performance. Emerging as a competitive process, fiber laser with high beam quality is expected to produce much less thermal damage such as striation, dross, heat affected zone (HAZ), and recast layer. To understand the process capability of fiber laser cutting of Nitinol alloy, a design-of-experiment based laser cutting experiment was performed. The kerf geometry, roughness, topography, microstructure, and hardness were studied to better understand the nature of the HAZ and recast layer in fiber laser cutting. Moreover, effect size analysis was conducted to investigate the relationship between surface integrity and process parameters.

  10. Effect of epidermal pigmentation on selective vascular effects of pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, O.T.; Kerschmann, R.; Parrish, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of epidermal pigmentation on the threshold exposure dose for inducing purpura with a tunable dye laser at 577 nm, 1.5 microseconds pulse duration, was studied in 21 human volunteers with varied genetically determined amounts of melanin. More laser energy was required to produce purpura as constitutive skin pigmentation increased. Histology showed that, in lighter skin, the laser threshold dose produced the most specific vascular injury with no disruption of surrounding structures. In more pigmented skin, damage occurred in the epidermal basal layer and very few changes were seen in blood vessels below.

  11. Optimizing treatment parameters for the vascular malformations using 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Lin, He; Xie, Shusen

    2010-02-01

    Near infrared Nd:YAG pulsed laser treatment had been proved to be an efficient method to treat large-sized vascular malformations like leg telangiectasia for deep penetrating depth into skin and uniform light distribution in vessel. However, optimal clinical outcome was achieved by various laser irradiation parameters and the key factor governing the treatment efficacy was still unclear. A mathematical model in combination with Monte Carlo algorithm and finite difference method was developed to estimate the light distribution, temperature profile and thermal damage in epidermis, dermis and vessel during and after 1064 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Simulation results showed that epidermal protection could be achieved during 1064 nm Nd:YAG pulsed laser irradiation in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling. However, optimal vessel closure and blood coagulation depend on a compromise between laser spot size and pulse duration.

  12. Fabrication and In Vitro Deployment of a Laser-Activated Shape Memory Polymer Vascular Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, G M; Small IV, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W J; Matthews, D L; Hartman, J; Maitland, D J

    2007-04-25

    Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel). Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP) stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W) due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of {approx}8 W. We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated.

  13. Fabrication and in vitro deployment of a laser-activated shape memory polymer vascular stent

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Géraldine M; Small, Ward; Wilson, Thomas S; Benett, William J; Matthews, Dennis L; Hartman, Jonathan; Maitland, Duncan J

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel). Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP) stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. Methods A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. Results At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W) due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of ~8 W. Conclusion We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated. PMID:18042294

  14. Comparison of different surface-cooling methods for transcutaneous laser treatment of vascular lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Carsten M.; Sokoll, C.; Nowak, W.; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of different combined cooling and compression techniques for the treatment of vascular disorders of the skin and subdermal layers. In combination with flashlamp pumped dye lasers, argon lasers and Nd:YAG-lasers the effectiveness of glass plates, a cooling chamber with a flexible membrane and continuous ice cube cooling were evaluated in vitro by temperature measurements with thermocouples and thermographic camera readings and in vivo by laser doppler flowmetry, color coded duplex sonography and comparison of photographic documents for effectiveness and occurrence of side effects. Experimental and clinical evaluations show excellent results for skin protection, effective treatment depth enhancement and minimalization of side effects as well as for pain perception.

  15. Combination of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and laser therapy for diabetic macular oedema: a review.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hemal; Gillies, Mark C; Fraser-Bell, Samantha

    2016-05-01

    This review provides a perspective on published and ongoing clinical trials of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (anti-VEGF agents) combined with laser therapy for diabetic macular oedema (DMO). Although there was little short-term benefit in combining prompt macular laser with anti-VEGF therapy for centre-involving DMO in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCRnet) Protocol I study, deferred macular laser was still required in over 40% of study eyes in DRCRnet Protocol T. Macular laser was applied in more than 30% of eyes with centre-involving DMO receiving ranibizumab in the RISE and RIDE studies. For non centre-involving DMO the evidence-base still supports use of focal macular laser alone, although clinicians should be cautious about applying laser too close to the foveal avascular zone with the availability of pharmacotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing whether selectively targeting areas of peripheral retinal ischaemia with laser reduces the number of anti-VEGF injections to stabilise DMO and whether combining macular micropulse laser with anti-VEGF therapy is beneficial in DMO. PMID:27061760

  16. Pulsed ultraviolet laser irradiation produces endothelium-independent relaxation of vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Steg, P.G.; Rongione, A.J.; Gal, D.; DeJesus, S.T.; Clarke, R.H.; Isner, J.M.

    1989-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that continuous wave laser irradiation induces contraction of vascular smooth muscle, except at powers far below the threshold for tissue ablation. To determine the corresponding effects of pulsed laser irradiation on vascular smooth muscle tone, vascular rings of rabbit thoracic aorta were mounted isometrically with 1 g tension in Krebs-bicarbonate buffer and irradiated with 308 or 351 nm from an excimer laser through a 400-microns optical fiber. A total of 250 exposures were performed with 1-6.5 mJ/pulse (fluence = 0.8-5.5 J/cm2), 10-50 Hz, and cumulative exposures of 10-120 seconds. Excimer laser irradiation in combinations of pulse energy (PE), repetition rate (RR), and cumulative exposure below, at, or above threshold for tissue ablation consistently produced relaxation unassociated with contraction in each of the 250 exposures. For the total 250 exposures, the magnitude of relaxation (reduction in recorded tension, Rmax) was 55 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) of maximum vasomotor reactivity recorded in the specimen in response to administration of serotonin. Rmax varied directly with both PE and RR. When PE was increased from 1 to 5 mJ/pulse (n = 13), Rmax increased from 57 +/- 19% to 80 +/- 19% (p less than 0.0001); when RR was increased from 10 to 50 Hz (n = 10), Rmax increased from 27 +/- 8 to 46 +/- 8 (p less than 0.0001). Rmax varied independently of endothelial integrity (assessed anatomically and pharmacologically) and wavelength (308 vs. 351 nm). Simultaneously recorded tissue-temperature profiles disclosed that during pulsed laser irradiation, tissue temperature rise did not exceed 5/degree/C.

  17. Acute and chronic complications of laser angioplasty: vascular wall damage and formation of aneurysms in the atherosclerotic rabbit.

    PubMed

    Lee, G; Ikeda, R M; Theis, J H; Chan, M C; Stobbe, D; Ogata, C; Kumagai, A; Mason, D T

    1984-01-15

    Acute and chronic vascular responses to laser exposure in atherosclerotic rabbits were studied. In 7 rabbits fed an atherogenic diet for 3 to 5 months before the study to induce aortic atherosclerosis, a flexible quartz fiber, 400 micron core diameter, attached to an argon ion laser was passed anterogradely or retrogradely to the atherosclerotic ascending aorta. The laser was turned on using power intensities of 1 to 2 W for 3 seconds. After laser treatment, the aortas were studied acutely in 3 rabbits and chronically in 4 rabbits after recovery for 1 to 14 days. In 2 rabbits studied acutely, the argon laser produced a vaporized crater within the atherosclerotic plaque at the endothelial surface; however, in 1 there was also vascular damage extending deep into the medial layer. In addition, aortic aneurysm with muscular wall damage occurred in 2 of the 4 animals studied chronically. Thus, vascular complications may arise when catheter laser angioplasty is randomly applied without visualizing specific plaque targets or without using safe dose increments of power intensities and durations of exposure. This study suggests caution in the clinical use of intensive phototherapy to cardiovascular lesions and stresses the need for further understanding of laser vascular consequences before application of laser angioplasty in patients. PMID:6695725

  18. Fetal soft tissue examinations by microdissection.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Mariline; Jocteur-Monrozier, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes methods for the examination of fetal abdominal and thoracic soft tissues by microdissection on either fresh (non-rodent) or fixed (rodent) specimens in order to detect structural abnormalities. With hundreds of fetuses examined for each species (rodent and non-rodent) in regulatory reproductive toxicity assessments (ICH, http://www.ich.org/fileadmin/Public_Web_Site/ICH_Products/Guidelines/Multidisciplinary/M3_R2/Step4/M3_R2__Guideline.pdf, 2009; ICH, http://www.ich.org/fileadmin/Public_Web_Site/ICH_Products/Guidelines/Safety/S5_R2/Step4/S5_R2__Guideline.pdf, 2005), microdissection techniques allow a thorough and relatively rapid examination of fetuses for soft tissue abnormalities. PMID:23138910

  19. Tissue-specific metabolite profiling of Cyperus rotundus L. rhizomes and (+)-nootkatone quantitation by laser microdissection, ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Yogini; Liang, Zhitao; Guo, Ping; Ho, Hing-Man; Chen, Hubiao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2014-07-23

    Cyperus rotundus L. is a plant species commonly found in both India and China. The caused destruction of this plant is of critical concern for agricultural produce. Nevertheless, it can serve as a potential source of the commercially important sesquiterpenoid (+)-nootkatone. The present work describes comparative metabolite profiling and (+)-nootkatone content determination in rhizome samples collected from these two countries. Laser dissected tissues, namely, the cortex, hypodermal fiber bundles, endodermis, amphivasal vascular bundles, and whole rhizomes were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was used for profiling of essential oil constituents and quantitation of (+)-nootkatone. The content of (+)-nootkatone was found to be higher in samples from India (30.47 μg/10 g) compared to samples from China (21.72 μg/10 g). The method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidelines (Q2 R1). The results from this study can be applied for quality control and efficient utilization of this terpenoid-rich plant for several applications in food-based industries. PMID:24938835

  20. Treatment of superficial cutaneous vascular lesions: experience with the KTP 532 nm laser.

    PubMed

    Clark, C; Cameron, H; Moseley, H; Ferguson, J; Ibbotson, S H

    2004-01-01

    Whilst most facial telangiectasias respond well to short-pulse-duration pulsed dye laser therapy, studies have shown that for the treatment of larger vessels these short-duration pulses are sub-optimal. Long-pulse frequency-doubled neodymium:YAG lasers have been introduced with pulse durations ranging from 1-50 ms and treatment beam diameters of up to 4 mm. We report the results of KTP/532 nm laser treatment for superficial vascular skin lesions. The aim was to determine the efficacy of the KTP/532 nm laser in the treatment of superficial cutaneous vascular lesions at a regional dermatology centre in a 2 year retrospective analysis. Patients were referred from general dermatology clinics to a purpose-built laser facility. A test dose was performed at the initial consultation and thereafter patients were reviewed and treated at 6 week intervals. Outcome was graded into five classifications by the patient and operator independently based on photographic records: clear, marked improvement, partial response, poor response, and no change or worsening. Over the 2 year period, 204 patients with 246 diagnoses were treated [156 female; median age 41 (range 1-74) years; Fitzpatrick skin types I-III]. Equal numbers of spider angioma (102) and facial telangiectasia (102) were treated. Of those patients who completed treatment and follow up, 57/58 (98%) of spider angiomas and 44/49 (90%) of facial telangiectasia markedly improved or cleared. Satisfactory treatment outcomes, with one clearance and two partial responses, occurred in three of five patients with port-wine stain. Few patients experienced adverse effects: two declined further treatment due to pain, and a small area of minimal superficial scarring developed in one case. Two patients developed mild persistent post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, and one subject experienced an episode of acute facial erythema, swelling and blistering after one treatment. The KTP/532 nm frequency-doubled neodymium:YAG laser is a safe and

  1. Laser in situ keratomileusis in patients with collagen vascular disease: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Rachel G; Moshirfar, Majid; Edmonds, Jason N; Christiansen, Steven M; Behunin, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the current United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations regarding laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery in patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD) and assess whether these patients make appropriate candidates for laser vision correction, and offer treatment recommendations based on identified clinical data. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Ovid to identify all existing studies of LASIK in patients with collagen vascular diseases. The search was conducted without date limitations. Keywords used for the search included MeSH terms: laser in situ keratomileusis, LASIK, refractive surgery, ocular surgery, and cataract surgery connected by “and” with the following MeSH and natural-language terms: collagen vascular disease, rheumatic disease, systemic disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren’s syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, HLA B27, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis. The abstracts for all studies meeting initial search criteria were reviewed; relevant studies were included. No prospective studies were found; however, four retrospective case studies were identified that examined LASIK surgery in patients with CVD. Several case reports were also identified in similar fashion. Results The FDA considers CVD a relative contraindication to LASIK surgery, due largely to the ocular complications associated with disease in the CVD spectrum. However, recent studies of LASIK in patients with CVD indicate LASIK may be safe for patients with very well-controlled systemic disease, minimal ocular manifestations, and no clinical signs or history of dry-eye symptoms. Conclusion LASIK surgery may be safe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus and the seronegative spondyloarthropathies if stringent preoperative criteria are met. Evidence suggests patients with Sjögren’s syndrome are not

  2. Laser balloon vascular welding using a dye-enhanced albumin solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Beat; Zueger, Benno J.; Erni, Dominique; Banic, Andrej; Schaffner, Thomas; Weber, Heinz P.; Frenz, Martin

    2001-05-01

    Porcine posterior tibial arteries (n equals 50) and saphenous veins (n equals 32) have been welded end-to-end using an 808 nm diode laser combined with an indocyanine green enhanced albumin solder. For comparison, the same welding procedure has been performed with a Holmium:YAG laser without solder. Both lasers were running in continuous wave (cw) regime at a power limited below 1.2 W. The vascular stumps were approached to each other over a coronary dilatation catheter in order to obtain a precise alignment. The balloon catheter simplified vessel handling and the tight vessel positioning prevented a solder penetration into the lumen. Standard histology revealed for both welding techniques a lateral tissue damage between 2 and 3 mm. The vessels welded with the 808 nm diode laser using albumin solder showed considerably higher tensile strength (1 N compared to 0.3 N) than vessels welded exclusively by Ho:YAG laser radiation. In contrast, leaking pressure (350 +/- 200 mmHg) and bursting pressure 457 +/- 200 mmHg) were independent of the welding technique used.

  3. Proteomic study of the microdissected aortic media in human thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Serhatli, Muge; Baysal, Kemal; Acilan, Ceyda; Tuncer, Eylem; Bekpinar, Seldag; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik

    2014-11-01

    Aortic aneurysm is a complex multifactorial disease, and its molecular mechanism is not understood. In thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA), the expansion of the aortic wall is lead by extracellular matrix (ECM) degeneration in the medial layer, which leads to weakening of the aortic wall. This dilatation may end in rupture and-if untreated-death. The aortic media is composed of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and proteins involved in aortic elasticity and distensibility. Delineating their functional and quantitative decrease is critical in elucidating the disease causing mechanisms as well as the development of new preventive therapies. Laser microdissection (LMD) is an advanced technology that enables the isolation of the desired portion of tissue or cells for proteomics analysis, while preserving their integrity. In our study, the aortic media layers of 36 TAA patients and 8 controls were dissected using LMD technology. The proteins isolated from these tissue samples were subjected to comparative proteomic analysis by nano-LC-MS/MS, which enabled the identification of 352 proteins in aortic media. Among these, 41 proteins were differentially expressed in the TAA group with respect to control group, and all were downregulated in the patients. Of these medial proteins, 25 are novel, and their association with TAA is reported for the first time in our study. Subsequent analysis of the data by ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) shows that the majority of differentially expressed proteins were found to be cytoskeletal-associated proteins and components of the ECM which are critical in maintaining aortic integrity. Our results indicate that the protein expression profile in the aortic media from TAA patients differs significantly from controls. Further analysis of the mechanism points to markers of pathological ECM remodeling, which, in turn, affect VSMC cytosolic structure and architecture. In the future, the detailed investigation of the differentially expressed

  4. Comparative histological studies of the tunable dye (at 577 nm) laser and argon laser: the specific vascular effects of the dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, J.; Rosen, S.; Anderson, R.R.; Harrist, T.; MacFarland, F.; Noe, J.; Parrish, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    This study compares the histological changes occurring after argon laser and dye laser (operating at 577 nm) treatment of normal human skin. The initial effect of the argon laser is a diffuse nonspecific epidermal and upper dermal necrosis with subsequent cell death and a neutrophilic response at 48 hr. These changes occur at 15 joules/cm2 and their extent closely correlates with the energy applied. In sharp contrast, the immediate effect of the dye laser is erythrocyte aggregation, vessel rupture, and hemorrhage. At 48 hr, there is a pattern of acute vasculitis in the upper dermis and a prominent perivascular neutrophilic response in the mid-dermis. Focal epidermal necrosis does occur but is relatively minimal, while skin appendages and collagen are preserved. The energy to produce these alterations is relatively small, approximately 3 J/cm2. Thus, the dye laser at 577 nm can selectively damage the cutaneous vascular plexus and may provide a basis for treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions.

  5. Micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators with complex geometries obtained by laser stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; de Blas Romero, Adrián; Chacón Tanarro, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    In our work we present the complete development process of geometrically complex micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators. The complex geometries and three-dimensional networks are designed by means of computer aided design resources. Manufacture is accomplished, in a single step, by means of laser stereolithography, directly from the computer-aided design files with the three dimensional geometries of the different actuators under development. To our knowledge, laser stereolithography is applied here for the first time to the development of shape memory polymer devices with complex geometries and inner micro-vasculatures for their activation using a thermal fluid. Final testing of the developed actuators helps to validate the approach and to put forward some present challenges.

  6. Novel Cell and Tissue Acquisition System (CTAS): Microdissection of Live and Frozen Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Lili C.; Vi, Nancy; Ma, Zhongcai; Fields, Tony; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K.; Haykinson, Michael J.; Bragin, Anatol; Karsten, Stanislav L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a novel, highly accurate, capillary based vacuum-assisted microdissection device CTAS - Cell and Tissue Acquisition System, for efficient isolation of enriched cell populations from live and freshly frozen tissues, which can be successfully used in a variety of molecular studies, including genomics and proteomics. Specific diameter of the disposable capillary unit (DCU) and precisely regulated short vacuum impulse ensure collection of the desired tissue regions and even individual cells. We demonstrated that CTAS is capable of dissecting specific regions of live and frozen mouse and rat brain tissues at the cellular resolution with high accuracy. CTAS based microdissection avoids potentially harmful physical treatment of tissues such as chemical treatment, laser irradiation, excessive heat or mechanical cell damage, thus preserving primary functions and activities of the dissected cells and tissues. High quality DNA, RNA, and protein can be isolated from CTAS-dissected samples, which are suitable for sequencing, microarray, 2D gel-based proteomic analyses, and Western blotting. We also demonstrated that CTAS can be used to isolate cells from native living tissues for subsequent recultivation of primary cultures without affecting cellular viability, making it a simple and cost-effective alternative for laser-assisted microdissection. PMID:22855692

  7. Microfluidics: The future of microdissection TESE?

    PubMed

    Samuel, Raheel; Badamjav, Odgerel; Murphy, Kristin E; Patel, Darshan P; Son, Jiyoung; Gale, Bruce K; Carrell, Douglas T; Hotaling, James M

    2016-06-01

    Non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is a severe form of infertility accounting for 10% of infertile men. Microdissection testicular sperm extraction (microTESE) includes a set of clinical protocols from which viable sperm are collected from patients (suffering from NOA), for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Clinical protocols associated with the processing of a microTESE sample are inefficient and significantly reduce the success of obtaining a viable sperm population. In this review we highlight the sources of these inefficiencies and how these sources can possibly be removed by microfluidic technology and single-cell Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27104311

  8. Real-time measurements of endogenous CO production from vascular cells using an ultrasensitive laser sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Durante, W.; Lancaster, D. G.; Klattenhoff, J.; Tittel, F. K.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been implicated as a biological messenger molecule analogous to nitric oxide. A compact gas sensor based on a midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy was developed for direct and real-time measurement of trace levels (in approximate pmol) of CO release by vascular cells. The midinfrared light is generated by difference frequency mixing of two nearinfrared lasers in a nonlinear optical crystal. A strong infrared absorption line of CO (4.61 microm) is chosen for convenient CO detection without interference from other gas species. The generation of CO from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells was detected every 20 s without any chemical modification to the CO. The sensitivity of the sensor reached 6.9 pmol CO. CO synthesis was measured from untreated control cells (0.25 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), sodium nitroprusside-treated cells (0.29 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), and hemin-treated cells (0.49 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). The sensor also detected decreases in CO production after the addition of the heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX (from 0.49 to 0.02 nmol per 10(7) cells/h) and increases after the administration of the HO substrate hemin (from 0.27 to 0.64 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). These results demonstrate that midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy is a useful technique for the noninvasive and real-time detection of trace levels of CO from biological tissues.

  9. Real-time measurements of endogenous CO production from vascular cells using an ultrasensitive laser sensor.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Y; Durante, W; Lancaster, D G; Klattenhoff, J; Tittel, F K

    2001-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been implicated as a biological messenger molecule analogous to nitric oxide. A compact gas sensor based on a midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy was developed for direct and real-time measurement of trace levels (in approximate pmol) of CO release by vascular cells. The midinfrared light is generated by difference frequency mixing of two nearinfrared lasers in a nonlinear optical crystal. A strong infrared absorption line of CO (4.61 microm) is chosen for convenient CO detection without interference from other gas species. The generation of CO from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells was detected every 20 s without any chemical modification to the CO. The sensitivity of the sensor reached 6.9 pmol CO. CO synthesis was measured from untreated control cells (0.25 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), sodium nitroprusside-treated cells (0.29 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), and hemin-treated cells (0.49 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). The sensor also detected decreases in CO production after the addition of the heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX (from 0.49 to 0.02 nmol per 10(7) cells/h) and increases after the administration of the HO substrate hemin (from 0.27 to 0.64 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). These results demonstrate that midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy is a useful technique for the noninvasive and real-time detection of trace levels of CO from biological tissues. PMID:11123266

  10. Experimental study on the vascular thermal response to visible laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Chen, B; Wu, W J; Wang, G X; He, Y L; Ying, Z X

    2015-01-01

    Port-wine stains (PWSs) are congenital vascular malformations that progressively darken and thicken with age, and laser therapy is the most effective in clinical practice. Using dorsal skin chamber (DSC), this study evaluated thermal response of blood vessel to a 595-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) with controlled energy doses and pulse durations. Totally, 32 vessels (30∼300 μm in diameter) are selected from the dorsal skin of the mouse to match those in port-wine stain. The experimental results showed that the thermal response of the blood vessels to laser irradiation can be recognized as coagulation, constriction with diameter decrease, disappearance (complete constriction), hemorrhage, and collagen damage in the order of increasing laser radiant exposure. Blood vessels with small diameter would response poorly and survive from the laser heating because their thermal relaxation time is much shorter than the pulse duration. The optimalradiant exposure is from 10 to 12 J/cm(2) under 6 ms pulse duration without considering the epidermal light absorption. Numerical simulations were also conducted using a 1,000-μm deep Sprague-Dawley (SD) mouse skinfold. The light transportation and heat diffusion in dorsal skin were simulated with the Monte Carlo method and heat transfer equation, while the blood vessel photocoagulation was evaluated by Arrhenius-type kinetic integral. Both experimental observation and numerical simulation supported that hemorrhage is the dominant thermal response, which occurs due to preferential heating of the superior parts of large blood vessels. In clinical practice for 595 nm PDL, the consequent purpura caused by hemorrhage can be used as a treatment end point. PMID:25048855

  11. Dermoscopy, confocal laser microscopy, and hi-tech evaluation of vascular skin lesions: diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grazzini, Marta; Stanganelli, Ignazio; Rossari, Susanna; Gori, Alessia; Oranges, Teresa; Longo, Anna Sara; Lotti, Torello; Bencini, Pier Luca; De Giorgi, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Vascular skin lesions comprise a wide and heterogeneous group of malformations and tumors that can be correctly diagnosed based on natural history and physical examination. However, considering the high incidence of such lesions, a great number of them can be misdiagnosed. In addition, it is not so rare that an aggressive amelanotic melanoma can be misdiagnosed as a vascular lesion. In this regard, dermoscopy and confocal laser microscopy examination can play a central role in increasing the specificity of the diagnosis of such lesions. In fact, the superiority of these tools over clinical examination has encouraged dermatologists to adopt these devices for routine clinical practice, with a progressive spread of their use. In this review, we will go through the dermoscopic and the confocal laser microscopy of diagnosis of most frequent vascular lesions (i.e., hemangiomas angiokeratoma, pyogenic granuloma, angiosarcoma) taking into particular consideration the differential diagnosis with amelanotic melanoma. PMID:22950556

  12. A meta-analysis of aneurysm formation in laser assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Peng, Fei; Xu, Dahai; Cheng, Qinghua

    2009-08-01

    Laser assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA) is looked as a particularly promising non-suture method in future. However, aneurysm formation is one of the main reasons delay the clinical application of LAVA. Some scientists investigated the incidence of aneurysms in animal model. To systematically analyze the literature on reported incidence of aneurysm formation in LAVA therapy, we performed a meta-analysis comparing LAVA with conventional suture anastomosis (CSA) in animal model. Data were systematically retrieved and selected from PUBMED. In total, 23 studies were retrieved. 18 studies were excluded, and 5 studies involving 647 animals were included. Analysis suggested no statistically significant difference between LAVA and CSA (OR 1.24, 95%CI 0.66-2.32, P=0.51). Result of meta analysis shows that the technology of LAVA is very close to clinical application.

  13. Micro-PIV quantification of capillary blood flow redistribution caused by laser-assisted vascular occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, Maxim A.; Stiukhina, Elena S.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    We propose μPIV-based technique for quantitative assessment of blood flow redistribution in microcirculatory networks. Our approach is based on per-segment averaging of measured quantities so we can avoid most of problems that are typical for point-wise measurements. The key point of our technique is the digital processing algorithms of recorded data that include: capillary network axial line construction; interrogation regions centering; blood flow velocity local estimate using PIV approach; blood flow velocity calculation by means of averaging over entire vessel segment; the calculation of blood volume flow rate map. We illustrate the application of developed technique with in vivo measurements and blood flow velocity map reconstruction for chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryo, in which the local vascular occlusion was produced using continuous wave laser light irradiation..

  14. Comparison of NIRS, laser Doppler flowmetry, photoplethysmography, and pulse oximetry during vascular occlusion challenges.

    PubMed

    Abay, T Y; Kyriacou, P A

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring changes in blood volume, blood flow, and oxygenation in tissues is of vital importance in fields such as reconstructive surgery and trauma medicine. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), laser Doppler (LDF) flowmetry, photoplethysmography (PPG), and pulse oximetry (PO) contribute to such fields due to their safe and noninvasive nature. However, the techniques have been rarely investigated simultaneously or altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate all the techniques simultaneously on healthy subjects during vascular occlusion challenges. Sensors were attached on the forearm (NIRS and LDF) and fingers (PPG and PO) of 19 healthy volunteers. Different degrees of vascular occlusion were induced by inflating a pressure cuff on the upper arm. The responses of tissue oxygenation index (NIRS), tissue haemoglobin index (NIRS), flux (LDF), perfusion index (PPG), and arterial oxygen saturation (PO) have been recorded and analyzed. Moreover, the optical densities were calculated from slow varying dc PPG, in order to distinguish changes in venous blood volumes. The indexes showed significant changes (p  <  0.05) in almost all occlusions, either venous or over-systolic occlusions. However, differentiation between venous and arterial occlusion by LDF may be challenging and the perfusion index (PI) may not be adequate to indicate venous occlusions. Optical densities may be an additional tool to detect venous occlusions by PPG. PMID:26963349

  15. Proteomic analysis of microdissected facial nuclei of the rat following facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Grosheva, Maria; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2009-12-15

    Recent studies using molecular and genetic techniques just have started to elucidate the complex process that drives successful peripheral nerve regeneration. Introducing proteomics to this field, we unilaterally performed a facial nerve axotomy in 13 adult Wistar rats. Seven days later, a total of 40 20-microm coronary cryostat sections of the operated and contralateral unoperated nucleus facialis were microdissected. On the one hand, microdissected areas were pooled for each side, lysed and applied to ProteinChip Arrays. On the other hand, one microdissected area from the right and left facial nucleus each was directly placed on the affinity chromatographic array. Facial motoneurons were lysed in situ and released their proteins to spatially defined points. 215 laser addressable distinct positions across the surface of the spot enabled a high spatial resolution of measured protein profiles for the analysed tissue area. Protein profiles of the single positions were plotted over the used tissue section to visualize their distribution. The comparative analysis of the protein lysates from operated and normal nuclei facialis revealed, for both approaches used, differentially expressed proteins. Although by direct application of one cryostat section only a few hundred motoneurons were analysed, results comparable to these using lysates were obtained. Additionally, the applied technique revealed differences in the intensity distribution of several proteins of unknown function in the lesioned in comparison to the contralateral normal facial nucleus. This proteomic analysis with ultra high sensitivity paired with potential for a spatial resolution is a promising methodology for peripheral nerve regeneration studies. PMID:19748522

  16. Necessity of Microdissecting Different Tumor Components in Pulmonary Tumor Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dahui; Zheng, Zhong; Shen, Shanxiang; Smith, Prudence; Khalil, Farah K

    2016-01-01

    Microdissection is a useful method in tissue sampling prior to molecular testing. Tumor heterogeneity imposes new challenges for tissue sampling. Different microdissecting methods have been employed in face of such challenge. We improved our microdissection method by separately microdissecting the morphologically different tumor components. This improvement helped the pyrosequencing data analysis of two specimens. One specimen consisted of both adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components. When both tumor components were sequenced together for KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) gene mutations, the resulting pyrogram indicated that it was not a wild type, suggesting that it contained KRAS mutation. However, the pyrogram did not match any KRAS mutations and a conclusion could not be reached. After microdissecting and testing the adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components separately, it was found that the adenocarcinoma was positive for KRAS G12C mutation and the neuroendocrine component was positive for KRAS G12D mutation. The second specimen consisted of two morphologically different tumor nodules. When microdissected and sequenced separately, one nodule was positive for BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) V600E and the other nodule was wild type at the BRAF codon 600. These examples demonstrate that it is necessary to microdissect morphologically different tumor components for pyrosequencing. PMID:27597976

  17. Necessity of Microdissecting Different Tumor Components in Pulmonary Tumor Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong; Shen, Shanxiang; Smith, Prudence; Khalil, Farah K.

    2016-01-01

    Microdissection is a useful method in tissue sampling prior to molecular testing. Tumor heterogeneity imposes new challenges for tissue sampling. Different microdissecting methods have been employed in face of such challenge. We improved our microdissection method by separately microdissecting the morphologically different tumor components. This improvement helped the pyrosequencing data analysis of two specimens. One specimen consisted of both adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components. When both tumor components were sequenced together for KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) gene mutations, the resulting pyrogram indicated that it was not a wild type, suggesting that it contained KRAS mutation. However, the pyrogram did not match any KRAS mutations and a conclusion could not be reached. After microdissecting and testing the adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components separately, it was found that the adenocarcinoma was positive for KRAS G12C mutation and the neuroendocrine component was positive for KRAS G12D mutation. The second specimen consisted of two morphologically different tumor nodules. When microdissected and sequenced separately, one nodule was positive for BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) V600E and the other nodule was wild type at the BRAF codon 600. These examples demonstrate that it is necessary to microdissect morphologically different tumor components for pyrosequencing. PMID:27597976

  18. In vivo argon laser vascular welding using thermal feedback: open and closed loop patency and collagen crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Small, W., LLNL

    1997-02-28

    An in vivo study of vascular welding with a fiber-delivered argon laser was conducted using a canine model. Longitudinal arteriotomies and venotomies were treated on femoral vein and artery. Laser energy was delivered to the vessel wall via a 400 {micro}m optical fiber. The surface temperature at the center of the laser spot was monitored in real time using a hollow glass optical fiber-based two-color infrared thermometer. The surface temperature was limited by either a room-temperature saline drip or direct feedback control of the laser using a mechanical shutter to alternately pass and block the laser. Acute patency was evaluated either visually (leak/no leak) or by in vivo burst pressure measurements. Biochemical assays were performed to investigate the possible laser-induced formation or destruction of enzymatically mediated covalent crosslinks between collagen molecules. Viable welds were created both with and without the use of feedback control. Tissues maintained at 50 C using feedback control had an elevated crosslink count compared to controls, while those irradiated without feedback control experienced a decrease. Differences between the volumetric heating associated with open and closed loop protocols may account for the different effects on collagen crosslinks. Covalent mechanisms may play a role in argon laser vascular fusion.

  19. Laser therapy for twin-twin transfusion syndrome in the absence of fetoscopically visible placental vascular anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Keisuke; Taguchi, Takako; Yamamoto, Ryo; Murata, Masaharu; Sasahara, Jun; Mitsuda, Nobuaki

    2013-01-01

    Fetoscopic laser photocoagulation (FLP) was performed at 22 weeks of gestation for a pregnancy complicated with twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and an anterior placenta. However, vascular anastomoses could not be identified by the fetoscope. To dichotomize the circulation between the twins, the terminal ends of the paired artery and vein of the recipient twin were coagulated. In addition, a line was drawn with the laser connecting the dots, which had been coagulated. The Doppler waveform as well as the amniotic fluid volume of each twin normalized after the procedure. The twins were delivered by cesarean section subsequent to onset of labor at gestational week 30; the recipient twin weighed 1,350 g and the donor twin weighed 550 g. Both twins had a normal neurologic exam at 6 months of age. Patent placental vascular anastomoses could not be detected. This case demonstrates that vascular anastomoses in TTTS may not be identified by a fetoscope and that FLP to coagulate the entire vascular equator closer to the area of the recipient twin was effective in this rare situation. PMID:24008354

  20. Microdissection and microcloning of mid-chromosome 4: Genetic mapping of 41 microdissection clones

    SciTech Connect

    Bahary, N.; McGraw, D.E.; Shilling, R.; Friedman, J.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Available genetic information places the mouse db (diabetes) gene approximately 5 cM distal to Ifa on mid/distal mouse chromosome 4. These data have indicated that there is a relevant paucity of genetic markers that map to this region of chromosome 4. To increase the density of the genetic map on mid-chromosome 4, the authors have applied the techniques of microdissection and microcloning of the mid-portion of mouse chromosome 4. A total of 47 RFLPs from the microdissection library were used to type the progeny of three C57BL/6J Mus spretus backcrosses. The resulting composite genetic map positions seven known genes, 41 microclones, and three other anonymous markers to a region of approximately 21 cM on mid-chromosome 4 extending from b to Lck. The density of markers in this region of chromosome 4 should be sufficient to initiate the physical mapping of this subchromosomal segment, facilitating efforts to clone the db gene, as well as other uncloned mutant loci in this region of chromosome 4. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Gestational diabetic transcriptomic profiling of microdissected human trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Bari, Muhammad Furqan; Ngo, Sherry; Bastie, Claire C; Sheppard, Allan M; Vatish, Manu

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the most common metabolic complication of pregnancy, is influenced by the placenta, and its prevalence directly increases with obesity. Therefore, to define the aetiology of GDM requires that the confounding influence of obesity and the heterogeneous nature of the placenta impairing accurate quantitative studies be accounted for. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM), we optimized RNA extraction from human placental trophoblast, the metabolic cellular interface between mother and foetus. This allowed specific transcriptomic profiling of trophoblast isolated from GDM, and obese and normal human placentae. Genome-wide gene expression analysis was performed on the RNA extracted from the trophoblast of GDM and obese and normal placentae. Forty-five differentially expressed genes (DEGs) specifically discriminated GDM from matched obese subjects. Two genes previously linked with GDM, pregnancy specific beta-1 glycoprotein 6 (PSG6) and placental system A sodium-dependent transporter system (SLC38A1), were significantly increased in GDM. A number of these DEGs (8 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (UBE) splice variants (UBE2D3 variants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 9) and UBE2V1 variant 4)) were involved in RNA processing and splicing, and a significant number of the DEGs, including the UBE variants, were associated with increased maternal fasting plasma glucose.It is concluded that DEGs discriminating GDM from obese subjects were pinpointed. Our data indicate a biological link between genes involved in RNA processing and splicing, ubiquitination, and fasting plasma glucose in GDM taking into account obesity as the confounder. PMID:26869332

  2. Nanotechnology and vascular neurosurgery: an in vivo experimental study on microvessels repair using laser photoactivation of a nanostructured hyaluronan solder.

    PubMed

    Esposito, G; Rossi, F; Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Sabatino, G; Puca, A; Albanese, A; Rossi, G; Marchese, E; Maira, G; Pini, R

    2012-01-01

    Sealing tissues by laser in neurosurgical procedures may overcome problems related to the use of conventional suturing methods which can be associated with various degrees of vascular wall damage. Despite the significant experimental and clinical achievements of the past, a standardized clinical application of laser-welding technology has not yet been implemented. The main problem is related to the use of common organic chromophores. A substantial breakthrough in the laser welding of biological tissues may come from the advent of nanotechnologies. In this paper we describe an experimental study, to confirm the feasibility of an innovative laser-assisted vascular repair (LAVR) technique based on diode laser irradiation and subsequent photoactivation of a hyaluronan solder embedded with near infrared (NIR) absorbing gold nanorods (GNRs), and to analyze the induced closuring effect in a follow-up study performed in animal model. Twenty New Zealand rabbits underwent closure of a 3-mm longitudinal incision performed on the common carotid artery (CCA) by means of 810 nm diode laser irradiation, in conjunction with the topical application of an optimized GNR composite. Effective closure of the arterial wound was accomplished by using very low laser intensity (30 W/cm2). The average CCA occlusion time was as low as 50 sec. Animals underwent different follow-up periods (2, 8, 30 days). After follow-up, they were re-anesthetized, the patency of the treated vessels was tested (Doppler analysis) and then the irradiated vessels were excised and subjected to histological evaluations. Morphological examinations of the samples documented the integrity of the vascular wall. No host reaction to nanoparticles occurred. Collagen and elastic fibers returned to their normal architecture 30 days after treatment. A Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examination and immuno-histochemical analysis demonstrated a full re-endothelization of the vessel walls. We thus confirmed that a laser

  3. Non-invasive technique for assessment of vascular wall stiffness using laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Segers, Patrick; Heuten, Hilde; Goovaerts, Inge; Ennekens, Guy; Vrints, Christiaan; Baets, Roel; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-06-01

    It has been shown that in cardiovascular risk management, stiffness of large arteries has a very good predictive value for cardiovascular disease and mortality. This parameter is best known when estimated from the pulse wave velocity (PWV) measured between the common carotid artery (CCA) in the neck and femoral artery in the groin, but may also be determined locally from short-distance measurements on a short vessel segment. In this work, we propose a novel, non-invasive, non-contact laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) technique for evaluating PWV locally in an elastic vessel. First, the method was evaluated in a phantom setup using LDV and a reference method. Values correlated significantly between methods (R ≤ 0.973 (p ≤ 0.01)); and a Bland-Altman analysis indicated that the mean bias was reasonably small (mean bias ≤ -2.33 ms). Additionally, PWV was measured locally on the skin surface of the CCA in 14 young healthy volunteers. As a preliminary validation, PWV measured on two locations along the same artery was compared. Local PWV was found to be between 3 and 20 m s-1, which is in line with the literature (PWV = 5-13 m s-1). PWV assessed on two different locations on the same artery correlated significantly (R = 0.684 (p < 0.01)). In summary, we conclude that this new non-contact method is a promising technique to measure local vascular stiffness in a fully non-invasive way, providing new opportunities for clinical diagnosing.

  4. Improved laser-assisted vascular tissue fusion using solder-doped polymer membranes on a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Sorg, Brian S.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Hodges, Diane E.; Welch, Ashley J.

    2000-05-01

    Newly developed light-activated surgical adhesives have been investigated as a substitute to traditional protein solders for vascular tissue fusion without the need for sutures. Canine femoral arteries (n equals 14), femoral veins (n equals 14) and carotid arteries (n equals 10) were exposed, and a 0.3 to 0.6 cm longitudinal incision was made in the vessel walls. The surgical adhesive, composed of a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold doped with the traditional protein solder mix of bovine serum albumin and indocyanine green dye, was used to close the incisions in conjunction with an 805 nm diode laser. Blood flow was restored to the vessels immediately after the procedure and the incision sites were checked for patency. The new adhesives were flexible enough to be wrapped around the vessels while their solid nature avoided the problems associated with 'runaway' of the less viscous liquid protein solders widely used by researchers. Assessment parameters included measurement of the ex vivo intraluminal bursting pressure one to two hours after surgery, as well as histology. The acute intraluminal bursting pressures were significantly higher in the laser-solder group (greater than 300 mmHg) compared to the suture control group (less than 150 mmHg) where four evenly spaced sutures were used to repair the vessel (n equals 4). Histological analysis showed negligible evidence of collateral thermal damage to the underlying tissue in the laser-solder repair group. These initial results indicated that laser-assisted vascular repair using the new adhesives is safe, easy to perform, and contrary to conventional suturing, provides an immediate leak-free closure. In addition, the flexible and moldable nature of the new adhesives should allow them to be tailored to a wide range of tissue geometries, thus greatly improving the clinical applicability of laser-assisted tissue repair.

  5. The use of Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation (ILBI) at 630–640 nm to prevent vascular diseases and to increase life expectancy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: The mortality rate from vascular diseases is one of the highest. The use of Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation (ILBI) within the last 30 years has demonstrated high efficacy in the treatment of vascular, cardiac and other systemic diseases. Rationale: Laser energy at 630-640 nanometers is arguably the most effective for irradiation of blood and the vascular wall. Photons at this wavelength are absorbed by oxygen, improve microcirculation, can change the viscosity of the blood and affect vascular endothelium. Conclusions: In summary, more than 25 years of experience of using laser energy at 630-640 nm has shown that this waveband directly influences the parameters of all cells in the blood, blood plasma, the coagulation process and all the structural components of the vascular wall. Additionally, ILBI directly or indirectly affects the cells of the immune system, hormones, and exchange processes in an organism, thereby not only improving the function of the vascular system, but also the other systems of an organism. It can finally lead to lower the incidence and number of vascular diseases, and indirectly to the reduction of the number of diseases in other organs and even systemically, thus helping to prolong the lifespan. PMID:25941421

  6. Effects of low-intensity laser irradiation on the apoptosis of rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. D.; Chen, P.; Zhang, C. P.; Wen, J. X.; Liang, J.; Kang, H. X.; Gao, R. L.; Fu, X. B.

    2011-11-01

    Restenosis is a major complication after coronary intervention therapy. Excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and a decline in their apoptosis, which eventually leads to excessive neointimal thickening in coronary arteries, are the main causes of restenosis. Induction of the apoptosis of VSMCs and inhibition of excessive proliferation of VSMCs are therefore crucial for the prevention of restenosis, and low-intensity laser irradiation of coronary arteries may play a promising role in keeping this in balance. In this study, we used in vitro cultured rabbit VSMCs to investigate the effects of low-intensity laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm on the apoptosis of VSMCs via morphological observation and molecular biology. The results showed that apoptotic bodies and obvious intranuclear apoptosis-positive particles formed within VSMCs 24 h after laser irradiation, suggesting that low-intensity laser irradiation at certain doses can inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs by promoting their apoptosis. This experiment provides evidences for further animal experiments and clinical trials on prevention and treatment of restenosis by intracoronary low-intensity laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm.

  7. Detection of biogenic CO production above vascular cell cultures using a near-room-temperature QC-DFB laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosterev, A. A.; Tittel, F. K.; Durante, W.; Allen, M.; Kohler, R.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2002-01-01

    We report the first application of pulsed, near-room-temperature quantum cascade laser technology to the continuous detection of biogenic CO production rates above viable cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. A computer-controlled sequence of measurements over a 9-h period was obtained, resulting in a minimum detectable CO production of 20 ppb in a 1-m optical path above a standard cell-culture flask. Data-processing procedures for real-time monitoring of both biogenic and ambient atmospheric CO concentrations are described.

  8. Real-time ultrasonography as a monitoring technique for interstitial Nd:YAG laser treatment of voluminous hemangiomas and vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Jochen A.; Gottschlich, Stefan; Lippert, Burkard M.; Folz, Benedikt J.

    1998-01-01

    Voluminous vascular anomalies of the head and neck region are still treated with conventional surgery although Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser therapy is an effective treatment method. One hundred thirty give patients with voluminous hemangiomas and vascular malformations were treated with interstitial Nd:YAG laser therapy, partly complemented by a non-contact mode Nd:YAG laser light application. The vascular tumors had a diameter of more than 3 cm in two or all three dimensions. Treatment was carried out under ultrasound and manual control. Nearly 60% of the patients showed a complete clinical regression of the vascular tumor, a third of the patients had a partial regression and were satisfied with the treatment outcome. Four patients were treated unsuccessfully with the laser and three of them subsequently underwent conventional surgery. Only 10 patients showed cosmetic and functional deficits. These results on the interstitial Nd:YAG laser therapy of voluminous hemangiomas and vascular malformations in a large patient group demonstrated the high effectiveness of this novel and innovative therapy modality.

  9. Proteomic analysis of neurons microdissected from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded Alzheimer’s disease brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Eleanor S; Nayak, Shruti; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of human tissue specimens are formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) archival samples, making this type of tissue a potential gold mine for medical research. It is now accepted that proteomics can be done using FFPE tissue and can generate similar results as snap-frozen tissue. However, the current methodology requires a large amount of starting protein, limiting the questions that can be answered in these types of proteomics studies and making cell-type specific proteomics studies difficult. Cell-type specific proteomics has the potential to greatly enhance understanding of cell functioning in both normal and disease states. Therefore, here we describe a new method that allows localized proteomics on individual cell populations isolated from FFPE tissue sections using laser capture microdissection. To demonstrate this technique we microdissected neurons from archived tissue blocks of the temporal cortex from patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Using this method we identified over 400 proteins in microdissected neurons; on average 78% that were neuronal and 50% that were associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, this technique is able to provide accurate and meaningful data and has great potential for any future study that wishes to perform localized proteomics using very small amounts of archived FFPE tissue. PMID:26487484

  10. Laser capture.

    PubMed

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes detailed methods used for laser capture microdissection (LCM) of discrete subpopulations of cells. Topics covered include preparing tissue blocks, cryostat sectioning, processing slides, performing the LCM, and purification of RNA from LCM samples. Notes describe the fine points of each operation, which can often mean the difference between success and failure. PMID:22639264

  11. Laser-induced (endo)vascular photothermal effects studied by combined brightfield and fluorescence microscopy in hamster dorsal skin fold venules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezemer, R.; Heger, M.; van den Wijngaard, J. P. H.; Mordon, S. R.; van Gemert, M. J. C.; Beek, J. F.

    2007-07-01

    The putative features of the (endo)vascular photothermal response, characterized by laser-induced thermal denaturation of blood and vessel wall constituents, have been elucidated individually, but not simultaneously in dynamic, isolated in vivo systems. A hamster dorsal skin fold model in combination with brightfield/fluorescence intravital microscopy was used to examine the effect of laser pulse duration and blood flow velocity on the size of the thermal coagulum, its attachment behavior, and laser-mediated vasomotion. The size of the coagulum and the extent of vasoconstriction and latent vasodilation were proportional to the laser pulse duration, but pulse duration had no effect on coagulum attachment/dislodgement. Blood flow velocity exhibited no significant effect on the studied parameters. The (endo)vascular photothermal response is governed predominantly by laser energy deposition and to a marginal extent by blood flow velocity.

  12. Microdissection of Shoot Meristem Functional Domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) maintains a pool of indeterminate cells within the SAM proper, while lateral organs are initiated from the SAM periphery. Laser microdissection–microarray technology was used to compare transcriptional profiles within these SAM domains to identify novel maize genes th...

  13. Mathematical modeling of selective photothermolysis to aid the treatment of vascular malformations and hemangioma with pulsed dye laser.

    PubMed

    Shafirstein, Gal; Buckmiller, Lisa M; Waner, Milton; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed dye lasers (PDL) are the standard of care in the treatment of cutaneous vascular disorders such as the port-wine strains or hemangiomas of infancy. Nonetheless, there is still uncertainty regarding the specific laser parameters that are likely to yield optimal clinical outcomes. Using mathematical modeling, we explain and associate clinical outcomes with laser wavelength, radiant exposure, and pulse time and shape. The model's prediction that a continuous PDL pulse of 0.45 ms with a radiant exposure of 6 J/cm(2) is equivalent to delivering a 1.5-ms pulse consisting of three pulses with a radiant exposure of 12 J/cm(2) is in agreement with clinical studies. The model also suggests that for vascular malformations involving vessel diameters in the range of 150-500 microm, one should use a PDL at a wavelength of 595 nm with a radiant exposure of at least 12 J/cm(2) and pulse time of 1.5 ms, delivered in three pulses. Whereas it is calculated that malformations with vessels smaller than 50 microm will not respond to PDL in any clinical setting, an excellent response to PDL treatment at either a 585- or 595-nm wavelength can be expected for malformations with vessel diameters of 50-150 microm. Epidermal cooling is highly recommended for all settings to minimize pain and the risk of side effects. Finally, the model is used to generate a reference table that suggests specific PDL parameters for the treatment of various malformations and hemangiomas. The table cannot replace a clinician's experience with respect to which and how parameters should be changed, but provides a defined window of parameters that should be tried to improve clinical response. PMID:17268765

  14. Assessment of the Microbiota in Microdissected Tissues of Crohn's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    De Hertogh, Gert; Lemmens, Bart; Verhasselt, Peter; de Hoogt, Ronald; Sagaert, Xavier; Joossens, Marie; Van Assche, Gert; Rutgeerts, Paul; Vermeire, Severine; Aerssens, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    The microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract is frequently mentioned as one of the key players in the etiopathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Four hypotheses have been suggested: the single, still unknown bacterial pathogen, an abnormal overall composition of the bowel microbiota (“dysbiosis”), an abnormal immunological reaction to an essentially normally composed microbiota, and increased bacterial translocation. We propose that laser capture microdissection of selected microscopic structures, followed by broad-range 16S rRNA gene sequencing, is an excellent method to assess spatiotemporal alterations in the composition of the bowel microbiota in CD. Using this approach, we demonstrated significant changes of the composition, abundance, and location of the gut microbiome in this disease. Some of these abnormal findings persisted even after macroscopic mucosal healing. Further investigations along these lines may lead to a better understanding of the possible involvement of the bowel bacteria in the development of clinical Crohn's disease. PMID:22191064

  15. An experimental study on minimally occlusive laser-assisted vascular anastomosis in bypass surgery: the importance of temperature monitoring during laser welding procedures.

    PubMed

    Esposito, G; Rossi, F; Puca, A; Albanese, A; Sabatino, G; Matteini, P; Lofrese, G; Maira, G; Pini, R

    2010-01-01

    Laser welding has been proposed as an alternative technique to conventional stitching in microvascular anastomosis, with the advantages of improving the vascular healing process and reducing the risk of malfunction of a bypass. Our group recently proposed a laser-assisted end-to-side anastomotic technique, providing the advantages of laser welding and reducing the occlusion time of the recipient vessel, that is important in neurosurgical bypass procedures, in order to reduce the risk of cerebral ischemia. This in vivo study focuses on the control of the temperature dynamics developing in the welded tissue. A jugular vein graft was harvested and implanted on the rabbit carotid artery by means of two end-to-side anastomosis. Laser welding procedure was then carried out to implant the bypass. A real-time monitoring of the temperature during welding was performed with an infrared thermocamera, in order to control the laser-induced heating effect on the external surface of the vessel walls. The temperature analysis highlighted the dynamic of the heating effect in space and time and enabled us to define an optimal temperature range in operative conditions. The temperature control provided safe tissue heating confined within the directly irradiated area, with negligible damage to surrounding tissues, as well as effective sealing and welding of the vessel edges at the anastomotic sites. The average occlusion time of the carotid artery was about 11 minutes. After a follow-up of 30 days, all the bypasses were patent and no signs of thrombosis or leak point pressure were present, thus confirming the safety of this laser-assisted anastomotic procedure. PMID:20846478

  16. Laser capture microdissection, a new technique to collect specific cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is one of the top five agricultural products in the U.S. Protection of soybean from present and new exotic pathogens is very important for soybean production. Soybean rust is caused by the obligate fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow, an exotic pathogen. This pathogen causes yield losses due ...

  17. A novel ultrasonic micro-dissection technique for biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lining; Wang, Huixiang; Chen, Liguo; Liu, Yaxin

    2006-12-22

    Molecular techniques are transforming our understanding of cellular function and disease. However, accurate molecular analysis methods will be limited if the input DNA, RNA, or protein is not derived from pure population of cells or is contaminated by the wrong cells. A novel Ultrasonic Vibration Micro-dissection (UVM) method was proposed to procure pure population of targeted cells from tissue sections for subsequent analysis. The principle of the ultrasonic vibration cutting is analyzed, and a novel micro-tool is designed. A multilayer piezoelectric actuator is used to actuate a sharp needle vibrating with high frequency and low amplitude (approx. 16-50 kHz, and 0-3 microm) to cut the tissue. Contrast experiment was done to test the feasibility of UVM method. Experimental results show that the embedded tissue can be quickly and precisely cut with the ultrasonic vibration micro-dissection method. PMID:16844160

  18. Long term results of treatment of vascular malformations of the gastrointestinal tract by neodymium Yag laser photocoagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Rutgeerts, P; Van Gompel, F; Geboes, K; Vantrappen, G; Broeckaert, L; Coremans, G

    1985-01-01

    The effect of Yag laser photocoagulation on the course of bleeding of gastrointestinal vascular malformations was studied in 59 patients, with a total of 482 lesions. The lesions were located in the upper gastrointestinal tract alone in 25 patients, in the lower tract alone in 31 patients and in both the lower and the upper gastrointestinal tract in three patients. In the month before laser therapy the number of bleeding episodes averaged 1.09 +/- 0.6 (SD) per patient (n = 57) and the transfusion requirements 2.4 +/- 2.6 red blood cells units per patient, while in the month after treatment the bleeding incidence averaged 0.16 +/- 0.5 and the transfusion requirements 0.21 +/- 0.8 (both p less than 0.001). Long term results were analysed considering for each patient an equally long pretreatment and follow up period. After a mean follow up period of 11.5 months (1-48 months), 17 of the 57 patients available for follow up rebled. The reduction of the bleeding rate was statistically significant at one, six, 12, and 18 months of follow up, while transfusion rate was significantly decreased at one, six, and 12 months. The results were disappointing in patients with Osler-Weber-Rendu (n = 4) and in patients with angiomas associated with Von Willebrand's disease (n = 3), who all rebled. In angiodysplasia the treatment was successful in 82% of the 49 patients. The more numerous the lesions, the less effective the reduction in bleeding rate by laser treatment was. Histological studies showed that the haemostatic effect of Yag laser photocoagulation was obtained by destruction of the lesion. Rebleeding was due to lesions missed at the first treatment, incompletely treated lesions and recurrence of new lesions. In two patients a free caecal perforation necessitated a right hemicolectomy. In both patients numerous or very large lesions had been treated in the caecum. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3874122

  19. Analytical modeling of laser pulse heating of embedded biological targets: An application to cutaneous vascular lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkov, Mirko; Sherr, Evan A.; Sierra, Rafael A.; Lloyd, Jenifer R.; Tanghetti, Emil

    2006-06-01

    Detailed understanding of the thermal processes in biological targets undergoing laser irradiation continues to be a challenging problem. For example, the contemporary pulsed dye laser (PDL) delivers a complex pulse format which presents specific challenges for theoretical understanding and further development. Numerical methods allow for adequate description of the thermal processes, but are lacking for clarifying the effects of the laser parameters. The purpose of this work is to derive a simplified analytical model that can guide the development of future laser designs. A mathematical model of heating and cooling processes in tissue is developed. Exact analytical solutions of the model are found when applied to specific temporal and spatial profiles of heat sources. Solutions are reduced to simple algebraic expressions. An algorithm is presented for approximating realistic cases of laser heating of skin structures by heat sources of the type found to have exact solutions. The simple algebraic expressions are used to provide insight into realistic laser irradiation cases. The model is compared with experiments on purpura threshold radiant exposure for PDL. These include data from four independent groups over a period of 20 years. Two of the data sets are taken from previously published articles. Two more data sets were collected from two groups of patients that were treated with two PDLs (585 and 595 nm) on normal buttocks skin. Laser pulse durations were varied between 0.5 and 40 ms radiant exposures were varied between 3 and 20 J/cm2. Treatment sites were evaluated 0.5, 1, and 24 hours later to determine purpuric threshold. The analytical model is in excellent agreement with a wide range of experimental data for purpura threshold radiant exposure. The data collected by independent research groups over the last 20 years with PDLs with wavelengths ranged from 577 to 595 nm were described accurately by this model. The simple analytical model provides an accurate

  20. Laser-Induced Noninvasive Vascular Injury Models in Mice Generate Platelet- and Coagulation-Dependent Thrombi

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Elliot D.; Raymond, Sylvain; Zollman, Amy; Noria, Francisco; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra; Shulman, Alexis; Merz, James L.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2001-01-01

    A minimally invasive laser-induced injury model is described to study thrombus development in mice in vivo. The protocol involves focusing the beam of an argon-ion laser through a compound microscope on the vasculature of a mouse ear that is sufficiently thin such that blood flow can be visualized by intravital microscopy. Two distinct injury models have been established. The first involves direct laser illumination with a short, high-intensity pulse. In this case, thrombus formation is inhibited by the GPIIb/IIIa antagonist, G4120. However, the anticoagulants, hirulog, PPACK, and NapC2 have minimal effect. This indicates that thrombus development induced by this model mainly involves platelet interactions. The second model involves low-intensity laser illumination of mice injected with Rose Bengal dye to induce photochemical injury in the region of laser illumination. Thrombi generated by this latter procedure have a slower development and are inhibited by both anticoagulant and anti-platelet compounds. PMID:11337359

  1. Laser-induced noninvasive vascular injury models in mice generate platelet- and coagulation-dependent thrombi.

    PubMed

    Rosen, E D; Raymond, S; Zollman, A; Noria, F; Sandoval-Cooper, M; Shulman, A; Merz, J L; Castellino, F J

    2001-05-01

    A minimally invasive laser-induced injury model is described to study thrombus development in mice in vivo. The protocol involves focusing the beam of an argon-ion laser through a compound microscope on the vasculature of a mouse ear that is sufficiently thin such that blood flow can be visualized by intravital microscopy. Two distinct injury models have been established. The first involves direct laser illumination with a short, high-intensity pulse. In this case, thrombus formation is inhibited by the GPIIb/IIIa antagonist, G4120. However, the anticoagulants, hirulog, PPACK, and NapC2 have minimal effect. This indicates that thrombus development induced by this model mainly involves platelet interactions. The second model involves low-intensity laser illumination of mice injected with Rose Bengal dye to induce photochemical injury in the region of laser illumination. Thrombi generated by this latter procedure have a slower development and are inhibited by both anticoagulant and anti-platelet compounds. PMID:11337359

  2. [Intravenous laser irradiation of the blood in occlusive vascular diseases of the extremities].

    PubMed

    Shval'b, P G; Zakharchenko, A Ia; Sigaev, A A; Kataev, M I

    1990-01-01

    The authors analyze the results of clinical application of intravenous He-Ne laser irradiation of the blood in patients with obliterating diseases of the limb vessels. Starting from 1984, this method was employed in the treatment of 133 patients, of these 102 ones with atherosclerosis obliterans of the lower limb vessels, 17 with endarteritis obliterans, and 14 with Raynaud's syndrome. Intravenous laser therapy proved to the most effective in atherosclerotic involvement of the vessels, when positive result was achieved in 77.5 percent of patients. The length of remission was up to 6 months. the method of treatment is described. PMID:2367895

  3. Effects of endovenous laser ablation on vascular tissue: molecular genetics approach

    PubMed Central

    Alur, İhsan; Dodurga, Yavuz; Güneş, Tevfik; Eroglu, Canan; Durna, Fırat; Türk, Nilay Şen; Adıgüzel, Esat; Emrecan, Bilgin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a treatment option for lower extremity varicose veins. In the present study, we investigate to the genetic changes and possibility of living tissue in the saphenous vein wall after the EVLA procedure. Methods: Eleven saphenous vein grafts were randomized in two groups: (1) 4 cm SVG segments of performed EVLA procedure in study group, (2) 4 cm segments of SVG none performed EVLA procedure in control group. SVG were taken from the remnants of distal saphenous vein grafts prepared for the bypass procedure but not used. SVG was approximately 8 cm in length and was divided into two parts 4 cm in length. One half was exposed to laser energy, while the other half of the same vein graft was untreated as a control. EVLA was performed on complete saphenous veins in the study group. Abnormal genetic changes of the SVG were observed with a Tri-Reagent method and quantified with a Nanodrop™ spectrophotometer. Results: Histopathological changes indicated that the intima including the endothelium was completely necrotized in the study group. It was observed that intimal thermal-energy-induced injury did not reach the media. Histopathological examination showed that homogenous eosinophilic discoloration and coagulation necrosis characterized the laser related thermal damage as well. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, we found that living tissue remained in the SVG wall after application of laser ablation, and we also detected abnormal genetic changes in the study group compared with the control group. PMID:26379903

  4. The alternative complement pathway aids in vascular regression during the early stages of a murine model of proliferative retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Clifford; Smith, Kaylee E; Castillejos, Alexandra; Diaz-Aguilar, Daniel; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Connor, Kip M

    2016-03-01

    Proliferative retinopathic diseases often progress in 2 phases: initial regression of retinal vasculature (phase 1) followed by subsequent neovascularization (NV) (phase 2). The immune system has been shown to aid in vascular pruning in such retinopathies; however, little is known about the role of the alternative complement pathway in the initial vascular regression phase. Using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), we observed that alternative complement pathway-deficient mice (Fb(-/-)) exhibited a mild decrease in vascular loss at postnatal day (P)8 compared with age- and strain-matched controls (P = 0.035). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the retinal blood vessels. Expression of the complement inhibitors Cd55 and Cd59 was significantly decreased in blood vessels isolated from hyperoxic retinas compared with those from normoxic control mice. Vegf expression was measured at P8 and found to be significantly lower in OIR mice than in normoxic control mice (P = 0.0048). Further examination of specific Vegf isoform expression revealed a significant decrease in Vegf120 (P = 0.00032) and Vegf188 (P = 0.0092). In conjunction with the major modulating effects of Vegf during early retinal vascular development, our data suggest a modest involvement of the alternative complement pathway in targeting vessels for regression in the initial vaso-obliteration stage of OIR. PMID:26631482

  5. Marker chromosome 21 identified by microdissection and FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Palmer, C.G.; Rubinstein, J.

    1995-03-27

    A child without Down`s syndrome but with developmental delay, short stature, and autistic behavior was found to be mosaic 46,XX/47,XX,+mar(21) de novo. The marker was a small ring or dot-like chromosome. Microdissection of the marker was performed. The dissected fragments were biotinylated with sequence-independent PCR as a probe pool for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results suggested an acrocentric origin of the marker. Subsequent FISH with {alpha}-satellite DNA probes for acrocentric chromosomes and chromosome-specific 21 and 22 painting probes confirmed its origin from chromosome 21. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Identification of specific protein markers in microdissected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Scheibner, Olaf; Kaufmann, Roland; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Settmacher, Utz; Hommann, Merten; Claussen, Uwe; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    At present, the molecular mechanisms of hepatocellular carcinogenesis are not well-understood, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) stays one of the most frequent and high-risk metastatic visceral neoplasms worldwide. For the identification of tumor-relevant proteins, we analyzed microdissected cells from nontumorous liver tissue (n = 28) and tissue derived from hepatic tumor center (n = 25), as well as tumor margin (n = 23). We unequivocally identified 53 proteins from hepatic tumor tissues by peptide fingerprint mapping and SELDI mass spectrometry that were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Among a number of signals that were detected as significantly different in the protein profiling analysis, we identified for the first time ferritin light subunit (FLS) and adenylate kinase 3 alpha-like 1 (AK3), showing decreased expressions in hepatic tumor, as well as biliverdin reductase B (BVRB) that was upregulated in HCC. The use of ProteinChip technology in combination with tissue microdissection gives insight of the complex changes occurring at the protein level in hepatocellular cancer associated with tumor development and progression and resulted in three new potential diagnostically useful markers. PMID:17203974

  7. Laser Doppler line scanner for monitoring skin perfusion changes of port wine stains during vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Defu; Ren, Jie; Wang, Ying; Gu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (V-PDT) is known to be an effective therapeutic modality for the treatment of port wine stains (PWS). Monitoring the PWS microvascular response to the V-PDT is crucial for improving the effectiveness of PWS treatment. The objective of this study was to use laser Doppler technique to directly assess the skin perfusion in PWS before and during V-PDT. In this study, 30 patients with PWS were treated with V-PDT. A commercially laser Doppler line scanner (LDLS) was used to record the skin perfusion of PWS immediately before; and at 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 minutes during V-PDT treatment. Our results showed that there was substantial inter- and intra-patient perfusion heterogeneity in PWS lesion. Before V-PDT, the comparison of skin perfusion in PWS and contralateral healthy control normal skin indicated that PWS skin perfusion could be larger than, or occasionally equivalent to, that of control normal skin. During V-PDT, the skin perfusion in PWS significantly increased after the initiation of V-PDT treatment, then reached a peak within 10 minutes, followed by a slowly decrease to a relatively lower level. Furthermore, the time for reaching peak and the subsequent magnitude of decrease in skin perfusion varied with different patients, as well as different PWS lesion locations. In conclusion, the LDLS system is capable of assessing skin perfusion changes in PWS during V-PDT, and has potential for elucidating the mechanisms of PWS microvascular response to V-PDT.

  8. [Focal Laser Ablation and Photodynamic Vascular Therapy with soluble TOOKAD® in the treatment of low risk prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Escrig, J L; Casanova Ramón-Borja, J

    2016-07-01

    The increase of the diagnosis of low risk prostate cancer translates into a new clinical entity, for which active surveillance may not be always enough and conventional therapies are clearly overtreatment. Faced with the necessity of giving a therapeutic answer to these patients, and facilitated by the technological advances in the imaging field and new energy sources, the interest is centered in the clinical development of focal therapies as an alternative with minimal morbidity and oncologically safe. As a part of the review carried out in this monographic issue, this article focus on the features relative to the preclinical and clinical development of laser ablative therapy and the innovative photodynamic vascular therapy with soluble TOOKAD®. With this aim we performed an exhaustive bibliographic search, updated to February 2016, in the greater databases, including original articles and reviews in reference to the object of this review, without restrictions for year of publication. This article reviews the preclinical and clinical development of these innovative ablative techniques in the field of focal therapy for low risk prostate cancer. PMID:27416636

  9. Assessment of the Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy on the Thyroid Vascularization of Patients with Autoimmune Hypothyroidism by Color Doppler Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Höfling, Danilo Bianchini; Chavantes, Maria Cristina; Juliano, Adriana G.; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Knobel, Meyer; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT) frequently alters thyroid vascularization, likely as a result of the autoimmune process. Objective. To evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the thyroid vascularization of patients with hypothyroidism induced by CAT using color Doppler ultrasound parameters. Methods. In this randomized clinical trial, 43 patients who underwent levothyroxine replacement for CAT-induced hypothyroidism were randomly assigned to receive either 10 sessions of LLLT (L group, n = 23) or 10 sessions of a placebo treatment (P group, n = 20). Color Doppler ultrasounds were performed before and 30 days after interventions. To verify the vascularity of the thyroid parenchyma, power Doppler was performed. The systolic peak velocity (SPV) and resistance index (RI) in the superior (STA) and inferior thyroid arteries (ITAs) were measured by pulsed Doppler. Results. The frequency of normal vascularization of the thyroid lobes observed in the postintervention power Doppler examination was significantly higher in the L than in the P group (P = 0.023). The pulsed Doppler examination revealed an increase in the SPV of the ITA in the L group compared with the P group (P = 0.016). No significant differences in the SPV of the STA and in the RI were found between the groups. Conclusion. These results suggest that LLLT can ameliorate thyroid parenchyma vascularization and increase the SPV of the ITA of patients with hypothyroidism caused by CAT. PMID:23316383

  10. Quantification of sympathetic vascular responses in skin by laser Doppler flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Khan, F; Spence, V A; Wilson, S B; Abbot, N C

    1991-05-01

    An improved physiological test of focal sympathetic nervous function using a laser Doppler flowmeter is presented. The test evaluates rapid reflex changes in skin blood flow at the finger tip where there are abundant arteriovenous anastomoses with dense sympathetic innervation. Indirect body heating was employed in all subjects to induce central vasodilation and to obtain stable comparable finger tip blood flows prior to stimulus. The reflex vasoconstriction which occurs following inspiratory gasp and contralateral hand cold challenge was quantified and its reproducibility investigated on three separate occasions in 20 young subjects. The variability in responses both within and between young subjects was small. The test was applied to 10 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy and to 10 age-matched control subjects. Vasoconstrictor reflexes were significantly lower in the diabetic group (p less than 0.005) with responses lower than 2 SD from the mean for age-matched controls. In conclusion, the test provides an assessment of focal autonomic damage which can be applied to other regions of the body rich in arteriovenous anastomoses and may have application in clinical studies investigating autonomic activity. PMID:2060997

  11. A Smart Haptic Hand-Held Device for Neurosurgical Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Marcus, Hani J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Microneurosurgery requires dexterity, precision and delicate force application in order to be carried out safely and effectively. Neurosurgeons must apply sufficient force in order to carry out microsurgical procedures effectively but not excessive force such that iatrogenic injury occurs. This paper presents a smart hand-held microsurgical instrument that indicates to the surgeon when a force-threshold has been exceeded by providing vibrotactile feedback. Many existing haptic-feedback systems, particularly master-slave robotic platforms, are large, highly complex, and costly. By comparison, the proposed device is compact, fail-safe and low cost. Two psychophysical user studies were carried out to assess the proposed vibrotactile force-threshold feedback system. A cadaveric pilot study was carried out to evaluate the device in a microdissection task. In all the studies performed, the haptic dissector device has shown to be effective in providing real-time feedback in terms of force application during microsurgical tasks. PMID:25631207

  12. High-quality RNA preparation for transcript profiling of osteocytes from native human bone microdissections.

    PubMed

    Eisenberger, Sabine; Hoppe, Godehard; Pyerin, Walter; Ackermann, Karin

    2004-12-15

    Osteocytes, the most abundant bone cell type with important roles in tissue maintenance and pathological aberrations such as observed in bone metastases, are enclosed within a highly compact, calcified extracellular matrix. This location complicates analysis in native bone, with the consequence that despite their importance their in vivo molecular physiology is only poorly understood. We have examined the possibility of isolating osteocyte RNA for transcript profiling from native, frozen bone instead of employing the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, decalcified version routinely used in histology, providing chemically modified and highly disintegrated RNAs. Bone tissue was tape-assisted cryosectioned and fixed to glass slides by support of UV-flash-triggered adhesive polymerization followed by quick hematoxylin-eosin staining to generate a guidance image for microdissection. Using an UVa-nitrogen laser, matrix-enclosed osteocytes were either excised and catapulted into RNA preparation vials or freed of accompanying nonosteocyte cellular material. The influences of bone sectioning, staining, and osteocyte capturing procedures on the prepared osteocyte RNAs were analyzed and the method was optimized accordingly. The obtained osteocyte RNAs showed the expected expression pattern of marker genes (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction), and, following conversion into fluorescent-labeled cDNAs, led to transcript profiles (cDNAchips; 2600 genes) with scatter-graph geometries indicating suitability for high-confidence evaluation. With the approach described here we introduce a methodological way for the characterization of the in vivo molecular physiology of osteocytes by functional genomics. PMID:15556565

  13. Visualization of in vivo thromboprophylactic and thrombolytic efficacy of enoxaparin in laser-induced vascular endothelial injury model using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Koike, Yuhki; Matsushita, Kohei; Okigami, Masato; Toiyama, Yuji; Kawamura, Mikio; Saigusa, Susumu; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Mizoguchi, Akira; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Enoxaparin is used postoperatively for the prevention of venous thromboembolism. In vitro studies and clinical trials have demonstrated the anticoagulant and antithrombotic efficacy of enoxaparin. In this study, we visualised thromboprophylactic and thrombolytic efficacy of enoxaparin in a laser-induced thrombus formation model in vivo using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (TPLSM). Thrombus was induced by the selective irradiation of vascular endothelium in arterioles of the cecum of green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. The thromboprophylactic and thrombolytic efficacy of enoxaparin was visualised in vivo real-time using TPLSM. Platelet adhesion, aggregation, and platelet-dependent thrombus formation were observed in the laser-induced thrombus formation model with reproducibility. Laser-induced thrombus formation was significantly inhibited by enoxaparin pretreatment as the thromboprophylactic agent, as compared with control. The mean thrombus volumes were 652 microcubic meters in mice pretreated with enoxaparin and 8906 microcubic meter in control mice. Enoxaparin reduced the volume of laser-induced thrombus when using it as a thrombolytic agent. The mean rate of reduction was 59 percent. In a lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis model, thromboprophylactic efficacy of enoxaparin was also observed in vivo in real-time. In vivo thromboprophylactic and thrombolytic efficacy of enoxaparin can be visualised at the single platelet level in the laser-induced endothelium injury model using TPLSM. PMID:25755830

  14. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  15. ERK-dependent activation of Sp1 is required for low-power laser irradiation-induced vascular endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Xing, Da

    2012-12-01

    Here, we report that low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) activates ERK/Sp1 pathway to upregulate VEGF expression and promote vascular endothelial cell proliferation. We demonstrate for the first time that LPLI enhances DNA-binding activity and transactivation activity of Sp1 on VEGF promoter. Additionally, ERK translocates from cytoplasm to nucleus following LPLI. Moreover, activated ERK phosphorylates Sp1 and results in increased EKR-Sp1 interaction. Selective inhibition of Sp1 or ERK suppresses the effect of LPLI on the promotion of cell cycle progression and proliferation. These findings provide a novel link between LPLI and angiogenesis, supplying potential therapy strategies for angiogenesis with LPLI.

  16. Laser Vascular Lesion Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2006-2013 Logical Images, Inc. All rights reserved. Advertising Notice This Site and third parties who place ... would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ...

  17. The alternative complement pathway aids in vascular regression during the early stages of a murine model of proliferative retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Clifford; Smith, Kaylee E.; Castillejos, Alexandra; Diaz-Aguilar, Daniel; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Connor, Kip M.

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathic diseases often progress in 2 phases: initial regression of retinal vasculature (phase 1) followed by subsequent neovascularization (NV) (phase 2). The immune system has been shown to aid in vascular pruning in such retinopathies; however, little is known about the role of the alternative complement pathway in the initial vascular regression phase. Using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), we observed that alternative complement pathway–deficient mice (Fb−/−) exhibited a mild decrease in vascular loss at postnatal day (P)8 compared with age- and strain-matched controls (P = 0.035). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the retinal blood vessels. Expression of the complement inhibitors Cd55 and Cd59 was significantly decreased in blood vessels isolated from hyperoxic retinas compared with those from normoxic control mice. Vegf expression was measured at P8 and found to be significantly lower in OIR mice than in normoxic control mice (P = 0.0048). Further examination of specific Vegf isoform expression revealed a significant decrease in Vegf120 (P = 0.00032) and Vegf188 (P = 0.0092). In conjunction with the major modulating effects of Vegf during early retinal vascular development, our data suggest a modest involvement of the alternative complement pathway in targeting vessels for regression in the initial vaso-obliteration stage of OIR.—Kim, C., Smith, K. E., Castillejos, A., Diaz-Aguilar, D., Saint-Geniez, M., Connor, K. M. The alternative complement pathway aids in vascular regression during the early stages of a murine model of proliferative retinopathy. PMID:26631482

  18. High-Throughput Microdissection for Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Avi Z.; Armani, Michael D.; Fetsch, Patricia A.; Xi, Liqiang; Pham, Tina Thu; Raffeld, Mark; Chen, Yun; O’Flaherty, Neil; Stussman, Rebecca; Blackler, Adele R.; Du, Qiang; Hanson, Jeffrey C.; Roth, Mark J.; Filie, Armando C.; Roh, Michael H.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Hipp, Jason D.; Tangrea, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine promises to enhance patient treatment through the use of emerging molecular technologies, including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. However, current tools in surgical pathology lack the capability to efficiently isolate specific cell populations in complex tissues/tumors, which can confound molecular results. Expression microdissection (xMD) is an immuno-based cell/subcellular isolation tool that procures targets of interest from a cytological or histological specimen. In this study, we demonstrate the accuracy and precision of xMD by rapidly isolating immunostained targets, including cytokeratin AE1/AE3, p53, and estrogen receptor (ER) positive cells and nuclei from tissue sections. Other targets procured included green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing fibroblasts, in situ hybridization positive Epstein-Barr virus nuclei, and silver stained fungi. In order to assess the effect on molecular data, xMD was utilized to isolate specific targets from a mixed population of cells where the targets constituted only 5% of the sample. Target enrichment from this admixed cell population prior to next-generation sequencing (NGS) produced a minimum 13-fold increase in mutation allele frequency detection. These data suggest a role for xMD in a wide range of molecular pathology studies, as well as in the clinical workflow for samples where tumor cell enrichment is needed, or for those with a relative paucity of target cells. PMID:26999048

  19. CO2, Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG), And Argon Laser Welding Of Vascular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rodney A.; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley R.; Kopchok, George; Dwyer, Richard M.; Uitto, Jouni

    1986-08-01

    Tne feasibility of welding thin-walled microvessels by laser has been established. This report summarizes our experience using laser welding to repair thick-walled, large-diameter, 4 to 8 mm canine veins and arteries using CO2, Nd:YAG and argon lasers. Welding of venotomies is uniformly successful using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, and Nd:YAG venotomies appear to veal more rapidly than sutured controls. Arterial welding has been accomplished with the Nd:YAG and argon laser. Our preliminary experience shows promise for welding both large diameter veins and arteries using lasers. Laser welding may represent an alternative for repair of small and large diameter vessels with several advantages compared to conventional suture techniques.

  20. A New Method for Histological Microdissection Utilizing an Ultrasonically Oscillating Needle

    PubMed Central

    Harsch, Michael; Bendrat, Klaus; Hofmeier, Gerhard; Branscheid, Detlef; Niendorf, Axel

    2001-01-01

    Molecular analysis of microdissected tissue samples is used for analyzing tissue heterogeneity of histological specimens. We have developed a rapid one-step microdissection technique, which was applied for the selective procurement of tissue areas down to a minimum of 10 cell profiles. The special features of our microdissection system consist of an ultrasonically oscillating needle and a piezo-driven micropipette. The validity of this technique is demonstrated in human lung large-cell carcinoma by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays of vimentin, cyclin D1, and carcinoembryonic antigen after linear RNA amplification. mRNA expression values of microdissected samples scattered around those of bulk tumor tissue and showed differential mRNA expression between samples of tumor parenchyma and supportive stromal cells for vimentin and carcinoembryonic antigen as confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, this procedure requires simple equipment, is easily performed, and delivers microdissected tissue samples of oligocellular clusters suitable for further molecular analysis. PMID:11395375

  1. Rapid generation of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.Y.; Meltzer, P.S.; Trent, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    A strategy for rapid construction of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection has recently been developed. WCPs were prepared from 20 copies of each target chromosome microdissected from normal human metaphase chromosomes and then directly amplified by PCR using a universal primer. Fifteen WCPs, including chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, and X, have been generated using this strategy. The probe complexity and hybridization specificity of these WCPs have been characterized by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Analysis of WCPs constructed by chromosome microdissection indicated that microdissected WCPs invariably provide strong and uniform signal intensity with no cytologically apparent cross-hybridization. To demonstrate the application of WCPs generated from microdissection, the authors have used these probes to detect complex chromosome rearrangements in a melanoma cell line, UM93-007. Two different translocations involving three chromosomes [t(1;3;13) and t(1;7;13)] have been identified, both of which were undetectable by conventional banding analysis. Further application of these WCPs (including generation of WCPs from mouse and other species) should greatly facilitate the cytogenetic analysis of complex chromosome rearrangements. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  2. One Possible Mechanism of Pulsed Dye Laser Treatment on Infantile Hemangioma: Induction of Endothelial Apoptosis and Serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) Level Changes

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yongqian; Wang, Fagang; Jia, Qingwei; Xu, Rongjian; Dang, Wei; Chen, Qing; Lin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pulsed dye laser (PDL) is an important treatment for superficial infantile hemangioma, but few studies report on its cellular mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate alterations of serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level in infantile hemangioma (IH) patients after laser treatment and effects of PDL irradiation on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro, as well as to explore the biomolecular mechanisms and ultrastructure changes of the PDL effect. Methods: 74 children with infant hemangioma including 45 patients in proliferating phase, 18 patients in involuting phase, 11 patients in involuted phase and 10 healthy children were engaged in this study. The plasma VEGF levels of children were measured with the enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). 24 hours after, HUVECs cultured in vitro were irradiated with PDL, cell apoptosis, mRNA levels of VEGF, and changes of ultrastructure were evaluated using flow cytometry, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Results: The serum VEGF concentrations in children with proliferating hemangiomas were significantly higher than in patients with involuting / involved hemangiomas and healthy patients. After receiving 3 laser treatments, the plasma VEGF levels of IH patients in proliferating hemangiomas decreased significantly. PDL irradiation could down-regulate VEGF mRNA expression of HUVECs, and increase cell apoptosis rate. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that PDL irradiation imparts apoptosis induction effects on HUVECs in vitro. Furthermore, our results suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor may be of particular importance in pathophysiology and PDL treatment of hemangiomas, also serum VEGF levels may be used as an aid in the follow up of IH. This provides valuable evidence of the PDL effect on infantile hemangioma. PMID:25653803

  3. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  4. Microdissection of Black Widow Spider Silk-producing Glands

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Yang; Gnesa, Eric; Zhao, Liang; Franz, Andreas; Vierra, Craig

    2011-01-01

    wrapping and egg case threads] 9 and pyriform [produces attachment disc silk] 10. This approach is based upon anesthetizing the spider with carbon dioxide gas, subsequent separation of the cephalothorax from the abdomen, and microdissection of the abdomen to obtain the silk-producing glands. Following the separation of the different silk-producing glands, these tissues can be used to retrieve different macromolecules for distinct biochemical analyses, including quantitative real-time PCR, northern- and western blotting, mass spectrometry (MS or MS/MS) analyses to identify new silk protein sequences, search for proteins that participate in the silk assembly pathway, or use the intact tissue for cell culture or histological experiments. PMID:21248709

  5. Photoacoustic-induced vascular tissue dissection resulting from irradition with a Q-switched frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Ferguson, Scott; Thomas, Stuart; Schwager, Konrad A.; Waner, Milton

    1995-05-01

    A Q-switched frequency-doubled Nd:YAG dye laser, tuned to 577 nm, was used to study the effect of nanosecond pulsed light on vascular tissue. Different reactions such as vasospasm, vessel expansion and vessel rupture were observed in living rats and were seen to be correlated with increasing fluence up to 3 J/cm2. When it occurred, localized vessel rupture was seen on the irradiated side of the blood vessel, as well as on the opposite side. It was hypothesized that the damage on the backside of the blood vessel is the result of intense acoustic waves produced by strong absorption of the laser radiant energy in the first 30 micrometers of blood. Experiments were performed in vitro using cuvettes filled with diluted hemoglobin on which the 532 nm radiant energy produced by a Q-switched frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser impinged. High-speed imaging of the irradiated air-blood interface using a time-delayed pulsed nitrogen-dye laser did not show evidence of cavitation micro-bubbles but did show the formation of a large, slowly expanding vapor bubble. Measurements of the acoustic waves produced with 12 mJ pulse in a spot size estimated to be 0.25 mm gave pressures up to 74 bars. Measurements at different positions with respect to the irradiation spot showed differences in acoustic amplitude that could not be explained by absorption attenuation. It is hypothesized that these differences are a result of differential diffraction of the frequency components of the acoustic wave, components of which extend up to a maximum of about 4 MHz. It is the highly directional high frequency acoustic energy that could be causing the damage on the side of the blood vessel opposite the point of irradiation.

  6. High recovery FASP applied to the proteomic analysis of microdissected formalin fixed paraffin embedded cancer tissues retrieves known colon cancer markers.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Ostasiewicz, Pawel; Mann, Matthias

    2011-07-01

    Proteomic analysis of samples isolated by laser capture microdissection from clinical specimens requires sample preparation and fractionation methods suitable for small amounts of protein. Here we describe a streamlined filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) workflow that allows efficient analysis of lysates from low numbers of cells. Addition of carrier substances such as polyethylene glycol or dextran to the processed samples improves the peptide yields in the low to submicrogram range. In a single LC-MS/MS run, analyses of 500, 1000, and 3000 cells allowed identification of 905, 1536, and 2055 proteins, respectively. Incorporation of an additional SAX fractionation step at somewhat higher amounts enabled the analysis of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded human tissues prepared by LCM to a depth of 3600-4400 proteins per single experiment. We applied this workflow to compare archival neoplastic and matched normal colonic mucosa cancer specimens for three patients. Label-free quantification of more than 6000 proteins verified this technology through the differential expression of 30 known colon cancer markers. These included Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA), the most widely used colon cancer marker, complement decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) and Metastasis-associated in colon cancer protein 1 (MACC1). Concordant with literature knowledge, mucin 1 was overexpressed and mucin 2 underexpressed in all three patients. These results show that FASP is suitable for the low level analysis of microdissected tissue and that it has the potential for exploration of clinical samples for biomarker and drug target discovery. PMID:21526778

  7. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  8. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  9. Mini-incision microdissection testicular sperm extraction: a useful technique for men with cryptozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Alrabeeah, K; Witmer, J; Ruiz, S; AlMalki, A; Phillips, S; Zini, A

    2016-03-01

    Microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) was developed to minimize the testicular injury associated with multiple open TESEs. We sought to evaluate a mini-incision micro-TESE in men with cryptozoospermia and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). We conducted a retrospective study of 26 consecutive men with NOA and cryptozoospermia who underwent a primary (first) micro-TESE between March 2015 and August 2015. Final assessment of sperm recovery (reported on the day of intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)) was recorded as (i) successful (available spermatozoa for ICSI) or (ii) unsuccessful (no spermatozoa for ICSI). The decision to perform a mini-incision micro-TESE (with limited unilateral micro-dissection) or standard/extensive (with unilateral or bilateral micro-dissection) was guided by the intra-operative identification of sperm recovery (≥5 spermatozoa) from the first testicle. Overall, sperm recovery was successful in 77% (20/26) of the men. In 37% of the men (8/26), the mini-incision micro-TESE was successful (positive sperm recovery). The remaining 18 men required a standard (extensive) microdissection: 61% (11/18) underwent a unilateral and 39% (7/18) a bilateral micro-TESE. We found that 90% (9/10) of the men with cryptozoospermia and 63% (10/16) of the men with NOA underwent a unilateral (mini or standard micro-TESE). The mini-incision micro-TESE allowed for successful sperm recovery in 60% (6/10) of the men with cryptozoospermia and 13% (2/16) of the men with NOA. The data demonstrate that a mini-incision micro-TESE together with rapid intra-operative assessment and identification of spermatozoa recovery can be useful in men undergoing microTESE, particularly, men with cryptozoospermia. PMID:26743017

  10. Microdissection and visualization of individual hair follicles for lineage tracing studies.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Inês; Legué, Emilie; Capgras, Suzanne; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    In vivo lineage tracing is a valuable technique to study cellular behavior. Our lab developed a lineage tracing method, based on the Cre/lox system, to genetically induce clonal labelling of cells and follow their progeny. Here we describe a protocol for temporally controlled clonal labelling and for microdissection of individual mouse hair follicles. We further present staining and visualization techniques used in our lab to analyze clones issued from genetically induced labelling. PMID:24281870

  11. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  12. [In vitro studies of shock wave effects during ablation of normal and atherosclerotic vascular wall by excimer laser].

    PubMed

    Haase, K K; Hanke, H; Baumbach, A; Wehrmann, M; Rose, C; Karsch, K R

    1993-02-01

    Ablation of atherosclerotic plaque and normal arterial wall was performed using a xenon-chloride-excimer laser with a wavelength of 308 nm and a pulse duration of 115 ns. The light was transmitted via a 600 micron fiber and adjusted to an energy density of 3.5 J/cm2. The acoustic signals generated by the laser pulse were measured with hydrophones consisting of polyvinylidenefluoride with active diameters of 0.3 mm and recorded on a dual-channel digital storage oscilloscope using either a 0.5 m coaxial cable or a broadband transmission system. From 19 cadavers human aortic tissue segments were excised and macroscopically classified as either normal or calcified atherosclerotic plaque. Approximately 500 measurements were performed in saline and blood each. Histological analysis was carried out after the experiments to verify the macroscopic diagnosis and to correlate the acoustic responses with the tissue characteristics. For "normal" arterial segments, maximum peak pressure was 1.25 MPa +/- 0.85 MPa, rise time 163 ns +/- 43 ns, and pressure increase 8.2 kPa +/- 5.4 kPa/ns in saline. For calcified, atheromatous segments a significantly higher maximum pressure (2.20 MPa +/- 1.16 MPa), a significantly shorter rise time (69.9 ns +/- 25.8 ns), and a significantly higher pressure increase (32.3 kPa +/- 21.3 kPa/ns) was found in saline (p < or = 0.0001). In blood, maximum peak pressure was 1.29 MPa +/- 0.43 MPa, rise time 93.3 ns +/- 27.7 ns, and pressure increase 14.6 kPa +/- 5.2 kPa/ns for "normal" arterial segments. Maximum peak pressure (2.28 MPa +/- 0.63 MPa) and pressure increase (32.8 kPa +/- Pa/ns) were significantly higher for calcified tissue segments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8465570

  13. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  14. Endothelial KLF2 links local arterial shear stress levels to the expression of vascular tone-regulating genes.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Rob J; van Thienen, Johannes V; Rohlena, Jakub; de Jager, Saskia C; Elderkamp, Yvonne W; Seppen, Jurgen; de Vries, Carlie J M; Biessen, Erik A L; van Berkel, Theo J C; Pannekoek, Hans; Horrevoets, Anton J G

    2005-08-01

    Lung Krüppel-like factor (LKLF/KLF2) is an endothelial transcription factor that is crucially involved in murine vasculogenesis and is specifically regulated by flow in vitro. We now show a relation to local flow variations in the adult human vasculature: decreased LKLF expression was noted at the aorta bifurcations to the iliac and carotid arteries, coinciding with neointima formation. The direct involvement of shear stress in the in vivo expression of LKLF was determined independently by in situ hybridization and laser microbeam microdissection/reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in a murine carotid artery collar model, in which a 4- to 30-fold induction of LKLF occurred at the high-shear sites. Dissection of the biomechanics of LKLF regulation in vitro demonstrated that steady flow and pulsatile flow induced basal LKLF expression 15- and 36-fold at shear stresses greater than approximately 5 dyne/cm2, whereas cyclic stretch had no effect. Prolonged LKLF induction in the absence of flow changed the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme, endothelin-1, adrenomedullin, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase to levels similar to those observed under prolonged flow. LKLF repression by siRNA suppressed the flow response of endothelin-1, adrenomedullin, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (P < 0.05). Thus, we demonstrate that endothelial LKLF is regulated by flow in vivo and is a transcriptional regulator of several endothelial genes that control vascular tone in response to flow. PMID:16049344

  15. Endothelial KLF2 Links Local Arterial Shear Stress Levels to the Expression of Vascular Tone-Regulating Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Rob J.; van Thienen, Johannes V.; Rohlena, Jakub; de Jager, Saskia C.; Elderkamp, Yvonne W.; Seppen, Jurgen; de Vries, Carlie J.M.; Biessen, Erik A.L.; van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Pannekoek, Hans; Horrevoets, Anton J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Lung Krüppel-like factor (LKLF/KLF2) is an endothelial transcription factor that is crucially involved in murine vasculogenesis and is specifically regulated by flow in vitro. We now show a relation to local flow variations in the adult human vasculature: decreased LKLF expression was noted at the aorta bifurcations to the iliac and carotid arteries, coinciding with neointima formation. The direct involvement of shear stress in the in vivo expression of LKLF was determined independently by in situ hybridization and laser microbeam microdissection/reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in a murine carotid artery collar model, in which a 4- to 30-fold induction of LKLF occurred at the high-shear sites. Dissection of the biomechanics of LKLF regulation in vitro demonstrated that steady flow and pulsatile flow induced basal LKLF expression 15- and 36-fold at shear stresses greater than ∼5 dyne/cm2, whereas cyclic stretch had no effect. Prolonged LKLF induction in the absence of flow changed the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme, endothelin-1, adrenomedullin, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase to levels similar to those observed under prolonged flow. LKLF repression by siRNA suppressed the flow response of endothelin-1, adrenomedullin, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (P < 0.05). Thus, we demonstrate that endothelial LKLF is regulated by flow in vivo and is a transcriptional regulator of several endothelial genes that control vascular tone in response to flow. PMID:16049344

  16. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  17. Plasma vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin-2, and soluble angiopoietin receptor tie-2 in diabetic retinopathy: effects of laser photocoagulation and angiotensin receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Lip, P L; Chatterjee, S; Caine, G J; Hope-Ross, M; Gibson, J; Blann, A D; Lip, G Y H

    2004-01-01

    Background: Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) may be a response to abnormal angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), and the soluble angiopoietin receptor tie-2. The authors hypothesised the following: (a) there are differences in plasma levels of these growth factors in different grades of diabetic retinopathy; and (b) that the effects of intervention with panretinal laser photocoagulation (PRP) for PDR, and angiotensin receptor blockade (using eprosartan) for patients with other grades of diabetic retinopathy will be to reduce levels of the growth factors. Methods: Cross sectional and interventional study (using PRP and eprosartan) in diabetic patients. VEGF, Ang-2, and tie-2 were measured by ELISA. Results: VEGF (p<0.001) and Ang-2 levels (p<0.001) were significantly higher in 93 diabetic patients compared to 20 healthy controls, with the highest levels in grade 2 and grade 3 diabetic retinopathy (p<0.05). Tie-2 was lower in diabetics compared to controls (p = 0.008), with no significant differences between the diabetic subgroups. Overall, VEGF significantly correlated with Ang-2 (p<0.001) and tie-2 (p = 0.004) but the correlation between Ang-2 and tie-2 levels was not significant (p = 0.065). Among diabetic patients only, VEGF levels were significantly correlated with Ang-2 (p<0.001) and tie-2 (p<0.001); the correlation between Ang-2 and tie-2 levels was also significant (p<0.001). There were no statistically significant effects of laser photocoagulation on plasma VEGF, Ang-2, and tie-2 in the 19 patients with PDR, or any effects of eprosartan in the 28 patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Conclusion: Increased plasma levels of VEGF and Ang-2, as well as lower soluble tie-2, were found in diabetic patients. The highest VEGF and Ang-2 levels were seen among patients with pre-proliferative and proliferative retinopathy, but there was no relation of tie-2 to the

  18. Peripheral vascular imaging and intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. ); Orron, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This reference addresses the entire clinical approach to the vascular system from the diagnosis of pathology to surgery or interventional radiological management. All diagnostic imaging modalities currently available are included with specific information on how to interpret various results. It features discussions of the latest therapeutic techniques, including laser angioplasty, intravascular stents, and transluminal embolization.

  19. LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION AND GENE ARRAY ANALYSIS OF PALATAL EPITHELIAL AND MESENCHYMAL CELLS EXPOSED TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Palatal shelves from embryos exposed on gestation day (GD) 12 to either retinoic acid (RA) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) contact but fail to fuse. It is of interest to know if diverse agents that induce clefting via the same etiology also activate the same biochem...

  20. Glycine max (soybean) roots and syncytia isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) exhibit differential gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) is an obligate parasite of soybean (Glycine max). It is the most destructive pathogen of G. max, accounting for approximately 0.46-0.82 billion dollars in crop losses, annually, in the U.S. Part of the infection process involves H. glycines establishin...

  1. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Alain; Ducos, Alain; Yerle, Martine

    2003-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+) translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5) were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2) from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases. PMID:14604515

  2. In situ phosphorylation of proteins in MCTs microdissected from rat kidney: Effect of AVP

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, S.; Gapstur, S.M.; Yusufi, N.K.; Dousa, T.P. )

    1988-04-01

    Adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein phosphorylation is considered a key step in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) to regulate water permeability in collecting tubules. However, the proteins serving as a substrate(s) for phosphorylation in undisrupted cells have not yet been identified. In the present study, the authors developed a method for investigation of in situ phosphorylation of microdissected segments of medullary collecting tubules (MCT) from rat kidney. Incubation of microdissected MCT segments with low concentrations of saponin, semipermeabilization, increased permeability of the membrane for ATP but did not allow leakage of macromolecules such as lactate dehydrogenase. This treatment also did not cause major disruption of cell structure, or impairment of AVP-sensitive adenylate cyclase. Incubation of semipermeabilized MCT with {gamma}-({sup 32}P)ATP resulted in corporation of {sup 32}P{sub i} into two major protein bands detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent autoradiography. Similar incubation of tubules disrupted by hyposmotic solutions and a stronger detergent Triton X-100 resulted in {sup 32}P{sub i} incorporation into multiple protein bands. These findings demonstrate a novel method for identification of endogenous protein substrate(s) for cAMP-dependent protein kinase and other protein kinases and phosphatases that are probably involved in post-cAMP steps in the cellular action of AVP in the intact cells of collecting tubules.

  3. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Critchley speculated that multiple vascular lesions of the basal ganglia must have an etiological connection to the symptoms of so-called vascular parkinsonism (VP), but without neuropathological confirmation. Some had doubts about its existence because of the lack of the pathologically confirmed case with adequate clinical correlation. At present, VP is characterized clinically by the short-stepped or frozen gait, lead-pipe rigidity, the symmetry of findings, absence of resting tremor, and negative response to levodopa in elderly patients with cerebrovascular lesions on CT/MRI. Pseudobulbar palsies, pyramidal tract findings, and/or multi-infarct dementia coexist in some of the cases. Most of clinically suspected VP patients have cerebral white matter lesions as well as basal ganglia lesions. PMID:9014431

  4. 78 FR 28229 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Device and System for Expression Microdissection (xMD)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... for Expression Microdissection (xMD) AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Activated Microtransfer;'' and all continuing applications and foreign counterparts to xMD Diagnostics, LLC... Field''). xMD Diagnostics, LLC (xMD) shall be the only entity granted rights in the Exclusive Field...

  5. Diagnosis of four chromosome abnormalities of unknown origin by chromosome microdissection and subsequent reverse and forward painting

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, K.E.F.A. de; Egashira, M.; Kato, R.

    1996-06-14

    A molecular cytogenetic method consisting of chromosome microdissection and subsequent reverse/forward chromosome painting is a powerful tool to identify chromosome abnormalities of unknown origin. We present 4 cases of chromosome structural abnormalities whose origins were ascertained by this method. In one MCA/MR patient with an add(5q)chromosome, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using probes generated from a microdissected additional segment of the add(5q) chromosome and then from a distal region of normal chromosome 5, confirmed that the patient had a tandem duplication for a 5q35-qter segment. Similarly, we ascertained that an additional segment of an add(3p) chromosome in another MCA/MR patient had been derived from a 7q32-qter segment. In a woman with a history of successive spontaneous abortions and with a minute marker chromosome, painting using microdissected probes from the whole marker chromosome revealed that it was i(15)(p10) or psu dic(15;15)(q11;q11). Likewise, a marker observed in a fetus was a ring chromosome derived from the paracentromeric region of chromosome 19. We emphasize the value of the microdissection-based chromosome painting method in the identification of unknown chromosomes, especially for marker chromosomes. The method may contribute to a collection of data among patients with similar or identical chromosome abnormalities, which may lead to a better clinical syndrome delineation. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Gene Expression Profiling of Microdissected Pancreatic Ductal Carcinomas Using High-Density DNA Microarrays1,3

    PubMed Central

    Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Ammerpohl, Ole; Lüttges, Jutta; Böhme, Armin; Sipos, Bence; Foerder, Melanie; Alldinger, Ingo; Jahnke, Beatrix; Schackert, Hans Konrad; Kalthoff, Holger; Kremer, Bernd; Klöppel, Günter; Saeger, Hans Detlev

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains an important cause of malignancy-related death and is the eighth most common cancer with the lowest overall 5-year relative survival rate. To identify new molecular markers and candidates for new therapeutic regimens, we investigated the gene expression profile of microdissected cells from 11 normal pancreatic ducts, 14 samples of PDAC, and 4 well-characterized pancreatic cancer cell lines using the Affymetrix U133 GeneChip set. RNA was extracted from microdissected samples and cell lines, amplified, and labeled using a repetitive in vitro transcription protocol. Differentially expressed genes were identified using the significance analysis of microarrays program. We found 616 differentially expressed genes. Within these, 140 were also identified in PDAC by others, such as Galectin-1, Galectin-3, and MT-SP2. We validated the differential expression of several genes (e.g., CENPF, MCM2, MCM7, RAMP, IRAK1, and PTTG1) in PDAC by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We present a whole genome expression study of microdissected tissues from PDAC, from microdissected normal ductal pancreatic cells and pancreatic cancer cell lines using highdensity microarrays. Within the panel of genes, we identified novel differentially expressed genes, which have not been associated with the pathogenesis of PDAC before. PMID:15548371

  7. Generation of full coverage libraries from microdissected DNA: Optimization for FISH of DNA microclones from an amplified domain

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, L.; Bittner, M.L.; McGill, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome microdissection/microcloning is increasingly important in the molecular analysis of chromosome rearrangements. Despite a number of publications using this technology, no detailed report examining representation of the starting template DNA have appeared. Based upon fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) performance of microdissected DNA probes derived from genetically amplified regions (dmins, hsrs) form compact intense signals readily interpretable even in interphase nuclei. Microdissected probes from non-amplified DNA typically produce much more diffuse signals in interphase nuclei. The difference in fluorescence intensity may arise from the more abundant template of the amplified domain at the time of dissection. We will report on the construction and characterization of microclone libraries using FISH to interphase nuclei as an indicator of template representation. Factors influencing cloning efficiency (e.g., vector cloning schemes, transformation vs. electroporation, generation of large PCR fragments, etc.) are being optimized to generate microclone libraries more fully representative of the dissected region. Retention of representation during microclone library generation is being examined for both a highly amplified starting material (dmin amplified for cmyc), and for a microdissected normal chromosome 8. It is expected that comparisons of the signal intensity between the uncloned and cloned dmin-derived PCR products will assist in the establishment of full coverage DNA microclone libraries and optimization of these products for FISH.

  8. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vascular Access for Hemodialysis Ventricular Assist Devices Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization Like every other organ or tissue in ... bypass surgery, there is a procedure called transmyocardial laser revascularization, also called TMLR or TMR. TMLR cannot ...

  9. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  10. The Y chromosome of the Atelidae family (Platyrrhini): study by chromosome microdissection.

    PubMed

    Gifalli-Iughetti, C; Koiffmann, C P

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the intergeneric variability of the Y chromosome, we describe the hybridization of the Y chromosome of Brachytelesarachnoides, obtained by microdissection, to metaphases of Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus, Lagothrixlagothricha, and Alouatta male specimens. Brachytelesarachnoides (Atelinae) has 62 chromosomes and a very small Y chromosome. Our results showed that the Brachytelesarachnoides Y chromosome probe hybridized to Lagothrixlagothricha metaphases yielding one hybridization signal on only the tiny Y chromosome, and when hybridized with Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus metaphases it yielded one hybridization signal on two thirds of the small acrocentric Y chromosome. However, no hybridization signal was observed in Alouatta metaphases (subfamily Alouattinae), a closely related genus in the Atelidae family. Furthermore, our data support a close phylogenetic relationship among Brachyteles, Ateles, and Lagothrix and their placement in the Atelinae subfamily, but exclude Alouatta from this group indicating its placement as basal to this group. PMID:19617696