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Sample records for laser plasma interferometry

  1. Validating Laser-Induced Birefringence Theory with Plasma Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cecilia

    2015-09-02

    Intense laser beams crossing paths in plasma is theorized to induce birefringence in the medium, resulting from density and refractive index modulations that affect the polarization of incoming light. The goal of the associated experiment, conducted on Janus at Lawrence Livermore’s Jupiter Laser Facility, was to create a tunable laser-plasma waveplate to verify the relationship between dephasing angle and beam intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature, and interaction length. Interferometry analysis of the plasma channel was performed to obtain a density map and to constrain temperature measured from Thomson scattering. Various analysis techniques, including Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and two variations of fringe-counting, were tried because interferograms captured in this experiment contained unusual features such as fringe discontinuity at channel edges, saddle points, and islands. The chosen method is flexible, semi-automated, and uses a fringe tracking algorithm on a reduced image of pre-traced synthetic fringes. Ultimately, a maximum dephasing angle of 49.6° was achieved using a 1200 μm interaction length, and the experimental results appear to agree with predictions.

  2. Application of x-ray-laser interferometry to study high-density laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.; Celliers, P.; Libby, S.B.; London, R.A.; Moreno, J.C.; Trebes, J.E.; Weber, F.

    1996-02-01

    Collisionally pumped soft-x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 4 to 40 nm. With the recent advances in the development of multilayer mirrors and beam splitters in the soft-x-ray regime, we can utilize the unique properties of x-ray lasers to study large, rapidly evolving laser-driven plasmas with high electron densities. Using a neonlike yttrium x-ray laser, which operates at a wavelength of 15.5 nm, we have performed a series of radiography, moir{acute e} deflectometry, and interferometry experiments to characterize plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion. We describe experiments using a soft-x-ray laser interferometer, operated in the Mach{endash}Zehnder configuration, to study CH plasmas. The two-dimensional density profiles obtained from the interferograms allow us to validate and benchmark our numerical models used to study the physics of laser{endash}plasma interactions. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  3. X-ray laser interferometry for probing high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 4-40 nm. With the recent advances in the development of multilayer mirrors and beamsplitters in the soft x-ray regime, the authors can utilize the unique properties of x-ray lasers to study large, rapidly evolving laser-driven plasmas with high electron densities. Using a neon-like yttrium x-ray laser which operates at a wavelength of 15.5 nm, they have performed a series of x-ray laser interferometry experiments to characterize plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion. In this paper the authors describe experiments using a soft x-ray laser interferometer, operated in the Mach-Zehnder configuration, to study CH plasmas and exploding foil targets commonly used for x-ray laser targets. The two-dimensional density profiles obtained from the interferograms allow the authors to validate and benchmark their numerical models used to study the physics of laser-plasma interactions.

  4. Microwave interferometry of laser induced air plasmas formed by short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, P.W.

    1993-08-01

    Applications for the interaction of laser induced plasmas with electromagnetic probes requires time varying complex conductivity data for specific laser/electromagnetic probe geometries. Applications for this data include plasma switching (Q switching) and the study of ionization fronts. The plasmas were created in laboratory air by 100 ps laser pulses at a wavelength of 1 {mu}m. A long focal length lens focused the laser pulse into WR90 (X band) rectangular waveguide. Two different laser beam/electromagnetic probe geometries were investigated. For the longitudinal geometry, the laser pulse and the microwave counterpropagated inside the waveguide. For the transverse geometry, the laser created a plasma ``post`` inside the waveguide. The effects of the laser beam deliberately hitting the waveguide were also investigated. Each geometry exhibits its own characteristics. This research project focused on the longitudinal geometry. Since the laser beam intensity varies inside the waveguide, the charge distribution inside the waveguide also varies. A 10 GHz CW microwave probe traveled through the laser induced plasma. From the magnitude and phase of the microwave probe, a spatially integrated complex conductivity was calculated. No measurements of the temporal or spatial variation of the laser induced plasma were made. For the ``plasma post,`` the electron density is more uniform.

  5. Dynamics of Converging Laser-Created Plasmas in Semi-Cylindrical Cavities Studied using Soft X-Ray Laser Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, M A; Grava, J; Filevich, J; Marconi, M; Dunn, J; Moon, S J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Jankowska, E; Rocca, J J

    2007-09-19

    The evolution of dense aluminum and carbon plasmas produced by laser irradiation of 500 {micro}m diameter semi-cylindrical targets was studied using soft x-ray laser interferometry. Plasmas created heating the cavity walls with 120 picosecond duration optical laser pulses of {approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} peak intensity were observed to expand and converge on axis to form a localized high density plasma region. Electron density maps were measured using a 46.9 nm wavelength tabletop capillary discharge soft x-ray laser probe in combination with an amplitude division interferometer based on diffraction gratings. The measurements show that the plasma density on axis exceeds 1 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The electron density profiles are compared with simulations conducted using the hydrodynamic code HYDRA, which show that the abrupt density increase near the axis is dominantly caused by the convergence of plasma generated at the bottom of the groove during laser irradiation.

  6. Plasma Interactions in Laser Irradiated Semi-Cylindrical Cavities Studied with Soft X-Ray Interferometry Using a Capillary Discharge Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, M A; Grava, J; Filevich, J; Marconi, M; Rocca, J J; Moon, S J; Dunn, J; Nilsen, J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Jankowska, E

    2007-09-19

    Soft x-ray interferometry was used to measure the evolution of dense converging plasmas created by laser irradiation of 500 {micro}m diameter semi-cylindrical carbon targets. Optical laser pulses with an intensity of {approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} and 120 ps duration were used to heat the surface of the cavities. The dense plasma formed expands from the walls converging slightly off the semi-cylinder's axis, giving rise to a bright localized high density plasma region. A sequence of electron density maps were measured using a 46.9 nm wavelength tabletop capillary discharge soft x-ray laser probe and a amplitude division interferometer based on diffraction gratings. The measured density profiles are compared with simulations conducted using the multi-dimensional hydrodynamic code HYDRA. The benchmarked model was then used to simulate particle trajectories which reveal that the increase in electron density near the axis is mainly the result of the convergence of plasma that originated at the bottom of the groove during laser irradiation.

  7. A novel femtosecond-gated, high-resolution, frequency-shifted shearing interferometry technique for probing pre-plasma expansion in ultra-intense laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Feister, S. Orban, C.; Nees, J. A.; Morrison, J. T.; Frische, K. D.; Chowdhury, E. A.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2014-11-15

    Ultra-intense laser-matter interaction experiments (>10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) with dense targets are highly sensitive to the effect of laser “noise” (in the form of pre-pulses) preceding the main ultra-intense pulse. These system-dependent pre-pulses in the nanosecond and/or picosecond regimes are often intense enough to modify the target significantly by ionizing and forming a plasma layer in front of the target before the arrival of the main pulse. Time resolved interferometry offers a robust way to characterize the expanding plasma during this period. We have developed a novel pump-probe interferometry system for an ultra-intense laser experiment that uses two short-pulse amplifiers synchronized by one ultra-fast seed oscillator to achieve 40-fs time resolution over hundreds of nanoseconds, using a variable delay line and other techniques. The first of these amplifiers acts as the pump and delivers maximal energy to the interaction region. The second amplifier is frequency shifted and then frequency doubled to generate the femtosecond probe pulse. After passing through the laser-target interaction region, the probe pulse is split and recombined in a laterally sheared Michelson interferometer. Importantly, the frequency shift in the probe allows strong plasma self-emission at the second harmonic of the pump to be filtered out, allowing plasma expansion near the critical surface and elsewhere to be clearly visible in the interferograms. To aid in the reconstruction of phase dependent imagery from fringe shifts, three separate 120° phase-shifted (temporally sheared) interferograms are acquired for each probe delay. Three-phase reconstructions of the electron densities are then inferred by Abel inversion. This interferometric system delivers precise measurements of pre-plasma expansion that can identify the condition of the target at the moment that the ultra-intense pulse arrives. Such measurements are indispensable for correlating laser pre-pulse measurements

  8. Two-dimensional laser interferometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehr, Leo; Concepcion, Ricky; Duggan, Robert; Moore, Hannah; Novick, Asher; Ransohoff, Lauren; Gourdain, Pierre-Alexandre; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    The objective of our research was to create a two-dimensional interferometer which we will use to measure plasma densities at the Cornell Research Beam Accelerator (COBRA). We built two shearing interferometers and mounted them on an optics table. They intercept the probe laser beam which travels directly through the plasma and is captured by a 16-bit CCD camera. In comparing the interferometer images before the shot and during the plasma shot, we observed both lateral and vertical shifts in the interference pattern caused by the change of the refractive index due to the plasma electrons. We developed a computer program using Matlab to map a vector field depicting the shift between the two images. This shift is proportional to the line integral of electron density through the plasma chamber. We show this method provides a reliable way to determine the plasma electron density profile. Additionally, we hope this method can improve upon the diagnostic capabilities and efficiency of data collection used with standard one-dimensional interferometry. Undergraduate.

  9. A simple laser system for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlet, S.; Volodimer, L.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2014-07-01

    We present here a simple laser system for a laser-cooled atom interferometer, where all functions (laser cooling, interferometry and detection) are realized using only two extended cavity laser diodes, amplified by a common tapered amplifier. One laser is locked by frequency modulation transfer spectroscopy, the other being phase locked with an offset frequency determined by an field-programmable gate array-controlled direct digital synthesizer, which allows for efficient and versatile tuning of the laser frequency. Raman lasers are obtained with a double pass acoustooptic modulator. We demonstrate a gravimeter using this laser system, with performances close to the state of the art.

  10. Phase-Shifted Laser Feedback Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovryn, Benjie

    1999-01-01

    Phase-shifted, laser feedback interferometry is a new diagnostic tool developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center under the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program directed by NASA Headquarters Microgravity Research Division. It combines the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce an instrument that can quantify both optical path length changes and sample reflectivity variations. In a homogenous medium, the optical path length between two points is the product of the index of refraction and the geometric distance between the two points. LFI differs from other forms of interferometry by using the laser as both the source and the phase detector. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. The combination of PSI and LFI has produced a robust instrument, based on a low-power helium-neon (HeNe) gas laser, with a high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static or oscillatory changes of the optical path length. Small changes in optical path length are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured; we can measure nonoscillatory changes with a root mean square (rms) error of the wavelength/1000 without averaging.

  11. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Stanton, Philip L.; Sweatt, William C.; Crump, Jr., O. B.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    1993-09-14

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  12. Parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian

    2013-12-15

    We present a parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometer based on spatial multiplexing which avoids the signal crosstalk in the former feedback interferometer. The interferometer outputs two close parallel laser beams, whose frequencies are shifted by two acousto-optic modulators by 2Ω simultaneously. A static reference mirror is inserted into one of the optical paths as the reference optical path. The other beam impinges on the target as the measurement optical path. Phase variations of the two feedback laser beams are simultaneously measured through heterodyne demodulation with two different detectors. Their subtraction accurately reflects the target displacement. Under typical room conditions, experimental results show a resolution of 1.6 nm and accuracy of 7.8 nm within the range of 100 μm.

  13. First measurement of laser Wakefield oscillations by longitudinal interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Le Blanc, S.P.; Rau, B.; Fisher, D.; Tajima, T.; Downer, M.C.; Babine, A.; Stepanov, A.; Sergeev, A.

    1996-12-31

    Because the electrostatic fields present in plasma waves can exceed those achievable in conventional accelerators and approach atomic scale values (E{sub a} {approximately} 500 GV/m), plasma based accelerators have received considerable attention as compact sources of high-energy electron pulses. Although stimulated Raman scattering or terahertz radiation at {ital w{sub p}} provided spatially averaged optical signatures of the plasma wave`s existence, new diagnostic techniques are required to map the the temporal and spatial structure of the plasma wave directly since such information is vital for addressing fundamental issues of wakefield generation and propagation. In this paper, we report femtosecond time resolved measurements of the longitudinal and radial structure of laser wakefield oscillations using an all optical technique known as interferometric ``photon acceleration`` or Longitudinal Interferometry.

  14. X-ray laser interferometry: A new tool for AGEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Moreno, J.C.; Libby, S.B.

    1995-10-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 4--40 nm. With the recent advances in the development of multilayer mirrors and beamsplitters in the soft x-ray regime, we can utilize the unique properties of x-ray lasers to study large, rapidly evolving laser-driven plasmas with high electron densities. By employing a shorter wavelength x-ray laser, as compared to using conventional optical laser as the probe source, we can access a much higher density regime while reducing refractive effects which limit the spatial resolution and data interpretation. Using a neon-like yttrium x-ray laser which operates at a wavelength of 15.5 mn, we have performed a series of soft x-ray laser interferometry experiments, operated in the skewed Mach-Zehnder configuration, to characterize plasmas relevant to both weapons and inertial confinement fusion. The two-dimensional density profiles obtained from the interferograms allow us to validate and benchmark our numerical models used to study the physics in the high-energy density regime, relevant to both weapons and inertial confinement fusion.

  15. Low Coherence Interferometry in Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neef, A.; Seyda, V.; Herzog, D.; Emmelmann, C.; Schönleber, M.; Kogel-Hollacher, M.

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is an additive layer manufacturing technology that offers several advantages compared to conven- tional methods of production such as an increased freedom of design and a toolless production suited for variable lot sizes. Despite these attractive aspects today's state of the art SLM machines lack a holistic process monitoring system that detects and records typical defects during production. A novel sensor concept based on the low coherence interferometry (LCI) was integrated into an SLM production setup. The sensor is mounted coaxially to the processing laser beam and is capable of sampling distances along the optical axis. Measurements during and between the processing of powder layers can reveal crucial topology information which is closely related to the final part quality. The overall potential of the sensor in terms of quality assurance and process control is being discussed. Furthermore fundamental experiments were performed to derive the performance of the system.

  16. Soft-x-ray laser interferometry of a pinch discharge using a tabletop laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, C.H.; Marconi, M.C.; Kanizay, K.; Rocca, J.J.; Uspenskii, Y.A.; Vinogradov, A.V.; Pershin, Y.A.

    1999-07-01

    We have used a tabletop soft-x-ray laser and a wave-front division interferometer to probe the plasma of a pinch discharge. A very compact capillary discharge-pumped Ne-like Ar laser emitting at 46.9 nm was combined with a wave division interferometer based on Lloyd{close_quote}s mirror and Sc-Si multilayer-coated optics to map the electron density in the cathode region of the discharge. This demonstration of the use of tabletop soft-x-ray laser in plasma interferometry could lead to the widespread use of these lasers in the diagnostics of dense plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, Stephen; Wilson, Robert W.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Bender, Peter; Burke, Bernard F.; Cornwell, Tim; Drever, Ronald; Dyck, H. Melvin; Johnston, Kenneth J.; Kibblewhite, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The following recommended programs are reviewed: (1) infrared and optical interferometry (a ground-based and space programs); (2) compensation for the atmosphere with adaptive optics (a program for development and implementation of adaptive optics); and (3) gravitational waves (high frequency gravitational wave sources (LIGO), low frequency gravitational wave sources (LAGOS), a gravitational wave observatory program, laser gravitational wave observatory in space, and technology development during the 1990's). Prospects for international collaboration and related issues are also discussed.

  18. Development of XUV-interferometry (155 {angstrom}) using a soft x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W.; Cauble, R.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past several years the authors have developed a variety of techniques for probing plasmas with x-ray lasers. These have included direct high resolution plasma imaging to quantify laser produced plasma uniformities and moire deflectometry to measure electron density profiles in one-dimension. Although these techniques have been valuable, a need existed for direct two dimensional measurements of electron densities in large high density plasmas. For this reason the authors have worked on developing a xuv interferometer compatible with the harsh environment of laser produced plasmas. This paper describes the design and presents some results showing excellent fringe visibility using the neon-like yttrium x-ray laser operating at 155 {angstrom}. The coherence properties of this x-ray laser source were measured using interferometry and are also discussed.

  19. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  20. Capabilities of Imaging Interferometry for Plasma Diagnostics in Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Sanin, A.L.; Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K.

    2005-01-15

    Two modifications of imaging interferometry: heterodyne (HI) and phase contrast interferometers (PCI) are designed for observation of plasma density profiles and density fluctuations respectively. Besides, spatial distributions of plasma velocities, velocities fluctuations and related electrical fields can be obtained from the analysis of HI and PCI data. New sensitive phase counters, developed at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, enable HI to include some capabilities of the PCI. In addition to well recognized transversal spatial resolution of imaging technique, progress in deconvolution of line-of-sight-integrated data was recently made. Computer simulation, bench-test experiments and recent experimental results from the Large Helical Device illustrate the potentials of the imaging interferometry for investigation of plasma. Application of the imaging interferometry with spatial resolution along the viewing line to mirror machines is finally considered.

  1. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  2. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  3. End-Point Detection With Laser Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busta, Heinz H.

    1981-04-01

    A laser interferometric method was developed to detect end-of-etching of materials such as doped and undoped polysilicon, Si3N4, Si02 and metals used during different stages of IC and thin film device processing. For metal etching, a detector trace of constant magnitude is obtained until the underlying layers are exposed. At this point, a step change in re-flectivity occurs, signaling the end-point. For the other above mentioned films, a sinu-soidal waveform is obtained which changes its frequency once the film of interest is etched and the underlying layers become exposed. The method is applicable to all of the dry etch-ing processes and will be illustrated in some detail for polysilicon and silicon nitride etching applications using a barrel-type plasma reactor.

  4. Pulsed thrust measurements using laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubbin, E. A.; Ziemer, J. K.; Choueiri, E. Y.; Jahn, R. G.

    1997-06-01

    An optical interferometric proximeter system (IPS) for measuring thrust and impulse bit of pulsed electric thrusters was developed. Unlike existing thrust stands, the IPS-based thrust stand offers the advantage of a single system that can yield electromagnetic interference-free, high accuracy (<2% error) thrust measurements within a very wide range of impulses (100 μN s to above 10 N s) covering the impulse range of all known pulsed plasma thrusters. In addition to pulsed thrusters, the IPS is theoretically shown to be capable of measuring steady-state thrust values as low as 20 μN for microthrusters such as the field emission electric propulsion thruster. The IPS-based thrust stand relies on measuring the dynamic response of a swinging arm using a two-sensor laser interferometer with 10 nm position accuracy. The wide application of the thrust stand is demonstrated with thrust measurements of an ablative pulsed plasma thruster and a quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thruster.

  5. Laser Development for Gravitational-Wave Interferometry in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, K.

    2013-01-01

    We are reporting on our development work on laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier systems for gravitational-wave interferometry in space. Our system is based on the mature, wave-guided optics technologies, which have advantages over bulk, crystal-based, free-space optics. We are investing in a new type of compact, low-noise master oscillator, called the planar-waveguide external cavity diode laser. We made measurements, including those of noise, and performed space-qualification tests.

  6. Laser Development for Gravitational-Wave Interferometry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting on our development work on laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier systems for gravitational-wave interferometry in space. Our system is based on the mature, wave-guided optics technologies, which have advantages over bulk, crystal-based, free-space optics. We are investing in a new type of compact, low-noise master oscillator, called the planar-waveguide external cavity diode laser. We made measurements, including those of noise, and performed space-qualification tests.

  7. Real-time laser holographic Interferometry for aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments in thermoplastic recording holograms and advancements in automated image digitalization and analysis make real-time laser holographic interferometry feasible for two-dimensional flows such as airfoil flows. Typical airfoil measurements would include airfoil presssure distributions, wake and boundary layer profiles, and flow field density contours. This paper addresses some of the problems and requirements of a real-time laser holographic interferometer.

  8. Real-time laser holographic interferometry for aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments in thermoplastic recording holograms and advancements in automated image digitalization and analysis make real-time laser holographic interferometry feasible for two-dimensional flows such as airfoil flows. Typical airfoil measurements would include airfoil pressure distributions, wake and boundary layer profiles, and flow field density contours. This paper addresses some of the problems and requirements of a real-time laser holographic interferometer.

  9. Semiconductor Laser Linewidth Measurements for Space Interferometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, D. J.; Guttierrez, R. C.; Dubovitsky, S.; Forouhar, S.

    2000-01-01

    Narrow linewidth (<100KHz) semiconductor lasers are expected to be a key technology in NASA's stellar interferometry missions to search for planets around nearby stars. Long coherence length lasers are needed for precise (20 pm to 5 mn) measurements of the optical path difference. This work discusses results using the self-heterodyne delay technique to measure 1.3 micrometer InP based DFB lasers. We will also address practical issues concerning detection and elimination of back reflections, choice of fiber length and resolution, and measurement of laser 1/f and current supply noise.

  10. Laser-driven Acceleration in Clustered Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, X.; Wang, X.; Shim, B.; Downer, M. C.

    2009-01-22

    We propose a new approach to avoid dephasing limitation of laser wakefield acceleration by manipulating the group velocity of the driving pulse using clustered plasmas. We demonstrated the control of phase velocity in clustered plasmas by third harmonic generation and frequency domain interferometry experiments. The results agree with a numerical model. Based on this model, the group velocity of the driving pulse in clustered plasmas was calculated and the result shows the group velocity can approach the speed of light c in clustered plasmas.

  11. Quantitative shadowgraphy for laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boné, A.; Lemos, N.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A new all optic non-perturbative diagnostic for measuring densities of long plasma structures is presented. A model based on the refraction of a laser beam crossing a cylindrical column of plasma with a Gaussian density profile is derived and used to measure plasma electronic densities. The model shows good agreement with the performed ray tracing simulations. Experimental measurements of the electronic density of plasma columns ranging from 2 to 8× {{10}18} cm-3 are presented and show good agreement when compared to interferometry measurements.

  12. Dual-wavelength laser source for onboard atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, V; Geiger, R; Stern, G; Zahzam, N; Battelier, B; Bresson, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2011-11-01

    We present a compact and stable dual-wavelength laser source for onboard atom interferometry with two different atomic species. It is based on frequency-doubled telecom lasers locked on a femtosecond optical frequency comb. We take advantage of the maturity of fiber telecom technology to reduce the number of free-space optical components, which are intrinsically less stable, and to make the setup immune to vibrations and thermal fluctuations. The source provides the frequency agility and phase stability required for atom interferometry and can easily be adapted to other cold atom experiments. We have shown its robustness by achieving the first dual-species K-Rb magneto-optical trap in microgravity during parabolic flights. PMID:22048340

  13. Searching for Dark Matter with Atomic Clocks and Laser Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Yevgeny; Flambaum, Victor

    2016-05-01

    We propose new schemes for the direct detection of low-mass bosonic dark matter, which forms a coherently oscillating classical field and resides in the observed galactic dark matter haloes, using atomic clock, atomic spectroscopy and laser interferometry measurements in the laboratory. We have recently shown that such dark matter can produce both a `slow' cosmological evolution and oscillating variations in the fundamental constants. Using recent atomic dysprosium spectroscopy measurements in, we have derived limits on the quadratic interactions of scalar dark matter with ordinary matter that improve on existing constraints by up to 15 orders of magnitude. We have also proposed the use of laser and maser interferometry as novel high-precision platforms to search for dark matter, with effects due to the variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant on alterations in the accumulated phase enhanced by up to 14 orders of magnitude. Other possibilities include the use of highly-charged ions, molecules and nuclear clocks.

  14. On Possibility of Fizeau Interferometry In Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Mirnov, V. V.

    2008-11-01

    The phase velocity of electromagnetic waves propagating through a substance depends on whether they propagate in a moving or stationary medium (Fizeau effect). In the case of a high frequency electromagnetic wave, the plasma dielectric response is dominated by the electrons so that the velocity of the medium is associated with the electron flow velocity. The Fizeau measurement of this characteristic can be linked to the electron current in plasma [1]. In the case of cold unmagnetized electrons, the plasma refraction index N^2 =1-- φpe^2/φ^2. Due to specific φ-2 scaling, the phase velocity turns out to be insensitive to the electron flow velocity. Any deviation from this scaling may result in wave vector dependence on the electron flow velocity that can make the Fizeau effect measurable. We evaluate the phase difference caused by the Fizeau effect and relate it to the experimental high-resolution, vertically viewing far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer system currently used on the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP). The calculations include the effect of motion of the plasma-vacuum interface, corrections caused by electron gyrorotation, and the influence of the finite electron temperature on the wave dispersion. [1] D. L. Brower, W. X. Ding, B. H. Deng, M. A. Mahdavi, V. V. Mirnov, S. C. Prager, Rev. of Sci. Inst. 75 (10) 3399 (2004). The work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. and N.S.F.

  15. Measurements of Laser Imprinting Using 2-D Velocity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehly, T. R.; Fiksel, G.; Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Celliers, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    Evaluating laser imprinting and its effect on target performance is critical to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion research. Using high-resolution velocity interferometry, we measure modulations in the velocity of shock waves produced by the 351-nm beams on OMEGA. These modulations result from nonuniformities in the drive laser beams. We use these measurements to evaluate the effect on imprinting of multibeam irradiation and metal layers on both plastic and cryogenic deuterium targets driven with 100-ps pulses. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Laser Development for Interferometry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a laser (master oscillator) and optical amplifier for interferometric space missions, including the gravitational-wave missions NGO and OpTIIX experiment on the international space station. Our system is based on optical fiber and semiconductor laser technologies, which have evolved dramatically in the past decade. We will report on the latest status of the development work, including noise measurements and space qualification tests.

  17. Ramsey interferometry with an atom laser.

    PubMed

    Döring, D; Debs, J E; Robins, N P; Figl, C; Altin, P A; Close, J D

    2009-11-01

    We present results on a free-space atom interferometer operating on the first order magnetically insensitive |F = 1,mF = 0) --> |F = 2,mF = 0) ground state transition of Bose-condensed (87)Rb atoms. A pulsed atom laser is output-coupled from a Bose-Einstein condensate and propagates through a sequence of two internal state beam splitters, realized via coherent Raman transitions between the two interfering states. We observe Ramsey fringes with a visibility close to 100% and determine the current and the potentially achievable interferometric phase sensitivity. This system is well suited to testing recent proposals for generating and detecting squeezed atomic states. PMID:19997295

  18. Skin-friction measurements by laser interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.-S.; Settles, G. S.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement of skin friction in rapidly distorted compressible flows is difficult, and very few reliable techniques are available. A recent development, the laser interferometer skin friction (LISF) meter, promises to be useful for this purpose. This technique interferometrically measures the time rate of thinning of an oil film applied to an aerodynamic surface. Under the proper conditions the wall shear stress may thus be found directly, without reference to flow properties. The applicability of the LISF meter to supersonic boundary layers is examined experimentally. Its accuracy and repeatability are assessed, and conditions required for its successful application are considered.

  19. Application of Phase Shifted, Laser Feedback Interferometry to Fluid Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovryn, Ben; Eppell, Steven J.; Andrews, James H.; Khaydarov, John

    1996-01-01

    We have combined the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce a new instrument that can measure both optical path length (OPL) changes and discern sample reflectivity variations. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. LFI can yield a high signal-to-noise ratio even for low reflectivity samples. By combining PSI and LFI, we have produced a robust instrument, based upon a HeNe laser, with high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static (dc) or oscillatory changes along the optical path. As with other forms of interferometry, large changes in OPL require phase unwrapping. Conversely, small phase changes are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured. We introduce the phase shifts with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) and use either the Carre or Hariharan algorithms to determine the phase and visibility. We have determined the accuracy and precision of our technique by measuring both the bending of a cantilevered piezoelectric bimorph and linear ramps to the EOM. Using PSI, sub-nanometer displacements can be measured. We have combined our interferometer with a commercial microscope and scanning piezoelectric stage and have measured the variation in OPL and visibility for drops of PDMS (silicone oil) on coated single crystal silicon. Our measurement of the static contact angle agrees with the value of 68 deg stated in the literature.

  20. Laser interferometry for ear ossicular motion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Joseph J.; Poret, Jay C.; Mattox, Doug E.

    1994-07-01

    The emphasis of this project has been to initially detect the displacements of the eardrum by using a laser interferometer. A small cobalt-samarium magnet (typically weighing less than 4 mg) was placed on human cadaver eardrums and positioned inside a solenoid coil. An ac modulated signal, having a frequency range of 500 - 2500 Hz, was passed through the coil. This signal created an ac magnetic field inside the coil that caused the magnet to vibrate at the modulation frequency. A commercial (TSI) laser interferometer as well as a laboratory-based fiber-optic interferometer, both operating at 632 nm, were used to examine the displacements initially. For measurements made with the fiber-optic interferometer at a frequency of 1500 Hz, the displacement of the eardrum was approximately 68 nm. The response decreased linearly at a rate of 0.02 nm/Hz for frequencies greater than 1500 Hz. This paper reports on the experimental apparatus as well as the experimental results. Details on the design of the driving circuit and the interferometers also are presented.

  1. Laser beam collimation using Talbot interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, A. R.; Venkateswarlu, Putcha

    1993-01-01

    A modified method of checking laser beam collimation using a single grating and a right-angled prism is presented. The self-images (Talbot images) of a grating illuminated by a collimated beam are formed at some distance from the grating. The use of a right-angled prism makes it possible to carry out the folding of the self-image with respect to the original grating and to ensure that the grating lines in the self-image and the actual grating are inclined at equal angles with respect to horizontal direction. It is concluded that the proposed collimation test method has an in-built reference and does not require precise orientation of the grating as in the two-grating method. Large beams can be tested with a small-size assembly.

  2. Multi-chord fiber-coupled interferometry of supersonic plasma jets andcomparisons with synthetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, Elizabeth C.; Lynn, Alan G.; Gilmore, Mark A.; Thoma, Carsten; Loverich, John; Hsu, Scott C.

    2012-05-03

    A multi-chord fiber-coupled interferometer [Merritt et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 033506 (2012)] is being used to make time-resolved density measurements of supersonic argon plasma jets on the Plasma Liner Experiment [Hsu et al., Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 56, 307 (2011)]. The long coherence length of the laser (> 10 m) allows signal and reference path lengths to be mismatched by many meters without signal degradation, making for a greatly simplified optical layout. Measured interferometry phase shifts are consistent with a partially ionized plasma in which an initially positive phase shift becomes negative when the ionization fraction drops below a certain threshold. In this case, both free electrons and bound electrons in ions and neutral atoms contribute to the index of refraction. This paper illustrates how the interferometry data, aided by numerical modeling, are used to derive total jet density, jet propagation velocity ({approx} 15-50 km/s), jet length ({approx} 20-100 cm), and 3D expansion.

  3. Comparison of Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry for Gravitational Wave Observations in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2015-08-01

    1. In 2013 a suggestion was made by Graham et al. [1] [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 171102 (2013)] of possible GW observations over 10^3 km baselines using strongly forbidden single photon transitions in atoms such as Sr-87. A comparison of the requirements for such a mission with those for laser interferometer missions such as LISA or eLISA with roughly 10^6 km baselines was published in 2014 [Bender, Phys. Rev. D 89, 062004 (2014)]. The comparison will be somewhat updated in this talk.2. Recently, a possible method for gravitational wave observations with atom interferometry over million km scale baselines has been suggested by Hogan and Kasevich [arXiv:1501.06797v1 (2015)]. As an example, they consider observations similar to those discussed in [1], but over a 2*10^6 km baseline. The atomic transitions in the two spacecraft would be driven by separate lasers that are phase locked using 1 W laser power and 30 cm diam. telescopes. Total observation times for individual clouds of 80 to 320 s are assumed, along with 50 concurrent interferometers and a 60 Hz Rabi frequency for the laser pulses.3. After the flight of the LISA Pathfinder mission later this year, it is expected that more intensive work will start on a laser interferometer gravitational wave mission. Probably the most important objective will be the observation of GW signals from the mergers at high redshifts of massive black holes with masses in the range from perhaps 10^4 to 10^7 M_sun. Such signals would give new constraints on the mechanisms for the formation of intermediate mass and larger black holes at early times, and probably contribute to understanding the observed close correlation between the growth of galaxies and of the massive black holes at their centers.

  4. Effects of laser polarization in the expansion of plasma waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, N.; Grismayer, T.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a column of hydrogen plasma generated by an ultra-short (sub-picosecond), moderate intensity (˜1015-16 W.cm-2) laser, radially expands at a higher velocity when using a circularly polarized laser beam instead of a linearly polarized beam. Interferometry shows that after 1 ns there is a clear shock structure formed, that can be approximated to a cylindrical blast wave. The shock velocity was measured for plasmas created with linearly and circularly polarized laser beams, indicating an approximately 20% higher velocity for plasmas generated with a circularly polarized laser beam, thus implying a higher plasma electron temperature. The heating mechanism was determined to be the Above Threshold Ionization effect. The calculated electrum energy spectrum for a circularly polarized laser beam was broader when compared to the one generated by a linearly polarized laser beam, leading to a higher plasma temperature.

  5. Effects of laser polarization in the expansion of plasma waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, N.; Grismayer, T.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2013-10-15

    We experimentally demonstrate that a column of hydrogen plasma generated by an ultra-short (sub-picosecond), moderate intensity (∼10{sup 15–16} W.cm{sup –2}) laser, radially expands at a higher velocity when using a circularly polarized laser beam instead of a linearly polarized beam. Interferometry shows that after 1 ns there is a clear shock structure formed, that can be approximated to a cylindrical blast wave. The shock velocity was measured for plasmas created with linearly and circularly polarized laser beams, indicating an approximately 20% higher velocity for plasmas generated with a circularly polarized laser beam, thus implying a higher plasma electron temperature. The heating mechanism was determined to be the Above Threshold Ionization effect. The calculated electrum energy spectrum for a circularly polarized laser beam was broader when compared to the one generated by a linearly polarized laser beam, leading to a higher plasma temperature.

  6. Laser Micromachining and Information Discovery Using a Dual Beam Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Senthil P. Theppakuttaikomaraswamy

    2001-12-31

    Lasers have proven to be among the most promising tools for micromachining because they can process features down to the size of the laser wavelength (smaller than 1 micrometer) and they provide a non-contact technology for machining. The demand for incorporating in-situ diagnostics technology into the micromachining environment is driven by the increasing need for producing micro-parts of high quality and accuracy. Laser interferometry can be used as an on-line monitoring tool and it is the aim of this work to enhance the understanding and application of Michelson interferometry principle for the in-situ diagnostics of the machining depth on the sub-micron and micron scales. micromachining is done on two different materials and a comprehensive investigation is done to control the width and depth of the machined feature. To control the width of the feature, laser micromachining is done on copper and a detailed analysis is performed. The objective of this experiment is to make a precision mask for sputtering with an array of holes on it using an Nd:YAG laser of 532 nm wavelength. The diameter of the hole is 50 {micro}m and the spacing between holes (the distance between the centers) is 100 {micro}m. Michelson interferometer is integrated with a laser machining system to control the depth of machining. An excimer laser of 308 nm wavelength is used for micromachining. A He-Ne laser of 632.8 nm wavelength is used as the light source for the interferometer. Interference patterns are created due to the change in the path length between the two interferometer arms. The machined depth information is obtained from the interference patterns on an oscilloscope detected by a photodiode. To compare the predicted depth by the interferometer with the true machining depth, a surface profilometer is used to measure the actual machining depth on the silicon. It is observed that the depths of machining obtained by the surface profile measurement are in accordance with the

  7. Laser noise mitigation through time delay interferometry for space-based gravitational wave interferometers using the UF laser interferometry simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitryk, Shawn J.

    2012-06-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was theorized in 1916 by Albert Einstein in accordance with the linearized theory of general relativity. Most experiments and observations to date have supported general relativity, but now, nearly 100 years later, the scientific community has yet devise a method to directly measure gravitational radiation. With the first attempts towards a gravitational wave measurement in the 1960s, many methods have been proposed and tested since then, all failing thus far to provide a positive detection. The most promising gravitational radiation detection method is through the use of a space-based laser interferometer and with the advancement of modern technologies, these space-based gravitational wave measurements will eventually provide important scientific data to physics, astro-physics, and astronomy communities. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is one such space-based laser interferometer. LISA's proposed design objective is to measure gravitational radiation in the frequency range from 30 microHz to 1 Hz using a modified Michelson interferometer. The interferometer arms are 5 Gm in length measured between each of the 3 spacecraft in the interferometer constellation. The differential arm-length will be measured to an accuracy of 18 pm/ Hz resulting in a baseline strain sensitivity of 3.6 x 10 --21 / Hz . Unfortunately, the dynamics of the spacecraft orbits complicate the differential arm-length measurements. The arms of the interferometer change in length resulting in time-dependent, unequal arm-lengths and laser Doppler shifts. Thus, to cancel the laser noise, laser beatnotes are formed between lasers on separate SC and, using these one-way laser phase measurements, one can reconstruct an equal-arm interferometer in post-processing. This is commonly referred to as time-delay interferometry (TDI) and can be exploited to cancel the laser phase noise and extract the gravitational wave (GW) induced arm-length strain. The

  8. Laser precision ranger based on beat-wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wu, Yanhua; Weia, Huang

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a laser precision ranger based on beat wave interferometry. A frequency-stabilized double longitudinal modes He-Ne laser with thermoregulation is used as the light source. The two beams of double longitudinal modes generated in the same resonator of the laser are naturally coaxial. They have a frequency difference of about 790MHz and a beat wavelength of 380mm. Their stability is the same as the laser, which is better than 10-7 in open air. The node of the beat wave is used as the sampling flag. An adaptive filter and a wavelet transform program are used to eliminate the noise and to improve the accuracy of node detection. The distance between the node and the measur ed point is measured with a double frequency interferometer, which is incorporated in the same optical system and has a resolution of 0.08μm. Experimental results indicate that the measuring range is 20m and the uncertainty 30μm /10m.

  9. Laser wakefield excitation and measurement by femtosecond longitudinal interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Le Blanc, S.P.; Fisher, D.; Tajima, T.; Downer, M.C.; Babine, A.; Stepanov, A.; Sergeev, A.

    1996-04-01

    Plasma density oscillations (Langmuir waves) in the wake of an intense (I{sub peak} {approximately} 3 {times} 10{sup 17}W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulse (100 fs) are measured with ultrafast time resolution using a longitudinal interferometric technique. Phase shifts consistent with large amplitude ({delta}n{sub e}/n{sub e} {approximately} 1) density waves at the electron plasma frequency were observed in a fully tunnel-ionized He plasma, corresponding to longitudinal electric fields of {approximately} 10 GV/m. Strong radial ponderomotive forces enhance the density oscillations. As this technique utilizes a necessary component of any laser-based plasma accelerator, it promises to be a powerful tool for on-line monitoring and control of future plasma-based particle accelerators.

  10. Visualization of thermal behavior of fluid by laser holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaki, Y.; Kashiwagi, T.

    1990-01-01

    Visualization of four phenomena associated with thermal and fluid flow fields effectively using laser holographic interferometry are reviewed: airflow in a narrow passage between louver arrays, steam absorption into an aqueous solution of LiBr, Marangoni convection effect of steam absorption into a solution with the addition of high molecular weight alcohol, and pressure distribution on a plate induced by air-jet impingement. The observation result obtained in the first case is useful for designing louvered fins used in a heat exchanger. In the second case, the mass diffusivity of water into a solution of LiBr is shown to be measurable. In the third case, the effect of Marangoni convection on steam absorption is both qualitatively and quantitatively elucidated. The last case is a new visualization method of fluctuating pressure on a wall that can be used to resolve eddy-motion behavior near a wall.

  11. Mapping a vibrating surface by using laser self- mixing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Roberto; Molina, Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The laser-diode self-mixing technique is a well-known, powerful, very simple and low cost interferometric technique. The typical structure of a laser-diode self-mixing device is made up of a laser-diode, a focusing lens and a processing unit. One can find in literature numerous examples of target displacement, fluid flow, velocity, distance and vibration measurements. Regarding vibration measurements, the self-mixing effect has been mainly applied to measure amplitude and frequency in isolated points but it is difficult to find real applications in which this technique is applied to measure the vibrating behavior of a complete surface. This is due to the different feedback signals that may appear when a laser beam is scattered by a real rough surface. When scanning a surface, the different speckle patterns that contain the feedback signal at different points introduce big changes in the intensity of the scattered signal captured by the photodiode that drives the laser into a strong coupling self-mixing regime with loss of the sinusoidal behavior of the fringes. In many cases, saturation of the photodiode is also found. When this occurs, it is not possible to measure any vibration parameter. By programming simple algorithms, this problem can be overcome. Here we present vibration measurements of titanium tweeter membranes up to 6.8 Khz that show the vibrating behavior in the micrometer range. We demonstrate that the limit in the frequency range is set by the sample frequency of the data acquisition device. Results are compared with different optical techniques for mapping vibrating surfaces such as laser triangulation and electronic speckle pattern interferometry.

  12. Atmospheric turbulence compensation with laser phase shifting interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabien, S.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Davies, R. I.; Ott, T.

    2006-04-01

    Laser guide stars with adaptive optics allow astronomical image correction in the absence of a natural guide star. Single guide star systems with a star created in the earth's sodium layer can be used to correct the wavefront in the near infrared spectral regime for 8-m class telescopes. For possible future telescopes of larger sizes, or for correction at shorter wavelengths, the use of a single guide star is ultimately limited by focal anisoplanatism that arises from the finite height of the guide star. To overcome this limitation we propose to overlap coherently pulsed laser beams that are expanded over the full aperture of the telescope, traveling upwards along the same path which light from the astronomical object travels downwards. Imaging the scattered light from the resultant interference pattern with a camera gated to a certain height above the telescope, and using phase shifting interferometry we have found a method to retrieve the local wavefront gradients. By sensing the backscattered light from two different heights, one can fully remove the cone effect, which can otherwise be a serious handicap to the use of laser guide stars at shorter wavelengths or on larger telescopes. Using two laser beams multiconjugate correction is possible, resulting in larger corrected fields. With a proper choice of laser, wavefront correction could be expanded to the visible regime and, due to the lack of a cone effect, the method is applicable to any size of telescope. Finally the position of the laser spot could be imaged from the side of the main telescope against a bright background star to retrieve tip-tilt information, which would greatly improve the sky coverage of the system.

  13. Cell volume and plasma membrane osmotic water permeability in epithelial cell layers measured by interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Farinas, J; Verkman, A S

    1996-01-01

    The development of strategies to measure plasma membrane osmotic water permeability (Pf) in epithelial cells has been motivated by the identification of a family of molecular water channels. A general approach utilizing interferometry to measure cell shape and volume was developed and applied to measure Pf in cell layers. The method is based on the cell volume dependence of optical path length (OPL) for a light beam passing through the cell. The small changes in OPL were measured by interferometry. A mathematical model was developed to relate the interference signal to cell volume changes for cells of arbitrary shape and size. To validate the model, a Mach-Zehnder interference microscope was used to image OPL in an Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell layer and to reconstruct the three-dimensional cell shape (OPL resolution < lambda/25). As predicted by the model, a doubling of cell volume resulted in a change in OPL that was proportional to the difference in refractive indices between water and the extracellular medium. The time course of relative cell volume in response to an osmotic gradient was computed from serial interference images. To measure cell volume without microscopy and image analysis, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was constructed in which one of two interfering laser beams passed through a flow chamber containing the cell layer. The interference signal in response to an osmotic gradient was analyzed to quantify the time course of relative cell volume. The calculated MDCK cell plasma membrane Pf of 6.1 x 10(-4) cm/s at 24 degrees C agreed with that obtained by interference microscopy and by a total internal reflection fluorescence method. Interferometry was also applied to measure the apical plasma membrane water permeability of intact toad urinary bladder; Pf increased fivefold after forskolin stimulation to 0.04 cm/s at 23 degrees C. These results establish and validate the application of interferometry to quantify cell volume and osmotic water

  14. Four-color laser diagnostics for Z-pinch and laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Anderson, A A; Begishev, I A

    2016-01-20

    Four-color laser diagnostics were developed for Z-pinch and laser plasma at the 1 MA pulsed power generator. Four harmonics of the Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 266, and 213 nm were produced during the cascade conversion in three nonlinear crystals and propagated together in one beampath. Deep UV probing allows better penetration of the dense plasma. Laser probing at four wavelengths allows observation of plasma in a wide range of densities in one shot of the diagnostic laser. Examples of four-color laser shadowgraphy and interferometry of the wire-array load and laser plasma interaction are presented and discussed. PMID:26835923

  15. Study of the reactive ion etching of 6H-SiC and 4H-SiC in SF 6/Ar plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy and laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara, N.; Zekentes, K.

    2002-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and laser interferometry (LI) were investigated as monitoring methods during reactive ion etching (RIE) of hexagonal SiC in SF 6/Ar gas mixtures. The etch rate and the surface roughness were monitored by LI, while at the same time OES monitored the intensity of the fluorine-related 704 nm line. It was found that the etch rate is directly related to the above intensity and not to the self-induced DC-bias. This explains the very high etch rates obtained at high pressures (150-250 mTorr) despite the low DC-bias values (˜100 V). Etch rates higher than 400 nm/min were achieved for 400 W of rf power.

  16. Subsonic jet pressure fluctuation characterization by tomographic laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martarelli, Milena; Castellini, Paolo; Tomasini, Enrico Primo

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the application of a nonconventional experimental technique based on optical interferometry for the characterization of aeroacoustic sources. The specific test case studied is a turbulent subsonic jet. Traditional experimental methods exploited for the measurement of aerodynamic velocity fields are laser Doppler anemometer and particle image velocimetry which have an important drawback due to the fact that they can measure only if the flow is seeded with tracer particles. The technique proposed, by exploiting a laser Doppler interferometer and a tomographic algorithm for 3D field reconstruction, overcomes the problem of the flow seeding since it allows directly measuring the flow pressure fluctuation due to the flow turbulence. A laser Doppler interferometer indeed is sensitive to the density oscillation within the medium traversed by the laser beam even though it integrates the density oscillation along the entire path traveled by the laser. Consequently, the 3D distribution of the flow density fluctuation can be recovered only by exploiting a tomographic reconstruction algorithm applied to several projections. Finally, the flow pressure fluctuation can be inferred from the flow density measured, which comprehends both the aerodynamic pressure related to the turbulence and the sound pressure due to the propagation of the acoustic waves into the far field. In relation to the test case studied in this paper, e.g., the turbulent subsonic jet, the method allows a complete aeroacoustic characterization of the flow field since it measures both the aerodynamic "cause" of the noise, such as the vortex shedding, and the acoustic "effect" of it, i.e., the sound propagation in the 3D space. The performances and the uncertainty have been evaluated and discussed, and the technique has been experimentally validated.

  17. Measurement of the laser-pulse group velocity in plasma waveguides.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, J; Daniels, J; Gonsalves, A J; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2014-06-01

    Electrically discharged plasma channels can guide laser pulses, extending the laser-plasma interaction length to many Rayleigh ranges. In applications such as the laser-plasma accelerator, the laser group velocity in the channel plays a critical role. The laser travel time (and thus the averaged group velocity) was measured through two-pulse frequency-domain interferometry and was found to depend on the on-axis plasma density and laser spot size. The data is in agreement with theory. PMID:25019900

  18. Laser Plasma Material Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Peter; Carpene, Ettore

    2004-12-01

    Surface treatment by means of pulsed laser beams in reactive atmospheres is an attractive technique to enhance the surface features, such as corrosion and wear resistance or the hardness. Many carbides and nitrides play an important role for technological applications, requiring the mentioned property improvements. Here we present a new promising fast, flexible and clean technique for a direct laser synthesis of carbide and nitride surface films by short pulsed laser irradiation in reactive atmospheres (e.g. methane, nitrogen). The corresponding material is treated by short intense laser pulses involving plasma formation just above the irradiated surface. Gas-Plasma-Surface reactions lead to a fast incorporation of the gas species into the material and subsequently the desired coating formation if the treatment parameters are chosen properly. A number of laser types have been used for that (Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG, Ti:sapphire, Free Electron Laser) and a number of different nitride and carbide films have been successfully produced. The mechanisms and some examples will be presented for Fe treated in nitrogen and Si irradiated in methane.

  19. Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    The continuing development of powerful laser systems has permitted to extend the interaction of laser beams with matter far into the relativistic domain, and to demonstrate new approaches for producing energetic particle beams. The extremely large electric fields, with amplitudes exceeding the TV/m level, that are produced in plasma medium are of relevance particle acceleration. Since the value of this longitudinal electric field, 10,000 times larger than those produced in conventional radio-frequency cavities, plasma accelerators appear to be very promising for the development of compact accelerators. The incredible progresses in the understanding of laser plasma interaction physic, allows an excellent control of electron injection and acceleration. Thanks to these recent achievements, laser plasma accelerators deliver today high quality beams of energetic radiation and particles. These beams have a number of interesting properties such as shortness, brightness and spatial quality, and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine, radio-biology, chemistry, physics and material science,security (material inspection), and of course in accelerator science.

  20. Laser Initiated, RF Sustained Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, John; Giar, Ryan; Hummelt, Jason; Way, Jesse

    2009-11-01

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes by focusing 193 nm, 260 mJ, 10 MW high power UV laser radiation to 18 cm and 1.3 cm zones are examined. Quantum resonant multi-photon (REMPI) and collisional cascade ionization processes affect the breakdown and plasma formation. Our spectroscopic measurements show that REMPI (2+1) processes on nitrogen play a substantial role at lower pressures due to the high photon energy (6.4 eV). The REMPI process yields high density air plasmas (5 x 10^16/cc) for the 18 cm focus with the laser flux three orders of magnitude below the classical breakdown threshold intensity. Measurements of the f = 1.3 cm core laser plasma density (8x10^17/cc) and electron temperature decay via two color laser interferometry are made. The 18 cm focal length lens and its ionizing shock wave front are utilized to produce air seed plasma to initiate a large volume (500 cc) RF sustainment discharge coupled by means of a 6 cm diameter helical coil at up to 10 kW power levels.

  1. Laser Interferometry for Gravitational Wave Observation: LISA and LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in the frequency range of 0.1mHz-100mHz. This observation band is inaccessible to ground-based detectors due to the large ground motions of the Earth. Gravitational wave sources for LISA include galactic binaries, mergers of supermasive black-hole binaries, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, and possibly from as yet unimagined sources. LISA is a constellation of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle, whose center follows the Earth in a heliocentric orbit with an orbital phase offset oF 20 degrees. Challenging technology is required to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of the six onboard test masses, whose distance fluctuations will be measured by interspacecraft laser interferometers with picometer accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA-launched technology demonstration mission of key LISA subsystems such us spacecraft control with micro-newton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of flight hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems of LISA Pathfinder is currently ongoing. An introduction to laser interferometric gravitational wave detection, ground-based observatories, and a detailed description of the two missions together with an overview of current investigations conducted by the community will bc discussed. The current status in development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts will also be presented

  2. Zeeman laser interferometry for detection and chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Zeeman interferometry has a number of applications for ultrasensitive detection and chemical analysis, including refractive index detection, micro-thermometry, thermooptic spectroscopy, and light scattering.

  3. Multiwavelength interferometry system for the Orion laser facility.

    PubMed

    Patankar, S; Gumbrell, E T; Robinson, T S; Lowe, H F; Giltrap, S; Price, C J; Stuart, N H; Kemshall, P; Fyrth, J; Luis, J; Skidmore, J W; Smith, R A

    2015-12-20

    We report on the design and testing of a multiwavelength interferometry system for the Orion laser facility based upon the use of self-path matching Wollaston prisms. The use of UV corrected achromatic optics allows for both easy alignment with an eye-safe light source and small (∼ millimeter) offsets to the focal lengths between different operational wavelengths. Interferograms are demonstrated at wavelengths corresponding to first, second, and fourth harmonics of a 1054 nm Nd:glass probe beam. Example data confirms the broadband achromatic capability of the imaging system with operation from the UV (263 nm) to visible (527 nm) and demonstrates that features as small as 5 μm can be resolved for object sizes of 15 by 10 mm. Results are also shown for an off-harmonic wavelength that will underpin a future capability. The primary optics package is accommodated inside the footprint of a ten-inch manipulator to allow the system to be deployed from a multitude of viewing angles inside the 4 m diameter Orion target chamber. PMID:26837022

  4. Diagnosing high density, fast-evolving plasmas using x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    As x-ray laser (XRL) research has matured, it has become possible to reliably utilize XRLs for applications in the laboratory. Laser coherence, high brightness and short pulse duration all make the XRL a unique tool for the diagnosis of laboratory plasmas. The high brightness of XRLs makes them well-suited for imaging and for interferometry when used in conjunction with multilayer mirrors and beamsplitters. We have utilized a soft x-ray laser in such an imaging system to examine laser-produced plasmas using radiography, moire deflectometry, and interferometry. Radiography experiments yield 100-200 ps snapshots of laser driven foils at a resolution of 1-2 {mu}m. Moire deflectometry with an XRL has been used to probe plasmas at higher density than by optical means. Interferograms, which allow direct measurement of electron density in laser plasmas, have been obtained with this system.

  5. Industrial laser interferometry II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Dearborn, MI, June 27, 28, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, M.Y.Y.; Pryputniewicz, R.

    1988-01-01

    Various papers on industrial laser interferometry are presented. Individual topics discussed include: specklegrammetry for precision surface coordinate measurement, fast detection of residual stresses by shearography, surface inspection of automotive bodies by reflective computer vision, shearographic detection of flaws in unity vision optical components, coherent information process of white light speckle sandwich, coherent sensors for hostile environments, and grating method for strain measurement. Also considered are: Talbot carrier image processing of birefringence effect, advancement in photocarrier Talbot effect theory, shearing photoelasticity, study of brake squeal problem by pulsed holographic interferometry, modeling of drill bit transverse vibrations, use of glass fiber techniques in holographic deformation analysis, and vibration studies using heterodyne hologram interferometry.

  6. Simultaneous velocity interferometry and electronic streak photography of laser-launched plates

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.; Garcia, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    Laser-launched, miniature, pseudo-one-dimensional flyer plates are evaluated by three distinct optical techniques that may be incorporated into an optical diagnostic system to give a complete understanding of the plate performance. These techniques are: velocity interferometry, streak photography, and pulsed laser stereo photography. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Progress on laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-04-01

    Several laser plasma accelerator schemes are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA). Theory indicates that a very high acceleration gradient, of order 1 GeV/m, can exist in the plasma wave driven by the beating lasers. Experimental results obtained on the PBWA experiment at UCLA confirms this. Parameters related to the PBWA as an accelerator system are derived, among them issues concerning the efficiency and the laser power and energy requirements are discussed.

  8. Plasma ignition for laser propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    For a specific optical system a pulsed carbon dioxide laser having an energy output of up to 15 joules was used to initiate a plasma in air at one atmosphere pressure. The spatial and temporal development of the plasma were measured using a multiframe image converter camera. In addition the time dependent velocity of the laser supported plasma front which moves opposite to the direction of the laser pulse was measured in order to characterize the type of wavefront developed. Reliable and reproducible spark initiation was achieved. The lifetime of the highly dense plasma at the initial focal spot was determined to be less than 100 nanoseconds. The plasma front propagates toward the laser at a variable speed ranging from zero to 1.6 x 1,000,000 m/sec. The plasma front propagates for a total distance of approximately five centimeters for the energy and laser pulse shape employed.

  9. Narrow-linewidth tunable laser working at 633 nm suitable for industrial interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Tuan Pham; Hucl, Václav; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Hrabina, Jan; Řeřucha, Šimon; Číp, Ondřej; Lazar, Josef

    2015-05-01

    Semiconductor lasers found a foothold in many fields of human activities, mainly thanks to its small size, low cost and high energy efficiency. Recent methods for accurate distance measurement in industrial practice use principles of laser interferometry, which are based on lasers operating in the visible spectrum. When the laser beam is visible the alignment of the industrial interferometer makes the measuring process easier. Traditional lasers for these purposes for many decades - HeNe gas laser - have superb coherence properties but small tunable range. On the other hand laser diodes are very useful lasers but only if the active layer of the semiconductor equips with a passive selective element that will increase the quality of their own resonator and also prevents the structure of its higher longitudinal modes. The main aim of the work is a design of the laser source based on a new commercial available laser diode with Distributed Bragg Reflector structure, butterfly package and fibre coupled output. The ultra-low noise injection current source, stable temperature controller and supply electronic equipment were developed with us and experimentally tested with this laser for the best performances required of the industrial interferometry field. The work also performs a setup for frequency noise properties investigation with an unbalanced fibre based Mach-Zehnder interferometer and 10 m long fibre spool inserted in the reference arm. The work presents the way to developing the narrow-linewidth operation the DBR laser with the wide tunable range up to more than 1 nm of the operation wavelength at the same time. Both capabilities predetermine this complex setup for the industrial interferometry application as they are the long distance surveying or absolute scale interferometry.

  10. Laser-ablation-induced refractive index fields studied using pulsed digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2009-07-01

    Pulsed digital holographic interferometry has been used to investigate the plume and the shock wave generated in the ablation process of a Q-switched Nd-YAG ( λ=1064 nm and pulse duration=12 ns) laser pulse on a polycrystalline boron nitride (PCBN) target under atmospheric air pressure. A special setup based on two synchronised wavelengths from the same laser for simultaneous processing and measurement has been used. Digital holograms were recorded for different time delays using collimated laser light ( λ=532 nm) passed through the volume along the target. Numerical data of the integrated refractive index field were calculated and presented as phase maps showing the propagation of the shock wave and the plume generated by the process. Radon inversion has been used to estimate the 3D refractive index fields measured from the projections assuming rotational symmetry. The shock wave density has been calculated using the point explosion model and the shock wave condition equation and its behaviour with time at different power densities ranging from 1.4 to 9.1 GW/cm 2 is presented. Shock front densities have been calculated from the reconstructed refractive index fields using the Gladstone-Dale equation. A comparison of the shock front density calculated from the reconstructed data and that calculated using the point explosion model at different time delays has been done. The comparison shows quite good agreement between the model and the experimental data. Finally the reconstructed refractive index field has been used to estimate the electron number density distribution within the laser-induced plasma. The electron number density behaviour with distance from the target at different power densities and its behaviour with time are shown. The electron number densities are found to be in the order of 10 18 cm -3 and decay at a rate of 3×10 15 electrons/cm 3 ns.

  11. The use of laser moire interferometry in the study of deformation fields in composites and adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, R.

    Laser moire interferometry is a recently developed optical technique which allows high resolution measurements of deformation fields in stressed materials. This paper describes the technique and illustrates its use in strain concentration measurements around circular holes in CFRP laminates and in a stressed adhesive bond. In the latter example the initiation and growth of damage have been successfully followed.

  12. Characterization of mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composite utilizing laser interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, S.; Truskowski, J.W. USAF, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH )

    1992-09-01

    A test technique to characterize the mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites utilizing laser interferometry was developed. This was demonstrated by measuring the mode II critical strain energy release rate at room temperature. The present study used the silicon-carbide-fiber/glass-ceramic matrix composite system. 13 refs.

  13. Space-Time Characterization of Laser Plasma Interactions in the Warm Dense Matter Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L F; Uschmann, I; Forster, E; Zamponi, F; Kampfer, T; Fuhrmann, A; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Toleikis, S; Tschentsher, T; Glenzer, S H

    2008-04-30

    Laser plasma interaction experiments have been performed using a fs Titanium Sapphire laser. Plasmas have been generated from planar PMMA targets using single laser pulses with 3.3 mJ pulse energy, 50 fs pulse duration at 800 nm wavelength. The electron density distributions of the plasmas in different delay times have been characterized by means of Nomarski Interferometry. Experimental data were compared with hydrodynamic simulation. First results to characterize the plasma density and temperature as a function of space and time are obtained. This work aims to generate plasmas in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime at near solid-density in an ultra-fast laser target interaction process. Plasmas under these conditions can serve as targets to develop x-ray Thomson scattering as a plasma diagnostic tool, e.g., using the VUV free-electron laser (FLASH) at DESY Hamburg.

  14. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schkolnik, V.; Hellmig, O.; Wenzlawski, A.; Grosse, J.; Kohfeldt, A.; Döringshoff, K.; Wicht, A.; Windpassinger, P.; Sengstock, K.; Braxmaier, C.; Krutzik, M.; Peters, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone toward space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology, is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 l and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technological maturity by remaining frequency stabilized throughout the mission including the rocket's boost phase.

  15. Analysis of multifrequency interferometry in a cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, D. J.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, B. N.; Chavers, D. G.; Dobson, C. C.; Jones, J. E.; Jacobson, V. T.

    2006-10-15

    A microwave interferometer operating simultaneously at 70, 90, and 110 GHz is used to measure line integrated electron density in a plasma column in the VX-20 experiment. Interferometer beam sizes are a significant part of the plasma radius at some locations. We model the wave propagation through the plasma using a scalar wave approximation with assumptions of a Gaussian beam profile and plasma spatial profile. The phase shifts obtained from this model are compared with standard thin beam calculations and experimental data.

  16. Experimental results to study astrophysical plasma jets using Intense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupias, B.; Gregory, C. D.; Falize, E.; Waugh, J.; Seiichi, D.; Pikuz, S.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Ravasio, A.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Barroso, P.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Nazarov, W.; Takabe, H.; Sakawa, Y.; Woolsey, N.; Koenig, M.

    2009-08-01

    We present experimental results of plasma jet, interacted with an ambient medium, using intense lasers to investigate the complex features of astrophysical jets. This experiment was performed in France at the LULI facility, Ecole Polytechnique, using one long pulse laser to generate the jet and a short pulse laser to probe it by proton radiography. A foam filled cone target was used to generate high velocity plasma jet, and a gas jet nozzle produced the well known ambient medium. Using visible pyrometry and interferometry, we were able to measure the jet velocity and electronic density. We get a panel of measurements at various gas density and time delay. From these measurements, we could underline the growth of a perturbed shape of the jet interaction with the ambient medium. The reason of this last observation is still in debate and will be presented in the article.

  17. Laser-Plasma Density and Temperature Measurements with Triple Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, A.; Quiros, N.; Khanal, V.; Wan, W. C.; Meineke, J.; Kugland, N. L.; Morita, T.; Gregori, G.; Park, H.-S.; Presura, R.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments to investigate shocks produced by the explosive expansion of a laser-plasma plume against a gas background were performed on the Titan laser (LLNL). Knowledge of density and temperature is essential for understanding the underlying processes. Triple Langmuir probes (TLP) were used for measuring these quantities as function of time at a given location in the plasma. In the experiment, laser ablation plasma from a carbon rod expanded in hydrogen, helium, or argon ambient gas. Density and temperature jumps in the TLP measurements can be correlated with shocks detected by interferometry and proton deflectometry. This work was supported by the US DOE/OFES grant DE-SC0008829.

  18. X-ray lasers and high-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The improved reliability, high brightness, and short wavelength of x-ray lasers make them ideally suited for studying large, high-density plasmas of interest to the laser-fusion research community. We have been developing the neonlike yttrium x-ray laser as a probe, together with the necessary multilayer mirrors and beam splitters, to image plasmas produced at the Nova laser facility and to measure electron density. With its short-wavelength (15.5-nm) light, we can use the yttrium x-ray laser to probe plasma densities up to 10{sup 23} cm{sup {minus}3}. At the highest magnification (30?), the spatial resolution of our imaging system is better than 1 {mu}m. Using the technique of moire deflectometry, we have measured density gradients of plasmas. Using the technique of interferometry, we have probed 3-mm-long plasmas with electron densities up to 3? 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}. Temporal blurring of plasma images remains the main limitation of our approach. Thus, we are continuing to improve our theoretical and experimental understanding of laboratory x-ray lasers. We are currently working on techniques to reduce the blurring of images by shortening the x-ray laser pulse to durations approaching about 20 ps. In the future, this important research tool can be applied to study high-density plasmas produced at the proposed National Ignition Facility. Other important applications of the x-ray laser include biological imaging of whole, live cells and other structures at resolutions superior to those obtainable by conventional optical microscopy.

  19. Experimental studies of laser guiding in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.P.

    1998-07-01

    The authors present results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor-Heater scheme is proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It makes use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort (< 100 fs) laser pulse, is brought to a line focus using a cylindrical lens to ionize the gas. The Heater pulse (160 ps long) is used subsequently to heat the existing spark via inverse Bremsstrahlung. The hydrodynamic shock expansion creates a partially evacuated plasma channel with a density minimum on axis. Such a channel has properties of an optical waveguide. This technique allows, creation of plasma channels in low atomic number gases, such as hydrogen, which is of importance for guiding of highly intense laser pulses. The channel density was diagnosed with time resolved longitudinal interferometry. From these measurements the plasma temperature was inferred. The guiding properties of the channels were tested by injecting a > 5 {times} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, 75 fs laser pulse.

  20. Non-contact angle measurement based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yi-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Lian

    2014-11-01

    We present a novel precise angle measurement scheme based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry (PLFI), which outputs two parallel laser beams and thus their displacement difference reflects the angle variation of the target. Due to its ultrahigh sensitivity to the feedback light, PLFI realizes the direct non-contact measurement of non-cooperative targets. Experimental results show that PLFI has an accuracy of 8″ within a range of 1400″. The yaw of a guide is also measured and the experimental results agree with those of the dual-frequency laser interferometer Agilent 5529A.

  1. Linewidth measurement of mid infrared quantum cascade laser by optical feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardilli, Maria Carmela; Dabbicco, Maurizio; Mezzapesa, Francesco Paolo; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    We estimated experimentally the linewidth (0.28 MHz) of a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting at 6.2 μm using optical feedback interferometry. The method is simply based on the analysis of the histogram of laser self-mixing fringe periods measured directly as voltage variation across the laser terminals. We assessed the optimal experimental conditions estimating the influence of the optical feedback strength on the interferometric phase noise and compared our results with those reported using conventional interferometric methods based on the analysis of the frequency noise power spectral density.

  2. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  3. Hardware Verification of Laser Noise Cancellation and Gravitational Wave Extraction using Time-Delay Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitryk, Shawn; Mueller, Guido

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a space-based modified Michelson interfer-ometer designed to measure gravitational radiation in the frequency range from 30 uHz to 1 Hz. The interferometer measurement system (IMS) utilizes one-way laser phase measurements to cancel the laser phase noise, reconstruct the proof-mass motion, and extract the gravitational wave (GW) induced laser phase modulations in post-processing using a technique called time-delay interferometry (TDI). Unfortunately, there exist few hard-ware verification experiments of the IMS. The University of Florida LISA Interferometry Simulator (UFLIS) is designed to perform hardware-in-the-loop simulations of the LISA interferometry system, modeling the characteris-tics of the LISA mission as accurately as possible. This depends, first, on replicating the laser pre-stabilization by locking the laser phase to an ultra-stable Zerodur cavity length reference using the PDH locking method. Phase measurements of LISA-like photodetector beat-notes are taken using the UF-phasemeter (PM) which can measure the laser BN frequency to within an accuracy of 0.22 uHz. The inter-space craft (SC) laser links including the time-delay due to the 5 Gm light travel time along the LISA arms, the laser Doppler shifts due to differential SC motion, and the GW induced laser phase modulations are simulated electronically using the electronic phase delay (EPD) unit. The EPD unit replicates the laser field propagation between SC by measuring a photodetector beat-note frequency with the UF-phasemeter and storing the information in memory. After the requested delay time, the frequency information is added to a Doppler offset and a GW-like frequency modulation. The signal is then regenerated with the inter-SC laser phase affects applied. Utilizing these components, I will present the first complete TDI simulations performed using the UFLIS. The LISA model is presented along-side the simulation, comparing the generation and

  4. Plasmas and Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas

    1999-11-01

    Many of the applications of short-pulse, high-intensity laser systems, including coherent UV and X-ray generation, compact particle accelerators, and non-perturbative nonlinear optics as well as the study of laser-matter interaction physics, require large intensity-interaction length products. In recent years, plasma structures resulting from the hydrodynamic evolution of laser-produced plasma filaments have proven to be attractive media for guiding pulses with peak powers approaching the terawatt level over lengths many times the vacuum Rayleigh range. The hydrodynamics of plasma waveguides have been characterized using time- and space-resolved interferometry measurements of electron density profiles. The laser-driven ionization and heating phase of the plasma filament creation is followed by hot electron driven plasma expansion. Density profiles suitable for optical guiding develop within the first few hundred picoseconds after plasma creation, during which rapid cooling occurs. At longer times the plasma expansion closely follows that of a cylindrical blast wave, with further cooling due to expansion work. The observed guided intensity profiles of end-coupled and tunnel-coupled pulses compare favorably with calculations of the quasi-bound waveguide modes based on the measured electron density profiles. Time- and space-resolved electron density measurements of a laser-driven concentric implosion were also performed. The implosion is the result of the interaction of a second laser pulse with an existing plasma waveguide. The two-pulse absorption and ionization significantly exceed that due to a single pulse of the same total energy. The author would like to acknowledge the significant contributions of Prof. Howard M. Milchberg to the work being presented.

  5. Investigation of Early Plasma Evolution Induced by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen B.

    2012-01-01

    Early plasma is generated owing to high intensity laser irradiation of target and the subsequent target material ionization. Its dynamics plays a significant role in laser-material interaction, especially in the air environment1-11. Early plasma evolution has been captured through pump-probe shadowgraphy1-3 and interferometry1,4-7. However, the studied time frames and applied laser parameter ranges are limited. For example, direct examinations of plasma front locations and electron number densities within a delay time of 100 picosecond (ps) with respect to the laser pulse peak are still very few, especially for the ultrashort pulse of a duration around 100 femtosecond (fs) and a low power density around 1014 W/cm2. Early plasma generated under these conditions has only been captured recently with high temporal and spatial resolutions12. The detailed setup strategy and procedures of this high precision measurement will be illustrated in this paper. The rationale of the measurement is optical pump-probe shadowgraphy: one ultrashort laser pulse is split to a pump pulse and a probe pulse, while the delay time between them can be adjusted by changing their beam path lengths. The pump pulse ablates the target and generates the early plasma, and the probe pulse propagates through the plasma region and detects the non-uniformity of electron number density. In addition, animations are generated using the calculated results from the simulation model of Ref. 12 to illustrate the plasma formation and evolution with a very high resolution (0.04 ~ 1 ps). Both the experimental method and the simulation method can be applied to a broad range of time frames and laser parameters. These methods can be used to examine the early plasma generated not only from metals, but also from semiconductors and insulators. PMID:22806170

  6. Time-Space Position of Warm Dense Matter in Laser Plasma Interaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L F; Uschmann, I; Forster, E; Zamponi, F; Kampfer, T; Fuhrmann, A; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H

    2006-09-25

    Laser plasma interaction experiments have been perform performed using an fs Titanium Sapphire laser. Plasmas have been generated from planar PMMA targets using single laser pulses with 3.3 mJ pulse energy, 50 fs pulse duration at 800 nm wavelength. Electron density distributions of the plasmas in different delay times have been characterized by means of Nomarski Interferometry. Experimental data were cautiously compared with relevant 1D numerical simulation. Finally these results provide a first experience of searching for the time-space position of the so-called warm dense plasma in an ultra fast laser target interaction process. These experiments aim to prepare near solid-density plasmas for Thomson scattering experiments using the short wavelength free-electron laser FLASH, DESY Hamburg.

  7. Proposed satellite laser ranging and very long baseline interferometry sites for crustal dynamics investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D.; Allenby, R. J.; Frey, H. V.

    1979-01-01

    Recommendations are presented for a global network of 125 sites for geodetic measurements by satellite laser ranging and very long baseline interferometry. The sites were proposed on the basis of existing facilities and scientific value for investigation of crustal dynamics as related to earthquake hazards. Tectonic problems are discussed for North America peripheral regions and for the world. The sites are presented in tables and maps, with bibliographic references.

  8. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging using self-mixing interferometry with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Lui, H S; Taimre, T; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Dean, P; Khanna, S P; Lachab, M; Valavanis, A; Indjin, D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Rakić, A D

    2014-05-01

    We propose a terahertz (THz)-frequency synthetic aperture radar imaging technique based on self-mixing (SM) interferometry, using a quantum cascade laser. A signal processing method is employed which extracts and exploits the radar-related information contained in the SM signals, enabling the creation of THz images with improved spatial resolution. We demonstrate this by imaging a standard resolution test target, achieving resolution beyond the diffraction limit. PMID:24784063

  9. Thomson scattering from laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J D; Alley, W E; De Groot, J S; Estabrook, K G; Glenzer, S H; Hammer, J H; Jadaud, J P; MacGowan, B J; Rozmus, W; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1999-01-12

    Thomson scattering has recently been introduced as a fundamental diagnostic of plasma conditions and basic physical processes in dense, inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Experiments at the Nova laser facility [E. M. Campbell et al., Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] have demonstrated accurate temporally and spatially resolved characterization of densities, electron temperatures, and average ionization levels by simultaneously observing Thomson scattered light from ion acoustic and electron plasma (Langmuir) fluctuations. In addition, observations of fast and slow ion acous- tic waves in two-ion species plasmas have also allowed an independent measurement of the ion temperature. These results have motivated the application of Thomson scattering in closed-geometry inertial confinement fusion hohlraums to benchmark integrated radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of fusion plasmas. For this purpose a high energy 4{omega} probe laser was implemented recently allowing ultraviolet Thomson scattering at various locations in high-density gas-filled hohlraum plasmas. In partic- ular, the observation of steep electron temperature gradients indicates that electron thermal transport is inhibited in these gas-filled hohlraums. Hydrodynamic calcula- tions which include an exact treatment of large-scale magnetic fields are in agreement with these findings. Moreover, the Thomson scattering data clearly indicate axial stagnation in these hohlraums by showing a fast rise of the ion temperature. Its timing is in good agreement with calculations indicating that the stagnating plasma will not deteriorate the implosion of the fusion capsules in ignition experiments.

  10. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron-positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  11. Semiconductor Laser Line-width Measurements for Space Interferometry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, D.; Guttierrez, R.; Dubovitsky, S.; Forouhar, S.

    1999-01-01

    This work discusses results using the self-heterodyne delay atechnique to measure 1.3 um InP based DFB lasers. We will also address practical issues concerning detection and elimination of back reflections, choice of fiber length and resolution, and measurement of laser 1/f and current supply noise.

  12. Wide baseline optical interferometry with Laser Guide Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D. T., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Laser guide stars have been used successfully as a reference source for adaptive optics systems. We present a possible method for utilizing laser beacons as sources for interferometric phasing. The technique would extend the sky coverage for wide baseline interferometers and allow interferometric measurement and imaging of dim objects.

  13. Frequency Noise Properties of Lasers for Interferometry in Nanometrology

    PubMed Central

    Hrabina, Jan; Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we focus on laser frequency noise properties and their influence on the interferometric displacement measurements. A setup for measurement of laser frequency noise is proposed and tested together with simultaneous measurement of fluctuations in displacement in the Michelson interferometer. Several laser sources, including traditional He-Ne and solid-state lasers, and their noise properties are evaluated and compared. The contribution of the laser frequency noise to the displacement measurement is discussed in the context of other sources of uncertainty associated with the interferometric setup, such as, mechanics, resolution of analog-to-digital conversion, frequency bandwidth of the detection chain, and variations of the refractive index of air. PMID:23435049

  14. Frequency noise properties of lasers for interferometry in nanometrology.

    PubMed

    Hrabina, Jan; Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Cíp, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we focus on laser frequency noise properties and their influence on the interferometric displacement measurements. A setup for measurement of laser frequency noise is proposed and tested together with simultaneous measurement of fluctuations in displacement in the Michelson interferometer. Several laser sources, including traditional He-Ne and solid-state lasers, and their noise properties are evaluated and compared. The contribution of the laser frequency noise to the displacement measurement is discussed in the context of other sources of uncertainty associated with the interferometric setup, such as, mechanics, resolution of analog-to-digital conversion, frequency bandwidth of the detection chain, and variations of the refractive index of air. PMID:23435049

  15. Pulsed laser interferometry with sub-picometer resolution using quadrature detection.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lei; Gorman, Jason J

    2016-07-25

    Femtosecond pulsed laser interferometry has important applications in measuring picometer-level displacements on sub-nanosecond time scales. In this paper, we experimentally examine its achievable displacement resolution, as well as the relationship between the laser's optical spectrum and the interferometer's effective wavelength. The resulting broadband displacement noise and noise floor of the pulsed laser Michelson interferometer are equivalent to that achieved with a stabilized continuous wave HeNe laser, where values of 1.01 nm RMS and 27.75 fm/√Hz have been demonstrated. It is also shown that a single effective wavelength can accurately describe the fringes of the pulsed laser interferometer but the effective wavelength value can only be determined from the optical spectrum under certain conditions. These results will be used for time-resolved displacement metrology with picosecond temporal resolution in the future. PMID:27464192

  16. Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Skoric, Milos M.

    2009-11-10

    Ever since the much acclaimed paper of Akhiezer and Polovin plasma theorists have been attempting to comprehend complex dynamics related to the propagation of high and ultra-high intensity electromagnetic (EM) radiation through a plasma. This topic was successfully revisited a number of years later by Kaw and Dawson whose analysis threw more light on the propagation of coupled longitudinal-transverse waves of arbitrary intensity. The high phase velocity case was soon solved exactly by Max and Perkins, (early review). The problem of relativistic laser-plasma interactions is of particular interest concerning the fast ignition concept, relevant to contemporary laser inertial confinement fusion research. Moreover, the understanding of relativistic laser pulse evolution in a plasma is basic to many new applications, including optical-field-ionized x-ray lasers, plasma-based electron accelerator schemes, as well as, interpretation of some astrophysical phenomena, and references, therein). From a text given in two tutorial lectures, in a limited space, we mainly focus on an important paradigm of stimulated Raman scattering.

  17. Laser frequency modulation with electron plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, T. J.; Latorre, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    When laser beam passes through electron plasma its frequency shifts by amount proportional to plasma density. This density varies with modulating signal resulting in corresponding modulation of laser beam frequency. Necessary apparatus is relatively inexpensive since crystals are not required.

  18. Chirped pulse reflectivity and frequency domain interferometry in laser driven shock experiments.

    PubMed

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Koenig, M; Boudenne, J M; Hall, T A; Batani, D; Scianitti, F; Masini, A; Di Santo, D

    1999-09-01

    We show the simultaneous applicability of the frequency domain interferometry and the chirped pulse reflectometry techniques to measure shock parameters. The experiment has been realized with the laser at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) with a 550-ps pulse duration and an intensity on target approximately 5 x 10(13) W/cm(2) to produce a shock in a layered aluminum-fused silica target. A second low energy, partially compressed chirped probe beam was used to irradiate the target rear side and the reflected light has been analyzed with a spectrometer, achieving a temporal resolution of the order of 1 ps. PMID:11970183

  19. Chirped pulse reflectivity and frequency domain interferometry in laser driven shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Boudenne, J. M.; Hall, T. A.; Batani, D.; Scianitti, F.; Masini, A.; di Santo, D.

    1999-09-01

    We show the simultaneous applicability of the frequency domain interferometry and the chirped pulse reflectometry techniques to measure shock parameters. The experiment has been realized with the laser at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) with a 550-ps pulse duration and an intensity on target ~5×1013 W/cm2 to produce a shock in a layered aluminum-fused silica target. A second low energy, partially compressed chirped probe beam was used to irradiate the target rear side and the reflected light has been analyzed with a spectrometer, achieving a temporal resolution of the order of 1 ps.

  20. Precision Pointing for the Laser Interferometry Space Antenna Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Maghami, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave detector consisting of three spacecraft in heliocentric orbit. Lasers are used to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard each spacecraft to the picometer level over a 5 million kilometer separation. Each spacecraft and its two laser transmit/receive telescopes must be held stable in pointing to less than 8 nanoradians per root Hertz in the frequency band 0.1-100 mHz. The pointing error is sensed in the received beam and the spacecraft attitude is controlled with a set of micro-Newton thrusters. Requirements, sensors, actuators, control design, and simulations are described.

  1. Sub-micron structuring of silicon using femtosecond laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.; Serra, R.; Oliveira, J. C.; Polushkin, N. I.; Conde, O.

    2013-12-01

    We report the fabrication of planar sub-micron gratings in silicon with a period of 720 nm using a modified Michelson interferometer and femtosecond laser radiation. The gratings consist of alternated stripes of laser ablated and unmodified material. Ablated stripes are bordered by parallel ridges which protrude above the unmodified material. In the regions where ridges are formed, the laser radiation intensity is not sufficient to cause ablation. Nevertheless, melting and a significant temperature increase are expected, and ridges may be formed due to expansion of silicon during resolidification or silicon oxidation. These conclusions are consistent with the evolution of the stripes morphology as a function of the distance from the center of the grating. Sub-micron gratings were created in silicon using femtosecond laser radiation. A modified Michelson interferometer was used. The gratings consist of alternated stripes of ablated and unmodified material. Ablated stripes are surrounded by ridges which protrude above unmodified surface.

  2. Design of multichannel laser interferometry for W7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Kornejew, P.; Hirsch, M.; Bindemann, T.; Dinklage, A.; Dreier, H.; Hartfuss, H.-J.

    2006-10-15

    An eight channel interferometer is developed for density feedback control and the continuous measurement of electron density profiles in the stellarator W7-X. An additional sightline is launched in the geometry of the Thomson scattering for cross calibration. Due to the W7-X coil geometry access is strongly restricted. This motivates the optimization of the sightline geometry and design studies for supplementary chords. In-vessel retroreflectors will be used and inserted in the first wall elements. To cope with associated mechanical vibrations and thermal drifts during the discharges with envisaged duration of 30 min either two-color or second harmonic interferometry techniques must be applied. Optimum wavelengths are found to be about 10 and 5 {mu}m. A CO{sub 2}/CO interferometer (10 {mu}m/5 {mu}m) will be tested and compared with an existing CO{sub 2}/HeNe test interferometer. A special difficulty of remotely operated diagnostics is the need of long transmission lines with a path length of about 60 m required from the diagnostics location to the torus hall and back. Different arrangements will be compared.

  3. Correlated errors in phase-shifting laser Fizeau interferometry.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    High-performance data processing algorithms for phase-shifting interferometry accommodate adjustment errors in the phase shift increment as well as harmonic distortions in the interference signal. However, a widely overlooked error source is the combination of these two imperfections. Phase shift tuning errors increase the sensitivity of phase estimation algorithms to second-order and higher harmonics present in Fizeau interference signals. I derive an analytical formula for evaluating these errors more realistically, in part to identify the characteristics of the optimal PSI algorithm. Even for advanced algorithms, it is found that multiple reflections increase the error contribution of detuning by orders of magnitude compared with the two-beam calculation and impose a practical limit of 30% in tuning error for sub-nm metrology in a 4%-4% Fizeau cavity. Consequently, a preferred approach for high precision spherical cavities is to use either wavelength tuning in place of mechanical phase shifting or an iterative solver that accommodates unknown phase shifts as a function of field position. PMID:25089998

  4. Design of multichannel laser interferometry for W7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornejew, P.; Hirsch, M.; Bindemann, T.; Dinklage, A.; Dreier, H.; Hartfuß, H.-J.

    2006-10-01

    An eight channel interferometer is developed for density feedback control and the continuous measurement of electron density profiles in the stellarator W7-X. An additional sightline is launched in the geometry of the Thomson scattering for cross calibration. Due to the W7-X coil geometry access is strongly restricted. This motivates the optimization of the sightline geometry and design studies for supplementary chords. In-vessel retroreflectors will be used and inserted in the first wall elements. To cope with associated mechanical vibrations and thermal drifts during the discharges with envisaged duration of 30min either two-color or second harmonic interferometry techniques must be applied. Optimum wavelengths are found to be about 10 and 5μm. A CO2/CO interferometer (10μm /5μm) will be tested and compared with an existing CO2/HeNe test interferometer. A special difficulty of remotely operated diagnostics is the need of long transmission lines with a path length of about 60m required from the diagnostics location to the torus hall and back. Different arrangements will be compared.

  5. Comparison of Plasma Density Measurements in ICP Discharges Using Langmuir Probe, Plasma Oscillation Probe and Interferometry Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John; Zawalski, Wade; Chen, Francis

    2000-10-01

    A comparison study of the application of various probe theories, including the so-called orbital motion limited (OML) and ABR theories, in the interpretation of Langmuir probe I-V characteristics is performed. Experimental data for the comparison is obtained in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source over a wide range of parameters of interest to the plasma processing community. Measurements of Ni from the Hiden Electrostatic Plasma Probe (ESP) characteristics and software are compared to ``known" values of Ne obtained via microwave interferometry and the plasma oscillation probe (POP) technique, in regimes including those where the probe theories yield different results. Excellent agreement is obtained between the interferometry and POP methods at low Po, whereas POP starts to fail at Po>5 mTorr, as expected. Langmuir probe results using OML theory yield reasonable agreement for Ne<2x1011cm-3, but fail at higher Ne. Closely spaced multiple peaks in the spectra of the POP are observed in some cases at higher RF input powers, possibly due to RF modulation of the source plasma density, leading to experimental uncertainty in Ne values thus obtained. Other considerations for the applicability of the POP method will also be discussed.

  6. Plasma dynamics near critical density inferred from direct measurements of laser hole boring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya.; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy J.; Joshi, Chan

    2016-06-01

    We have used multiframe picosecond optical interferometry to make direct measurements of the hole boring velocity, vHB, of the density cavity pushed forward by a train of C O2 laser pulses in a near critical density helium plasma. As the pulse train intensity rises, the increasing radiation pressure of each pulse pushes the density cavity forward and the plasma electrons are strongly heated. After the peak laser intensity, the plasma pressure exerted by the heated electrons strongly impedes the hole boring process and the vHB falls rapidly as the laser pulse intensity falls at the back of the laser pulse train. A heuristic theory is presented that allows the estimation of the plasma electron temperature from the measurements of the hole boring velocity. The measured values of vHB, and the estimated values of the heated electron temperature as a function of laser intensity are in reasonable agreement with those obtained from two-dimensional numerical simulations.

  7. Plasma-based XUV lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klisnick, A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture is an introduction to the generation of plasma-based XUV lasers and their use as a source for scientific applications. We first discuss the main conditions required to create population inversions and amplify XUV radiation. We give an overview of the main properties of the different types of XUV lasers beams that are currently operational worldwide, while comparing them to other ultrashort, high-brightness sources existing in the same spectral range. We discuss recent demonstrations of applications of plasma-based XUV lasers to high-resolution imaging and interaction with matter at high intensity. Finally we conclude with current prospects for extending these sources to shorter wavelength and higher output intensity.

  8. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered

  9. Remote sensing of seismic vibrations by laser Doppler interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Berni, A.J. . Bellaire Research Center)

    1994-12-01

    The objective of this work is to sense seismic particle motion by recovering the Doppler shift of a laser beam that is directed to various ground spots from a remote location. This paper presents results from two field tests using experimental, laser-based, data acquisitions systems. In the first test, strong ground-roll vibrations were detected at an 800-m range by reflecting the beam directly from various terrain targets. The weaker, seismic-reflection events were inundated by a noise associated with propagation of the laser beam through the atmosphere. The second test used a novel optical interferometer that canceled the turbulence noise. A reflector apparatus is needed at the ground target position to cancel the turbulence effects in this system.

  10. Remote sensing of seismic vibrations by laser Doppler interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Berni, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    The objective is to sense seismic particle motion by recovering the Doppler shift of a laser beam that is directed to various ground spots from a remote location. This paper presents results from two field tests using experimental, laser-based, data acquisition systems. In the first test, strong ground-roll vibrations were detected at 800 m range by reflecting the beam directly from various terrain targets. The weaker, seismic-reflection events were inundated by a noise associated with propagation of the laser beam through the atmosphere. The second test used a novel optical interferometer that canceled the turbulence noise. A reflector apparatus is needed at the ground target position in order to cancel the turbulence effects in this system.

  11. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  12. Laser-Self-Mixing Interferometry for Mechatronics Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ottonelli, Simona; Dabbicco, Maurizio; De Lucia, Francesco; di Vietro, Michela; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2009-01-01

    We report on the development of an all-interferometric optomechatronic sensor for the detection of multi-degrees-of-freedom displacements of a remote target. The prototype system exploits the self-mixing technique and consists only of a laser head, equipped with six laser sources, and a suitably designed reflective target. The feasibility of the system was validated experimentally for both single or multi-degrees-of-freedom measurements, thus demonstrating a simple and inexpensive alternative to costly and bulky existing systems. PMID:22412324

  13. Diffraction effects in length measurements by laser interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sasso, C P; Massa, E; Mana, G

    2016-03-21

    High-accuracy dimensional measurements by laser interferometers require corrections because of diffraction, which makes the effective fringe-period different from the wavelength of a plane (or spherical) wave λ0. By using a combined X-ray and optical interferometer as a tool to investigate diffraction across a laser beam, we observed wavelength variations as large as 10-8λ0. We show that they originate from the wavefront evolution under paraxial propagation in the presence of wavefront- and intensity-profile perturbations. PMID:27136842

  14. Laser beam steering for GRACE Follow-On intersatellite interferometry.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Daniel; Stede, Gunnar; Müller, Vitali; Gerberding, Oliver; Bandikova, Tamara; Sheard, Benjamin S; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2014-10-01

    The GRACE Follow-On satellites will use, for the first time, a Laser Ranging Interferometer to measure intersatellite distance changes from which fluctuations in Earth's geoid can be inferred. We have investigated the beam steering method that is required to maintain the laser link between the satellites. Although developed for the specific needs of the GRACE Follow-On mission, the beam steering method could also be applied to other intersatellite laser ranging applications where major difficulties are common: large spacecraft separation and large spacecraft attitude jitter. The beam steering method simultaneously coaligns local oscillator beam and transmitted beam with the laser beam received from the distant spacecraft using Differential Wavefront Sensing. We demonstrate the operation of the beam steering method on breadboard level using GRACE satellite attitude jitter data to command a hexapod, a six-degree-of-freedom rotation and translation stage. We verify coalignment of local oscillator beam/ transmitted beam and received beam of better than 10 μrad with a stability of 10 μrad/ √Hz in the GRACE Follow-On measurement band of 0.002...0.1 Hz. Additionally, important characteristics of the beam steering setup such as Differential Wavefront Sensing signals, heterodyne efficiency, and suppression of rotation-to-pathlength coupling are investigated and compared with analysis results. PMID:25321987

  15. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  16. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  17. Phasemeter core for intersatellite laser heterodyne interferometry: modelling, simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerberding, Oliver; Sheard, Benjamin; Bykov, Iouri; Kullmann, Joachim; Esteban Delgado, Juan Jose; Danzmann, Karsten; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Intersatellite laser interferometry is a central component of future space-borne gravity instruments like Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), evolved LISA, NGO and future geodesy missions. The inherently small laser wavelength allows us to measure distance variations with extremely high precision by interfering a reference beam with a measurement beam. The readout of such interferometers is often based on tracking phasemeters, which are able to measure the phase of an incoming beatnote with high precision over a wide range of frequencies. The implementation of such phasemeters is based on all digital phase-locked loops (ADPLL), hosted in FPGAs. Here, we present a precise model of an ADPLL that allows us to design such a readout algorithm and we support our analysis by numerical performance measurements and experiments with analogue signals.

  18. Laser differential interferometry for supersonic blunt body receptivity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyer, Terry Ray

    2002-01-01

    The laser differential interferometer is a high sensitivity (lambda/13,000 minimum detectable wavelength shift), large bandwidth (6 MHz), nonintrusive instrument ideal for low-density optical flow diagnostics. Up to one half wavelength shifts are possible with active phase compensation. With feedback control, a phase modulator stabilizes the system within the linear range. Calibrated receptivity experiments are performed in a Mach 4 quiet-flow Ludwieg tube. Laser-generated thermal spots are used as repeatable, controlled perturbations to the subsonic region behind the bow shock of both a hemispherical nose and a forward-facing cavity. Thermal spot amplitudes, spatial characteristics, and repeatability are measured. Both on-axis and off axis surveys of the subsonic region indicate damped oscillations with both blunt nose configurations. With the forward-facing cavity, a characteristic frequency based on the cavity geometry is detected. The results from both configurations correlate with nose-mounted and cavity base-mounted pressure transducer measurements, and thus remove frequency ambiguity from the pressure transducer experiments. High speed synchronous schlieren images show the thermal spot evolution and impingement at the hemispherical nose. Additionally, the thermal spot in freestream is modeled based on the experimental measurements. Quantitative comparisons with CFD simulations of these experiments show similar characteristics. CFD agreement is expected to improve with future use of the advanced thermal spot model.

  19. Holographic Laser Interferometry For Detection Of Tumors In The Rabbit Urinary Bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowering, R.; Hofstetter, A.; Keiditsch, E.; Grunewald, K.

    1980-05-01

    Holographic interferometric investigations were performed in male giant rabbits (n=10) with and without bladder tumors. Double impulse ruby laser technique was able to detect elasticity changes of the bladder wall caused by tumors. The reproducibility of the experimental results was tested in vivo and in vitro. Healthy and tumorous changed regions of the bladder show a different stretch behavior in response to alterations of internal pressure.The method was found applicable to organic tissue without destruction of the tissue. Holographic interferometry was found to be sensitive method for distinction between normal and tumorous regions of the bladder wall. The results encourage the construction of a designed endoscope for holographic medical diagnostics.

  20. Measurement of Poisson's ratio of nonmetallic materials by laser holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian T.

    1991-12-01

    By means of the off-axis collimated plane wave coherent light arrangement and a loading device by pure bending, Poisson's ratio values of CFRP (carbon fiber-reinforced plactics plates, lay-up 0 degree(s), 90 degree(s)), GFRP (glass fiber-reinforced plactics plates, radial direction) and PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate, x, y direction) have been measured. In virtue of this study, the ministry standard for the Ministry of Aeronautical Industry (Testing method for the measurement of Poisson's ratio of non-metallic by laser holographic interferometry) has been published. The measurement process is fast and simple. The measuring results are reliable and accurate.

  1. A dynamic optical measurement system for cryogenic fluids using laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. H.; Bao, S. R.; Zhang, R. P.; Qiu, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic visualization is of great significance in the research of flow conditions and mass transfer process of cryogenic fluids. In this paper, two common ways to measure the concentration of cryogenic fluids are introduced and compared. To improve the real-time monitoring of cryogenic fluid, a non-contact dynamic optical measurement system using laser interferometry is designed, which is sensitive to subtle changes of fluid concentration. A precise and dynamic interference pattern can be obtained using this system. Two-dimensional concentration distribution of the fluid can be calculated from the interference pattern. Detailed calculation process is presented in the paper.

  2. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  3. Arm locking for space-based laser interferometry gravitational wave observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Mitryk, Shawn; Mueller, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Laser frequency stabilization is a critical part of the interferometry measurement system of space-based gravitational wave observatories such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). Arm locking as a proposed frequency stabilization technique transfers the stability of the long arm lengths to the laser frequency. The arm locking sensor synthesizes an adequately filtered linear combination of the interspacecraft phase measurements to estimate the laser frequency noise, which can be used to control the laser frequency. At the University of Florida we developed the hardware-based University of Florida LISA Interferometer Simulator to study and verify laser frequency noise reduction and suppression techniques under realistic LISA-like conditions. These conditions include the variable Doppler shifts among the spacecraft, LISA-like signal travel times, optical transponders, realistic laser frequency, and timing noise. We review the different types of arm locking sensors and discuss their expected performance in LISA. The presented results are supported by results obtained during experimental studies of arm locking under relevant LISA-like conditions. We measured the noise suppression as well as initial transients and frequency pulling in the presence of Doppler frequency errors. This work has demonstrated the validity and feasibility of arm locking in LISA.

  4. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA. PMID:27587174

  5. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Sylla, F.; Lambert, G.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 1019 cm-3 range well suited for LWFA.

  6. Surface plasma wave excitation via laser irradiated overdense plasma foil

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-04-09

    A laser irradiated overdense plasma foil is seen to be susceptible to parametric excitation of surface plasma wave (SPW) and ion acoustic wave (IAW) on the ion plasma period time scale. The SPW is localised near the front surface of the foil while IAW extends upto the rear. The evanescent laser field and the SPW exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the IAW. The density perturbation associated with the latter beats with the laser induced oscillatory electron velocity to drive the SPW. At relativistic laser intensity, the growth rate is of the order of ion plasma frequency.

  7. Critical dimensional linewidth calibration using UV microscope and laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Gao, Si-tian; Li, Wei; Lu, Ming-zhen; Zhang, Ming-kai

    2013-10-01

    In order to calibrate the critical dimensional (CD) uncertainty of lithography masks in semiconductor manufacturing, NIM is building a two dimensional metrological UV microscope which has traceable measurement ability for nanometer linewidths and pitches. The microscope mainly consists of UV light receiving components, piezoelectric ceramics (PZT) driven stage and interferometer calibration framework. In UV light receiving components they include all optical elements on optical path. The UV light originates from Köhler high aperture transmit/reflect illumination sources; then goes through objective lens to UV splitting optical elements; after that, one part of light attains UV camera for large range calibration, the other part of light passes through a three dimensional adjusted pinhole and is collected by PMT for nanoscale scanning. In PZT driven stage, PZT stick actuators with closed loop control are equipped to push/pull a flexural hinge based platform. The platform has a novel designed compound flexural hinges which nest separate X, Y direction moving mechanisms within one layer but avoiding from mutual cross talk, besides this, the hinges also contain leverage structures to amplify moving distance. With these designs, the platform can attain 100 μm displacement ranges as well as 1 nm resolution. In interferometer framework a heterodyne multi-pass interferometer is mounted on the platform, which measures X-Y plane movement and Z axis rotation, through reference mirror mounted on objective lens tube and Zerodur mirror mounted on PZT platform, the displacement is traced back to laser wavelength. When development is finished, the apparatus can offer the capability to calibrate one dimensional linewidths and two dimensional pitches ranging from 200nm to 50μm with expanded uncertainty below 20nm.

  8. A microchip laser source with stable intensity and frequency used for self-mixing interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaohui; Zhang, Shulian; Tan, Yidong; Sun, Liqun

    2016-05-01

    We present a stable 40 × 40 × 30 mm(3) Laser-diode (LD)-pumped-microchip laser (ML) laser source used for self-mixing interferometry which can measure non-cooperative targets. We simplify the coupling process of pump light in order to make its polarization and intensity robust against environmental disturbance. Thermal frequency stabilization technology is used to stabilize the laser frequency of both LD and ML. Frequency stability of about 1 × 10(-7) and short-term intensity fluctuation of 0.1% are achieved. The theoretical long-term displacement accuracy limited by frequency and intensity fluctuation is about 10 nm when the measuring range is 0.1 m. The line-width of this laser is about 25 kHz corresponding to 12 km coherent length and 6 km measurement range for self-mixing interference. The laser source has been equipped to a self-mixing interferometer, and it works very well. PMID:27250399

  9. Measurement of basilar membrane motion in the turtle with laser-feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Michael P.; Bearden, Alan J.

    1993-09-01

    In mammalian hearing, the frequency-dependent spatial pattern of movement in the basilar membrane (BM) forms the basis of frequency discrimination (tuning). This is not necessarily the case in lower vertebrates; the turtle, for example, has an electrical resonance mechanism in its auditory receptor cells that varies in best frequency from cell-to-cell along the underlying BM. But how much, if any, of the frequency separation by this reptile is done mechanically by its BM? In other animals, vibrational analyses were indirect in that they required the placement of nonphysiological objects on the BM (e.g., the radioactive source of the Mossbaurer technique or the mirror of traditional laser interferometry). Our attempt to find an alternative approach led to the rediscovery of laser-feedback interferometry (LFI), here applied for the first time to vibration analysis in a biological system. LFI is an ideal method to directly measure the nanometer motion (amplitude and phase) of diffuse scattering surfaces such as the BM because of its simple geometry, ease of alignment, and its ability to respond to surfaces with a broad range of reflectances (10-6 to 1). Preliminary LFI investigations of BM motion in the turtle reveal that its BM is broadly tuned and mainly reflects middle ear filter characteristics. No evidence for frequency-selective spatial BM mechanical tuning was found.

  10. Wavelength scanning interferometry using a Ti:Sapphire laser with wide tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, A.; Huntley, J. M.; Pallikarakis, C.; Ruiz, P. D.; Coupland, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    Wavelength scanning interferometry in the visible or near-infra red is normally restricted to relatively narrow wavelength tuning ranges, which results in poor depth resolution compared to related techniques such as scanning white light interferometry. We describe how a commercially-available Ti:Sapphire laser with>100 nm scan range has been customized to allow high speed scans of several tens of thousands of frames at rates of up to 30 frames s-1, with variable exposure time to compensate for wavelength variation of laser power output and camera sensitivity. Mode hops and other nonlinearities in the scans, which prevent successful depth reconstructions by the standard approach of temporal Fourier transformation, are handled by measuring phase changes in the interferograms from a set of four wedges, and resampling the intensity signals on a uniformly-spaced vector of wavenumbers. With these changes, the depth-resolution is improved by a factor of more than 100x, and is found to approach the theoretical limit for scan ranges of up to 37 nm.

  11. A laser interferometer for measuring straightness and its position based on heterodyne interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Benyong; Zhang Enzheng; Yan Liping; Li Chaorong; Tang Wuhua; Feng Qibo

    2009-11-15

    Not only the magnitude but also the position of straightness errors are of concern to users. However, current laser interferometers used for measuring straightness seldom give the relative position of the straightness error. To solve this problem, a laser interferometer for measuring straightness and its position based on heterodyne interferometry is proposed. The optical configuration of the interferometer is designed and the measurement principle is analyzed theoretically. Two experiments were carried out. The first experiment verifies the validity and repeatability of the interferometer by measuring a linear stage. Also, the second one for measuring a flexure-hinge stage demonstrates that the interferometer is capable of nanometer measurement accuracy. These results show that this interferometer has advantages of simultaneously measuring straightness error and the relative position with high precision, and a compact structure.

  12. High resolution quartz flexure accelerometer based on laser self-mixing interferometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuo; Li, Xingfei; Kou, Ke; Wu, Tengfei; Xiang, Hongbiao

    2015-06-01

    As common high-precision inertial sensors, quartz flexure accelerometers have a wide application prospect in low-cost inertial navigation systems. To ameliorate their resolution performance restricted by differential capacitance detection, we proposed a modified type of quartz flexure accelerometer based on an emerging optical technique named laser self-mixing interferometry, which is utilized to sense the displacement of a quartz pendulous reed, and then an equal and opposite force is accordingly produced to maintain the reed motionless relative to the inertial frame. The configuration and working principle of the improved accelerometer have been introduced and analyzed. The preliminary experiments indicate that its bias stability reaches 0.75-0.85 μg, which shows some progress when compared to the traditional type. Further improvements are mainly limited by the characteristics of the laser diode and the multiple reflections from the pendulous reed. PMID:26133862

  13. Characterization of a controlled plasma expansion in vacuum for laser driven ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Flacco, A.; Guemnie-Tafo, A.; Malka, V.; Nuter, R.; Lefebvre, E.; Veltcheva, M.; Batani, D.

    2008-11-15

    We present experimental and numerical results on the formation of a controlled plasma density gradient in front of a solid target irradiated with a subpicosecond, moderate intensity laser pulse. Interferometry with femtosecond probe is used to map the temporal evolution of the spatial density distribution of the generated plasma. Experimental results are found to be in good agreement with 1D1/2 hydrodynamic simulations. Moreover, these numerical simulations enable us to determine the impact of such a heating beam on the target rear surface and to correlate the plasma gradient that can be produced on the illuminated surface with the position of the shock wave in the bulk.

  14. Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

  15. Diagnosing collisions of magnetized, high energy density plasma flows using a combination of collective Thomson scattering, Faraday rotation, and interferometry (invited).

    PubMed

    Swadling, G F; Lebedev, S V; Hall, G N; Patankar, S; Stewart, N H; Smith, R A; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Burdiak, G C; de Grouchy, P; Skidmore, J; Suttle, L; Suzuki-Vidal, F; Bland, S N; Kwek, K H; Pickworth, L; Bennett, M; Hare, J D; Rozmus, W; Yuan, J

    2014-11-01

    A suite of laser based diagnostics is used to study interactions of magnetised, supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma flows produced using the Magpie pulse power generator (1.4 MA, 240 ns rise time). Collective optical Thomson scattering measures the time-resolved local flow velocity and temperature across 7-14 spatial positions. The scattering spectrum is recorded from multiple directions, allowing more accurate reconstruction of the flow velocity vectors. The areal electron density is measured using 2D interferometry; optimisation and analysis are discussed. The Faraday rotation diagnostic, operating at 1053 nm, measures the magnetic field distribution in the plasma. Measurements obtained simultaneously by these diagnostics are used to constrain analysis, increasing the accuracy of interpretation. PMID:25430344

  16. Diagnosing collisions of magnetized, high energy density plasma flows using a combination of collective Thomson scattering, Faraday rotation, and interferometry (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Hall, G. N.; Patankar, S.; Stewart, N. H.; Smith, R. A.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Burdiak, G. C.; de Grouchy, P.; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bland, S. N.; Kwek, K. H.; Pickworth, L.; Bennett, M.; Hare, J. D.; Rozmus, W.; Yuan, J.

    2014-11-01

    A suite of laser based diagnostics is used to study interactions of magnetised, supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma flows produced using the Magpie pulse power generator (1.4 MA, 240 ns rise time). Collective optical Thomson scattering measures the time-resolved local flow velocity and temperature across 7-14 spatial positions. The scattering spectrum is recorded from multiple directions, allowing more accurate reconstruction of the flow velocity vectors. The areal electron density is measured using 2D interferometry; optimisation and analysis are discussed. The Faraday rotation diagnostic, operating at 1053 nm, measures the magnetic field distribution in the plasma. Measurements obtained simultaneously by these diagnostics are used to constrain analysis, increasing the accuracy of interpretation.

  17. Diagnosing collisions of magnetized, high energy density plasma flows using a combination of collective Thomson scattering, Faraday rotation, and interferometry (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Swadling, G. F. Lebedev, S. V.; Hall, G. N.; Patankar, S.; Stewart, N. H.; Smith, R. A.; Burdiak, G. C.; Grouchy, P. de; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bland, S. N.; Kwek, K. H.; Pickworth, L.; Bennett, M.; Hare, J. D.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Rozmus, W.; Yuan, J.

    2014-11-15

    A suite of laser based diagnostics is used to study interactions of magnetised, supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma flows produced using the Magpie pulse power generator (1.4 MA, 240 ns rise time). Collective optical Thomson scattering measures the time-resolved local flow velocity and temperature across 7–14 spatial positions. The scattering spectrum is recorded from multiple directions, allowing more accurate reconstruction of the flow velocity vectors. The areal electron density is measured using 2D interferometry; optimisation and analysis are discussed. The Faraday rotation diagnostic, operating at 1053 nm, measures the magnetic field distribution in the plasma. Measurements obtained simultaneously by these diagnostics are used to constrain analysis, increasing the accuracy of interpretation.

  18. Study of spatio-temporal dynamics of laser-hole boring in near critical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochitsky, Sergei; Gong, Chao; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy; Joshi, Chan

    2015-11-01

    At high-intensities of light, radiation pressure becomes one of the dominant mechanisms in laser-plasma interaction. The radiation pressure of an intense laser pulse can steepen and push the critical density region of an overdense plasma creating a cavity or a hole. This hole boring phenomenon is of importance in fast-ignition fusion, high-gradient laser-plasma ion acceleration, and formation of collisionless shocks. Here multi-frame picosecond optical interferometry is used for the first direct measurements of space and time dynamics of the density cavity as it is pushed forward by a train of CO2 laser pulses in a helium plasma. The measured values of the hole boring velocity into an overdense plasma as a function of laser intensity are consistent with a theory based on energy and momentum balance between the heated plasma and the laser and with two-dimensional numerical simulations. We show possibility to extract a relative plasma electron temperature within the laser pulse by applying an analytical theory to the measured hole boring velocities. This work was supported by DOE grant DE-SC0010064.

  19. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.

    2009-04-03

    Energy depletion of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma waves is investigated numerically and analytically. The evolution of a resonant laser pulse proceeds in two phases. In the first phase, the pulse steepens, compresses, and frequency red-shifts as energy is deposited in the plasma. The second phase of evolution occurs after the pulse reaches a minimum length at which point the pulse rapidly lengthens, losing resonance with the plasma. Expressions for the rate of laser energy loss and rate of laser red-shifting are derived and are found to be in excellent agreement with the direct numerical solution of the laser field evolution coupled to the plasma response. Both processes are shown to have the same characteristic length-scale. In the high intensity limit, for nearly-resonant Gaussian laser pulses, this scale length is shown to be independent of laser intensity.

  20. Experimental investigation of the dynamics of laser-induced gas-plasma flows under femtosecond laser ablation of copper in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktionov, E. Yu.; Protasov, Yu. S.; Protasov, Yu. Yu.

    2013-11-01

    Thermophysical and gas-dynamic characteristics of gas-plasma flows induced by ultrashort laser pulses interacting with a thin-film copper target in vacuum were studied experimentally. Using combined laser interferometry and complex processing of experimental data, we estimated the momentum coupling coefficient and the efficiency of laser-energy conversion to kinetic energy, spatiotemporal distributions of the number density and velocities of particles, pressure, and temperature in the gas-plasma flow. We provide comparative analysis of presented data with those found in the literature, which were obtained by other methods.

  1. Design of a digital multiradian phase detector and its application in fusion plasma interferometry.

    PubMed

    Mlynek, A; Schramm, G; Eixenberger, H; Sips, G; McCormick, K; Zilker, M; Behler, K; Eheberg, J

    2010-03-01

    We discuss the circuit design of a digital multiradian phase detector that measures the phase difference between two 10 kHz square wave TTL signals and provides the result as a binary number. The phase resolution of the circuit is 1/64 period and its dynamic range is 256 periods. This circuit has been developed for fusion plasma interferometry with submillimeter waves on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The results from interferometric density measurement are discussed and compared to those obtained with the previously used phase detectors, especially with respect to the occurrence of phase jumps. It is illustrated that the new phase measurement provides a powerful tool for automatic real-time validation of the measured density, which is important for feedback algorithms that are sensitive to spurious density signals. PMID:20383905

  2. Measurement of the Optical Coherence of a Femtosecond Pulsed Laser by Shearing Interferometry with a Double-Frequency Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Hai; Qian, Jiang-yuan; Xie, Jian-ping; A, B. Fedotov; X, Xiao; M, M. T. Loy

    1998-01-01

    Shearing interferometry of an ion-etched holographic double-frequency grating is used to measure the optical coherence of femtosecond pulsed lasers. The experimental results show that the optical coherence of the femtosecond light beam is not only related to the spectral width and size of the light source but is also related to the pulse duration and mode-locked laser state. The results of theoretical analysis and numerical calculation are also given. Application of this research is also discussed.

  3. Mestastable State Population in Laser Induced Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.; Kyriakides, C.; Ward, W. K.

    2006-01-01

    Laser induced plasma has been used as a source of neutrals and ions in the study of astrophysical plasmas. The purity of state of this source is essential in the determination of collision parameters such as the charge transfer rate coefficients between ions and neutrals. We will show that the temperature of the laser induced plasma is a rapidly decreasing function of time. The temperature is initially high but cools off rapidly through collisions with the expanding plasma electrons as the plasma recombines and streams into the vacuum. This rapid expansion of the plasma, similar to a supersonic jet, drastically lowers the internal energy of the neutrals and ions.

  4. External magnetic field influence on properties of high-power laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołowski, J.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.

    1996-03-01

    The paper presents results of formation of expanding plasma by combining laser-produced plasma with an external strong magnetic field. The plasma was generated by means of a Nd-glass laser which was focused on a solid target located on the axis of a single-turn coil providing magnetic field of up to 50 T. Spatial characteristics of the dynamics of interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field were registered by means of a three-frame interferometry. For registration and analysis of interferograms, CCD cameras and a multichannel image acquisition system were used. An interesting influence of the strong magnetic field on the plasma dynamics and shape was observed. Preliminary results of numerical modelling are compared with the experimental data.

  5. Determination of residual stresses by local annealing to laser speckle pattern interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.; Vikram, C.S.

    1997-05-01

    One of the most common methods of experimentally determining residual stresses is Blind Hole Drilling (BHD). A new method which is a thermo-optical analog to BHD is being developed. This method uses local heating to anneal a tiny spot and uses laser speckle interferometry to measure the strain that results. This strain is used to determine the state of stress prior to heating. The peak temperatures are on the order of 200 Celsius so that for most metals, there will be no changes in phase or other material properties except for a slight reduction in yield stress. Preliminary experiments with type 304 stainless steel were performed using resistance heating. The experimental results were in excellent agreement with finite element model predictions of the process. Subsequently, the resistance heating was replaced with laser heating. The heat input (22.5 Watt peak) from a small sealed radio frequency excited Carbon Dioxide laser was used. In order to both control the heating temperature and efficiently couple the infrared photons from the laser into the test specimen, a substance known as Liquid Temperature Indicating Paint was used. Without this substance the laser power would be so large as to make this approach impractical. Furthermore the measurement and control for the heat input would be very complicated. Using this laser heating approach was successful in obtaining similar results to those obtained in other work. Since this laser based technique is a thermo-optical analog to blind hole drilling a simple stress model is required to interpret the measured results. This simple stress model is presented. As in BHD, the simple model must be modified by empirical coefficients to be useful. These empirical coefficients are determined by experimentation and/or numerical analysis

  6. DH and ESPI laser interferometry applied to the restoration shrinkage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. P.; Parra, D. F.; Vasconcelos, M. R.; Vaz, M.; Monteiro, J.

    2014-01-01

    In dental restoration postoperative marginal leakage is commonly associated to polymerization shrinkage effects. In consequence the longevity and quality of restorative treatment depends on the shrinkage mechanisms of the composite filling during the polymerization. In this work the development of new techniques for evaluation of those effects under light-induced polymerization of dental nano composite fillings is reported. The composite resins activated by visible light, initiate the polymerization process by absorbing light in wavelengths at about 470 nm. The techniques employed in the contraction assessment were digital holography (DH) and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) based on laser interferometry. A satisfactory resolution was achieved in the non-contact displacement field measurements on small objects concerning the experimental dental samples. According to a specific clinical protocol, natural teeth were used (human mandibular premolars). A class I cavity was drilled and restored with nano composite material, according to Black principles. The polymerization was monitored by DH and ESPI in real time during the cure reaction of the restoration. The total displacement reported for the material in relation of the tooth wall was 3.7 μm (natural tooth). The technique showed the entire tooth surface (wall) deforming during polymerization shrinkage.

  7. High pulse rate interferometry using a ruby laser and a cordin model 360 camera

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, V.A.; Epstein, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This system was originally developed in support of a dynamic diffraction moire effort, but has obvious applications to other types of imaging, interferometry, and high speed optical measurement techniques. The system includes a holographic grade Apollo ruby laser and a Cordin model 330A high speed film camera. The laser has been modified to generate a train of 1 to 100 or more pulses having individual pulse energies of about 40 mJ and a pulse width under 50 ns. The separation between pulses is currently 8 {mu}s, but is expected to soon be reduced to about 1 {mu}s. The laser pulses are synchronized with the framing sync signals from the Cordin camera, so that an individual interferogram is recorded on each of the available frames (a maximum record length of 80 frames is possible). The system is currently configured as a diffraction moire interferometer that illuminates a specimen diffraction grating with a pair of laser beams. The resulting interferograms are recorded using the Cordin camera. The system and the experimental synchronization method are described and some representative experimental data are presented. 1 ref., 5 figs.

  8. Probing the disassembly of ultrafast laser heated gold using frequency domain interferometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Tommy; Ping, Yuan; Lee, Edward

    2005-10-01

    Ultrafast laser heating of a solid offers a unique approach to examine the behavior of non-equilibrium high energy density states. Initially, the electrons are optically excited while the ions in the lattice remain cold. This is followed by electron-electron and electron-phonon relaxation. Recently, experiments were performed in which ultrathin freestanding, gold foils were heated by a femtosecond pump laser to a strongly overdriven regime with energy densities reaching 20 MJ/kg. Interestingly, femtosecond laser reflectivity and transmission measurements on the heated sample revealed a quasi-steady-state behavior before the onset of hydrodynamic expansion. This led to the conjecture of the existence of a metastable, disordered state prior to the disassembly of the solid. To further examine the dynamics of ultrafast laser heated solids, frequency domain interferometry (FDI) was used to provide an independent observation. The highly sensitive change in the phase shift of the FDI probe clearly showed evidence of the quasi-steady-state behavior. The new experiment also yielded a detailed measurement of the time scale of such a quasi-steady-state phase that may help elucidate the process of electron-phonon coupling and disassembly in a strongly overdriven regime.

  9. Control of laser plasma instabilities in hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1996-12-01

    Laser plasma instabilities are an important constraint on the operating regime for inertial fusion. Many techniques have been developed to control the various laser-driven instabilities. Experiments with long scale length plasmas are testing these instability levels, the nonlinear regimes, and the control mechanisms.

  10. Filamentation of laser in an inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ranjeet; Tripathi, V. K.

    2011-02-15

    Filamentation of an intense short pulse laser in an inhomogeneous plasma is investigated when laser propagates along the direction of density gradient and nonlinearity arises due to the relativistic mass variation and ponderomotive force. The ion motion is neglected; however, the effect of dielectric swelling is included. The inhomogeneity in the density profile introduces dielectric swelling of the pump intensity enhancing the plasma permittivity and the growth rate of the instability. The perturbation in laser amplitude grows faster than exponential as the laser penetrates deeper into the denser plasma.

  11. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm-2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations.

  12. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm−2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations. PMID:27283369

  13. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D A; Mori, W B; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 10(16) W cm(-2) to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations. PMID:27283369

  14. Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskii, Iu. M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskii, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The ambient-pressure dependences of the dynamic and optical characteristics of a laser plasma generated by CO2-laser irradiation of an obstacle are investigated experimentally. The change of the sample's surface roughness after irradiation is investigated as a function of air pressure. It is concluded that the transition from the air plasma to the erosion plasma takes place at an air pressure of about 1 mm Hg. The results confirm the existing theory of plasma formation near the surface of an obstacle under the CO2-laser pulse effect in air.

  15. Magnetooptical Faraday and Light-Scattering Diagnostics of Laser Plasma in Leopard Laser Facility at UNR/NTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Yates, K.; Ivanov, V. V.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Yasin, E.; Wiewior, P.; Astanovitsky, A.; Chaly, O.; Kindel, J.

    2009-11-01

    Laser plasma of the solid target on Leopard Laser Facility at University of Nevada Reno was investigated using polarimetry, interferometry and laser-scattering diagnostics. 50 TW Nd:glass Leopard laser operates on 1056 nm wavelength, 10 J energy and 1ns/400 fs pulse width. Power flux on a target surface varied from 10^14 to 10^19W/cm^2 with 20 μm focus spot from off-axis parabola. The diagnostic of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser plasma was carried out using three-channel polarinterferometer with Faraday, shadow and interferogram channels. Ultrafast two-frame shadowgrams/interferograms with two probing beams with orthogonal polarizations were used for investigation of fast moving plasma phenomena (jets, ionization front propagation). Continuous 1W green DPSS-laser with external modulation was used for light scattering experiments for investigation of the late-time micro-particles generation in laser plasma with expected large charge number of the grain Z ˜ 100-1000.

  16. Evidences for direct magnetic patterning via diffusive transformations using femtosecond laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polushkin, N. I.; Oliveira, V.; Conde, O.; Vilar, R.; Drozdov, Yu. N.; Apolinário, A.; García-García, A.; Teixeira, J. M.; Kakazei, G. N.

    2012-09-01

    The application of femtosecond laser interferometry to direct patterning of thin-film magnetic alloys is demonstrated. The formation of stripe gratings with submicron periodicities is achieved in Fe1-xVx (x = 18-34 wt. %) layers, with a difference in magnetic moments up to Δμ/μ ˜ 20 between adjacent stripes but without any significant development of the topographical relief (<1% of the film thickness). The produced gratings exhibit a robust effect of their anisotropy shape on magnetization curves in the film plane. The obtained data witness ultrafast diffusive transformations associated with the process of spinodal decomposition and demonstrate an opportunity for producing magnetic nanostructures with engineered properties upon this basis.

  17. Residual Stress Measurements with Laser Speckle Correlation Interferometry and Local Heat Treating

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.J.; Miller, R.F.; Vikram, C.S.

    1994-01-06

    A new experimental technique has been devised to measure residual stresses in ductile materials with a combination of laser speckle pattern interferometry and spot heating. The speckle pattern interferometer measures in-plane deformations while the heating provides for very localized stress relief. The residual stresses are determined by the amount of strain that is measured subsequent to the heating and cool-down of the region being interrogated. A simple lumped parameter model is presented to provide a description of the method. This description is followed by presentations of the results of finite element analyses and experimental results with uniaxial test specimens. Excellent agreement between the experiments and the computer analyses were obtained.

  18. Speckle interferometry, fibre optic sensors and laser induced ultrasounds as solutions to industrial demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbani, Franco; Delvò, Pierino; Fiorina, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Cristina Mariottini e. Maria Luciana

    2002-04-01

    Industrial operators have been taking interest in optical diagnostics through years. Optical methods are mainly well appreciated for their attitude to be used as non-contact and non-invasive techniques. The paper presents three examples of applications carried-out by researchers of Centro Elettrotecnico Sperimentale Italiano (CESI) in collaboration with people working in industrial fields. The first part shows the applications of speckle interferometry to measure residual stresses in association with the traditional blind-hole drilling, while the second part presents the installation of fibre optic sensors in a power plant for monitoring possible overheating to avoid fires and finally the last presentation outlines a particular application in the field of laser generated ultrasounds that is the monitoring of the variation of ultrasonic speed propagation due to residual stresses.

  19. The Radiation Environment for the LISA/Laser Interferometry Space Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; Xapsos, Michael; Poivey, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the radiation environment for the evaluation of degradation due to total ionizing and non-ionizing dose and of single event effects (SEES) for the Laser Interferometry Space Antenna (LISA) instruments and spacecraft. The analysis took into account the radiation exposure for the nominal five-year mission at 20 degrees behind Earth's orbit of the sun, at 1 AU (astronomical unit) and assumes a launch date in 2014. The transfer trajectory out to final orbit has not yet been defined, therefore, this evaluation does not include the impact of passing through the Van Allen belts. Generally, transfer trajectories do not contribute significantly to degradation effects; however, single event effects and deep dielectric charging effects must be taken into consideration especially if critical maneuvers are planned during the van Allen belt passes.

  20. Plasma laser accelerator: longitudinal dynamics, the plasma/laser interaction, and a qualitative design

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chao, A.W.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper we present our studies on a plasma laser accelerator. First we look at the longitudinal dynamics and the trapping of particles in the potential well due to the longitudinal electric field in a plasma density wave. Next we study the plasma/laser interaction to obtain power requirements. Lastly, we qualitatively design a plasma/laser accelerator with parameters somewhat more modest than existing suggestions.

  1. Laser-plasma instability in hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Hsing, W.W.

    1994-10-01

    A gas-filled hohlraum designed so as to approach plasma conditions expected in future ignition hohlraums has been fielded at the Nova laser. Radiation hydrodynamics modeling of these Nova hohlraums predicts reasonably well the measured plasma parameters. The measured reflectivity of a probe beam by Stimulated Brillouin scattering is modest. Some observed dependencies of reflectivity on laser and plasma parameters are understood theoretically, while others are not.

  2. A side-injected-laser plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J.M.; Sultana, D.; Yun, Y.T.

    1985-10-01

    A new method for driving relativistic plasma waves capable of ultra-high acceleration gradients (order 1GeV/cm) is presented. By injecting a single laser frequency from the side, rather than colinearly with the accelerated particles, both pump depletion and particle dephasing may be avoidable. The coupling of the side injected laser to the relativistic plasma wave via a pre-formed density ripple in the plasma is modelled analytically and with computer simulation.

  3. The GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer; A inter-spacecraft laser interferometry technology demonstrator with similarities to LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, William; McKenzie, Kirk; Grace Follow-On LASER Ranging Interferometer Team

    2016-03-01

    GRACE Follow-On will replace the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, which has been measuring Earth's gravity field since 2002. Like GRACE, GRACE Follow-On will use a microwave link as its primary instrument to measure micron-level changes in the 200km separation of a pair of satellites in a following polar orbit. GRACE Follow-On will also include a 2-way laser-link, the Laser Ranging Interferometer (LRI), as a technology demonstrator package. The LRI is an NASA/German partnership and will demonstrate inter-spacecraft laser interferometry with a goal of 10 times better precision than the microwave instrument, or about 90 nm/ √(Hz) between 10 and 100 mHz. The similarities between the LRI and a single arm of Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mean many of the required technologies will be the same. This talk will give an overview of the LRI and the status of the LRI instruments, and implications for LISA.

  4. A primary standard for low-g shock calibration by laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Wang, Jian-lin; Hu, Hong-bo

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a novel implementation of a primary standard for low-g shock acceleration calibration by laser interferometry based on rigid body collision at National Institute of Metrology, China. The mechanical structure of the standard device and working principles involved in the shock acceleration exciter, laser interferometers and virtual instruments are described. The novel combination of an electromagnetic exciter and a pneumatic exciter as the mechanical power supply of the standard device can deliver a wide range of shock acceleration levels. In addition to polyurethane rubber, two other types of material are investigated to ensure a wide selection of cushioning pads for shock pulse generation, with pulse shapes and data displayed. A heterodyne He-Ne laser interferometer is preferred for its precise and reliable measurement of shock acceleration while a homodyne one serves as a check standard. Some calibration results of a standard acceleration measuring chain are shown in company with the uncertainty evaluation budget. The expanded calibration uncertainty of shock sensitivity of the acceleration measuring chain is 0.8%, k = 2, with the peak acceleration range from 20 to 10 000 m s-2 and pulse duration from 0.5 to 10 ms. This primary shock standard can meet the traceability requirements of shock acceleration from various applications of industries from automobile to civil engineering and therefore is used for piloting the ongoing shock comparison of Technical Committee of Acoustics, Ultrasound and Vibration (TCAUV) of Asia Pacific Metrology Program (APMP), coded as APMP.AUV.V-P1.

  5. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huifeng; Yuan, Hong; Tang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  6. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong; Tang Zhiping

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  7. Measurement of ultrafast dynamics in the interaction of intense laser pulses with gases, clusters, and plasma waveguidesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. Y.; Alexeev, I.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2005-05-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved dynamics in the interaction of high intensity, ultrashort laser pulses with various targets—gases, nanometer-size clusters, and plasma waveguides—was studied using a new ultrafast optical diagnostic: Single-shot supercontinuum spectral interferometry (SSSI). The diagnostic measures ultrarapid transients induced by an intense laser pulse in the complex refractive index of the evolving target medium, providing a direct view of how the laser-produced disturbances, such as plasma densities, evolve in time and space. Using the SSSI diagnostic (i) the laser-induced double step ionization of helium, (ii) time-resolved explosion dynamics of intense-laser-heated clusters, and (iii) the coupling and guiding of intense laser pulses injected into a plasma waveguide were examined.

  8. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  9. Laser guiding for GeV laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Tóth, Csaba

    2006-03-15

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short-term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators. PMID:16483950

  10. Laser Diagnostics for Plasma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, Serguei Victor

    The time transients of vibrational/rotational excitation up to v = 7 vibrational level of the ground electronic state of nitrogen were measured in a positive column during the 1-10 mus pulsed electric discharges, and in the afterglow. Current densities were up to 25 A/cm^2, and pressures up to 6 Torr. It is shown that initially energy is being transferred, primarily into vibrational levels above v = 1, resulting in a highly non Boltzmann distribution. The redistribution between vibrational levels takes place within 100 mus after the discharge pulse. Beyond 100 mus the vibrational populations resemble closely Boltzmann distribution. Significant rotational heating was observed in the afterglow and is attributed to energy transfer from vibration to rotation via collisions with electrons. The rotational temperature was as high as 3500 K and reached maximum values between 80 and 100 mus after the discharge pulse. Standard, Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) was employed in all measurements. A novel laser interferometric system has been developed for real time in situ monitoring of the etch rate during the plasma etching. The two-beam-two-path optical set-up provides continuous etch rate measurements while plasma parameters are changing.

  11. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-01

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world. Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called "dream beams on a table top", which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  12. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-11

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world.Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called ''dream beams on a table top'', which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  13. Guiding of high intensity ultrashort laser pulses in plasma channels produced with the dual laser pulse ignitor-heater technique

    SciTech Connect

    Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.P.

    1998-07-01

    The authors present results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor-Heater scheme is proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It makes use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort (< 100 fs) laser pulse, is brought to a line focus using a cylindrical lens to ionize the gas. The Heater pulse (160 ps long) is used subsequently to heat the existing spark via inverse Bremsstrahlung. The hydrodynamic shock expansion creates a partially evacuated plasma channel with a density minimum on axis. Such a channel has properties of an optical waveguide. This technique allows creation of plasma channels in low atomic number gases, such as hydrogen, which is of importance for guiding of highly intense laser pulses. The channel density was diagnosed with time resolved longitudinal interferometry. From these measurements the plasma temperature was inferred. The guiding properties of the channels were tested by injecting a > 5 {times} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, 75 fs laser pulse.

  14. Atomic processes in plasmas created by an ultra-short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, P.; Lecherbourg, L.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Shepherd, R.; Renaudin, P.

    2008-05-01

    Point projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient aluminum plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum were measured for an extended range of densities in a relatively low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained from frequency domain interferometry (FDI) diagnostic and allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. The experimental spectra are compared with opacity calculations using the density and temperature inferred from the analysis of the FDI data.

  15. Plasma interferometry and how the bound-electron contribution can bend fringes in unexpected ways

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, Joseph; Johnson, Walter R

    2005-12-01

    Utilizing a new average atom code, we calculate the index of refraction in C, Al, Ti, and Pd plasmas and show many conditions over which the bound-electron contribution dominates the free electrons as we explore photon energies from the optical to 100 eV (12 nm) soft x rays. For decades measurement of the electron density in plasmas by interferometers has relied on the approximation that the index of refraction in a plasma is due solely to the free electrons and therefore is less than 1. Recent measurements of Al plasmas using x-ray laser interferometers observed fringes bending in the opposite direction than expected due to the bound-electron contribution causing the index of refraction to be larger than 1. During the next decade x-ray free-electron lasers and other sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths, so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas is essential.

  16. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  17. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.

    2015-02-01

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75 GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field.

  18. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.

    2015-02-15

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75 GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field.

  19. Laser hosing in relativistically hot plasmas.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Mori, W B; Ren, C

    2013-04-12

    Electron response in an intense laser is studied in the regime where the electron temperature is relativistic. Equations for laser envelope and plasma density evolution, both in the electron plasma wave and ion acoustic wave regimes, are rederived from the relativistic fluid equations to include relativistic plasma temperature effect. These equations are used to study short-pulse and long-pulse laser hosing instabilities using a variational method approach. The analysis shows that relativistic electron temperatures reduce the hosing growth rates and shift the fastest-growing modes to longer wavelengths. These results resolve a long-standing discrepancy between previous nonrelativistic theory and simulations or experiments on hosing. PMID:25167277

  20. Laser-plasma-interaction experiments using multikilojoule lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.

    1987-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of several laser-plasma-interaction experiments using multikilojoule lasers, and considers their implications for laser fusion. The experiments used 1.06, 0.53, 0.35, and 0.26 ..mu..m light to produce relatively large, warm, planar plasmas and to study the effect of laser wavelength and density-gradient scale length on the Stimulated Raman Scattering and on the scattering of light at frequencies near the incident laser frequency by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering or other processes. The results of these experiments suggest that some laser wavelength between 0.2 and 0.6 ..mu..m will be required for high-gain laser fusion.

  1. Multiple pulse resonantly enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Corner, L.; Walczak, R.; Nevay, L. J.; Dann, S.; Hooker, S. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Cowley, J.

    2012-12-21

    We present an outline of experiments being conducted at Oxford University on multiple-pulse, resonantly-enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration. This method of laser plasma acceleration uses trains of optimally spaced low energy short pulses to drive plasma oscillations and may enable laser plasma accelerators to be driven by compact and efficient fibre laser sources operating at high repetition rates.

  2. Dual-wavelength, continuous-wave Yb:YAG laser for high-resolution photothermal common-path interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Fengjiang; Jungbluth, Bernd; Gronloh, Bastian; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter; Zhang, Ge

    2013-07-20

    We present a continuous-wave (CW) intracavity frequency-doubled Yb:YAG laser providing 1030 and 515 nm output simultaneously. This laser system was designed for photothermal common-path interferometry to measure spatially resolved profiles of the linear absorption in dielectric media and coatings for visible or infrared light as well as of the nonlinear absorption for the combination of both. A Z-shape laser cavity was designed, providing a beam waist in which an LBO crystal was located for effective second-harmonic generation (SHG). Suitable frequency conversion parameters and cavity configurations were discussed to achieve the optimal performance of a diode-pumped CW SHG laser. A 12.4 W 1030 nm laser and 5.4 W 515 nm laser were developed simultaneously in our experiment. PMID:23872763

  3. Implementation of primary low-g shock standard for laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Wang, Jian-lin; Hu, Hong-bo

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the novel implementation of a primary standard for low-g shock acceleration calibration based on rigid body collision using laser interferometry at National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. The combination of an electromagnetic exciter and a pneumatic exciter as mechanical power supply of the shock excitation system are built up to achieve a wider acceleration range. Three types of material for shock pulse generators between airborne anvil and hammer are investigated and compared in the aspects of pulse shapes and acceleration levels. A heterodyne He-Ne laser interferometer is employed for precise measurement of shock acceleration with less electronic and mechanical influences from both the standard device itself and its surroundings. For signal acquisition and processing, virtual instrument technology is used to build up data acquisition PXI hardware from National Instrument and calibration software developed by LabVIEW. Some calibration results of a standard accelerometer measuring chain are shown accompany with the uncertainty evaluation budget. The expanded calibration uncertainty of shock sensitivity of the accelerometer measuring chain is 0.8%, k=2, with the peak range of half-sine squared acceleration shape from 20m/s2 to 10000 m/s2 and pulse duration from 0.5 ms to 10 ms. This primary shock standard can meet the traceability requirements of shock acceleration from various applications of industries from automobile to civil engineering and is used for piloting ongoing international shock comparison APMP.AUV.V-P1.

  4. Measurement of a fiber-end surface profile by use of phase-shifting laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihua; Quan, Chenggen; Tay, Cho Jui; Reading, Ivan; Fang, Zhongping

    2004-01-01

    We describe a laser interferometric system in which two objectives are used to measure surface profile on a connectorized fiber-end surface. By the use of the proposed illumination design a He-Ne laser as a point light source is transformed to an extended light source, which is beneficial to localize interference fringe pattern near the test surface. To obtain an optimal contrast of the interference fringe pattern, the flat mirror with an adjustable reflection ratio is used to suit different test surfaces. A piezoelectric transducer attached on the reference mirror can move precisely along the optical axis of the objective and permits implementation of four-step phase-shifting interferometry without changing the relative position between the CCD sensor and the test surface. Therefore, an absolutely constant optical magnification can be accurately kept to capture the interference fringe patterns resulting from a combination of light reflected from both the reference flat mirror and the test surface. The experimental result shows that surface profile on a fiber-end with surface features such as a small fiber diameter of 125 μm and a low reflection ratio of less than 4% are measurable. Measurements on a standard calibration ball show that the accuracy of the proposed setup is comparable with that of existing white-light interferometers and stylus profilometers.

  5. Initial planning for interferometry measurements on triggered plasma opening switch source.

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan G.; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Sharpe, Rob A.; Gilmore, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    The Triggered Plasma Opening Switch (TPOS) at SNL is a unique device that exploits the high conductivity and low mass properties of plasma. The TPOS's objective is to take the initial {approx}0.8 MA ({approx}250 ns rise time) storage inductor current and deliver {approx}0.5 MA at {approx}2.4 MV ({approx}10 ns rise time) to a load of {approx}5-10 Omega. Configuration advantages include low current jitter and resistive voltage drop, power gain, and minimization of trigger input power as the result of using two stages in series. This two-stage design is novel and is the first to demonstrate operation of magnetically triggered stages. Study of TPOS characteristics is in progress via an offline interferometer diagnostic; specifically, a laser interferometer will be used to make density measurements of the source plasma. It is thought that the gross plasma source density is {approx}10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, but details of the spatial structure and temporal evolution have not previously been studied. In order to better understand switch operation, these details are essential. Presently two interferometer systems are planned for testing: a temporary 1 mum system for initial plasma characterization, and a 10.6 mum laser system for routine use. We will start with a single chord measurement then upgrade to a multi-chord system. Future plans involve varying plasma source parameters, such as magnetic field strength and plasma fill time, in order to understand the density dependence on these parameters. Improved knowledge of the plasma source density behavior should allow for improved switch operation.

  6. One-shot phase stepping with a pulsed laser and modulation of polarization: application to speckle interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zurita, G; García-Arellano, A; Toto-Arellano, N I; Flores-Muñoz, V H; Pastrana-Sánchez, R; Robledo-Sánchez, C; Martínez-Bravo, O; Vásquez-Pasmiño, N; Costa-Vera, C

    2015-09-01

    For applications involving time varying optical phase distributions, fast cameras and/or pulsed lasers have to be used. To apply phase-shifting interferometry techniques (PSI) as well, single shot capture is required. Among others, modulation of polarization and phase grating interferometry is a possible technique to be considered. In this paper, a report about the use of this technique based on a double pulse laser system is presented. Single-pulse and twin-pulse operations are considered both in optical interferometers as well as in ESPI systems (mainly in subtraction mode). In ESPI a reduction of the degree of polarization appears due to scattering, so some measures have to be taken to prevent such deletereous effect. To show the feasibility of the proposed variants some experimental results are presented. PMID:26368442

  7. Reinjection of transmitted laser light into laser-produced plasma for efficient laser ignition.

    PubMed

    Endo, Takuma; Takenaka, Yuhei; Sako, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Tomohisa; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Namba, Shinichi

    2016-02-10

    For improving the laser absorption efficiency in laser ignition, the transmitted laser light was returned to the laser-produced plasma by using a corner cube. In the experiments, the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma at different times. The laser absorption efficiency was found to be substantially improved when the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma after adequate plasma expansion. Furthermore, through visualization experiments on gas-dynamics phenomena, it was found that the reinjection of the transmitted light affected not only the laser absorption efficiency but also the gas dynamics after breakdown, and thereby the initial flame kernel development. PMID:26906388

  8. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Durrant, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    Laser ablation for solid sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially-resolved elemental analysis is briefly reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  10. Precision measurement of refractive index of air based on laser synthetic wavelength interferometry with Edlén equation estimation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Enzheng; Zhang, Shihua; Yang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    A novel method for the precision measurement of refractive index of air (n(air)) based on the combining of the laser synthetic wavelength interferometry with the Edlén equation estimation is proposed. First, a n(air_e) is calculated from the modified Edlén equation according to environmental parameters measured by low precision sensors with an uncertainty of 10(-6). Second, a unique integral fringe number N corresponding to n(air) is determined based on the calculated n(air_e). Then, a fractional fringe ε corresponding to n(air) with high accuracy can be obtained according to the principle of fringe subdivision of laser synthetic wavelength interferometry. Finally, high accurate measurement of n(air) is achieved according to the determined fringes N and ε. The merit of the proposed method is that it not only solves the problem of the measurement accuracy of n(air) being limited by the accuracies of environmental sensors, but also avoids adopting complicated vacuum pumping to measure the integral fringe N in the method of conventional laser interferometry. To verify the feasibility of the proposed method, comparison experiments with Edlén equations in short time and in long time were performed. Experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of n(air) is better than 2.5 × 10(-8) in short time tests and 6.2 × 10(-8) in long time tests. PMID:26329237

  11. Optical Probing of CO2 Laser-Plasma Interactions at Near Critical Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chao

    by a factor of 100 ( nc ≈1 x 1019cm -3). Therefore overdense CO2 laser plasma is transparent for a fast optical probe which opens a unique opportunity to study the physics of laser hole boring in the temporal and spatial domain simultaneously. This thesis reports the first direct measurements of the laser hole boring velocity in an overdense plasma using a four-frame picosecond green pulse interferometry. The plasma was created by tunnel ionization of a plume of He gas from a gas jet using a train of 3ps long CO2 laser pulses. For probing the plasma, a ˜2ps frequency-doubled (532nm) Nd:Glass laser pulse is used in a four-frame interferometry scheme. Spatio-temporal dynamics of hole boring in CO2 laser-plasma interaction at Ilambda 2 ≤2x1018 Wmum2/cm 2 are studied with a ˜15microm spatial and better than 2ps time resolutions. Experimental measurements indicate the hole boring process is determined by a balance between the radiation pressure PL and thermal pressure Pth. As a result of this competition, nuhb increases during the risetime of the laser pulse where PL > Pth but decreases with a larger slope rate on the falling edge. This is because the plasma electrons once heated cool slowly and Pth diminishes the efficacy of PL even faster.

  12. Application of Laser Speckle Pattern Interferometry for Precise Measurements of Displacement Distribution in Porous Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akira; Kato, Motoki

    This paper deals with experiments for detecting two-dimensional microscopic deformations by laser speckle pattern interferometry system. The optical setup uses a laser diode for the source together with a lens to expand the laser beam, and an inspection area can be chosen with the optical setup between 5×7.5 mm2 (microscopic range) up to 200×300 mm2 (macroscopic range). The measurements by the macroscopic and microscopic ranges are performed without marking to get overall and detailed deformations of porous ceramic materials respectively. In the macroscopic measurement, it was shown that pore of the ceramics is recognized as a kind of the marker in generating interference fringe. On the other hand, displacement behavior related to the microscopic structure of material can be observed when spatial decomposition of measuring distance is smaller than the pore size is achieved by limiting the inspection area to micro region. In this condition, displacement data with continuous distribution has not been obtained, because displacement measured at pore inside and that at material surface are detected in the one under way without distinguishing at all in the measurement for this microscopic region. However, through the measurement of displacement behavior in crack tip vicinity, it was confirmed that measured displacement distribution agrees with the analytic solution if the data is detected in the position where pore and surface concavity are avoided along the crack edge. By arranging measured data based on above-mentioned processing, valuable information such as strain distributions between adjacent pore was obtained from the measurement for microscopic region.

  13. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  14. Interaction of plasmas with intense lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, William L.

    2000-06-01

    The interaction of plasmas with intense lasers is an excellent example of how different fields of physics are interconnected. Invention of the laser and its ongoing development has allowed the creation and study of high temperature, dense matter in the laboratory. The results both advance the underlying plasma science and are relevant to many fields ranging from astrophysics to fusion and nonlinear physics. A brief overview of the interaction physics is given. Selected topics are discussed to illustrate the exciting progress in experimental, theoretical, and computational investigations with focused laser intensities up to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Relativistic plasma shutter for ultraintense laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Stephen A.; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Bulanov, Stepan; Tampo, Motonobu; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Yanovsky, Victor; Kodama, Ryousuke; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Krushelnick, Karl; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2009-01-01

    A relativistic plasma shutter technique is proposed and tested to remove the sub-100 ps pedestal of a high-intensity laser pulse. The shutter is an ultrathin foil placed before the target of interest. As the leading edge of the laser ionizes the shutter material it will expand into a relativistically underdense plasma allowing for the peak pulse to propagate through while rejecting the low intensity pedestal. An increase in the laser temporal contrast is demonstrated by measuring characteristic signatures in the accelerated proton spectra and directionality from the interaction of 30 TW pulses with ultrathin foils along with supporting hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:19654882

  16. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitomer, Steven J.; Jones, Roger D.

    1990-06-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper, we examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g. lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g. kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g. laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  17. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitomer, S. J.; Jones, R. D.

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. Those areas of laser medicine are examined in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. Examples are examined for the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  18. Relativistic plasma astrophysics with intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Chu, Hsu-Hsin; Hau, Lin-Ni; Chen, Shih-Hung; Liu, Yao-Li; Hsieh, Chia-Ying; Sakawa, Youichi; Hideaki, Takabe; Wang, Jyhpyng

    2015-12-01

    Recent progresses of laser technologies enable us to investigate space and astrophysical phenomena in laboratories. In space plasmas the local observations by spacecrafts provide us the microscopic information of the plasma and electric/magnetic fields, however, it is difficult to obtain the global structures of the phenomena. In astrophysical plasmas, in contrast, global images provide us the macroscopic information, although there is no local observation and thus no microscopic information. Laboratory experiments on space and astrophysical phenomena provide us the local and global information simultaneously. We have investigated so far mostly non-relativistic phenomena in the universe with long laser pulses. Now we extend our research from non-relativistic to relativistic regime with an ultra intense laser, the 100 TW laser facility at National Central University. We introduce our facility and model relativistic phenomena in laboratory, focusing on the magnetic field generation and the magnetic reconnection in the universe.

  19. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gitomer, S.J. ); Jones, R.D. . Applied Theoretical Physics Div.)

    1991-12-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photodynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper the authors examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation), and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented, along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  20. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gitomer, S.J.; Jones, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper, we examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included. 63 refs.

  1. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S. Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.; Costello, J. T.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Hirooka, Y.

    2014-01-15

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

  2. Enhanced laser beam coupling to a plasma

    DOEpatents

    Steiger, Arno D.; Woods, Cornelius H.

    1976-01-01

    Density perturbations are induced in a heated plasma by means of a pair of oppositely directed, polarized laser beams of the same frequency. The wavelength of the density perturbations is equal to one half the wavelength of the laser beams. A third laser beam is linearly polarized and directed at the perturbed plasma along a line that is perpendicular to the direction of the two opposed beams. The electric field of the third beam is oriented to lie in the plane containing the three beams. The frequency of the third beam is chosen to cause it to interact resonantly with the plasma density perturbations, thereby efficiently coupling the energy of the third beam to the plasma.

  3. Staging of laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Benedetti, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Daniels, J.; Swanson, K. K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Shaw, B. H.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present results of an experiment where two laser-plasma-accelerator stages are coupled at a short distance by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from the first stage were used to longitudinally probe the dark-current-free, quasi-linear wakefield excited by the laser of the second stage. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second stage laser pulse allowed reconstruction of the temporal wakefield structure, determination of the plasma density, and inference of the length of the electron beam. The first stage electron beam could be focused by an active plasma lens to a spot size smaller than the transverse wake size at the entrance of the second stage. This permitted electron beam trapping, verified by a 100 MeV energy gain.

  4. Experimental Study of Heat Transfer of Parallel Louvered Fins through Laser Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaki, Yasuo; Kashiwagi, Takao; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Uzuhashi, Hideo; Tang, Xue-Zhong

    The objectives of this paper are experimentally to study the detail of heat transfer in louver-array and to propose the preferable geometrical arrangement of louver from the point of view of improving the performance of heat exchanger. Our approach toward that goal was made via the following steps. The first step in the present study is optically to visualize the temperature field around louvers by employing the primitive heated flat louver model consisting of thin bakelite plate and thin Nichrome foil as a heater, and to measure the heat transfer coefficients of the louvers. Our experiment achieved to visualize the isotherms through the Laser holographic interferometry. The clear isotherms for various louver arrangements were successfully obtained. The thermal boundary layer and wake generated by an upstream louver were clearly observed to extend toward downstream ones ; the heat transfer coefficients obtained by the experiment were virtually affected by those boundary layers and wakes. The second step is to examine the plausible arrangement of louver for enhancing heat transfer. The slight position shift of downstream louvers toward the direction avoiding the influence of heated air wake was proposed from both the observation of isotherms and the measurement of heat transfer coefficients in staggered louver array ; its effectiveness was varified by the experiment. The improvement of the performance of heat exchanger is expected by applying the proposed minor rearrangement of louver array for enhanced fins.

  5. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-07-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 {mu}m radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N{sub 2}C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation.

  6. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-07-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 μm radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation.

  7. Charged Particle Acceleration by Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2007-07-11

    Several physical processes of laser electron acceleration in plasmas are revisited. A laser beam can drive plasma waves which in turn can accelerate resonant electrons. If these plasma waves can reach amplitude limited only by wave breaking alone, then the corresponding accelerating gradient in the plasma wave is of the order of electron rest mass energy per plasma skin depth, typically about GEV per centimeter. This is several orders of magnitudes higher than the conventional RF field gradient, giving rise to the possibility of compact accelerators needed for high energy physics research as well as medical and other applications. The chirped short pulse laser, with intensity exceeding the threshold for relativistic self focusing, can generate ion bubble in its wake by expelling electrons. The electrons at the bubble boundary, surge toward the stagnation point and pile up there. As the pile acquires a critical size, these electrons are injected into the bubble and accelerated by the combined fields of ion space charge and the plasma wave to Gev in energy. Most remarkably these electrons are bunched in phase space while being accelerated to high energy, resulting in near mono-energetic electron beam of high beam quality, with narrow energy spread. We review also other processes related to laser electron acceleration, such as acceleration in plasma wave assisted by ponderomotive force and betatron acceleration.

  8. Relativistic laser pulse compression in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yun; Sang, Hai-Bo Wan, Feng; Lv, Chong; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-07-15

    The self-compression of a weak relativistic Gaussian laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the laser pulse amplitude evolution, is deduced and solved numerically. The pulse compression is observed in the cases of both left- and right-hand circular polarized lasers. It is found that the compressed velocity is increased for the left-hand circular polarized laser fields, while decreased for the right-hand ones, which is reinforced as the enhancement of the external magnetic field. We find a 100 fs left-hand circular polarized laser pulse is compressed in a magnetized (1757 T) plasma medium by more than ten times. The results in this paper indicate the possibility of generating particularly intense and short pulses.

  9. Current new applications of laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, A.A.; Forslund, D.W.; McKinstrie, C.J.; Wark, J.S.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Hamil, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes several new applications of laser-produced plasmas that have arisen in the last few years. Most of the applications have been an outgrowth of the active research in laser/matter interaction inspired by the pursuit of laser fusion. Unusual characteristics of high-intensity laser/matter interaction, such as intense x-ray and particle emission, were noticed early in the field and are now being employed in a significant variety of applications outside the fusion filed. Applications range from biology to materials science to pulsed-power control and particle accelerators. 92 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Hybrid Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hidding, B.; Koenigstein, T.; Willi, O.; Pretzler, G.; Karsch, S.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2010-11-04

    The concept of driving a driver/witness-type plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) with quasimonoenergetic double electron bunches from a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is studied. In the quasimonoenergetic LWFA/SMLWFA (self-modulated LWFA) regime, it is possible to generate multiple quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with durations of only a few fs and distances of only a few tens of fs with a comparably simple experimental setup. In a subsequent high-density plasma afterburner stage the witness bunch energy can be boosted in the plasma wakefield generated by the driver. Such a hybrid system can increase the maximum energy output of a laser wakefield accelerator and is well suited to study driver/witness plasma accelerator phenomena and can be used as a cost-effective test-bed for future high-energy plasma-based accelerators.

  11. Hybrid Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidding, B.; Königstein, T.; Karsch, S.; Willi, O.; Pretzler, G.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2010-11-01

    The concept of driving a driver/witness-type plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) with quasimonoenergetic double electron bunches from a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is studied. In the quasimonoenergetic LWFA/SMLWFA (self-modulated LWFA) regime, it is possible to generate multiple quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with durations of only a few fs and distances of only a few tens of fs with a comparably simple experimental setup. In a subsequent high-density plasma afterburner stage the witness bunch energy can be boosted in the plasma wakefield generated by the driver. Such a hybrid system can increase the maximum energy output of a laser wakefield accelerator and is well suited to study driver/witness plasma accelerator phenomena and can be used as a cost-effective test-bed for future high-energy plasma-based accelerators.

  12. Fast and economic signal processing technique of laser diode self-mixing interferometry for nanoparticle size measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huarui; Shen, Jianqi

    2014-05-01

    The size of nanoparticles is measured by laser diode self-mixing interferometry, which employs a sensitive, compact, and simple optical setup. However, the signal processing of the interferometry is slow or expensive. In this article, a fast and economic signal processing technique is introduced, in which the self-mixing AC signal is transformed into DC signals with an analog circuit consisting of 16 channels. These DC signals are obtained as a spectrum from which the size of nanoparticles can be retrieved. The technique is examined by measuring the standard nanoparticles. Further experiments are performed to compare the skimmed milk and whole milk, and also the fresh skimmed milk and rotten skimmed milk.

  13. Characterization and control of plasma density distribution for the development of solid-target x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.-C.; Lin, P.-H.; Chen, D.-L.; Tsai, H.-E.; Wang, J.; Lee, C.-H.; Lin, J.-Y.; Chen, S.-Y.

    2005-08-01

    By using deflectometry of a longitudinal probe pulse and reflective interferometry of a transverse probe pulse to resolve the spatiotemporal distribution of the preformed plasma, we characterize and control the plasma density distribution near the target surface for the development of solid-target x-ray lasers. We show that the use of prepulses in an ignitor-heater scheme can increase the scale length of the preformed plasma and how the effect varies with target materials. Many important issues crucial to x-ray lasing such as electron density distribution, electron temperature, and the optimal timing between pumping pulses can be resolved with these methods.

  14. Characterization and control of plasma density distribution for the development of solid-target x-ray lasers.

    PubMed

    Chou, M-C; Lin, P-H; Tsai, H-E; Chen, D-L; Lee, C-H; Lin, J-Y; Wang, J; Chen, S-Y

    2005-08-01

    By using deflectometry of a longitudinal probe pulse and reflective interferometry of a transverse probe pulse to resolve the spatiotemporal distribution of the preformed plasma, we characterize and control the plasma density distribution near the target surface for the development of solid-target x-ray lasers. We show that the use of prepulses in an ignitor-heater scheme can increase the scale length of the preformed plasma and how the effect varies with target materials. Many important issues crucial to x-ray lasing such as electron density distribution, electron temperature, and the optimal timing between pumping pulses can be resolved with these methods. PMID:16196718

  15. Characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry

    SciTech Connect

    Craxton, R.S.; Turner, F.S.; Hoefen, R. ); Darrow, C. ); Gabl, E.F.; Busch, G.E. )

    1993-12-01

    Grid image refractometry (GIR) is proposed as a technique for determining the two-dimensional density profiles of long scale-length laser-produced plasmas. Its distinctive feature is that an optical probe beam is broken up into rays'' by being passed through a grid before traversing the plasma. The refraction angles of the rays are measured by imaging the plasma at two or more object planes and are integrated to yield the phase front. For cylindrically symmetric plasmas the density profile is then determined using Abel inversion. The feasibility of GIR is illustrated by an experiment in which a thick CH target was irradiated with [similar to]100 J of 527 nm radiation and diagnosed with a 20 ps, 263 nm probe. The resulting density profile is substantially larger than any that have previously been reported using interferometry and compares quite closely with hydrodynamic simulations.

  16. Characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craxton, R. S.; Turner, F. S.; Hoefen, R.; Darrow, C.; Gabl, E. F.; Busch, Gar. E.

    1993-12-01

    Grid image refractometry (GIR) is proposed as a technique for determining the two-dimensional density profiles of long scale-length laser-produced plasmas. Its distinctive feature is that an optical probe beam is broken up into ``rays'' by being passed through a grid before traversing the plasma. The refraction angles of the rays are measured by imaging the plasma at two or more object planes and are integrated to yield the phase front. For cylindrically symmetric plasmas the density profile is then determined using Abel inversion. The feasibility of GIR is illustrated by an experiment in which a thick CH target was irradiated with ˜100 J of 527 nm radiation and diagnosed with a 20 ps, 263 nm probe. The resulting density profile is substantially larger than any that have previously been reported using interferometry and compares quite closely with hydrodynamic simulations.

  17. Laser welding control by monitoring of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelickova, Hana; Sebestova, Hana; Havelkova, Martina; Rihakova, Lenka; Nozka, Libor

    2013-04-01

    Deep penetration welding is a typical industrial application of high power lasers, where plasma can be generated above the keyhole. Thanks to the plasma plume presence welding process can be controlled on-line by means of the plasma intensity measurements. Various on-line monitoring methods have been developed in research centers all over the world. Goal of them is to enable promptly operator action to avoid enormous economical looses if un-expected defect is detected. Our laboratory was participated in project CLET - "Closed loop control of the laser welding process through the measurement of plasma" as a responsible partner for developed system testing both in the laboratory with pulsed Nd:YAG laser and in the real welding facility with high power continual CO2 laser. Control system is based on the electron temperature computation from the relative intensities of couple of emission lines belong to certain metal ion present in plasma plume. Our experiment was realized using Ocean Optics HR2000+ spectrometer within the stainless steel tube longitudinal welding. Several couples of emission lines were tested to acquire a good signal at actual welding conditions. Then power calibration was made to obtain the electron temperature dependence on increasing power. Samples were prepared for microanalysis and measured by laser confocal scanning microscope to find optimal power range for full penetrations achieving without thermal distortion of the tube or weld humping. Numerical model of the remelted area cross section was made to display temperature distribution dependence on increasing power.

  18. Laser pulse modulation instabilities in plasma channels

    PubMed

    Sprangle; Hafizi; Penano

    2000-04-01

    In this paper the modulational instability associated with propagation of intense laser pulses in a partially stripped, preformed plasma channel is analyzed. In general, modulation instabilities are caused by the interplay between (anomalous) group velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. The analysis is based on a systematic approach that includes finite-perturbation-length effects, nonlinearities, group velocity dispersion, and transverse effects. To properly include the radial variation of both the laser field and plasma channel, the source-dependent expansion method for analyzing the wave equation is employed. Matched equilibria for a laser beam propagating in a plasma channel are obtained and analyzed. Modulation of a uniform (matched) laser beam equilibrium in a plasma channel leads to a coupled pair of differential equations for the perturbed spot size and laser field amplitude. A general dispersion relation is derived and solved. Surface plots of the spatial growth rate as a function of laser beam power and the modulation wave number are presented. PMID:11088236

  19. Laser propagation and channel formation in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. E.

    1996-05-01

    The understanding of laser beam propagation through underdense plasmas is of vital importance to inertial confinement fusion schemes, as well as being a fundamental physics issue. Formation of plasma channels has numerous applications including table-top x-ray lasers and laser-plasma induced particle accelerators. The fast ignitor concept (M. Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 1), 1626 (1994)., for example, requires the formation of an evacuated channel through a large, underdense plasma. Scaled experiments (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 63), 2812 (1989). (S. Wilks et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73), 2994 (1994). (P.E. Young et al, Phys. Plasmas 2), 2825 (1995). have shown that the axial extent of a channel formed by a 100 ps pulse is limited by the onset of the filamentation instability (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 61), 2336 (1988).. We have obtained quantitative comparison between filamentation theory and experiment (P.E. Young, Phys. Plasmas 2), 2815 (1995).. More recent experiments (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 1082 (1995). have shown that by increasing the length of the channel-forming pulse, the filamentation instability is overcome and the channel forms at higher densities. This result has important implications for the fast ignitor design and the understanding of time-dependent beam dynamics. In addition, we will present measurements of ion energies ejected by the ponderomotive force which is a measurement of the peak laser intensity in the plasma; the ion energies indicate filamented laser intensities above 1.5× 10^17 W/cm^2. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48. ^ In collaboration with S. Wilks, J. Hammer, W. Kruer, M. Foord, G. Guethlein, and M. Tabak.

  20. Laser-rf creation and diagnostics of seeded atmospheric pressure air and nitrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Siqi; Denning, C. Mark; Scharer, John E.

    2008-07-01

    A laser initiation and radio frequency (rf) sustainment technique has been developed and improved from our previous work to create and sustain large-volume, high-pressure air and nitrogen plasmas. This technique utilizes a laser-initiated, 15 mTorr partial pressure tetrakis (dimethylamino) ethylene seed plasma with a 75 Torr background gas pressure to achieve high-pressure air/nitrogen plasma breakdown and reduce the rf power requirement needed to sustain the plasma. Upon the laser plasma initiation, the chamber pressure is raised to 760 Torr in 0.5 s through a pulsed gas valve, and the end of the chamber is subsequently opened to the ambient air. The atmospheric-pressure plasma is then maintained with the 13.56 MHz rf power. Using this technique, large-volume (1000 cm{sup 3}), high electron density (on the order of 10{sup 11-12} cm{sup -3}), 760 Torr air and nitrogen plasmas have been created while rf power reflection is minimized during the entire plasma pulse utilizing a dynamic matching method. This plasma can project far away from the antenna region (30 cm), and the rf power budget is 5 W/cm{sup 3}. Temporal evolution of the plasma electron density and total electron-neutral collision frequency during the pulsed plasma is diagnosed using millimeter wave interferometry. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) aided by SPECAIR, a special OES simulation program for air-constituent plasmas, is used to analyze the radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma. Rotational and vibrational temperatures of 4400-4600{+-}100 K are obtained from the emission spectra from the N{sub 2}(2+) and N{sub 2}{sup +}(1-) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results. Based on the relation between the electron collision frequency and the neutral density, utilizing millimeter wave interferometry, the electron temperature of the 760 Torr nitrogen plasma is found to be 8700{+-}100 K (0.75{+-}0.1 eV). Therefore, the plasma

  1. Trends in laser-plasma-instability experiments for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1991-06-06

    Laser-plasma instability experiments for laser fusion have followed three developments. These are advances in the technology and design of experiments, advances in diagnostics, and evolution of the design of high-gain targets. This paper traces the history of these three topics and discusses their present state. Today one is substantially able to produce controlled plasma conditions and to diagnose specific instabilities within such plasmas. Experiments today address issues that will matter for future laser facilities. Such facilities will irradiate targets with {approx}1 MJ of visible or UV light pulses that are tens of nanoseconds in duration, very likely with a high degree of spatial and temporal incoherence. 58 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Laser Plasma and Hydrodynamics Experiments with KrF Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, James

    2006-10-01

    The proposed Fusion Test Facility (FTF) will exploit the unique features of Krypton Fluoride (KrF) lasers to achieve ignition and substantial gain (>20) at <500 kJ laser energies using direct drive.[1] The strategy uses highly uniform, high bandwidth, 248 nm KrF laser illumination at intensities near 2 x 10^15 W/cm^2 to accelerate low-aspect ratio pellets to implosion velocities of 400 km/s. Higher than usual implosion velocity allows ignition at substantially reduced laser energy. Amplitudes of both hydrodynamic instability during the pellet implosion and deleterious laser plasma instability (LPI) in the corona must be kept sufficiently low if one is to achieve ignition and gain. Increased laser intensity reduces hydrodynamic instability because it allows acceleration of thicker, low aspect ratio pellets, but is also more likely to produce deleterious LPI. The deep UV wavelength of KrF should allow use of these higher intensities. Studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and laser plasma instabilities (LPI) are the subject of ongoing experiments at the 2-3 kJ Nike KrF laser. The Nike laser has demonstrated highly uniform UV irradiation of planar targets at moderate laser intensities (I˜10^14 W/cm^2), including the recent addition of short duration ``spike'' prepulses for hydrodynamic stability studies. A new effort in LPI physics is underway at the Nike facility where the peak intensity is being extended above 10^15 W/cm^2 by a combination of smaller focal diameters and shorter pulse lengths. This talk will discuss progress in the ongoing experiments at Nike in support of the FTF design. [1] S. P. Obenschain, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13 056329 (2006).

  3. Plasma channel guided laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    2005-11-01

    High quality electron beams (several 109 electrons above 80 MeV energy with percent energy spread and low divergence) have been produced for the first time in a compact, high gradient, all-optical laser accelerator by extending the interaction distance using a pre-formed plasma density channel to guide the drive laser pulse. Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (wake) driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser, have over the past decade demonstrated accelerating fields thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators. This has spurred interest in them as compact next-generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance resulted in low-energy beams with 100 percent electron energy spread, which has limited potential applications. Optical guiding of relativistically intense (>1018 W/cm 2) laser pulses over distances greater than 10 diffraction lengths is demonstrated herein using plasma channels, which have a density minimum on the axis of propagation, formed by hydrodynamic shock. Laser modes with peak powers of up to 4 TW---twice the self-guiding threshold---were guided without aberration by tuning the plasma density profile. The transmitted optical spectrum showed that the pulse remained in the channel over the entire length, and no accelerated electrons were observed at these powers. Simulations indicated that a large plasma wave was driven by the 4 TW pulse, indicating a possible dark current free structure for a laser wakefield accelerator using controlled injection. The presence of a large plasma wave was verified by increasing laser power and observing electron acceleration. At a guided drive pulse power of 9 TW (500 mJ in 50 fs

  4. Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M

    2006-01-13

    In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: Relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald

    2003-04-01

    By focusing petawatt peak power laser light to intensities up to 1021 W cm-2, highly relativistic plasmas can now be studied. The force exerted by light pulses with this extreme intensity has been used to accelerate beams of electrons and protons to energies of a million volts in distances of only microns. This acceleration gradient is a thousand times greater than in radio-frequency-based accelerators. Such novel compact laser-based radiation sources have been demonstrated to have parameters that are useful for research in medicine, physics and engineering. They might also someday be used to ignite controlled thermonuclear fusion. Ultrashort pulse duration particles and x-rays that are produced can resolve chemical, biological or physical reactions on ultrafast (femtosecond) timescales and on atomic spatial scales. These energetic beams have produced an array of nuclear reactions, resulting in neutrons, positrons and radioactive isotopes. As laser intensities increase further and laser-accelerated protons become relativistic, exotic plasmas, such as dense electron-positron plasmas, which are of astrophysical interest, can be created in the laboratory. This paper reviews many of the recent advances in relativistic laser-plasma interactions.

  6. Ion beams from laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. H.; Anderson, R. J.; Gray, L. G.; Rosenfeld, J. P.; Manka, C. K.; Carruth, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the space-charge-limited beams produced by the plasma blowoffs generated by 20-MW bursts of 1.06-micron radiation from an active Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Laser power densities near 10 to the 11th/sq cm on solid targets generate thermalized plasma plumes which drift to a 15-kV gridded extraction gap where the ions are extracted, accelerated, and electrostatically focused; the spatially defined ion beams are then magnetically analyzed to determine the charge state content in the beams formed from carbon, aluminum, copper, and lead targets. This technique preserves time-of-flight (TOF) information in the plasma drift region, which permits plasma ion temperatures and mass flow velocities to be determined from the Maxwellian ion curve TOF shapes for the individual charge species.

  7. Terahertz radiation from a laser plasma filament.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-C; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J; Ruhl, H; Sheng, Z-M

    2011-03-01

    By the use of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we clarify the terahertz (THz) radiation mechanism from a plasma filament formed by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The nonuniform plasma density of the filament leads to a net radiating current for THz radiation. This current is mainly located within the pulse and the first cycle of the wakefield. As the laser pulse propagates, a single-cycle and radially polarized THz pulse is constructively built up forward. The single-cycle shape is mainly due to radiation damping effect. PMID:21517604

  8. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  9. Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Esarey, E.; Cary, J. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of laser ablated silicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hira; Mumtaz, M.; Shahzada, S.; Nadeem, A.; Haq, S. U.

    2014-06-01

    We report plasma parameters of laser ablated silicon plasma using the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonics (532 nm) of a Nd : YAG laser. The electron temperature and electron number density are evaluated using the Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadened line profile, respectively. The electron temperature and electron number density are deduced using the same laser irradiance 2-16 GW cm-2 for 1064 nm and 532 nm as 6350-7000 K and (3.42-4.44) × 1016 cm-3 and 6000-6400 K and (4.20-5.72) × 1016 cm-3, respectively. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters shows a decreasing trend of 8200-6300 K and (4.00-3.60) × 1016 cm-3 for 1064 nm and 6400-5500 K and (5.10-4.50) × 1016 cm-3 for 532 nm laser ablation. Furthermore, plasma parameters are also investigated at low pressure from 45 to 550 mbar, yielding the electron temperature as 4580-5535 K and electron number density as (1.51-2.12) × 1016 cm-3. The trend of the above-mentioned results is in good agreement with previous investigations. However, wavelength-dependent studies and the spatial evolution of plasma parameters have been reported for the first time.

  11. Collisionless shock generation in counter-streaming plasmas produced by a high-power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Y.; Morita, T.; Aoki, H.; Tanji, H.; Shibata, S.; Ide, T.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Shiroshita, A.; Shigemori, K.; Sano, T.; Norimatsu, T.; Kato, T.; Takabe, H.; Waugh, J.; Woolsey, N.; Loupias, B.; Gregory, C.; Koenig, M.

    2009-11-01

    Laboratory experiments to study collisionless shock generation in counter-streaming plasmas have been investigated using Gekko XII HIPER laser system (352 nm (3φ), 500 ps, ˜100 J / beam, one or four beams, < 10^15 W/cm^2) at ILE. Two types of double-plane targets, Jet and Ablation types were used. In the Jet (Ablation) type, 10 μm (60 μm) and 60 μm thick CH planes were placed with the separation of 4.5 mm; beams were irradiated on the 1st CH and a rear-side (an ablation) plasma is formed, and the plasma from the 2nd CH is created by radiation and/or plasmas from the1st CH. The plasmas and shocks were diagnosed transverse to the main laser propagation direction; shadowgraphy and modified Nomarski interferometry using a probe laser with ICCD and streak cameras, and SOP and GOI using a visible (450 nm) self-emission. Counter-streaming plasmas were produced, and shock waves were observed. The width of the transition region is much shorter than ion-ion mean-free-path. A particle-in-cell simulation has predicted generation of an electrostatic shock.

  12. Decay of femtosecond laser-induced plasma filaments in air, nitrogen, and argon for atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, N L; Bodrov, S B; Tsarev, M V; Murzanev, A A; Sergeev, Yu A; Malkov, Yu A; Stepanov, A N

    2016-07-01

    The temporal evolution of a plasma channel at the trail of a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse was studied experimentally and theoretically in air, nitrogen (with an admixture of ∼3% O_{2}), and argon in a wide range of gas pressures (from 2 to 760 Torr). Measurements by means of transverse optical interferometry and pulsed terahertz scattering techniques showed that plasma density in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure reduces by an order of magnitude within 3-4 ns and that the decay rate decreases with decreasing pressure. The argon plasma did not decay within several nanoseconds for pressures of 50-760 Torr. We extended our theoretical model previously applied for atmospheric pressure air plasma to explain the plasma decay in the gases under study and to show that allowance for plasma channel expansion affects plasma decay at low pressures. PMID:27575227

  13. Decay of femtosecond laser-induced plasma filaments in air, nitrogen, and argon for atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Bodrov, S. B.; Tsarev, M. V.; Murzanev, A. A.; Sergeev, Yu. A.; Malkov, Yu. A.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    The temporal evolution of a plasma channel at the trail of a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse was studied experimentally and theoretically in air, nitrogen (with an admixture of ˜3% O2), and argon in a wide range of gas pressures (from 2 to 760 Torr). Measurements by means of transverse optical interferometry and pulsed terahertz scattering techniques showed that plasma density in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure reduces by an order of magnitude within 3-4 ns and that the decay rate decreases with decreasing pressure. The argon plasma did not decay within several nanoseconds for pressures of 50-760 Torr. We extended our theoretical model previously applied for atmospheric pressure air plasma to explain the plasma decay in the gases under study and to show that allowance for plasma channel expansion affects plasma decay at low pressures.

  14. Dependence of laser-plasma interaction physics on laser wavelength and plasma scalelength

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.

    1984-04-09

    We discuss the dependence of many features of laser-plasma interaction physics on both the laser wavelength and plasma dimensions. Experimental results that are presented include absorption, stimulated Brillouin scattering, suprathermal electron production, and optical signatures of the two plasmon decay and stimulated Raman instabilities. While the experiments show beneficial effects of decreasing laser wavelength on the coupling physics, the mix and efficiency of the various interaction processes is shown to be strongly dependent on the size of the underdense plasma. 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Fourier transform-limited optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interferometry over several tens of laser coherence lengths.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weilin; Zhou, Qian; Bretenaker, Fabien; Xia, Zongyang; Shi, Hongxiao; Qin, Jie; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-07-01

    We report on a versatile optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interferometry technique that exploits wideband phase locking for generating highly coherent linear laser frequency chirps. This technique is based on an ultra-short delay-unbalanced interferometer, which leads to a large bandwidth, short lock time, and robust operation even in the absence of any isolation from environmental perturbations. In combination with a digital delay-matched phase error compensation, this permits the achievement of a range window about 60 times larger than the intrinsic laser coherence length with a 1.25 mm Fourier transform-limited spatial resolution. The demonstrated configuration can be easily applied to virtually any semiconductor laser. PMID:27367076

  16. Laser micro-machining of waveguide devices for sub-mm and far IR interferometry and detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drou't d'Aubigny, Christian Y.; Walker, Christopher K.; Golish, Dathon; Swain, Mark R.; Dumont, Philip J.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2003-02-01

    Laser induced, micro-chemical etching is a promising new technology that can be used to fabricate three dimensional structures many millimeters across with micrometer accuracy. Laser micromachining possesses a significant edge over more conventional techniques. It does not require the use of masks and is not confined to crystal planes. A non-contact process, it eliminates tool wear and vibration problems associated with classical milling machines. At the University of Arizona we have constructed the first such laser micromaching system optimized for the fabrication of THz and far IR waveguide and quasi-optical components. Our system can machine many millimeters across down to a few microns accuracy in a short time, with a remarkable surface finish. This paper presents the design, operation and performance of our system, and its applications to waveguide devices for sub millimeter and far IR interferometry.

  17. Experimental studies of laser guiding and wake excitation in plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volfbeyn, Pavel

    1998-12-01

    This thesis presents results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor- Heater scheme was proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It made use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort (<100 fs) laser pulse, was brought to a line focus using a cylindrical lens to ionize the gas. The Heater pulse (100-200 ps long) was used subsequently to heat the existing spark via inverse Bremsstrahlung. The hydrodynamic shock expansion created a partially evacuated plasma channel with a density minimum on axis. Such a channel has properties of an optical waveguide. This technique allowed, for the first time, creation of plasma channels in low atomic number gases, such as hydrogen, which is of importance for guiding of highly intense laser pulses. The channel density was diagnosed with time resolved longitudinal interferometry. From these measurements the plasma temperature was inferred. The guiding properties of the channels were tested by injecting a 5 × 1017 W/cm2, 75fs laser pulse. The guiding properties and transmission and coupling efficiency were studied as a function of relative position of the channel and the injection pulse focus. Whereas entrance coupling efficiency into the channel was lower than expected, channel coupling to continuum losses were found to be in good agreement with analytical predictions. We speculate that increased coupling efficiency can be achieved through better mode matching into the channel. Analytic and numerical one dimensional (1-D), nonrelativistic theory of laser pulse propagation in underdense plasma was presented, in the context of laser wakefield acceleration. The relation between the laser pulse energy depletion, longitudinal laser pulse shape distortion, and changes in the group velocity and center wavelength was explored. 1-D theory was extended to treat the case of a laser exciting a wake in a hollow plasma channel, by making

  18. Variations of Earth Rotation from Ring Laser Gyroscopes: One Hundred Years of Rotation sensing with Optical Interferometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, K. U.

    2013-12-01

    Earth Rotation and Orientation are providing the link between the terrestrial (ITRF) and celestial reference frames (ICRF). Traditionally the Earth orientation parameters (EOPs) are observed by radio interferometry. The fixed positions of the quasars, along with the measurement redundancy of a sufficiently large network, provide the long-term stability of the observations. For the short-term and the access to the instantaneous rotation axis of the Earth, VLBI is depending on suitable models, which still have some deficiencies. Optical interferometric rotation sensing with ring lasers in contrast provide direct access to the Earth rotation axis, a high resolution in the short-term, but are suffering from tiny non-reciprocal laser behavior causing a small drift in the long-term. Exactly one hundred years after George Sagnac's important paper, published in Comptes Rendus in 1913, the tools of modern quantum optics have matured to a point where they make ring lasers more than 12 orders of magnitude more sensitive than the early instrumentation in this field and they observe continuously. The single component prototype ring laser G in Wettzell now resolves rotation rates of 10e-12 rad/s after one hour of integration and has demonstrated an impressive sensor stability over several month. The combination of VLBI and ring laser measurements offers an improved sensitivity for the EOPs in the short-term and the direct access to the Earth rotation axis. At the same time the progress in controlling the backscatter coupling in ring lasers has succeeded to reach the domain of 3 parts per billion for the relative uncertainty of the measured Earth rotation. This paper explores the contribution of optical Sagnac Interferometry to space geodesy at the Centennial of the Sagnac effect.

  19. A scheme for recording a fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Jiang, Biqiang

    2015-04-01

    A scheme for recording fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave (CW) laser is described and demonstrated experimentally, which employs delayed-time fibers and angular multiplexing technique and can realize the variable temporal resolution at nanosecond scale and different measured depths of object field at certain temporal resolution. The actual delay-time is controlled by two delayed-time fibers with different lengths. The object field information in two different states can be simultaneously recorded in a composite hologram. This scheme is also suitable for recording fast process at picosecond scale, by using an electro-optic modulator.

  20. Frequency scanning interferometry with nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode under scanning speed control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuma, Seiichi

    2015-12-01

    Frequency scanning interferometry technique with a nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode (VCSEL) is presented. Since the frequency scanning of the VCSEL is linearized by the phase-locked-loop technique, the gradient of the interference fringe order can be precisely determined using linear least squares fitting. This enables a length measurement with a precision better than a quarter wavelength, and the absolute fringe number including the integer part at the atomic transition spectrum (rubidium-D2 line) is accurately determined. The validity of the method is demonstrated by excellent results of block gauge measurement with a root mean square error better than 5 nm.

  1. Production of plasmas by long-wavelength lasers

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, J.M.

    1973-10-01

    A long-wavelength laser system for heating low-density plasma to high temperatures is described. In one embodiment, means are provided for repeatedly receiving and transmitting long-wavelength laser light in successive stages to form a laser-light beam path that repeatedly intersects with the equilibrium axis of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma column for interacting the laser light with the plasma for providing controlled thermonuclear fusion. Embodiments for heating specific linear plasmas are also provided. (Official Gazette)

  2. X-ray lasers for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.; Celliers, P.; Kalantar, D.H.; Snavely, R.; Trebes, J.E.; Wan, A.S.; Weber, F.

    1997-12-31

    Soft x-ray lasers have evolved from the early demonstration phase to becoming reliable xuv sources. They operate over a wide wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ns pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup {minus}4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this talk the authors describe their use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beam splitters they have constructed and sued a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {angstrom} to probe 1--3 mm size laser produced plasmas. They have also used x-ray lasers and a multilayer mirror imaging system to study hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1--2 {micro}m spatial resolution. They are now planning a moire deflectometry to measure the electron density profile in ICF hohlraums. The results of these experiments and the limitations of these techniques will be presented. The prospects for short wavelength (10 {angstrom}) x-ray lasers which are better suited to higher density probing will also be discussed.

  3. Generation of phase - matched coherent point source in plasma media by propagated X-ray laser seeded beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, T.; Faenov, A.; Magnitskiy, S.; Nagorskiy, N.; Tanaka, M.; Ishino, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kando, M.; Kato, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant interest in developing the coherent table-top X-ray lasers. Advent of plasma-based transient collisional excitation x-ray laser and particular, injection of coherent seeded beam, especially high-order harmonics, has tremendously improved the spatial coherence of such lasers, what allowed them to be the same widely used as synchrotron sources. Here we report experimental founding of unknown interference structure in a spatial profile of the output beam of the two-stage plasma X-ray laser. That allowed us experimental and theoretical discovering a new phenomenon consisted in a generation of phase-matched coherent point source in a laser plasma media by propagated X-ray laser seeded beam. This phenomenon could extend the applications of such x-ray lasers. For explanation of the observed phenomenon a new method of solving the standard system of Maxwell-Bloch equations has been developed. It was found that the interference pattern in the output laser beam was formed due to an emergence of phase-matched coherent virtual point source in the XRL amplifier and could be treated as the first observation of mirage phenomenon, analogous to the optical mirage, but in X-rays. The obtained results bring new comprehension into the physical nature of amplification of X-ray radiation in laser-induced plasma amplifiers and opening new opportunities for X-ray interferometry, holography and other applications, which requiring multiple rigidly phased sources of coherent radiation.

  4. Laser propagation in underdense plasmas: Scaling arguments

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    The propagation of an intense laser beam in the underdense plasma is modelled by treating the plasma as a relativistic, zero temperature, charged fluid. For paraxial propagation and a sufficiently underdense plasma ({omega}p/{omega} {much_lt} 1), a multiple-scales technique is used to expand the exact equations in powers of the small parameter {theta} {equivalent_to} {omega}p/{omega}. The zeroth order equations are used in a critical examination of previous work on this problem, and to derive a scaling law for the threshold power required for cavitation.

  5. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma-based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma-based collider is presented.

  6. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-05-04

    Design considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-gamma collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator gamma gamma collider is presented.

  7. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-01

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma based collider is presented.

  8. Laser-driven electron acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-12-15

    We study the laser-driven electron acceleration in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma channel. We find that, in inhomogeneous plasma channel, the developing of instability for electron acceleration and the electron energy gain can be controlled by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of plasma channel. That is, we can short the accelerating length and enhance the energy gain in inhomogeneous plasma channel by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of the plasma channel.

  9. Optical probe investigation of laser ablated carbon plasma plume in nitrogen ambient

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap; Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-12-15

    We report the study of carbon plasma produced using 1064 nm laser in nitrogen ambient at atmospheric pressure using 2-dimensional fast imaging of ablated plume, optical emission spectroscopy, and optical probe at 532 nm for interferometry and shadowgraphy. The dominance of C{sub 2} and CN molecules over ionic species at later stages of expanding carbon plasma plume is reported. The observed ring structure in shadowgrams and change in the direction of fringe shift from positive to negative in recorded interferograms are correlated with the relative abundance of different species in the plasma plume as function of time delay with respect to ablating pulse. An agreement in observed onset time of formation of clusters/atomic species or low ionic species using different diagnostic techniques has been reported.

  10. Plasma mirrors for short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yanovksy, V.P.; Perry, M.D.; Brown, C.G.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.

    1997-06-11

    We show experimentally and theoretically that plasmas created by a sufficiently (1014 1015 2 short (<500 fs) intense W/cm ) laser pulse on the surface of dielectric material act as nearly perfect mirrors: reflecting p to 90% of the incident radiation with a wavefront quality equal to that of the initial solid surface.

  11. PRECISE CHARGE MEASUREMENT FOR LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Donahue, Rich; Rodgers, David; Smith, Alan; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-19

    Cross-calibrations of charge diagnostics are conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). Employed diagnostics are a scintillating screen, activation based measurement, and integrating current transformer. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8 %, showing that they can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided they are used properly.

  12. Wavelength scaling of laser plasma coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1983-11-03

    The use of shorter wavelength laser light both enhances collisional absorption and reduces deleterious collective plasma effects. Coupling processes which can be important in reactor-size targets are briefly reviewed. Simple estimates are presented for the intensity-wavelength regime in which collisional absorption is high and collective effects are minimized.

  13. Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence of Argon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, Earl; Soderholm, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A pair of axicon lenses create an annular beam path for the emission collection and the pump laser light is confined inside the annulus of the collection beam. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. Here we present optical modeling of and initial results from the axicon based confocal optical system. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  14. Characterization of Surface Modifications by White Light Interferometry: Applications in Ion Sputtering, Laser Ablation, and Tribology Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Baryshev, Sergey V.; Erck, Robert A.; Moore, Jerry F.; Zinovev, Alexander V.; Tripa, C. Emil; Veryovkin, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    In materials science and engineering it is often necessary to obtain quantitative measurements of surface topography with micrometer lateral resolution. From the measured surface, 3D topographic maps can be subsequently analyzed using a variety of software packages to extract the information that is needed. In this article we describe how white light interferometry, and optical profilometry (OP) in general, combined with generic surface analysis software, can be used for materials science and engineering tasks. In this article, a number of applications of white light interferometry for investigation of surface modifications in mass spectrometry, and wear phenomena in tribology and lubrication are demonstrated. We characterize the products of the interaction of semiconductors and metals with energetic ions (sputtering), and laser irradiation (ablation), as well as ex situ measurements of wear of tribological test specimens. Specifically, we will discuss: Aspects of traditional ion sputtering-based mass spectrometry such as sputtering rates/yields measurements on Si and Cu and subsequent time-to-depth conversion. Results of quantitative characterization of the interaction of femtosecond laser irradiation with a semiconductor surface. These results are important for applications such as ablation mass spectrometry, where the quantities of evaporated material can be studied and controlled via pulse duration and energy per pulse. Thus, by determining the crater geometry one can define depth and lateral resolution versus experimental setup conditions. Measurements of surface roughness parameters in two dimensions, and quantitative measurements of the surface wear that occur as a result of friction and wear tests. Some inherent drawbacks, possible artifacts, and uncertainty assessments of the white light interferometry approach will be discussed and explained. PMID:23486006

  15. X-ray absorption of a warm dense aluminum plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecherbourg, L.; Renaudin, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Shepherd, R.; Audebert, P.

    2007-05-01

    Point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient aluminum plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. The 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum were measured for an extended range of densities in a low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained using frequency domain interferometry diagnostic (FDI) that allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. A detailed opacity code using the density and temperature inferred from the FDI reproduce the measured absorption spectra except in the last stage of the recombination phase.

  16. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Cormier-Michel, E.

    2010-11-04

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA). In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  17. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations [8]. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  18. Damage-controlled high power lasers and plasma mirror application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Nishikino, Masaharu; Nagashima, Keisuke; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Itakura, Ryoji; Sugiyama, Akira; Kando, Masaki; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Kondo, Kimonori; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2015-07-01

    Following three different types of high power lasers at Kansai Photon Science Institute are overviewed and controlling the laser damages in these laser systems are described: (1) PW-class Ti:sapphire laser for high field science, (2) zig-zag slab Nd:glass laser for x-ray laser pumping, and (3) high-repetition Yb:YAG thin-slab laser for THz generation. Also reported is the use of plasma mirror for characterization of short-wavelength ultrashort laser pulses. This new method will be useful to study evolution of plasma formation which leads to laser damages.

  19. Fracture toughness of unidirectional fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in Mode II utilizing laser interferometry. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Truskowski, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    A laser interferometry technique to measure crack opening displacement was developed and applied to end notched flexure specimens of a Corning Glass Works 1723 glass matrix with silicon carbide fibers. The laser interferometer displacement guage monitored the crack opening displacement (COD) at the location of a support while specimens were subjected to Mode II (forward shear) cracking at room temperature via three point bend tests on a standard Instron Compression machine. Vertical displacement was measured at the center of the test specimen using a linear variable differential transformer. Load verses displacement curves were generated for both the LVDT displacement and the COD. The COD curve showed a marked improvement in determining the onset of crack growth. From the enhanced critical load determination, the materials fracture toughness in Mode II, GI.Ic was calculated for varying crack lengths. The calculations provided estimates with a variance of only 10% from the mean thus illustrating the utility of this procedure.

  20. Ion beam control in laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Nagashima, T.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2016-03-01

    By a two-stage successive acceleration in laser ion acceleration, our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by a few hundreds of MeV; the maximum proton energy reaches about 250MeV. The ions are accelerated by the inductive continuous post-acceleration in a laser plasma interaction together with the target normal sheath acceleration and the breakout afterburner mechanism. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when an intense short- pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in the plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field strength, the moving longitudinal inductive electric field is induced by the Faraday law, and accelerates the forward-moving ions continously. The multi-stage acceleration provides a unique controllability in the ion energy and its quality.

  1. Nuclear Powered Laser Driven Plasma Propulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammash, T.

    A relativistic plasma thruster that could open up the solar system to near-term human exploration is presented. It is based on recent experimental and theoretical research, which show that ultrafast (very short pulse length) lasers can accelerate charged particles to relativistic speeds. In table top-type experiments charge-neutral proton beams containing more than 1014 particles with mean energies of tens of MeV's have been produced when high intensity lasers with femtosecond (10-15 s) pulse lengths are made to strike thin solid targets. When viewed from a propulsion standpoint such systems can produce specific impulses of several million seconds albeit at modest thrusts and require nuclear power systems to drive them. Several schemes are proposed to enhance the thrust and make these systems suitable for manned interplanetary missions. In this paper we set forth the physics principles that make relativistic plasma driven by ultrafast lasers particularly attractive for propulsion applications. We introduce the “Laser Accelerated Plasma Propulsion System” LAPPS, and demonstrate its potential propulsive capability by addressing an interstellar mission to the Oort Cloud, and a planetary mission to Mars. We show that the first can be carried out in a human's lifetime and the second in a matter of months. In both instances we identify the major technological problems that must be addressed if this system is to evolve into a leading contender among the advance propulsion concepts currently under consideration.

  2. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. J.; Fiuza, F.; Debayle, A.; Johzaki, T.; Mori, W. B.; Patel, P. K.; Sentoku, Y.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-05-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition (FI) approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser-plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to FI. Increases in computational and modelling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modelling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modelling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the comparison of simulation results with experimental observables. In particular, we address the question of surrogacy of today's experiments for the full-scale FI problem.

  3. CO2 Laser Absorption in Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tegel, Jochen; Schall, Wolfgang O.

    2006-05-02

    The impulse formation by laser ablation is limited by the premature absorption of the incident laser radiation in the initially produced cloud of ablation products. The power fraction of a CO2 laser pulse transmitted through a small hole in a POM sample for pulse energies of 35 to 150 J focused on a spot of 2 cm2 has been compared with the incident power. The plasma formation in vacuum and in air of 3500 Pa and the spread of the shock wave with velocities of 1.6 to 2.4 km/s in the low pressure air was observed by Schlieren photography. A sharp edged dark zone with a maximum extension of 10 to 12 mm away from the target surface develops within 5 {mu}s independently of the pressure and is assumed to be a plasma. In order to find out, if this is also the zone where the majority of the incident laser radiation is absorbed, a CO2 probe laser beam was directed through the expansion cloud parallel to and at various distances from the sample surface. The time behavior of the absorption signal of the probe beam has been measured and an absorption wave could be observed.

  4. Lasing effects in a laser-induced plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagli, Lev; Gaft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We have studied coherent emission from optically pumped preliminarily created laser induced plasma and demonstrate the possibility to create laser sources based on laser plasma as an active medium. The effect was studied in detail with Al plasma, and preliminary but promising results were also obtained with other atoms from the 13th and 14th groups of the periodic table. These lasers may be used as coherent light sources in a variety of optical applications.

  5. Electromagnetically Induced Guiding of Counter-propagating Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = G. Shvets; A. Pukhov

    1998-05-01

    The interaction of counter-propagating laser pulses in a plasma is considered. When the frequencies of the two lasers are close, nonlinear modification of the refraction index results in the mutual focusing of the two beams. A short (of order the plasma period) laser pulse can also be nonlinearly focused by a long counter-propagating beam which extends over the entire guiding length. This phenomenon of electromagnetically induced guiding can be utilized in laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  6. Control of laser-ablation plasma potential with external electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, Fumika Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-15

    The potential of a laser-ablation plasma was controlled stably up to +2 kV by using external ring electrodes. A stable electron sheath was formed between the plasma and the external electrodes by placing the ring electrodes away from the boundary of the drifting plasma. The plasma kept the potential for a few μs regardless of the flux change of the ablation plasma. We also found that the plasma potential changed with the expansion angle of the plasma from the target. By changing the distance between the plasma boundary and the external electrodes, we succeeded in controlling the potential of laser-ablation plasma.

  7. Pulse evolution and plasma-wave phase velocity in channel-guided laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, C; Rossi, F; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2015-08-01

    The self-consistent laser evolution of an intense, short-pulse laser exciting a plasma wave and propagating in a preformed plasma channel is investigated, including the effects of pulse steepening and energy depletion. In the weakly relativistic laser intensity regime, analytical expressions for the laser energy depletion, pulse self-steepening rate, laser intensity centroid velocity, and phase velocity of the plasma wave are derived and validated numerically. PMID:26382537

  8. Laser plasma in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo,K.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.; Dabrowski, R.; Okamura, M.

    2009-09-20

    Laser Ion Source (LIS) is a candidate among various heavy ion sources. A high density plasma produced by Nd:YAG laser with drift velocity realizes high current and high charge state ion beams. In order to obtain higher charged particle ions, we had test experiments of LIS with a magnetic field by which a connement effect can make higher charged beams. We measured total current by Faraday Cup (FC) and analyzed charge distribution by Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA). It is shown that the ion beam charge state is higher by a permanent magnet.

  9. Kinetic Approach for Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Banaz; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2008-10-22

    Non-equilibrium distribution functions of electron gas and phonon gas excited with ultrashort intense laser pulses are calculated for laser-induced plasmas occurring in solids. The excitation during femtosecond irradiation and the subsequent thermalization of the free electrons, as well as the dynamics of phonons are described by kinetic equations. The microscopic collision processes, such as absorption by inverse bremsstrahlung, electron-electron collisions, and electron-phonon interactions are considered by complete Boltzmann collision integrals. We apply our kinetic approach for gold by taking s-band electron into account and compare it with the case of excitation of d-band electrons.

  10. Laser-heated emissive plasma probe.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Roman; Ionita, Codrina; Balan, Petru; Gstrein, Ramona; Grulke, Olaf; Windisch, Thomas; Brandt, Christian; Klinger, Thomas; Madani, Ramin; Amarandei, George; Sarma, Arun K

    2008-08-01

    Emissive probes are standard tools in laboratory plasmas for the direct determination of the plasma potential. Usually they consist of a loop of refractory wire heated by an electric current until sufficient electron emission. Recently emissive probes were used also for measuring the radial fluctuation-induced particle flux and other essential parameters of edge turbulence in magnetized toroidal hot plasmas [R. Schrittwieser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 055004 (2008)]. We have developed and investigated various types of emissive probes, which were heated by a focused infrared laser beam. Such a probe has several advantages: higher probe temperature without evaporation or melting and thus higher emissivity and longer lifetime, no deformation of the probe in a magnetic field, no potential drop along the probe wire, and faster time response. The probes are heated by an infrared diode laser with 808 nm wavelength and an output power up to 50 W. One probe was mounted together with the lens system on a radially movable probe shaft, and radial profiles of the plasma potential and of its oscillations were measured in a linear helicon discharge. PMID:19044350

  11. Laser Plasma instability reduction by coherence disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W l; Amendt, P A; Meezan, N; Suter, L J

    2006-04-19

    The saturation levels of stimulated scattering of intense laser light in plasmas and techniques to reduce these levels are of great interest. A simple model is used to highlight the dependence of the reflectivity on the coherence length for the density fluctuations producing the scattering. Sometimes the coherence lengths can be determined nonlinearly. For NIF hohlraum plasmas, a reduction in the coherence lengths might be engineered in several ways. Finally, electron trapping in ion sound waves is briefly examined as a potentially important effect for the saturation of stimulated Brillouin scattering.

  12. Excitation of nuclear isomers by X rays from laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Aleksandr A; Karpeshin, F; Trzhaskovskaya, M B; Platonov, Konstantin Yu; Rozhdestvenskii, Yu V

    2010-06-23

    The possibility of obtaining isomer nuclei is studied by the example of the molybdenum isomer {sup 93}Mo upon irradiation of a niobium {sup 93}Nb target by {approx}50-J, 100-fs laser pulses. It is shown that the modern laser technique allows production of isomer nuclei by accelerated protons and radiative de-excitation of isomer nuclear states by thermal or line X-rays from laser plasma. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  13. Hydrogen alpha laser ablation plasma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Parigger, C G; Surmick, D M; Gautam, G; El Sherbini, A M

    2015-08-01

    Spectral measurements of the H(α) Balmer series line and the continuum radiation are applied to draw inferences of electron density, temperature, and the level of self-absorption in laser ablation of a solid ice target in ambient air. Electron densities of 17 to 3.2×10(24) m(-3) are determined from absolute calibrated emission coefficients for time delays of 100-650 ns after generation of laser plasma using Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation. The corresponding temperatures of 4.5-0.95 eV were evaluated from the absolute spectral radiance of the continuum at the longer wavelengths. The redshifted, Stark-broadened hydrogen alpha line emerges from the continuum radiation after a time delay of 300 ns. The electron densities inferred from power law formulas agree with the values obtained from the plasma emission coefficients. PMID:26258326

  14. Weak collisionless shocks in laser-plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Trines, R. G. M.; Norreys, P.

    2015-04-01

    We obtain a theory describing laminar shock-like structures in a collisionless plasma and examine the parameter limits, in terms of the ion sound Mach number and the electron/ion temperature ratio, within which these structures exist. The essential feature is the inclusion of finite ion temperature with the result that some ions are reflected from a potential ramp. This destroys the symmetry between upstream and downstream regions that would otherwise give the well-known ion solitary wave solution. We have shown earlier (Cairns et al 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 022112) that such structures may be relevant to problems such as the existence of strong, localized electric fields observed in laser compressed pellets and laser acceleration of ions. Here we present results on the way in which these structures may produce species separation in fusion targets and suggest that it may be possible to use shock ion acceleration for fast ignition.

  15. Dynamics of intense laser propagation in underdense plasma: Polarization dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D. K.; Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O.; Davies, J. R.; Sarri, G.

    2012-07-15

    We present a comprehensive numerical study of the dynamics of an intense laser pulse as it propagates through an underdense plasma in two and three dimensions. By varying the background plasma density and the polarization of the laser beam, significant differences are found in terms of energy transport and dissipation, in agreement with recently reported experimental results. Below the threshold for relativistic self-focusing, the plasma and laser dynamics are observed to be substantially insensitive to the initial laser polarization, since laser transport is dominated by ponderomotive effects. Above this threshold, relativistic effects become important, and laser energy is dissipated either by plasma heating (p-polarization) or by trapping of electromagnetic energy into plasma cavities (s-polarization) or by a combination of both (circular polarization). Besides the fundamental interest of this study, the results presented are relevant to applications such as plasma-based accelerators, x-ray lasers, and fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion.

  16. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-07-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in theLaser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced AcceleratorConcepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespreadobservation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement betweenmeasured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration oflaser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laserwakefield structure; new methods for measuring<100 fs electronbunches; and new methods for "machining" laser-plasma acceleratorstructures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmapfor laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection andguiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics;petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasmaaccelerators.

  17. Carbon Multicharged Ion Generation from Laser Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2014-10-01

    Multicharged ions (MCI) have potential uses in different areas such as microelectronics and medical physics. Carbon MCI therapy for cancer treatment is considered due to its localized energy delivery to hard-to-reach tumors at a minimal damage to surrounding tissues. We use a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 40 ns pulse width operated at 1064 nm to ablate a graphite target in ultrahigh vacuum. A time-of-flight energy analyzer followed by a Faraday cup is used to characterize the carbon MCI extracted from the laser plasma. The MCI charge state and energy distribution are obtained. With increase in the laser fluence, the ion charge states and ion energy are increased. Carbon MCI up to C+9 are observed along with carbon clusters. When an acceleration voltage is applied between the carbon target and a grounded mesh, ion extraction is observed to increase with the applied voltage. National Science Foundation.

  18. Improving sensitivity of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using laser plasmas interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, Alexey A.; Golik, Sergey S.; Nagorny, Ivan G.; Bulanov, Alexey V.

    2006-11-01

    Laser plasmas interaction and spectral characteristics of plasma were investigated at a laser breakdown in a normal atmosphere with the purpose of improving laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensitivity. Colliding plasmas interaction was investigated depending on mechanism of absorption wave of laser radiation and distance between foci. Laser supported detonation wave, breakdown wave and fast wave of ionization are absorption wave observed in experiment. It was shown that seed electrons for cascade breakdown in front of fast wave of ionization is occurred due to oxygen molecules photoionization. Molecular emission and collapse of intensity of plasma continuum during the initial moments of laser plasma expansion were registered. The line/continuum ratio was essentially increased in case of laser plasmas interaction. Thus laser plasmas interaction improves sensitivity of LIBS.

  19. Evaluation of Homogeneity and Elastic Properties of Solid Argon at High Pressures Using Picosecond Laser Ultrasonic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerr, A.; Kuriakose, M.; Raetz, S.; Chigarev, N.; Nikitin, S. M.; Gasteau, D.; Tournat, V.; Bulou, A.; Castagnede, B.; Gusev, V. E.; Lomonosov, A.

    2015-12-01

    In picosecond ultrasonic interferometry [1], femto- or picosecond pump laser pulses are first used to generate acoustic pulses ranging from several to a few tens of nanometres length, thanks to the optoacoustic transduction in a light absorbing generator. Time-delayed femto- or picosecond probe laser pulses are then used to follow the propagation of these ultrashort acoustic pulses through a transparent medium that is in contact with the generator surface. The transient signal thus contains, at each moment in time, information on the local elastic, optical and elasto-optical properties of the tested material at the position where the laser-generated picosecond acoustic pulse is located during its propagation in the sample depth. Hence, the technique allows evaluation of sound velocities and elastic anisotropy of micro-crystallites composing a transparent material compressed to high pressures in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). This interferometry technique also helps to understand the micro-crystallite orientations in a case of elastically anisotropic material. Here we report the preliminary results of picosecond ultrasonic interferometry applied to the evaluation of homogeneities and elastic properties of polycrystalline solid argon compressed to 10 GPa and 15 GPa. In comparison with the earlier reported experiments on H2O ice at Mbar pressures [2], more efforts were spent to the evaluation of the lateral microstructure of the sample at high pressures, i.e., to inhomogeneities along the surface of the optoacoustic generator, rather than to the in-depth imaging along the axis of the DAC. The lateral imaging is performed over a distance of 60 - 90 µm, nearly corresponding to the complete sample diameter. In addition to the presence of expected lateral inhomogeneities the obtained results demonstrate important changes in their distribution upon pressure increase from 10 to 15 GPa. On the basis of the analysis of the statistic probability in the detection of differently

  20. Light source employing laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S

    2013-09-17

    A system and a method of generating radiation and/or particle emissions are disclosed. In at least some embodiments, the system includes at least one laser source that generates a first pulse and a second pulse in temporal succession, and a target, where the target (or at least a portion the target) becomes a plasma upon being exposed to the first pulse. The plasma expand after the exposure to the first pulse, the expanded plasma is then exposed to the second pulse, and at least one of a radiation emission and a particle emission occurs after the exposure to the second pulse. In at least some embodiments, the target is a solid piece of material, and/or a time period between the first and second pulses is less than 1 microsecond (e.g., 840 ns).

  1. Pushing the Limits of Plasma Length in Inertial-Fusion Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; London, R. A.; Michel, P.; Berger, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Neumayer, P.; Ross, J. S.; Wallace, R.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate laser beam propagation and low backscatter in laser produced hohlraum plasmas of ignition plasma length. At intensities I<5×1014Wcm-2 greater than 80% of the energy in a blue (3ω, 351 nm) laser is transmitted through a L=5-mm long, high-temperature (Te=2.5keV), high-density (ne=5×1020cm-3) plasma. These experiments show that the backscatter scales exponentially with plasma length which is consistent with linear theory. The backscatter calculated by a new steady state 3D laser-plasma interaction code developed for large ignition plasmas is in good agreement with the measurements.

  2. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-07-15

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator, plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses, and highly nonlinear regimes. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse diffraction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, and beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Experiments demonstrating key physics, such as the production of high-quality electron bunches at energies of 0.1-1 GeV, are summarized.

  3. Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-05-17

    Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

  4. Focusing of Intense Laser via Parabolic Plasma Concave Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Wu, Fengjuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shan, Lianqiang; Cao, Leifeng; Zhang, Baohan

    2015-12-01

    Since laser intensity plays an important role in laser plasma interactions, a method of increasing laser intensity - focusing of an intense laser via a parabolic plasma concave surface - is proposed and investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The geometric focusing via a parabolic concave surface and the temporal compression of high harmonics increased the peak intensity of the laser pulse by about two orders of magnitude. Compared with the improvement via laser optics approaches, this scheme is much more economic and appropriate for most femtosecond laser facilities. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11174259, 11175165), and the Dual Hundred Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics

  5. Measurements of laser-induced plasma temperature field in deep penetration laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Genyu; Zhang, Mingjun; Zhao, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Li, Shichun

    2013-02-01

    Laser-induced plasma in deep penetration laser welding is located inside or outside the keyhole, namely, keyhole plasma or plasma plume, respectively. The emergence of laser-induced plasma in laser welding reveals important information of the welding technological process. Generally, electron temperature and electron density are two important characteristic parameters of plasma. In this paper, spectroscopic measurements of electron temperature and electron density of the keyhole plasma and plasma plume in deep penetration laser welding conditions were carried out. To receive spectra from several points separately and simultaneously, an Optical Multi-channel Analyser (OMA) was developed. On the assumption that the plasma was in local thermal equilibrium, the temperature was calculated with the spectral relative intensity method. The spectra collected were processed with Abel inversion method to obtain the temperature fields of keyhole plasma and plasma plume.

  6. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Boundary instability of an erosion laser plasma expanding into a background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Grishina, V. G.; Derkach, O. N.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1993-12-01

    The stability of the contact region in the system consisting of an erosion plasma and a gas has been determined experimentally under conditions such that the length of the applied laser pulse is longer than the rise time of the instability, and the expansion of the erosion plume is accompanied by breakdown of the background gas. The evolution of perturbations of the plasma front following the introduction of initial perturbations with a fixed spatial period has been studied. It is possible to model the injection of plasma bunches into a low-pressure gas by studying the dynamics of the vaporization at moderate laser-light intensities, characteristic of technological applications.

  7. Absolute distance measurement by multi-heterodyne interferometry using a frequency comb and a cavity-stabilized tunable laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Liu, Tingyang; Balling, Petr; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a multi-heterodyne system capable of absolute distance measurement using a frequency comb and a tunable diode laser locked to a Fabry-Perot cavity. In a series of subsequent measurements, numerous beat components can be obtained by downconverting the optical frequency into the RF region with multi-heterodyne interferometry. The distances can be measured via the mode phases with a series of synthetic wavelengths. The comparison with the reference interferometer shows an agreement within 1.5 μm for the averages of five measurements and 2.5 μm for the single measurement, which is at the 10-8 relative precision level. PMID:27411152

  8. Readout for intersatellite laser interferometry: Measuring low frequency phase fluctuations of high-frequency signals with microradian precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerberding, Oliver; Diekmann, Christian; Kullmann, Joachim; Tröbs, Michael; Bykov, Ioury; Barke, Simon; Brause, Nils Christopher; Esteban Delgado, Juan José; Schwarze, Thomas S.; Reiche, Jens; Danzmann, Karsten; Rasmussen, Torben; Hansen, Torben Vendt; Enggaard, Anders; Pedersen, Søren Møller; Jennrich, Oliver; Suess, Martin; Sodnik, Zoran; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Precision phase readout of optical beat note signals is one of the core techniques required for intersatellite laser interferometry. Future space based gravitational wave detectors like eLISA require such a readout over a wide range of MHz frequencies, due to orbit induced Doppler shifts, with a precision in the order of μ rad / √{ Hz } at frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. In this paper, we present phase readout systems, so-called phasemeters, that are able to achieve such precisions and we discuss various means that have been employed to reduce noise in the analogue circuit domain and during digitisation. We also discuss the influence of some non-linear noise sources in the analogue domain of such phasemeters. And finally, we present the performance that was achieved during testing of the elegant breadboard model of the LISA phasemeter, which was developed in the scope of a European Space Agency technology development activity.

  9. Accelerated Bone Repair After Plasma Laser Corticotomies

    PubMed Central

    Leucht, Philipp; Lam, Kentson; Kim, Jae-Beom; Mackanos, Mark A.; Simanovskii, Dmitrii M.; Longaker, Michael T.; Contag, Christopher H.; Schwettman, H Alan; Helms, Jill A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To reveal, on a cellular and molecular level, how skeletal regeneration of a corticotomy is enhanced when using laser-plasma mediated ablation compared with conventional mechanical tissue removal. Summary Background Data: Osteotomies are well-known for their most detrimental side effect: thermal damage. This thermal and mechanical trauma to adjacent bone tissue can result in the untoward consequences of cell death and eventually in a delay in healing. Methods: Murine tibial corticotomies were performed using a conventional saw and a Ti:Sapphire plasma-generated laser that removes tissue with minimal thermal damage. Our analyses began 24 hours after injury and proceeded to postsurgical day 6. We investigated aspects of wound repair ranging from vascularization, inflammation, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone remodeling. Results: Histology of mouse corticotomy sites uncovered a significant difference in the onset of bone healing; whereas laser corticotomies showed abundant bone matrix deposition at postsurgical day 6, saw corticotomies only exhibited undifferentiated tissue. Our analyses uncovered that cutting bone with a saw caused denaturation of the collagen matrix due to thermal effects. This denatured collagen represented an unfavorable scaffold for subsequent osteoblast attachment, which in turn impeded deposition of a new bony matrix. The matrix degradation induced a prolonged inflammatory reaction at the cut edge to create a surface favorable for osteochondroprogenitor cell attachment. Laser corticotomies were absent of collagen denaturation, therefore osteochondroprogenitor cell attachment was enabled shortly after surgery. Conclusion: In summary, these data demonstrate that corticotomies performed with Ti:Sapphire lasers are associated with a reduced initial inflammatory response at the injury site leading to accelerated osteochondroprogenitor cell migration, attachment, differentiation, and eventually matrix deposition. PMID:17592303

  10. PLASMA WAKE EXCITATION BY LASERS OR PARTICLE BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Leemans, Wim

    2011-04-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. Plasma wake excitation driven by lasers or particle beams is examined, and the implications of the different physical excitation mechanisms for accelerator design are discussed. Plasma-based accelerators have attracted considerable attention owing to the ultrahigh field gradients sustainable in a plasma wave, enabling compact accelerators. These relativistic plasma waves are excited by displacing electrons in a neutral plasma. Two basic mechanisms for excitation of plasma waves are actively being researched: (i) excitation by the nonlinear ponderomotive force (radiation pressure) of an intense laser or (ii) excitation by the space-charge force of a dense charged particle beam. There has been significant recent experimental success using lasers and particle beam drivers for plasma acceleration. In particular, for laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs), the demonstration at LBNL in 2006 of high-quality, 1 GeV electron beams produced in approximately 3 cm plasma using a 40 TW laser. In 2007, for beam-driven plasma accelerators, or plasma-wakefield accelerators (PWFAs), the energy doubling over a meter to 42 GeV of a fraction of beam electrons on the tail of an electron beam by the plasma wave excited by the head was demonstrated at SLAC. These experimental successes have resulted in further interest in the development of plasma-based acceleration as a basis for a linear collider, and preliminary collider designs using laser drivers and beam drivers are being developed. The different physical mechanisms of plasma wave excitation, as well as the typical characteristics of the drivers, have implications for accelerator design. In the following, we identify the similarities and differences between wave excitation by lasers and particle beams. The field structure of the plasma wave driven by lasers or particle beams is discussed, as well as the

  11. Tailoring the air plasma with a double laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-06-15

    We present a comprehensive model of plasma dynamics that enables a detailed understanding of the ways the air plasma induced in the atmosphere in the wake of a laser-induced filament can be controlled by an additional laser pulse. Our model self-consistently integrates plasma-kinetic, Navier-Stokes, electron heat conduction, and electron-vibration energy transfer equations, serving to reveal laser-plasma interaction regimes where the plasma lifetime can be substantially increased through an efficient control over plasma temperature, as well as suppression of attachment and recombination processes. The model is used to quantify the limitations on the length of uniform laser-filament heating due to the self-defocusing of laser radiation by the radial profile of electron density. The envisaged applications include sustaining plasma guides for long-distance transmission of microwaves, standoff detection of impurities and potentially hazardous agents, as well as lightning control and protection.

  12. Tailoring the air plasma with a double laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Miles, R. B.

    2011-06-01

    We present a comprehensive model of plasma dynamics that enables a detailed understanding of the ways the air plasma induced in the atmosphere in the wake of a laser-induced filament can be controlled by an additional laser pulse. Our model self-consistently integrates plasma-kinetic, Navier-Stokes, electron heat conduction, and electron-vibration energy transfer equations, serving to reveal laser-plasma interaction regimes where the plasma lifetime can be substantially increased through an efficient control over plasma temperature, as well as suppression of attachment and recombination processes. The model is used to quantify the limitations on the length of uniform laser-filament heating due to the self-defocusing of laser radiation by the radial profile of electron density. The envisaged applications include sustaining plasma guides for long-distance transmission of microwaves, standoff detection of impurities and potentially hazardous agents, as well as lightning control and protection.

  13. Coherent microwave radiation from a laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.

    2012-12-24

    We propose a method for generation of coherent monochromatic microwave/terahertz radiation from a laser-induced plasma. It is shown that small-scale plasma, located in the interaction region of two co-propagating plane-polarized laser beams, can be a source of the dipole radiation at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the lasers. This radiation is coherent and appears as a result of the so-called optical mixing in plasma.

  14. Measurement of Debye length in laser-produced plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Debye length of an expanded plasma created by placing an evacuated chamber with an entrance slit in the path of a freely expanding laser produced plasma was measured, using the slab geometry. An independent measurement of electron density together with the observed value for the Debye length also provided a means for evaluating the plasma electron temperature. This temperature has applications in ascertaining plasma conductivity and magnetic field necessary for confinement of the laser produced plasma. Also, the temperature obtained would be useful in analyzing electron-ion recombination rates in the expanded plasma and the dynamics of the cooling process of the plasma expansion.

  15. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  16. Laser diagnostics of plasma assisted combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xing

    In this study, a microwave re-entrant cavity discharge system and a direct current (DC) plasmatron are used to investigate flame enhancement and nitric oxide (NO) formation using laser and optical diagnostics. The uniqueness of this study lies in the direct coupling concept, a novel highly efficient strategy used here for the first time. To investigate combustion dynamics of direct microwave coupled combustion, an atmospheric high-Q re-entrant cavity applicator is used to couple microwave (2.45 GHz) electromagnetic energy directly into the reaction zone of a premixed laminar methane-oxygen flame using a compact torch. When microwave energy increases, a transition from electric field enhancement to microwave plasma discharge is observed. At 6 to 10 Watts, ionization and eventually break-down occurs. 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging of hydroxyl radicals (OH) and carbon monoxide (CO) is conducted in the reaction zone over this transition, as well as spectrally resolved flame emission measurements. These measurements serve to monitor excited state species and derive rotational temperatures using OH chemiluminescence for a range of equivalence ratios (both rich and lean) and total flow rates. Combustion dynamics is also investigated for plasma enhanced methane-air flames in premixed and nonpremixed configurations using a transient arc DC plasmatron. Results for OH and CO PLIF also indicate the differences in stability mechanism, and energy consumption for premixed and nonpremixed modes. It is shown that both configurations are significantly influenced by in-situ fuel reforming at higher plasma powers. Parametric studies are conducted in a plasma assisted methane/air premixed flame for quantitative NO production using a DC plasmatron with PLIF imaging. Quantitative measurements of NO are reported as a function of gas flow rate (20 to 50 SCFH), plasma power (100 to 900 mA, 150 to 750 W) and equivalence ratio (0.7 to 1.3). NO PLIF images and single point NO

  17. Accurate Alignment of Plasma Channels Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-03-23

    A technique has been developed to accurately align a laser beam through a plasma channel by minimizing the shift in laser centroid and angle at the channel outptut. If only the shift in centroid or angle is measured, then accurate alignment is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel properties are scanned. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique is important for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  18. Observation of Laser-Pulse Shortening in Nonlinear Plasma Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, J.; Glinec, Y.; Santos, J.J.; Ewald, F.; Rousseau, J.-P.; Malka, V.; Kiselev, S.; Pukhov, A.; Hosokai, T.

    2005-11-11

    We have measured the temporal shortening of an ultraintense laser pulse interacting with an underdense plasma. When interacting with strongly nonlinear plasma waves, the laser pulse is shortened from 38{+-}2 fs to the 10-14 fs level, with a 20% energy efficiency. The laser ponderomotive force excites a wakefield, which, along with relativistic self-phase modulation, broadens the laser spectrum and subsequently compresses the pulse. This mechanism is confirmed by 3D particle in cell simulations.

  19. Observation of laser-pulse shortening in nonlinear plasma waves.

    PubMed

    Faure, J; Glinec, Y; Santos, J J; Ewald, F; Rousseau, J-P; Kiselev, S; Pukhov, A; Hosokai, T; Malka, V

    2005-11-11

    We have measured the temporal shortening of an ultraintense laser pulse interacting with an underdense plasma. When interacting with strongly nonlinear plasma waves, the laser pulse is shortened from 38 +/- 2 fs to the 10-14 fs level, with a 20% energy efficiency. The laser ponderomotive force excites a wakefield, which, along with relativistic self-phase modulation, broadens the laser spectrum and subsequently compresses the pulse. This mechanism is confirmed by 3D particle in cell simulations. PMID:16384066

  20. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  1. Fissioning uranium plasmas and nuclear-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Current research into uranium plasmas, gaseous-core (cavity) reactors, and nuclear-pumped lasers is discussed. Basic properties of fissioning uranium plasmas are summarized together with potential space and terrestrial applications of gaseous-core reactors and nuclear-pumped lasers. Conditions for criticality of a uranium plasma are outlined, and it is shown that the nonequilibrium state and the optical thinness of a fissioning plasma can be exploited for the direct conversion of fission fragment energy into coherent light (i.e., for nuclear-pumped lasers). Successful demonstrations of nuclear-pumped lasers are described together with gaseous-fuel reactor experiments using uranium hexafluoride.

  2. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  3. Mapping neutral, ion, and electron number densities within laser-ablated plasma plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, I.; Doyle, Liam A.; Martin, G. W.; Riley, Dave; Lamb, M. J.; Graham, William G.; Morrow, Tom; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.

    1998-05-01

    Spatially and temporally varying neutral, ion and electron number densities have been mapped out within laser ablated plasma plumes expanding into vacuum. Ablation of a magnesium target was performed using a KrF laser, 30 ns pulse duration and 248 nm wavelength. During the initial stage of plasma expansion (t interferometry has been used to obtain line averaged electron number densities, for laser power densities on target in the range 1.3 - 3.0 X 108 W/cm2. Later in the plasma expansion (t equals 1 microsecond(s) ) simultaneous absorption and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to determine 3D neutral and ion number densities, for a power density equal to 6.7 X 107 W/cm2. Two distinct regions within the plume were identified. One is a fast component (approximately 106 cm-1) consisting of ions and neutrals with maximum number densities observed to be approximately 30 and 4 X 1012 cm-3 respectively, and the second consists of slow moving neutral material at a number density of up to 1015 cm-3. Additionally a Langmuir probe has been used to obtain ion and electron number densities at very late times in the plasma expansion (1 microsecond(s) laser, 7.5 ns duration and 532 nm (2 (omega) ) wavelength, with a power density on target equal to 6 X 108 W/cm2. Two regions within the plume with different velocities were observed. Within a fast component (approximately 3 X 106 cms-1) electron and ion number densities of the order 5 X 1012 cm-3 were observed and within the second slower component (approximately 106 cms-1) electron and ion number densities of the order 1 - 2 X 1013 cm-3 were determined.

  4. Collaborative Research: Instability and transport of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey Arnold; Lushnikov, Pavel

    2014-11-18

    Our goal was to determine the onset of laser light scattering due to plasma wave instabilities. Such scatter is usually regarded as deleterious since laser beam strength is thereby diminished. While this kind of laser-plasma-instability (LPI) has long been understood for the case of coherent laser light, the theory of LPI onset for a laser beam with degraded coherence is recent. Such a laser beam fills plasma with a mottled intensity distribution, which has large fluctuations. The key question is: do the exceptionally large fluctuations control LPI onset or is it controlled by the relatively quiescent background laser intensity? We have answered this question. This is significant because LPI onset power in the former case is typically small compared to that of the latter. In addition, if large laser intensity fluctuations control LPI onset, then nonlinear effects become significant for less powerful laser beams than otherwise estimated.

  5. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  6. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  7. Aluminium plasma production at high laser intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.

    2014-02-28

    Thick and thin films of Al targets were irradiated in vacuum with iodine laser at 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration at a maximum intensity of about 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} by varying the pulse energy and focal position. The laser-generated plasma was monitored in forward and backward directions by using ion collectors, SiC detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and X-ray streak camera. Ion emission shows maximum proton energy of about 4 MeV in self-focusing conditions and a maximum Al ion energy of about 50 MeV. An evaluation of the electric field driving ions in conditions of target normal sheath acceleration is given.

  8. Railgun system using a laser-induced plasma armature

    SciTech Connect

    Onozuka, M.; Oda, Y.; Azuma, K.

    1996-05-01

    Development of an electromagnetic railgun system that utilizes a laser-induced plasma armature formation has been conducted to investigate the application of the railgun system for high-speed pellet injection into fusion plasmas. Using the laser-induced plasma formation technique, the required breakdown voltage was reduced by one-tenth compared with that for the spark-discharged plasma. The railgun system successfully accelerated the laser-induced plasma armature by an electromagnetic force that accelerated the pellet. The highest velocity of the solid hydrogen pellets, obtained so far, was 2.6 km/sec using a 2m-long railgun. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Modelling of relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwick, Stuart James

    In order to characterise the propagation and stability of linearly polarised laser pulses of arbitrary intensity interacting with underdense plasma, a one-dimensional, fully relativistic, covariant electron fluid model is derived. As a first step, the model is Lorentz transformed into a frame moving with the group velocity of the laser pulse. A linear instability analysis is undertaken which generates an infinite hierarchy of homogeneous mode-coupling equations describing the decay of the laser pump via stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS), stimulated Raman back scattering (SRBS) and the relativistic modulational instability (RMI). SRFS and RMI are seen to merge into a hybrid instability at high intensities (1>1018Wcm-2) and a 6-wave analysis (rather than the conventional 3 or 4-wave) is required to accurately predict growth. Next, an Eulerian fluid code is developed in order to evolve the full non- linear equations. The method of characteristics is used to integrate the electromagnetic wave equation and a predictor-corrector algorithm is used to integrate the equations of continuity and momentum. After testing, this code is used to simulate the propagation and stability of ultra-short (<200fs), 'table-top' and cos2 modulated laser pulses of relativistic intensities in underdense plasma. Comparison is made to the predictions of the dispersion relation and growth rates obtained in each case are reconciled. The spatiotemporal behaviour is discussed with reference to the results of a 3-wave WKB model of the interaction. The importance of seeding mechanisms, pulse shape and relativity on the evolution of the instabilities is also discussed.

  10. Magnetic plasma confinement for laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Adeyemi, A; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Kondo, K; Dabrowski, R

    2010-02-01

    A laser ion source (LIS) can easily provide a high current beam. However, it has been difficult to obtain a longer beam pulse while keeping a high current. On occasion, longer beam pulses are required by certain applications. For example, more than 10 micros of beam pulse is required for injecting highly charged beams to a large sized synchrotron. To extend beam pulse width, a solenoid field was applied at the drift space of the LIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The solenoid field suppressed the diverging angle of the expanding plasma and the beam pulse was widened. Also, it was observed that the plasma state was conserved after passing through a few hundred gauss of the 480 mm length solenoid field. PMID:20192365

  11. Laser produced plasma light source for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomenkov, Igor V.; Ershov, Alex I.; Partlo, William N.; Myers, David W.; Brown, Daniel; Sandstrom, Richard L.; La Fontaine, Bruno; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Khodykin, Oleh V.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Das, Palash; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Zhang, Kevin; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Rajyaguru, Chirag; De Dea, Silvia; Hou, Richard R.; Dunstan, Wayne J.; Baumgart, Peter; Ishihara, Toshihiko; Simmons, Rod D.; Jacques, Robert N.; Bergstedt, Robert A.; Brandt, David C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the development of laser-produced-plasma (LPP) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) source architecture for advanced lithography applications in high volume manufacturing. EUV lithography is expected to succeed 193 nm immersion technology for sub-22 nm critical layer patterning. In this paper we discuss the most recent results from high qualification testing of sources in production. Subsystem performance will be shown including collector protection, out-of-band (OOB) radiation measurements, and intermediate-focus (IF) protection as well as experience in system use. This presentation reviews the experimental results obtained on systems with a focus on the topics most critical for an HVM source.

  12. Plasma detector for TEA CO2 laser pulse measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Mitsuishi, A.; Fujita, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamanaka, C.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Takai, M.

    1983-10-01

    Laser-pulse evolution can be detected by measuring the emf generated by fast electrons in a laser-produced plasma when the laser radiation is focused onto a solid metal target in a vacuum. Using this phenomenon a 'plasma detector' is constructed, and its characteristics for the TEA CO2 laser radiation of intensity 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 10th W/sq cm are investigated experimentally. The plasma detector operates at room temperature and is strong against laser damages. For the evacuated plasma detector down to 0.1 torr, a maximum output voltage of 90 V and a rise time shorter than 1 ns are observed. The plasma detector, therefore, can be used as a power monitor for laser pulses and as a trigger voltage source.

  13. Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, several researchers, including yours truly, have been able to demonstrate theoretically that quantum photon entanglement has the potential to also revolutionize the entire field of optical interferometry, by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum entangled photon interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like 1/Sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles (photons, electrons, atoms, neutrons) passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of Sqrt[N] (square root of N) to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical (laser) interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. Applications are to tests of General Relativity such as ground and orbiting optical interferometers for gravity wave detection, Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) and the European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), respectively.

  14. Anions in laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, S. V.; Gornushkin, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    The equation of state for plasmas containing negative atomic and molecular ions (anions) is modeled. The model is based on the assumption that all ionization processes and chemical reactions are at local thermal equilibrium and the Coulomb interaction in the plasma is described by the Debye-Hückel theory. In particular, the equation of state is obtained for plasmas containing the elements Ca, Cl, C, Si, N, and Ar. The equilibrium reaction constants are calculated using the latest experimental and ab initio data of spectroscopic constants for the molecules CaCl_2, CaCl, Cl_2, N_2, C_2, Si_2, CN, SiN, SiC, and their positive and negative ions. The model is applied to laser-induced plasmas (LIPs) by including the equation of state into a fluid dynamic numerical model based on the Navier-Stokes equations describing an expansion of LIP plumes into an ambient gas as a reactive viscous flow with radiative losses. In particular, the formation of anions Cl-, C-, Si-, {{Cl}}2^{ - }, {{Si}}2^{ - }, {{C}}2^{ - }, CN-, SiC-, and SiN- in LIPs is investigated in detail.

  15. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  16. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  17. Plasma undulator based on laser excitation of wakefields in a plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Carl; Rykovanov, Sergey; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Leemans, Wim

    2015-11-01

    A novel plasma undulator based on the wakefields excited by a laser pulse in a plasma channel is described. Generation of the undulator fields is achieved by inducing centroid oscillations of the laser pulse in the channel. The period of such a plasma undulator is proportional to the Rayleigh length of the laser pulse and can be sub-millimeter, with an effective undulator strength parameter of order unity. The undulator period can further be controlled and reduced by beating laser modes or using multiple colors. Analytic expressions for the electron trajectories in the plasma undulator and the synchrotron radiation are compared to numerical modeling. Examples of short-period laser-driven plasma undulators are presented based on available laser and plasma channel parameters. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  18. Plasma mirrors for short pulse KrF lasers.

    PubMed

    Gilicze, Barnabás; Barna, Angéla; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor; Földes, István B

    2016-08-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that plasma mirrors can be successfully applied for KrF laser systems. High reflectivity up to 70% is achieved by optimization of the beam quality on the plasma mirror. The modest spectral shift and the good reflected beam quality allow its applicability for high power laser systems for which a new arrangement is suggested. PMID:27587094

  19. Plasma mirrors for short pulse KrF lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilicze, Barnabás; Barna, Angéla; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor; Földes, István B.

    2016-08-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that plasma mirrors can be successfully applied for KrF laser systems. High reflectivity up to 70% is achieved by optimization of the beam quality on the plasma mirror. The modest spectral shift and the good reflected beam quality allow its applicability for high power laser systems for which a new arrangement is suggested.

  20. Measurement of ultrafast dynamics in the interaction of intense laser pulses with gases, atomic clusters, and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Yong

    2003-10-01

    We have investigated the time resolved dynamics of intense, ultrashort pulse laser interactions with gases, nanometer-size clusters, and plasma waveguides. To probe the ultrafast dynamics in these interactions, we developed a new femtosecond optical diagnostic, single-shot supercontinuum spectral interferometry (SSSI), which measures ultra-rapid transients induced by an intense laser pulse in the complex index of refraction. The measurement of the transient refractive index in intense laser-heated materials provides a direct view of how the laser-produced perturbation evolves in time and space. Our SSSI diagnostic is capable of ˜10 fs temporal resolution on a temporal window ˜1.5 ps long, along with ˜7 mum one-dimensional (1D) spatial resolution. SSSI was first applied to probe the ionization dynamics of helium gas under the irradiation of high intensity (˜1017 W/cm 2) laser pulses. It revealed a characteristic stepwise transition process He → He+ → He2+, in agreement with the optical field ionization model. This measurement was used as a test case to demonstrate that finite laser-target interaction lengths can strongly affect the interpretation of all measurements involving extraction of transient phases. The time-resolved explosion dynamics of intense (˜1015 W/cm2) laser-heated clusters was also studied with SSSI and additional ultrafast optical diagnostics. Here, the ultrafast processes are ionization and rapid cluster plasma explosion. The measurement strongly supports our laser-cluster interaction scenario in which laser-heated clusters explode layer-by-layer, and the laser is strongly coupled at critical density. For the cluster sizes and laser intensities of this experiment, the measured several hundred-femtosecond evolution timescale of laser-heated clusters can be understood in terms of plasma hydrodynamics. A major implication of our understanding of microscopic cluster dynamics was the prediction and observation of self-focusing in clustered

  1. Electromagnetically induced guiding of counterpropagating lasers in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, G.; Pukhov, A.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of counterpropagating laser pulses in a plasma is considered. When the frequencies of the two lasers are close, nonlinear modification of the refraction index results in the mutual focusing of the two beams. A short (of order of the plasma period) laser pulse can also be nonlinearly focused by a long counterpropagating beam which extends over the entire guiding length. This phenomenon of electromagnetically induced guiding can be utilized in laser-driven plasma accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Infrared Signatures of Laser Induced Plasma in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hening, Alexandru; Lu, Ryan; Ramirez, Ayax; Advanced Technology Team

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of the temporal and spatial evolution of laser generated plasma in air is necessary for the development of potential applications which range from laser induced ionized micro channels and filaments able to transfer high electric pulses over few hundreds of meters, to the generation of plasma artifacts in air, far away from the laser source. This work is focused mainly on the infrared spectrum. The influence of laser parameters (energy per pulse, pulse duration, repetition rate, wavelength and etc.) on the plasma formation and evolution has been investigated. Laser transmission losses through the air as well as through the breakdown plasma as well as their effect on infrared plasma signature are to be presented.

  3. Laser acceleration in vacuum, gases, and plasmas withcapillary waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1998-07-01

    I propose a new method for laser acceleration of relativistic electrons using the leaky modes of a hollow dielectric waveguide. The hollow core of the waveguide can be either in vacuum or filled with uniform gases or plasmas. In case of vacuum and gases, TM01 mode is used for direct acceleration. In case of plasmas, EH11 mode is used to drive longitudinal plasma wave for acceleration. Structure damage due to high power laser can be avoided by choosing a core radius sufficiently larger than laser wavelength. Effect of nonuniform plasma density on waveguide performance is also analyzed.

  4. Photon kinetic modeling of laser pulse propagation in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, A. J. W.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Bingham, R.; Cairns, R. A.; Mendonca, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-11-15

    This paper discusses photon kinetic theory, which is a description of the electromagnetic field in terms of classical particles in coordinate and wave number phase space. Photon kinetic theory is applied to the interaction of laser pulses with underdense plasma and the transfer of energy and momentum between the laser pulse and the plasma is described in photon kinetic terms. A comparison is made between a one-dimensional full wave and a photon kinetic code for the same laser and plasma parameters. This shows that the photon kinetic simulations accurately reproduce the pulse envelope evolution for photon frequencies down to the plasma frequency.

  5. Enhanced focusing of laser beams in semiconductor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D. N.; Suk, H.

    2007-02-01

    The beating of two copropagating laser beams (having frequency difference Δω ≈ωp, where ωp is the plasma frequency) can resonantly excite a large amplitude plasma wave in a narrow-gap semiconductor [V. I. Berezhiani and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Rev. B 55, 9247 (1997)]. The higher ponderomotive force on the electrons due to the plasma beat wave makes the medium highly nonlinear. As a result, the incident laser beams become self-focused due to the nonlinearity by the ponderomotive force. In this paper, we show the self-focusing and spot size evolution of the laser beams in semiconductor plasmas.

  6. Plasma Channel Diagnostic Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-09-09

    A technique has been developed for measuring the properties of discharge-based plasma channels by monitoring the centroid location of a laser beam exiting the channel as a function of input alignment offset between the laser and the channel. The centroid position of low-intensity (<10{sup 14}Wcm{sup -2}) laser pulses focused at the input of a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide was scanned and the exit positions recorded to determine the channel shape and depth with an accuracy of a few %. In addition, accurate alignment of the laser beam through the plasma channel can be provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel depth is scanned either by scanning the plasma density or the discharge timing. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique will be crucial for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  7. Plasma effects on harmonic spectra generated from moderately relativistic laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Ondarza-Rovira, R; Boyd, T J M

    2012-08-01

    When intense p-polarized laser light is incident on a plasma with an electron density many times the critical density, the flux of fast electrons created by Brunel absorption excites plasma oscillations. These oscillations may in turn affect the spectrum of high harmonics by modulating the spectrum at the plasma frequency, ω(p), and by coupling to the radiation field through the steep density gradient at the plasma-vacuum interface, so generating plasma line emission (PLE) at ω(p) and harmonics of ω(p). Both aspects depend sensitively on a range of plasma and laser pulse parameters, including the initial electron density, the density profile at the plasma-vacuum interface, and the intensity, pulse shape, and pulse length of the incident laser light. These various dependences have been characterised for moderately relativistic laser-plasma interactions by means of a series of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. PMID:23005869

  8. Laser interferometry force-feedback sensor for an interfacial force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Houston, Jack E.; Smith, William L.

    2004-04-13

    A scanning force microscope is provided with a force-feedback sensor to increase sensitivity and stability in determining interfacial forces between a probe and a sample. The sensor utilizes an interferometry technique that uses a collimated light beam directed onto a deflecting member, comprising a common plate suspended above capacitor electrodes situated on a substrate forming an interference cavity with a probe on the side of the common plate opposite the side suspended above capacitor electrodes. The probe interacts with the surface of the sample and the intensity of the reflected beam is measured and used to determine the change in displacement of the probe to the sample and to control the probe distance relative to the surface of the sample.

  9. Holographic interferometry with an injection seeded Nd:YAG laser and two reference beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of twin injection seeded Nd:YAG lasers is compared with the performance of an argon-ion laser for recording dual-reference-beam holograms in AGFA 8E56 emulsion. Optical heterodyning is used to measure interference, and the results are expressed in terms of heterodyning signal level and intensity signal-to-noise. The Nd:YAG laser system is to be used for optical inspections of structures for cracks, defects, gas leaks, and structural changes.

  10. Laser driven electron acceleration in vacuum, gases and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Krall, J.

    1996-04-19

    This paper discusses some of the important issues pertaining to laser acceleration in vacuum, neutral gases and plasmas. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage and electron aperture effects, are discussed. An inverse Cherenkov laser acceleration configuration is presented in which a laser beam is self guided in a partially ionized gas. Optical self guiding is the result of a balance between the nonlinear self focusing properties of neutral gases and the diffraction effects of ionization. The stability of self guided beams is analyzed and discussed. In addition, aspects of the laser wakefield accelerator are presented and laser driven accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  11. Plasma lasers (a strong source of coherent radiation in astrophysics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1981-01-01

    The generation of electromagnetic radiation from the free energy available in electron streams is discussed. The fundamental principles involved in a particular class of coherent plasma radiation sources, i.e., plasma lasers, are reviewed, focusing on three wave coupling, nonlinear parametric instabilities, and negative energy waves. The simplest case of plasma lasers, that of an unmagnetized plasma containing a finite level of density fluctuations and electrons streaming with respect to the ions, is dealt with. A much more complicated application of plasma lasers to the case of auroral kilometric radiation is then examined. The concept of free electron lasers, including the role of relativistic scattering, is elucidated. Important problems involving the escape of the excited radiation from its generation region, effects due to plasma shielding and nonlinear limits, are brought out.

  12. Pulse distortion and modulation instability in laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Singh, Ram Gopal; Upadhyay, Ajay K.

    2009-01-15

    The present paper deals with the propagation of a short, intense, Gaussian laser pulse in plasma. Using a one dimensional model, a wave equation including finite pulse length and group velocity dispersion is set up and solved to obtain the intensity distribution across the laser pulse. It is shown that the pulse profile becomes asymmetric as it propagates through plasma. Further, the growth rate of modulation instability and range of unstable frequencies across the laser pulse have been derived and graphically analyzed.

  13. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; Campbell, Edward Michael; Gomez, Matthew R.; Harding, Eric; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Kimmel, Mark W.; et al

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Wemore » determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.« less

  14. Nonlinear laser-plasma interaction in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Campbell, M. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P.; Lewis, S. M.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Scoglietti, D. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.; Vesey, R. A.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. While magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Key LPI processes are determined, and mitigation methods are discussed. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  15. Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses propagating in tenuous plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N. E.; Gorbunov, L. M.; Mora, P.; Ramazashvili, R. R.

    2007-08-15

    The filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses (shorter than a plasma period) propagating in tenuous plasmas is studied. In this regime relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities tend to cancel each other. Time-dependent residual nonlinear plasma response brings about the dynamical filamentation with the maximum unstable transverse wave number decreasing in the course of laser pulse propagation. Dynamics of a hot spot that seeds the filamentation instability is studied numerically and reveals a good agreement with the analytical results.

  16. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  17. Laser production and heating of plasma for MHD application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been made on the production and heating of plasmas by the absorption of laser radiation. These experiments were performed to ascertain the feasibility of using laser-produced or laser-heated plasmas as the input for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. Such a system would have a broad application as a laser-to-electricity energy converter for space power transmission. Experiments with a 100-J-pulsed CO2 laser were conducted to investigate the breakdown of argon gas by a high-intensity laser beam, the parameters (electron density and temperature) of the plasma produced, and the formation and propagation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. Experiments were also carried out using a 1-J-pulsed CO2 laser to heat the plasma produced in a shock tube. The shock-tube hydrogen plasma reached electron densities of approximately 10 to the 17th/cu cm and electron temperatures of approximately 1 eV. Absorption of the CO2 laser beam by the plasma was measured, and up to approximately 100 percent absorption was observed. Measurements with a small MHD generator showed that the energy extraction efficiency could be very large with values up to 56 percent being measured.

  18. Resolving microstructures in Z pinches with intensity interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J. P.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.

    2014-03-15

    Nearly 60 years ago, Hanbury Brown and Twiss [R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, Nature 178, 1046 (1956)] succeeded in measuring the 30 nrad angular diameter of Sirius using a new type of interferometry that exploited the interference of photons independently emitted from different regions of the stellar disk. Its basis was the measurement of intensity correlations as a function of detector spacing, with no beam splitting or preservation of phase information needed. Applied to Z pinches, X pinches, or laser-produced plasmas, this method could potentially provide spatial resolution under one micron. A quantitative analysis based on the work of Purcell [E. M. Purcell, Nature 178, 1449 (1956)] reveals that obtaining adequate statistics from x-ray interferometry of a Z-pinch microstructure would require using the highest-current generators available. However, using visible light interferometry would reduce the needed photon count and could enable its use on sub-MA machines.

  19. Modulation instability of laser pulse in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Kumar, Punit; Raj, Gaurav; Upadhyaya, Ajay K.

    2005-12-15

    Modulation instability of a laser pulse propagating through transversely magnetized underdense plasma is studied. It is observed that interaction of laser radiation with plasma in the presence of uniform magnetic field results in an additional perturbed transverse plasma current density along with the relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinear current densities, thus affecting the modulational interaction. In the plane wave limit it is observed that modulational interaction is more stable for magnetized plasma as compared to the unmagnetized case. The analysis shows that there is a significant reduction in the growth rate of modulation instability over a given range of unstable wave numbers due to magnetization of plasma.

  20. Investigation of long pulse laser induced flame on Al in air using optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongchao; Lu, Jian; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu

    2013-05-01

    The process of long pulse laser(1ms) interaction with the aluminum plate was analyzed using Mach-Zehnder interferometer in this paper. A continuous semiconductor laser with about 50mW power and 532nm wavelength was used to detect the flame which induced by long pulse laser interaction with the aluminum plate. A high speed camera was used to capture the interferograms. The exposure time of the high speed camera is about 2 microseconds. And the frame rate is 2130fps. The high-speed camera and the long pulse laser pulse was synchronously controlled by the four-channel digital delay (Stanford Research Systems DG535).The FFT(Fast Fourier transform ) analysis is applied to extract the phase of the interferograms. The results provide an understanding of the process of long pulse laser drilling of the Al target.

  1. Spectroscopic and interferometric measurements of laser-plasma produced blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, E. A.; Stamper, J. A.; Manka, C. K.; Griem, H. R.; Ali, A. W.; Ripin, B. H.

    1986-08-01

    A laser-produced plasma generates blast waves as it expands supersonically into a stationary photoionized background gas (N2) at a pressure of 1-5 Torr.1 Using a combination of spectroscopic and interferometric measurements, time- and space-resolved values of the temperature and density are obtained. This study was performed on targets in the NRL Pharos III laser facility with laser energies of 20-120 J and pulse durations of ˜5 ns. A 1-m spectrograph equipped with three photomultiplier channels, which are calibrated on an absolute scale, is used for the spectroscopic measurements. The interferometry is done with a folded-wavefront interferometer. It uses an optical probe pulse at 5270 Å that is split off of the main laser pulse, reduced in pulse duration (˜300 ps), and time delayed. Interferometric measurements can be made simultaneously with the spectroscopic measurements. Experimental data and the technique of analysis will be shown. This work was supported by the Defense Nuclear Agency.

  2. Dependence of terahertz power from laser-produced plasma on laser intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Jin, Z.; Hosokai, T.; Kodama, R.

    2012-07-11

    Power of terahertz radiation from plasma which is generated from air irradiated by coupled ({omega}, 2{omega}) femtosecond laser pulses is analyzed for high laser intensities, for which non-linear plasma effects on the pulse propagation become essential, with multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations including the self-consistent plasma kinetics. The growth rate of THz power becomes slower as the laser intensity increases. A reason of such a lowering of efficiency in THz emission is found to be ionization of air by the laser pulse, which results in poor focusing of laser pulses.

  3. Characteristics of laser produced plasmas and lasers for pulsed ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, K.; Suzuki, T.; Itoh, Y.; Kamiya, T.; Watanabe, M.; Kawakita, Y.; Shioda, K.; Kanazawa, H.

    1996-05-01

    Preliminary experiments were performed to investigate the fundamental characteristics of the laser produced plasmas and the KrF lasers for the pulsed ion beam production. (1) Lithium target was irradiated by a small e-beam pumped KrF laser and the exhausted plasmas were measured. (2) A larger KrF laser of the same kind was operated and the output characteristics were observed. (3) The mode patterns of a discharge-pumped KrF laser was also measured most recently to prepare the future target irradiation to produce ion-source plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Development of dual-wavelength fiber ring laser and its application to step-height measurement using self-mixing interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, S; Xie, F; Chen, L; Wang, Y Z; Dong, L L; Zhao, K Q

    2016-03-21

    A dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber (EDF) ring laser was developed and its application to step-height measurement using two-wavelength self-mixing interferometry (SMI) was demonstrated. The fiber laser can emit two different wavelengths without any laser mode competition. It is composed of two EDF laser cavities and employs fiber Bragg gratings to determine which wavelengths are emitted. The step heights can be measured using SMI of the two wavelengths, and the maximum height that can be measured is half the synthetic wavelength of the two wavelengths. A step height of 1mm was constructed using two gauge blocks and then measured using the laser. The measurement was repeated ten times, and the standard deviation of the measurements was 2.4nm. PMID:27136766

  5. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Robert W.; McLachlin, Katherine M.; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS–based bioimaging instruments for general users. PMID:27500232

  6. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1percent per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within +/-10 percent.

  7. Pseudorelativistic laser-semiconductor quantum plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunliang; Eliasson, Bengt

    2016-04-01

    A model is presented for the nonlinear interaction between a large-amplitude laser and semiconductor plasma in the semirelativistic quantum regime. The collective behavior of the electrons in the conduction band of a narrow-gap semiconductor is modeled by a Klein-Gordon equation, which is nonlinearly coupled with the electromagnetic (EM) wave through the Maxwell equations. The parametric instabilities involving the stimulated Raman scattering and modulational instabilities are analyzed theoretically and the resulting dispersion relation relation is solved numerically to assess the quantum effects on the instability. The study of the quasi-steady-state solution of the system and direct numerical simulations demonstrate the possibility of the formation of localized EM solitary structures trapped in electrons density holes.

  8. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within ±10%.

  9. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/ps/mm{sup 2}, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within {+-}10%.

  10. [Research on cells ablation characters by laser plasma].

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-hua; Zhang, Xin-gang; Cai, Xiao-tang; Duan, Tao; Feng, Guo-ying; Yang, Li-ming; Zhang, Ya-jun; Wang, Shao-peng; Li, Shi-wen

    2012-08-01

    The study on the mechanism of laser ablated cells is of importance to laser surgery and killing harmful cells. Three radiation modes were researched on the ablation characteristics of onion epidermal cells under: laser direct irradiation, focused irradiation and the laser plasma radiation. Based on the thermodynamic properties of the laser irradiation, the cell temperature rise and phase change have been analyzed. The experiments show that the cells damage under direct irradiation is not obvious at all, but the focused irradiation can cause cells to split and moisture removal. The removal shape is circular with larger area and rough fracture edges. The theoretical analysis found out that the laser plasma effects play a key role in the laser ablation. The thermal effects, radiation ionization and shock waves can increase the deposition of laser pulses energy and impact peeling of the cells, which will greatly increase the scope and efficiency of cell killing and is suitable for the cell destruction. PMID:23156745

  11. Laser diagnostics on atmospheric-pressure low-temperature helium pulsed plasmas in room- and cryogenic-temperature environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Noritaka; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Yasui, Ryoma; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    In atmospheric-pressure low- temperature plasmas, the control of the plasma gas temperature (Tg) by a few kelvin is considered to be crucial for their applications to novel materials processing such as bio-materials. However, there have been only few studies that focused on the influence of Tg on the plasma characteristics. On the other hand, it was reported that helium metastables played a key role in the dependency of chemical reactions on Tg in helium-nitrogen plasmas. In this study, laser diagnostics were carried out in atmospheric-pressure helium pulsed plasmas near or below room temperature, at 340 -100 K. Parallel electrodes of copper rods (diameter: 2 mm) with a gap distance of 535 μm were used and pulsed discharges with a pulse width of a few hundred nanoseconds were generated inside a reactor. The density and lifetime of helium metastables were estimated by laser absorption spectroscopy measurements and Tg was evaluated by near-infrared laser heterodyne interferometry measurements. At 300 K, the helium metastable density was 1.5 × 1013 cm-3 while the lifetime was 3.1 μs, and increase in Tg was up to 70 K. Dependency of the density and lifetime of helium metastables on Tg was observed and also discussed.

  12. A new asymmetric Abel-inversion method for plasma interferometry in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1989-02-01

    In order to get precise local electron density information from chordal interferometric measurement of a tokamak plasma, a self- consistent and reliable inversion method is necessary. In this paper, a new asymmetric Abel-inversion method is introduced. This method includes flexible boundary conditions, application to a non-circular geometry, and estimation of the plasma in the scrape-off layer. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by comparison with other methods. This new inversion method is applied to a parametric study which includes dependence on the Shafranov shift and elongation of the profile. The inverted results are integrated along different views and compared with other density measurements. This new method can also be applied to plasma spectroscopy. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Pathogen reduction in human plasma using an ultrashort pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Kingsley, David H; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bert; Sizemore, Sara; Vaiana, Sara M; Anderson, Jeanne; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen reduction is a viable approach to ensure the continued safety of the blood supply against emerging pathogens. However, the currently licensed pathogen reduction techniques are ineffective against non-enveloped viruses such as hepatitis A virus, and they introduce chemicals with concerns of side effects which prevent their widespread use. In this report, we demonstrate the inactivation of both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses in human plasma using a novel chemical-free method, a visible ultrashort pulsed laser. We found that laser treatment resulted in 2-log, 1-log, and 3-log reductions in human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis A virus, and murine cytomegalovirus in human plasma, respectively. Laser-treated plasma showed ≥70% retention for most coagulation factors tested. Furthermore, laser treatment did not alter the structure of a model coagulation factor, fibrinogen. Ultrashort pulsed lasers are a promising new method for chemical-free, broad-spectrum pathogen reduction in human plasma. PMID:25372037

  14. Pathogen Reduction in Human Plasma Using an Ultrashort Pulsed Laser

    PubMed Central

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Kingsley, David H.; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bert; Sizemore, Sara; Vaiana, Sara M.; Anderson, Jeanne; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen reduction is a viable approach to ensure the continued safety of the blood supply against emerging pathogens. However, the currently licensed pathogen reduction techniques are ineffective against non-enveloped viruses such as hepatitis A virus, and they introduce chemicals with concerns of side effects which prevent their widespread use. In this report, we demonstrate the inactivation of both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses in human plasma using a novel chemical-free method, a visible ultrashort pulsed laser. We found that laser treatment resulted in 2-log, 1-log, and 3-log reductions in human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis A virus, and murine cytomegalovirus in human plasma, respectively. Laser-treated plasma showed ≥70% retention for most coagulation factors tested. Furthermore, laser treatment did not alter the structure of a model coagulation factor, fibrinogen. Ultrashort pulsed lasers are a promising new method for chemical-free, broad-spectrum pathogen reduction in human plasma. PMID:25372037

  15. Characterization of a Laser-Assisted Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Masatoshi; Igari, Akira; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kimura, Itsuro

    2004-03-01

    An assessment of a novel laser-electric hybrid propulsion system was conducted, in which a laser-induced plasma was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a target and accelerated by electrical means instead of the direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. A fundamental study of newly developed rectangular laser-assisted pulsed-plasma thruster (PPT) was conducted. Inducing a short-duration conductive plasma between electrodes with certain voltages, short-duration switching or a discharge was achieved. At low-voltage conditions (~ 100 V), applied to electrodes or charged to a capacitor, it was confirmed that electric discharge can be achieved even under low voltage conditions. From the results, it was found that discharge duration at the low-voltage case was as long as that of laser-induced plasma. Therefore, the discharge in the low-voltage case must be controlled with an incident laser pulse, or a laser-induced plasma. While in high-voltage cases (~ 2000 V), the discharge duration was much longer than that of laser-induced plasma. In this case, the laser-induced plasma should be leading main discharge from a capacitor, where some amount of neutral components of vaporized propellant must be ionized through the discharge. Considering ratios of the laser energy to the discharge energies, the discharge process in the high-voltage mode cases must be defined as the laser-assisted electric discharge, or the laser-assisted electric propulsion mode, while in the low-voltage mode case with smaller electric energy, as the electrically-assisted laser-induced process, or the electric-assisted laser propulsion mode. Moreover, plasma behaviors emitted from each thruster in various cases were observed with the ICCD camera. It was shown that the plasma behaviors were almost identical between low and high voltage cases in initial several hundred nanoseconds, however, plasma emission with longer duration was observed in higher voltage cases. Canted current sheet

  16. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  17. Laser plasma influence on the space-time structure of powerful laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyin, O. B.; Bogdanov, G. S.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Gerasimov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, A. P.; Melekhov, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of laser plasma on the structure of the radiation field of a powerful Nd-glass laser with pulse energy up to 30 J and with the diameter of the output beam 45 mm. Laser plasma is generated by focusing the laser radiation on a low-density target such as nylon mesh and teflon or mylar films. Temporal profile of the laser pulse with a total duration of 25 ns consists of a several short pulse train. Duration of each pulse is about 2 ns. Notable smoothing of spatially non-uniform radiation structure was observed in the middle of the laser pulse.

  18. Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-04-22

    We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

  19. Electron acceleration in long scale laser - plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamperidis, Christos; Mangles, Stuart P. D.; Nagel, Sabrina R.; Bellei, Claudio; Krushelnick, Karl; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Bourgeois, Nicola; Marques, Jean Raphael; Kaluza, Malte C.

    2006-10-01

    Broad energy electron bunches are produced through the Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Acceleration scheme at the 30J, 300 fsec laser, LULI, France, with long scale underdense plasmas, created in a He filled gas cell and in He gas jet nozzles of various lengths. With c.τlaser>>λplasma, electrons reached Emax ˜ 200MeV. By carefully controlling the dynamics of the interaction and by simultaneous observations of the electron energy spectra and the forward emitted optical spectrum, we found that a plasma density threshold (˜5.10^18 cm-3) exists for quasi-monoenergetic (˜30MeV) features to appear. The overall plasma channel size was inferred from the collected Thomson scattered light. 2D PIC simulations indicate that the main long laser pulse breaks up into small pulselets that eventually get compressed and tightly focused inside the first few plasma periods, leading to a bubble like acceleration of electron bunches.

  20. An experimental study of laser supported hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, D. M.; Mccay, T. D.; Eskridge, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The rudiments of a rocket thruster which receives its enthalpy from an energy source which is remotely beamed from a laser is described. An experimental study now partially complete is discussed which will eventually provide a detailed understanding of the physics for assessing the feasibility of using hydrogen plasmas for accepting and converting this energy to enthalpy. A plasma ignition scheme which uses a pulsed CO2 laser has been developed and the properties of the ignition spark documented, including breakdown intensities in hydrogen. A complete diagnostic system capable of determining plasma temperature and the plasma absorptivity for subsequent steady state absorption of a high power CO2 laser beam are developed and demonstrative use is discussed for the preliminary case study, a two atmosphere laser supported argon plasma.

  1. Laser interferometry method for absolute measurement of the acceleration of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, O. K.

    1971-01-01

    Gravimeter permits more accurate and precise absolute measurement of g without reference to Potsdam values as absolute standards. Device is basically Michelson laser beam interferometer in which one arm is mass fitted with corner cube reflector.

  2. Fully referenced single-comb interferometry using optical sampling by laser-cavity tuning.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Simon; Boudreau, Sylvain; Deschênes, Jean-Daniel; Genest, Jérôme

    2013-01-10

    The correction of setup and laser instabilities in a single-comb interferometric measurement using optical sampling by laser-cavity tuning is investigated. A two-reference solution that allows full correction of the interferogram is presented. The technique is compared to a slightly simpler one-reference correction. For the one-reference case, all the subtleties involved in this partial correction and the dependence between the achievable measurement accuracy and the setup parameters are highlighted. The parameters considered are the comb bandwidth, the laser-frequency noise, the required spectral resolution, the cavity scan speed, and the length of the delay line. For both referencing approaches, experimental results using a fiber delay line of 10 km and a 100 MHz mode-locked laser with its repetition rate swept at 500 Hz are shown. PMID:23314642

  3. Frequency Noise Suppression of a Single Mode Laser with an Unbalanced Fiber Interferometer for Subnanometer Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Šmíd, Radek; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Číp, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    We present a method of noise suppression of laser diodes by an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer. The unstabilized laser source is represented by compact planar waveguide external cavity laser module, ORIONTM (Redfern Integrated Optics, Inc.), working at 1540.57 nm with a 1.5-kHz linewidth. We built up the unbalanced Michelson interferometer with a 2.09 km-long arm based on the standard telecommunication single-mode fiber (SMF-28) spool to suppress the frequency noise by the servo-loop control by 20 dB to 40 dB within the Fourier frequency range, remaining the tuning range of the laser frequency. PMID:25587980

  4. Frequency noise suppression of a single mode laser with an unbalanced fiber interferometer for subnanometer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Šmíd, Radek; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Číp, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    We present a method of noise suppression of laser diodes by an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer. The unstabilized laser source is represented by compact planar waveguide external cavity laser module, ORIONTM (Redfern Integrated Optics, Inc.), working at 1540.57 nm with a 1.5-kHz linewidth. We built up the unbalanced Michelson interferometer with a 2.09 km-long arm based on the standard telecommunication single-mode fiber (SMF-28) spool to suppress the frequency noise by the servo-loop control by 20 dB to 40 dB within the Fourier frequency range, remaining the tuning range of the laser frequency. PMID:25587980

  5. Measurement of ultrafast dynamics in the interaction of intense laser pulses with gases, clusters, and plasma waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. Y.

    2004-11-01

    We have investigated the femtosecond time resolved dynamics of intense, ultrashort laser interactions with various targets-gases, nanometer-size clusters, and plasma waveguides. To probe the ultrafast dynamics in these interactions, we developed a new ultrafast optical diagnostic, single-shot supercontinuum spectral interferometry (SSSI) [1], which measures ultra-rapid transients induced by an intense laser pulse in the complex index of refraction of the evolving medium. This measurement provides a direct view on how the laser-produced perturbations evolve in time and space. To date, we have measured, using the SSSI diagnostic, (i) the laser-induced double step ionization of helium [2], (ii) time-resolved explosion dynamics of intense-laser-heated clusters [3], and (iii) the coupling and guiding of intense laser pulses injected into a plasma waveguide. [1] K. Y. Kim, I. Alexeev, and H. M. Milchberg, Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 4124 (2002). [2] K. Y. Kim, I. Alexeev, and H. M. Milchberg, Opt. Express 10, 1563 (2002). [3] K. Y. Kim et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 023401 (2003); I. Alexeev et al., ibid. 90, 103402 (2003).

  6. Two-wavelength laser-diode heterodyne interferometry with one phasemeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Ribun; Ishii, Yukihiro

    1995-12-01

    A two-wavelength laser-diode interferometer that is based on heterodyne detection with one phasemeter has been constructed. Two laser diodes are frequency modulated by mutually inverted sawtooth currents on an unbalanced interferometer. One can measure the tested phase at a synthetic wavelength from the sum of the interference beat signals by synchronizing them with the modulation frequency. The experimental result presented shows a phase-measurement range with a 4.7- mu m synthetic wavelength.

  7. A theoretical investigation of laser-sustained plasma thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Keefer, Dennis

    1987-01-01

    A numerical code has been successfully developed for the investigation of thruster performance using a laser-sustained hydrogen plasma as the propellant. The plasma was sustained using a 10.6-micron CO2 laser beam focused at different positions within the thruster. The physical model assumed that plasma is in thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE), and geometric ray tracing was adopted to describe the laser beam. The steady-state, axisymmetric, Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the laser power absorption process have been solved numerically. A pressure based Navier-Stokes numerical solver using body-fitted coordinates was used to calculate the laser-supported rocket flow which includes both subsonic and supersonic flow regions. From the limited parametric study, which did not try to optimize the rocket performance, it was found that better performance was obtained when the laser beam was focused closer to the rocket throat.

  8. Development of a high accurate gear measuring machine based on laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hu; Xue, Zi; Yang, Guoliang; Huang, Yao; Wang, Heyan

    2015-02-01

    Gear measuring machine is a specialized device for gear profile, helix or pitch measurement. The classic method for gear measurement and the conventional gear measuring machine are introduced. In this gear measuring machine, the Abbe errors arisen from the angle error of guideways hold a great weight in affection of profile measurement error. For minimize of the Abbe error, a laser measuring system is applied to develop a high accurate gear measuring machine. In this laser measuring system, two cube-corner reflectors are placed close to the tip of probe, a laser beam from laser head is splited along two paths, one is arranged tangent to the base circle of gear for the measurement of profile and pitch, another is arranged parallel to the gear axis for the measurement of helix, both laser measurement performed with a resolution of 0.3nm. This approach not only improves the accuracy of length measurement but minimize the Abbe offset directly. The configuration of this improved measuring machine is illustrated in detail. The measurements are performed automatically, and all the measurement signals from guide rails, rotary table, probe and laser measuring system are obtained synchronously. Software collects all the data for further calculation and evaluation. The first measurements for a gear involute artifact and a helix artifact are carried out, the results are shown and analyzed as well.

  9. Intense transient magnetic-field generation by laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1981-08-18

    In a laser system, the return current of a laser generated plasma is conducted near a target to subject that target to the magnetic field thereof. In alternate embodiments the target may be either a small non-fusion object for testing under the magnetic field or a laser-fusion pellet. In the laser-fusion embodiment, the laser-fusion pellet is irradiated during the return current flow and the intense transient magnetic field is used to control the hot electrons thereof to hinder them from striking and heating the core of the irradiated laser-fusion pellet.

  10. Relativistic soliton formation in laser magnetized plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, W.; Li, J. Q.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The laser plasma interactions in the presence of strong magnetic field are studied by employing particle-in-cell simulations. Simulations show that the energy absorption of strong laser pulse is mainly characterized by the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) when the magnetic field is large enough. However, it is found that for a weaker magnetic field, a standing or moving soliton can be generated in some moderate laser intensity regions, greatly enhancing the laser absorption. The laser intensity for the soliton heating decreases as the magnetic field increases. Furthermore, the soliton position moves towards the front boundary when the laser intensity or magnetic field strength increases.

  11. Readout for intersatellite laser interferometry: Measuring low frequency phase fluctuations of high-frequency signals with microradian precision.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver; Diekmann, Christian; Kullmann, Joachim; Tröbs, Michael; Bykov, Ioury; Barke, Simon; Brause, Nils Christopher; Esteban Delgado, Juan José; Schwarze, Thomas S; Reiche, Jens; Danzmann, Karsten; Rasmussen, Torben; Hansen, Torben Vendt; Enggaard, Anders; Pedersen, Søren Møller; Jennrich, Oliver; Suess, Martin; Sodnik, Zoran; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Precision phase readout of optical beat note signals is one of the core techniques required for intersatellite laser interferometry. Future space based gravitational wave detectors like eLISA require such a readout over a wide range of MHz frequencies, due to orbit induced Doppler shifts, with a precision in the order of μrad/√Hz at frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. In this paper, we present phase readout systems, so-called phasemeters, that are able to achieve such precisions and we discuss various means that have been employed to reduce noise in the analogue circuit domain and during digitisation. We also discuss the influence of some non-linear noise sources in the analogue domain of such phasemeters. And finally, we present the performance that was achieved during testing of the elegant breadboard model of the LISA phasemeter, which was developed in the scope of a European Space Agency technology development activity. PMID:26233398

  12. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun

    2015-04-15

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10{sup −6}(K{sup −1}) at the range of 298 K–598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K–748 K.

  13. Positioning the actual interference fringe pattern on the tooth flank in measuring gear tooth flanks by laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Suping; Wang, Leijie; Liu, Shiqiao; Komori, Masaharu; Kubo, Aizoh

    2011-05-01

    In measuring form deviation of gear tooth flanks by laser interferometry, the collected interference fringe pattern (IFP) is badly distorted, in the case of shape, relative to the actual tooth flank. Meanwhile, a clear and definite mapping relationship between the collected IFP and the actual tooth flank is indispensable for both transforming phase differences into deviation values and positioning the measurement result on the actual tooth flank. In order to solve these problems, this paper proposes a method using the simulation tooth image as a bridge connecting the actual tooth flank and the collected IFP. The mapping relationship between the simulation tooth image and the actual tooth flank has been obtained by ray tracing methods [Fang et al., Appl. Opt. 49(33), 6409-6415 (2010)]. This paper mainly discusses how to build the relationship between the simulation tooth image and the collected IFP by using a matching algorithm of two characteristic point sets. With the combination of the two above-mentioned assistant mapping relationships, the mapping relationship between the collected IFP and the actual tooth flank can be built; the collected IFP can be positioned on the actual tooth flank. Finally, the proposed method is employed in a measurement of the form deviation of a gear tooth flank and the result proves the feasibility of the proposed method.

  14. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun; Zhang, Shulian

    2015-04-01

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10-6(K-1) at the range of 298 K-598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K-748 K.

  15. Study of non-contact measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of materials based on laser feedback interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fasong; Tan, Yidong; Lin, Jing; Ding, Yingchun; Zhang, Shulian

    2015-04-01

    The noncooperative and ultrahigh sensitive length measurement approach is of great significance to the study of a high-precision thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) determination of materials at a wide temperature range. The novel approach is presented in this paper based on the Nd:YAG microchip laser feedback interferometry with 1064 nm wavelength, the beam frequency of which is shifted by a pair of acousto-optic modulators and then the heterodyne phase measurement technique is used. The sample is placed in a muffle furnace with two coaxial holes opened on the opposite furnace walls. The measurement beams are perpendicular and coaxial on each surface of the sample, the configuration which can not only achieve the length measurement of sample but also eliminate the influence of the distortion of the sample supporter. The reference beams inject on the reference mirrors which are put as possible as near the holes, respectively, to eliminate the air disturbances and the influence of thermal lens effect out of the furnace chamber. For validation, the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and steel 45 samples are measured from room temperature to 748 K, which proved measurement repeatability of TECs is better than 0.6 × 10(-6)(K(-1)) at the range of 298 K-598 K and the high-sensitive non-contact measurement of the low reflectivity surface induced by the oxidization of the samples at the range of 598 K-748 K. PMID:25933843

  16. A CLOSE COMPANION SEARCH AROUND L DWARFS USING APERTURE MASKING INTERFEROMETRY AND PALOMAR LASER GUIDE STAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernat, David; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Cromer, John L.; Dekany, Richard G.; Moore, Anna M.; Ireland, Michael; Tuthill, Peter; Martinache, Frantz; Angione, John; Burruss, Rick S.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Henning, John R.; Hickey, Jeff; Kibblewhite, Edward; McKenna, Daniel L.; Petrie, Harold L.; Roberts, Jennifer; Shelton, J. Chris; Thicksten, Robert P.; Trinh, Thang

    2010-06-01

    We present a close companion search around 16 known early L dwarfs using aperture masking interferometry with Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS AO). The use of aperture masking allows the detection of close binaries, corresponding to projected physical separations of 0.6-10.0 AU for the targets of our survey. This survey achieved median contrast limits of {Delta}K {approx} 2.3 for separations between 1.2 {lambda}/D-4{lambda}/D and {Delta}K {approx} 1.4 at 2/3 {lambda}/D. We present four candidate binaries detected with moderate-to-high confidence (90%-98%). Two have projected physical separations less than 1.5 AU. This may indicate that tight-separation binaries contribute more significantly to the binary fraction than currently assumed, consistent with spectroscopic and photometric overluminosity studies. Ten targets of this survey have previously been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of companion searches. We use the increased resolution of aperture masking to search for close or dim companions that would be obscured by full aperture imaging, finding two candidate binaries. This survey is the first application of aperture masking with LGS AO at Palomar. Several new techniques for the analysis of aperture masking data in the low signal-to-noise regime are explored.

  17. Nanosecond Carbon-Dioxide Laser Interaction with a Dense Helium Z-Pinch Plasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, David Frederick

    A short pulse CO(,2) laser system was constructed to investigate the interaction of intense electromagnetic radiation with dense plasma. The laser was focused perpendicular to the axis of a linear helium Z-pinch plasma and properties of the transmitted beam were monitored. Transmitted beam intensity and spatial distribution were measured as functions of incident intensity and interaction time. The short pulse laser system consisted of a single -mode oscillator, pulse switch, amplifiers, and focusing optics. The oscillator was a transversely-excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) discharge module having an intracavity CW gain tube for single-mode operation. The pulse selector was a germanium semiconductor reflection switch controlled by a pulse-transmission model (PTM) ruby laser. Switched 10.6 micron pulses were preamplified in a triple-pass double -discharge TEA module and boosted to maximum power in a commercial large aperture amplifier. The laser beam from the final amplifier was focused onto the plasma by a modified Newtonian telescope. The system was capable of producing 4 nanosecond (full width at half maximum) pulses containing up to 2.7 joules. The focused intensity on target is greater than 10('12) W/cm('2) in a 125 micron diameter focal spot. The plasma was a pulsed linear Z-pinch having a peak density of 4 x 10('19)/cm('3) in a 3 mm column at a temperature of 20 eV. The plasma density is known from holographic interferometry, and the temperature was inferred from visible wavelength spectroscopy and x-ray diagnostics. Depending on the time of laser incidence, the highly collisional plasma provided either an overdense or an underdense target. Previous work with 40 nanosecond pulses revealed penetration of the critical region of the plasma. The transmitted pulse was strongly modified, and the transmitted spatial distribution was characteristic of diffraction through a hard, circular aperture. No penetration was observed with the 4 nanosecond pulses incident on

  18. Metallic targets ablation by laser plasma production in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilis, I. I.

    2016-03-01

    A model of metallic target ablation and metallic plasma production by laser irradiation is reported. The model considers laser energy absorption by the plasma, electron emission from hot targets and ion flux to the target from the plasma as well as an electric sheath produced at the target-plasma interface. The proposed approach takes into account that the plasma, partially shields the laser radiation from the target, and also converts absorbed laser energy to kinetic and potential energies of the charged plasma particles, which they transport not only through the ambient vacuum but also through the electrostatic sheath to the solid surface. Therefore additional plasma heating by the accelerated emitted electrons and target heating caused by bombardment of it by the accelerated ions are considered. A system of equations, including equations for solid heat conduction, plasma generation, and plasma expansion, is solved self-consistently. The results of calculations explain the measured dependencies of ablation yield (μ g/pulse) for Al, Ni, and Ti targets on laser fluence in range of (5-21)J/cm2 published previously by Torrisi et al.

  19. Axial laser heating of three meter theta pinch plasma columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Lowenthal, D. D.

    1980-10-01

    A 3-m long plasma column formed and confined by a fast rising solenoidal field was irradiated from one end by a powerful pulsed CO2 laser. It was found that beam trapping density minima could be maintained for the length of the laser pulse if the plasma diameter exceeded about 1.5 cm. The erosion of the density minimum was governed by classical diffusion processes. Three meter long plasmas in 2.6 cm bore plasma tubes could be fairly uniformly heated by 3.0 kJ of CO2 laser irradiation. Best results were obtained when heating began before or during the theta pinch implosion phase and the plasma fill pressure exceeded 1.0 torr H2. Plasma line energies of about 1 kJ/m could be obtained in a magnetic field rising to 6 T in 4.7 microseconds.

  20. QED effects and radiation generation in relativistic laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Nerush, E. N.; Bashmakov, V. F.

    2011-06-01

    The radiative and quantum effects in laser plasmas are discussed. The self-consistent numerical model based on particle-in-cell and Monte-Carlo methods are developed. First we analyze the spectra of Compton backscattered photons and betatron radiation in the classical and quantum regimes. Then we address an interaction between intense laser pulse and relativistic electron beam. Finally we discuss the electron-positron pair plasma production in extremely-intense laser field. It is shown that such plasma can be an efficient source of energetic gammaquanta.

  1. Capillary waveguide for laser acceleration in vacuum, gases and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1998-06-01

    The authors propose a new method for laser acceleration of relativistic electrons using the leaky modes of a hollow dielectric waveguide. The hollow core of the waveguide can be either in vacuum or filled with uniform gases or plasmas. In of vacuum and gases, TM{sub 01} mode is used for direct acceleration. In case of plasmas, EH{sub 11} mode is used to drive longitudinal plasma wave for acceleration. Structure damage by high power laser is avoided by choosing a core radius much larger than laser wavelength.

  2. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic study of ammonium nitrate plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hanif, M.; Salik, M.; Baig, M. A.

    2013-12-15

    We present the optical emission studies of the ammonium nitrate plasma produced by the fundamental (1064 nm) and second (532 nm) harmonics of a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The target material was placed in front of the laser beam in an open atmospheric air. The spectrum reveals numerous transitions of neutral nitrogen. We have studied the spatial behavior of the plasma temperature (T{sub e}) and electron number density (N{sub e}) determined using the Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadened line profiles, respectively. Besides, we have studied the variation of the plasma parameters as a function of the laser irradiance.

  3. Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame. Both the laser and the wakefield buckets must be resolved over the entire domain of the plasma, requiring many cells and many time steps. While researchers often use a simulation window that moves with the pulse, this reduces only the multitude of cells, not the multitude of time steps. For an artistic impression of how to solve the simulation by using the boosted-frame method, watch the video "Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the wakefield frame."

  4. Propagation of intense laser pulses in strongly magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. H. Ge, Z. Y.; Xu, B. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Shao, F. Q.; Yu, W.; Xu, H.; Yu, M. Y.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Propagation of intense circularly polarized laser pulses in strongly magnetized inhomogeneous plasmas is investigated. It is shown that a left-hand circularly polarized laser pulse propagating up the density gradient of the plasma along the magnetic field is reflected at the left-cutoff density. However, a right-hand circularly polarized laser can penetrate up the density gradient deep into the plasma without cutoff or resonance and turbulently heat the electrons trapped in its wake. Results from particle-in-cell simulations are in good agreement with that from the theory.

  5. Strongly-coupled plasmas formed from laser-heated solids

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M.; Bergeson, S. D.; Hart, G.; Murillo, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ion temperatures in laser-produced plasmas formed from solids with different initial lattice structures. We show that the equilibrium ion temperature is limited by a mismatch between the initial crystallographic configuration and the close-packed configuration of a strongly-coupled plasma, similar to experiments in ultracold neutral plasmas. We propose experiments to demonstrate and exploit this crystallographic heating in order to produce a strongly coupled plasma with a coupling parameter of several hundred. PMID:26503293

  6. Strongly-coupled plasmas formed from laser-heated solids.

    PubMed

    Lyon, M; Bergeson, S D; Hart, G; Murillo, M S

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ion temperatures in laser-produced plasmas formed from solids with different initial lattice structures. We show that the equilibrium ion temperature is limited by a mismatch between the initial crystallographic configuration and the close-packed configuration of a strongly-coupled plasma, similar to experiments in ultracold neutral plasmas. We propose experiments to demonstrate and exploit this crystallographic heating in order to produce a strongly coupled plasma with a coupling parameter of several hundred. PMID:26503293

  7. Evolution of laser-induced plasma in solvent aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hening, Alexandru; Wroblewski, Ronald; George, Robert; McGirr, Scott

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes a novel technique for the detection of contaminants in air using the process of laser-induced filamentation. This work is focused primarily on the visible and infrared spectrum. Characterization of the temporal and spatial evolution of laser-generated plasma in solvent aerosols is necessary for the development of potential applications. Atmospheric aerosols impact capabilities of applications such as range from laser-induced ionized micro channels and filaments able to transfer high electric pulses over a few hundreds of meters, to the generation of plasma artifacts in air, far away from the laser source.

  8. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, K.B.

    1998-11-02

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and pulse lengths and a

  9. Pushing the limits of plasma length in inertial-fusion laser-plasma interaction experiments.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Michel, P; Berger, R L; Meezan, N B; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Wallace, R; Glenzer, S H

    2008-01-11

    We demonstrate laser beam propagation and low backscatter in laser produced hohlraum plasmas of ignition plasma length. At intensities I < 5 x 10(14) W cm(-2) greater than 80% of the energy in a blue (3 omega, 351 nm) laser is transmitted through a L=5-mm long, high-temperature (Te = 2.5 keV), high-density (ne = 5 x 10(20) cm(-3)) plasma. These experiments show that the backscatter scales exponentially with plasma length which is consistent with linear theory. The backscatter calculated by a new steady state 3D laser-plasma interaction code developed for large ignition plasmas is in good agreement with the measurements. PMID:18232778

  10. Pushing the limits of plasma length in inertial fusion laser-plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D; Divol, L; London, R; Michel, P; Berger, R L; Meezan, N; Neumayer, P; Ross, J; Wallace, R; Glenzer, S H

    2007-08-02

    We demonstrate laser beam propagation and low backscatter in laser produced hohlraum plasmas of ignition plasma length. At intensities I < 5 x 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2} greater than 80% of the energy in a blue (3{omega}, 351 nm) laser is transmitted through a L=5-mm long, high-temperature (T{sub e} = 2.5 keV), high-density (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) plasma. These experiments show that the backscatter scales exponentially with plasma length which is consistent with linear theory. The backscatter calculated by a new steady state 3D laser-plasma interaction code developed for large ignition plasmas is in good agreement with the measurements.

  11. Guiding of intense laser pulse in uniform plasmas and preformed plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jingwei; Lei, A. L.; Wang Xin; Yu Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Senecha, V. K.; Wang, X. G.; Murakami, M.; Mima, K.

    2010-10-15

    Guiding of laser pulse in uniform plasmas and preformed plasma channels is investigated. The self-guiding mechanisms for these two cases are quite different. It is found that an intense laser pulse can be steadily self-guided in underdense plasmas with nearly a constant spot size if the self-consistently generated electron cavity has a sufficiently steep density gradient at the edge. In a preformed plasma channel, however, laser guiding is maintained mainly by the balance between the light diffraction and focusing. The latter is induced by the wall plasmas which greatly reduce the local dielectric constant. It is shown that the self-guiding of a laser pulse in uniform plasmas requires tens of terawatts power, but those that are in preformed channels can be realized with only a terawatt power.

  12. A comparison of planar, laser-induced fluorescence, and high-sensitivity interferometry techniques for gas-puff nozzle density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S. L.; Weber, B. V.; Mosher, D.; Phipps, D. G.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Qi, N.; Failor, B. H.; Coleman, P. L.

    2008-10-15

    The distribution of argon gas injected by a 12-cm-diameter triple-shell nozzle was characterized using both planar, laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and high-sensitivity interferometry. PLIF is used to measure the density distribution at a given time by detecting fluorescence from an acetone tracer added to the gas. Interferometry involves making time-dependent, line-integrated gas density measurements at a series of chordal locations that are then Abel inverted to obtain the gas density distribution. Measurements were made on nominally identical nozzles later used for gas-puff Z-pinch experiments on the Saturn pulsed-power generator. Significant differences in the mass distributions obtained by the two techniques are presented and discussed, along with the strengths and weaknesses of each method.

  13. Inline monitoring of laser processing: new industrial results with the low coherence interferometry sensor approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogel-Hollacher, Markus; Schoenleber, Martin; Bautze, Thibault; Moser, Rüdiger; Strebel, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of inline coherent imaging technologies as a sensor for the laser materials processing is accompanied by the integration into several applications. One of these is the measurement of the depth of the vapor capillary for laser welding applications, now allowing to keep record of the welding depth with an accuracy of micrometers and a sub millisecond temporal resolution. The broader achievement is the closed-loop control of the welding depth that was not available in industrial environments till now due to the lack of an adequate sensor. Further use includes the acquisition of 3D images around the laser process itself, allowing for coaxial integration of pre- and post-process sensors. These applications are demonstrated by using the In-Process Depth Meter (IDM).

  14. High-order harmonics from laser-irradiated plasma surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Teubner, U.; Gibbon, P.

    2009-04-15

    The investigation of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) of femtosecond laser pulses by means of laser-produced plasmas is surveyed. This kind of harmonic generation is an alternative to the HHG in gases and shows significantly higher conversion efficiency. Furthermore, with plasma targets there is no limitation on applicable laser intensity and thus the generated harmonics can be much more intense. In principle, harmonic light may also be generated at relativistic laser intensity, in which case their harmonic intensities may even exceed that of the focused laser pulse by many orders of magnitude. This phenomenon presents new opportunities for applications such as nonlinear optics in the extreme ultraviolet region, photoelectron spectroscopy, and opacity measurements of high-density matter with high temporal and spatial resolution. On the other hand, HHG is strongly influenced by the laser-plasma interaction itself. In particular, recent results show a strong correlation with high-energy electrons generated during the interaction process. The harmonics are a promising tool for obtaining information not only on plasma parameters such as the local electron density, but also on the presence of large electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, and the (electron) transport inside the target. This paper reviews the theoretical and experimental progress on HHG via laser-plasma interactions and discusses the prospects for applying HHG as a short-wavelength, coherent optical tool.

  15. Absorption of a laser light pulse in a dense plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlman-Balloffet, G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of the absorption of a laser light pulse in a transient, high-density, high-temperature plasma is presented. The plasma is generated around a metallic anode tip by a fast capacitive discharge occurring in vacuum. The amount of transmitted light is measured for plasmas made of different metallic ions in the regions of the discharge of high electronic density. Variation of the transmission during the laser pulse is also recorded. Plasma electrons are considered responsible for the very high absorption observed.

  16. Improving the Capabilities of a Continuum Laser Plasma Interaction Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hittinger, J F; Dorr, M R

    2006-06-15

    The numerical simulation of plasmas is a critical tool for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). We have been working to improve the predictive capability of a continuum laser plasma interaction code pF3d, which couples a continuum hydrodynamic model of an unmagnetized plasma to paraxial wave equations modeling the laser light. Advanced numerical techniques such as local mesh refinement, multigrid, and multifluid Godunov methods have been adapted and applied to nonlinear heat conduction and to multifluid plasma models. We describe these algorithms and briefly demonstrate their capabilities.

  17. Protocol for determining Apparent Young's Modulus of human teeth using laser speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Palmer, Rosario; González-Peña, Rolando J.; Martínez-Celorio, René A.; López, Francisco J.; Paredes, Vanessa; Cibrián, Rosa

    2012-10-01

    Digital Speckle Shearing Pattern Interferometry (DSSPI) allows to directly quantify deformations in teeth that are subjected to stress. Eighteen second premolars (2PM) were studied both before and after endodontic treatment made with the ProTaper method in order to evaluate the variation of dental elasticity. We present a protocol for determination tooth Apparent Young's Modulus (AYM). Each tooth underwent different flexion loads from 50 to 300 g. DSSPI technique, makes it possible to show the deformation at each point of a line, selected by the researcher, that goes from the attachment point (Point 0) to the root area where the load is applied (Point 300-350, depending on the tooth size). The deformation of each tooth was characterized by the deformation value of point 150, located around the mid-area of tooth. This value was obtained from a linear regression applied on the deformation values of all the points in the fitted line. The correlation coefficients of these fitted regression lines were always higher than 0.972. The elasticity constant of each tooth was obtained as the slope of a new regression line, corresponding to the different loads applied on the tooth versus the corresponding deformation at point 150. This value, divided by the length of the tooth, is the apparent Young's modulus (AYM), which is expressed in arbitrary units (a.u.). Values of the AYM before (4.16 104 a.u) and after endodontic treatment using the ProTaper method (4.30 104 a.u.) showed no statistically significant difference in the elasticity of teeth (p>0.7).

  18. Laser red shifting based characterization of wakefield excitation in a laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, S.; Benedetti, C.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Shaw, B. H.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tóth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-15

    Optical spectra of a drive laser exiting a channel guided laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) are analyzed through experiments and simulations to infer the magnitude of the excited wakefields. The experiments are performed at sufficiently low intensity levels and plasma densities to avoid electron beam generation via self-trapping. Spectral redshifting of the laser light is studied as an indicator of the efficiency of laser energy transfer into the plasma through the generation of coherent plasma wakefields. Influences of input laser energy, plasma density, temporal and spatial laser profiles, and laser focal location in a plasma channel are analyzed. Energy transfer is found to be sensitive to details of laser pulse shape and focal location. The experimental conditions for these critical parameters are modeled and included in particle-in-cell simulations. Simulations reproduce the redshift of the laser within uncertainties of the experiments and produce an estimate of the wake amplitudes in the experiments as a function of amount of redshift. The results support the practical use of laser redshifting to quantify the longitudinally averaged accelerating field that a particle would experience in an LPA powered below the self-trapping limit.

  19. Multistage coupling of independent laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; van Tilborg, J; Benedetti, C; Geddes, C G R; Schroeder, C B; Daniels, J; Swanson, K K; Gonsalves, A J; Nakamura, K; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2016-02-11

    Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) are capable of accelerating charged particles to very high energies in very compact structures. In theory, therefore, they offer advantages over conventional, large-scale particle accelerators. However, the energy gain in a single-stage LPA can be limited by laser diffraction, dephasing, electron-beam loading and laser-energy depletion. The problem of laser diffraction can be addressed by using laser-pulse guiding and preformed plasma waveguides to maintain the required laser intensity over distances of many Rayleigh lengths; dephasing can be mitigated by longitudinal tailoring of the plasma density; and beam loading can be controlled by proper shaping of the electron beam. To increase the beam energy further, it is necessary to tackle the problem of the depletion of laser energy, by sequencing the accelerator into stages, each powered by a separate laser pulse. Here, we present results from an experiment that demonstrates such staging. Two LPA stages were coupled over a short distance (as is needed to preserve the average acceleration gradient) by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from a first LPA were focused to a twenty-micrometre radius--by a discharge capillary-based active plasma lens--into a second LPA, such that the beams interacted with the wakefield excited by a separate laser. Staged acceleration by the wakefield of the second stage is detected via an energy gain of 100 megaelectronvolts for a subset of the electron beam. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second-stage laser pulse allowed us to reconstruct the temporal wakefield structure and to determine the plasma density. Our results indicate that the fundamental limitation to energy gain presented by laser depletion can be overcome by using staged acceleration, suggesting a way of reaching the electron energies required for collider applications. PMID:26829223

  20. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: X-ray spectral diagnostics of plasmas heated by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryunetkin, B. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Khakhalin, S. Ya; Kalashnikov, M. P.; Nickles, P. V.; Schnürer, M.

    1993-06-01

    The properties of a magnesium plasma heated by picosecond laser pulses have been determined by x-ray spectral methods. Experiments were carried out at a laser power density ~ 1.5 · 1018 W/cm2. The x-ray spectra were detected by spectrographs with a plane CsAP crystal and a mica crystal bent into part of a spherical surface 10 cm in radius. The experimental data are compared with predictions of a calculation on the time-varying kinetics of multiply charged magnesium ions.

  1. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Coulomb explosion of a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachev, Aleksei N.; Yakovlenko, Sergei I.

    1993-11-01

    The behavior of a plasma produced by multistep selective ionization of a vapor and subjected to an intense pulsed electric field has been studied. Electrons are quickly "sucked" out of such a plasma, and then there is a Coulomb explosion of the net charge.

  2. Magnetically Controlled Plasma Waveguide For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Davis, P; Palastro, J; Michel, P; Leurent, V; Glenzer, S H; Pollock, B; Tynan, G

    2008-05-14

    An external magnetic field applied to a laser plasma is shown produce a plasma channel at densities relevant to creating GeV monoenergetic electrons through laser wakefield acceleration. Furthermore, the magnetic field also provides a pressure to help shape the channel to match the guiding conditions of an incident laser beam. Measured density channels suitable for guiding relativistic short-pulse laser beams are presented with a minimum density of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} which corresponds to a linear dephasing length of several centimeters suitable for multi-GeV electron acceleration. The experimental setup at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where a 1-ns, 150 J 1054 nm laser will produce a magnetically controlled channel to guide a < 75 fs, 10 J short-pulse laser beam through 5-cm of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} plasma is presented. Calculations presented show that electrons can be accelerated to 3 GeV with this system. Three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations are used to design the laser and plasma parameters and quasi-static kinetic simulations indicate that the channel will guide a 200 TW laser beam over 5-cm.

  3. Synergistic laser-wakefield and direct-laser acceleration in the plasma-bubble regime.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir N; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-05-01

    The concept of a hybrid laser plasma accelerator is proposed. Relativistic electrons undergoing resonant betatron oscillations inside the plasma bubble created by a laser pulse are accelerated by gaining energy directly from the laser pulse and from its plasma wake. The resulting phase space of self-injected plasma electrons is split into two, containing a subpopulation that experiences wakefield acceleration beyond the standard dephasing limit because of the multidimensional nature of its motion that reduces the phase slippage between the electrons and the wake. PMID:26001005

  4. Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-15

    Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

  5. Double plasma mirror for ultrahigh temporal contrast ultraintense laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Anna; Ceccotti, Tiberio; D'Oliveira, Pascal; Réau, Fabrice; Perdrix, Michel; Quéré, Fabien; Monot, Pascal; Bougeard, Michel; Lagadec, Hervé; Martin, Philippe; Geindre, Jean-Paul; Audebert, Patrick

    2007-02-01

    We present and characterize a very efficient optical device that employs the plasma mirror technique to increase the contrast of high-power laser systems. Contrast improvements higher than 10(4) with 50% transmission are shown to be routinely achieved on a typical 10 TW laser system when the pulse is reflected on two consecutive plasma mirrors. Used at the end of the laser system, this double plasma mirror preserves the spatial profile of the initial beam, is unaffected by shot-to-shot fluctuations, and is suitable for most high peak power laser systems. We use the generation of high-order harmonics as an effective test for the contrast improvement produced by the double plasma mirrors. PMID:17215955

  6. Origin of 'energetic' ions from laser-produced plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.; Linlor, W. I.

    1973-01-01

    A fast-ion current peak, measured with an ion collector placed in the path of an expanding laser-produced plasma, was identified as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen contaminants which originated from a tungsten target surface.

  7. Multifunctional laser facility with photoelectric recording for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatnitsky, L.N.; Yakushev, G.G.; Oberman, F.M. )

    1989-01-01

    A laser facility with photoelectric recording is described. It can be used in performing plasma diagnostics by four different measuring techniques. The application of photoelectric recording considerably simplifies the automation of measurements.

  8. Controlling electron injection in laser plasma accelerators using multiple pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Plateau, G. R.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.; Bruhwiler, D.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Chen, M.; Yu, L.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    Use of counter-propagating pulses to control electron injection in laser-plasma accelerators promises to be an important ingredient in the development of stable devices. We discuss the colliding pulse scheme and associated diagnostics.

  9. Heterodyne laser frequency stabilization for long baseline optical interferometry in space-based gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichholz, Johannes; Tanner, David B.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-07-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected the gravitational universe as the science theme for L3, a large space mission with a planned launch in 2034. NASA expressed a strong interest in joining ESA as a junior partner. The goal of the mission is the detection of gravitational waves of frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 0.1 Hz, where many long-lived sources are expected to be steady emitters of gravitational waves. Most likely, the mission design will evolve out of the earlier Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) concept. The interferometric heterodyne phase readout in LISA is performed by phase meters developed specifically to handle the low light powers and Doppler-drift of laser frequencies that appear as complications in the mission baseline. LISA requires the frequency noise of its seed lasers to be below 300 Hz /√{Hz } throughout the measurement band due to uncertainties in the absolute interferometer arm lengths. We have developed and successfully demonstrated Heterodyne Stabilization (HS), a novel cavity-laser frequency stabilization method that integrates well into the LISA mission baseline due to similar component demand. The cavities for the test setup were assembled with Clearceram-Z spacers, an ultralow thermal expansion coefficient material with potential applicability in interferometric space missions. Using HS, we were able to suppress the frequency noise of two lasers in a bench-top experiment to a level that meets the LISA requirement, suggesting both HS and Clearceram-Z can be considered in future mission concepts.

  10. Relativistically strong CO{sub 2} laser driver for plasma-channeled particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Long-wavelength, short-duration laser pulses are desirable for plasma wakefield particle acceleration and plasma waveguiding. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser is under development to test laser-driven electron acceleration schemes.

  11. Influence of Reverse Expansion of Laser Plasma on Ions Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysoev, Alexander A.; Gracheva, O. I.; Karpov, A. V.

    Effect of laser plasma reverse extension is described in this paper. Influence of the effect on ion acceleration in a laser ion source is researched. This effect leads to sedimentation of ions on metal target, which significantly impacts acceleration time of other ions. In this case, the ions also tend to travel major part of their path with constant velocity. This allows one to consider movement of the ions in plasma drift space, when optimizing time focusing ability of the TOF analyzer.

  12. Measurement of acceleration in femtosecond laser-plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haessner, R.; Theobald, W.; Niedermeier, S.; Michelmann, K.; Feurer, T.; Schillinger, H.; Sauerbrey, R.

    1998-02-20

    Accelerations up to 4x10{sup 19} m/s{sup 2} are measured in femtosecond laser-produced plasmas at intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} using the Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) technique. A high density plasma is formed by focusing an ultrashort unchirped laser pulse on a plane carbon target and part of the reflected pulse is eventually detected by a FROG autocorrelator. Radiation pressure and thermal pressure accelerate the plasma which causes a chirp in the reflected laser pulse. The retrieved phase and amplitude information reveal that the plasma motion is dominated by the large light pressure which pushes the plasma into the target. This is supported by theoretical estimates and by the results of independently measured time integrated spectra of the reflected pulse.

  13. Plasma spectrum peak extraction algorithm of laser film damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dan; Su, Jun-hong; Xu, Jun-qi

    2012-10-01

    The plasma spectrometry is an emerging method to distinguish the thin-film laser damage. Laser irradiation film surface occurrence of flash, using the spectrometer receives the flash spectrum, extracting the spectral peak, and by means of the spectra of the thin-film materials and the atmosphere has determine the difference, as a standard to determine the film damage. Plasma spectrometry can eliminate the miscarriage of justice which caused by atmospheric flashes, and distinguish high accuracy. Plasma spectra extraction algorithm is the key technology of Plasma spectrometry. Firstly, data de noising and smoothing filter is introduced in this paper, and then during the peak is detecting, the data packet is proposed, and this method can increase the stability and accuracy of the spectral peak recognition. Such algorithm makes simultaneous measurement of Plasma spectrometry to detect thin film laser damage, and greatly improves work efficiency.

  14. Results from colliding magnetized plasma jet experiments executed at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Rasmus, A. M.; Kurnaz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Davis, J. S.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Adams, C. S.; Pollock, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of high-velocity plasma flows in a background magnetic field has applications in pulsed-power and fusion schemes, as well as astrophysical environments, such as accretion systems and stellar mass ejections into the magnetosphere. Experiments recently executed at the Trident Laser Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory investigated the effects of an expanding aluminum plasma flow into a uniform 4.5-Tesla magnetic field created using a solenoid designed and manufactured at the University of Michigan. Opposing-target experiments demonstrate interesting collisional behavior between the two magnetized flows. Preliminary interferometry and Faraday rotation measurements will be presented and discussed. This work is funded by the U.S Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship grant number PF3-140111 awarded by the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Astrophysical Observatory for NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  15. Density profile of a line plasma generated by laser ablation for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Hwangbo, Y.; Ryu, W.-J.; Kim, K. N.; Park, S. H.

    2016-03-01

    An elongated line plasma generated by a laser ablation of an aluminum target was investigated, which can be used in the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) by employing ultra-intense laser pulse through the longitudinal direction of the plasma. To generate a uniform and long plasma channel along the propagation of ultra-intense laser pulse (main pulse), a cylindrical lens combined with a biprism was used to shape the intensity of a ns Nd:YAG laser (pre-pulse) on the Al target. A uniformity of laser intensity can be manipulated by changing the distance between the biprism and the target. The density profile of the plasma generated by laser ablation was measured using two interferometers, indicating that a 3-mm long uniform line plasma with a density of 6 × 1017 cm-3 could be generated. The density with main pulse was also measured and the results indicated that the density would increase further due to additional ionization of the plasma by the main ultra-intense laser pulse. The resulting plasma density, which is a crucial parameter for the LWFA, can be controlled by the intensity of the pre-pulse, the time delay between the pre- and main pulse, and the distance of the main pulse from the target surface.

  16. Laser ablated zirconium plasma: A source of neutral zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Dheerendra; Thareja, Raj K.

    2010-10-15

    The authors report spectroscopic investigations of laser produced zirconium (Zr) plasma at moderate laser fluence. At low laser fluence the neutral zirconium species are observed to dominate over the higher species of zirconium. Laser induced fluorescence technique is used to study the velocity distribution of ground state neutral zirconium species. Two-dimensional time-resolved density distributions of ground state zirconium is mapped using planner laser induced fluorescence imaging and total ablated mass of neutral zirconium atoms is estimated. Temporal and spatial evolutions of electron density and temperature are discussed by measuring Stark broadened profile and ratio of intensity of emission lines, respectively.

  17. Analysis and testing of a new method for drop size measurement using laser scatter interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research was conducted on a laser light scatter detection method for measuring the size and velocity of spherical particles. The method is based upon the measurement of the interference fringe pattern produced by spheres passing through the intersection of two laser beams. A theoretical analysis of the method was carried out using the geometrical optics theory. Experimental verification of the theory was obtained by using monodisperse droplet streams. Several optical configurations were tested to identify all of the parametric effects upon the size measurements. Both off-axis forward and backscatter light detection were utilized. Simulated spray environments and fuel spray nozzles were used in the evaluation of the method. The measurements of the monodisperse drops showed complete agreement with the theoretical predictions. The method was demonstrated to be independent of the beam intensity and extinction resulting from the surrounding drops. Signal processing concepts were considered and a method was selected for development.

  18. Stabilization of a laser on a large-detuned atomic-reference frequency by resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Priscila M. T.; Nascimento, Guilherme G.; Araújo, Michelle O.; da Silva, Cícero M.; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    We report a simple technique for stabilization of a laser frequency at the wings of an atomic resonance. The reference signal used for stabilization issues from interference effects obtained in a low-quality cavity filled with a resonant atomic vapour. For a frequency detuned 2.6 GHz from the 133Cs D2 6S{}1/2 F = 4 to 6P{}3/2 F’ = 5 transition, the fractional frequency Allan deviation is 10-8 for averaging times of 300 s, corresponding to a frequency deviation of 4 MHz. Adequate choice of the atomic density and of the cell thickness allows locking the laser at detunings larger than 10 GHz. Such a simple technique does not require magnetic fields or signal modulation.

  19. Laser plasma interaction physics in the context of fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Fuchs, J.; Depierreux, S.; Baldis, H. A.; Pesme, D.; Myatt, J.; Hüller, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Laval, G.

    2000-08-01

    Of vital importance for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are the understanding and control of the nonlinear processes which can occur during the propagation of the laser pulses through the underdense plasma surrounding the fusion capsule. The control of parametric instabilities has been studied experimentally, using the LULI six-beam laser facility, and also theoretically and numerically. New results based on the direct observation of plasma waves with Thomson scattering of a short wavelength probe beam have revealed the occurence of the Langmuir decay instability. This secondary instability may play an imporant role in the saturation of stimulated Raman scattering. Another mechanism for reducing the growth of the scattering instabilities is the so-called `plasma-induced incoherence'. Namely, recent theoretical studies have shown that the propagation of laser beams through the underdense plasma can increase their spatial and temporal incoherence. This plasma-induced beam smoothing can reduce the levels of parametric instabilities. One signature of this process is a large increase of the spectral width of the laser light after propagation through the plasma. Comparison of the experimental results with numerical simulations shows an excellent agreement between the observed and calculated time-resolved spectra of the transmitted laser light at various laser intensities.

  20. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrle, A.; Schnick, M.; Rose, S.; Demuth, C.; Beyer, E.; Füssel, U.

    2011-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  1. Precise charge measurement for laser plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, Dave; Donahue, Rick; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-10-01

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics was conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. Using an integrating current transformer as a calibration reference, the sensitivity of the Lanex Fast was found to decrease by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. By using electron beams from LPA, cross calibrations of the charge were carried out with an integrating current transformer, scintillating screen (Lanex from Kodak), and activation based measurement. The diagnostics agreed within ~8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided necessary cares. Work supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  2. Frequency measurement of refraction index of air for high-resolution laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Petru, Frantisek; Matousek, Vit; Lazar, Josef

    2004-08-01

    In the work, we present a method for direct measurement of the refraction index of air. We designed two coupled glass cells (one evacuated and the other filled by atmospheric air) inserted to plan-parallel Fabry-Perot resonator (F. P. resonator). Two tunable single-frequency lasers pass laser beams through the evacuated and aired cell simultaneously. Two F.-P. resonators are built up by this way: one of them in evacuated cell and the other in the open air cell. If both lasers are tuned along the resonant modes of F.-P. resonators, an optical frequency difference between two adjacent modes can be identified for each resonator. The evacuated one will have another mode-to-mode difference than the aired resonator. With knowledge of these values we can determine the index of refraction very fast. We verified the method with using Michelson interferometer based technique where a glass cell placed to the measurement arm of the interferometer is evacuated by an oil pump. In this case Michelson interferometer monitors changes of the optical path caused by the process of evacuation. Experimental results achieved by the method will be presented.

  3. Vacuum laser acceleration of relativistic electrons using plasma mirror injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thévenet, M.; Leblanc, A.; Kahaly, S.; Vincenti, H.; Vernier, A.; Quéré, F.; Faure, J.

    2016-04-01

    Accelerating particles to relativistic energies over very short distances using lasers has been a long-standing goal in physics. Among the various schemes proposed for electrons, vacuum laser acceleration has attracted considerable interest and has been extensively studied theoretically because of its appealing simplicity: electrons interact with an intense laser field in vacuum and can be continuously accelerated, provided they remain at a given phase of the field until they escape the laser beam. But demonstrating this effect experimentally has proved extremely challenging, as it imposes stringent requirements on the conditions of injection of electrons in the laser field. Here, we solve this long-standing experimental problem by using a plasma mirror to inject electrons in an ultraintense laser field, and obtain clear evidence of vacuum laser acceleration. With the advent of petawatt lasers, this scheme could provide a competitive source of very high charge (nC) and ultrashort relativistic electron beams.

  4. Invited Article: Expanded and improved traceability of vibration measurements by laser interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Hans-Jürgen von

    2013-12-15

    Traceability to the International System of Units has been established for vibration and shock measurements as specified in international document standards, recommendations, and regulations to ensure product quality, health, and safety. New and upgraded laser methods and techniques developed by national metrology institutes and by leading manufacturers in the past two decades have been swiftly specified as standard methods in the ISO 16063 series of international document standards. In ISO 16063-11:1999, three interferometric methods are specified for the primary calibration of vibration transducers (reference standard accelerometers) in a frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 kHz. In order to specify the same (modified) methods for the calibration of laser vibrometers (ISO 16063-41:2011), their applicability in an expanded frequency range was investigated. Steady-state sinusoidal vibrations were generated by piezoelectric actuators at specific frequencies up to 347 kHz (acceleration amplitudes up to 376 km/s{sup 2}). The displacement amplitude, adjusted by the special interferometric method of coincidence to 158.2 nm (quarter the wavelength of the He-Ne laser light), was measured by the standardized interferometric methods of fringe counting and sine-approximation. The deviations between the measurement results of the three interferometric methods applied simultaneously were smaller than 1 %. The limits of measurement uncertainty specified in ISO 16063-11 between 1 Hz to 10 kHz were kept up to frequencies, which are orders of magnitude greater; the uncertainty limit 0.5 % specified at the reference frequency 160 Hz was not exceeded at 160 kHz. The reported results were considered during the development of ISO 16063-41 by specifying the instrumentation and procedures for performing calibrations of rectilinear laser vibrometers in the frequency range typically between 0.4 Hz and 50 kHz—the interferometric methods may be applied within expanded frequency ranges using

  5. ON THE COMPLEMENTARITY OF PULSAR TIMING AND SPACE LASER INTERFEROMETRY FOR THE INDIVIDUAL DETECTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2013-02-20

    Gravitational waves coming from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are targeted by both the Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) and Space Laser Interferometry (SLI). The possibility of a single SMBHB being tracked first by PTA, through inspiral, and later by SLI, up to merger and ring-down, has been previously suggested. Although the bounding parameters are drawn by the current PTA or the upcoming Square Kilometer Array (SKA), and by the New Gravitational Observatory (NGO), derived from the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), this paper also addresses sequential detection beyond specific project constraints. We consider PTA-SKA, which is sensitive from 10{sup -9} to p Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Hz (p = 4, 8), and SLI, which operates from s Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} up to 1 Hz (s = 1, 3). An SMBHB in the range of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M {sub Sun} (the masses are normalized to a (1 + z) factor, the redshift lying between z = 0.2 and z = 1.5) moves from the PTA-SKA to the SLI band over a period ranging from two months to fifty years. By combining three supermassive black hole (SMBH)-host relations with three accretion prescriptions, nine astrophysical scenarios are formed. They are then related to three levels of pulsar timing residuals (50, 5, 1 ns), generating 27 cases. For residuals of 1 ns, sequential detection probability will never be better than 4.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} yr{sup -2} or 3.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} yr{sup -2} (per year to merger and per year of survey), according to the best and worst astrophysical scenarios, respectively; put differently this means one sequential detection every 46 or 550 years for an equivalent maximum time to merger and duration of the survey. The chances of sequential detection are further reduced by increasing values of the s parameter (they vanish for s = 10) and of the SLI noise, and by decreasing values of the remnant spin. The spread in the predictions

  6. On the Complementarity of Pulsar Timing and Space Laser Interferometry for the Individual Detection of Supermassive Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2013-02-01

    Gravitational waves coming from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are targeted by both the Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) and Space Laser Interferometry (SLI). The possibility of a single SMBHB being tracked first by PTA, through inspiral, and later by SLI, up to merger and ring-down, has been previously suggested. Although the bounding parameters are drawn by the current PTA or the upcoming Square Kilometer Array (SKA), and by the New Gravitational Observatory (NGO), derived from the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), this paper also addresses sequential detection beyond specific project constraints. We consider PTA-SKA, which is sensitive from 10-9 to p × 10-7 Hz (p = 4, 8), and SLI, which operates from s × 10-5 up to 1 Hz (s = 1, 3). An SMBHB in the range of 2 × 108-2 × 109 M ⊙ (the masses are normalized to a (1 + z) factor, the redshift lying between z = 0.2 and z = 1.5) moves from the PTA-SKA to the SLI band over a period ranging from two months to fifty years. By combining three supermassive black hole (SMBH)-host relations with three accretion prescriptions, nine astrophysical scenarios are formed. They are then related to three levels of pulsar timing residuals (50, 5, 1 ns), generating 27 cases. For residuals of 1 ns, sequential detection probability will never be better than 4.7 × 10-4 yr-2 or 3.3 × 10-6 yr-2 (per year to merger and per year of survey), according to the best and worst astrophysical scenarios, respectively; put differently this means one sequential detection every 46 or 550 years for an equivalent maximum time to merger and duration of the survey. The chances of sequential detection are further reduced by increasing values of the s parameter (they vanish for s = 10) and of the SLI noise, and by decreasing values of the remnant spin. The spread in the predictions diminishes when timing precision is improved or the SLI low-frequency cutoff is lowered. So while transit times and the SLI signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) may be

  7. Electron acceleration by a laser pulse in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstrie, C.J.; Startsev, E.A.

    1996-08-01

    The acceleration of an electron by a circularly polarized laser pulse in a plasma is studied. It appears possible to increase significantly the energy of a preaccelerated electron. Although the pulse tends to generate a plasma wake, to which it loses energy, one can eliminate the wake by choosing the duration of the pulse judiciously. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Enhanced line emission from laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmer, C.; Srivastava, S. K.; Hall, T. E.; Fucaloro, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    This communication reports the first systematic study on background gas-induced spectral-line-emission enhancement from laser-produced plasmas. Line emission from aluminum plasmas was enhanced by factors of up to 35 by the introduction of He, Ne, Xe, or N2. The enhancement has been attributed to three-body recombination.

  9. Traveling-wave laser-produced-plasma energy source for photoionization laser pumping and lasers incorporating said

    DOEpatents

    Sher, Mark H.; Macklin, John J.; Harris, Stephen E.

    1989-09-26

    A traveling-wave, laser-produced-plasma, energy source used to obtain single-pass gain saturation of a photoionization pumped laser. A cylindrical lens is used to focus a pump laser beam to a long line on a target. Grooves are cut in the target to present a surface near normal to the incident beam and to reduce the area, and hence increase the intensity and efficiency, of plasma formation.

  10. Laser propagation and soliton generation in strongly magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, W.; Li, J. Q.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The propagation characteristics of various laser modes with different polarization, as well as the soliton generation in strongly magnetized plasmas are studied numerically through one-dimensional (1D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and analytically by solving the laser wave equation. PIC simulations show that the laser heating efficiency substantially depends on the magnetic field strength, the propagation modes of the laser pulse and their intensities. Generally, large amplitude laser can efficiently heat the plasma with strong magnetic field. Theoretical analyses on the linear propagation of the laser pulse in both under-dense and over-dense magnetized plasmas are well confirmed by the numerical observations. Most interestingly, it is found that a standing or moving soliton with frequency lower than the laser frequency is generated in certain magnetic field strength and laser intensity range, which can greatly enhance the laser heating efficiency. The range of magnetic field strength for the right-hand circularly polarized (RCP) soliton formation with high and low frequencies is identified by solving the soliton equations including the contribution of ion's motion and the finite temperature effects under the quasi-neutral approximation. In the limit of immobile ions, the RCP soliton tends to be peaked and stronger as the magnetic field increases, while the enhanced soliton becomes broader as the temperature increases. These findings in 1D model are well validated by 2D simulations.

  11. Neural Network Compensation for Frequency Cross-Talk in Laser Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wooram; Heo, Gunhaeng; You, Kwanho

    The heterodyne laser interferometer acts as an ultra-precise measurement apparatus in semiconductor manufacture. However the periodical nonlinearity property caused from frequency cross-talk is an obstacle to improve the high measurement accuracy in nanometer scale. In order to minimize the nonlinearity error of the heterodyne interferometer, we propose a frequency cross-talk compensation algorithm using an artificial intelligence method. The feedforward neural network trained by back-propagation compensates the nonlinearity error and regulates to minimize the difference with the reference signal. With some experimental results, the improved accuracy is proved through comparison with the position value from a capacitive displacement sensor.

  12. Skin friction measurements by laser interferometry in swept shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kwang-Soo; Settles, Gary S.

    1988-01-01

    The laser interferometric skin friction meter was used to measure wall shear stress distributions in two interactions of fin-generated swept shock waves with turbulent boundary layers. The basic research configuration was an unswept sharp-leading-edge fin of variable angle mounted on a flatplate. The results indicate that such measurements are practical in high-speed interacting flows, and that a repeatability of + or - 6 percent or better is possible. Marked increases in wall shear were observed in both swept interactions tested.

  13. Constraining the history of inflation from microwave background polarimetry and laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caligiuri, Jerod; Kosowsky, Arthur; Kinney, William H.; Seto, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    A period of inflation in the early Universe produces a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of gravitational waves over a huge range in wavelength. If the amplitude of this gravitational wave background is large enough to be detectable with microwave background polarization measurements, it will also be detectable directly with a space-based laser interferometer. Using a Monte Carlo sampling of inflation models, we demonstrate that the combination of these two measurements will strongly constrain the expansion history during inflation and the physical mechanism driving it.

  14. The TARANIS laser : A multi-terawatt system for laser plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, C. L. S.; Nersisyan, G.; Borghesi, M.; Doria, D.; Dromey, B.; Dzelzainis, T.; Makita, M.; McKeever, K.; Riley, D.; White, S.; Marlow, D.; Williams, G.; Zepf, M.

    2012-11-01

    The Terawatt Apparatus for Relativistic And Non-linear Interdisciplinary Science (TARANIS), installed in the Centre for Plasma Physics at the Queen's University Belfast, supports a wide ranging science program, including laser-driven particle acceleration, X-ray lasers and high energy density physics experiments. We present (1) an overview of the laser facility, (2) results of preliminary investigations on proton acceleration, laser action at 13.9 nm and Kα sources and (3) speculation on future experiments using these extreme sources.

  15. Measurements of laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas using x-ray laser refractometry (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, R.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, K.A.; Kato, Y.; Murai, K.; Weber, F.; Barbee, T.W.; DaSilva, L.B.

    1999-01-01

    We developed a 19.6 nm laser x-ray laser grid-image refractometer (XRL-GIR) to diagnose laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas. The XRL-GIR was optimized to measure two-dimensional electron density perturbation on a scale of a few tens of {mu}m in underdense plasmas. Electron density profiles of laser-produced plasmas were obtained for 10{sup 20}{endash}10{sup 22}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} with the XRL-GIR and for 10{sup 19}{endash}10{sup 20}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} from an ultraviolet interferometer, the profiles of which were compared with those from hydrodynamic simulation. By using this XRL-GIR, we directly observed laser channeling into overdense plasmas accompanied by a bow shock wave showing a Mach cone ascribed to supersonic propagation of the channel front. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Measurements of laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas using x-ray laser refractometry (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, R.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Kato, Y.; Murai, K.; Weber, F.; Barbee, T. W.; DaSilva, L. B.

    1999-01-01

    We developed a 19.6 nm laser x-ray laser grid-image refractometer (XRL-GIR) to diagnose laser-hole boring into overdense plasmas. The XRL-GIR was optimized to measure two-dimensional electron density perturbation on a scale of a few tens of μm in underdense plasmas. Electron density profiles of laser-produced plasmas were obtained for 1020-1022cm-3 with the XRL-GIR and for 1019-1020cm-3 from an ultraviolet interferometer, the profiles of which were compared with those from hydrodynamic simulation. By using this XRL-GIR, we directly observed laser channeling into overdense plasmas accompanied by a bow shock wave showing a Mach cone ascribed to supersonic propagation of the channel front.

  17. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  18. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  19. Controlling plasma channels through ultrashort laser pulse filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, Andrey A.; Seleznev, Leonid V.; Sunchugasheva, Elena S.

    2013-10-01

    A review of studies fulfilled at the Lebedev Institute in collaboration with the Moscow State University and Institute of Atmospheric Optics in Tomsk (Siberia) on influence of various characteristics of ultrashort laser pulse on plasma channels formed under its filamentation is presented. Filamentation of high-power laser pulses with wavefront controlled by a deformable mirror, with cross-sections spatially formed by various diaphragms and with different wavelengths was experimentally and numerically studied. An application of plasma channels formed due to filamentation of ultrashort laser pulse including a train of such pulses for triggering and guiding electric discharge is discussed.

  20. Interaction physics of multipicosecond Petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A J; Divol, L

    2012-11-01

    We study the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma over several picoseconds, using two- and three-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. Sustained irradiation with non-diffraction-limited pulses at relativistic intensities yields conditions that differ qualitatively from what is experimentally available today. Nonlinear saturation of laser-driven density perturbations at the target surface causes recurrent emissions of plasma, which stabilize the surface and keep absorption continuously high. This dynamics leads to the acceleration of three distinct groups of electrons up to energies many times the laser ponderomotive potential. We discuss their energy distribution for applications like the fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion. PMID:23215393

  1. Relativistic intensity laser interactions with low-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingale, L.; Nilson, P. M.; Zulick, C.; Chen, H.; Craxton, R. S.; Cobble, J.; Maksimchuk, A.; Norreys, P. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Scott, R. H. H.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-03-01

    We perform relativistic-intensity laser experiments using the Omega EP laser to investigate channeling phenomena and particle acceleration in underdense plasmas. A fundamental understanding of these processes is of importance to the hole-boring fast ignition scheme for inertial confinement fusion. Proton probing was used to image the electromagnetic fields formed as the Omega EP laser pulse generated a channel through underdense plasma. Filamentation of the channel was observed, followed by self-correction into a single channel. The channel radius as a function of time was found to be in reasonable agreement with momentum- conserving snowplough models.

  2. Laser-Induced Underwater Plasma And Its Spectroscopic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lazic, Violeta

    2008-09-23

    Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for analysis of immersed solid and soft materials, and for liquid impurities are described. A method for improving the LIBS signal underwater and for obtaining quantitative analyses in presence of strong shot-to-shot variations of the plasma properties is proposed. Dynamic of the gas bubble formed by the laser pulse is also discussed, together with its importance in Double-Pulse (DP) laser excitation. Results of the studies relative to an application of multi-pulse sequence and its effects on the plasma and gas bubble formation are also presented.

  3. An MPP hydrocode to study laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S H; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Williams E A

    1998-10-01

    Because of the increased size and power inherent in a laser-AGEX on NIF, laser-plasma interactions (LPI) observed in NOVA AGEX play an increasingly important role. The process by which filamentation and stimulated backscatter grow is complex. Furthermore, there is a competition among the instabilities so that lessening one can increase another. Therefore, simulating them is an integral part to successful experiments on NIF. In this paper, we present a massively parallel hydrocode to simulate laser-plasma interactions in NIF-relevant AGEX regimes.

  4. The high accuracy data processing system of laser interferometry signals based on MSP430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yong-yue; Lin, Yu-chi; Zhao, Mei-rong

    2009-07-01

    Generally speaking there are two orthogonal signals used in single-frequency laser interferometer for differentiating direction and electronic subdivision. However there usually exist three errors with the interferential signals: zero offsets error, unequal amplitude error and quadrature phase shift error. These three errors have a serious impact on subdivision precision. Based on Heydemann error compensation algorithm, it is proposed to achieve compensation of the three errors. Due to complicated operation of the Heydemann mode, a improved arithmetic is advanced to decrease the calculating time effectively in accordance with the special characteristic that only one item of data will be changed in each fitting algorithm operation. Then a real-time and dynamic compensatory circuit is designed. Taking microchip MSP430 as the core of hardware system, two input signals with the three errors are turned into digital quantity by the AD7862. After data processing in line with improved arithmetic, two ideal signals without errors are output by the AD7225. At the same time two original signals are turned into relevant square wave and imported to the differentiating direction circuit. The impulse exported from the distinguishing direction circuit is counted by the timer of the microchip. According to the number of the pulse and the soft subdivision the final result is showed by LED. The arithmetic and the circuit are adopted to test the capability of a laser interferometer with 8 times optical path difference and the measuring accuracy of 12-14nm is achieved.

  5. Plasma Undulator Based on Laser Excitation of Wakefields in a Plasma Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykovanov, S. G.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-04-01

    An undulator is proposed based on the plasma wakefields excited by a laser pulse in a plasma channel. Generation of the undulator fields is achieved by inducing centroid oscillations of the laser pulse in the channel. The period of such an undulator is proportional to the Rayleigh length of the laser pulse and can be submillimeter, while preserving high undulator strength. The electron trajectories in the undulator are examined, expressions for the undulator strength are presented, and the spontaneous radiation is calculated. Multimode and multicolor laser pulses are considered for greater tunability of the undulator period and strength.

  6. Plasma undulator based on laser excitation of wakefields in a plasma channel.

    PubMed

    Rykovanov, S G; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Geddes, C G R; Leemans, W P

    2015-04-10

    An undulator is proposed based on the plasma wakefields excited by a laser pulse in a plasma channel. Generation of the undulator fields is achieved by inducing centroid oscillations of the laser pulse in the channel. The period of such an undulator is proportional to the Rayleigh length of the laser pulse and can be submillimeter, while preserving high undulator strength. The electron trajectories in the undulator are examined, expressions for the undulator strength are presented, and the spontaneous radiation is calculated. Multimode and multicolor laser pulses are considered for greater tunability of the undulator period and strength. PMID:25910131

  7. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10-6%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon-acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  8. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  9. Collisional coupling in counterstreaming laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, D. W.; Goforth, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The collisional processes which transfer momentum between counterstreaming plasmas are reviewed and applied to the example of a laser-produced plasma expanding into a partially ionized background. Experimental measurements of the dependence of the ion flow field on collisional momentum transfer demonstrate the validity of the simplified treatment of collision processes which have been adopted. A numerical model which simulates the laser-plasma interaction with the background confirms the importance of collisions in previous experimental studies of momentum coupling, and provides some insight into the distinction between collisional and collisionless flow regimes.

  10. Measurement of plasma temperature and density using laser absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A laser radiation absorption technique, suitable for temporal measurement of the electron density, the temperature, or a simultaneous determination of both, in an LTE plasma, is discussed. The theoretical calculation of the absorption coefficient for a hydrogen plasma is outlined; some results are presented for visible wavelengths. Measurements of electron density and temperature are presented and shown to be in good agreement with those values obtained by other methods. Finally, the possible use of the argon ion laser for simultaneous electron density and temperature measurement is discussed, and the theoretical curves necessary for its application to hydrogen plasma diagnostics are shown.

  11. Characteristics of microwave plasma induced by lasers and sparks.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuji; Tsuruoka, Ryoji

    2012-03-01

    Characteristics of the plasma light source of microwave (MW) plus laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) or spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy (SIBS) were studied. The plasma was initially generated by laser- or spark-induced breakdown as a plasma seed. A plasma volume was then grown and sustained by MWs in air. This MW plasma had a long lifetime, large volume, strong emission intensity, and high stability with time. These characteristics are suitable for applications in the molecular analysis of gases such as OH or N(2). Because the plasma properties did not depend on laser or spark plasma seeds, the resulting plasma was easily controllable by the input power and duration of the MWs. Therefore, a significant improvement was achieved in the spectral intensity and signal-to-noise ratio. For example, the peak intensity of the Pb spectra of LIBS increased 15 times, and that of SIBS increased 880 times without increases in their background noise. A MW-enhanced plasma light source could be used to make the total system smaller and cheaper than a conventional LIBS system, which would be useful for real-time and in situ analysis of gas molecules in, for example, food processing, medical applications, chemical exposure, and gas turbine or automobile air-to-fuel ratio and exhaust gas measurement. PMID:22410918

  12. Interaction of plasmas in laser ion source with double laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwa, Y.; Ikeda, S.; Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Tokyo ; Kumaki, M.; Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo ; Sekine, M.; Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo ; Cinquegrani, D.; Romanelli, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.; Iwashita, Y.

    2014-02-15

    Multiple laser shots could be used to elongate an ion beam pulse width or to intensify beam current from laser ion sources. In order to confirm the feasibility of the multiple shot scheme, we investigated the properties of plasmas produced by double laser shots. We found that when the interval of the laser shots is shorter than 10 μs, the ion current profile had a prominent peak, which is not observed in single laser experiments. The height of this peak was up to five times larger than that of single laser experiment.

  13. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  14. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  15. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  16. Plasma channel diagnostic based on laser centroid oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Lin, C.; Osterhoff, J.; Shiraishi, S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Tóth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-05-01

    A technique has been developed for measuring the properties of discharge-based plasma channels by monitoring the centroid location of a laser beam exiting the channel as a function of input alignment offset between the laser and the channel. Experiments were performed using low-intensity (<1014 Wcm-2) laser pulses focused onto the entrance of a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. Scanning the laser centroid position at the input of the channel and recording the exit position allows determination of the channel depth with an accuracy of a few percent, measurement of the transverse channel shape, and inference of the matched spot size. In addition, accurate alignment of the laser beam through the plasma channel is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel depth is scanned either by scanning the plasma density or the discharge timing. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique will be crucial for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  17. Optical spectroscopy of laser plasma in a deep crater

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, Taras V; Konov, Vitalii I; Walter, D; Dausinger, F

    2009-04-30

    The time dynamics of plasma-emission spectra is studied experimentally at different stages of the drilling of a steel plate by 100-fs and 5-ps laser pulses: from a shallow crater to a hole. The change in the time dependence of the plasma temperature caused by variations in the irradiated surface geometry is analysed. It is found that the time interval needed to reach a particular temperature (about 8000 K) drastically increases from 40-50 to 150-200 ns when a specific crater depth is achieved. The opposite tendency is observed as the crater depth grows further and a hole is produced. Strong self-absorption in a plasma plume inside a deep crater is experimentally confirmed which results in the appearance of line absorption against a continuous emission spectrum. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  18. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  19. Thomson parabola spectrometry for gold laser-generated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ando, L.; Ullschmied, J.

    2013-02-15

    The plasma generated from thin gold films irradiated in high vacuum at high intensity ({approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) laser shot is characterized in terms of ion generation through time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometry. Gold ions and protons, accelerated in forward direction by the electric field developed in non-equilibrium plasma, have been investigated. Measurements, performed at PALS laboratory, give information about the gold charge states distributions, the ion energy distributions and the proton acceleration driven as a function of film thickness, laser parameters, and angular emission. The ion diagnostics of produced plasma in forward direction permits to understand some mechanisms developed during its expansion kinetics. The role of the focal position of a laser beam with respect to the target surface, plasma properties, and the possibility to accelerate protons up to energies above 3 MeV has been presented and discussed.

  20. Use of support vector machines and fabry-perot interferometry to classify states of a laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, John

    This thesis develops an algorithm that can determine if a laser is functioning correctly over a long period of time. A Fourier fit is created to model fringe profiles from a Fabry-Perot interferometer, and singular value decomposition is used to reduce noise in each signal. Levenberg-Marquardt gradient descent is performed to correctly locate the center of each image and to optimize each fit with respect to the spatial frequency. The Fourier fit is used to extract important information from each image to be used for separating the image types from one another. Principal component analysis is used to reduce the dimensionality of the data set and to plot a projection of the data using its first two principal components. It is determined that the image data are not linearly separable and require a non-linear support vector network to complete the classification of each image type.

  1. Research on radiation induced laser plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Rowe, M. J.; Carter, B. D.; Walters, R. A.; Cox, J. D.; Liang, R.; Roxey, T.; Zapata, L.

    1979-01-01

    The development of high power nuclear pumped lasers is discussed. The excitation mechanism of continuous wave (CW) HeNe nuclear pumped lasers is studied and a CO2 nuclear pumped laser is used to demonstrate the CW output in the order of watts. The assumption that high power densities are only achievable by volume fission fragment sources is used to identify laser gases which are compatible with UF6 by excited states lifetime measurements. The examination of Xe2, XeF, and KrF under nuclear irradiation to determine if they are good candidates for nuclear-pumped lasers is described.

  2. Turbulence measurements in high-speed wind tunnels using focusing laser differential interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulghum, Matthew R.

    Characterization of freestream disturbances and their effect on laminar boundary layer transition is of great importance in high-speed wind tunnel testing, where significant differences between the behavior of scale-model and free-flight transition have long been noted. However, the methods traditionally used to perform this characterization in low-speed flows present significant difficulties when applied to supersonic and especially hypersonic wind tunnels. The design and theory of a focusing laser differential interferometer (FLDI) instrument, originally invented by Smeets at the Institut Saint-Louis in the 1970s and used recently by Parziale in the CalTech T5 shock tunnel, is presented. It is a relatively-simple, non-imaging common-path interferometer for measuring refractive signals from transition and turbulence, and it has a unique ability to look through facility windows, ignore sidewall boundary-layers and vibration, and concentrate only on the refractive signal near a pair of sharp beam foci in the core flow. The instrument's low cost and ease of implementation make it a promising alternative to traditional hot-wire anemometry and particle-based methods for turbulence characterization. Benchtop experiments using a turbulent supersonic air jet demonstrate its focusing ability, frequency response, unwanted signal rejection, and ease of use. The instrument is used to optically interrogate the flow in the Penn State University Supersonic Wind Tunnel and USAF AEDC Hypervelocity Tunnel 9 for measurement of the overall intensity and spectra of freestream disturbances. Precise characterization of the strength and spectral content of the disturbances provides insight into their nature and potential effect upon boundary layer transition. A special feature of the FLDI instrument used here is the replacement of traditional fixed Wollaston prisms with variable Sanderson prisms for laser-beam separation and recombination.

  3. Pre-plasma effect on energy transfer from laser beam to shock wave generated in solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarczyk, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Badziak, J.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Kasperczuk, A.; Parys, P.; Rosinski, M.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.; Folpini, G.; Maheut, Y.; Baffigi, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Krousky, E.; and others

    2014-01-15

    Efficiency of the laser radiation energy transport into the shock wave generated in layered planar targets (consisting of massive Cu over coated by thin CH layer) was investigated. The targets were irradiated using two laser pulses. The 1ω pulse with the energy of ∼50 J produced a pre-plasma, imitating the corona of the pre-compressed inertial confinement fusion target. The second main pulse used the 1ω or 3ω laser harmonics with the energy of ∼200 J. The influence of the pre-plasma on parameters of the shock wave was determined from the crater volume measurements and from the electron density distribution measured by 3-frame interferometry. The experimental results show that the energy transport by fast electrons provides a definite contribution to the dynamics of the ablative process, to the shock wave generation, and to the ablation pressure in dependence on the target irradiation conditions. The strong influence of the pre-plasma on the investigated process was observed in the 1ω case. Theoretical analysis supports the explanation of experimental results.

  4. Collision dynamics of laser produced carbon plasma plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, M.; Ruiz, H. M.; Cortés, D.; Merello, F.; Bhuyan, H.; Veloso, F.; Wyndham, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present preliminary experimental observations of the collision processes between two orthogonal laser produced plasmas in a low pressure neutral gas background. A Nd:YAG laser, 340 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, operating at 10 Hz, is used in the experiments. The main laser beam is divided in two beams by a 50% beam splitter, and then focused over two rotating graphite targets, with characteristic fluence 3.5 J/cm2. Experiments are conducted in a range from a base pressure of 0.3 mTorr, up to 50 mTorr argon. The dynamics of the laser plasmas is characterized by time resolved and time integrated optical emission spectroscopy (OES), with 20 ns and 10 ms time resolution, and 50 ns time resolved plasma imaging of visible plasma emission. Clear effects of the neutral gas background on the postcollision plasma dynamics are identified. The overall dynamics of the post-collision plasma is found to be consistent with high collisionality of the carbon plasma plumes, which results in full stagnation on collisioning.

  5. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-01

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible. PMID:27314721

  6. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  7. Preliminary Study on Generating Condition of Laser Sustained Plasma using 1 kW CW Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Koji; Kumita, Mamoru; Matsui, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    In the laser sustained plasma of conventional laser driven plasma wind tunnel, CO2 laser have been used. However, the efficiency of is about 10%. Recently, the development of diode laser is remarkable and the energy efficiency of it reaches nearly 80% in laboratory stage. Therefore, in our research group, the generation of laser sustained plasma using diode laser is being tried. In this study, the generation threshold of it was numerically calculated. Assuming that focused laser diameter is 200 um, in the condition of the pressure of 0.1-1 MPa, it was deduced that the threshold of laser power is about 500 W.

  8. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ˜100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach.

  9. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ∼100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach.

  10. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weikum, M. K.; Li, F. Y.; Assmann, R. W.; Sheng, Z. M.; Jaroszynski, D.

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented.

  11. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  12. Light-curing polymers for laser plasma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktionov, E. Y.; Protasov, Y. S.; Protasov, Y. Y.; Telekh, V. D.

    2015-07-01

    Solid rather than liquid media are used in pulsed laser plasma generators despite sophisticated transportation and dosing system need for a long-term operation. Liquid media could be more preferable due to transfer and dosing (down to 10-14 L) being well developed, but plasma generation of those results in intense droplet formation and kinetic energy losses. Combination of liquids transportation advantages and solids plasma generation efficiency might resolve this trade-off. Liquid-to-solid transition can be induced by cooling down to sublimation temperature, thermo-, photo- or electron induced polymerization (curing). Light cured polymers seem to be very useful as active media for plasma generators, since they can be solidified very fast (ca. 30 ms) just before impact. We considered experimentally several UV- curing polymer and mixtures ablation regimes and supply schemes for laser plasma generation. The best results were obtained for liquid polymer at high-power pulsed irradiation matching curing optimum wavelength.

  13. Time Evolution of the Electron and Ar* Metastable Atom Densities in Pulsed Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sikimic, Brankica; Stefanovic, Ilija; Winter, Joerg; Denysenko, Igor; Sadeghic, Nader

    2011-11-29

    Metastable and electron densities of pulsed argon plasma containing nano-sized particles were measured by the means of Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and Microwave Interferometry, respectively. Laser Induced Fluorescence was probing the Ar* metastable axial distribution during one dust growing cycle. The experimental results of the dust-free and dusty plasma afterglow were compared to the results obtained by a global model.

  14. Plasma species dynamics in a laser produced carbon plasma expanding in low pressure neutral gas background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, H. M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Bhuyan, H.; Chuaqui, H.; Wyndham, E.

    2012-06-01

    We present time and space resolved spectroscopic observations of a laser produced carbon plasma, in an argon background. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 370 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, with a fluence of 6.8 J/cm2, is used to produce a plasma from a solid graphite target, at a base pressure of 0.5 mTorr, and with 80 mTorr Argon background. The spectral emission in the visible is recorded with 15 ns time resolution. 20 ns time resolution plasma imagining, filtered at characteristic carbon species emission wavelengths, is used to study the dynamics of the expanding plasma. Two different fronts with ionic or molecular compositions are seen to detach from de laser target plasma.

  15. MIGA: combining laser and matter wave interferometry for mass distribution monitoring and advanced geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuel, B.; Pelisson, S.; Amand, L.; Bertoldi, A.; Cormier, E.; Fang, B.; Gaffet, S.; Geiger, R.; Harms, J.; Holleville, D.; Landragin, A.; Lefèvre, G.; Lhermite, J.; Mielec, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Riou, I.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-04-01

    The Matter-Wave laser Interferometer Gravitation Antenna, MIGA, will be a hybrid instrument composed of a network of atom interferometers horizontally aligned and interrogated by the resonant field of an optical cavity. This detector will provide measurements of sub Hertz variations of the gravitational strain tensor. MIGA will bring new methods for geophysics for the characterization of spatial and temporal variations of the local gravity field and will also be a demonstrator for future low frequency Gravitational Wave (GW) detections. MIGA will enable a better understanding of the coupling at low frequency between these different signals. The detector will be installed underground in Rustrel (FR), at the "Laboratoire Souterrain Bas Bruit" (LSBB), a facility with exceptionally low environmental noise and located far away from major sources of anthropogenic disturbances. We give in this paper an overview of the operating mode and status of the instrument before detailing simulations of the gravitational background noise at the MIGA installation site.

  16. [The Spectral Analysis of Laser-Induced Plasma in Laser Welding with Various Protecting Conditions].

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao; Yang, Li-jun; Liu, Tong; Jiao, Jiao; Wang, Hui-chao

    2016-01-01

    The shielding gas plays an important role in the laser welding process and the variation of the protecting conditions has an obvious effect on the welding quality. This paper studied the influence of the change of protecting conditions on the parameters of laser-induced plasma such as electron temperature and electron density during the laser welding process by designing some experiments of reducing the shielding gas flow rate step by step and simulating the adverse conditions possibly occurring in the actual Nd : YAG laser welding process. The laser-induced plasma was detected by a fiber spectrometer to get the spectral data. So the electron temperature of laser-induced plasma was calculated by using the method of relative spectral intensity and the electron density by the Stark Broadening. The results indicated that the variation of protecting conditions had an important effect on the electron temperature and the electron density in the laser welding. When the protecting conditions were changed, the average electron temperature and the average electron density of the laser-induced plasma would change, so did their fluctuation range. When the weld was in a good protecting condition, the electron temperature, the electron density and their fluctuation were all low. Otherwise, the values would be high. These characteristics would have contribution to monitoring the process of laser welding. PMID:27228732

  17. Guiding of Laser Beams in Plasmas by Radiation Cascade Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-11-01

    The near-resonant heatwave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating trains of few-fs electromagnetic pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a co-moving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the beat frequency. Consequently, the cascade of sidebands red- and blue-shifted from the fundamental by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the phase chirp enables laser beatnote compression by the group velocity dispersion [S. Kalmykov and G. Shvets, Phys. Rev. E 73, 046403 (2006)]. In the 3D cylindrical geometry, the frequency-downshifted EPW not only modulates the laser frequency, but also causes the pulse to self-focus [P. Gibbon, Phys. Fluids B 2, 2196 (1990)]. After self-focusing, the multi-frequency laser beam inevitably diverges. Remarkably, the longitudinal beatnote compression can compensate the intensity drop due to diffraction. A train of high-intensity radiation spikes with continually evolving longitudinal profile can be self-guided over several Rayleigh lengths in homogeneous plasmas. High amplitude of the EPW is maintained over the entire propagation length. Numerical experiments on the electron acceleration in the cascade-driven (cascade-guided) EPW [using the code WAKE by P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] show that achieving GeV electron energy is possible under realistic experimental parameters.

  18. Guiding of Laser Beams in Plasmas by Radiation Cascade Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-11-27

    The near-resonant heatwave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating trains of few-fs electromagnetic pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a co-moving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the beat frequency. Consequently, the cascade of sidebands red- and blue-shifted from the fundamental by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the phase chirp enables laser beatnote compression by the group velocity dispersion [S. Kalmykov and G. Shvets, Phys. Rev. E 73, 046403 (2006)]. In the 3D cylindrical geometry, the frequency-downshifted EPW not only modulates the laser frequency, but also causes the pulse to self-focus [P. Gibbon, Phys. Fluids B 2, 2196 (1990)]. After self-focusing, the multi-frequency laser beam inevitably diverges. Remarkably, the longitudinal beatnote compression can compensate the intensity drop due to diffraction. A train of high-intensity radiation spikes with continually evolving longitudinal profile can be self-guided over several Rayleigh lengths in homogeneous plasmas. High amplitude of the EPW is maintained over the entire propagation length. Numerical experiments on the electron acceleration in the cascade-driven (cascade-guided) EPW [using the code WAKE by P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] show that achieving GeV electron energy is possible under realistic experimental parameters.

  19. Plasma wake inhibition at the collision of two laser pulses in an underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rechatin, C.; Faure, J.; Lifschitz, A.; Malka, V.; Lefebvre, E.

    2007-06-15

    An electron injector concept for a laser-plasma accelerator was developed by E. Esarey et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997)] and G. Fubiani et al. [Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004)]; it relies on the use of counterpropagating ultrashort laser pulses. In the latter work, the scheme is as follows: the pump laser pulse generates a large-amplitude laser wakefield (plasma wave). The counterpropagating injection pulse interferes with the pump laser pulse to generate a beatwave pattern. The ponderomotive force of the beatwave is able to inject plasma electrons into the wakefield. In this paper, this injection scheme is studied using one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations. The simulations reveal phenomena and important physical processes that were not taken into account in previous models. In particular, at the collision of the laser pulses, most plasma electrons are trapped in the beatwave pattern and cannot contribute to the collective oscillation supporting the plasma wave. At this point, the fluid approximation fails and the plasma wake is strongly inhibited. Consequently, the injected charge is reduced by one order of magnitude compared to the predictions from previous models.

  20. Measurements of laser-plasma instability relevant to ignition hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Bauer, B.S.; Cobble, J.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Kyrala, G.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rose, H.A.; Vu, H.X.; Watt, R.G.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilke, M.D.; Wood, W.M.; Failor, B.H.; Kirkwood, R.; MacGowan, B.J.

    1997-05-01

    The potential for laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce x-rays for imploding a fusion capsule symmetrically. The speckled nature of laser beams used in ICF is an important factor in laser-plasma instability processes. For example, models which calculate the spatial growth of convective instability by properly accounting for the laser speckles successfully predict the observed onsets of backscattering due to stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering instabilities (SBS and SRS). Assuming pump depletion as the only saturation mechanism in these models results in very large predicted levels of SBS and SRS backscattering from the long-scale plasmas expected in ignition hohlraums. However, in the long-scale plasmas studied in the Nova and Trident lasers [E. M. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 57}, 2101 (1986) and N. K. Moncur {ital et al.}, Appl. Opt. {bold 34}, 4274 (1995)], SRS and SBS are observed to saturate much below the levels expected from pump depletion. While the mechanism of SBS saturation is not understood at present, the observations of SRS saturation are qualitatively understood. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  2. Study of laser plasma interactions in the relativistic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Umstadter, D.

    1997-08-13

    We discuss the first experimental demonstration of electron acceleration by a laser wakefield over instances greater than a Rayleigh range (or the distance a laser normally propagates in vacuum). A self-modulated laser wakefield plasma wave is shown to have a field gradient that exceeds that of an RF linac by four orders of magnitude (E => 200 GV/m) and accelerates electrons with over 1-nC of charge per bunch in a beam with space-charge-limited emittance (1 mm-mrad). Above a laser power threshold, a plasma channel, created by the intense ultrashort laser pulse (I approx. 4 x1018 W/CM2, gamma = 1 micron, r = 400 fs), was found to increase the laser propagation distance, decrease the electron beam divergence, and increase the electron energy. The plasma wave, directly measured with coherent Thomson scattering is shown to damp-due to beam loading-in a duration of 1.5 ps or approx. 100 plasma periods. These results may have important implications for the proposed fast ignitor concept.

  3. Erosion resistant nozzles for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources

    DOEpatents

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Bernardez, II, Luis J.

    2000-01-04

    A gas nozzle having an increased resistance to erosion from energetic plasma particles generated by laser plasma sources. By reducing the area of the plasma-facing portion of the nozzle below a critical dimension and fabricating the nozzle from a material that has a high EUV transmission as well as a low sputtering coefficient such as Be, C, or Si, it has been shown that a significant reduction in reflectance loss of nearby optical components can be achieved even after exposing the nozzle to at least 10.sup.7 Xe plasma pulses.

  4. Slowdown mechanisms of ultraintense laser propagation in critical density plasma.

    PubMed

    Iwawaki, T; Habara, H; Yabuuchi, T; Hata, M; Sakagami, H; Tanaka, K A

    2015-07-01

    We use one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to demonstrate that the propagation of an ultraintense laser (I=10(19)W/cm(2)) in critical density plasma can be interfered with by a high density plasma wall region generated at the propagation front. When the electron flow speed of the wall region exceeds a certain relativistic threshold, the region behaves as an overdense plasma due to a decrease of the effective critical density. The region forms then very small overdense plasma islands. The islands impede the propagation intermittently and slow down the propagation speed significantly. PMID:26274293

  5. Quantum cascade laser: a compact, low cost, solid-state source for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, L.; Tredicucci, A.; Vitiello, M. S.

    2012-02-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) are unipolar injection lasers based on intersubband transitions in a modular semiconductor heterostructure. The first THz QCL, operating at 67 μm (4.3 THz), was demonstrated in 2002; the wavelength range now extends beyond 250 μm (1.2 THz) and is entering the sub-terahertz frequency range for devices operated in external magnetic field. Although a number of different quantum designs have been demonstrated, increasing the operating temperature remains a major challenge: the maximum temperature is still ~ 195 K, and recently approached 225 K in high magnetic fields. Nevertheless, compact continuous wave systems operating within Sterling coolers already ensure ample portability and turn-key operation and QCLs represent then the THz solid-state radiation source that actually shows the best performance in terms of optical output power, which can reach more than 100 mW average, and linewidth, typically in the tens of kHz for single mode devices. THz QCLs have then a realistic chance to deeply impact technological applications such as process monitoring, security controls, and bio-medical diagnostics. They are ideally suited though for plasma polarimetry and interferometry, thanks to their high polarization selectivity, excellent stability and ruggedness, and ease of high-speed modulation. Their compact size and monolithic cavity arrangement allows placement in the very proximity of the plasma to be monitored, easing requirements of stability against vibrations etc. Furthermore, the long coherence lengths should be easily compatible with interferometric arms of even very different lengths, a geometry ideal for coupling to a plasma reactor. The possibility of direct current modulation at MHz if not GHz frequencies ensures then an excellent temporal resolution of the meaurements, and a large low-frequency noise rejection. New analysis schemes also become feasible, for instance employing two-color lasers, operating at the same time at two

  6. High-energy 4{omega} probe laser for laser-plasma experiments at nova

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S. H., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    For the characterization of inertial confinement fusion plasmas we implemented a high-energy 4{omega} probe laser at the Nova laser facility. A total energy of > 50 Joules at 4{omega}, a focal spot size of order 100 {micro}m, and a pointing accuracy of 100 {micro}m was demonstrated for target shots. This laser provides intensities of up to 3 x 10{sup 14}W cm{sup -2} and therefore fulfills high-power requirements for laser-plasma interaction experiments. The 4{omega} probe laser is now routinely used for Thomson scattering. Successful experiments were performed in gas-filled hohlraums at electron densities of n{sub e} > 2 X 10{sup 21}cm{sup -3} which represents the highest density plasma so far being diagnosed with Thomson scattering.

  7. Application of Gaseous Laser Targets and Optical Diagnostics to Study High Mach Number Unstable Plasma Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J; MacKinnon, A; Robey, H

    2001-04-01

    The information that can be obtained from current laser driven high Mach number (compressible) hydrodynamics experiments using solid targets and foams is limited by the need to use X-ray diagnostics. These do well at providing the shape of gross 2D structures which we model well, but are a long way from being able to reveal detailed information at the smaller spatial scales, or in 3D turbulent flows, where most of the modeling uncertainties exist. Remedying this is, and will continue to be, an ongoing research effort. An alternative approach that is not being considered is to use gaseous targets coupled with optical diagnostics. The lower density of gases compared to solids or foams means we can use much larger targets for a given laser energy. This should significantly improve spatial resolution, and the dynamic range of scales that are resolvable. In addition, it may be possible to adapt powerful techniques, such as LIF, used by the low Mach number (incompressible) fluid/gas community so that they work in the high Mach number plasma regime. This would provide much more detailed information on turbulent flows than could be achieved with current X-ray diagnostics. We propose a small research effort to use established techniques such as optical interferometry (absolute electron density), and Schlieren photography (electron density gradient), to study compressible hydrodynamic instabilities. We also propose to explore whether techniques such as LIF may be adapted to the plasma regime, thus providing detailed information, particularly about turbulent flows, that is not currently obtainable in plasmas using X-ray diagnostics. The setting will be radiating blast waves, which avoids costly target fabrication, while promising a high physics payoff to the astrophysics community just from using the established diagnostics alone. We propose to conduct the work in collaboration with Dr Todd Ditmire at the University of Texas at Austin, principally on the Janus laser, and

  8. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Harilal, S S; LaHaye, N L; Phillips, M C

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of a solid aluminum target at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous wave (cw) Ti:sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the cw laser at one transition. Time-delayed, gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate resonantly excited fluorescence emission from thermally excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable cw laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultrahigh resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing cw laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods. PMID:27472615

  9. LASER-ELECTRON COMPTON INTERACTION IN PLASMA CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, we propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. We demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  10. Laser-plasma ion beams-experiments towards charge transfer x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Fill, E.E. ); Bruch, R. ); Schneider, D. )

    1993-06-05

    Laser plasmas produced at intensities of up to 10[sup 14] W/cm[sup 2] expand towards a secondary target a few millimeters away. The intense x-ray emission during the interaction plasma-target was recorded spectrally, spatially and time-resolved. A number of processes, like recombination and charge transfer may account for this strong radiation. The implications of these experiments to the design of a charge transfer x-ray laser are discussed.

  11. Measurements of laser-plasma electron density with a soft x-ray laser deflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.; DaSilva, L.B.; London, R.A.; Trebes, J.E.; Mrowka, S.; Procassini, R.J.; Barbee, T.W. Jr. ); Lehr, D.E. )

    1994-07-22

    A soft x-ray laser (wavelength [lambda] = 15.5 nanometers) was used to create a moire deflectogram of a high-density, laser-produced plasma. The use of deflectometry at this short wavelength permits measurement of the density spatial profile in a long-scalelength (3 millimeters), high-density plasma. A peak density of 3.2 [times] 10[sup 21] per cubic centimeter was recorded.

  12. Measurement of Laser-Plasma Electron Density with a Soft X-ray Laser Deflectometer.

    PubMed

    Ress, D; Dasilva, L B; London, R A; Trebes, J E; Mrowka, S; Procassini, R J; Barbee, T W; Lehr, D E

    1994-07-22

    A soft x-ray laser (wavelength lambda = 15.5 nanometers) was used to create a moiré deflectogram of a high-density, laser-produced plasma. The use of deflectometry at this short wavelength permits measurement of the density spatial profile in a long-scalelength (3 millimeters), high-density plasma. A peak density of 3.2 x 10(21) per cubic centimeter was recorded. PMID:17781311

  13. The effect of laser wavelength on laser-induced carbon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T.; Hoffman, J.; Szymanski, Z.

    2013-08-28

    The effect of laser wavelength on parameters of laser-ablated carbon plume is studied. A theoretical model is applied, which describes the target heating and formation of the plasma and its expansion, and calculations are made for the fundamental and third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. The calculated distributions of plasma temperature and electron density in the early phase of expansion show that plasma temperatures are higher in the case of 1064 nm but the electron densities are higher in the case of 355 nm, which is in agreement with experimental findings. It has been shown that while a higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is the result of stronger plasma absorption, the greater ablation rate in the case of 355 nm results in larger mass density of the ablated plume and hence, in higher electron densities. An additional consequence of a higher ablation rate is slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plume.

  14. Effect of Stress and Saturation on Shear Wave Anisotropy: Laboratory Observations Using Laser Doppler Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, M.; Collet, O.; Bona, A.; Gurevich, B.

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of hydrocarbon and water resources as well as reservoir management during production are the main challenges facing the resource recovery industry nowadays. The recently discovered reservoirs are not only deep but they are also located in complicated geological formations. Hence, the effect of anisotropy on reservoir imaging becomes significant. Shear wave (S-wave) splitting has been observed in the field and laboratory experiments for decades. Despite the fact that S-wave splitting is widely used for evaluation of subsurface anisotropy, the effects of stresses as well fluid saturation on anisotropy have not been understood in detail. In this paper we present the laboratory study of the effect of stress and saturation on S-wave splitting for a Bentheim sandstone sample. The cubic sample (50mm3), porosity 22%, density 1890kg/m3) was placed into a true-triaxial cell. The sample was subjected to several combinations of stresses varying from 0 to 10MPa and applied to the sample in two directions (X and Y), while no stress was applied to the sample in the Z-direction. The sample's bedding was nearly oriented parallel to Y-Z plane. The ultrasonic S-waves were exited at a frequency of 0.5MHz by a piezoelectric transducer and were propagating in the Z-direction. Upon wave arrival onto the free surface the displacement of the surface was monitored by a Laser Doppler interferometer. Hodograms of the central point of the dry sample (Fig. 1) demonstrate how S-wave polarizations for both "fast" and "slow" S-waves change when increasing the stress in the X direction, while the stress in direction Y is kept constant at 3 MPa. Polarization of the fast S wave is shifted towards the X-axis (axis of the maximum stress). While both S-wave velocities increase with stress, the anisotropy level remains the same. No shift of polarization of fast wave was observed when the stress along the Y-axis was kept at 3 MPa, while the stress along the X-axis was increasing. However, in

  15. Generation of strongly coupled plasmas by high power excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yongxiang; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yongsheng; Hu, Yun; Zhang, Jiyan; Zheng, Zhijian; Ye, Xisheng

    2013-05-01

    (ultraviolet). To generate strongly coupled plasmas (SCP) by high power excimer laser, an Au-CH-Al-CH target is used to make the Al sample reach the state of SCP, in which the Au layer transforms laser energy to X-ray that heating the sample by volume and the CH layers provides necessary constraints. With aid of the MULTI-1D code, we calculate the state of the Al sample and its relationship with peak intensity, width and wavelength of laser pulses. The calculated results suggest that an excimer laser with peak intensity of the magnitude of 1013W/cm2 and pulse width being 5ns - 10ns is suitable to generate SCP with the temperature being tens of eV and the density of electron being of the order of 1022/cm-3. Lasers with shorter wavelength, such as KrF laser, are preferable.

  16. Plasma physics issues in gas discharge laser development

    SciTech Connect

    Garscadden, A. ); Kushner, M.J.; Eden, J.G. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1991-12-01

    In this paper an account is given of the interplay between partially ionized plasma physics and the development of gas discharge lasers. Gas discharge excitation has provided a wide array of laser devices extending from the soft X-ray region to the far infrared. The scaling of gas discharge lasers in power and energy also covers many orders of magnitude. The particular features of three regimes are discussed: short wavelength lasers (deep UV to soft X-ray); visible and near UV lasers; and infrared molecular gas lasers. The current status (Fall 1990) of these areas is reviewed, and an assessment is made of future research topics that are perceived to be important.

  17. Expansion dynamics of laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, B.; Lunney, J. G.

    2011-05-01

    We consider the applicability of the isentropic, adiabatic gas dynamical model of plume expansion for laser ablation in vacuum. We show that the model can be applied to ionized plumes and estimate the upper electron temperature limit on the applicability of the isentropic approximation. The model predictions are compared with Langmuir ion probe measurements and deposition profiles obtained for excimer laser ablation of silver.

  18. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Thresholds of surface plasma formation by the interaction of laser pulses with a metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1995-04-01

    An analysis is made of a model of the formation of a surface laser plasma which takes account of the heating and vaporisation of thermally insulated surface microdefects. This model is used in an interpretation of experiments in which such a plasma has been formed by irradiation of a titanium target with microsecond CO2 laser pulses. A comparison with the experimental breakdown intensities is used to calculate the average sizes of microdefects and their concentration: the results are in agreement with the published data. The dependence of the delay time of plasma formation on the total energy in a laser pulse is calculated.

  19. Propagation of ultraintense laser pulses through overdense plasma layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, S.; Mora, P.; Adam, J. C.; Héron, A.; Laval, G.

    1996-07-01

    Due to relativistic effects, a large amplitude electromagnetic wave can propagate in a classically overdense plasma with ω2p≳ω2≳ω2p/γ, where ωp is the plasma frequency, ω the laser frequency, and γ the relativistic factor of an electron in the laser field. Particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the interaction of an ultrahigh intensity laser pulse in normal incidence on a one-dimensional preformed plasma layer. Both electrons and ions dynamics are included. The width of the layer is 10 to 30 μm and the plasma is characterized by (ωp/ω)2=1.5. During the penetration of the electromagnetic wave a large longitudinal electric field is generated. It results in a strong longitudinal heating of electrons which reach relativistic temperatures. This heating further lowers the effective plasma frequency ωp/γ so the layer becomes almost transparent after the plasma crossing by the wave front. Velocity of the wave front, reflection and transmission rates are studied as functions of the incident energy flux, the plasma thickness, and the pulse duration.

  20. Visualization of plasma turbulence with laser-induced fluorescence (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, Fred M.; Trintchouk, Fedor

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence is a key factor limiting the performance of fusion devices. Plasma edge turbulence determines the boundary values of the plasma density and temperature, which in turn determine the internal gradients and controls global plasma transport. In recent years, significant progress has been made in modeling turbulence behavior in plasmas and its effect on transport. Progress has also been made in diagnostics for turbulence measurement; however, there is still a large gap in our understanding of it. An approach to improve this situation is to experimentally visualize the turbulence, that is, a high resolution 2-D image of the plasma density. Visualization of turbulence can improve the connection to theory and help validate theoretical models. One method that has been successfully developed to visualize turbulence in gases and fluids is planar laser-induced fluorescence. We have recently applied this technique to visualize turbulence and structures in a plasma. This was accomplished using an Alexandrite laser that is tunable between 700 and 800 nm, and from 350 to 400 nm with second harmonic generation. The fluorescence light from an argon ion transition has been imaged onto an intensified charged coupled device camera that is gated in synchronization with the laser. Images from the plasma show a rotating structure at 30 kHz in addition to small scale turbulence.