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Sample records for laser thermal thruster

  1. Chemical kinetic performance losses for a hydrogen laser thermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Dexter, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Projected requirements for efficient, economical, orbit-raising propulsion systems have generated investigations into several potentially high specific impulse, moderate thrust, advanced systems. One of these systems, laser thermal propulsion, utilizes a high temperature plasma as the enthalpy source. The plasma is sustained by a focused laser beam which maintains the plasma temperature at levels near 20,000 K. Since such temperature levels lead to total dissociation and high ionization, the plasma thruster system potentially has a high specific impulse decrement due to recombination losses. The nozzle flow is expected to be sufficiently nonequilibrium to warrant concern over the achievable specific impluse. This investigation was an attempt at evaluation of those losses. The One-Dimensional Kinetics (ODK) option of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Computer Program was used with a chemical kinetics rate set obtained from available literature to determine the chemical kinetic energy losses for typical plasma thruster conditions. The rates were varied about the nominal accepted values to band the possible losses. Kinetic losses were shown to be highly significant for a laser thermal thruster using hydrogen. A 30 percent reduction in specific impulse is possible simply due to the inability to completely extract the molecular recombination energy.

  2. Laser-heated thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, N. H.; Krech, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    The development of computer codes for the thrust chamber of a rocket of which the propellant gas is heated by a CW laser beam was investigated. The following results are presented: (1) simplified models of laser heated thrusters for approximate parametric studies and performance mapping; (3) computer programs for thrust chamber design; and (3) shock tube experiment to measure absorption coefficients. Two thrust chamber design programs are outlined: (1) for seeded hydrogen, with both low temperature and high temperature seeds, which absorbs the laser radiation continuously, starting at the inlet gas temperature; and (2) for hydrogen seeded with cesium, in which a laser supported combustion wave stands near the gas inlet, and heats the gas up to a temperature at which the gas can absorb the laser energy.

  3. Laser-heated thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, N. H.; Lewis, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a computer program for the design of the thrust chamber for a CW laser heated thruster was examined. Hydrodgen was employed as the propellant gas and high temperature absorber. The laser absorption coefficient of the mixture/laser radiation combination is given in temperature and species densities. Radiative and absorptive properties are given to determine radiation from such gas mixtures. A computer code for calculating the axisymmetric channel flow of a gas mixture in chemical equilibrium, and laser energy absorption and convective and radiative heating is described. It is concluded that: (1) small amounts of cesium seed substantially increase the absorption coefficient of hydrogen; (2) cesium is a strong radiator and contributes greatly to radiation of cesium seeded hydrogen; (3) water vapor is a poor absorber; and (4) for 5.3mcm radiation, both H2O/CO and NO/CO seeded hydrogen mixtures are good absorbers.

  4. Stabilization and steering of a parabolic laser thermal thruster with an ignition device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharring, Stefan; Hoffmann, Daniela; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2009-12-01

    High energy pulses of a CO 2 laser are focused in a parabolic mirror yielding to a laser-supported detonation. The generated thrust acting on the reflector as a bell nozzle is studied in multiple pulse free flight experiments with respect to axial, lateral and angular momentum coupling. The employment of an ignition pin on the reflector's axis of symmetry lowering the ignition threshold by several orders of magnitude is found to provide for a reproducible detonation process. The axial momentum coupling of each pulse is analyzed with respect to initial lateral offset and tilt during the flight. High speed analyses of recorded flights indicate that lateral momentum components occur re-centering the thruster on the beam. Thrust vector steering can be realized by tilt of the ignition pin inside the thruster, thus shifting the detonation. A design model of a laser-driven rocket including a remotely accessible steering gear was developed and tested successfully.

  5. NEXT Ion Thruster Thermal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    As the NEXT ion thruster progresses towards higher technology readiness, it is necessary to develop the tools that will support its implementation into flight programs. An ion thruster thermal model has been developed for the latest prototype model design to aid in predicting thruster temperatures for various missions. This model is comprised of two parts. The first part predicts the heating from the discharge plasma for various throttling points based on a discharge chamber plasma model. This model shows, as expected, that the internal heating is strongly correlated with the discharge power. Typically, the internal plasma heating increases with beam current and decreases slightly with beam voltage. The second is a model based on a finite difference thermal code used to predict the thruster temperatures. Both parts of the model will be described in this paper. This model has been correlated with a thermal development test on the NEXT Prototype Model 1 thruster with most predicted component temperatures within 5 to 10 C of test temperatures. The model indicates that heating, and hence current collection, is not based purely on the footprint of the magnet rings, but follows a 0.1:1:2:1 ratio for the cathode-to-conical-to-cylindrical-to-front magnet rings. This thermal model has also been used to predict the temperatures during the worst case mission profile that is anticipated for the thruster. The model predicts ample thermal margin for all of its components except the external cable harness under the hottest anticipated mission scenario. The external cable harness will be re-rated or replaced to meet the predicted environment.

  6. Laser-heated rocket thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A space vehicle application using 5,000-kw input laser power was conceptually evaluated. A detailed design evaluation of a 10-kw experimental thruster including plasma size, chamber size, cooling, and performance analyses, was performed for 50 psia chamber pressure and using hydrogen as a propellant. The 10-kw hardware fabricated included a water cooled chamber, an uncooled copper chamber, an injector, igniters, and a thrust stand. A 10-kw optical train was designed.

  7. Beam-Riding Analysis of a Parabolic Laser-thermal Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    2011-11-10

    Flight experiments with laser-propelled vehicles (lightcrafts) are often performed by wire-guidance or with spin-stabilization. Nevertheless, the specific geometry of the lightcraft's optics and nozzle may provide for inherent beam-riding properties. These features are experimentally investigated in a hovering experiment at a small free flight test range with an electron-beam sustained pulsed CO{sub 2} high energy laser. Laser bursts are adapted with a real-time control to lightcraft mass and impulse coupling for ascent and hovering in a quasi equilibrium of forces. The flight dynamics is analyzed with respect to the impulse coupling field vs. attitude, given by the lightcraft's offset and its inclination angle against the beam propagation axis, which are derived from the 3D-reconstruction of the flight trajectory from highspeed recordings. The limitations of the experimental parameters' reproducibility and its impact on flight stability are explored in terms of Julia sets. Solution statements for dynamic stabilization loops are presented and discussed.

  8. Beam-Riding Analysis of a Parabolic Laser-thermal Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2011-11-01

    Flight experiments with laser-propelled vehicles (lightcrafts) are often performed by wire-guidance or with spin-stabilization. Nevertheless, the specific geometry of the lightcraft's optics and nozzle may provide for inherent beam-riding properties. These features are experimentally investigated in a hovering experiment at a small free flight test range with an electron-beam sustained pulsed CO2 high energy laser. Laser bursts are adapted with a real-time control to lightcraft mass and impulse coupling for ascent and hovering in a quasi equilibrium of forces. The flight dynamics is analyzed with respect to the impulse coupling field vs. attitude, given by the lightcraft's offset and its inclination angle against the beam propagation axis, which are derived from the 3D-reconstruction of the flight trajectory from highspeed recordings. The limitations of the experimental parameters' reproducibility and its impact on flight stability are explored in terms of Julia sets. Solution statements for dynamic stabilization loops are presented and discussed.

  9. Bibliography of electrothermal thruster technology, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sovey, J.S.; Hardy, T.L.; Englehart, M.

    1986-03-01

    Electrothermal propulsion concepts are briefly discussed as an introduction to a bibliography and author index. Nearly 700 citations are given for resistojets, thermal arcjets, pulsed electrothermal thrusters, microwave heated devices, solar thermal thrusters, and laser thermal thrusters.

  10. A bibliography of electrothermal thruster technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Hardy, T. L.; Englehart, M.

    1986-01-01

    Electrothermal propulsion concepts are briefly discussed as an introduction to a bibliography and author index. Nearly 700 citations are given for resistojets, thermal arcjets, pulsed electrothermal thrusters, microwave heated devices, solar thermal thrusters, and laser thermal thrusters.

  11. Fundamental Experiments on Glycerin Propellant Laser Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Masakatsu; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Uchida, Shigeaki; Bato, Masafumi; Niino, Masayuki

    2004-03-30

    Impulse generation experiments of a liquid propellant laser thruster were conducted using glycerin propellants in the energy range of 60 mJ {approx} 60 J. Momentum coupling coefficients and specific impulses were obtained from momentum impulse and propellant mass measurements. The maximum specific impulse was 18 s at the laser beam energy of 55 J. Experimental data were scaled in terms of the laser beam energy and the diameter of the glycerin droplet to extrapolate laser thruster performance. The results indicate that the diameter of the glycerin droplet must be less than 0.24 mm in these experiments to achieve specific impulse more than 1,000 s that will be required to compete with other space propulsion systems.

  12. Laser-Assisted Micro-Pulsejet Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Eto, Sou

    2010-10-13

    A fundamental study of a laser-assisted micro-pulsejet thruster was conducted for a candidate of next-generation air-breathing micro-thruster systems. CFD analyses were conducted to evaluate internal phenomena, thrust performances, and influence of exhaust orifice for propellants of hydrogen-air mixture. Experimental investigations were also conducted to evaluate influence of exhaust orifices and the optimum configuration of the micro-combustion chamber. From the results, it was shown that the exhaust orifice was more effective for the improvement of thrust performance. Moreover, influence of combustor geometry on thrust performance for the improvement was confirmed. In our simulation and experimental results, the efficiency from ideal chemical energy, which is expected to be released from an ideal hydrogen-air mixture, into kinetic energy was a few percents. There are still some ways to recover this amount of loss with optimum combustor geometries and higher laser energies, and potential achieving much higher thrust performances.

  13. Laser-Driven Mini-Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B.

    2006-05-01

    Laser-driven mini-thrusters were studied using Delrin® and PVC (Delrin® is a registered trademark of DuPont) as propellants. TEA CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 μm) was used as a driving laser. Coupling coefficients were deduced from two independent techniques: force-time curves measured with a piezoelectric sensor and ballistic pendulum. Time-resolved ICCD images of the expanding plasma and combustion products were analyzed in order to determine the main process that generates the thrust. The measurements were also performed in a nitrogen atmosphere in order to test the combustion effects on thrust. A pinhole transmission experiment was performed for the study of the cut-off time when the ablation/air breakdown plasma becomes opaque to the incoming laser pulse.

  14. Laser-Driven Mini-Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Enrique; Lin Jun; Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B. Jr.

    2006-05-02

    Laser-driven mini-thrusters were studied using Delrin registered and PVC (Delrin registered is a registered trademark of DuPont) as propellants. TEA CO2 laser ({lambda} = 10.6 {mu}m) was used as a driving laser. Coupling coefficients were deduced from two independent techniques: force-time curves measured with a piezoelectric sensor and ballistic pendulum. Time-resolved ICCD images of the expanding plasma and combustion products were analyzed in order to determine the main process that generates the thrust. The measurements were also performed in a nitrogen atmosphere in order to test the combustion effects on thrust. A pinhole transmission experiment was performed for the study of the cut-off time when the ablation/air breakdown plasma becomes opaque to the incoming laser pulse.

  15. Acceleration Mechanism Of Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Mashima, Yuki; Yamada, Osamu

    2011-11-10

    A fundamental study of a newly developed rectangular pulsed laser-electromagnetic hybrid thruster was conducted. Laser-ablation plasma in the thruster was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a solid target and accelerated by electrical means instead of direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. The performance of the thrusters was evaluated by measuring the ablated mass per pulse and impulse bit. As results, significantly high specific impulses up to 7,200 s were obtained at charge energies of 8.6 J. Moreover, from the Faraday cup measurement, it was confirmed that the speed of ions was accelerated with addition of electric energy.

  16. Dual-throat thruster thermal model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewen, R. L.; Obrien, C. J.; Matthews, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The dual-throat engine is one of the dual nozzle engine concepts studied for advanced space transportation applications. It provides a thrust change and an in-flight area ratio change through the use of two concentric combustors with their throats arranged in series. Test results are presented for a dual throat thruster burning gaseous oxygen and hydrogen at primary (inner) chamber pressures from 380 to 680 psia. Heat flux profiles were obtained from calorimetric cooling channels in the inner nozzle, outer or secondary chamber and the tip of the inner nozzle. Data were obtained for two nozzle spacings over a chamber pressure ratio (secondary/primary) range of 0.45 to 0.83 with both chambers firing (Mode I). Fluxes near the end of the inner nozzle were significantly higher than in Mode II when only the inner chamber was fired, due to the flow separation and recirculation caused by the back pressure imposed by the secondary chamber. As the pressure ratio increased, these heat fluxes increased and the region of high heat flux relative to Mode II extended farther upstream. The use of the gaseous hydrogen bleed flow in the secondary chamber to control heat fluxes in the primary plume attachment region was investigated in Mode II testing. A thermal model of a dual throat thruster was developed and upgraded using the experimental data.

  17. A theoretical evaluation of laser-sustained plasma thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Keefer, Dennis

    1987-01-01

    An extensive numerical experiment has been conducted to evaluate rocket thruster performance using a laser-sustained hydrogen plasma as the propellant. The plasma was sustained using a 30 kW CO2 laser beam operated at 10.6 microns focused inside the thruster. The steady-state Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the laser power absorption process have been solved numerically. A pressure based Navier-Stokes solver using body-fitted coordinate was used to calculate the laser-supported rocket flow which included both recirculating and transonic flow regions. The local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) assumption was used for the plasma thermophysical and optical properties. Geometric ray tracing was adopted to describe the laser beam. Several different throat size thrusters operated at 150 and 300 kPa chamber stagnation pressure were studied. It was found that the thruster performance (vacuum specific impulse) was highly dependent on the operating conditions, and a properly designed laser supported thruster can attain a specific impulse around 1500 secs. The heat loading on the thruster wall was also estimated and was in the range of that for a conventional chemical rocket.

  18. Computational design of an experimental laser-powered thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ronald; Keefer, Dennis

    1988-01-01

    An extensive numerical experiment, using the developed computer code, was conducted to design an optimized laser-sustained hydrogen plasma thruster. The plasma was sustained using a 30 kW CO2 laser beam operated at 10.6 micrometers focused inside the thruster. The adopted physical model considers two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the laser power absorption process, geometric ray tracing for the laser beam, and the thermodynamically equilibrium (LTE) assumption for the plasma thermophysical and optical properties. A pressure based Navier-Stokes solver using body-fitted coordinate was used to calculate the laser-supported rocket flow which consists of both recirculating and transonic flow regions. The computer code was used to study the behavior of laser-sustained plasmas within a pipe over a wide range of forced convection and optical arrangements before it was applied to the thruster design, and these theoretical calculations agree well with existing experimental results. Several different throat size thrusters operated at 150 and 300 kPa chamber pressure were evaluated in the numerical experiment. It is found that the thruster performance (vacuum specific impulse) is highly dependent on the operating conditions, and that an adequately designed laser-supported thruster can have a specific impulse around 1500 sec. The heat loading on the wall of the calculated thrusters were also estimated, and it is comparable to heat loading on the conventional chemical rocket. It was also found that the specific impulse of the calculated thrusters can be reduced by 200 secs due to the finite chemical reaction rate.

  19. Thermal Modeling for Pulsed Inductive FRC Plasmoid Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, Michael

    Due to the rising importance of space based infrastructure, long-range robotic space missions, and the need for active attitude control for spacecraft, research into Electric Propulsion is becoming increasingly important. Electric Propulsion (EP) systems utilize electric power to accelerate ions in order to produce thrust. Unlike traditional chemical propulsion, this means that thrust levels are relatively low. The trade-off is that EP thrusters have very high specific impulses (Isp), and can therefore make do with far less onboard propellant than cold gas, monopropellant, or bipropellant engines. As a consequence of the high power levels used to accelerate the ionized propellant, there is a mass and cost penalty in terms of solar panels and a power processing unit. Due to the large power consumption (and waste heat) from electric propulsion thrusters, accurate measurements and predictions of thermal losses are needed. Excessive heating in sensitive locations within a thruster may lead to premature failure of vital components. Between the fixed cost required to purchase these components, as well as the man-hours needed to assemble (or replace) them, attempting to build a high-power thruster without reliable thermal modeling can be expensive. This paper will explain the usage of FEM modeling and experimental tests in characterizing the ElectroMagnetic Plasmoid Thruster (EMPT) and the Electrodeless Lorentz Force (ELF) thruster at the MSNW LLC facility in Redmond, Washington. The EMPT thruster model is validated using an experimental setup, and steady state temperatures are predicted for vacuum conditions. Preliminary analysis of the ELF thruster indicates possible material failure in absence of an active cooling system for driving electronics and for certain power levels.

  20. Thermal Environmental Testing of NSTAR Engineering Model Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.; Becker, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium program will fly a xenon ion propulsion system on the Deep Space 1 Mission. Tests were conducted under NASA's Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) Program with 3 different engineering model ion thrusters to determine thruster thermal characteristics over the NSTAR operating range in a variety of thermal environments. A liquid nitrogen-cooled shroud was used to cold-soak the thruster to -120 C. Initial tests were performed prior to a mature spacecraft design. Those results and the final, severe, requirements mandated by the spacecraft led to several changes to the basic thermal design. These changes were incorporated into a final design and tested over a wide range of environmental conditions.

  1. A theoretical investigation of laser-sustained plasma thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Keefer, Dennis

    1987-01-01

    A numerical code has been successfully developed for the investigation of thruster performance using a laser-sustained hydrogen plasma as the propellant. The plasma was sustained using a 10.6-micron CO2 laser beam focused at different positions within the thruster. The physical model assumed that plasma is in thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE), and geometric ray tracing was adopted to describe the laser beam. The steady-state, axisymmetric, Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the laser power absorption process have been solved numerically. A pressure based Navier-Stokes numerical solver using body-fitted coordinates was used to calculate the laser-supported rocket flow which includes both subsonic and supersonic flow regions. From the limited parametric study, which did not try to optimize the rocket performance, it was found that better performance was obtained when the laser beam was focused closer to the rocket throat.

  2. A Very-High-Specific-Impulse Relativistic Laser Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kimura, Itsuro

    2008-04-28

    Characteristics of compact laser plasma accelerators utilizing high-power laser and thin-target interaction were reviewed as a potential candidate of future spacecraft thrusters capable of generating relativistic plasma beams for interstellar missions. Based on the special theory of relativity, motion of the relativistic plasma beam exhausted from the thruster was formulated. Relationships of thrust, specific impulse, input power and momentum coupling coefficient for the relativistic plasma thruster were derived. It was shown that under relativistic conditions, the thrust could be extremely large even with a small amount of propellant flow rate. Moreover, it was shown that for a given value of input power thrust tended to approach the value of the photon rocket under the relativistic conditions regardless of the propellant flow rate.

  3. Studies of a repetitively-pulsed laser powered thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, D. I.; Kemp, N. H.; Miller, M.

    1982-01-01

    In this report we present results of continuing analytical and experimental investigations carried out to evaluate the concept of pulsed laser propulsion. This advanced propulsion scheme, which has been the subject of several previous studies, involves supplying propellant energy by beaming short, repetitive laser pulses to a thruster from a remote laser power station. The concept offers the advantages of a remote power source, high specific impulse, high payload to total mass ratio (a consequence of the first two features) and moderate to high thrust (limited primarily by the average laser power available). The present research addresses questions related to thruster performance and optical design. In the thruster scheme under consideration, parabolic nozzle walls focus the incoming laser beam to yield breakdown in a propellant at the focal point of the parabola. The resulting high pressure plasma is characteristic of a detonation wave initiation by high power laser-induced breakdown. With a short laser pulse, the detonation wave quickly becomes a blast wave which propagates to the nozzle exit plane converting the high pressure of the gas behind it to a force on the nozzle wall. Propellant is fed to the focal region from a plenum chamber. The laser-induced blast wave stops the propellant flow through the throat until the pressure at the throat decays to the sonic pressure; then the propellant flow restarts. The process is repeated with each successive laser pulse.

  4. Laser thermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, D.; Elkins, R.; Peters, C.; Jones, L.

    1984-01-01

    Laser thermal propulsion (LTP) is studied for the case in which laser power is absorbed by a small very high-temperature plasma (about 20,000 K) and transferred to the remainder of the pure hydrogen propellant by radiation and mixing. This concept could lead to the realization of a lightweight orbital transfer vehicle propulsion system having a specific impulse in the range 1000-2000 s. Approximately 12 percent of the input power may be radiated to the thruster walls, and 15 percent of the total propellant flow must be heated to 20,000 K to provide a bulk temperature of 5000 K prior to expansion. Three principal research issues identified are: (1) conditions for hydrogen plasma ignition, (2) control of the plasma position within the laser beam, plasma stability, and plasma absorption efficiency, and (3) characterization of the mixing of the plasma and buffer flows.

  5. Laser ablation in a running hall effect thruster for space propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balika, L.; Focsa, C.; Gurlui, S.; Pellerin, S.; Pellerin, N.; Pagnon, D.; Dudeck, M.

    2013-07-01

    Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) are promising electric propulsion devices for the station-keeping of geostationary satellites (more than 120 in orbit to date). Moreover, they can offer a cost-effective solution for interplanetary journey, as proved by the recent ESA SMART-1 mission to the Moon. The main limiting factor of the HETs lifetime is the erosion of the annular channel ceramics walls. In order to provide a better understanding of the energy deposition on the insulated walls, a laser irradiation study has been carried out on a PPS100-ML thruster during its run in the PIVOINE-2G ground test facility (CNRS Orléans, France). Two distinct approaches have been followed: continuous wave fiber laser irradiation (generation of thermal defects) and nanosecond pulsed laser ablation (generation of topological defects). The irradiated zones have been monitored in situ by IR thermography and optical emission spectroscopy and further investigated ex situ by scanning electron microscopy and profilometry.

  6. Effect of nozzle geometry on the performance of laser ablative propulsion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Jiao, Long; Tang, Zhiping; Hu, Xiaojun; Peng, Jie

    2016-05-01

    The performance of "ablation mode" laser propulsion thrusters can be improved obviously by nozzle constraint. The nozzle geometry of "ablation mode" laser propulsion thrusters has been studied experimentally with CO2 lasers. Experimental results indicate that the propulsion performance of cylindrical nozzle thrusters is better than expansionary nozzle thrusters at the same lengths. The cylindrical nozzle thrusters were optimized by different laser energies. The results show that two important factors, the length-to-diameter ratio α and the thruster diameter to laser-spot diameter ratio β, affect the propulsion performance of the thruster obviously. The momentum coupling coefficient C m increases with the increase of α, while C m increases at first and then decreases with the increase of β.

  7. Thermal Storage Advanced Thruster System (TSATS) Experimental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Frank; Lisano, Michael E., II

    1991-01-01

    The Thermal Storage Advanced Thruster System (TSATS) rocket test stand is completely assembled and operational. The first trial experimental runs of a low-energy TSATS prototype rocket was made using the test stand. The features of the rocket test stand and the calibration of the associated diagnostics are described and discussed. Design and construction of the TSATS prototype are discussed, and experimental objectives, procedures, and results are detailed.

  8. Thermal-environmental testing of a 30-cm engineering model thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental test program was carried out to document all 30-cm electron bombardment Hg ion bombardment thruster functions and characteristics over the thermal environment of several proposed missions. An engineering model thruster was placed in a thermal test facility equipped with -196 C walls and solar simulation. The thruster was cold soaked and exposed to simulated eclipses lasting in duration from 17 to 72 minutes. The thruster was operated at quarter, to full beam power in various thermal configurations which simulated multiple thruster operation, and was also exposed to 1 and 2 suns solar simulation. Thruster control characteristics and constraints; performance, including thrust magnitude and direction; and structural integrity were evaluated over the range of thermal environments tested.

  9. Convective heat flux in a laser-heated thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, P. K. S.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis is performed to estimate the convective heating to the wall in a laser-heated thruster on the basis of a solution of the laminar boundary-layer equations with variable transport properties. A local similiarity approximation is used, and it is assumed that the gas phase is in equilibrium. For the thruster described by Wu (1976), the temperature and pressure distributions along the nozzle are obtained from the core calculation. The similarity solutions and heat flux are obtained from the freestream conditions of the boundary layer, in order to determine if it is necessary to couple the boundary losses directly to the core calculation. In addition, the effects of mass injection on the convective heat transfer across the boundary layer with large density-viscosity product gradient are examined.

  10. Characterization of a Laser-Assisted Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Masatoshi; Igari, Akira; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kimura, Itsuro

    2004-03-01

    An assessment of a novel laser-electric hybrid propulsion system was conducted, in which a laser-induced plasma was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a target and accelerated by electrical means instead of the direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. A fundamental study of newly developed rectangular laser-assisted pulsed-plasma thruster (PPT) was conducted. Inducing a short-duration conductive plasma between electrodes with certain voltages, short-duration switching or a discharge was achieved. At low-voltage conditions (~ 100 V), applied to electrodes or charged to a capacitor, it was confirmed that electric discharge can be achieved even under low voltage conditions. From the results, it was found that discharge duration at the low-voltage case was as long as that of laser-induced plasma. Therefore, the discharge in the low-voltage case must be controlled with an incident laser pulse, or a laser-induced plasma. While in high-voltage cases (~ 2000 V), the discharge duration was much longer than that of laser-induced plasma. In this case, the laser-induced plasma should be leading main discharge from a capacitor, where some amount of neutral components of vaporized propellant must be ionized through the discharge. Considering ratios of the laser energy to the discharge energies, the discharge process in the high-voltage mode cases must be defined as the laser-assisted electric discharge, or the laser-assisted electric propulsion mode, while in the low-voltage mode case with smaller electric energy, as the electrically-assisted laser-induced process, or the electric-assisted laser propulsion mode. Moreover, plasma behaviors emitted from each thruster in various cases were observed with the ICCD camera. It was shown that the plasma behaviors were almost identical between low and high voltage cases in initial several hundred nanoseconds, however, plasma emission with longer duration was observed in higher voltage cases. Canted current sheet

  11. Effect of the Thruster Configurations on a Laser Ignition Microthruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Hamasaki, Kyoichi; Kondo, Ryo; Okada, Keisuke; Nakano, Masakatsu; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    Research and development of small spacecraft have advanced extensively throughout the world and propulsion devices suitable for the small spacecraft, microthruster, is eagerly anticipated. The authors proposed a microthruster using 1—10-mm-size solid propellant. Small pellets of solid propellant are installed in small combustion chambers and ignited by the irradiation of diode laser beam. This thruster is referred as to a laser ignition microthruster. Solid propellant enables large thrust capability and compact propulsion system. To date theories of a solid-propellant rocket have been well established. However, those theories are for a large-size solid propellant and there are a few theories and experiments for a micro-solid rocket of 1—10mm class. This causes the difficulty of the optimum design of a micro-solid rocket. In this study, we have experimentally investigated the effect of thruster configurations on a laser ignition microthruster. The examined parameters are aperture ratio of the nozzle, length of the combustion chamber, area of the nozzle throat, and divergence angle of the nozzle. Specific impulse dependences on those parameters were evaluated. It was found that large fraction of the uncombusted propellant was the main cause of the degrading performance. Decreasing the orifice diameter in the nozzle with a constant open aperture ratio was an effective method to improve this degradation.

  12. Laser ignition of a cryogenic thruster using a miniaturised Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Manfletti, Chiara; Kroupa, Gerhard

    2013-11-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the feasibility of implementing laser ignition in cryogenic reaction and control and orbital manouvering thrusters. A experimental thruster with a single-coaxial injector element combustion chamber for testing with liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen/gaseous methane was designed for this purpose. Mapping tests conducted using a standard table top laser revealed that the minimum incident energies required for 100% reliable laser plasma and laser ablation ignition of liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen are 72 mJ and 14.5 mJ respectively. In addition, the miniaturised HIPoLas® laser was mounted directly on the thruster and used as ignition system. This paper reports locations of energy deposition, levels of delivered energy and associated ignition probabilities obtained. The results indicate the feasibility of using a laser system for the direct ignition of reaction and control and orbital manouvering thrusters and highlight further investigations and developments necessary for the implementation of miniaturised laser systems for vacuum igntion of cryogenic propellants. PMID:24514931

  13. Dual-throat thruster thermal model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewen, R.L.; Obrien, C.J.; Matthews, L.W.

    1986-08-01

    The dual-throat engine is one of the dual nozzle engine concepts studied for advanced space transportation applications. It provides a thrust change and an in-flight area ratio change through the use of two concentric combustors with their throats arranged in series. Test results are presented for a dual throat thruster burning gaseous oxygen and hydrogen at primary (inner) chamber pressures from 380 to 680 psia. Heat flux profiles were obtained from calorimetric cooling channels in the inner nozzle, outer or secondary chamber and the tip of the inner nozzle. Data were obtained for two nozzle spacings over a chamber pressure ratio (secondary/primary) range of 0.45 to 0.83 with both chambers firing (Mode I). Fluxes near the end of the inner nozzle were significantly higher than in Mode II when only the inner chamber was fired, due to the flow separation and recirculation caused by the back pressure imposed by the secondary chamber. As the pressure ratio increased, these heat fluxes increased and the region of high heat flux relative to Mode II extended farther upstream. The use of the gaseous hydrogen bleed flow in the secondary chamber to control heat fluxes in the primary plume attachment region was investigated in Mode II testing. A thermal model of a dual throat thruster was developed and upgraded using the experimental data.

  14. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the cylindrical Hall thruster plume

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, R.; Diamant, K. D.; Beiting, E. J.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-09-15

    An investigation of a fully cylindrical Hall thruster was performed using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure ion velocity profiles in the plume. The measurements confirm a previously reported 9% increase in the exhaust energy when the cathode keeper draws an excess current (overrun mode). Furthermore, the velocity directions in the plume remain relatively unchanged for the cusped and direct magnetic field configuration in both overrun and nonoverrun modes. Previously reported plume narrowing in the overrun mode was confirmed and found to be due to the shift of the acceleration and ionization regions toward the anode. The electric field inferred from the LIF measurements allowed calculation of the electron ExB drift. Close to the centerline of the thruster, electrons drift azimuthally with velocity decreasing away from the centerline, thus creating shear. This shear can be a source of plasma instabilities and influence electron transport. Further away from the centerline, electrons drift in the opposite direction with their velocity increasing with increasing radius. In that region, electrons rotate without shear.

  15. MPD thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: in house program elements; performance measurements; applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance scaling; MPD thruster technology; thermal efficiency scaling; anode fall voltage measurements; anode power deposition studies; MPD thruster plasma modeling; MPD thruster lifetime studies; and MPD thruster performance studies.

  16. Thermal Characterization of a NASA 30-cm Ion Thruster Operated up to 5 kW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SarverVerhey, Timothy R.; Domonkos, Matthew T.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary thermal characterization of a newly-fabricated NSTAR-derived test-bed thruster has recently been performed. The temperature behavior of the rare-earth magnets are reported because of their critical impact on thruster operation. The results obtained to date showed that the magnet temperatures did not exceed the stabilization Emit during thruster operation up to 4.6 kW. Magnet temperature data were also obtained for two earlier NSTAR Engineering Model Thrusters and are discussed in this report. Comparison between these thrusters suggests that the test-bed engine in its present condition is able to operate safely at higher power because of the lower discharge losses over the entire operating power range of this engine. However, because of the 'burn-in' behavior of the NSTAR thruster, magnet temperatures are expected to increase as discharge losses increase with accumulated thruster operation. Consequently, a new engineering solution may be required to achieve 5-kW operation with acceptable margin.

  17. Non-Contact Thermal Characterization of NASA's HERMeS Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Meyers, James L.; Yim, John T.; Neff, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The Thermal Characterization Test of NASAs 12.5-kW Hall thruster is being completed. This thruster is being developed to support of a number of potential Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission concepts, including the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission concept. As a part of this test, an infrared-based, non-contact thermal imaging system was developed to measure Hall thruster surfaces that are exposed to high voltage or harsh environment. To increase the accuracy of the measurement, a calibration array was implemented, and a pilot test was performed to determine key design parameters for the calibration array. The raw data is analyzed in conjunction with a simplified thermal model of the channel to account for reflection. The reduced data will be used to refine the thruster thermal model, which is critical to the verification of the thruster thermal specifications. The present paper will give an overview of the decision process that led to identification of the need for a non-contact temperature diagnostic, the development of said diagnostic, the measurement results, and the simplified thermal model of the channel.

  18. Numerical modeling of laser thermal propulsion flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Thoenes, J.

    1984-01-01

    An review of the problems associated with modeling laser thermal propulsion flows, a synopsis of the status of such models, and the attributes of a successful model are presented. The continuous gaseous hydrogen laser-supported combustion wave (LSCW) thruster, for which a high-energy laser system (preferably space-based) should exist by the time the propulsion technology is developed, is considered in particular. The model proposed by Raizer (1970) is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional flow at constant pressure with heat conduction as the principal heat transfer mechanism. Consideration is given to subsequent models which account for radiative transfer into the ambient gas; provide a two-dimensional generalization of Raizer's analysis for the subsonic propagation of laser sparks in air; include the effect of forward plasma radiation in a one-dimensional model; and attempt a time-dependent (elliptic) solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow in a simple axisymmetric thruster. Attention is also given to thruster and nozzle flow models and thermodynamic and transport properties.

  19. Performance and Thermal Characterization of the NASA-300MS 20 kW Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Shastry, Rohit; Soulas, George; Smith, Timothy; Mikellides, Ioannis; Hofer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate is sponsoring the development of a high fidelity 15 kW-class long-life high performance Hall thruster for candidate NASA technology demonstration missions. An essential element of the development process is demonstration that incorporation of magnetic shielding on a 20 kW-class Hall thruster will yield significant improvements in the throughput capability of the thruster without any significant reduction in thruster performance. As such, NASA Glenn Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory collaborated on modifying the NASA-300M 20 kW Hall thruster to improve its propellant throughput capability. JPL and NASA Glenn researchers performed plasma numerical simulations with JPL's Hall2De and a commercially available magnetic modeling code that indicated significant enhancement in the throughput capability of the NASA-300M can be attained by modifying the thruster's magnetic circuit. This led to modifying the NASA-300M magnetic topology to a magnetically shielded topology. This paper presents performance evaluation results of the two NASA-300M magnetically shielded thruster configurations, designated 300MS and 300MS-2. The 300MS and 300MS-2 were operated at power levels between 2.5 and 20 kW at discharge voltages between 200 and 700 V. Discharge channel deposition from back-sputtered facility wall flux, and plasma potential and electron temperature measurements made on the inner and outer discharge channel surfaces confirmed that magnetic shielding was achieved. Peak total thrust efficiency of 64% and total specific impulse of 3,050 sec were demonstrated with the 300MS-2 at 20 kW. Thermal characterization results indicate that the boron nitride discharge chamber walls temperatures are approximately 100 C lower for the 300MS when compared to the NASA- 300M at the same thruster operating discharge power.

  20. Erosion rate diagnostics in ion thrusters using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, C. J.; Matossian, J. N.; Turley, R. S.; Beattie, J. R.; Williams, J. D.; Williamson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    We have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to monitor the charge-exchange ion erosion of the molybdenum accelerator electrode in ion thrusters. This real-time, nonintrusive method was implemented by operating a 30cm-diam ring-cusp thruster using xenon propellant. With the thruster operating at a total power of 5 kW, laser radiation at a wavelength of 390 nm (corresponding to a ground state atomic transition of molybdenum) was directed through the extracted ion beam adjacent to the downstream surface of the molybdenum accelerator electrode. Molybdenum atoms, sputtered from this surface as a result of charge-exchange ion erosion, were excited by the laser radiation. The intensity of the laser-induced fluorescence radiation, which is proportional to the sputter rate of the molybdenum atoms, was measured and correlated with variations in thruster operating conditions such as accelerator electrode voltage, accelerator electrode current, and test facility background pressure. We also demonstrated that the LIF technique has sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution to evaluate accelerator electrode lifetime in ground-based test facilities.

  1. Comparison of thermal analytic model with experimental test results for 30-sentimeter-diameter engineering model mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglebay, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A thermal analytic model for a 30-cm engineering model mercury-ion thruster was developed and calibrated using the experimental test results of tests of a pre-engineering model 30-cm thruster. A series of tests, performed later, simulated a wide range of thermal environments on an operating 30-cm engineering model thruster, which was instrumented to measure the temperature distribution within it. The modified analytic model is described and analytic and experimental results compared for various operating conditions. Based on the comparisons, it is concluded that the analytic model can be used as a preliminary design tool to predict thruster steady-state temperature distributions for stage and mission studies and to define the thermal interface bewteen the thruster and other elements of a spacecraft.

  2. A structural and thermal packaging approach for power processing units for 30-cm ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, J. E.; Sharp, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) is currently being studied for possible use in a number of near earth and planetary missions. The thruster subsystem for these missions would consist of 30 centimeter ion thrusters with Power Processor Units (PPU) clustered in assemblies of from two to ten units. A preliminary design study of the electronic packaging of the PPU has been completed at Lewis Research Center of NASA. This study evaluates designs meeting the competing requirements of low system weight and overall mission flexibility. These requirements are evaluated regarding structural and thermal design, electrical efficiency, and integration of the electrical circuits into a functional PPU layout.

  3. The microwave thermal thruster and its application to the launch problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, Kevin L. G.

    Nuclear thermal thrusters long ago bypassed the 50-year-old specific impulse (Isp) limitation of conventional thrusters, using nuclear powered heat exchangers in place of conventional combustion to heat a hydrogen propellant. These heat exchanger thrusters experimentally achieved an Isp of 825 seconds, but with a thrust-to-weight ratio (T/W) of less than ten they have thus far been too heavy to propel rockets into orbit. This thesis proposes a new idea to achieve both high Isp and high T/W The Microwave Thermal Thruster. This thruster covers the underside of a rocket aeroshell with a lightweight microwave absorbent heat exchange layer that may double as a re-entry heat shield. By illuminating the layer with microwaves directed from a ground-based phased array, an Isp of 700--900 seconds and T/W of 50--150 is possible using a hydrogen propellant. The single propellant simplifies vehicle design, and the high Isp increases payload fraction and structural margins. These factors combined could have a profound effect on the economics of building and reusing rockets. A laboratory-scale microwave thermal heat exchanger is constructed using a single channel in a cylindrical microwave resonant cavity, and new type of coupled electromagnetic-conduction-convection model is developed to simulate it. The resonant cavity approach to small-scale testing reveals several drawbacks, including an unexpected oscillatory behavior. Stable operation of the laboratory-scale thruster is nevertheless successful, and the simulations are consistent with the experimental results. In addition to proposing a new type of propulsion and demonstrating it, this thesis provides three other principal contributions: The first is a new perspective on the launch problem, placing it in a wider economic context. The second is a new type of ascent trajectory that significantly reduces the diameter, and hence cost, of the ground-based phased array. The third is an eclectic collection of data, techniques, and

  4. Scaling and applied field studies of MPD thrusters with laser diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: self-field magnetoplasmadynamics; 1/4-scale applied-field MPD; scaling of arcs and MPD-arcs; magnetic nozzle studies; advanced diagnostic techniques needed for obtaining particle velocity, temperature, and current distributions in plasma thrusters; nonintrusive laser diagnostics for arcs and MPD-arcs; and schematic of multi-beam interferometer for electron density profile determination.

  5. Non-Contact Thermal Characterization of NASA's HERMeS Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Myers, James L.; Yim, John T.; Neff, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The thermal characterization test of NASA's 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding has been completed. This thruster was developed to support a number of potential Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission concepts, including the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission concept. As a part of the preparation for this characterization test, an infrared-based, non-contact thermal imaging system was developed to measure the temperature of various thruster surfaces that are exposed to high voltage or plasma. An in-situ calibration array was incorporated into the setup to improve the accuracy of the temperature measurement. The key design parameters for the calibration array were determined in a separate pilot test. The raw data from the characterization test was analyzed though further work is needed to obtain accurate anode temperatures. Examination of the front pole and discharge channel temperatures showed that the thruster temperature was driven more by discharge voltage than by discharge power. Operation at lower discharge voltages also yielded more uniform temperature distributions than at higher discharge voltages. When operating at high discharge voltage, increasing the magnetic field strength appeared to have made the thermal loading azimuthally more uniform.

  6. Laser Fine-Adjustment Thruster For Space Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezunkov, Yu. A.; Egorov, M. S.; Repina, E. V.; Safronov, A. L.; Rebrov, S. G.

    2010-05-06

    To the present time, a few laser propulsion engine devices have been developed by using dominant mechanisms of laser propulsion. Generally these mechanisms are laser ablation, laser breakdown of gases, and laser detonation waves that are induced due to extraction of the internal energy of polymer propellants. In the paper, we consider the Aero-Space Laser Propulsion Engine (ASLPE) developed earlier, in which all of these mechanisms are realized via interaction of laser radiation with polymers both in continuous wave (CW) and in repetitively pulsed modes of laser operation. The ASLPE is considered to be exploited as a unit of a laser propulsion device being arranged onboard space vehicles moving around the Earth or in interplanetary missions and intended to correct the vehicles orbits. To produce a thrust, a power of the solar pumped lasers designed to the present time is considered in the paper. The problem of increasing the efficiency of the laser propulsion device is analyzed as applied to space missions of vehicles by optimizing the laser propulsion propellant composition.

  7. Performance Characteristics of Low-Power Laser Ablative Thrusters for Small Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Maesato, Hikaru; Koizumi, Eiichiro; Tahara, Hirokazu

    2006-05-02

    In a laser ablative thruster, laser is irradiated to some solid propellant; it is ablated, and then produced small powders and/or gas particles with high energy are expanded resulting in thrust generation. In this study, a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and an output energy of 0.65 J was irradiated to polymer propellants to examine performance characteristics of laser ablative thrusters for small satellites. Impulse bit and mass loss were measured. As polymer propellants, PTFE, PTFE(carbon: 10mass%), PTFE(carbon: 15mass%), POM, POM(carbon: 20mass%), PE and PVC were selected. The performance characteristics mainly depended on specific weight and carbon concentration of polymer propellant. PTFE(carbon: 10mass%) and POM(carbon: 20mass%) were preferable propellants for high performance although with PTFE(carbon: 10mass%) laser should be irradiated to its new surface for every shot. In laser irradiation with PTFE divergent nozzles, there existed an optimum nozzle geometry for improvement of performance characteristics. In a case with a nozzle half angle of 15 deg and a length of 3 mm, the momentum coupling coefficient and the specific impulse reached 112 {mu}Ns/J and 300 sec, respectively.

  8. Structural and thermal response of 30 cm diameter ion thruster optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, G. S.; Zavesky, R. J.; Gooder, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    Tabular and graphical data are presented which are intended for use in calibrating and validating structural and thermal models of ion thruster optics. A 30 cm diameter, two electrode, mercury ion thruster was operated using two different electrode assembly designs. With no beam extraction, the transient and steady state temperature profiles and center electrode gaps were measured for three discharge powers. The data showed that the electrode mount design had little effect on the temperatures, but significantly impacted the motion of the electrode center. Equilibrium electrode gaps increased with one design and decreased with the other. Equilibrium displacements in excess of 0.5 mm and gap changes of 0.08 mm were measured at 450 W discharge power. Variations in equilibrium gaps were also found among assemblies of the same design. The presented data illustrate the necessity for high fidelity ion optics models and development of experimental techniques to allow their validation.

  9. High efficient configuration design and simulation of platelet heat exchanger in solar thermal thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, BaoYu; Liu, Kun; Huang, MinChao; Cheng, MouSen

    2014-06-01

    Solar thermal propulsion system includes solar thermal propulsion and nuclear thermal propulsion, and it is a significant issue to improve the heat transfer efficiency of the solar thermal thruster. This paper proposes a platelet configuration to be used in the heat exchanger core, which is the most important component of solar thermal system. The platelet passage can enhance the heat transfer between the propellant and the hot core heated by the concentrated sunlight. Based on fluid-solid coupled heat transfer, the paper utilized the platelet heat transfer characteristic to simulate the heat transfer and flow field of the platelet passage. A coupled system includes the coupled flow and heat transfer between the fluid region and solid region. The simulation result shows that the propellant can be heated to the design temperature of 2300K in platelet passage of the thermal propulsion system, and the fluid-solid coupled method can solve the heat transfer in the platelet structure more precisely.

  10. On applicability of the “thermalized potential” solver in simulations of the plasma flow in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Jinyue; Brieda, Lubos; Rose, Laura; Keidar, Michael

    2013-09-14

    In Hall thrusters, the potential distribution plays an important role in discharge processes and ion acceleration. This paper presents a 2D potential solver in the Hall thruster instead of the “thermalized potential”, and compares equipotential contours solved by these two methods for different magnetic field conditions. The comparison results reveal that the expected “thermalized potential” works very well when the magnetic field is nearly uniform and electron temperature is constant along the magnetic field lines. However for the case with a highly non-uniform magnetic field or variable electron temperature along the magnetic field lines, the “thermalized potential” is not accurate. In some case with magnetic separatrix inside the thruster channel, the “thermalized potential” model cannot be applied at all. In those cases, a full 2D potential solver must be applied. Overall, this paper shows the limit of applicability of the “thermalized potential” model.

  11. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  12. The microwave electro-thermal (MET) thruster: A new technology for satellite propulsion and attitude control

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, J.E.; Micci, M.M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper discusses the current research status of the MET (Microwave Electro-Thermal) thruster. In the MET thruster, an electrodeless, vortex stabilized, plasma is produced in a microwave resonator cavity for the purpose of heating gaseous fuel to produce a high temperature rocket exhaust for space propulsion. The higher specific impulse (momentum transfer per unit weight) of these heated gases offers advantages over traditional chemical rockets in terms of reduced fuel mass. In MET devices, dense plasmas have been produced in various possible fuel gases, nitrogen, hydrogen, and ammonia, using 600 to 2200 Watts of microwave power at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. Ammonia has been found to give a specific impulse of 550 sec. It has been found that the plasma is a 98{percent} absorber of microwave power leading to negligible reflection of power back to the microwave source and making the cavity operate at low {ital Q}. Taking advantage of this effect, it has been found that a very compact MET thruster design could be operated, with the magnetron microwave source and resonator cavity joined in one unit. The MET can run at a variety of power levels and use many fuels, including H{sub 2}O. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. A mercury flow meter for ion thruster testing. [response time, thermal sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of operation of the thermal flow meter is presented, and a theoretical model is used to determine design parameters for a device capable of measuring mercury flows in the range of 0 to 5 gm/hr. Flow meter construction is described. Tests performed using a positive displacement mercury pump as well as those performed with the device in the feed line of an operating thruster are discussed. A flow meter response time of about a minute and a sensitivity of about 10 mv/gm/hr are demonstrated. Additional work to relieve a sensitivity of the device to variations in ambient temperature is indicated to improve its quantitative performance.

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in a running Hall Effect Thruster for space propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balika, L.; Focsa, C.; Gurlui, S.; Pellerin, S.; Pellerin, N.; Pagnon, D.; Dudeck, M.

    2012-08-01

    Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) are promising electric propulsion devices for the station-keeping of geostationary satellites and for interplanetary missions. The main limiting factor of the HET lifetime is the erosion of the annular channel ceramic walls. Erosion monitoring has been performed in the laboratory using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements and data treatment based on the coronal model and the actinometric hypothesis. This study uses laser ablation of the ceramic wall in a running HET in order to introduce controlled amounts of sputtered material in the thruster plasma. The transient laser-induced breakdown plasma expands orthogonally in a steady-state plasma jet created by the HET discharge. The proposed spectroscopic method involves species from both plasmas (B, Xe, Xe+). The optical emission signal is correlated to the ablated volume (measured by profilometry) leading to the first direct validation of the actinometric hypothesis in this frame and opening the road for calibration of in-flight erosion monitoring based on the OES method.

  15. Measurement of xenon plasma properties in an ion thruster using laser Thomson scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, N.; Tomita, K.; Sugita, K.; Kurita, T.; Nakashima, H.; Uchino, K.

    2012-07-15

    This paper reports on the development of a method for measuring xenon plasma properties using the laser Thomson scattering technique, for application to ion engine system design. The thresholds of photo-ionization of xenon plasma were investigated and the number density of metastable atoms, which are photo-ionized by a probe laser, was measured using laser absorption spectroscopy, for several conditions. The measured threshold energy of the probe laser using a plano-convex lens with a focal length of 200 mm was 150 mJ for a xenon mass flow rate of 20 {mu}g/s and incident microwave power of 6 W; the probe laser energy was therefore set as 80 mJ. Electron number density was found to be (6.2 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and electron temperature was found to be 2.2 {+-} 0.4 eV at a xenon mass flow rate of 20 {mu}g/s and incident microwave power of 6 W. The threshold of the probe laser intensity against photo-ionization in a miniature xenon ion thruster is almost constant for various mass flow rates, since the ratio of population of the metastable atoms to the electron number density is little changed.

  16. Measurement of xenon plasma properties in an ion thruster using laser Thomson scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Tomita, K; Sugita, K; Kurita, T; Nakashima, H; Uchino, K

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the development of a method for measuring xenon plasma properties using the laser Thomson scattering technique, for application to ion engine system design. The thresholds of photo-ionization of xenon plasma were investigated and the number density of metastable atoms, which are photo-ionized by a probe laser, was measured using laser absorption spectroscopy, for several conditions. The measured threshold energy of the probe laser using a plano-convex lens with a focal length of 200 mm was 150 mJ for a xenon mass flow rate of 20 μg/s and incident microwave power of 6 W; the probe laser energy was therefore set as 80 mJ. Electron number density was found to be (6.2 ± 0.4) × 10(17) m(-3) and electron temperature was found to be 2.2 ± 0.4 eV at a xenon mass flow rate of 20 μg/s and incident microwave power of 6 W. The threshold of the probe laser intensity against photo-ionization in a miniature xenon ion thruster is almost constant for various mass flow rates, since the ratio of population of the metastable atoms to the electron number density is little changed. PMID:22852670

  17. Combined effects of electron partial thermalization and secondary emission in Hall thruster discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, E.; Pablo, V. de

    2007-08-15

    A model of the plasma interaction with the ceramic walls of a Hall thruster chamber is presented that takes into account partial thermalization of the electron distribution function. A model of secondary electron emission with both elastically reflected and true-secondary electrons is considered. The plasma response is found to differ substantially from low to high thermalization. The different roles of the bulk and emitted populations of electrons are discussed. Plasma fluxes to the wall are independent of the thermalization level except in the very-low thermalization limit, when the tail of the distribution function of bulk electrons is highly depleted. To the contrary, energy losses to the walls and the sheath charge saturation limit depend strongly on the level of thermalization. Elastically reflected electrons affect significantly the plasma response by modifying the fluxes of primary and secondary electrons at the walls. Emphasis is put on obtaining analytical expressions for main plasma magnitudes, which can be implemented in two-dimensional models of the whole plasma discharge.

  18. Numerical study on thermal load of laser reflecting focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fu Qiang; Hong, Yan Ji

    2013-05-01

    In laser thrusters, the reflectors of the focusing system work under high-intensity laser radiation. The material choice of the reflectors is quite important due to thermal load raised by laser absorption. Meanwhile the endurance of heavy thermal load should be attributed to the metallic reflectors with low laser energy absorption ratio. Based on two-dimension heat conduction equation and several approximations, this study investigates the melting time and thermal deformation characteristics for three kind of metallic materials that are of high heat specific heat, high conductivity and high melting point, and so are some alloys. Calculated through Finite Differential Method, the results show that, as for the twice reflecting focusing system, the thermal load is quite remarkable for the both reflectors and is more serious for the second one, while different materials present distinct thermal endurance performance. For the materials under study, the beryllium mirrors featuring higher specific heat could endure longer laser radiation and may prolong the work time. Moreover, if the reflecting mirror is required to work under high laser radiation for longer time, the aid of cooling system maybe indispensable.

  19. Ion thruster design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kami, S.; Schnelker, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Questions concerning the mechanical design of a thruster are considered, taking into account differences in the design of an 8-cm and a 30-cm model. The components of a thruster include the thruster shell assembly, the ion extraction electrode assembly, the cathode isolator vaporizer assembly, the neutralizer isolator vaporizer assembly, ground screen and mask, and the main isolator vaporizer assembly. Attention is given to the materials used in thruster fabrication, the advanced manufacturing methods used, details of thruster performance, an evaluation of thruster life, structural and thermal design considerations, and questions of reliability and quality assurance.

  20. A multiple thruster array for 30-cm thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The 3.0-m diameter chamber of the 7.6-m diameter by 21.4-m long vacuum tank at NASA LeRC was modified to permit testing of an array of up to six 30-cm thrusters with a variety of laboratory and thermal vacuum bread-board power systems. A primary objective of the Multiple Thruster Array (MTA) program is to assess the impact of multiple thruster operation on individual thruster and power processor requirements. The areas of thruster startup, steady-state operation, throttling, high voltage recycle, thrust vectoring, and shutdown are of special concern. The results of initial tests are reported.

  1. Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of the Ion Velocity Distribution in the H6 Hall Thruster Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durot, Christopher; Gallimore, Alec

    2013-10-01

    We developed a technique to recover time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence signals from strong background emission in plasma sources that have a relatively constant spectrum of oscillations in steady-state operation but are not periodically pulsed, such as Hall thrusters. The system was previously validated using a hollow cathode plasma source with forced discharge current oscillations. We present the first results using the new technique to capture oscillations in a Hall thruster. The ion velocity distribution function in the plume of the H6 Hall thruster is interrogated during breathing mode oscillations, which are characterized by an oscillating depletion and replenishment of neutrals at a frequency of 10-25 kHz. We use laser modulation on the order of megahertz, well above the time scale of interest (about 0.1 ms). A combination of band-pass filtering, phase-sensitive detection (with a time constant on the order of microseconds), and averaging over transfer functions is used to recover the signal. This technique has advantages such as a shorter dwell time than other techniques and the lack of a need for triggering averaging in the time domain. The ultimate bandwidth of the system that we implemented is approximately 1 MHz, limited by the speed of the AOM and signal photon rate collected. This work was supported by AFOSR and AFRL through the MACEEP center of excellence grant number FA9550-09-1-0695.

  2. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOEpatents

    Milner, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall mperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser.

  3. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurement of ion and neutral dynamics in a Hall thruster during ionization oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher V.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents spatially and temporally resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of the xenon ion and neutral velocity distribution functions in a 400 W Hall thruster during natural ionization oscillations at 23 kHz, the so-called "breathing mode." Strong fluctuations in measured axial ion velocity throughout the discharge current cycle are observed at five spatial locations and the velocity maxima appear in the low current interval. The spatio-temporal evolution of the ion velocity distribution function suggests a propagating acceleration front undergoing periodic motion between the thruster exit plane and ˜1 cm downstream into the plume. The ion LIF signal intensity oscillates almost in phase with the discharge current, while the neutral fluorescence signal appears out of phase, indicating alternating intervals of strong and weak ionization.

  4. The MPD thruster program at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, John; Goodfellow, Keith; Polk, James; Pivirotto, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The main topics covered include: (1) the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) context; (2) critical issues of MPD Thruster design; and (3) the Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) Thruster Program at JPL. Under the section on the SEI context the nuclear electric propulsion system and some electric thruster options are addressed. The critical issues of MPD Thruster development deal with the requirements, status, and approach taken. The following areas are covered with respect to the MPD Thruster Program at JPL: (1) the radiation-cooled MPD thruster; (2) the High-Current Cathode Test Facility; (3) thruster component thermal modeling; and (4) alkali metal propellant studies.

  5. MOA: Magnetic Field Oscillating Amplified Thruster and its Application for Nuclear Electric and Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Frischauf, Norbert; Hettmer, Manfred; Grassauer, Andreas; Bartusch, Tobias; Koudelka, Otto

    2006-07-01

    More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfven had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfven waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept, utilising Alfven waves to accelerate ionised matter for propulsive purposes, is MOA - Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified thruster. Alfven waves are generated by making use of two coils, one being permanently powered and serving also as magnetic nozzle, the other one being switched on and off in a cyclic way, deforming the field lines of the overall system. It is this deformation that generates Alfven waves, which are in the next step used to transport and compress the propulsive medium, in theory leading to a propulsion system with a much higher performance than any other electric propulsion system. Based on computer simulations, which were conducted to get a first estimate on the performance of the system, MOA is a highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an 'afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space-terrestrial application research and utilisation strategy. (authors)

  6. Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Ion Velocity Distribution in the Plume of a 6 kW Hall Thruster with Unperturbed Discharge Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durot, Christopher; Gallimore, Alec

    2014-10-01

    We present laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of the time-resolved ion velocity distribution in the plume of a 6 kW laboratory Hall thruster. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements of time-resolved ion velocity distribution on completely unperturbed Hall thruster operating conditions. To date, time-resolved LIF measurements have been made on Hall thrusters with oscillations driven or perturbed to be amenable to averaging techniques that assume a periodic oscillation. Natural Hall thruster breathing and spoke oscillations, however, are not periodic due to chaotic variations in amplitude and frequency. Although the system averages over many periods of nonperiodic oscillation, it recovers the time-resolved signal in part by assuming that a constant transfer function exists relating discharge current and LIF signal and averaging over the transfer function itself (http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4856635). The assumption of a constant transfer function has been validated for a Hall thruster and the technique is now applied to a Hall thruster for the first time.

  7. Optical properties of thermal control coating contaminated by MMH/N2O4 5-pound thruster in a vacuum environment with solar simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommers, R. D.; Raquet, C. A.; Cassidy, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Cat-a-lac Black, and S13G thermal control coatings were exposed to the exhaust of a thruster in a simulated space environment. Vacuum was maintained at less than 10 to the minus 5th power torr during thruster firing in the liquid helium cooled facility. The thruster was fired in a 50-millisecond pulse mode and the accumulated firing time was 224 seconds. Solar absorptance (alpha sub s) and thermal emittance (sigma) of the coatings were measured in-situ at intervals of 300 pulses. A calorimetric technique was used to measure alpha sub s and sigma. The tests, technique, and test results are presented. The Cat-a-lac Black coatings showed no change in alpha sub s or sigma. The S13G showed up to 25 percent increase in alpha sub s but no change in sigma.

  8. Thermal lensing of laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mark J.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper focuses on the three main effects that can induce wave-front distortion due to thermal lensing in laser gain media: 1) thermo-optic (dn/dT); 2) stress-optic; and 3) surface deformation (e.g., "end-bulging" of a laser rod). Considering the simple case of a side-pumped cylindrical rod which is air- or water-cooled along its length, the internal temperature distribution has long been known to assume a simple parabolic profile. Resulting from this are two induced refractive index variations due to thermo-optic and stress-optic effects that also assume a parabolic profile, but generally not of the same magnitude, nor even of the same sign. Finally, a small deformation on the rod ends can induce a small additional lensing contribution. We had two goals in this study: a) use finite-element simulations to verify the existing analytical expressions due to Koechner1 and Foster and Osterink; and b) apply them to glasses from the SCHOTT laser glass portfolio. The first goal was a reaction to more recent work by Chenais et al. who claimed Koechner made an error in his analysis with regard to thermal stress, throwing into doubt conclusions within studies since 1970 which made use of his equations. However, our re-analysis of their derivations, coupled with our FE modeling, confirmed that the Koechner and Foster and Osterink treatments are correct, and that Chenais et al. made mistakes in their derivation of the thermally-induced strain. Finally, for a nominal laser rod geometry, we compared the thermally-induced optical distortions in LG-680, LG-750, LG-760, LG-770, APG-1, and APG-2. While LG-750, -760, and -770 undergo considerable thermo-optic lensing, their stress-optic lensing is nearly of the same magnitude but of opposite sign, leading to a small total thermal lensing signature.

  9. Measurement of axial neutral density profiles in a microwave discharge ion thruster by laser absorption spectroscopy with optical fiber probes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutaka; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2011-12-15

    In order to reveal the physical processes taking place within the ''{mu}10'' microwave discharge ion thruster, internal plasma diagnosis is indispensable. However, the ability of metallic probes to access microwave plasmas biased at a high voltage is limited from the standpoints of the disturbance created in the electric field and electrical isolation. In this study, the axial density profiles of excited neutral xenon were successfully measured under ion beam acceleration by using a novel laser absorption spectroscopy system. The target of the measurement was metastable Xe I 5p{sup 5}({sup 2}P{sup 0}{sub 3/2})6s[{sup 3}/{sub 2}]{sup 0}{sub 2} which absorbed a wavelength of 823.16 nm. Signals from laser absorption spectroscopy that swept a single-mode optical fiber probe along the line of sight were differentiated and converted into axial number densities of the metastable neutral particles in the plasma source. These measurements revealed a 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} order of metastable neutral particles situated in the waveguide, which caused two different modes during the operation of the {mu}10 thruster. This paper reports a novel spectroscopic measurement system with axial resolution for microwave plasma sources utilizing optical fiber probes.

  10. Measurement of axial neutral density profiles in a microwave discharge ion thruster by laser absorption spectroscopy with optical fiber probes.

    PubMed

    Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutaka; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2011-12-01

    In order to reveal the physical processes taking place within the "μ10" microwave discharge ion thruster, internal plasma diagnosis is indispensable. However, the ability of metallic probes to access microwave plasmas biased at a high voltage is limited from the standpoints of the disturbance created in the electric field and electrical isolation. In this study, the axial density profiles of excited neutral xenon were successfully measured under ion beam acceleration by using a novel laser absorption spectroscopy system. The target of the measurement was metastable Xe I 5p(5)((2)P(0) (3/2))6s[3/2](0) (2) which absorbed a wavelength of 823.16 nm. Signals from laser absorption spectroscopy that swept a single-mode optical fiber probe along the line of sight were differentiated and converted into axial number densities of the metastable neutral particles in the plasma source. These measurements revealed a 10(18) m(-3) order of metastable neutral particles situated in the waveguide, which caused two different modes during the operation of the μ10 thruster. This paper reports a novel spectroscopic measurement system with axial resolution for microwave plasma sources utilizing optical fiber probes. PMID:22225195

  11. Improved Hall type thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetch, Joseph R.; See-pok Wong, Britt, Edward J.; McCracken, Kevin J.; Lin, Raymond; Petrosov, Valeri; Koroteev, Anatoli

    1995-01-01

    An improved design of the Hall type stationary plasma thruster has been tested in 1994. The test results are presented. The test measures performance, EMI and beam divergence of two models of thrusters from the Russian Keldysh Scientific-Research Institute of Thermal Processes. The first of these engines, T-100 produces 80 mN thruster with power of 1.35 kWe. The other thruster, T-160 is larger and produces 280 nM thrust with 4.5 kWe. Endurance testing of the T-100 for 2000 hours was completed at NIITP. Post operation wear measurements indicate that the insulator life expectency will exceed the 8000 hour design life objective. Improved efficiencies of 48 to 52% were measured for the T-100 and 58-62% (with elevated tank pressure) for the T-160 at specific impulse Isp of 1600 seconds and 2000 seconds respectively.

  12. Integrated thruster assembly program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The program is reported which has provided technology for a long life, high performing, integrated ACPS thruster assembly suitable for use in 100 typical flights of a space shuttle vehicle over a ten year period. The four integrated thruster assemblies (ITA) fabricated consisted of: propellant injector; a capacitive discharge, air gap torch type igniter assembly; fast response igniter and main propellant valves; and a combined regen-dump film cooled chamber. These flightweight 6672 N (1500 lb) thruster assemblies employed GH2/GO2 as propellants at a chamber pressure of 207 N/sq cm (300 psia). Test data were obtained on thrusted performance, thermal and hydraulic characteristics, dynamic response in pulsing, and cycle life. One thruster was fired in excess of 42,000 times.

  13. A laser spectroscopic study on Xe{sup +} ion transport phenomena in the ExB discharge of a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouffre, S.; Gawron, D.; Kulaev, V.; Luna, J. Perez; Sadeghi, N.

    2008-03-19

    The Velocity Distribution Function (VDF) of metastable Xe{sup +} ions was measured along the channel axis of the 5 kW-class PPS registered X000 Hall effect thruster by means of Laser Induced Fluorescence spectroscopy at 834.72 nm for various voltages, magnetic fields and mass flow rates. Axial velocity and dispersion profiles are compared to on-axis profiles obtained with the 1.5 kW-class PPS100 thruster. Outcomes of the comparison are threefold. (i) The broadening of the FDV across the region of strong magnetic field is a general feature for Hall thrusters. It originates in the overlap between ionization and acceleration layers. The velocity dispersion increases with the discharge voltage; it reaches up to 200 eV in unit of kinetic energy at 700 V. (ii) Most of the acceleration potential ({approx_equal}70%) is localized outside the thruster channel whatever the thruster size and operating conditions. The electric field moves upstream when the applied voltage is ramped up; in other words the fraction of potential inside the channel increases with the voltage; (iii) A non negligible amount of very slow and very fast (kinetic energy higher than the applied potential) Xe{sup +} ions are always observed. Such ions may find their origin in space and temporal oscillations of the electric field as suggested by numerical simulations carried out with a hybrid model.

  14. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOEpatents

    Milner, J.R.

    1994-10-25

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall temperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser. 8 figs.

  15. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Eric Bryant

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a new technique for remote nonintrusive measurement of thermophysical gas properties. LITA involves forming, via opto-acoustic effects, grating-shaped perturbations of gas properties by the use of intersecting beams from a short-pulse laser. A third beam scatters coherently into a signal beam off the perturbation grating via acousto-optical effects. The evolution of the gas perturbations modulates the scattered signal beam. Accurate values of the sound speed, transport properties, and composition of the gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal beam. An analytical expression for the spectrum, absolute magnitude, and time history of the LITA signal is derived. The optoacoustic effects of thermalization and electrostriction are treated. Finite beam-diameter, beam-duration, and thermalization-rate effects are included in the analysis. The expression accurately models experimental signals over a wide range of gas conditions. Experimental tests using LITA have been conducted on pure and NO_2-seeded air and helium at pressures ranging from {~ }0.1 kPa-14 MPa. Carbon dioxide has been explored near its liquid-vapor critical point. Accuracies of 0.1% in sound speed measurements have been achieved in these tests. Accuracies of {~}1% have been achieved in measurements of thermal diffusivity, although beam misalignment effects have typically degraded this accuracy by a factor of {~} 10-20. Using LITA, susceptibility spectra have been taken of approximately a femtogram of NO_2 . The effects of fluid motion and turbulence have been explored. LITA velocimetry has been demonstrated, in which the Doppler shift of light scattered from a flowing fluid is measured. LITA velocimetry requires no particle seeding, has a coherent signal beam, and can be applied to pulsed flows. LITA has also been applied to measure single-shot |chi^{(1) }|^2 or "Rayleigh scattering" spectra of a gas by the use of a technique of wavelength -division multiplexing

  16. Laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Eric B.

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a new technique for remote nonintrusive measurement of thermophysical gas properties. LITA involves forming, via opto-acoustic effects, grating-shaped perturbations of gas properties using intersecting beams from a short-pulse laser. A third beam scatters coherently into a signal beam off the perturbation grating via acousto-optical effects. The evolution of the gas perturbations modulates the scattered signal beam. Accurate values of the sound speed, transport properties, and composition of the gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal beam.An analytical expression for the spectrum, absolute magnitude, and time history of the LITA signal is derived. The optoacoustic effects of thermalization and electrostriction are treated. Finite beam-diameter, beam-duration, and thermalization-rate effects are included in the analysis. The expression accurately models experimental signals over a wide range of gas conditions.Experimental tests using LITA have been conducted on pure and [...]-seeded air and helium at pressures ranging from ~0.1 kPa-14 MPa. Carbon dioxide has been explored near its liquid-vapor critical point. Accuracies of 0.1% in sound speed measurements have been achieved in these tests. Accuracies of ~1% have been achieved in measurements of thermal diffusivity, although beam misalignment effects have typically degraded this accuracy by a factor of ~10-20. Using LITA, susceptibility spectra have been taken of approximately a femtogram of [...]. The effects of fluid motion and turbulence have been explored. LITA velocimetry has been demonstrated, in which the Doppler shift of light scattered from a flowing fluid is measured. LITA velocimetry requires no particle seeding, has a coherent signal beam, and can be applied to pulsed flows. LITA has also been applied to measure single-shot [...] or "Rayleigh scattering" spectra of a gas using a technique of wavelength-division multiplexing, called multiplex LITA. The LITA

  17. Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Dr. Tom Markusic, a propulsion research engineer at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), adjusts a diagnostic laser while a pulsed plasma thruster (PPT) fires in a vacuum chamber in the background. NASA/MSFC's Propulsion Research Center (PRC) is presently investigating plasma propulsion for potential use on future nuclear-powered spacecraft missions, such as human exploration of Mars.

  18. Polymers as fuel for laser plasma thrusters: A correlation of thrust with material and plasma properties by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urech, Lukas; Lippert, Thomas; Phipps, Claude R.; Wokaun, Alexander

    2006-05-01

    The micro laser plasma thruster (μLPT) is a micro propulsion device, designed for the steering and propelling of small satellites (1 to 10 kg). A laser is focused onto a polymer layer on a substrate to form a plasma. The thrust produced by this plasma is used to control the satellite motion. To understand the influence of the specific properties of the polymers, three different "high"- and "low"-energetic polymers were tested: poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) as a low-energetic reference polymer that showed the best properties among commercial polymers, a glycidyl azide polymer (GAP), and poly(vinyl nitrate) (PVN) as high-energetic polymers. It was necessary to dope the polymers with carbon nanoparticles or an IR-dye to achieve absorption at the irradiation wavelength in the near IR. Decomposition into smaller fragmentation was measured for the energetic polymers than for PVC corresponding well to the higher momentum coupling coefficient of the energetic polymers, which indicates that more thrust can be gained from a chosen incident laser power. The measurements of the kinetic energies of selected decomposition fragments revealed no significant difference between the different carbon doped polymers. Only for GAP with the IR-dye a change in the ratio between ions with different kinetic energy was observed with increasing fluence. More C + ions with higher kinetic energy were detected at higher fluences. No correlation between the kinetic energies of the ablation products and the specific impulse could be established for the obtained data.

  19. Electrode power deposition and thermal characteristics of a quasi-steady MPD arcjet thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagaya, Yoichi; Tahara, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Takao

    Deposited powers into the anode and cathode have been measured in a periodical pulse firing test of the quasi-steady magneto plasma dynamic (MDP) thruster. The test system is operated at the averaged input power of about 1 kW (the input power during quasi-steady arc discharge of 0.3 MW to 1.2 MW) and the arc current level of 4 kA to 10 kA. The dissipated power into the exhausted plasma is evaluated from calorimetric measurements. The obtained results showed that the energy depositions in the electrodes and the exhaust plasma flow are characterized by the species and mass flow rate of the propellant and arc current. The fraction of input power deposited into the anode was found to be 30 to 35% for nitrogen/hydrogen mixtures, 20 to 30% for hydrogen and 40 to 50% for argon. The input fraction into the cathode was from 10 to 17% for nitrogen/hydrogen mixtures, from 11 to 14% for hydrogen, and about 30% for argon. The anode and cathode potential drops, which are defined as the rate of each electrode input power divided by the arc current, are estimated from the data of the calorimetric measurements and discharge characteristics. By use of the anode and cathode input fractions appraised from the measured heat flux into each electrode, the temperature distribution of a MPD thruster head has been calculated in simulated higher power operation than 10kW in input power. The results showed that the key technology for higher power operations is dependent on how to reduce the cathode tip temperature.

  20. A mechanical, thermal and electrical packaging design for a prototype power management and control system for the 30 cm mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. R.; Gedeon, L.; Oglebay, J. C.; Shaker, F. S.; Siegert, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A prototype Electric Power Management and Thruster Control System for a 30 cm ion thruster has been built and is ready to support a first mission application. The system meets all of the requirements necessary to operate a thruster in a fully automatic mode. Power input to the system can vary over a full two to one dynamic range (200 to 400 V) for the solar array or other power source. The Power Management and Control system is designed to protect the thruster, the flight system and itself from arcs and is fully compatible with standard spacecraft electronics. The system is designed to be easily integrated into flight systems which can operate over a thermal environment ranging from 0.3 to 5 AU. The complete Power Management and Control system measures 45.7 cm x 15.2 cm x 114.8 cm and weighs 36.2 kg. At full power the overall efficiency of the system is estimated to be 87.4 percent. Three systems are currently being built and a full schedule of environmental and electrical testing is planned.

  1. A mechanical, thermal and electrical packaging design for a prototype power management and control system for the 30 cm mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. R.; Gedeon, L.; Oglebay, J. C.; Shaker, F. S.; Siegert, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A prototype electric power management and thruster control system for a 30 cm ion thruster is described. The system meets all of the requirements necessary to operate a thruster in a fully automatic mode. Power input to the system can vary over a full two to one dynamic range (200 to 400 V) for the solar array or other power source. The power management and control system is designed to protect the thruster, the flight system and itself from arcs and is fully compatible with standard spacecraft electronics. The system is easily integrated into flight systems which can operate over a thermal environment ranging from 0.3 to 5 AU. The complete power management and control system measures 45.7 cm (18 in.) x 15.2 cm (6 in.) x 114.8 cm (45.2 in.) and weighs 36.2 kg (79.7 lb). At full power the overall efficiency of the system is estimated to be 87.4 percent. Three systems are currently being built and a full schedule of environmental and electrical testing is planned.

  2. Electric thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    It has been customary to assume that ions flow nearly equally in all directions from the ion production region within an electron-bombardment discharge chamber. In general, the electron current through a magnetic field can alter the electron density, and hence the ion density, in such a way that ions tend to be directed away from the region bounded by the magnetic field. When this mechanism is understood, it becomes evident that many past discharge chamber designs have operated with a preferentially directed flow of ions. Thermal losses were calculated for an oxide-free hollow cathode. At low electron emissions, the total of the radiation and conduction losses agreed with the total discharge power. At higher emissions, though, the plasma collisions external to the cathode constituted an increasingly greater fraction of the discharge power. Experimental performance of a Hall-current thruster was adversely affected by nonuniformities in the magnetic field, produced by the cathode heating current. The technology of closed-drift thrusters was reviewed. The experimental electron diffusion in the acceleration channel was found to be within about a factor of 3 of the Bohm value for the better thruster designs at most operating conditions. Thruster efficiencies of about 0.5 appear practical for the 1000 to 2000 s range of specific impulse. Lifetime information is limited, but values of several thousands of hours should be possible with anode layer thrusters operated or = to 2000 s.

  3. NEXT Propellant Management System Integration With Multiple Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Soulas, George C.; Herman, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    As a critical part of the NEXT test validation process, a multiple-string integration test was performed on the NEXT propellant management system and ion thrusters. The objectives of this test were to verify that the PMS is capable of providing stable flow control to multiple thrusters operating over the NEXT system throttling range and to demonstrate to potential users that the NEXT PMS is ready for transition to flight. A test plan was developed for the sub-system integration test for verification of PMS and thruster system performance and functionality requirements. Propellant management system calibrations were checked during the single and multi-thruster testing. The low pressure assembly total flow rates to the thruster(s) were within 1.4 percent of the calibrated support equipment flow rates. The inlet pressures to the main, cathode, and neutralizer ports of Thruster PM1R were measured as the PMS operated in 1-thruster, 2-thruster, and 3-thruster configurations. It was found that the inlet pressures to Thruster PM1R for 2-thruster and 3-thruster operation as well as single thruster operation with the PMS compare very favorably indicating that flow rates to Thruster PM1R were similar in all cases. Characterizations of discharge losses, accelerator grid current, and neutralizer performance were performed as more operating thrusters were added to the PMS. There were no variations in these parameters as thrusters were throttled and single and multiple thruster operations were conducted. The propellant management system power consumption was at a fixed voltage to the DCIU and a fixed thermal throttle temperature of 75 C. The total power consumed by the PMS was 10.0, 17.9, and 25.2 W, respectively, for single, 2-thruster, and 3-thruster operation with the PMS. These sub-system integration tests of the PMS, the DCIU Simulator, and multiple thrusters addressed, in part, the NEXT PMS and propulsion system performance and functionality requirements.

  4. Thermal characterization of nanofluids using laser induced thermal lens technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Achamma; Kumar, Rajesh B.; George, Sajan D.

    2009-08-01

    A laser induced thermal lens technique has been employed to evaluate the dynamic thermal parameter, the thermal diffusivity, of gold nanofluids. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by citrate reduction of HAuCl4 in water. The UVVIS optical absorption spectra show an absorption peak around 540 nm owing to surface Plasmon resonance band of the gold particles. The thermal diffusivity of gold nanoparticles was evaluated by knowing the time constant of transient thermal lens obtained by fitting the experimental curve to the theoretical model of the mode-matched thermal lens. Analyses of the results show that the nanofluid exhibits lower thermal diffusivity value in comparison to the host medium, water. Further investigations also reveal that the concentration of nanoparticles in the fluid have influence on the measured thermal diffusivity value. Results are interpreted in terms of interfacial thermal resistance around the nanoparticles as well as on the clustering of nanoparticles.

  5. Laser modification of thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. A.; Fomin, A. D.; Naumkin, A. O.; Pekshev, P. Iu.; Smurov, I. Iu.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental results are reported on the modification of thermally sprayed coatings on steels and aluminum alloys using pulsed YAG and CW CO2 lasers. In particular, results obtained for self-fluxing Ni9CrBSi powders, ZRO2 ceramic, and titanium are examined. It is shown that the laser treatment of thermally sprayed coatings significantly improves their physicomechanical properties; it also makes it possible to obtain refractory coatings on low-melting substrates with good coating-substrate adhesion.

  6. Proposal of Liquid Cannon Target Driven by Fiber Laser for Micro-Thruster in Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Takashi; Ohzono, Hirokazu; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Baasandash, Choijil; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Oku, Takehiro; Taniguchi, Kazumoto; Miyazaki, Sho; Akoh, Ryosuke; Ogata, Yoichi; Rosenberg, Benjamin; Yoshida, Minoru

    2004-03-01

    We propose a new concept controlling a satellite by a fiber laser loaded in it and demonstrated the acceleration of pendulum with 7kW/2n and 2kHz fiber laser, and measured the Cm of 16Ns/MJ corresponding to the scaling of YAG laser. This laser can be easily bundled to generate much larger power. For more efficient acceleration, we propose ``metal-free water cannon target'', the new concept of propulsion using only water. The momentum coupling coefficient of 2500[Ns/MJ] was achieved with vacuum pump oil instead of water, and we succeeded in controlling the driving direction by the system based on the new concept. This can be used for thrusting a satellite and controlling its posture in combination with fiber lasers.

  7. Proposal of Liquid Cannon Target Driven by Fiber Laser for Micro-Thruster in Satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Yabe, Takashi; Ohzono, Hirokazu; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Baasandash, Choijil; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Oku, Takehiro; Taniguchi, Kazumoto; Miyazaki, Sho; Akoh, Ryosuke; Ogata, Yoichi; Rosenberg, Benjamin; Yoshida, Minoru

    2004-03-30

    We propose a new concept controlling a satellite by a fiber laser loaded in it and demonstrated the acceleration of pendulum with 7kW/2n and 2kHz fiber laser, and measured the Cm of 16Ns/MJ corresponding to the scaling of YAG laser. This laser can be easily bundled to generate much larger power. For more efficient acceleration, we propose 'metal-free water cannon target', the new concept of propulsion using only water. The momentum coupling coefficient of 2500[Ns/MJ] was achieved with vacuum pump oil instead of water, and we succeeded in controlling the driving direction by the system based on the new concept. This can be used for thrusting a satellite and controlling its posture in combination with fiber lasers.

  8. Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M.

    2008-09-23

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

  9. Thermal effects of lasers on dental tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Launay, Y.; Mordon, S.; Cornil, A.; Brunetaud, J.M.; Moschetto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal effects of Nd:YAG, argon, and CO/sub 2/ laser beams are observed on enamel, dentin, and dental pulp by means of computerized infrared thermography and thermocouple. This study shows that the Nd:YAG laser beam deeply diffuses through the enamel and dentin to the pulp. The argon laser effects are inconsistent depending on whether the enamel surface is cleaned, but after cleaning, the superficial and deep temperatures are low. With the CO/sub 2/ laser, the enamel and dentin surfaces reach very high temperatures, but only low temperatures are measured in the pulp chamber.

  10. Laser synchronization of a thermal explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Sandstrom, M. M.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.

    2007-06-01

    The authors describe a method by which prompt ignition of thermal explosions is achieved. A convergent heating geometry is applied to a solid cylindrical explosive generating spatial temperature gradients which define a thermal ignition volume. A laser pulse is introduced via an optical fiber to apply a nonshock temperature perturbation in this volume seconds prior the normal ignition time. Explosion occurs hundreds of microseconds subsequent to this perturbation. They show that the subsequent explosive response is identical to that of a normal thermal explosion. This synchronization method enables fast radiographic imaging of nonlinear thermal explosion.

  11. Green Liquid Monopropellant Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash B.

    2015-01-01

    Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI), and Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) are developing a unique chemical propulsion system for next-generation NASA science spacecraft and missions. The system is compact, lightweight, and can operate with high reliability over extended periods of time and under a wide range of thermal environments. The system uses a new storable, low-toxicity liquid monopropellant as its working fluid. In Phase I, the team demonstrated experimentally the critical ignition and combustion processes for the propellant and used the data to develop thruster design concepts. In Phase II, the team developed and demonstrated in the laboratory a proof-of-concept prototype thruster. A Phase III project is envisioned to develop a full-scale protoflight propulsion system applicable to a class of NASA missions.

  12. Investigation of beamed-energy ERH thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, Leik N.; Strayer, T. Darton; Bossard, John A.; Richard, Jacques C.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the performance of an External Radiation Heated (ERH) thruster. In this thruster, high intensity laser energy is focused to ignite either a Laser Supported Combustion (LSC) wave or a Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) wave. Thrust is generated as the LSC or LSD wave propagates over the thruster's surface, or in the proposed thruster configuration, the vehicle afterbody. Thrust models for the LSC and LSD waves were developed and simulated on a computer. Performance parameters investigated include the effect of laser intensity, flight Mach number, and altitude on mean-thrust and coupling coefficient of the ERH thruster. Results from these models suggest that the ERH thruster using LSC/LSD wave ignition could provide propulsion performance considerably greater than any propulsion system currently available.

  13. Thermal conductivity of garnet laser crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. S.; Jiang, H. H.; Zhang, Q. L.; Yin, S. T.

    2008-03-01

    The thermal conductivities of nine different synthetic garnet laser crystals at various temperatures, range from 273 to 393 K have been investigated by instantaneous measurement method. The results show that the thermal conductivity of each crystal decreases exponentially with the temperature increasing. It is notable that, different host crystals, such as YAG, GGG, and GSGG have different thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the crucial influence of crystal structure and composition on the absolute value of their thermal conductivity. Moreover, with respect to the same host crystals, the impurity scattering also results in the change of their thermal conductivities. This is because that a higher concentration of doped ions leads to a more phonon scattering modes, which results in a shorter mean free path of the phonons and a lower thermal conductivity. In addition, different host crystals have various dependences of thermal conductivity on dopant concentration. This works provides reliable and useful information for designing high power, high quality, and high stability laser devices.

  14. Thermal conductivity of synthetic garnet laser crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. S.; Jiang, H. H.; Zhang, Q. L.; Yin, S. T.

    2007-07-01

    The thermal conductivities of nine different synthetic garnet laser crystals at various temperatures, range from 273 to 393K have been investigated by instantaneous measurement method. The results show that the thermal conductivity of each crystal decreases exponentially with the temperature increasing. It is notable that, different host crystals, such as YAG, GGG, and GSGG have different thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the crucial influence of crystal structure and composition on the absolute value of their thermal conductivity. Moreover, with respect to the same host crystals, the impurity scattering also results in the change of their thermal conductivities. This is because that a higher concentration of doped ions leads to a more phonon scattering modes, which results in a shorter mean free path of the phonons and a lower thermal conductivity. In addition, different host crystals have various dependences of thermal conductivity on dopant concentration. This works provides reliable and useful information for designing high power, high quality, and high stability laser devices.

  15. Electrodeless Experimental Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Brainerd, Jerome J.; Reisz, Al

    2009-03-16

    An electrodeless experimental electric thruster has been built and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The plasma is formed by Electron-Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) absorption of RF waves (microwaves). The RF source operates in the 1 to 2 kW range. The plasma is overdense and is confined radially by an applied axial dc magnetic field. The field is shaped by a strong magnetic mirror on the upstream end and a magnetic nozzle on the downstream end. Argon is used as the propellant. The velocity profile in the exhaust plume has been measured with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). An unusual bimodal velocity profile has been measured.

  16. Laser thermal shock and fatigue testing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantini, Vincenzo; Serri, Laura; Bianchi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Thermal fatigue consists in repeatedly cycling the temperature of a specimen under test without any other constraint and stopping the test when predefined damage aspects. The result is a lifetime in terms of number of cycles. The parameters of the thermal cycle are the following: minimum and maximum temperature, time of heating, of cooling and time at high or at low temperature. When the temperature jump is very big and fast, phenomena of thermal shock can be induced. Among the numerous techniques used to perform these tests, the laser thermal fatigue cycling is very effective when fast heating of small and localized zones is required. That's the case of test performed to compare new and repaired blades of turbogas machines or components of combustion chambers of energy power plants. In order to perform these tests a thermal fatigue system, based on 1 kW Nd-YAG laser as source of heating, has been developed. The diameter of the heated zone of the specimen irradiated by the laser is in the range 0.5 - 20 mm. The temperatures can be chosen between 200 degree(s)C and 1500 degree(s)C and the piece can be maintained at high and/or low temperature from 0 s to 300 s. Temperature are measured by two sensors: a pyrometer for the high range (550 - 1500 degree(s)C) and a contactless thermocouple for the low range (200 - 550 degree(s)C). Two different gases can be blown on the specimen in the irradiated spot or in sample backside to speed up cooling phase. A PC-based control unit with a specially developed software performs PID control of the temperature cycle by fast laser power modulation. A high resolution vision system of suitable magnification is connected to the control unit to detect surface damages on the specimen, allowing real time monitoring of the tested zone as well as recording and reviewing the images of the sample during the test. Preliminary thermal fatigue tests on flat specimens of INCONEL 738 and HAYNES 230 are presented. IN738 samples, laser cladded by

  17. Ion Beam Characterization of a NEXT Multi-Thruster Array Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.; Diaz, Esther M.; Van Noord, Jonathan L.; McEwen, Heather K.

    2006-01-01

    Three operational, engineering model, 7-kW ion thrusters and one instrumented, dormant thruster were installed in a cluster array in a large vacuum facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. A series of engineering demonstration tests were performed to evaluate the system performance impacts of operating various multiple-thruster configurations in an array. A suite of diagnostics was installed to investigate multiple-thruster operation impact on thruster performance and life, thermal interactions, and alternative system modes and architectures. The ion beam characterization included measuring ion current density profiles and ion energy distribution with Faraday probes and retarding potential analyzers, respectively. This report focuses on the ion beam characterization during single thruster operation, multiple thruster operation, various neutralizer configurations, and thruster gimbal articulation. Comparison of beam profiles collected during single and multiple thruster operation demonstrated the utility of superimposing single engine beam profiles to predict multi-thruster beam profiles. High energy ions were detected in the region 45 off the thruster axis, independent of thruster power, number of operating thrusters, and facility background pressure, which indicated that the most probable ion energy was not effected by multiple-thruster operation. There were no significant changes to the beam profiles collected during alternate thruster-neutralizer configurations, therefore supporting the viability of alternative system configuration options. Articulation of one thruster shifted its beam profile, whereas the beam profile of a stationary thruster nearby did not change, indicating there were no beam interactions which was consistent with the behavior of a collisionless beam expansion.

  18. A time-resolved laser induced fluorescence study on the ion velocity distribution function in a Hall thruster after a fast current disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouffre, S.; Gawron, D.; Sadeghi, N.

    2009-04-15

    The temporal characteristics of the Xe{sup +} ion axial velocity distribution function (VDF) were recorded in the course of low-frequency discharge current oscillations ({approx}14 kHz) of the 5 kW class PPS X000 Hall thruster. The evolution in time of the ion axial velocity component is monitored by means of a laser induced fluorescence diagnostic tool with a time resolution of 100 ns. As the number of fluorescence photons is very low during such a short time period, a homemade pulse-counting lock-in system was used to perform real-time discrimination between background photons and fluorescence photons. The evolution in time of the ion VDF was observed at three locations along the thruster channel axis after a fast shutdown of the thruster power. The anode discharge current is switched off at 2 kHz during 5 {mu}s without any synchronization with the current oscillation cycle. This approach allows to examine the temporal behavior of the ion VDF during decay and ignition of the discharge as well as during forced and natural plasma oscillations. Measurements show that the distribution function of the axial component of the Xe{sup +} ion does change periodically in time with a frequency close to the current oscillation frequency in both forced and natural cases. The ion density and the mean velocity are found to oscillate, whereas the velocity dispersion stays constant, which indicates that ionization and acceleration layers have identical dynamics. Finally, variations over time in the electric field are for the first time experimentally evidenced in a crossed-field discharge.

  19. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications. PMID:25727222

  20. Stationary plasma thruster evaluation in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A team of electric propulsion specialists from U.S. government laboratories experimentally evaluated the performance of a 1.35-kW Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT) at the Scientific Research Institute of Thermal Processes in Moscow and at 'Fakel' Enterprise in Kaliningrad, Russia. The evaluation was performed using a combination of U.S. and Russian instrumentation and indicated that the actual performance of the thruster appears to be close to the claimed performance. The claimed performance was a specific impulse of 16,000 m/s, an overall efficiency of 50 percent, and an input power of 1.35 kW, and is superior to the performance of western electric thrusters at this specific impulse. The unique performance capabilities of the stationary plasma thruster, along with claims that more than fifty of the 660-W thrusters have been flown in space on Russian spacecraft, attracted the interest of western spacecraft propulsion specialists. A two-phase program was initiated to evaluate the stationary plasma thruster performance and technology. The first phase of this program, to experimentally evaluate the performance of the thruster with U.S. instrumentation in Russia, is described in this report. The second phase objective is to determine the suitability of the stationary plasma thruster technology for use on western spacecraft. This will be accomplished by bringing stationary plasma thrusters to the U.S. for quantification of thruster erosion rates, measurements of the performance variation as a function of long-duration operation, quantification of the exhaust beam divergence angle, and determination of the non-propellant efflux from the thruster. These issues require quantification in order to maximize the probability for user application of the SPT technology and significantly increase the propulsion capabilities of U.S. spacecraft.

  1. Propulsion Instruments for Small Hall Thruster Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Lee K.; Conroy, David G.; Spanjers, Greg G.; Bromaghim, Daron R.

    2001-01-01

    Planning and development are underway for the propulsion instrumentation necessary for the next AFRL electric propulsion flight project, which includes both a small Hall thruster and a micro-PPT. These instruments characterize the environment induced by the thruster and the associated data constitute part of a 'user's manual' for these thrusters. Several instruments probe the back-flow region of the thruster plume, and the data are intended for comparison with detailed numerical models in this region. Specifically, an ion probe is under development to determine the energy and species distributions, and a Langmuir probe will be employed to characterize the electron density and temperature. Other instruments directly measure the effects of thruster operation on spacecraft thermal control surfaces, optical surfaces, and solar arrays. Specifically, radiometric, photometric, and solar-cell-based sensors are under development. Prototype test data for most sensors should be available, together with details of the instrumentation subsystem and spacecraft interface.

  2. Improving thermal barrier coatings by laser remelting.

    PubMed

    Múnez, C J; Gómez-García, J; Sevillano, F; Poza, P; Utrilla, M V

    2011-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are extensively used to protect metallic components in applications where the operating conditions include aggressive environment at high temperatures. These coatings are usually processed by thermal spraying techniques and the resulting microstructure includes thin and large splats, associated with the deposition of individual droplets, with porosity between splats. This porosity reduces the oxidation and corrosion resistance favouring the entrance of aggressive species during service. To overcome this limitation, the top coat could be modified by laser glazing reducing surface roughness and sealing open porosity. ZrO2(Y2O3) top coat and NiCrAlY bond coating were air plasma sprayed onto an Inconel 600 Ni base alloy. The top coat was laser remelted and a densified ceramic layer was induced in the top surface of the ceramic coating. This layer inhibited the ingress of aggressive species and delayed bond coat oxidation. PMID:22400250

  3. Laser thermal preconditioning enhances dermal wound repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Carter, Terry; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2008-02-01

    Preconditioning tissues with an initial mild thermal stress, thereby eliciting a stress response, can serve to protect tissue from subsequent stresses. Patients at risk for impaired healing, such as diabetics, can benefit from therapeutic methods which enhance wound repair. We present a laser thermal preconditioning protocol that accelerates cutaneous wound repair in a murine model. A pulsed diode laser (λ = 1.86 μm, τ p = 2 ms, 50 Hz, H = 7.64 mJ/cm2) was used to precondition mouse skin before incisional wounds were made. The preconditioning protocol was optimized in vitro and in vivo using hsp70 expression, cell viability, and temperature measurements as benchmarks. Hsp70 expression was non-invasively monitored using a transgenic mouse strain with the hsp70 promoter driving luciferase expression. Tissue temperature recordings were acquired in real time using an infrared camera. Wound repair was assessed by measuring hsp70 expression, biomechanical properties, and wound histology for up to 24 d. Bioluminescence (BLI) was monitored with the IVIS 200 System (Xenogen) and tensile properties with a tensiometer (BTC-2000). The in vivo BLI studies indicated that the optimized laser preconditioning protocol increased hsp70 expression by 15-fold. The tensiometer data revealed that laser preconditioned wounds are ~40% stronger than control wounds at 10 days post surgery. Similar experiments in a diabetic mouse model also enhanced wound repair strength. These results indicate that 1) noninvasive imaging methods can aid in the optimization of novel laser preconditioning methods; 2) that optimized preconditioning with a 1.86 μm diode laser enhances early wound repair.

  4. Seedless Laser Velocimetry Using Heterodyne Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A need exists for a seedless equivalent of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for use in low-turbulence or supersonic flows or elsewhere where seeding is undesirable or impractical. A compact laser velocimeter using heterodyne non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) to measure a single component of velocity is described. Neither molecular (e.g. NO2) nor particulate seed is added to the flow. In non-resonant LITA two beams split from a short-pulse pump laser are crossed; interference produces two counterpropagating sound waves by electrostriction. A CW probe laser incident on the sound waves at the proper angle is directed towards a detector. Measurement of the beating between the Doppler-shifted light and a highly attenuated portion of the probe beam allows determination of one component of flow velocity, speed of sound, and temperature. The sound waves essentially take the place of the particulate seed used in LDV. The velocimeter was used to study the flow behind a rearward-facing step in NASA Langley Research Center's Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel. Comparison is made with pitot-static probe data in the freestream over the range 0 m/s - 55 m/s. Comparison with LDV is made in the recirculation region behind the step and in a well-developed boundary layer in front of the step. Good agreement is found in all cases.

  5. Mechanical design of SERT 2 thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavesky, R. J.; Hurst, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical design of the mercury bombardment thruster that was tested on SERT is described. The report shows how the structural, thermal, electrical, material compatibility, and neutral mercury coating considerations affected the design and integration of the subsystems and components. The SERT 2 spacecraft with two thrusters was launched on February 3, 1970. One thruster operated for 3782 hours and the other for 2011 hours. A high voltage short resulting from buildup of loose eroded material was believed to be the cause of failure.

  6. Thermal ignition of pyrotechnics with lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, C.T.S.; Mohler, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    We are studying the transient phenomena of thermal ignition using laser energy. Present-day infrared scanning and recording techniques enable us to determine the heat content based on the thermal profiles, during ignition, with spatial and temporal resolution. Thus, we can actually observe the laser heating and onset of self-sustained combustion in the sample pellet, and we can use the data obtained with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more-precise kinetic models of the ignition process. The results demonstrate the viability of our methods for studying the pyrotechnic ignition process. The whole ignition process consists of two stages. In the first stage, a laser acts as an external heat source that heats the surface of a pellet, an inert body. When the temperature reaches a certain level, a second-stage chemical reaction occurs. The two stages are separated by the inflection point of the temperature-vs-time trace. We present a formula derived from the thermal-explosion theory that allows one to determine the kinetic constants, with the surface-heat flux and the inflection temperature as the only parameters. In addition, we also report the ignition delay time as a function of the heat flux and describe the experimental apparatus used. We investigated three reactions: Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4//Al, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3//Al, and Ti/2B. For our test samples, we used several kinds of powders, including spherical and flaked aluminum powders and medium and fine iron-oxide powders, with various compact densities. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Second Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The meeting focused on progress made in establishing performance and lifetime expectations of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters as functions of power, propellant, and design; models for the plasma flow and electrode components; viability and transportability of quasi-steady thruster testing; engineering requirements for high power, long life thrusters; and facilities and their requirements for performance and life testing.

  8. Proposal for Testing and Validation of Vacuum Ultra-Violet Atomic Laser-Induced Fluorescence as a Method to Analyze Carbon Grid Erosion in Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Previous investigation under award NAG3-25 10 sought to determine the best method of LIF to determine the carbon density in a thruster plume. Initial reports from other groups were ambiguous as to the number of carbon clusters that might be present in the plume of a thruster. Carbon clusters would certainly affect the ability to LIF; if they were the dominant species, then perhaps the LIF method should target clusters. The results of quadrupole mass spectroscopy on sputtered carbon determined that minimal numbers of clusters were sputtered from graphite under impact from keV Krypton. There were some investigations in the keV range by other groups that hinted at clusters, but at the time the proposal was presented to NASA, there was no data from low-energy sputtering available. Thus, the proposal sought to develop a method to characterize the population only of atoms sputtered from a graphite target in a test cell. Most of the ground work had been established by the previous two years of investigation. The proposal covering 2003 sought to develop an anti-Stokes Raman shifting cell to generate VUW light and test this cell on two different laser systems, ArF and YAG- pumped dye. The second goal was to measure the lowest detectable amounts of carbon atoms by 156.1 nm and 165.7 nm LIF. If equipment was functioning properly, it was expected that these goals would be met easily during the timeframe of the proposal, and that is the reason only modest funding was requested. The PI was only funded at half- time by Glenn during the summer months. All other work time was paid for by Whitworth College. The college also funded a student, Charles Shawley, who worked on the project during the spring.

  9. Thermal Performance of ATLAS Laser Thermal Control System Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin; Patel, Deepak; Ottenstein, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The second Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite mission currently planned by National Aeronautics and Space Administration will measure global ice topography and canopy height using the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System {ATLAS). The ATLAS comprises two lasers; but only one will be used at a time. Each laser will generate between 125 watts and 250 watts of heat, and each laser has its own optimal operating temperature that must be maintained within plus or minus 1 degree Centigrade accuracy by the Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS) consisting of a constant conductance heat pipe (CCHP), a loop heat pipe (LHP) and a radiator. The heat generated by the laser is acquired by the CCHP and transferred to the LHP, which delivers the heat to the radiator for ultimate rejection. The radiator can be exposed to temperatures between minus 71 degrees Centigrade and minus 93 degrees Centigrade. The two lasers can have different operating temperatures varying between plus 15 degrees Centigrade and plus 30 degrees Centigrade, and their operating temperatures are not known while the LTCS is being designed and built. Major challenges of the LTCS include: 1) A single thermal control system must maintain the ATLAS at 15 degrees Centigrade with 250 watts heat load and minus 71 degrees Centigrade radiator sink temperature, and maintain the ATLAS at plus 30 degrees Centigrade with 125 watts heat load and minus 93 degrees Centigrade radiator sink temperature. Furthermore, the LTCS must be qualification tested to maintain the ATLAS between plus 10 degrees Centigrade and plus 35 degrees Centigrade. 2) The LTCS must be shut down to ensure that the ATLAS can be maintained above its lowest desirable temperature of minus 2 degrees Centigrade during the survival mode. No software control algorithm for LTCS can be activated during survival and only thermostats can be used. 3) The radiator must be kept above minus 65 degrees Centigrade to prevent ammonia from freezing using no more

  10. Laser-induced thermal acoustic velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan

    2000-11-01

    Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA) is a non- intrusive, remote, four-wave mixing laser diagnostic technique for measurements of the speed of sound and of the thermal diffusivity in gases. If the gas composition is known, then its temperature and density can be inferred. Beam misalignments and bulk fluid velocities can influence the time history and intensity of LITA signals. A closed-form analytic expression for LITA signals incorporating these effects is derived. The magnitude of beam misalignment and the flow velocity can be inferred from the signal shape using a least-squares fit of this model to the experimental data. High-speed velocimetry using homodyne detection is demonstrated with NO2-seeded air in a supersonic blow-down nozzle. The measured speed of sound deviates less than 2% from the theoretical value assuming isentropic quasi-1D flow. Boundary layer effects degrade the velocity measurements to errors of 20%. Heterodyne detection is used for low-speed velocimetry up to Mach number M = 0.1. The uncertainty of the velocity measurements was ~0.2 m/s. The sound speed measurements were repeatable to 0.5%. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good. A one-hidden-layer feed-forward neural network is trained using back-propagation learning and a steepest descent learning rule to extract the speed of sound and flow velocity from a heterodyne LITA signal. The effect of the network size on the performance is demonstrated. The accuracy is determined with a second set of LITA signals that were not used during the training phase. The accuracy is found to be better than that of a conventional frequency decomposition technique while being computationally as efficient. This data analysis method is robust with respect to noise, numerically stable, and fast enough for real-time data analysis. The accuracy and uncertainty of non-resonant LITA measurements is investigated. The error in measurements of the speed of sound and of the thermal diffusivity

  11. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition if the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research questions still outstanding in this area. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J. )

    1990-07-30

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition of the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the Program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research question still outstanding in this area.

  13. Thermal effects of laser radiation in biological tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, L; Nauenberg, M

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented that simulates the thermal effects of laser radiation incident on biological tissue. The multiple scattering and absorption of the laser beam and the thermal diffusion process in the tissue are evaluated by a numerical technique that is well suited for microcomputers. Results are compared with recent empirical observations. PMID:6838985

  14. Laser-assisted manufacturing of thermal energy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Tewolde, Mahder; Kim, Ki-Hoon; Seo, Dong-Min; Longtin, Jon P.; Hwang, David J.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we will present recent progress in the laser-assisted manufacturing of thermal energy devices that require suppressed thermal transport characteristics yet maintaining other functionalities such as electronic transport or mechanical strength. Examples of such devices to be demonstrated include thermoelectric generator or insulating materials. To this end, it will be shown that an additive manufacturing approaches can be facilitated and improved by unique processing capabilities of lasers in composite level. In order to tailor thermal characteristics in thermal devices, we will mainly investigate the potential of laser heating, curing, selective removal and sintering processes of material systems in the composite level.

  15. Thermal Regime of High-power Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Krokhin, O. N.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Pevtsov, V. F.; Popov, Yu. M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    We discuss the design and application perspectives of different crystal, ceramic and composite-type submounts with thermo-compensating properties as well as submounts from materials with high thermal conductivity for overcoming thermal problem in high-power laser diodes (LD) and improving thermal management of other high-power optoelectronic and electronic semiconductor devices. Thermal fields in high-power laser diodes were calculated in 3 D thermal model at CW operation for some heatsink designs taking into account the experimental dependence of laser total efficiency against pumping current in order to extend the range of reliable operation up to thermal loads 20-30 W and corresponding output optical power up to 15-20 W for 100 μm stripe laser diodes.

  16. Magnetoplasmadynamic thruster applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, E. V.

    1976-01-01

    Advance study activities within NASA indicate that electric propulsion will be required to make certain types of potential missions feasible. The large power levels under consideration make magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters a good candidate for these applications since this type of electric thruster is best suited to operation at high power levels. This paper examines the status of the magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and compares it to the ion thruster which also is a candidate. The use of these two types of electric propulsion devices for orbit raising of a self-powered large satellite is examined from a cost standpoint. In addition the use of nuclear electric propulsion is described for use as both a near-earth space tug and for an interplanetary exploration vehicle. These preliminary examinations indicate that the magnetoplasmadynamic thruster is the lowest cost thruster and therefore merits serious consideration for these applications.

  17. High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert; Tverdokhlebov, Sergery; Manzella, David

    1999-01-01

    The development of Hall thrusters with powers ranging from tens of kilowatts to in excess of one hundred kilowatts is considered based on renewed interest in high power. high thrust electric propulsion applications. An approach to develop such thrusters based on previous experience is discussed. It is shown that the previous experimental data taken with thrusters of 10 kW input power and less can be used. Potential mass savings due to the design of high power Hall thrusters are discussed. Both xenon and alternate thruster propellant are considered, as are technological issues that will challenge the design of high power Hall thrusters. Finally, the implications of such a development effort with regard to ground testing and spacecraft intecrati'on issues are discussed.

  18. Pulsed hall thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, Vladimir J. (Inventor); Pote, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gamero-Castano, Manuel (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pulsed Hall thruster system includes a Hall thruster having an electron source, a magnetic circuit, and a discharge chamber; a power processing unit for firing the Hall thruster to generate a discharge; a propellant storage and delivery system for providing propellant to the discharge chamber and a control unit for defining a pulse duration .tau.<0.1d.sup.3.rho./m, where d is the characteristic size of the thruster, .rho. is the propellant density at standard conditions, and m is the propellant mass flow rate for operating either the power processing unit to provide to the Hall thruster a power pulse of a pre-selected duration, .tau., or operating the propellant storage and delivery system to provide a propellant flow pulse of duration, .tau., or providing both as pulses, synchronized to arrive coincidentally at the discharge chamber to enable the Hall thruster to produce a discreet output impulse.

  19. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  20. Second Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The meeting focused on progress made in establishing performance and lifetime expectations of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters as functions of power, propellant, and design; models for the plasma flow and electrode components; viability and transportability of quasi-steady thruster testing; engineering requirements for high power, long life thrusters; and facilities and their requirements for performance and life testing. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  1. MPD thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    Inhouse magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster technology is discussed. The study focussed on steady state thrusters at powers of less than 1 MW. Performance measurement and diagnostics technologies were developed for high power thrusters. Also developed was a MPD computer code. The stated goals of the program are to establish: performance and life limitation; influence of applied fields; propellant effects; and scaling laws. The presentation is mostly through graphs and charts.

  2. Manipulation of heat-diffusion channel in laser thermal lithography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingsong; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yiqun

    2014-12-29

    Laser thermal lithography is a good alternative method for forming small pattern feature size by taking advantage of the structural-change threshold effect of thermal lithography materials. In this work, the heat-diffusion channels of laser thermal lithography are first analyzed, and then we propose to manipulate the heat-diffusion channels by inserting thermal conduction layers in between channels. Heat-flow direction can be changed from the in-plane to the out-of-plane of the thermal lithography layer, which causes the size of the structural-change threshold region to become much smaller than the focused laser spot itself; thus, nanoscale marks can be obtained. Samples designated as "glass substrate/thermal conduction layer/thermal lithography layer (100 nm)/thermal conduction layer" are designed and prepared. Chalcogenide phase-change materials are used as thermal lithography layer, and Si is used as thermal conduction layer to manipulate heat-diffusion channels. Laser thermal lithography experiments are conducted on a home-made high-speed rotation direct laser writing setup with 488 nm laser wavelength and 0.90 numerical aperture of converging lens. The writing marks with 50-60 nm size are successfully obtained. The mark size is only about 1/13 of the focused laser spot, which is far smaller than that of the light diffraction limit spot of the direct laser writing setup. This work is useful for nanoscale fabrication and lithography by exploiting the far-field focusing light system. PMID:25607209

  3. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  4. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  5. Titanium Optics for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1999-01-01

    Ion thruster total impulse capability is limited, in part, by accelerator grid sputter erosion. A development effort was initiated to identify a material with a lower accelerator grid volumetric sputter erosion rate than molybdenum, but that could utilize the present NSTAR thruster grid design and fabrication techniques to keep development costs low, and perform as well as molybdenum optics. After comparing the sputter erosion rates of several atomic materials to that of molybdenum at accelerator voltages, titanium was found to offer a 45% reduction in volumetric erosion rates. To ensure that screen grid sputter erosion rates are not higher at discharge chamber potentials, titanium and molybdenum sputter erosion rates were measured at these potentials. Preliminary results showed only a slightly higher volumetric erosion rate for titanium, so that screen grid erosion is insignificant. A number of material, thermal, and mechanical properties were also examined to identify any fabrication, launch environment, and thruster operation issues. Several titanium grid sets were successfully fabricated. A titanium grid set was mounted onto an NSTAR 30 cm engineering model ion thruster and tested to determine optics performance. The titanium optics operated successfully over the entire NSTAR power range of 0.5 to 2.3 kW. Differences in impingement-limited perveances and electron backstreaming limits were found to be due to a larger cold gap for the titanium optics. Discharge losses for titanium grids were lower than those for molybdenum, likely due to a slightly larger titanium screen grid open area fraction. Radial distributions of beam current density with titanium optics were very similar to those with molybdenum optics at all power levels. Temporal electron backstreaming limit measurements showed that titanium optics achieved thermal equilibrium faster than molybdenum optics.

  6. The theory of compensated laser propagation through strong thermal blooming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, Jonathan F.

    An account is given of the theory of adaptive compensation for a laser beam's thermal blooming in atmospheric transmission, giving attention to MOLLY, a highly realistic computer simulation of adaptively compensated laser propagation which illustrates the effects of atmospheric turbulence and thermal blooming. Robust experimental signatures have been developed for such important fundamental processes as phase-compensation instability (PCI), which is caused by positive feedback between an adaptive optics system and laser-induced atmospheric heating. The physics of uncompensated and compensated thermal blooming is discussed, in conjunction with the architecture of MOLLY and an analysis of PCI that takes detailed adaptive-optics hardware structures into account.

  7. Technology development and demonstration of a low thrust resistojet thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfeifer, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Three thrusters were fabricated to definitized thruster drawings using new rhenium vapor deposition technology. Two of the thrusters were operated using ammonia as propellant and one was operated using hydrogen propellant for performance determination. All demonstrated consistent operational specific impulse performance while demonstrating thermal performance better than the development units from which they evolved. Two of the thrusters were subjected to environmental structural testing including vibration, acceleration and shock loading to specifications. Both of the thrusters subjected to the environmental tests passed all required tests. The third, spare, thruster was introduced into the life test portion of the program. Two thrusters were then subjected to a life cycling test program under typical spacecraft operating power levels. During the life test sequence, the hydrogen thruster accrued 720 operating life test cycles, more than 370 on-off cycles and 365 hours of powered up time. The ammonia accrued approximately 380 on-off cycles and 392.2 on time hours of operation during the 720 cycling hour test. Both thrusters completed the scheduled operational life test in reasonably good condition, structurally integral and capable of indefinite further operation.

  8. NASA's Hall Thruster Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Jacobson, David T.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Mason, Lee S.; Mantenieks, Maris A.; Manzella, David H.; Hofer, Richard R.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Hall thruster program has base research and focused development efforts in support of the Advanced Space Transportation Program, Space-Based Program, and various other programs. The objective of the base research is to gain an improved understanding of the physical processes and engineering constraints of Hall thrusters to enable development of advanced Hall thruster designs. Specific technical questions that are current priorities of the base effort are: (1) How does thruster life vary with operating point? (2) How can thruster lifetime and wear rate be most efficiently evaluated? (3) What are the practical limitations for discharge voltage as it pertains to high specific impulse operation (high discharge voltage) and high thrust operation (low discharge voltage)? (4) What are the practical limits for extending Hall thrusters to very high input powers? and (5) What can be done during thruster design to reduce cost and integration concerns? The objective of the focused development effort is to develop a 50 kW-class Hall propulsion system, with a milestone of a 50 kW engineering model thruster/system by the end of program year 2006. Specific program wear 2001 efforts, along with the corporate and academic participation, are described.

  9. Multi-Thruster Propulsion Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An electric propulsion machine includes an ion thruster having a discharge chamber housing a large surface area anode. The ion thruster includes flat annular ion optics with a small span to gap ratio. Optionally, at least a second thruster may be disposed radially offset from the ion thruster.

  10. Laser induced thermal-wave fields in bilayered spherical solids.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guangxi; Chen, Zhifeng; Wang, Chinhua; Mandelis, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    We present a theoretical model for evaluating solid bilayered spherical samples (surfaces) that are heated by a frequency modulated light beam generating thermal waves. The Green's function method is used as it provides a way of evaluating thermal-wave fields of bilayered spherical structures with arbitrary intensity distributions of incident laser beams. The specific thermal-wave Green's function corresponding to the composite structure has been derived. The characteristics of the thermal-wave field with respect to the thermal diffusivity of the material, the diameter of the sample, the size of the incident beam, and the polar angle at which the thermal-wave field is measured on the surface are presented. Experimental results obtained with laser infrared photothermal radiometry are fitted to the theory and the thermal diffusivities of steel spheres are deduced. PMID:19334944

  11. Mercury ion thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.

    1989-01-01

    The Mercury Ion Thruster Technology program was an investigation for improving the understanding of state-of-the-art mercury ion thrusters. Emphasis was placed on optimizing the performance and simplifying the design of the 30 cm diameter ring-cusp discharge chamber. Thruster performance was improved considerably; the baseline beam-ion production cost of the optimized configuration was reduced to Epsilon (sub i) perspective to 130 eV/ion. At a discharge propellant-utilization efficiency of 95 percent, the beam-ion production cost was reduced to about 155 eV/ion, representing a reduction of about 40 eV/ion over the corresponding value for the 30 cm diameter J-series thruster. Comprehensive Langmuir-probe surveys were obtained and compared with similar measurements for a J-series thruster. A successful volume-averaging scheme was developed to correlate thruster performance with the dominant plasma processes that prevail in the two thruster designs. The average Maxwellian electron temperature in the optimized ring-cusp design is as much as 1 eV higher than it is in the J-series thruster. Advances in ion-extraction electrode fabrication technology were made by improving materials selection criteria, hydroforming and stress-relieving tooling, and fabrications procedures. An ion-extraction performance study was conducted to assess the effect of screen aperture size on ion-optics performance and to verify the effectiveness of a beam-vectoring model for three-grid ion optics. An assessment of the technology readiness of the J-series thruster was completed, and operation of an 8 cm IAPS thruster using a simplified power processor was demonstrated.

  12. Evaluation of laser prostatectomy devices by thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenaar, David G.; van Vliet, Remco J.; van Swol, Christiaan F. P.; Boon, Tom A.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.

    1994-12-01

    The treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) using Nd:YAG laser light has become an accepted alternative to TURP. However, there is no consensus to the dosimetry using the various laser devices. In our study, we evaluate the optical and thermal characteristics of 7 commercially available side firing laser probes. For the thermal analysis, an optical method was used based on `Schlieren' techniques producing color images of the temperature distribution around the laser probe in water. Absolute temperatures were obtained after calibration measurements with thermocouples. Laser probes using metal mirrors for beam deflection heated up entirely. The local temperature rose up to 100 degrees centigrade, thus inducing vapor bubble formation that interfered with the emitted beam. Laser devices, using total internal reflection for deflection, showed far less heating primarily at the exit window, though Fresnel reflections and secondary beams indirectly heated up the (metal) housing of the tip. After clinical application, the absorption at the probe surface and hence temperature increased due to probe deterioration. Color Schlieren imaging is a powerful method for the thermal evaluation of laser devices. The thermal behavior of laser probes can be used as a guidance for the method of application and as an indication of the lifetime of the probes.

  13. Differences between thermal and laser-induced diffusion.

    PubMed

    Zaum, Ch; Meyer-Auf-der-Heide, K M; Mehlhorn, M; McDonough, S; Schneider, W F; Morgenstern, K

    2015-04-10

    A combination of femtosecond laser excitation with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope is used to study long-range interaction during diffusion of CO on Cu(111). Both thermal and laser-driven diffusion show an oscillatory energy dependence on the distance to neighboring molecules. Surprisingly, the phase is inverted; i.e., at distances at which thermal diffusion is most difficult, it is easiest for laser-driven diffusion and vice versa. We explain this unexpected behavior by a transient stabilization of the negative ion during diffusion as corroborated by ab initio calculations. PMID:25910140

  14. Thermal emf generated by laser emission along thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Satiukov, D. G.; Uglov, S. A.

    1991-07-01

    Substantial pulse thermal emf values (about 1.5 V) have been detected along the substrate during the interaction of laser emission with thin metal films (Ni, Ti, and Bi) sprayed on corrugated substrates. Relationships are established between the irradiation conditions and parameters of the generated electrical signals. Possible mechanisms of thermal emf generation and promising applications are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of a steady state MPD thruster test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.; Doss, E.D.; Kilgore, O.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of multimegawatt MPD thrusters depends, to a great extent, on testing them under steady state high altitude space conditions. Steady state testing is required to provide thermal characteristics, life cycle, erosion, and other essential data. the major technical obstacle for ground testing of MPD thrusters in a space simulation facility is the inability of state-of-the-art vacuum systems to handle the tremendous pumping speeds required for multimegawatt MPD thrusters. This is true for other types of electric propulsion devices as well. This paper discusses the results of the first phase of an evaluation of steady state MPD thruster test facilities. The first phase addresses the conceptual design of vacuum systems required to support multimegawatt MPD thruster testing. Three advanced pumping system concepts were evaluated and are presented here.

  16. Thermal behavior of the STM tip under laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Christopher G.

    This thesis discusses the thermal behavior of the STM tip under laser irradiation. The thermal expansion of the tip was researched with varying laser spot size, frequency, location, and power. In order to determine the thermal expansion of the STM tip, the behavior in both the time and frequency domain were investigated. By employing the FFT analysis, the noise of the thermal behavior in the frequency domain was greatly reduced when compared to the time domain behavior, allowing for higher resolution expansions. With noise reduced, a thermal expansion of 1 nm, equating to a 0.03 K average temperature rise across the tip was found. Besides the heating and expansion of the STM tip, the thermal diffusivity of the PtIr STM tip was calculated using the TET and Characteristic Point methods, and found to be within 3% of the expected value.

  17. Gimballing Spacecraft Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Tim; Bossard, John

    2010-01-01

    A gimballing spacecraft reaction-control-system thruster was developed that consists of a small hydrogen/oxygen-burning rocket engine integrated with a Canfield joint. (Named after its inventor, a Canfield joint is a special gimbal mount that is strong and stable yet allows a wide range of motion.) One especially notable aspect of the design of this thruster is integration, into both the stationary legs and the moving arms of the Canfield joint, of the passages through which the hydrogen and oxygen flow to the engine. The thruster was assembled and subjected to tests in which the engine was successfully fired both with and without motion in the Canfield joint.

  18. Noncatalytic hydrazine thruster development - 0.050 to 5.0 pounds thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murch, C. K.; Sackheim, R. L.; Kuenzly, J. D.; Callens, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Noncatalytic (thermal-decompositon) hydrazine thrusters can operate in both the pulsing and steady-state modes to meet the propulsive requirements of long-life spacecraft. The thermal decomposition mode yields higher specific impulse than is characteristic of catalytic thrusters at similar thrust levels. This performance gain is the result of higher temperature operation and a lower fraction of ammonia dissociation. Some life limiting factors of catalytic thrusters are eliminated.

  19. Thermal characterization of the laser-assisted consolidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Guceri, S. I.; McCullough, R. L.; Schultz, J. M.

    1992-04-01

    A thermal analysis of the filament winding process employing a CO2 laser beam is presented. Comparison of experimental process temperatures, measured utilizing very fast response thermocouples, with temperatures computed employing a heat transfer model offered by Beyeler and Guceri, indicates that only 20 pct of the laser energy is absorbed by the composite material in the process configuration utilized in these experiments. It is assumed that the low absorption of the laser energy is a result of the high incidence angle at which the laser beam strikes the material.

  20. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH in the exhaust of a bi-propellant thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Phillip H.; Clemens, N. T.; Makel, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of the hydroxyl radical has been performed on the flow produced by the exhaust of a subscale H2/O2 fueled bi-propellant rocket engine. Measurements were made to test the feasibility of OH (0,0) and (3,0) excitation strategies by using injection seeded XeCl and KrF excimer lasers, respectively. The flow is produced with hydrogen and oxygen reacting at a combustor chamber pressure of 5 atm which then exhausts to the ambient. The hydroxyl concentration in the exhaust flow is approximately 8 percent. Fluorescence images obtained by pumping the Q1(3) transition in the (0,0) band exhibited very high signals but also showed the effect of laser beam absorption. To obtain images when pumping the P1(8) transition in the (3,0) band it was necessary to use exceptionally fast imaging optics and unacceptably high intensifier gains. The result was single-shot images which displayed a signal-to-noise ratio of order unity or less when measured on a per pixel basis.

  1. Thermal effects in laser-assisted embryo hatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, Diarmaid H.; Conia, Jerome D.

    2000-08-01

    Diode lasers [(lambda) equals 1480 nm] are used with in-vitro fertilization [IVF] as a promoter of embryo hatching. A focused laser beam is applied in vitro to form a channel in the zona pellucida (shell) of the pre-embryo. After transfer into the uterus, the embryo hatches: it extrudes itself through the channel and implants into the uterine wall. Laser-assisted hatching can result in improving implantation and pregnancy success rates. We present examples of zone pellucida ablation using animal models. In using the laser it is vital not to damage pre-embryo cells, e.g. by overheating. In order to define safe regimes we have derived some thermal side-effects of zona pellucida removal. The temperature profile in the beam and vicinity is predicted as function of laser pulse duration and power. In a crossed-beam experiment a HeNe laser probe detects the temperature-induced change in refractive index. We find that the diode laser beam produces superheated water approaching 200 C on the beam axis. Thermal histories during and following the laser pulse are given for regions in the neighborhood of the beam. We conclude that an optimum regime exists with pulse duration laser power approximately 100 mW.

  2. An Approach to Thermal Modeling of Laser Polishing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukar, E.; Lamikiz, A.; Tabernero, I.; Liebana, F.; del Pozo, D.

    2009-11-01

    Polishing operation of die and molds represents up to 30% of the total manufacturing cost, since it is a high added value operation that is necessary carried out manually by qualified personnel. There are several alternatives to hand operations, such as abrasive automated methods operated by robots, ball burnishing or laser polishing process in order to reduce operation time and costs. The presented article proposes a laser based polishing operation which consists in the application of a laser beam in a very controlled way. The radiated energy melts a microscopic layer which flows and re-solidifies smoothing the topographic irregularities of the surface resulting in a reduction of the initial roughness. The article presents, in addition to some experimental results of laser polishing process, a thermal model developed based on the finite difference method. The model is able to take into account different types of lasers; in particular, simulations for a CO2 laser and a high power diode laser have been carried out. As the model gets the full map of temperatures in 3D, it is possible to predict the melted material layer thickness, which is a crucial parameter in the laser polishing process. Finally, two types of validation tests are presented: First, some tests measured by pyrometers on the test part surface. Secondly, the comparison of a series of metallographic analysis on W.-Nr.1.2379 tool steel, where the metallurgical changes caused by the laser radiation can be observed with the thermal field estimated by the model.

  3. Development of Microplasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Yoshinori; Ono, Kouichi

    This paper proposes an electrothermal microplasma thruster using azimuthally symmetric microwave-excited plasmas, which consists of a microplasma source and a micronozzle. The microplasma source is made of a 10 mm long dielectric chamber of 2 mm in inner diameter covered with an electrically grounded metal, which produces high temperature plasmas at around atmospheric pressure. The micronozzle has a throat of 0.2 mm in diameter, which converts high thermal energy of plasmas into directional kinetic energy to produce the axial thrust. First, we have developed a numerical model for Ar microplasmas and micronozzle flows to estimate the thruster performance. The model consists of three modules: a volume-averaged global model, an electromagnetic model for microplasma sources, and a fluid model for micronozzle flows. Numerical results indicate that the microwave power absorbed in plasmas increases with microwave frequency f and relative permittivityɛd of the dielectric chamber, to achieve the plasma density in the range 1014-1016 cm-3. A certain combination of the frequency and permittivity significantly increases the power absorption. The micronozzle flow was found to be very lossy because of high viscosity in thick boundary layers, implying that shortening the nozzle length with increasing half-cone angles suppresses the effect of viscous loss and thus enhances the thrust performance. A thrust of 2.5-3.5 mN and a specific impulse of 130-180 s were obtained for a given microwave power range (Pt <10 W), which is applicable to a station-keeping maneuver for microspacecraft less than 10 kg. Moreover, we have developed a microwave-excited microplasma source, which has a dielectric chamber of 10 mm length and 1.5 mm in inner diameter, where off-the-shelf mullite (ɛd ≈ 6) and zirconia (ɛd ≈ 12-25) tubes are employed. Experiments were performed at f = 2 and 4 GHz, Pt < 10 W, an Ar flow rate of 50 sccm, and a microplasma pressure of 10 kPa, where optical emission

  4. Magnetoplasmadynamic thruster development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, E. V.; Vondra, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Current research on self-field MPD thrusters presents the possibility of developing high power/low cost electric propulsion. The interest generated in this propulsion concept within both NASA and the U.S. Air Force has led to a coordinated interagency effort, and the recent completion of several test sites are expected to speed thruster concept development. Efficiencies approaching 40% at 2200 sec have been experimentally demonstrated. Among the characteristics recommending development of MPD thrusters are high thrust density and power handling capability, simplicity, and a wide dynamic range of thrust and specific impulse. MPD thrusters can, moreover, operate either continuously, at high available power levels, or in a pulsed mode, to match lower power levels.

  5. MPD thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Lapointe, Michael R.; Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1991-01-01

    MPD thrusters have demonstrated between 2000 and 7000 sec specific impulse at efficiencies approaching 40 percent, and have been operated continuously at power levels over 500 kW. These demonstrated capabilities, combined with the simplicity and robustness of the thruster, make them attractive candidates for application to both unmanned and manned orbit raising, lunar, and planetary missions. This work reviews the present status of MPD thruster research, including developments in the measured performance levels and electrode erosion rates, and theoretical studies of the thruster dynamics. Significant progress has been made in establishing empirical scaling laws, performance and lifetime limitations, and in the development of numerical codes to simulate the flowfield and the electrode processes.

  6. MPD thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Mantenieks, Maris A.; Lapointe, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    MPD (MagnetoPlasmaDynamic) thrusters demonstrated between 2000 and 7000 seconds specific impulse at efficiencies approaching 40 percent, and were operated continuously at power levels over 500 kW. These demonstrated capabilities, combined with the simplicity and robustness of the thruster, make them attractive candidates for application to both unmanned and manned orbit raising, lunar, and planetary missions. To date, however, only a limited number of thruster configurations, propellants, and operating conditions were studied. The present status of MPD research is reviewed, including developments in the measured performance levels and electrode erosion rates. Theoretical studies of the thruster dynamics are also described. Significant progress was made in establishing empirical scaling laws, performance and lifetime limitations and in the development of numerical codes to simulate the flow field and electrode processes.

  7. Ion thruster performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A model of ion thruster performance is developed for high flux density, cusped magnetic field thruster designs. This model is formulated in terms of the average energy required to produce an ion in the discharge chamber plasma and the fraction of these ions that are extracted to form the beam. The direct loss of high energy (primary) electrons from the plasma to the anode is shown to have a major effect on thruster performance. The model provides simple algebraic equations enabling one to calculate the beam ion energy cost, the average discharge chamber plasma ion energy cost, the primary electron density, the primary-to-Maxwellian electron density ratio and the Maxwellian electron temperature. Experiments indicate that the model correctly predicts the variation in plasma ion energy cost for changes in propellant gas (Ar, Kr and Xe), grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam extraction area, discharge voltage, and discharge chamber wall temperature. The model and experiments indicate that thruster performance may be described in terms of only four thruster configuration dependent parameters and two operating parameters. The model also suggests that improved performance should be exhibited by thruster designs which extract a large fraction of the ions produced in the discharge chamber, which have good primary electron and neutral atom containment and which operate at high propellant flow rates.

  8. Thermal injuries as a result of CO2 laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Grossman, A R; Majidian, A M; Grossman, P H

    1998-09-01

    CO2 laser resurfacing of the face for fine wrinkles has gained great popularity over a short period of time. The use of the CO2 laser has proven to be effective in reducing or eliminating fine wrinkles. This tool in the surgeon's armamentarium has been added to those of dermabrasion and chemical peel. The theoretical advantage of the use of the CO2 laser for resurfacing has been better accuracy and reportedly more control of the depth of penetration. The use of the CO2 laser has been welcomed by many cosmetic surgeons. Until now, there have been few reported cases of complications with the use of the CO2 laser. To many, this would sound too good to be true; unfortunately, that is the case. The CO2 laser is a high-energy machine that can indeed cause thermal injury. This thermal injury can result in deep burns to the skin and hypertrophic scarring. We feel this is more common than is currently being reported, and we share our experience as a burn and wound care referral service. During an 18-month period, 20 consecutive patients were referred to our practice who had received injuries from the CO2 laser resurfacing laser. We present here in this review a summary of those injuries. The CO2 resurfacing laser is a very effective tool for the treatment of fine wrinkles, but it is not without the potential for serious complications. We urge caution with the use of the laser and prompt recognition and treatment of thermal injury to the skin. PMID:9734452

  9. 43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for powering hydraulics to boom as in some other tenders in same class. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter BRAMBLE, Waterfront at Lincoln Avenue, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  10. Thermally excited proton spin-flip laser emission in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    Based on statistical thermodynamic fluctuation arguments, it is shown here for the first time that thermally excited spin-flip laser emission from the fusion product protons can occur in large tokamak devices that are entering the reactor regime of operation. Existing experimental data from TFTR supports this conjecture, in the sense that these measurements are in complete agreement with the predictions of the quasilinear theory of the spin-flip laser.

  11. Thermal measurements of short-duration CO2 laser resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Fried, Daniel; Reinisch, Lou; Bell, Thomas; Lyver, Rex

    1997-05-01

    The thermal consequences of a 100 microsecond carbon-dioxide laser used for skin resurfacing were examined with infrared radiometry. Human skin was evaluated in a cosmetic surgery clinic and extirpated rodent skin was measured in a research laboratory. Thermal relaxation following single pulses of in vivo human and ex vivo animal skin were quantitatively similar in the 30 - 1000 msec range. The thermal emission from the area of the irradiated tissue increased monotonically with increasing incident laser fluence. Extremely high peak temperatures during the 100 microsecond pulse are attributed to plume incandescence. Ejecta thermal emission may also contribute to our measurements during the first several msecs. The data are combined into a thermal relaxation model. Given known coefficients, and adjusting tissue absorption to reflect a 50% water content, and thermal conductivity of 2.3 times that of water, the measured (both animal back and human forearm) and calculated values coincide. The high thermal conductance suggests preferential thermal conduction along the protein matrix. The clinical observation of a resurfacing procedure clearly shows thermal overlap and build-up is a result of sequential, adjacent pulses. A decrease of 4 - 6 degrees Celsius in surface temperature at the treatment site that appeared immediately post-Tx and gradually diminished over several days is possibly a sign of dermal convective and/or evaporative cooling.

  12. Thermal lensing compensation optics for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaggs, Michael; Haas, Gil

    2011-03-01

    Athermalization of focusing objectives is a common technique for optimizing imaging systems in the infrared where thermal effects are a major concern. The athermalization is generally done within the spectrum of interest and not generally applied to a single wavelength. The predominate glass used with high power infrared lasers in the near infrared of one micron, such as Nd:YAG and fiber lasers, is fused silica which has excellent thermal properties. All glasses, however, have a temperature coefficient of index of refraction (dn/dT) where as the glass heats up its index of refraction changes. Most glasses, fused silica included, have a positive dn/dT. A positive dn/dT will cause the focal length of the lens to decrease with a temperature rise. Many of the fluoride glasses, like CaF2, BaF2, LiF2, etc. have a negative dn/dT. By applying athermalization techniques of glass selection and optical design, the thermal lensing in a laser objective of a high power laser system can be substantially mitigated. We describe a passive method for minimizing thermal lensing of high power laser optics.

  13. Laser-induced thermal-acoustic velocimetry with heterodyne detection

    SciTech Connect

    Schlamp, Stefan; Cummings, Eric B.; Sobota, Thomas H.

    2000-02-15

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) was used with heterodyne detection to measure simultaneously and in a single laser pulse the sound speed and flow velocity of NO{sub 2} -seeded air in a low-speed wind tunnel up to Mach number M=0.1 . The uncertainties of the velocity and the sound speed measurements were {approx}0.2 m/s and 0.5%, respectively. Measurements were obtained through a nonlinear least-squares fit to a general, analytic closed-form solution for heterodyne-detected LITA signals from thermal gratings. Agreement between theory and experiment is exceptionally good. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  14. Quantifying thermal modifications on laser welded skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakoglu, Hasim Ö.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2011-02-01

    Laser tissue welding is a potential medical treatment method especially on closing cuts implemented during any kind of surgery. Photothermal effects of laser on tissue should be quantified in order to determine optimal dosimetry parameters. Polarized light and phase contrast techniques reveal information about extend of thermal change over tissue occurred during laser welding application. Change in collagen structure in skin tissue stained with hematoxilen and eosin samples can be detected. In this study, three different near infrared laser wavelengths (809 nm, 980 nm and 1070 nm) were compared for skin welding efficiency. 1 cm long cuts were treated spot by spot laser application on Wistar rats' dorsal skin, in vivo. In all laser applications, 0.5 W of optical power was delivered to the tissue, 5 s continuously, resulting in 79.61 J/cm2 energy density (15.92 W/cm2 power density) for each spot. The 1st, 4th, 7th, 14th, and 21st days of recovery period were determined as control days, and skin samples needed for histology were removed on these particular days. The stained samples were examined under a light microscope. Images were taken with a CCD camera and examined with imaging software. 809 Nm laser was found to be capable of creating strong full-thickness closure, but thermal damage was evident. The thermal damage from 980 nm laser welding was found to be more tolerable. The results showed that 1070 nm laser welding produced noticeably stronger bonds with minimal scar formation.

  15. NASA's Hall Thruster Program 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Jacobson, David T.; Pinero, Luis R.; Manzella, David H.; Hofer, Richard R.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hall thruster program currently supports a number of tasks related to high power thruster development for a number of customers including the Energetics Program (formerly called the Space-based Program), the Space Solar Power Program, and the In-space Propulsion Program. In program year 2002, two tasks were central to the NASA Hall thruster program: 1) the development of a laboratory Hall thruster capable of providing high thrust at high power-, and 2) investigations into operation of Hall thrusters at high specific impulse. In addition to these two primary thruster development activities, there are a number of other on-going activities supported by the NASA Hall thruster program. These additional activities are related to issues such as high-power power processor architecture, thruster lifetime, and spacecraft integration.

  16. Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2004-11-01

    Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

  17. Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2005-01-01

    Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

  18. Thermally induced birefringence in Nd:YAG slab lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ostermeyer, Martin; Mudge, Damien; Veitch, Peter J.; Munch, Jesper

    2006-07-20

    We study thermally induced birefringence in crystalline Nd:YAG zigzag slab lasers and the associated depolarization losses. The optimum crystallographic orientation of the zigzag slab within the Nd:YAG boule and photoelastic effects in crystalline Nd:YAG slabs are briefly discussed. The depolarization is evaluated using the temperature and stress distributions, calculated using a finite element model, for realistically pumped and cooled slabs of finite dimensions. Jones matrices are then used to calculate the depolarization of the zigzag laser mode. We compare the predictions with measurements of depolarization, and suggest useful criteria for the design of the gain media for such lasers.

  19. Laser ablation dynamics in metals: The thermal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzapesa, F. P.; Brambilla, M.; Dabbicco, M.; Scamarcio, G.; Columbo, L. L.; Ancona, A.; Sibillano, T.

    2012-07-02

    We studied the laser ablation dynamics of steel in the thermal regime both experimentally and theoretically. The real-time monitoring of the process shows that the ablation rate depends on laser energy density and ambient pressure during the exposure time. We demonstrated that the ablation efficiency can be enhanced when the pressure is reduced with respect to the atmospheric pressure for a given laser fluence, reaching an upper limit despite of high-vacuum conditions. An analytical model based on the Hertz-Knudsen law reproduces all the experimental results.

  20. Iodine Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    Iodine enables dramatic mass and cost savings for lunar and Mars cargo missions, including Earth escape and near-Earth space maneuvers. The demonstrated throttling ability of iodine is important for a singular thruster that might be called upon to propel a spacecraft from Earth to Mars or Venus. The ability to throttle efficiently is even more important for missions beyond Mars. In the Phase I project, Busek Company, Inc., tested an existing Hall thruster, the BHT-8000, on iodine propellant. The thruster was fed by a high-flow iodine feed system and supported by an existing Busek hollow cathode flowing xenon gas. The Phase I propellant feed system was evolved from a previously demonstrated laboratory feed system. Throttling of the thruster between 2 and 11 kW at 200 to 600 V was demonstrated. Testing showed that the efficiency of iodine fueled BHT-8000 is the same as with xenon, with iodine delivering a slightly higher thrust-to-power (T/P) ratio. In Phase II, a complete iodine-fueled system was developed, including the thruster, hollow cathode, and iodine propellant feed system. The nominal power of the Phase II system is 8 kW; however, it can be deeply throttled as well as clustered to much higher power levels. The technology also can be scaled to greater than 100 kW per thruster to support megawatt-class missions. The target thruster efficiency for the full-scale system is 65 percent at high specific impulse (Isp) (approximately 3,000 s) and 60 percent at high thrust (Isp approximately 2,000 s).

  1. Thermal, optical and spectroscopic characterizations of borate laser crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavoutier, M.; Jubera, V.; Veber, P.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.; Hejtmanek, J.; Decourt, R.; Debray, J.; Menaert, B.; Segonds, P.; Adamietz, F.; Rodriguez, V.; Manek-Hönninger, I.; Fargues, A.; Descamps, D.; Garcia, A.

    2011-02-01

    The Yb-content Li 6Ln(BO 3) 3 ( Ln: Gd, Y) solid solution has been investigated. Crystal growth has been successful for several compositions. A 22% molar content of ytterbium ions was determined by chemical analysis (ICP). Physical properties relevant to laser operation like mechanical hardness, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity were measured on single crystals. Optical measurements, including refractive index and low temperature spectroscopy, were also performed. Finally, the effect of the Y/Gd ratio is discussed.

  2. Thermal Noise in Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaminio, Raffaele

    Thermal noise is one of the major limitations to the sensitivity of present and future laser interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection. According to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem any mechanical oscillator is affected by a motion of thermal origin directly related to its thermodynamic temperature. The mirrors and their suspensions that are used in gravitational wave detectors such as Virgo or LIGO are examples of such mechanical oscillators. As a consequence their position is affected by this thermal vibration and the sensitivity of the gravitational wave detector is thermal noise limited over a wide range of frequencies. After recalling briefly the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and its origins, this chapter describes the main types of thermal noise affecting gravitational wave detectors. In the last part of the chapter a special emphasis is given to the thermal noise due to dissipation in the mirrors optical coatings.

  3. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fi

    2007-07-24

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation. __________________________________________________

  4. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2007-11-27

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation.

  5. Laser wavelength effect on laser-induced photo-thermal sintering of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeng, Dongwoo; Yeo, Junyeob; Lee, Daeho; Moon, Seung-Jae; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2015-09-01

    This work is concerned with the laser wavelength effect on the electrical properties and surface morphology of laser-sintered nanoparticle thin films. Silver nanoparticle thin films spin-coated on soda lime glass substrates were irradiated with lasers of three different wavelengths (near ultraviolet 405 nm, green 514.5 nm, near infrared 817 nm) at varied laser intensities and scanning speeds. Scanning electron microscopy images and ex situ resistivity measurements show that the photo-thermal sintering alters significantly the film surface morphology and electrical properties, depending on the processing parameters (laser wavelength, laser intensities and scanning speed). While the optical response of the material is determined largely by the processing laser wavelength, the laser beam intensity and scanning speed regulate the induced temperature field. Examination of the optical properties of as-deposited silver nanoparticle thin film in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy images taken from the laser-sintered lines helps elucidate how the processing laser wavelength modulates the optical response of silver nanoparticle thin film and therefore affects the thermal response.

  6. Thermal Aspects of Ductile Mode Micro Laser Assisted Machining

    SciTech Connect

    Virkar, Saurabh R.; Patten, John A.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents the simulation work performed to study an innovative process called micro-Laser Assisted Machining ({mu}-LAM). {mu}-LAM is being used for machining hard and brittle semiconductor and ceramic materials such as Silicon Carbide. Numerical simulations were carried out using the commercial software AdvantEdge Version 5.4. The cutting tool is modeled as a single point diamond tip. The workpiece material (4H-SiC) is heated locally during the actual machining process by a laser beam, which passes through the diamond tool tip. The workpiece is heated beyond the thermal softening point in order to study the effect of increased temperature on the machining process. The initial work started with an approximate thermal softening curve to ensure that thermal effects can be incorporated in the simulation model. A new thermal softening curve was developed based upon experimental data and implemented in the material model. A thermal boundary was provided on the workpiece top surface to simulate the effect of laser heating. In all three cases the chip formation was observed and the changes in cutting and thrust forces were evaluated. The simulation results indicate a significant decrease in machining forces if Silicon Carbide is heated and thermally softened thus demonstrating the benefits of the {mu}-LAM process.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic MACH Code Used to Simulate Magnetoplasmadynamic Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Pavlos G.; LaPointe, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The On-Board Propulsion program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is utilizing a state of-the-art numerical simulation to model the performance of high-power electromagnetic plasma thrusters. Such thrusters are envisioned for use in lunar and Mars cargo transport, piloted interplanetary expeditions, and deep-space robotic exploration of the solar system. The experimental portion of this program is described in reference 1. This article describes the numerical modeling program used to guide the experimental research. The synergistic use of numerical simulations and experimental research has spurred the rapid advancement of high-power thruster technologies for a variety of bold new NASA missions. From its inception as a U.S. Department of Defense code in the mid-1980's, the Multiblock Arbitrary Coordinate Hydromagnetic (MACH) simulation tool has been used by the plasma physics community to model a diverse range of plasma problems--including plasma opening switches, inertial confinement fusion concepts, compact toroid formation and acceleration, z-pinch implosion physics, laser-target interactions, and a variety of plasma thrusters. The MACH2 code used at Glenn is a time-dependent, two-dimensional, axisymmetric, multimaterial code with a multiblock structure. MACH3, a more recent three-dimensional version of the code, is currently undergoing beta tests. The MACH computational mesh moves in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fashion that allows the simulation of diffusive-dominated and dispersive-dominated problems, and the mesh can be refined via a variety of adaptive schemes to capture regions of varying characteristic scale. The mass continuity and momentum equations model a compressible viscous fluid, and three energy equations are used to simulate nonthermal equilibrium between electrons, ions, and the radiation field. Magnetic fields are modeled by an induction equation that includes resistive diffusion, the Hall effect, and a thermal source for magnetic

  8. High-Power Ion Thruster Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.

    1996-01-01

    Performance data are presented for the NASA/Hughes 30-cm-diam 'common' thruster operated over the power range from 600 W to 4.6 kW. At the 4.6-kW power level, the thruster produces 172 mN of thrust at a specific impulse of just under 4000 s. Xenon pressure and temperature measurements are presented for a 6.4-mm-diam hollow cathode operated at emission currents ranging from 5 to 30 A and flow rates of 4 sccm and 8 sccm. Highly reproducible results show that the cathode temperature is a linear function of emission current, ranging from approx. 1000 C to 1150 C over this same current range. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements obtained from a 30-cm-diam thruster are presented, suggesting that LIF could be a valuable diagnostic for real-time assessment of accelerator-arid erosion. Calibration results of laminar-thin-film (LTF) erosion badges with bulk molybdenum are presented for 300-eV xenon, krypton, and argon sputtering ions. Facility-pressure effects on the charge-exchange ion current collected by 8-cm-diam and 30-cm-diam thrusters operated on xenon propellant are presented to show that accel current is nearly independent of facility pressure at low pressures, but increases rapidly under high-background-pressure conditions.

  9. Simulation of the thermal effect of laser irradiation to optimize laser epilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Detlef; Kienle, Alwin; Falkenstein, Werner; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    2000-11-01

    For hair removal commonly lasers are used with wavelengths being selectively absorbed by melanin .As a consequence, laser radiation leads to an increase of the temperature not only in melanin containing structures of the hair but also in the epidermis. Therefore, we simulated and studied the laser induced temperature development in tissue for various laser wavelengths and various pulse profiles. Modifying the beam parameters can improve the selectivity of the method. Monte- Carlo-Simulations were used to calculate light absorption in dermal structures, considering the tissue specific optical properties. The thermal diffusion in tissue was calculated by a finite difference method. The biological reaction due to the temperature rise was determined by an Arrhenius formalism and depends on temperature and time of laser-tissue interaction. The simulation program allows to calculate the temperature distribution and thermal damage for various temporal pulse profiles, fluence rates and irradiation geometries. Superficial cooling has an important influence and has been considered in the calculations. The results of our simulations for various laser types show differences in the thermal reaction which can be used to optimize the treatment modalities. The potential and limits of laser epilation can be estimated from these results. For example, a series of laser pulses has some advantages compared to a longer single pulse.

  10. Thermal resistance of ridge-waveguide lasers mounted upside down

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.

    1987-01-05

    The heat dissipation in upside down mounted ridge-waveguide lasers equipped with a double-channel structure is analyzed by a simplified device model. Assuming an isothermal active region, the thermal resistance is obtained by means of conformal mapping. A comparison to published experimental results shows good agreement.

  11. Laser window with annular grooves for thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Horton, J.A.; Alger, T.W.

    1983-07-13

    A laser window or other optical element which is thermally loaded, heats up and causes optical distortions because of temperature gradients between the center and the edge. A number of annular grooves, one to three or more, are formed in the element between a central portion and edge portion, producing a web portion which concentrates the thermal gradient and thermally isolates the central portion from the edge portion, producing a uniform temperature profile across the central portion and therefore reduce the optical distortions. The grooves are narrow and closely spaced with respect to the thickness of the element, and successive grooves are formed from alternate sides of the element.

  12. Hydrogen-oxygen catalytic ignition and thruster investigation. Volume 2: High pressure thruster evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. J.; Heckert, B.; Burge, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    A high pressure thruster effort was conducted with the major objective of demonstrating a duct cooling concept with gaseous propellant in a thruster operating at nominally 300 psia and 1500 lbf. The analytical design methods for the duct cooling were proven in a series of tests with both ambient and reduced temperature propellants. Long duration tests as well as pulse mode tests demonstrated the feasibility of the concept. All tests were conducted with a scaling of the raised post triplet injector design previously demonstrated at 900 lbf in demonstration firings. A series of environmental conditioned firings were also conducted to determine the effects of thermal soaks, atmospheric air and high humidity. This volume presents the results of the high pressure thruster evaluations.

  13. Advanced space propulsion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments showed that stray magnetic fields can adversely affect the capacity of a hollow cathode neutralizer to couple to an ion beam. Magnetic field strength at the neutralizer cathode orifice is a crucial factor influencing the coupling voltage. The effects of electrostatic accelerator grid aperture diameters on the ion current extraction capabilities were examined experimentally to describe the divergence, deflection, and current extraction capabilities of grids with the screen and accelerator apertures displaced relative to one another. Experiments performed in orificed, mercury hollow cathodes support the model of field enhanced thermionic electron mission from cathode inserts. Tests supported the validity of a thermal model of the cathode insert. A theoretical justification of a Saha equation model relating cathode plasma properties is presented. Experiments suggest that ion loss rates to discharge chamber walls can be controlled. A series of new discharge chamber magnetic field configurations were generated in the flexible magnetic field thruster and their effect on performance was examined. A technique used in the thruster to measure ion currents to discharge chamber walls is described. Using these ion currents the fraction of ions produced that are extracted from the discharge chamber and the energy cost of plasma ions are computed.

  14. Thermal diffusivity of diamond films using a laser pulse technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Winfree, William P.; Crews, B. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. A laser pulse technique was developed to measure the thermal diffusivity of diamond films deposited on a silicon substrate. The effective thermal diffusivity of a diamond film on silicon was measured by observing the phase and amplitude of the cyclic thermal waves generated by laser pulses. An analytical model is presented to calculate the effective in-plane (face-parallel) diffusivity of a two-layer system. The model is used to reduce the effective thermal diffusivity of the diamonds/silicon sample to a value for the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of the diamond film. The average effective diffusivity values are 1.47 + or - 0.03 and 1.83 + or - 0.10 yielding thermal diffusivity values of 7.46 + or - 0.90 and 7.33 + or - 0.70 sq cm/s respectively, for the two samples; the calculated thermal con ductivity values are 13.50 and 13.28 W/cmK, which are better than that of type 1a natural diamond. The phase and amplitude measurements give similar results.

  15. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Some advances in component technology for inert gas thrusters are described. The maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar was increased 60-70% by the use of an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar, but without emissive oxide, was also obtained. A 30 cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages give double-ion measurements consistent with a double ion correlation developed previously using 15 cm thruster data. An attempt was made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The reason this attempt was unsuccessful is not yet clear. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration was evaluated. The ion impingement on the single grid accelerator was found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator was 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  16. Magnetoplasmadynamic thruster erosion research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, D. Q.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (MPdT) lifetime at sustained multimagawatt power levels is unknown but will be governed by plasma erosion of thruster surfaces. Before the thruster can be developed for an orbital propulsion application the physics of the erosion mechanisms must be studied. The following key questions that must be resolved to understand erosion are addressed: (1) what are the erosion mechanisms on the anode, cathode, and insulator and what are the quantitative rates for each; (2) what governs the cathode heat balance at high current density and magawatt power levels; (3) what governs the anode heat balance; and (4) how does the cathode work function change with time, and what effect does this have on erosion. The approach aims at developing an understanding of the erosion of the electrode and insulator surfaces by conducting experiments on a steady-state, scaled-down MPD device, and by analysis of key processes.

  17. Krypton Ion Thruster Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Williams, George J.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary data were obtained from a 30 cm ion thruster operating on krypton propellant over the input power range of 0.4 to 5.5 kW. The data presented are compared and contrasted to the data obtained with xenon propellant over the same input power envelope. Typical krypton thruster efficiency was 70 percent at a specific impulse of approximately 5000 s, with a maximum demonstrated thrust to power ratio of approximately 42 mN/kW at 2090 s specific impulse and 1580 watts input power. Critical thruster performance and component lifetime issues were evaluated. Order of magnitude power throttling was demonstrated using a simplified power-throttling strategy.

  18. Krypton ion thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Williams, George J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary data were obtained from a 30 cm ion thruster operating on krypton propellant over the input power range of 0.4-5.5 kW. The data are presented, and compared and contrasted to those obtained with xenon propellant over the same input power envelope. Typical krypton thruster efficiency was 70 percent at a specific impulse of approximately 5000 s, with a maximum demonstrated thrust-to-power ratio of approximately 42 mN/kW at 2090 s specific impulse and 1580 watts input power. Critical thruster performance and component lifetime issues were evaluated. Order-of-magnitude power throttling was demonstrated using a simplified power-throttling strategy.

  19. Inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inert gas performance with three types of 12 cm diameter magnetoelectrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters was tested. The types tested included: (1) a hemispherical shaped discharge chamber with platinum cobalt magnets; (2) three different lengths of the hemispherical chambers with samarium cobalt magnets; and (3) three lengths of the conical shaped chambers with aluminum nickel cobalt magnets. The best argon performance was produced by a 8.0 cm long conical chamber with alnico magnets. The best xenon high mass utilization performance was obtained with the same 8.0 cm long conical thruster. The hemispherical thruster obtained 75 to 87% mass utilization at 185 to 205 eV/ion of singly charged ion equivalent beam.

  20. Magnesium Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project is developing a magnesium (Mg) Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for in situ resource utilization (ISRU)-based solar system exploration. Magnesium is light and easy to ionize. For a Mars- Earth transfer, the propellant mass savings with respect to a xenon Hall effect thruster (HET) system are enormous. Magnesium also can be combusted in a rocket with carbon dioxide (CO2) or water (H2O), enabling a multimode propulsion system with propellant sharing and ISRU. In the near term, CO2 and H2O would be collected in situ on Mars or the moon. In the far term, Mg itself would be collected from Martian and lunar regolith. In Phase I, an integrated, medium-power (1- to 3-kW) Mg HET system was developed and tested. Controlled, steady operation at constant voltage and power was demonstrated. Preliminary measurements indicate a specific impulse (Isp) greater than 4,000 s was achieved at a discharge potential of 400 V. The feasibility of delivering fluidized Mg powder to a medium- or high-power thruster also was demonstrated. Phase II of the project evaluated the performance of an integrated, highpower Mg Hall thruster system in a relevant space environment. Researchers improved the medium power thruster system and characterized it in detail. Researchers also designed and built a high-power (8- to 20-kW) Mg HET. A fluidized powder feed system supporting the high-power thruster was built and delivered to Busek Company, Inc.

  1. NASA's 2004 Hall Thruster Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David T.; Manzella, David H.; Hofer, Richard R.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Hall thruster research and development tasks conducted during fiscal year 2004 is presented. These tasks focus on: raising the technology readiness level of high power Hall thrusters, developing a moderate-power/ moderate specific impulse Hall thruster, demonstrating high-power/high specific impulse Hall thruster operation, and addressing the fundamental technical challenges of emerging Hall thruster concepts. Programmatic background information, technical accomplishments and out year plans for each program element performed under the sponsorship of the In-Space Transportation Program, Project Prometheus, and the Energetics Project are provided.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Thruster Cathode Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crofton, Mark

    2004-11-01

    Advanced ion propulsion technologies are being developed under the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) program for use in outer planet exploration. A revolutionary approach to thruster cathode design is dictated by the very high lifetime and propellant throughput requirements for nuclear electric applications. In conventional dispenser hollow cathodes used in thrusters, processes leading to depletion, inadequate transport, or insufficient production of barium are among those limiting the lifetime. A reservoir hollow cathode is being developed to address each of these failure mechanisms, exploiting four design variables - matrix material, source material, geometry, and thermal design - to essentially eliminate established failure modes. The very long anticipated lifetime necessitates new life validation methods to augment or replace the conventional lifetest approach. One important tool for quickly evaluating design changes is the ability to measure barium density inside a hollow cathode and/or in the plume. The dependence of barium density on temperature and other factors is an extremely important indicator of cathode health, particularly if the ratio Ba:BaO is also obtained. Comparison of barium production for reservoir and conventional cathodes will enable an assessment of the efficacy of reservoir designs and the goal of reducing barium consumption at a given emission current level. This study describes benchmark measurements made on a conventional cathode previously operated in a 20-kW NEXIS laboratory engine. Data on cathode operation and life-limiting processes were obtained through direct, real-time monitoring of atoms and molecules. A high-resolution, tunable laser system was employed to detect absorption of the low-density barium atoms inside the cathode. The plume was monitored also, using a quadrupole mass spectrometer to monitor multiple species and measure ion charge ratios. Data obtained with retarding potential analyzers or other means are

  3. Progress on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam; Eskridge, Richard; Fimognari, Peter; Koelfgen, Syri J.; Lee, Mike

    2004-01-01

    A plasmoid is a compact plasma structure with an integral magnetic field, that may be categorized according to the relative strength of the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field (B(sub p) and B(sub t), respectively). An object with B(sub p)/B(sub t), much much more than 1 is called a Field Reverse Configuration (FRC); if B(sub p) approximately equal to B(sub t), it is called a Spheromak. The thruster operates by repetitively producing plasmoids that are accelerated and ejected at high velocity. As this process is inductive, there are no electrodes. Also, the magnetic structure of the plasmoid should suppress thermal and mass losses to the wall, and improve detachment of the plasma exhaust from the thruster. This concept should be capable of producing an Isp in the range of 5,000 - 10,000 s with thrust densities of order 10(exp 5) N per square meters. The current experiment is designed to produce jet powers in the range of 5-10 kW, although the concept should be scalable into the MW range. In PTX, the plasmoid is formed inside of a single turn conical theta-pinch coil (17.58 cone angle). The coil is driven by a 640 nF, 35 kV capacitor bank, which rings at a frequency of 500 kHz. Previous experiments on PTX were conducted with a static-fill of propellant gas (6% H2 in He), and demonstrated reliable ionization over a pressure range of 40 - 200 mTorr. We are now adding a fast gas-puff valve to load the propellant, and a ringing pre-ionization circuit (f = 5 Mhz) to better control the plasmoid formation. An alternate coil (8.58 cone angle) will also be used, so as to investigate the effect of coil shape on performance. In addition, a variety of propellants will be used, including hydrogen, nitrogen, and argon. The plasmoid mass and velocity will be measured with a variety of diagnostics, including external B-dot probes and flux loops, a high-speed framing camera, and a HeNe laser interferometer. Internal B-dot probes and a quadruple Langmuir probe will provide additional

  4. Thermal Conductivity Based on Modified Laser Flash Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2005-01-01

    The laser flash method is a standard method for thermal diffusivity measurement. It employs single-pulse heating of one side of a thin specimen and measures the temperature response of the other side. The thermal diffusivity of the specimen can be obtained based on a one-dimensional transient heat transfer analysis. This paper reports the development of a theory that includes a transparent reference layer with known thermal property attached to the back of sample. With the inclusion of heat conduction from the sample to the reference layer in the theoretical analysis, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of sample can be extracted from the temperature response data. Furthermore, a procedure is established to select two points from the data to calculate these properties. The uncertainty analysis indicates that this method can be used with acceptable levels of uncertainty.

  5. Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    On May 16, 1991, the NASA Headquarters Propulsion, Power, and Energy Division and the NASA Lewis Research Center Low Thrust Propulsion Branch hosted a workshop attended by key experts in magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters and associated sciences. The scope was limited to high power MPD thrusters suitable for major NASA space exploration missions, and its purpose was to initiate the process of increasing the expectations and prospects for MPD research, primarily by increasing the level of cooperation, interaction, and communication between parties within the MPD community.

  6. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-11

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.

  7. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters' utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  8. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  9. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  10. Inert gas ion thruster development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Two 12 cm magneto-electrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters were performance mapped with argon and xenon. The first, hexagonal, thruster produced optimized performance of 48.5to 79 percent argon mass utilization efficiencies at discharge energies of 240 to 425 eV/ion, respectively, Xenon mass utilization efficiencies of 78 to 95 percent were observed at discharge energies of 220 to 290 eV/ion with the same optimized hexagonal thruster. Changes to the cathode baffle reduced the discharge anode potential during xenon operation from approximately 40 volts to about 30 volts. Preliminary tests conducted with the second, hemispherical, MESC thruster showed a nonuniform anode magnetic field adversely affected thruster performance. This performance degradation was partially overcome by changes in the boundary anode placement. Conclusions drawn the hemispherical thruster tests gave insights into the plasma processes in the MESC discharge that will aid in the design of future thrusters.

  11. [Use of the thermal laser effect of laser irradiation for cardiovascular applications exemplified by the Nd:YAG laser].

    PubMed

    Ischinger, T; Coppenrath, K; Weber, H; Enders, S; Unsöld, E; Hessel, S

    1989-11-01

    Techniques of percutaneous transluminal application of laser energy for vessel recanalization have been used clinically since 1983. The commonly used Nd:YAG and argon lasers achieve ablation of atherosclerotic plaques by thermal action (vaporization). In order to reduce undesirable thermal damage in the neighborhood of the target tissue and to avoid vessel perforation, optimal irradiation parameters, modified (atraumatic) fiber tips (hot tips, sapphires), and steerable catheter systems needed to be implemented. Favorable results from peripheral application have encouraged use in the coronary circulation. More recently, coagulative tissue effects of circumferential irradiation of the vessel wall during balloon dilatation have been used for stabilization of acute and late results after mechanical balloon angioplasty. Enhancement of the differential light absorption of atherosclerotic plaque by use of biological dyes may further improve selective intravascular laser application. Intraoperative ECG-guided laser coagulation of arrhythmogenic areas of myocardium is a method for treatment of malignant arrhythmias. Transluminal non-operative application of myocardial laser photocoagulation has now been tested experimentally and shown to be safe and effective. There was no arrhythmogenicity or thermal damage of coronary arteries associated with this method. Innovative techniques such as nanosecond pulsed excimer lasers (athermal action) and development of "intelligent" lasers--which are equipped with spectroscopy-guided feedback systems for plaque recognition--have opened new perspectives and will further improve safety and efficacy of clinical laser application. However, according to current experience, the thermally acting Nd:YAG laser is an effective and versatile mode of laser therapy for selected cardiovascular indications. PMID:2532812

  12. Frequency stabilization of laser diodes in an aggressive thermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minch, J. R.; Walther, F. G.; Savage, S.; Plante, A.; Scalesse, V.

    2015-03-01

    Mobile free-space laser communication systems must reconcile the requirements of low size, weight, and power with the ability to both survive and operate in harsh thermal and mechanical environments. In order to minimize the aperture size and amplifier power requirements of such systems, communication links must exhibit performance near theoretical limits. Such performance requires laser transmitters and receiver filters and interferometers to maintain frequency accuracy to within a couple hundred MHz of the design frequency. We demonstrate an approach to achieving high frequency stability over wide temperature ranges by using conventional DFB lasers, tuned with TEC and current settings, referenced to an HCN molecular frequency standard. A HCN cell absorption line is scanned across the TEC set-point to adjust the DFB laser frequency. Once the center of the line is determined, the TEC set-point is offset as required to obtain frequency agility. To obtain large frequency offsets from an HCN absorption line, as well as continuous laser source operation, a second laser is offset from the reference laser and the resulting beat tone is detected in a photoreceiver and set to the desired offset using a digital frequency-locked loop. Using this arrangement we have demonstrated frequency accuracy and stability of better than 8 MHz RMS over an operational temperature range of 0ºC to 50º C, with operation within minutes following 8 hour soaks at -40º C and 70º C.

  13. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters considered for space propulsion systems were investigated. Electron diffusion across a magnetic field was examined utilizing a basic model. The production of doubly charged ions was correlated using only overall performance parameters. The use of this correlation is therefore possible in the design stage of large gas thrusters, where detailed plasma properties are not available. Argon hollow cathode performance was investigated over a range of emission currents, with the positions of the inert, keeper, and anode varied. A general trend observed was that the maximum ratio of emission to flow rate increased at higher propellant flow rates. It was also found that an enclosed keeper enhances maximum cathode emission at high flow rates. The maximum cathode emission at a given flow rate was associated with a noisy high voltage mode. Although this mode has some similarities to the plume mode found at low flows and emissions, it is encountered by being initially in the spot mode and increasing emission. A detailed analysis of large, inert-gas thruster performance was carried out. For maximum thruster efficiency, the optimum beam diameter increases from less than a meter at under 2000 sec specific impulse to several meters at 10,000 sec. The corresponding range in input power ranges from several kilowatts to megawatts.

  14. Modeling the Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.; Fruchtman, A.

    1998-08-01

    The acceleration of the plasma in the Hall thruster to supersonic velocities is examined by the use of a steady state model. Flows that are smooth across the sonic transition plane are found. The possibility of generating flows in which the acceleration across the sonic plane is abrupt, is also studied.

  15. Plasma thrusters from Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, E.J.

    1992-09-01

    A report on the Russian stationary plasma thrusters having plasma accelerated to high velocities by electrical and magnetic forces is described. For specific impulses of 15-20 km/sec, optimal for such applications as satellite station keeping and orbital transfer, a unit supplying 0.05 N from a 2-kW input has a 30-cm-diameter nozzle.

  16. The effects of exposure to LN2 temperatures and 2.5 suns solar radiation on 30-cm ion thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental test program was developed to demonstrate all 30 cm Hg-ion bombardment thruster functions over the thermal environment of several proposed missions. A 30 cm thruster with grids dished 1.25 cm and instrumented with 31 thermocouples, was placed in a vacuum tank equipped with minus 196 C walls. Cold storage of a thruster was simulated and temperatures as low as minus 100 C were attained on the thruster. The thruster started successfully from these cold conditions. The thruster operating at both half and full beam power was exposed to 2.5 suns on axis solar simulation. Various thruster thermal configurations, used to simulate multiple thruster operation, were tested at the above conditions. The results of these tests are reported herein.

  17. The effects of exposure to LN2 temperatures and 2.5 suns solar radiation on 30-cm ion thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental test program was developed to demonstrate all 30 cm Hg-ion bombardment thruster functions over the thermal environment of several proposed missions. A 30 cm thruster with grids dished 1.25 cm and instrumented with 31 thermocouples, was placed in a vacuum tank equipped with -196 C walls. Cold storage of a thruster was simulated and temperatures as low as -100 C were attained on the thruster. The thruster started successfully from these cold conditions. The thruster operating at both half and full beam power was exposed to 2.5 suns on axis solar simulation. Various thruster thermal configurations, used to simulate multiple thruster operation, were tested at the above conditions. The results of these tests are reported herein.

  18. Laser drilling of thermal barrier coated jet-engine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, H. K.

    Aero engine hot end components are often covered with ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs). Laser drilling in the TBC coated components can be a source of service life TBC degradation and spallation. The present study aims to understand the mechanisms of TBC delamination and develop techniques to drill holes without damaging the TBC, Nimonic 263 workpieces coated with TBC are used in the experiments. Microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) is employed to monitor the integrity of the coating /substrate interfaces of the post-laser drilled materials. A numerical modelling technique is used to investigate the role of melt ejection on TBC delamination. The model accounts for the vapour and the assist gas flow effects in the process. Broadly, melt ejection induced mechanical stresses for the TBC coating / bond coating and thermal effects for the bond coating / substrate interfaces are found the key delamination mechanisms. Experiments are carried out to validate the findings from the model. Various techniques that enable laser drilling without damaging the TBC are demonstrated. Twin jet assisted acute angle laser drilling is one successful technique that has been analysed using the melt ejection simulation. Optimisation of the twin jet assisted acute angle laser drilling process parameters is carried out using Design of Experiments (DoE) and statistical modelling approaches. Finally, an industrial case study to develop a high speed, high quality laser drilling system for combustor cans is described. Holes are drilled by percussion and trepan drilling in TBC coated and uncoated Haynes 230 workpieces. The production rate of percussion drilling is significantly higher than the trepan drilling, however metallurgical hole quality and reproducibility is poor. A number of process parameters are investigated to improve these characteristics. Gas type and gas pressure effects on various characteristics of the inclined laser drilled holes are investigated through theoretical

  19. Effect of thermal noise on random lasers in diffusion regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini-Farzad, Mahmood; Montakhab, Afshin

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of thermal noise on the time evolution of a weak light pulse (probe) in the presence of a strong light pulse (pump) within a gain medium which includes random scatterer particles. Suitable thermal noise term is added to a set of four coupled equations including three diffusion equations for energy densities and a rate equation for the upper level population in a four-level gain medium. These equations have been solved simultaneously by Crank-Nicholson numerical method. The main result is that the back-scattered output probe light is increased as the thermal noise strength is increased and simultaneously, with the same rate, the amplified spontaneous emission is decreased. Therefore, the amplified response of the random laser in diffusion regime for the input probe pulse is enhanced due to effect of the thermal noise.

  20. [Thermal stress of the inner ear during laser stapedotomy. I: Continuous-wave laser].

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, S; Schönfeld, U; Fischer, R; Döring, M; Prapavat, V; Müller, G; Scherer, H

    1995-12-01

    As a consequence of perforating the footplate during laser stapedotomy, direct radiation to the inner ear will warm perilymph and adjacent structures. To determine the possible thermal dangers to cochlear structures from different laser parameters, heat transport mechanisms, temperature increases and temperature fields were investigated in a model system approximating caloric and physiologic changes in the inner ear. The temperature-time course of local cochlear warming showed a rapid convection-dependent increase that reached a peak at about the end of the laser impulse. An increase in power density caused an elevation of the temperature in all laser systems used. Maximum temperatures varied widely for CO2 lasers at the same wave-length, but a different beam-time behavior was found at a distance of 2 mm behind the perforation by using low-power densities. Heat values were lowest at a pulse duration of 50 ms in the superpulse (< 5 degrees C) and continuous wave (cw) modes (< 9 degrees C), while the highest value was found in the pulser mode (to 21 degrees C). After argon laser irradiation at high-power densities, temperatures were nearly independent of location (5.5-13 degrees C). When considering risks of possible inner ear damage from thermal stress during laser stapedotomy, application of the CO2 superpulse and cw laser appears to be safe over a large power-density range. Low energies using a small-beam diameter and short pulse durations (50-100 ms) are recommended. In contrast, use of the CO2 laser in a pulser mode may result in inner-ear damage because of the high temperatures produced. Structures located at a greater distance can be endangered by direct irradiation with the argon laser. PMID:8582829

  1. Thermal expansion of scanning tunneling microscopy tips under laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafström, S.; Schuller, P.; Kowalski, J.; Neumann, R.

    1998-04-01

    The periodic thermal expansion of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips arising under irradiation with power-modulated laser light has been investigated. The expansion was determined by comparison with a calibrated piezomotion measured in an STM, which was operated in the constant-current mode, and instrumental effects were corrected for. The experimental data concerning the frequency response of the thermal expansion for various geometries of the tip and for different positions of the laser focus are compared with theoretical results which were derived from a numerical solution of the equation of heat conduction. A very good agreement is found. The results are also interpreted in terms of simplified analytical expressions. Furthermore, the theoretical data are used to derive the response of the tip to fast transients of the light power as in the case of pulsed irradiation.

  2. Thermal degradation of PA66 during laser transmission welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Guo, Dehui; Chen, Guochun; Jiang, Hairong; Meng, Dongdong; Yan, Zhang; Liu, Huixia

    2016-09-01

    The thermal degradation of materials strongly influences the weld strength in laser transmission welding (LTW). Weld strength decreases at high temperatures because of material thermal degradation. Hence, it is necessary to investigate this phenomenon. Thermal degradation of polyamide 66 (PA66) was predicted by combining a pyrolysis kinetic model with a 3-D transient thermal model. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the pyrolysis characteristic of PA66. The TGA data were used to obtain kinetic parameters of PA66 using an nth order model in MATLAB. In addition, material conversion as a function of temperature (time) was analyzed using this kinetic reaction model containing the relevant kinetic parameters. A 3-D transient thermal model based on a volumetric heat source was developed. The temperature-time data of the point located at the maximum temperature was predicted through this thermal analysis model under different weld parameters. This study demonstrates that the predicted power at which the material starts to degrade is generally consistent with the power at which shear strength begins to decrease. The present studies lay a theoretical foundation for the investigation of thermal degradation during LTW.

  3. Thermal Changes of Maize Seed by Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Aguilar, C.; Dominguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this research, the thermal evolution in maize seeds ( Zea mays L.) was studied when low-intensity laser irradiation was applied during 60 s. The seeds were irradiated in three different conditions: suspended in air, placed on an aluminum surface, and finally placed on a cardboard; the evolution of the seed temperature was measured by an infrared camera. Photoacoustic spectroscopy and the Rosencwaig and Gersho model were used to determine the optical absorption coefficient (β ) of the seeds. The results indicate that using 650 nm laser light and 27.4 mW, it is possible to produce temperature changes (up to 9.06°C after 1 min) on the seeds. Comparing the mean temperature of the seeds, during and after the incidence of light from a laser, it was found that there were statistically significant differences (P≤ 0.05) from time t1 to time t_{16} (t1 to t_{16}) and t3 to t_{16}, for the laser turned on and off, respectively. The seed condition that had the highest temperature variation, relative to the initial temperature (during the irradiation laser exposure), involved the seeds suspended in air. With regard to the stage of decay of the temperature, it was found that the seed condition that decays more slowly was the seed placed on the cardboard. It was also found that black-dyed maize seeds are optically opaque in the 300 nm to 700 nm range Also, the thermal diffusion length is smaller than the optical penetration length. In the present investigation, it was shown that there is a thermal component associated with the mechanisms of laser biostimulation, which is also a function of the container materials of the seed. In this way, the effects of laser treatment on maize seeds involve at least a temperature effect. It is important to know the temperature changes in the seeds that have been irradiated with a laser beam since they could have substantial practical and theoretical importance.

  4. Thermal treatment effects on laser surface remelting duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Alex M.; Ierardi, Maria Clara F.; Aparecida Pinto, M.; Tavares, Sérgio S. M.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the microstructural changes and effects on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels UNS S32304 and UNS S32205, commonly used by the petroleum industry, were studied, following the execution of laser surface remelting (LSM) and post-thermal treatments (TT). In this way, data was obtained, which could then be compared with the starting condition of the alloys. In order to analyze the corrosion behaviour of the alloys in the as-received conditions, treated with laser and after post-thermal treatments, cyclic polarization tests were carried out. A solution of 3.5% NaCl (artificial sea water) was used, as duplex stainless steels are regularly used by the petroleum industry in offshore locations. The results obtained showed that when laser surface treated, due to rapid resolidification, the alloys became almost ferritic, and since the level of nitrogen in the composition of both alloys is superior to their solubility limit in ferrite, a precipitation of Cr2N (chromium nitrides) occurred in the ferritic matrix, causing loss of corrosion resistance, thus resulting in an increase in surface hardness. However, after the post-thermal treatment the alloys corrosion resistance was restored to values close to those of the as-received condition.

  5. Thermal-mechanical modeling of laser ablation hybrid machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, Mohammad Kaiser

    2001-08-01

    Hard, brittle and wear-resistant materials like ceramics pose a problem when being machined using conventional machining processes. Machining ceramics even with a diamond cutting tool is very difficult and costly. Near net-shape processes, like laser evaporation, produce micro-cracks that require extra finishing. Thus it is anticipated that ceramic machining will have to continue to be explored with new-sprung techniques before ceramic materials become commonplace. This numerical investigation results from the numerical simulations of the thermal and mechanical modeling of simultaneous material removal from hard-to-machine materials using both laser ablation and conventional tool cutting utilizing the finite element method. The model is formulated using a two dimensional, planar, computational domain. The process simulation acronymed, LAHM (Laser Ablation Hybrid Machining), uses laser energy for two purposes. The first purpose is to remove the material by ablation. The second purpose is to heat the unremoved material that lies below the ablated material in order to ``soften'' it. The softened material is then simultaneously removed by conventional machining processes. The complete solution determines the temperature distribution and stress contours within the material and tracks the moving boundary that occurs due to material ablation. The temperature distribution is used to determine the distance below the phase change surface where sufficient ``softening'' has occurred, so that a cutting tool may be used to remove additional material. The model incorporated for tracking the ablative surface does not assume an isothermal melt phase (e.g. Stefan problem) for laser ablation. Both surface absorption and volume absorption of laser energy as function of depth have been considered in the models. LAHM, from the thermal and mechanical point of view is a complex machining process involving large deformations at high strain rates, thermal effects of the laser, removal of

  6. The MPD thruster development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, L. K.; Pawlik, E. V.

    1979-01-01

    Recent research results have inferred that the self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster can attain efficiency and specific impulse levels which are competitive with ion thrusters. Based on these results, a program was initiated at JPL to develop this thruster for application on future spacecraft. Preliminary mission analyses have shown that the high thrust density MPD arcjet is advantageous for high power missions, such as a short trip time earth orbit transfer vehicle or a nuclear powered outer planet explorer. Direct thrust stand verification of the inferred performance levels used in these analyses is planned for a facility being assembled at Princeton University. A parallel effort at JPL is considering various thruster system configurations, energy storage concepts and propellant control techniques. In addition, a one pulse per second thruster test facility is planned at JPL to be used for thruster optimization studies including erosion and lifetime measurements.

  7. Colloid micro-Newton thruster development for the ST7-DRS and LISA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemer, John K.; Gamero-Castano, Manuel; Hruby, Vlad; Spence, Doug; Demmons, Nate; McCormick, Ryan; Roy, Tom

    2005-01-01

    We present recent progress and development of the Busek Colloid Micro-Newton Thruster (CMNT) for the Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS) and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Missions.

  8. Performance Evaluation of the Prototype Model NEXT Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance testing results of the first prototype model NEXT ion engine, PM1, are presented. The NEXT program has developed the next generation ion propulsion system to enhance and enable Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship-type NASA missions. The PM1 thruster exhibits operational behavior consistent with its predecessors, the engineering model thrusters, with substantial mass savings, enhanced thermal margins, and design improvements for environmental testing compliance. The dry mass of PM1 is 12.7 kg. Modifications made in the thruster design have resulted in improved performance and operating margins, as anticipated. PM1 beginning-of-life performance satisfies all of the electric propulsion thruster mission-derived technical requirements. It demonstrates a wide range of throttleability by processing input power levels from 0.5 to 6.9 kW. At 6.9 kW, the PM1 thruster demonstrates specific impulse of 4190 s, 237 mN of thrust, and a thrust efficiency of 0.71. The flat beam profile, flatness parameters vary from 0.66 at low-power to 0.88 at full-power, and advanced ion optics reduce localized accelerator grid erosion and increases margins for electron backstreaming, impingement-limited voltage, and screen grid ion transparency. The thruster throughput capability is predicted to exceed 750 kg of xenon, an equivalent of 36,500 hr of continuous operation at the full-power operating condition.

  9. Performance and lifetime assessment of MPD arc thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1988-01-01

    A summary of performance and lifetime characteristics of pulsed and steady-state magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters is presented. The technical focus is on cargo vehicle propulsion for exploration-class missions to the Moon and Mars. Relatively high MPD thruster efficiencies of 0.43 and 0.69 have been reported at about 5000 s specific impulse using hydrogen and lithium, respectively. Efficiencies of 0.10 to 0.35 in the 1000 to 4500 s specific impulse range have been obtained with other propellants (e.g., Ar, NH3, N2). Thermal efficiency data in excess of 0.80 at MW power levels using pulsed thrusters indicate the potential of high MPD thruster performance. Extended tests of pulsed and steady-state MPD thrusters yield total impulses at least two to three orders of magnitude below that necessary for cargo vehicle propulsion. Performance tests and diagnostics for life-limiting mechanisms of megawatt-class thrusters will require high fidelity test stands which handle in excess of 10 kA and a vacuum facility whose operational pressure is less than 3 x 10 to the -4 torr.

  10. The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, R.; Martin, Adam; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Koelfgen, Syri

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the overall Plasma Thruster Experiment (PTX), it's purpose and design, compact toroid propulsion, advantages and requirements of a plasmoid thruster, the projected efficiency, theta-pinch formation, a simulation of the PTX Coil/Bank Circuit using SPICE, the test firing of the PTX Capacitor Bank, PTX diagnostics, the excluded flux array, thruster simulations using MOQUI, and future work on the PTX.

  11. 8-cm mercury ion thruster system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technology status of 8-cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5-cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8-cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

  12. Galium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design of a new type of two-stage pulsed electromagnetic accelerator, the gallium electromagnetic (GEM) thruster. A schematic illustration of the GEM thruster concept is given. In this concept, liquid gallium propellant is pumped into the first stage through a porous metal electrode using an electromagnetic pump. At a designated time, a pulsed discharge (approx. 10-50 J) is initiated in the first stage, ablating the liquid gallium from the porous electrode surface and ejecting a dense thermal gallium plasma into the second state. The presence of the gallium plasma in the second stage serves to trigger the high-energy (approx. 500 J), second-stage pulse which provides the primary electromagnetic (j x B) acceleration.

  13. Thermal and laser properties of Yb:LuAG for kW thin disk lasers.

    PubMed

    Beil, Kolja; Fredrich-Thornton, Susanne T; Tellkamp, Friedjof; Peters, Rigo; Kränkel, Christian; Petermann, Klaus; Huber, Günter

    2010-09-27

    Thin disk laser experiments with Yb:LuAG (Yb:Lu(3)Al(5)O(12)) were performed leading to 5 kW of output power and an optical-to-optical efficiency exceeding 60%. Comparative analyses of the laser relevant parameters of Yb:LuAG and Yb:YAG were carried out. While the spectroscopic properties were found to be nearly identical, investigations of the thermal conductivities revealed a 20% higher value for Yb:LuAG at Yb(3+)-doping concentrations of about 10%. Due to the superior thermal conductivity with respect to Yb:YAG, Yb:LuAG offers thus the potential of improved performance in high power thin disk laser applications. PMID:20940967

  14. Concentration measurements with Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan; Sobota, Thomas H.

    2001-03-01

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is used to measure the concentration of iodine vapor (40-150 ppm) in air instantaneously (1 μs), remotely, and non-intrusively. Two focused, pulsed intersecting laser beams inscribe a density grating in the fluid. A cw interrogation beam directed at the Bragg angle on the grating is scattered into a coherent signal beam whose intensity depends on the instantaneous density grating magnitude. The signal beam is detected by a photomultiplier tube and its history recorded by a digital storage oscilloscope. The species in question (e.g., I_2) and the dilution species are excited resonantly (by thermalization) and non-resonantly (by electrostriction), respectively. The signals show oscillations at (twice) the grating's Brillouin frequency for the case of thermalization (electrostriction). The ratio of the thermalization to the electrostriction grating magnitudes is proportional to the resonant species concentration. They are extracted by a least-squares fitting scheme. For good accuracy, the ratio must be of order unity. For this case, the standard error is 5%. The speed of sound (error <1%) and flow velocity (error <1%) can be measured simultaneously.

  15. Dynamic thermal model of photovoltaic cell illuminated by laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Hua, Wenshen; Guo, Tong

    2015-07-01

    Photovoltaic cell is one of the most important components of laser powered unmanned aerial vehicle. Illuminated by high power laser beam, photovoltaic cell temperature increases significantly, which leads to efficiency drop, or even physical damage. To avoid such situation, the temperature of photovoltaic cell must be predicted precisely. A dynamic thermal model of photovoltaic cell is established in this paper, and the relationships between photovoltaic cell temperature and laser power, wind speed, ambient temperature are also analyzed. Simulation result indicates that illuminated by a laser beam, the temperature of photovoltaic cell rises gradually and reach to a constant maximum value. There is an approximately linear rise in photovoltaic cell temperature as the laser flux gets higher. The higher wind speed is, the stronger forced convection is, and then the lower photovoltaic cell temperature is. But the relationship between photovoltaic cell temperature and wind speed is not linear. Photovoltaic cell temperature is proportional to the ambient temperature. For each increase of 1 degree of ambient temperature, there is approximate 1 degree increase in photovoltaic cell temperature. The result will provide fundamentals to take reasonable measures to control photovoltaic cell temperature.

  16. Multimegawatt MPD thruster design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Parkes, James E.; Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1992-01-01

    Performance and lifetime requirements for multimegawatt magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters were used to establish a baseline 2.5 MW thruster design. The chamber surface power deposition resulting from current conduction, plasma and surface radiation, and conduction from the hot plasma was then evaluated to establish the feasibility of thruster operation. It was determined that state of the art lithium heat pipes were adequate to cool the anode electrode, and that the liquid hydrogen propellant could be used to cool the applied field magnet, cathode, and backplate. Unresolved issues having an impact of thruster design are discussed to help focus future research.

  17. Thruster sealing system and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A thruster nozzle sealing system and apparatus is provided for protection of spacecraft thruster motors. The system includes a sealing plug, a sealing plug insertion tool, an outer cover, an outer cover attachment, and a ferry flight attachment. The sealing plug prevents moisture from entering the thruster engine so as to prevent valve failure. The attachments are interchangeably connectable with the sealing plug. The ferry flight attachment is used during air transportation of the spacecraft, and the outer cover attachment is used during storage and service of the spacecraft. The outer cover provides protection to the thruster nozzle from mechanical damage.

  18. Thruster sealing system and apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svejkovsky, Paul A.

    1992-11-01

    A thruster nozzle sealing system and apparatus is provided for protection of spacecraft thruster motors. The system includes a sealing plug, a sealing plug insertion tool, an outer cover, an outer cover attachment, and a ferry flight attachment. The sealing plug prevents moisture from entering the thruster engine so as to prevent valve failure. The attachments are interchangeably connectable with the sealing plug. The ferry flight attachment is used during air transportation of the spacecraft, and the outer cover attachment is used during storage and service of the spacecraft. The outer cover provides protection to the thruster nozzle from mechanical damage.

  19. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  20. Helical plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  1. Single shot thermometry using laser induced thermal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Pubo; Guan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenrong; Wang, Sheng; Li, Guohua; Ye, Jingfeng; Hu, Zhiyun

    2015-05-01

    With the concern of environmental protection and reducing the fossil fuel consumption, combustion processes need to be more efficient and less contaminable. Therefore, the ability to obtain important thermophysical parameters is crucial to combustion research and combustor design. Traditional surveying techniques were difficult to apply in a confined space, especially the physically intrusions of detectors can alter the combustion processes. Laser-based diagnostic techniques, like CARS, SVRS, PLIF and TDLAS, allow the in situ, non-intrusive, spatially and temporally resolved measurements of combustion parameters in hostile environments. We report here a new non-intrusive optical diagnostic technique, based on laser-induced thermal grating. Thermal gratings generated in NO2/N2 binary mixtures, arise from the nonlinear interaction between the medium and the light radiation from the interference of two pulsed, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers (532 nm). This leads to the formation of a dynamic grating through the resonant absorption and the subsequent collisional relaxation. By the temporally resolved detection of a continuous wave, frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 probe laser beam (671 nm) diffracted by LITG. The temporal behavior of the signal is a function of the local temperature and other properties of gas, various parameters of the target gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal. The accurate singleshot temperature measurements were carried out at different test conditions using a stainless steel pressurized cell, data averaged on 100 laser shots were compared with simultaneously recorded thermocouple data, and the results were consistent with each other. The LITG signal is shown to grow with increasing the gas pressure and is spatially coherent, which makes the LITG thermometry technique a promising candidate in high pressure environments.

  2. Effect of scanned quasi-cw CO2 laser irradiation on tissue thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domankevitz, Yacov; Bua, Dominic; Chung, Jina; Hanel, Edward; Silver, Geoffrey; Nishioka, Norman S.

    1994-08-01

    Residual thermal damage produced by a scanned quasi cw CO2 laser was measured in pig skin. The effects of scan speed on thermal damage distribution for laser dwell times ranging between 1 and 150 msec were examined. Significantly larger thermal damage zones were produced along the crater wall for laser dwell times longer than 50 msec. Thermal damage along the crater base was constant independent of dwell time. The preliminary experimental results suggest that quasi cw CO2 can consistently produce less than 200 micrometers zones of thermal damage if laser parameters are carefully chosen.

  3. MPD thruster erosion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, David Q.; Callas, John L.

    1988-11-01

    The multimegawatt MPD (Magnetoplasma Dynamic) thruster is an electric engine capable of orbital transfer and maneuvering of large payloads driven by a megawatt class space power supply. The MPD thruster is capable of specific impulses from 1,500 to 8,000 s. The high specific impulse means this system can perform missions using much less propellant than chemical systems. A five MW MPD electric system, propellant and payload from one shuttle launch must be replaced by the equivalent of four fully loaded Centaur G' stages. Thus, the savings in propellant and launch costs are very substantial. This report discusses 3 aspects of MPD thruster Physics: (1) A significant operational problem which has limited the useful operation of the device is discussed. This is severe erosion of the insulator at the cathode insulator junction. A technique which appears to solve the problem has been tested, and is described. (2) A preliminary analyses of anode sheath is presented. (3) Analysis of the discharges two dimensional nature is explored for the case where transverse gradients are considered but transverse velocity is assumed to be zero. This situation applies to high aspect ratio devices. The analyses concludes with a formalism that provides a means to qualitatively evaluate Ohmic dissipation from simple measurements of magnetic Hall effect on magnetosonic choking (where thermodynamics is ignored).

  4. Pulsed Plasma Thruster Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Pencil, Eric J.; Carter, Justin; Heminger, Jason; Gatsonis, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) are currently baselined for the Air Force Mightysat II.1 flight in 1999 and are under consideration for a number of other missions for primary propulsion, precision positioning, and attitude control functions. In this work, PPT plumes were characterized to assess their contamination characteristics. Diagnostics included planar and cylindrical Langmuir probes and a large number of collimated quartz contamination sensors. Measurements were made using a LES 8/9 flight PPT at 0.24, 0.39, 0.55, and 1.2 m from the thruster, as well as in the backflow region behind the thruster. Plasma measurements revealed a peak centerline ion density and velocity of approx. 6 x 10(exp 12) cm(exp -3) and 42,000 m/s, respectively. Optical transmittance measurements of the quartz sensors after 2 x 10(exp 5) pulses showed a rapid decrease in plume contamination with increasing angle from the plume axis, with a barely measurable transmittance decrease in the ultraviolet at 90 deg. No change in optical properties was detected for sensors in the backflow region.

  5. 10 kW class pulsed MPD thruster design for SEOTV applications

    SciTech Connect

    Domonkos, M.T.; Roderick, N.F.

    1994-06-01

    Pulsed magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters offer ease of power scaling, reduced test facility requirements, and the potential of launch cost reductions through efficient high specific impulse operation at power levels which make them attractive for several primary propulsion missions. This work addresses the operational design of 10 kW class pulsed applied-field MPD thrusters for solar electric orbit transfer vehicles (SEOTVs). The design includes integration of heated cathode technology to meet lifetime requirements for orbit transfer. Propellant injection system design insures Paschen breakdown and high propellant utilization efficiency. Thermal modeling shows that the temperature distribution does not exceed any thruster material limits. This analysis illustrates the thermal issues involved with applied-field thruster average power scaling, and identifies necessary design modifications for cathode life issues. Applied magnetic fields enhance thruster efficiency, and experiments show that two insulating axial slits in the anode are sufficient to insure rapid pulsed field diffusion. 32 refs.

  6. Preliminary investigation of a low power pulsed arcjet thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Russell D.; Burton, Rodney L.; Wetzel, Kyle K.

    1992-01-01

    A type of pulsed arcjet is examined which operates with gaseous helium propellant at powers from 100 to 1500 W and pulse rats from 360 to 6000 pulses per second. During the pulse, peak power is 50 to 250 kW generating chamber pressures of 10 to 50 atmospheres. The high operating pressure substantially reduces ionization in the 2.5 mm diameter x 12.5 mm long capillary and lowers frozen flow losses in the nozzle. The thruster thermal efficiency, measured calorimetrically, is 43 percent at 440 W and 8 mg/sec helium mass flow rate. Thruster performance trends are predicted by a time-dependent lumped-parameter model which includes heat exchange between the propellant and the wall. The model substantially underpredicts the experimental thermal efficiency values. Alternative thruster configurations yielding significant improvements in thrust efficiency and specific impulse are discussed.

  7. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5mN with a resolution of 15μN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  8. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.

    2009-05-15

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 {mu}N. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  9. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas.

    PubMed

    West, Michael D; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 microN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments. PMID:19485509

  10. Probabilistic uncertainty analysis of laser/material thermal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis George

    Performance of a system during heat-flux (laser-type) irradiation is of increasing importance to a variety of defense and commercial applications. For laser irradiation of spacecraft components, such as a laser power or propulsion system receiver, predicting with accuracy the moment (time) and type of failure of it is difficult. These difficulties arise from the inherent nonlinear nature of the problem, because surface reradiation heat transport mechanisms come into play as the system is heated. Additionally, there are uncertainties associated with the irradiation source intensity, interaction cross-section and view angle; the property state of the material(s) that are being heated; and the effective emissivity/absorptivity and surface radiation view factor(s). The physical properties of the materials on a spacecraft may also change greatly over time due to exposure to the space environment. To better understand the uncertainties associated with these issues, a study was performed at the University of New Mexico's Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, under U. S. Air Force Phillips Laboratory sponsorship, to develop and apply uncertainty computer model for generic laser heating problems that incorporate probabilistic design (Monte Carlo sampling based) assessment methods. This work discusses in detail: the background associated with the laser irradiation/material thermal interaction process; past work in related technical areas; the research objectives of the study; the technical approach employed; as well as the development and application of the generic one- and two-dimensional laser/material heating uncertainty interaction analysis models. This study successfully demonstrated an efficient uncertainty assessment methodology to assess simple laser irradiation/material thermal heating process problems. Key parameter uncertainties were characterized and ranked for numerous example problem applications, and the influence of various Monte Carlo sampling

  11. Thermal melting and ablation of silicon by femtosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I. Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Bunkin, A. F.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2013-03-15

    The space-time dynamics of thermal melting, subsurface cavitation, spallative ablation, and fragmentation ablation of the silicon surface excited by single IR femtosecond laser pulses is studied by timeresolved optical reflection microscopy. This dynamics is revealed by monitoring picosecond and (sub)nanosecond oscillations of probe pulse reflection, which is modulated by picosecond acoustic reverberations in the dynamically growing surface melt subjected to ablation and having another acoustic impedance, and by optical interference between the probe pulse replicas reflected by the spalled layer surface and the layer retained on the target surface. The acoustic reverberation periods change during the growth and ablation of the surface melt film, which makes it possible to quantitatively estimate the contributions of these processes to the thermal dynamics of the material surface. The results on the thermal dynamics of laser excitation are supported by dynamic measurements of the ablation parameters using noncontact ultrasonic diagnostics, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical interference microscopy of the modified regions appearing on the silicon surface after ablation.

  12. Thermal melting and ablation of silicon by femtosecond laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Bunkin, A. F.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2013-03-01

    The space-time dynamics of thermal melting, subsurface cavitation, spallative ablation, and fragmentation ablation of the silicon surface excited by single IR femtosecond laser pulses is studied by timeresolved optical reflection microscopy. This dynamics is revealed by monitoring picosecond and (sub)nanosecond oscillations of probe pulse reflection, which is modulated by picosecond acoustic reverberations in the dynamically growing surface melt subjected to ablation and having another acoustic impedance, and by optical interference between the probe pulse replicas reflected by the spalled layer surface and the layer retained on the target surface. The acoustic reverberation periods change during the growth and ablation of the surface melt film, which makes it possible to quantitatively estimate the contributions of these processes to the thermal dynamics of the material surface. The results on the thermal dynamics of laser excitation are supported by dynamic measurements of the ablation parameters using noncontact ultrasonic diagnostics, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical interference microscopy of the modified regions appearing on the silicon surface after ablation.

  13. Thermal, optical and spectroscopic characterizations of borate laser crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chavoutier, M.; Jubera, V.; Veber, P.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.; Hejtmanek, J.; Decourt, R.; Debray, J.; Menaert, B.; Segonds, P.; Adamietz, F.; Rodriguez, V.; Manek-Hoenninger, I.; Fargues, A.; Descamps, D.; Garcia, A.

    2011-02-15

    The Yb-content Li{sub 6}Ln(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (Ln: Gd, Y) solid solution has been investigated. Crystal growth has been successful for several compositions. A 22% molar content of ytterbium ions was determined by chemical analysis (ICP). Physical properties relevant to laser operation like mechanical hardness, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity were measured on single crystals. Optical measurements, including refractive index and low temperature spectroscopy, were also performed. Finally, the effect of the Y/Gd ratio is discussed. -- Graphical abstract: Several solid solutions of a rare earth borate were studied. The figure illustrates one of these single crystals obtained by Czochralski and shows thermal behaviour and absorption spectra at low temperature. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} We have grown by Czochralski method five Li{sub 6}Ln(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (Ln=Y, Gd,Yb) single crystals. {yields} Chemical, physical and spectroscopic characteristics are reported. {yields} Data relevant to laser operation are listed.

  14. Thermal stability of laser-produced iron nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Carpene, E.; Landry, F.; Lieb, K.-P.; Schaaf, P.

    2001-04-01

    Laser nitriding is a very efficient method to improve the mechanical properties, surface hardness, corrosion, and wear resistance of iron and steel, with the advantages of a high nitrogen concentration, fast treatment, and accurate position control, and without any undesired heating effect on the substrate. However, the stability of laser-produced iron nitrides is still under investigation. This article reports investigations of the thermal stability of these iron nitrides upon annealing treatments, which were conducted both in vacuum and air. The phase and elemental composition of the nitride layers were deduced from conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, resonant nuclear reaction analysis, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. The surface hardness was measured by the nanoindentation method. In laser-nitrided iron, two critical temperatures are found: at 523 K the predominant iron-nitride phase changes from the γ/ɛ to the γ' phase. When the temperature exceeds 773 K, all of the nitrogen has escaped from the surface layer. For annealing in air the nitrogen escapes completely already at 673 K, where a thick oxide layer has formed. Stainless steel proved to be more stable than iron, and even up to 973 K no new phases or oxides were produced, here, also, only at 973 K the nitrogen content decreased significantly. Therefore, laser-nitrided stainless steel is well suited for applications.

  15. Common-Path Heterodyne Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics for Seedless Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, G. C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a novel technique for the detection of heterodyne laser-induced thermal acoustics signals, which allows the construction of a highly stable seedless laser velocimeter. A common-path configuration is combined with quadrature detection to provide flow direction, greatly improve robustness to misalignment and vibration, and give reliable velocity measurement at low flow velocities. Comparison with Pitot tube measurements in the freestream of a wind tunnel shows root-mean-square errors of 0.67 m/s over the velocity range 0.55 m/s.

  16. Improved method of laser thermal keratoplasty to overcome presbyopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, K. Jonathan; Glen, Harry G.; Salz, James J.; Maguen, Ezra; Berry, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    Optimal keratoplasty (Opti-K®) is an improved method of laser thermal keratoplasty (LTK) that is performed using a continuous wave (cw) laser for anterior stromal heating together with a sapphire applanation window for epithelial protection. Opti-KK® has been used to improve uncorrected near visual acuity (UNVA) in emmetropic presbyopes while retaining or even improving uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) - a truly optimal result that is linked to corneal multifocality produced by optimal keratoplasty. Opti-KK® has also been used to improve both UDVA and UNVA in hyperopic presbyopes. The safety and effectiveness of Opti-KK® have been evaluated in a Nassau clinical study and in an ongoing U.S. Clinical Trial. The procedure is noninvasive, simple, rapid, comfortable and repeatable. Although Opti-KK® VA improvements are temporary, treatments can be repeated whenever needed to maintain "vision rejuvenationK®".

  17. Laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, David A.; Lin, Yuting; Luk, Alex; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2012-08-01

    Due to the strong scattering nature of biological tissue, optical imaging beyond the diffusion limit suffers from low spatial resolution. In this letter, we present an imaging technique, laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging (PMI), which uses laser illumination to induce temperature increase in a medium and magnetic resonance imaging to map the spatially varying temperature, which is proportional to absorbed energy. This technique can provide high-resolution images of optical absorption and can potentially be used for small animal as well as breast cancer and lymph node imaging. First, we describe the theory of PMI, including the modeling of light propagation and heat transfer in tissue. We also present experimental data with corresponding predictions from theoretical models, which show excellent agreement.

  18. Photon machines. [thermal gasdynamic lasers for power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Christiansen, W. H.; Johnston, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    The basic thermodynamics of thermal lasers of the gas-dynamic type are reviewed, and it is shown that an efficient coherent photon generator can be developed on a closed-cycle principle. The efficiency limits of such a device are explored, and the results of the analysis indicate that the production efficiency of coherent radiation from heat can, in the limit of high component efficiency, be equal to that of the production of work. An indispensable element of any power transmission system also involves an engine capable of transforming the transmitted energy into useful shaft power. It is shown that a closed-cycle system may also be developed in principle which can transform the transmitted laser radiation into shaft power with an efficiency approaching one.

  19. Nonlinear model for thermal effects in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, E. Endler, A. Rizzato, F. B.

    2014-11-15

    In the present work, we extend results of a previous paper [Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 12 3104 (2013)] and develop a semi-analytical model to account for thermal effects on the nonlinear dynamics of the electron beam in free-electron lasers. We relax the condition of a cold electron beam but still use the concept of compressibility, now associated with a warm beam model, to evaluate the time scale for saturation and the peak laser intensity in high-gain regimes. Although vanishing compressibilites and the associated divergent densities are absent in warm models, a series of discontinuities in the electron density precede the saturation process. We show that full wave-particle simulations agree well with the predictions of the model.

  20. Numerical modeling of Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Chable, S.; Rogier, F.

    2005-05-16

    A stationary plasma thruster is numerically studied using different levels. An one dimensional modeling is first analyzed and compared with experimental results. A simplified model of oscillations thruster is proposed and used to control the amplitude of oscillations. A two dimensional numerical method is discussed and applied to the computation of the flow in the exhaust.

  1. Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

    2012-03-19

    Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences <8 J/cm{sup 2} could be improved >35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

  2. Electron Transport in Hall Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael Sean

    Despite high technological maturity and a long flight heritage, computer models of Hall thrusters remain dependent on empirical inputs and a large part of thruster development to date has been heavily experimental in nature. This empirical approach will become increasingly unsustainable as new high-power thrusters tax existing ground test facilities and more exotic thruster designs stretch and strain the boundaries of existing design experience. The fundamental obstacle preventing predictive modeling of Hall thruster plasma properties and channel erosion is the lack of a first-principles description of electron transport across the strong magnetic fields between the cathode and anode. In spite of an abundance of proposed transport mechanisms, accurate assessments of the magnitude of electron current due to any one mechanism are scarce, and comparative studies of their relative influence on a single thruster platform simply do not exist. Lacking a clear idea of what mechanism(s) are primarily responsible for transport, it is understandably difficult for the electric propulsion scientist to focus his or her theoretical and computational tools on the right targets. This work presents a primarily experimental investigation of collisional and turbulent Hall thruster electron transport mechanisms. High-speed imaging of the thruster discharge channel at tens of thousands of frames per second reveals omnipresent rotating regions of elevated light emission, identified with a rotating spoke instability. This turbulent instability has been shown through construction of an azimuthally segmented anode to drive significant cross-field electron current in the discharge channel, and suggestive evidence points to its spatial extent into the thruster near-field plume as well. Electron trajectory simulations in experimentally measured thruster electromagnetic fields indicate that binary collisional transport mechanisms are not significant in the thruster plume, and experiments

  3. Controlling the thermally induced focal shift in laser processing heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negel, Jan-Philipp; Abt, Felix; Blázquez-Sánchez, David; Austerschulte, Armin; Hafner, Margit; Liebig, Thomas; von Strobl-Albeg, Philipp; Weber, Rudolf; Abdou Ahmed, Marwan; Voss, Andreas; Graf, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    A system being able to in situ measure and control not simply the distance between the workpiece and the focusing optics, but the true focal position on the workpiece including the thermally induced focal shift in a laser processing head is presented. In order to achieve this, a bundle of astigmatic measurement beams is used following the same optical path as the welding beam. A camera and a software algorithm allow to keep the focal position constant within a range of 4 mm and with a resolution between 150 μm and 500 μm.

  4. Thermal effects in Er:strengthened-glass laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilleman, Michael M.; Jackel, Steven M.; Moshe, Inon

    1998-06-01

    We report the development of a high-power Er:strengthened- glass laser emitting at the eye-safe 1.535 μm wavelength. The flashlamp pumped Cr:Yb:Er:glass produced 330 mJ output @ 0.45% slope efficiency. Thermo-optical measurements indicated strong thermal lensing, of 16 diopter/kW and mild birefringence induced depolarization of 5% at 200 W. In terms of radial and birefringence elastooptical coefficients these data determine the values of 0.075 +/- 0.002 and 0.0094, respectively. For a hemispherical resonator configuration a TEM00 beam was achieved.

  5. Nonresonant Referenced Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics Thermometry in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, Gregory C.

    1999-01-01

    We report a detailed investigation of nonresonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) for the single-shot measurement of the speed of sound ( v S ) in an oven containing room air. A model for the speed of sound that includes important acoustic relaxation effects is used to convert the speed of sound into temperature. A reference LITA channel is used to reduce uncertainties in v S . Comparing thermocouple temperatures with temperatures deduced from our v S measurements and model, we find the mean temperature difference from 300 to 650 K to be 1% ( 2 ). The advantages of using a reference LITA channel are discussed.

  6. Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) signals from finite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, E. B.; Leyva, I. A.; Hornung, H. G.

    1995-06-01

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a four-wave mixing technique that may be employed to measure sound speeds, transport properties, velocities, and susceptibilities of fluids. It is particularly effective in high-pressure gases ( greater than 1 bar). An analytical expression for LITA signals is derived by the use of linearized equations of hydrodynamics and light scattering. This analysis, which includes full finite-beam-size effects and the optoacoustic effects of thermalization and electrostriction, predicts the amplitude and the time history of narrow-band time-resolved LITA and broadband spectrally resolved (mulitplex) LITA signals. The time behavior of the detected LITA signal depends significantly on the detection solid angle, with implications for the measurement of diffusivities by the use of LITA and the proper physical picture of LITA scattering. This and other elements of the physics of LITA that emerge from the analysis are discussed. Theoretical signals are compared with experimental LITA data.

  7. Neural network data analysis for laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan; Hornung, Hans G.; Cummings, Eric B.

    2000-06-01

    A general, analytical closed-form solution for laser-induced thermal acoustic (LITA) signals using homodyne or heterodyne detection and using electrostrictive and thermal gratings is derived. A one-hidden-layer feed-forward neural network is trained using back-propagation learning and a steepest descent learning rule to extract the speed of sound and flow velocity from a heterodyne LITA signal. The effect of the network size on the performance is demonstrated. The accuracy is determined with a second set of LITA signals that were not used during the training phase. The accuracy is found to be better than that of a conventional frequency decomposition technique while being computationally as efficient. This data analysis method is robust with respect to noise, numerically stable and fast enough for real-time data analysis.

  8. Improvement of thermal management in the composite Yb:YAG/YAG thin-disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I. I.; Mukhin, I. B.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    To improve the thermal management in the composite Yb:YAG/YAG thin-disk laser a new design of laser head is developed. Thermal-induced phase distortions, small signal gain and lasing in the upgraded laser head are investigated and compared with previously published results. A substantial decrease of the thermal lens optical power and phase aberrations and increase of the laser slope efficiency are observed. A continuous-wave laser with 440 W average power and 44% slope efficiency is constructed.

  9. Pulsed Plasma Thruster Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The continuing emphasis on reducing costs and downsizing spacecraft is forcing increased emphasis on reducing the subsystem mass and integration costs. For many commercial, scientific, and Department of Defense space missions, onboard propulsion is either the predominant spacecraft mass or it limits the spacecraft lifetime. Electromagnetic-pulsed-plasma thrusters (PPT's) offer the combined benefits of extremely low average electric power requirements (1 to 150 W), high specific impulse (approx. 1000 sec), and system simplicity derived from the use of an inert solid propellant. Potential applications range from orbit insertion and maintenance of small satellites to attitude control for large geostationary communications satellites.

  10. Segmented ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for large-area, high-power ion engines comprise dividing a single engine into a combination of smaller discharge chambers (or segments) configured to operate as a single large-area engine. This segmented ion thruster (SIT) approach enables the development of 100-kW class argon ion engines for operation at a specific impulse of 10,000 s. A combination of six 30-cm diameter ion chambers operating as a single engine can process over 100 kW. Such a segmented ion engine can be operated from a single power processor unit.