Science.gov

Sample records for laser tracking microrheometry

  1. Fast fluorescence laser tracking microrheometry, II: quantitative studies of cytoskeletal mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Maxine; Huang, Hayden; Kamm, Roger D; So, Peter T C

    2008-07-01

    Fluorescence laser tracking microrheometry (FLTM) is what we believe to be a novel method able to assess the local, frequency-dependent mechanical properties of living cells with nanometer spatial sensitivity at speeds up to 50 kHz. In an earlier article, we described the design, development, and optimization phases of the FLTM before reporting its performances in a variety of viscoelastic materials. In the work presented here, we demonstrate the suitability of FLTM to study local cellular rheology and obtain values for the storage and loss moduli G'(omega) and G''(omega) of fibroblasts consistent with past literature. We further establish that chemically induced cytoskeletal disruption is accompanied by reduced cellular stiffness and viscosity. Next, we provide a systematic study of some experimental variables that may critically influence microrheology measurements. First, we interrogate and justify the relevance of bead endocytosis as a method of cellular internalization of 1-microm probes in FLTM. Second, we show that as sample temperature increases, FLTM findings are elevated toward higher frequencies. Third, we confirm that relevant bead sizes (1 and 2 microm) have no effect on FLTM measurements. Fourth, we report the lack of influence of bead coatings (antiintegrin, antitransferrin, antidystroglycan, or uncoated tracers were surveyed) on their rheological readouts. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of FLTM in studying how substratum rigidity regulates cellular rheological properties. Interestingly, multiple, coupled strain relaxation mechanisms can be observed separated by two plateau moduli. Although these observations can be partly explained by rheological theories describing entangled actin filaments, there is a clear need to extend existing microrheology models to the cytoskeleton, including potentially important factors such as network geometry and remodeling. PMID:18424489

  2. Active laser tweezers microrheometry of microbial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, N.; Slapar, V.; Boric, M.; Stopar, D.; Babič, D.; Poberaj, I.

    2010-08-01

    Microbial biofilms are present on biotic and abiotic surfaces and have a significant impact on many fields in industry, health care and technology. Thus, a better understanding of processes that lead to development of biofilms and their chemical and mechanical properties is needed. In the following paper we report the results of active laser tweezers microrheology study of optically inhomogeneous extracellular matrix secreted by Visbrio sp. bacteria. One particle and two particle active microrheology were used in experiments. Both methods exhibited high enough sensitivity to detect viscosity changes at early stages of bacterial growth. We also showed that both methods can be used in mature samples where optical inhomogeneity becomes significant.

  3. Is microrheometry affected by channel deformation?

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Francesco; Greco, Francesco; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Maffettone, Pier Luca

    2016-07-01

    Microrheometry is very important for exploring rheological behaviours of several systems when conventional techniques fail. Microrheometrical measurements are usually carried out in microfluidic devices made of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Although PDMS is a very cheap material, it is also very easy to deform. In particular, a liquid flowing in a PDMS device, in some circumstances, can effectively deform the microchannel, thus altering the flow conditions. The measure of the fluid relaxation time might be performed through viscoelasticity induced particle migration in microfluidics devices. If the channel walls are deformed by the flow, the resulting measured value of the relaxation time could be not reliable. In this work, we study the effect of channel deformation on particle migration in square-shaped microchannel. Experiments are carried out in several PolyEthylene Oxyde solutions flowing in two devices made of PDMS and Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA). The relevance of wall rigidity on particle migration is investigated, and the corresponding importance of wall rigidity on the determination of the relaxation time of the suspending liquid is examined. PMID:27098237

  4. Precision laser automatic tracking system.

    PubMed

    Lucy, R F; Peters, C J; McGann, E J; Lang, K T

    1966-04-01

    A precision laser tracker has been constructed and tested that is capable of tracking a low-acceleration target to an accuracy of about 25 microrad root mean square. In tracking high-acceleration targets, the error is directly proportional to the angular acceleration. For an angular acceleration of 0.6 rad/sec(2), the measured tracking error was about 0.1 mrad. The basic components in this tracker, similar in configuration to a heliostat, are a laser and an image dissector, which are mounted on a stationary frame, and a servocontrolled tracking mirror. The daytime sensitivity of this system is approximately 3 x 10(-10) W/m(2); the ultimate nighttime sensitivity is approximately 3 x 10(-14) W/m(2). Experimental tests were performed to evaluate both dynamic characteristics of this system and the system sensitivity. Dynamic performance of the system was obtained, using a small rocket covered with retroreflective material launched at an acceleration of about 13 g at a point 204 m from the tracker. The daytime sensitivity of the system was checked, using an efficient retroreflector mounted on a light aircraft. This aircraft was tracked out to a maximum range of 15 km, which checked the daytime sensitivity of the system measured by other means. The system also has been used to track passively stars and the Echo I satellite. Also, the system tracked passively a +7.5 magnitude star, and the signal-to-noise ratio in this experiment indicates that it should be possible to track a + 12.5 magnitude star. PMID:20048888

  5. Laser tracks in rainbow films on water

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Aleksandr V; Stoilov, Yurii Yu

    2012-08-31

    It is found that narrow non-diverging laser tracks, earlier studied in free soap films, can also arise in thin rainbow films, e.g., of petrol, on water. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Precision CW laser automatic tracking system investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, K. T.; Lucy, R. F.; Mcgann, E. J.; Peters, C. J.

    1966-01-01

    Precision laser tracker capable of tracking a low acceleration target to an accuracy of about 20 microradians rms is being constructed and tested. This laser tracking has the advantage of discriminating against other optical sources and the capability of simultaneously measuring range.

  7. Laser tracking system with automatic reacquisition capability.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R E; Weiss, P F

    1968-06-01

    A laser based tracking system is described that has the capability of automatically performing an acquisition search to locate the target. This work is intended for precision launch phase tracking of the Saturn V launch vehicle. System tracking accuracies limited only by the atmosphere have been demonstrated, as has acquisition over a 1 degrees x 1 degrees field of view. PMID:20068746

  8. Subnanoradian, Groundbased Tracking of Spaceborne Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.

    1993-01-01

    Over the next few decades groundbased tracking of lasers on planetary spacecraft will supplement or replace tracking of radio transponders. This paper describes research on two candidate technologies for groundbased, angular, laser tracking: the infrared interferometer and the optical filled-aperture telescope. The motivation for infrared and optical tracking will be followed by a description of the current (10-50 nanoradian) and future (subnanororadian) stellar tracking demonstrations with the University of California-Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI) and the University of California-San Diego Optical Ronchi Telescope.

  9. Laser Marked Codes For Paperless Tracking Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crater, David

    1987-01-01

    The application of laser markers for marking machine readable codes is described. Use of such codes for automatic tracking and considerations for marker performance and features are discussed. Available laser marker types are reviewed. Compatibility of laser/material combinations and material/code/reader systems are reviewed.

  10. Semiconductor Laser Tracking Frequency Distance Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, James D.; Reasenberg, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced astronomical missions with greatly enhanced resolution and physics missions of unprecedented accuracy will require a spaceworthy laser distance gauge of substantially improved performance. The Tracking Frequency Gauge (TFG) uses a single beam, locking a laser to the measurement interferometer. We have demonstrated this technique with pm (10(exp -12) m) performance. We report on the version we are now developing based on space-qualifiable, fiber-coupled distributed-feedback semiconductor lasers.

  11. Binocular eye tracking with the Tracking Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, S B; Sheehy, C K; Roorda, A

    2016-01-01

    The development of high magnification retinal imaging has brought with it the ability to track eye motion with a precision of less than an arc minute. Previously these systems have provided only monocular records. Here we describe a modification to the Tracking Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (Sheehy et al., 2012) that splits the optical path in a way that slows the left and right retinas to be scanned almost simultaneously by a single system. A mirror placed at a retinal conjugate point redirects half of each horizontal scan line to the fellow eye. The collected video is a split image with left and right retinas appearing side by side in each frame. Analysis of the retinal motion in the recorded video provides an eye movement trace with very high temporal and spatial resolution. Results are presented from scans of subjects with normal ocular motility that fixated steadily on a green laser dot. The retinas were scanned at 4° eccentricity with a 2° square field. Eye position was extracted offline from recorded videos with an FFT based image analysis program written in Matlab. The noise level of the tracking was estimated to range from 0.25 to 0.5arcmin SD for three subjects. In the binocular recordings, the left eye/right eye difference was 1-2arcmin SD for vertical motion and 10-15arcmin SD for horizontal motion, in agreement with published values from other tracking techniques. PMID:25676884

  12. A laser tracking dynamic robot metrology instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, G. A.; Mayer, J. R. R.

    1989-01-01

    Research work over several years has resulted in the development of a laser tracking instrument capable of dynamic 3-D measurements of robot end-effector trajectories. The instrument characteristics and experiments to measure the static and dynamic performance of a robot in an industrial manufacturing environment are described. The use of this technology for space applications is examined.

  13. Monitoring structure movement with laser tracking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Giussani, Alberto; Roncoroni, Fabio; Previtali, Mattia

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the use of laser tracking technology for structure monitoring. In this field the use of this precise instrument is innovative and therefore new investigations are needed for civil structures, especially for applications carried out during unstable environmental conditions. On the other hand, as laser trackers are today very used in industrial applications aimed at collecting data at high speed with precisions superior to +/-0.05 mm, they seem quite promising for those civil engineering applications where numerous geodetic tools, often coupled with mechanical and electrical instruments, are usually used to inspect structure movements. This work illustrates three real civil engineering monitoring applications where laser tracking technology was used to detect object movements. The first one is a laboratory testing for the inspection of a beam (bending moment and shear). The second experiment is the stability inspection of a bridge. The last experiment is one of the first attempts where laser trackers tried to substitute traditional high precision geometric leveling for monitoring an important historical building: the Cathedral of Milan. The achieved results, pro and contra along with some practical issues are described.

  14. Automatic laser tracking and ranging system.

    PubMed

    Cooke, C R

    1972-02-01

    An automatic laser tracking and ranging system has been developed for use with cooperative retroreflective targets. Target position is determined with high precision at ranges out to 19 km and sample rates up to one hundred measurements per second. The data are recorded on a magnetic tape in the form of azimuth, elevation, range, and standard time and are computer-compatible. The system is fully automatic with the exception of the initial acquisition sequence, which is performed manually. This eliminates the need for expensive and time-consuming photographic data reduction. Also, position is uniquely determined by a single instrument. To provide convenient operation at remote sites, the system is van-mounted and operates off a portable power generator. The transmitter is a flash-pumped Q-spoiled Nd:YAG laser developing 1 MW peak power in a 10-mrad beam at a rate of 100 pps. The beam, which is coaxial with the receiver, is directed to the target by an azimuth-elevation mirror mount. The return beam is imaged o separate ranging and tracking receivers. The ranging receiver measures time of flight of the 25-nsec laser pulse with range accuracies of +/-15 cm. The tracking receiver uses a quadrant photodiode followed by matched log video amplifiers and achieves a tracking accuracy of +/-0.1 mrad. An optical dynamic range of 30 dB is provided to minimize error due to scintillation. Also, 80 dB of optical dynamic range is provided by adjustable neutral density filters to compensate for changes in target range. PMID:20111495

  15. Precision laser tracking for global and polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawe, M. E.; Adelman, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Goddard Laser Tracking Network (GLTN). GLTN station locations, equipment, possible improvements, and data flow are discussed. Locations of the other major laser tracking networks and their present or expected performance are also provided. The material includes a listing of the Lunar Laser Ranging Stations (LLRSs) and their actual or expected performance.

  16. Theory of tracking accuracy of laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazovsky, L.

    1983-06-01

    The peformance of the quadrant detector-based laser tracking system is theoretically evaluated. Measurement span, estimation bias, and estimation variance are analyzed, with the emphasis on the quantitative evaluation of the estimation bias and variance. It is found that the measurement span does not exceed the radius of the light spot. If system specifications restrict estimation bias, then the measurement span must be limited even further, to a fraction of the light spot. The systematic error component of estimation bias is rather large but may be cancelled. Signal-dependent bias decreases when the SNR increases, and increases rapidly when the light spot approaches the end of the measurement span. Estimation variance decreases when the SNR increases, and remains approximately constant as the light spot moves over the measurement span.

  17. Particle track simulation by N2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchin, E.; Lebedev, A. N.; Somov, S. V.

    1984-07-01

    The use of N2 high-power pulsed lasers to simulate particle tracks is discussed. In gas-filled detectors, the tracks are attributed to either direct photoionization of the surface of dust particles or to two-photon ionization of unidentified molecular impurities with an ionization potential less than 2 hnu. Two-photon ionization of various saturated organic vapors is investigated and it is found that the addition of these substances to the working gas makes it possible to decrease the laser power and obtain laser tracks with virtually any electron density. It is also shown that the electron density is proportional to the square of the light power. Laser track simulation has applications in spatial and energy calibration of positive-sensitive detectors, the measurement of the drift of particle tracks in streamer, spark, and bubble chambers, and photoionization molecular spectroscopy.

  18. On the nature of laser polariton tracks in soap films

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Aleksandr V; Stoilov, Yurii Yu

    2004-06-30

    The results of the study of narrow laser tracks in soap films with the divergence below the diffraction-limited value are presented, and the mechanism of formation of narrow channels (spatial polariton solitons) based on laser dielectrophoresis in films is proposed. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  19. Track analysis of laser-illuminated etched track detectors using an opto-digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghan, Moses J.; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Oppon, Osborne C.

    2007-11-01

    An opto-digital imaging system for counting and analysing tracks on a LR-115 detector is described. One batch of LR-115 track detectors was irradiated with Am-241 for a determined period and distance for linearity test and another batch was exposed to radon gas. The laser-illuminated etched track detector area was imaged, digitized and analysed by the system. The tracks that were counted on the opto-digital system with the aid of media cybernetics software as well as spark gap counter showed comparable track density results ranging between 1500 and 2750 tracks cm-2 and 65 tracks cm-2 in the two different batch detector samples with 0.5% and 1% track counts, respectively. Track sizes of the incident alpha particles from the radon gas on the LR-115 detector demonstrating different track energies are statistically and graphically represented. The opto-digital imaging system counts and measures other track parameters at an average process time of 3-5 s.

  20. Tracking strategies for laser ranging to multiple satellite targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, J. W.; Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.

    1994-01-01

    By the middle of the decade, several new Laser Geodynamic Satellites will be launched to join the current constellation comprised of the laser geodynamic satellite (LAGEOS) (US), Starlette (France), Ajisai (Japan), and Etalon I and II (USSR). The satellites to be launched, LAGEOS II and III (US & Italy), and Stella (France), will be injected into orbits that differ from the existing constellation so that geodetic and gravimetric quantities are sampled to enhance their resolution and accuracy. An examination of various possible tracking strategies adopted by the network of laser tracking stations has revealed that the recovery of precise geodetic parameters can be obtained over shorter intervals than is currently obtainable with the present constellation of satellites. This is particularly important in the planning of mobile laser tracking operations, given a network of permanently operating tracking sites. Through simulations, it is shown that laser tracking of certain satellite passes, pre-selected to provide optimal sky-coverage, provides the means to acquire a sufficient amount of data to allow the recovery of 1 cm station positions.

  1. Integrated laser/radar satellite ranging and tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1974-01-01

    A laser satellite ranging system that is mounted upon and integrated with a microwave tracking radar is reported. The 1-pulse/sec ruby laser transmitter is attached directly to the radar's elevation axis and radiates through a new opening in the radar's parabolic dish. The laser photomultiplier tube receiver utilizes the radar's existing 20-cm diam f/11 boresight telescope and observes through a similar symmetrically located opening in the dish. The laser system possesses separate ranging system electronics but shares the radar's timing, computer, and data handling/recording systems. The basic concept of the laser/radar is outlined together with a listing of the numerous advantages over present singular laser range-finding systems. The developmental laser hardware is described along with preliminary range-finding results and expectations.

  2. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory laser tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M. R.; Lanham, N. W.; Lehr, C. G.; Wohn, J.

    1977-01-01

    The four SAO laser satellite-ranging systems, located in Brazil, Peru, Australia, and Arizona, have been in operation for more than five years and have provided ranging data at accuracy levels of a meter or better. The paper examines system hardware (laser transmitter, the electronics, mount, photoreceiver, minicomputer, and station timing) and software (prediction program, calibration programs, and data handling and quick-look programs) and also considers calibration, station operation, and system performance.

  3. Tracking system with PCM laser for space control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, V.; Khizhnyak, A.; Zel'dovich, B.; Martinez, T.; Liu, Shiang

    2003-09-01

    Effective operation of a space control system requires extremely accurate acquisition, tracking, pointing and discrimination (ATPD) capabilities, and should provide the ability to disrupt or degrade an adversary space operations if needed. We present a laser based system concept that will offer an innovative solutions to satisfy many space control mission needs. A long-range adaptive laser tracking system (ALTS) described here will provide the required capabilities in target tracking and characterization. It is based on an approach that uses the target as one of the mirrors of the laser resonator. Then, due to specificity of laser, the parameters of its emission allow for deriving the complete information on spatial-angular position of the target, its range, velocity, and flight direction. In this paper we discuss the architecture and operational principles of the ALTS capable in performing the required ATPD function for a remote target. A double-cavity laser scheme with its resonators coupled through the phase-conjugate mirror (PCM) is at the heart of the system. Four-wave mixing mechanism is applied here to form the PCM. Such a scheme allows for automatic adaptive operation of the laser with movable mirror. Both, the results of the theoretical analysis and experimental studies of the proposed ALTS system will be presented, as well as the methods of detecting the spatial-temporal characteristics of the target (its position, range, velocity) through analysis of the received signal. In addition the perspectives of using the proposed ALTS for remote target imaging are also discussed.

  4. Polar motion from laser tracking of artificial satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Plotkin, H. H.; Johnson, T. S.; Dunn, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the range to the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft from a single laser tracking system at Goddard Space Flight Center have been used to determine the change in latitude of the station arising from polar motion. A precision of 0.03 arc second was obtained for the latitude during a 5-month period in 1970.

  5. Polar motion from laser tracking of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Dunn, P. J.; Plotkin, H. H.; Johnson, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    Laser ranges to the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft from a single Goddard Space Flight Center tracking system were used to determine the change in latitude of the station arising from polar motion. A precision of 0.03 arcsecs rms was obtained for the latitude during a five-month period in 1970.

  6. Geoid undulation computations at laser tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Despotakis, Vasilios K.

    1987-01-01

    Geoid undulation computations were performed at 29 laser stations distributed around the world using a combination of terrestrial gravity data within a cap of radius 2 deg and a potential coefficient set up to 180 deg. The traditional methods of Stokes' and Meissl's modification together with the Molodenskii method and the modified Sjoberg method were applied. Performing numerical tests based on global error assumptions regarding the terrestrial data and the geopotential set it was concluded that the modified Sjoberg method is the most accurate and promising technique for geoid undulation computations. The numerical computations for the geoid undulations using all the four methods resulted in agreement with the ellipsoidal minus orthometric value of the undulations on the order of 60 cm or better for most of the laser stations in the eastern United States, Australia, Japan, Bermuda, and Europe. A systematic discrepancy of about 2 meters for most of the western United States stations was detected and verified by using two relatively independent data sets. For oceanic laser stations in the western Atlantic and Pacific oceans that have no terrestrial data available, the adjusted GEOS-3 and SEASAT altimeter data were used for the computation of the geoid undulation in a collocation method.

  7. Baseline estimation from simultaneous satellite laser tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dedes, George C.

    1987-01-01

    Simultaneous Range Differences (SRDs) to Lageos are obtained by dividing the observing stations into pairs with quasi-simultaneous observations. For each of those pairs the station with the least number of observations is identified, and at its observing epochs interpolated ranges for the alternate station are generated. The SRD observables are obtained by subtracting the actually observed laser range of the station having the least number of observations from the interpolated ranges of the alternate station. On the basis of these observables semidynamic single baseline solutions were performed. The aim of these solutions is to further develop and implement the SRD method in the real data environment, to assess its accuracy, its advantages and disadvantages as related to the range dynamic mode methods, when the baselines are the only parameters of interest. Baselines, using simultaneous laser range observations to Lageos, were also estimated through the purely geometric method. These baselines formed the standards the standards of comparison in the accuracy assessment of the SRD method when compared to that of the range dynamic mode methods. On the basis of this comparison it was concluded that for baselines of regional extent the SRD method is very effective, efficient, and at least as accurate as the range dynamic mode methods, and that on the basis of a simple orbital modeling and a limited orbit adjustment. The SRD method is insensitive to the inconsistencies affecting the terrestrial reference frame and simultaneous adjustment of the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) is not necessary.

  8. Tracking accuracy for Leosat-Geosat laser links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshamani, Ramani; Rao, D. V. B.; Alex, T. K.; Jain, Y. K.

    1989-06-01

    A tracking accuracy of 1 microrad is required for the achievement of Leosat-Geosat laser communications links, entailing exceptionally accurate alignment between transmitter and receiver as well as point-ahead capability. The pointing and acquisition procedure would involve the two optical system/telescope units to be pointed toward each other with an attitude accuracy smaller than the position uncertainty; a spatial-scam operation by the Leosat's narrow beam, and subsequently by the Geosat's would have to be conducted before acquisition is completed, allowing switching from acquisition to tracking mode.

  9. Site evaluation for laser satellite-tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, N. H.; Mohr, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-six locations for potential laser satellite-tracking stations, four of them actually already occupied in this role, are reviewed in terms of their known local and regional geology and geophysics. The sites are also considered briefly in terms of weather and operational factors. Fifteen of the sites qualify as suitable for a stable station whose motions are likely to reflect only gross plate motion. The others, including two of the present laser station sites (Arequipa and Athens), fail to qualify unless extra monitoring schemes can be included, such as precise geodetic surveying of ground deformation.

  10. Rail Track Detection and Modelling in Mobile Laser Scanner Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oude Elberink, S.; Khoshelham, K.; Arastounia, M.; Diaz Benito, D.

    2013-10-01

    We present a method for detecting and modelling rails in mobile laser scanner data. The detection is based on the properties of the rail tracks and contact wires such as relative height, linearity and relative position with respect to other objects. Points classified as rail track are used in a 3D modelling algorithm. The modelling is done by first fitting a parametric model of a rail piece to the points along each track, and estimating the position and orientation parameters of each piece model. For each position and orientation parameter a smooth low-order Fourier curve is interpolated. Using all interpolated parameters a mesh model of the rail is reconstructed. The method is explained using two areas from a dataset acquired by a LYNX mobile mapping system in a mountainous area. Residuals between railway laser points and 3D models are in the range of 2 cm. It is concluded that a curve fitting algorithm is essential to reliably and accurately model the rail tracks by using the knowledge that railways are following a continuous and smooth path.

  11. Retinal Image-Based Eye-Tracking Using the Tracking Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Christy Kathleen

    The tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) was designed, built and characterized for high-resolution eye-tracking, imaging, and targeted retinal stimulus delivery. Eye-tracking is done via an image-based software program that monitors the image of the retina over time while simultaneously logging the displacements of the eye. Currently, this system is the most accurate, fast and functional eye-tracking system used in a standard ophthalmic instrument. The TSLO has the ability to non-invasively track the eye at 960 Hz (with an accuracy of 0.2 arcminutes or roughly 1 micron) and present stimuli to the retina at the resolution of single cone photoreceptors (0.66 arcminutes, which is roughly 3 microns). The combination of structural imaging and functional testing allows one to begin to more thoroughly understand retinal disease progression, as well probe specific retinal locations in order to test new treatment efficacies. This level of accuracy is unprecedented in the clinic and is crucial when monitoring minute changes in eye motion, structure, and function. Additionally, the system is capable of providing external eye-tracking for other high-resolution imaging systems, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) systems through the active steering of an imaging beam. This feature allows the imaging raster or stimuli to stay on target during fixational eye motion. This dissertation steps through all of the above-mentioned uses of the TSLO and further elaborates on the optimal design and system test performance capabilities of the system.

  12. Precision targeting with a tracking adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Bigelow, Chad E.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Ustun, Teoman E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Imholte, Michelle L.; Kumru, Semih S.; McCall, Michelle N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2006-02-01

    Precise targeting of retinal structures including retinal pigment epithelial cells, feeder vessels, ganglion cells, photoreceptors, and other cells important for light transduction may enable earlier disease intervention with laser therapies and advanced methods for vision studies. A novel imaging system based upon scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) with adaptive optics (AO) and active image stabilization was designed, developed, and tested in humans and animals. An additional port allows delivery of aberration-corrected therapeutic/stimulus laser sources. The system design includes simultaneous presentation of non-AO, wide-field (~40 deg) and AO, high-magnification (1-2 deg) retinal scans easily positioned anywhere on the retina in a drag-and-drop manner. The AO optical design achieves an error of <0.45 waves (at 800 nm) over +/-6 deg on the retina. A MEMS-based deformable mirror (Boston Micromachines Inc.) is used for wave-front correction. The third generation retinal tracking system achieves a bandwidth of greater than 1 kHz allowing acquisition of stabilized AO images with an accuracy of ~10 μm. Normal adult human volunteers and animals with previously-placed lesions (cynomolgus monkeys) were tested to optimize the tracking instrumentation and to characterize AO imaging performance. Ultrafast laser pulses were delivered to monkeys to characterize the ability to precisely place lesions and stimulus beams. Other advanced features such as real-time image averaging, automatic highresolution mosaic generation, and automatic blink detection and tracking re-lock were also tested. The system has the potential to become an important tool to clinicians and researchers for early detection and treatment of retinal diseases.

  13. Laser Tracker III: Sandia National Laboratories` third generation laser tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    At Sandia Labs` Coyote Canyon Test Complex, it became necessary to develop a precision single station solution to provide time space position information (tspi) when tracking airborne test vehicles. Sandia`s first laser tracker came on line in 1968, replacing the fixed camera technique for producing trajectory data. This system shortened data reduction time from weeks to minutes. Laser Tracker 11 began operations in 1982, replacing the original tracker. It incorporated improved optics and electronics, with the addition of a microprocessor-based real-time control (rtc) system within the main servo loop. The rtc added trajectory prediction with the loss of adequate tracking signal and automatic control of laser beam divergence according to target range. Laser Tracker III, an even more advanced version of the systems, came on line in 1990. Unlike LTII, which is mounted in a trailer and must by moved by a tractor, LTIII is mounted on its own four-wheel drive carrier. This allows the system to be used at even the most remote locations. It also incorporated improved optics and electronics with the addition of absolute ranging, acquisition on the fly, and automatic transition from manual Joystick tracking to laser tracking for aircraft tests. LTIII provides a unique state of the art tracking capability for missile, rocket sled, aircraft, submunition, and parachute testing. Used in conjunction with LTII, the systems together can provide either simultaneous or extended range tracking. Mobility, accuracy, reliability, and cost effectiveness enable these systems to support a variety of testing at Department of Energy and Department of Defense ranges.

  14. Baseline monitoring using aircraft laser ranging. [spaceborne laser simulation and aircraft laser tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Hoge, F. E.; Martin, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    The use of aircraft laser ranging for the determination of baselines between ground based retroreflectors was investigated via simulations and with tests at Wallops Flight Center using the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) on the Wallops C-54 aircraft ranging to a reflector array deployed around one of the Wallops runways. The aircraft altitude and reflector spacing were chosen on the basis of scaled down modeling of spacecraft tracking from 1000 km of reflectors separated by some 52 km, or of high altitude (10 km) aircraft tracking of reflectors separated by some 500 m. Aircraft altitudes flown for different passes across the runway reflector array varied from 800 m to 1350 m, with 32 reflectors deployed over an approximtely 300 m x 500 m ground pattern. The AOL transmitted 400 pulses/sec with a scan rate of 5/sec in a near circular pattern, so that the majority of the pulses were reflected by the runway surface or its environs rather than by retroreflectors. The return pulse characteristics clearly showed the high reflectivity of portions of the runway, with several returns indistinguishable in amplitude from reflector returns. For each pass across the reflector field, typically six to ten reflector hits were identified, consistent with that predicted by simulations and the observed transmitted elliptical pulse size.

  15. Sandia National Lab`s precision laser tracking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, D.

    1995-04-01

    Sandia Labs` mobile tracking systems have only one moving part. The double gimballed 18 inch diameter beryllium mirror is capable of constant tracking velocities up to 5 rads/sec in both axes, and accelerations to 150 rads/sec/sec in both axes. Orthogonality is <10 microradians. The mirror directs the 488 and 514 nm wavelength CW laser beams to adhesive-backed reflective material applied to the test unit. The mirror catches the return beam and visual image, directing the visual image to three camera bays, and the return beam to an image dissector behind an 80 inch gathering telescope. The image dissector or image position sensor is a photomultiplier with amplifying drift tube and electron aperture and its associated electronics. During the test, the image dissector scan senses the change in position of the reflective material and produces signals to operate the azimuth and elevation torque motors in the gimbal assembly. With the help of 1 1/8 inch diameter azimuth and elevation galvonometer steering mirrors in the optical path, the laser beam is kept on the target at extremely high velocities. To maintain a constant return signal strength, the outgoing beam is run through a microprocessor controlled beam focusing telescope.

  16. Photon counting detector for space debris laser tracking and lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, Franz

    2014-08-01

    We are reporting on a design, construction and performance of solid state photon counting detector package which has been designed for laser tracking of space debris. The detector has been optimized for top photon detection efficiency and detection delay stability. The active area of the commercially available avalanche photodiode manufactured on Si (SAP500 supplied by Laser Components, Inc.) is circular with a diameter of 500 μm. The newly designed control circuit enables to operate the detection sensor at a broad range of biases 5-50 V above its breakdown voltage of 125 V. This permits to select a right trade-off between photon detection efficiency, timing resolution and dark count rate. The photon detection efficiency exceeds 70% at the wavelength of 532 nm. This is the highest photon detection efficiency ever reported for such a device. The timing properties of the detector have been investigated in detail. The timing resolution is better than 80 ps r.m.s, the detection delay is stable within units of picoseconds over several hours of operation. The detection delay stability in a sense of time deviation of 800 fs has been achieved. The temperature change of the detection delay is 0.5 ps/K. The detector has been tested as an echo signal detector in laser tracking of space debris at the satellite laser station in Graz, Austria. Its application in lunar laser ranging is under consideration by several laser stations.

  17. Image-based synchronization of force and bead motion in active electromagnetic microrheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Young; Saleh, Omar A.

    2014-12-01

    In the past, electromagnetic tweezers have been used to make active microrheometers. An active microrheometer measures the dynamic mechanical properties of a material from the motion of embedded particles under external force, e.g. a sinusoidal magnetic force generated by a sinusoidal current on a coil. The oscillating amplitude and the phase lag of the motion are then used to estimate the material’s dynamic mechanical properties. The phase lag, in particular, requires precise synchronization of the particle motion with the external force. In previous works, synchronization difficulties have arisen from measuring two parameters with two instruments, one of them being a camera. We solved the synchronization issue by measuring two parameters with a single instrument, the camera alone. From captured images, particles can be tracked in three dimensions through an image-analysis algorithm while the current on the coil can be measured from the brightness of the image; this enables simultaneous synchronization of the phases of the driving current on the electromagnet coil and the motion of the magnetic probe particle. We calibrate the phase delay between the magnetic force and the particle’s motion in glycerol and confirm the calibration with a Hall probe. The technique is further tested by measuring the shear modulus of a polyacrylamide gel, and comparing the results to those obtained using a conventional rheometer.

  18. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's minicomputer vs. the laser. [computer predictions for laser tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherniack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of some of the problems encountered in replacing a CDC 6400, that was used for supplying a network of laser tracking stations with predictions, by an 8K Data General 1200 minicomputer with a teletype for I/O. Before the replacement, the predictions were expensive to compute and to transmit, and were clumsy logistically. The achieved improvements are described, along with every step it took to accomplish them, and the incurred costs.

  19. The applications of laser tracking and ranging technology in space rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Wenji; Gao, Limin; Zhou, Liang; Li, Dawei; Wang, Rong

    2013-09-01

    With the development of space technology, more and more Rendezvous and Docking (RVD) mission require more precise measurement of relative position and attitude between tracking spacecraft and target spacecraft. In the procedure of docking between near spacecraft , the optical retroreflector on the target Spacecraft were tracked by the laser tracking and ranging device on the tracking spacecraft , the distance data were provided by laser ranging system, and the azimuth data were provided by tracking gimbal, Synthesized the distance data and azimuth data, the relative position information between two spacecraft were provided to the target spacecraft. Furthermore, through tracking more than three point on the target spacecraft ,the complete information of relative position and attitude between two spacecraft were calculated rapidly by the measurement system,which were presented to the control system during the whole RVD operating stage. The laser tracking technology guaranteed continuous measurement and supplied accurate azimuth information, and the laser ranging technology ensured high accuracy of distance information. In addition, the untouched measure mode give no disturbance to the docking operation, moreover, the monochromaticity of laser make the tracking and ranging procedure avoiding to be disturbed by parasitic light of space, thus there will be a effective measurement accompanying the whole docking operating procedure and affording valid data to the control system of docking.

  20. Design of tracking mount and controller for mobile satellite laser ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Son, Young Su; Kim, Byung In; Ham, Sang Young; Lee, Sung Whee; Lim, Hyung Chul

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have proposed and implemented a design for the tracking mount and controller of the ARGO-M (Accurate Ranging system for Geodetic Observation - Mobile) which is a mobile satellite laser ranging (SLR) system developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) and Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM). The tracking mount comprises a few core components such as bearings, driving motors and encoders. These components were selected as per the technical specifications for the tracking mount of the ARGO-M. A three-dimensional model of the tracking mount was designed. The frequency analysis of the model predicted that the first natural frequency of the designed tracking mount was high enough. The tracking controller is simulated using MATLAB/xPC Target to achieve the required pointing and tracking accuracy. In order to evaluate the system repeatability and tracking accuracy of the tracking mount, a prototype of the ARGO-M was fabricated, and repeatability tests were carried out using a laser interferometer. Tracking tests were conducted using the trajectories of low earth orbit (LEO) and high earth orbit (HEO) satellites. Based on the test results, it was confirmed that the prototype of the tracking mount and controller of the ARGO-M could achieve the required repeatability along with a tracking accuracy of less than 1 arcsec.

  1. Laser-Based Pedestrian Tracking in Outdoor Environments by Multiple Mobile Robots

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Masataka; Kakimuma, Kei; Hashimoto, Masafumi; Takahashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an outdoors laser-based pedestrian tracking system using a group of mobile robots located near each other. Each robot detects pedestrians from its own laser scan image using an occupancy-grid-based method, and the robot tracks the detected pedestrians via Kalman filtering and global-nearest-neighbor (GNN)-based data association. The tracking data is broadcast to multiple robots through intercommunication and is combined using the covariance intersection (CI) method. For pedestrian tracking, each robot identifies its own posture using real-time-kinematic GPS (RTK-GPS) and laser scan matching. Using our cooperative tracking method, all the robots share the tracking data with each other; hence, individual robots can always recognize pedestrians that are invisible to any other robot. The simulation and experimental results show that cooperating tracking provides the tracking performance better than conventional individual tracking does. Our tracking system functions in a decentralized manner without any central server, and therefore, this provides a degree of scalability and robustness that cannot be achieved by conventional centralized architectures. PMID:23202171

  2. Laser-based pedestrian tracking in outdoor environments by multiple mobile robots.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Masataka; Kakimuma, Kei; Hashimoto, Masafumi; Takahashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an outdoors laser-based pedestrian tracking system using a group of mobile robots located near each other. Each robot detects pedestrians from its own laser scan image using an occupancy-grid-based method, and the robot tracks the detected pedestrians via Kalman filtering and global-nearest-neighbor (GNN)-based data association. The tracking data is broadcast to multiple robots through intercommunication and is combined using the covariance intersection (CI) method. For pedestrian tracking, each robot identifies its own posture using real-time-kinematic GPS (RTK-GPS) and laser scan matching. Using our cooperative tracking method, all the robots share the tracking data with each other; hence, individual robots can always recognize pedestrians that are invisible to any other robot. The simulation and experimental results show that cooperating tracking provides the tracking performance better than conventional individual tracking does. Our tracking system functions in a decentralized manner without any central server, and therefore, this provides a degree of scalability and robustness that cannot be achieved by conventional centralized architectures. PMID:23202171

  3. Solid state laser communications in space (SOLACOS) position, acquisition, and tracking (PAT) subsystem implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemmig, Joerg; Pribil, Klaus

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents the concept and implementation aspects of the Pointing, Acquisition and Tracking Subsystem (PAT) which is developed in the frame of the SOLACOS (Solid State Laser Communications in Space) program.

  4. Performance of laser tracking of small targets during turbulence and beam jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove

    2003-08-01

    Small target detection and tracking are important for laser radars in many applications such as Directed Infrared Countermeasures (DIRCM), fire control, target recognition and free space laser communications. The detection and tracking performance is depending on the mode of detection, signal to noise ratio, target signal statistics, beam jitter and turbulence induced intensity variations. We will show results of the rms tracking error vs SNR primarily for direct detection systems. For the general case of a certain signal and noise probability density functions (pdf) it is hard to obtain analytical solutions for the mean and variances of the estimates for the rms tracking error. We have therefore used numerical simulations to illustrate how the pdf and SNR will affect the tracking accuracy. A manifold of gamma functions and other pdf:s can be used to characterize the signal distributions to get a first hand on tracking performance. The results are presented as tracking errors vs the angular spot size of the laser beam in the tracking detector plane. We have also investigated the beam optimization problem for target detection and "power in bucket", that is maximizing the laser energy at the target. We find that there are optimum beam sizes (w) vs. the rms jitter (σ) and that optimum w/σ (minimizing the false alarm rate for a given detection probability Pd) typically fall in the region 1-3 depending on probability of detection and the representative pdf for the application in mind.

  5. Real-time tracking of objects for space applications using a laser range scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blais, F.; Couvillon, R. A.; Rioux, M.; Maclean, S. G.

    1994-01-01

    Real-time tracking of multiple targets and three dimensional object features was demonstrated using a laser range scanner. The prototype was immune to ambient illumination and sun interference. Tracking error feedback was simultaneously obtained from individual targets, global predicted target position, and the human operator. A more complete study of calibration parameters and temperature variations on the scanner is needed to determine the exact performance of the sensor. Lissajous patterns used in three-dimensional real-time tracking prove helpful given their high resolution. The photogrammetry-based Advanced Space Vision System (ASVS) is discussed in combination with the laser range scanner.

  6. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  7. Spacecraft to Spacecraft Coherent Laser Tracking as a Xylophone Interferometer Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, M.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for gravitational radiation can be performed in space with two spacecraft tracking each other with coherent laser light. This experimental technique could be implemented with two spacecraft carrying an appropriate optical payload, or with the proposed broad-band, space-based laser interferometer detectors of gravitational waves operated in this non-interferometric mode.

  8. Design and improvement of laser tracking control system using ANN technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ying; Zhang, Guoxiong; Li, Xingfei

    2005-01-01

    Laser tracking method for space coordinates measurement is a newly developed technique that possesses the characteristics of high accuracy, large measuring range, flexible and dynamic measurement and so on. Laser tracking interferometer system based on this method has become an important measuring tool in many industrial fields. However, the control system sometimes acts nonlinearly because of long-range measurement and various applications. To solve this problem, artificial neural network (ANN) controller is introduced as an advanced adaptive control configuration in laser tracking interferometer system. The reason is that artificial neural network which is an important branch of intelligent control area has great potential ability in dealing with high nonlinearity and indeterminate factors. Then the simulation of tracking control system based on either conventional PID controller or ANN controller is carried out separately and the result of comparison is given.

  9. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  10. Ocular dynamics and visual tracking performance after Q-switched laser exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, Harry; Stuck, Bruce E.; Lund, David J.; Nawim, Maqsood

    2001-05-01

    In previous investigations of q-switched laser retinal exposure in awake task oriented non-human primates (NHPs), the threshold for retinal damage occurred well below that of the threshold for permanent visual function loss. Visual function measures used in these studies involved measures of visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. In the present study, we examine the same relationship for q-switched laser exposure using a visual performance task, where task dependency involves more parafoveal than foveal retina. NHPs were trained on a visual pursuit motor tracking performance task that required maintaining a small HeNe laser spot (0.3 degrees) centered in a slowly moving (0.5deg/sec) annulus. When NHPs reliably produced visual target tracking efficiencies > 80%, single q-switched laser exposures (7 nsec) were made coaxially with the line of sight of the moving target. An infrared camera imaged the pupil during exposure to obtain the pupillary response to the laser flash. Retinal images were obtained with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope 3 days post exposure under ketamine and nembutol anesthesia. Q-switched visible laser exposures at twice the damage threshold produced small (about 50mm) retinal lesions temporal to the fovea; deficits in NHP visual pursuit tracking were transient, demonstrating full recovery to baseline within a single tracking session. Post exposure analysis of the pupillary response demonstrated that the exposure flash entered the pupil, followed by 90 msec refractory period and than a 12 % pupillary contraction within 1.5 sec from the onset of laser exposure. At 6 times the morphological threshold damage level for 532 nm q-switched exposure, longer term losses in NHP pursuit tracking performance were observed. In summary, q-switched laser exposure appears to have a higher threshold for permanent visual performance loss than the corresponding threshold to produce retinal threshold injury. Mechanisms of neural plasticity within the retina and at

  11. AIRBORNE INERTIAL SURVEYING USING LASER TRACKING AND PROFILING TECHNIQUES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cyran, Edward J.

    1986-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey through a contract with the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory has developed the Aerial Profiling of Terrain System. This is an airborne inertial surveying system designed to use a laser tracker to provide position and velocity updates, and a laser profiler to measure terrain elevations. The performance characteristics of the system are discussed with emphasis placed on the performance of the laser devices. The results of testing the system are summarized for both performance evaluation and applications.

  12. Automatic Tracking Algorithm in Coaxial Near-Infrared Laser Ablation Endoscope for Fetus Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yan; Yamanaka, Noriaki; Masamune, Ken

    2014-07-01

    This article reports a stable vessel object tracking method for the treatment of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome based on our previous 2 DOF endoscope. During the treatment of laser coagulation, it is necessary to focus on the exact position of the target object, however it moves by the mother's respiratory motion and still remains a challenge to obtain and track the position precisely. In this article, an algorithm which uses features from accelerated segment test (FAST) to extract the features and optical flow as the object tracking method, is proposed to deal with above problem. Further, we experimentally simulate the movement due to the mother's respiration, and the results of position errors and similarity verify the effectiveness of the proposed tracking algorithm for laser ablation endoscopy in-vitro and under water considering two influential factors. At average, the errors are about 10 pixels and the similarity over 0.92 are obtained in the experiments.

  13. Performance and modeling of the GSFC pointing acquisition and tracking system for laser communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, N. D.; Chapman, W. W.; Johnson, T. S.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) laser communication pointing, acquisition, and tracking laboratory demonstration program is discussed. This program entails the construction of a flexible brass-board simulation tool, and a supporting computer simulation effort. The result of this program will be a viable test bed to support the design and specification of space-based laser communication terminals and, additionally, to address critical performance issues such as tracking robustness in the presence of background (e.g., stellar or earth) noise and/or internally generated thermal noise.

  14. Development of reprogrammable high frame-rate detector devices for laser communication pointing, acquisition and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Terita; Conner, Kenneth; Covington, Richard; Ngo, Hung; Rink, Christine

    2008-02-01

    A Two Terminal Laser Communication Test Bed has been developed at The Aerospace Corporation. This paper presents the design and preliminary results of a reprogrammable detector within the Test Bed for use in pointing, acquisition, and tracking between a Satellite-to-Satellite Laser Communication link. The detector may be commanded by an emulated spacecraft Command & Data Handling subsystem to switch between full-array scanning and "small sized" N x M pixel Field of View (FOV) for high-rate laser tracking. The approach follows a parallel path to implement the signal processing algorithm on two different hardware resources: a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The focus of this effort is to present a methodology for testing and evaluating various techniques for advanced focal plane array (FPA) hardware, as well as sensor FPA control, image processing and laser beam X & Y position algorithms.

  15. Satellite height determination using satellite-to-satellite tracking and ground laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt was made to use GEOS-C spacecraft height, as measured by the onboard radar altimeter, for an improved determination of the earth's gravitational field and for the determination of the variation of the physical surface of the oceans. Two tracking system approaches to accurately determine the spacecraft height (orbit) are described and their results stated. These are satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) and ground-laser tracking (GLT). Height variations can be observed in the dm-regions using SST and in the m-region using present GLT.

  16. Satellite height determination using satellite-to-satellite tracking and ground laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1972-01-01

    The height of the GEOS-C spacecraft was utilized as measured by the onboard radar altimeter, for an improved determination of the earth's gravitational field and for the determination of the variation of the physical surface of the oceans. Two tracking system approaches to accurately determine the spacecraft height (orbit) are described and their results stated. These are satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) and ground laser tracking (GLT). Height variations can be observed in the dm-regions using SST and in the m-region using present GLT.

  17. A Real-Time Orbit Determination Method for Smooth Transition from Optical Tracking to Laser Ranging of Debris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    A critical requirement to achieve high efficiency of debris laser tracking is to have sufficiently accurate orbit predictions (OP) in both the pointing direction (better than 20 arc seconds) and distance from the tracking station to the debris objects, with the former more important than the latter because of the narrow laser beam. When the two line element (TLE) is used to provide the orbit predictions, the resultant pointing errors are usually on the order of tens to hundreds of arc seconds. In practice, therefore, angular observations of debris objects are first collected using an optical tracking sensor, and then used to guide the laser beam pointing to the objects. The manual guidance may cause interrupts to the laser tracking, and consequently loss of valuable laser tracking data. This paper presents a real-time orbit determination (OD) and prediction method to realize smooth and efficient debris laser tracking. The method uses TLE-computed positions and angles over a short-arc of less than 2 min as observations in an OD process where simplified force models are considered. After the OD convergence, the OP is performed from the last observation epoch to the end of the tracking pass. Simulation and real tracking data processing results show that the pointing prediction errors are usually less than 10″, and the distance errors less than 100 m, therefore, the prediction accuracy is sufficient for the blind laser tracking. PMID:27347958

  18. A Real-Time Orbit Determination Method for Smooth Transition from Optical Tracking to Laser Ranging of Debris.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    A critical requirement to achieve high efficiency of debris laser tracking is to have sufficiently accurate orbit predictions (OP) in both the pointing direction (better than 20 arc seconds) and distance from the tracking station to the debris objects, with the former more important than the latter because of the narrow laser beam. When the two line element (TLE) is used to provide the orbit predictions, the resultant pointing errors are usually on the order of tens to hundreds of arc seconds. In practice, therefore, angular observations of debris objects are first collected using an optical tracking sensor, and then used to guide the laser beam pointing to the objects. The manual guidance may cause interrupts to the laser tracking, and consequently loss of valuable laser tracking data. This paper presents a real-time orbit determination (OD) and prediction method to realize smooth and efficient debris laser tracking. The method uses TLE-computed positions and angles over a short-arc of less than 2 min as observations in an OD process where simplified force models are considered. After the OD convergence, the OP is performed from the last observation epoch to the end of the tracking pass. Simulation and real tracking data processing results show that the pointing prediction errors are usually less than 10″, and the distance errors less than 100 m, therefore, the prediction accuracy is sufficient for the blind laser tracking. PMID:27347958

  19. Laser speckle tracking for monitoring and analysis of retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Eric; Bliedtner, Katharina; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    Laser coagulation of the retina is an established treatment for several retinal diseases. The absorbed laser energy and thus the induced thermal damage varies with the transmittance and scattering properties of the anterior eye media and with the pigmentation of the fundus. The temperature plays the most important role in the coagulation process. An established approach to measure a mean retinal temperature rise is optoacoustics, however it provides limited information on the coagulation. Phase sensitive OCT potentially offers a three dimensional temporally resolved temperature distribution but is very sensitive to slightest movements which are clinically hard to avoid. We develop an optical technique able to monitor and quantify thermally and coagulation induced tissue movements (expansions and contractions) and changes in the tissue structure by dynamic laser speckle analysis (LSA) offering a 2D map of the affected area. A frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm) is used for photocoagulation. Enucleated porcine eyes are used as targets. The spot is 100μm. A Helium Neon laser (HeNe) is used for illumination. The backscattered light of a HeNe is captured with a camera and the speckle pattern is analyzed. A Q-switched Nd:YLF laser is used for simultaneous temperature measurements with the optoacoustic approach. Radial tissue movements in the micrometer regime have been observed. The signals evaluation by optical flow algorithms and generalized differences tuned out to be able to distinguish between regions with and without immediate cell damage. Both approaches have shown a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity above 99% at their optimal threshold.

  20. Multiple target tracking and target attitude determination with a scanning laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, T.; Coombes, D.

    1974-01-01

    A scanning laser radar that can acquire and track single or multiple targets has recently been developed. Scan patterns have been designed for acquisition and tracking of one or more targets using a narrow laser beam. A synchronously scanned transmitter-receiver is used to acquire and track targets anywhere in a 376 x 376 element raster covering a 30 x 30 deg field. All scan patterns are electronically programmed, and the system automatically acquires and tracks the target or targets without the aid of an operator. The maximum tracking rate is 1.0 deg/sec (10.0 deg/sec) when used with a 1 kHz (10 kHz) scan rate. The estimated free space range against passive cooperative targets (corner cube reflectors) is 30 nautical miles. The laser radar has an accuracy of 10 cm (range) and 0.05 deg (angle). The developmental system is relatively small (1.5 cu ft), lightweight (60 lbs) and low-power-consuming (60 W).

  1. Automatic tracking of the intersection of a laser and electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Turko, B.T.; Fuzesy, R.Z.; Pripstein, D.A.; Kowitt, M.; Chamberlain, O.; Shapiro, G. ); Hughes, E. )

    1990-05-01

    For the Compton Polarimeter experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator the crossing point of a laser beam and an electron beam must be kept accurate and stable. An electronic system is described for the automatic tracking and correcting of the beam crossing. A remote CCD camera, relatively insensitive to electromagnetic disturbance, records small displacements of the pulsed laser beam. Video signals are analyzed at a remote station, the amount of drift from a selected reference point determined and the appropriate correction commands sent to the motorized mirror deflecting the laser beam. A description of the system, its performance and the test results are presented. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Assessment of laser tracking and data transfer for underwater optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Malcolm A.; Blanchard, Paul M.; Stace, Chris; Bhogul, Priya K.; White, Henry J.; Kelly, Anthony E.; Watson, Scott; Valyrakis, Manousos; Najda, Stephen P.; Marona, Lucja; Perlin, Piotr

    2014-10-01

    We report on an investigation into optical alignment and tracking for high bandwidth, laser-based underwater optical communication links. Link acquisition approaches (including scanning of narrow laser beams versus a wide-angle `beacon' approach) for different underwater laser-based communications scenarios are discussed. An underwater laserbased tracking system was tested in a large water flume facility using water whose scattering properties resembled that of a turbid coastal or harbour region. The lasers used were state-of-the-art, temperature-controlled, high modulation bandwidth gallium nitride (GaN) devices. These operate at blue wavelengths and can achieve powers up to ~100 mW. The tracking performance and characteristics of the system were studied as the light-scattering properties of the water were increased using commercial antacid (Maalox) solution, and the results are reported here. Optical tracking is expected to be possible even in high scattering water environments, assuming better components are developed commercially; in particular, more sensitive detector arrays. High speed data transmission using underwater optical links, based on blue light sources, is also reported.

  3. Seam tracking with texture based image processing for laser materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, S.; Fiedler, W.; Drenker, A.; Abels, P.

    2014-02-01

    This presentation deals with a camera based seam tracking system for laser materials processing. The digital high speed camera records interaction point and illuminated work piece surface. The camera system is coaxially integrated into the laser beam path. The aim is to observe interaction point and joint gap in one image for a closed loop control of the welding process. Especially for the joint gap observation a new image processing method is used. Basic idea is to detect a difference between the textures of the surface of the two work pieces to be welded together instead of looking for a nearly invisible narrow line imaged by the joint gap. The texture based analysis of the work piece surface is more robust and less affected by varying illumination conditions than conventional grey scale image processing. This technique of image processing gives in some cases the opportunity for real zero gap seam tracking. In a condensed view economic benefits are simultaneous laser and seam tracking for self-calibrating laser welding applications without special seam pre preparation for seam tracking.

  4. Laser system for identification, tracking, and control of flying insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flying insects are common vectors for transmission of pathogens and inflict significant harm on humans in large parts of the developing world. Besides the direct impact to humans, these pathogens also cause harm to crops and result in agricultural losses. Here, we present a laser-based system that c...

  5. Design and evaluation of an optically-tracked single-CCD laser range scanner

    PubMed Central

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Lennon, Brian; Thompson, Reid C.; Miga, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Acquisition of laser range scans of an organ surface has the potential to efficiently provide measurements of geometric changes to soft tissue during a surgical procedure. A laser range scanner design is reported here which has been developed to drive intraoperative updates to conventional image-guided neurosurgery systems. Methods: The scanner is optically-tracked in the operating room with a multiface passive target. The novel design incorporates both the capture of surface geometry (via laser illumination) and color information (via visible light collection) through a single-lens onto the same charge-coupled device (CCD). The accuracy of the geometric data was evaluated by scanning a high-precision phantom and comparing relative distances between landmarks in the scans with the corresponding ground truth (known) distances. The range-of-motion of the scanner with respect to the optical camera was determined by placing the scanner in common operating room configurations while sampling the visibility of the reflective spheres. The tracking accuracy was then analyzed by fixing the scanner and phantom in place, perturbing the optical camera around the scene, and observing variability in scan locations with respect to a tracked pen probe ground truth as the camera tracked the same scene from different positions. Results: The geometric accuracy test produced a mean error and standard deviation of 0.25 ± 0.40 mm with an RMS error of 0.47 mm. The tracking tests showed that the scanner could be tracked at virtually all desired orientations required in the OR set up, with an overall tracking error and standard deviation of 2.2 ± 1.0 mm with an RMS error of 2.4 mm. There was no discernible difference between any of the three faces on the lasers range scanner (LRS) with regard to tracking accuracy. Conclusions: A single-lens laser range scanner design was successfully developed and implemented with sufficient scanning and tracking accuracy for image

  6. Image-based tracking system for vibration measurement of a rotating object using a laser scanning vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongkyu; Khalil, Hossam; Jo, Youngjoon; Park, Kyihwan

    2016-06-01

    An image-based tracking system using laser scanning vibrometer is developed for vibration measurement of a rotating object. The proposed system unlike a conventional one can be used where the position or velocity sensor such as an encoder cannot be attached to an object. An image processing algorithm is introduced to detect a landmark and laser beam based on their colors. Then, through using feedback control system, the laser beam can track a rotating object.

  7. Calibration method for a vision guiding-based laser-tracking measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Mingwei; Wei, Zhenzhong; Hu, Mengjie; Zhang, Guangjun

    2015-08-01

    Laser-tracking measurement systems (laser trackers) based on a vision-guiding device are widely used in industrial fields, and their calibration is important. As conventional methods typically have many disadvantages, such as difficult machining of the target and overdependence on the retroreflector, a novel calibration method is presented in this paper. The retroreflector, which is necessary in the normal calibration method, is unnecessary in our approach. As the laser beam is linear, points on the beam can be obtained with the help of a normal planar target. In this way, we can determine the function of a laser beam under the camera coordinate system, while its corresponding function under the laser-tracker coordinate system can be obtained from the encoder of the laser tracker. Clearly, when several groups of functions are confirmed, the rotation matrix can be solved from the direction vectors of the laser beams in different coordinate systems. As the intersection of the laser beams is the origin of the laser-tracker coordinate system, the translation matrix can also be determined. Our proposed method not only achieves the calibration of a single laser-tracking measurement system but also provides a reference for the calibration of a multistation system. Simulations to evaluate the effects of some critical factors were conducted. These simulations show the robustness and accuracy of our method. In real experiments, the root mean square error of the calibration result reached 1.46 mm within a range of 10 m, even though the vision-guiding device focuses on a point approximately 5 m away from the origin of its coordinate system, with a field of view of approximately 200 mm  ×  200 mm.

  8. Comparison between conventional and laser method of imaging tracks on PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbucha, R.; Kocik, M.; Mizeraczyk, J.; Kozioł, G.; Borecki, J.

    2007-02-01

    The increasing demands for miniaturization and better functionality of electronic components and devices have a significant effect on the requirements facing the printed circuit board (PCB) industry. PCB manufactures are driving for producing high density interconnect (HDI) boards at significantly reduced cost and reduced implementation time. The interconnection complexity of the PCB is still growing and today calls for 50/50 μm or 25/25 μm technology are real. Existing technologies are unable to offer acceptable solution. Recently the Laser Direct Imaging (LDI) technology is considered as an answer for these challenges. LDI is a process of imaging electric circuits directly on PCB without the use of a phototool or mask. The exposure of the photo-sensitive resist is carried out using a laser beam that is scanned across photoresist surface and switched on and off by means of a computer control system according to the electrical circuit pattern. Usually the laser used in the LDI generates a UV line, which is suitable to the commonly available photoresists. Our laboratory system for Laser Direct Imaging is designed for tracks and spaces on PCB with minimum width distance of 50/50 μm. In comparison with conventional photolithography method, this technology is much better for 50/50 μm track and spaces. In our research we used photoresist with resolution 50 μm, but in case of using laser photoresists with better resolution (e.g. 25 μm) it will be possible to image tracks in super-fine-line technology (25/25 μm). The comparison between two technology of creating mosaic pattern tracks on PCB proved that laser imaging is promising technology in high density interconnects patterns, which are widely use in multilayered PCB and similar applications.

  9. Aerogel Track Morphology: Measurement, Three Dimensional Reconstruction and Particle Location using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Ball, A. D.; Wozniakiewicz, P. A.; Graham, G. A.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Horz, F.; See, T. H.

    2007-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft returned the first undoubted samples of cometary dust, with many grains embedded in the silica aerogel collector . Although many tracks contain one or more large terminal particles of a wide range of mineral compositions , there is also abundant material along the track walls. To help interpret the full particle size, structure and mass, both experimental simulation of impact by shots and numerical modeling of the impact process have been attempted. However, all approaches require accurate and precise measurement of impact track size parameters such as length, width and volume of specific portions. To make such measurements is not easy, especially if extensive aerogel fracturing and discoloration has occurred. In this paper we describe the application and limitations of laser confocal imagery for determination of aerogel track parameters, and for the location of particle remains.

  10. Subpicometer Length Measurement Using Semiconductor Laser Tracking Frequency Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thapa, Rajesh; Phillips, James D.; Rocco, Emanuele; Reasenburg, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated heretofore unattained distance precision of 0:14pm (2pm) incremental and 14nm (2.9 micrometers) absolute in a resonant (nonresonant) interferometer at an averaging time of 1 s, using inexpensive telecommunications diode lasers. We have controlled the main source of error, that due to spurious reflection and the resulting amplitude modulation. In the resonant interferometer, absolute distance precision is well under lambda/6. Therefore, after an interruption, an absolute distance measurement can be used to return to the same interferometer order.

  11. Scanning mid-IR laser apparatus with eye tracking for refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telfair, William B.; Yoder, Paul R., Jr.; Bekker, Carsten; Hoffman, Hanna J.; Jensen, Eric F.

    1999-06-01

    A robust, real-time, dynamic eye tracker has been integrated with the short pulse mid-infrared laser scanning delivery system previously described. This system employs a Q- switched Nd:YAG laser pumped optical parametric oscillator operating at 2.94 micrometers. Previous ablation studies on human cadaver eyes and in-vivo cat eyes demonstrated very smooth ablations with extremely low damage levels similar to results with an excimer. A 4-month healing study with cats indicated no adverse healing effects. In order to treat human eyes, the tracker is required because the eyes move during the procedure due to both voluntary and involuntary motions such as breathing, heartbeat, drift, loss of fixation, saccades and microsaccades. Eye tracking techniques from the literature were compared. A limbus tracking system was best for this application. Temporal and spectral filtering techniques were implemented to reduce tracking errors, reject stray light, and increase signal to noise ratio. The expanded-capability system (IRVision AccuScan 2000 Laser System) has been tested in the lab on simulated eye targets, glass eyes, cadaver eyes, and live human subjects. Circular targets ranging from 10-mm to 14-mm diameter were successfully tracked. The tracker performed beyond expectations while the system performed myopic photorefractive keratectomy procedures on several legally blind human subjects.

  12. Modal analysis of rotating plate using tracking laser Doppler vibrometer: algorithm modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Hossam; Kim, Dongkyu; Nam, Joonsik; Park, Kyihwan

    2015-07-01

    A modified algorithm for tracking laser Doppler vibrometer (TLDV) is introduced to measure the vibration of rotating objects. The proposed algorithm unlike the old algorithm for TLDV can be used when the speed of the object to be tracked varies continuously or alternating in a small range. The proposed algorithm is to use encoder only as a position sensor. The position from the encoder is used to calculate the driving signals to the galvanometers. To verify the proposed method, experimental modal analysis of the circular plate in stationary and rotating cases are made.

  13. Nano-hardness and microstructure of selective laser melted AlSi10Mg scan tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulkhair, Nesma T.; Maskery, Ian; Tuck, Chris; Ashcroft, Ian; Everitt, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) of aluminium alloys faces more challenges than other ongoing alloys such as stainless steels and titanium alloys because of the material's properties. It is important to study single scan tracks if high density large parts are to be made since they are the primary building blocks. In this study, the geometrical features of AlSi10Mg tracks indicated keyhole mode melting domination. Chemical composition mapping and nanoindentation showed enhanced nano-hardness in SLM material over conventional material with no spatial variation. This is due to a homogeneous elemental distribution and fine microstructure developed by fast solidification.

  14. Pointing, acquisition, and tracking system for the free-space laser communication system SILEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Toni Tolker

    1995-04-01

    The flight hardware for the European Semiconductor laser Intersatellite Link EXperiment, SILEX, is presently under integration. Qualification at equipment level has been performed during 1994 and performance testing at subsystem level is being undertaken. This paper describes the design requirements, the actual design, and the tests of the Pointing Acquisition and Tracking subsystem. It can be summarized in the following headlines: Mission overview, system tracking and pointing strategy, terminal design, PAT subsystem requirements, PAT equipment design, PAT subsystem design, and on ground verification approach.

  15. Proposed SLR Optical Bench Required to Track Debris Using 1550 nm Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coyle, D. B.; McGarry, J. F.; Bufton, J.; Cheek, J. W.; Clarke, G.; Hull, S. M.; Skillman, D. R.; Stysley, P. R.; Sun, X.; Young, R. P.; Zagwodzki, T.

    2015-01-01

    A previous study has indicated that by using approx.1550 nm wavelengths a laser ranging system can track debris objects in an "eye safe" manner, while increasing the expected return rate by a factor of approx. 2/unit area of the telescope. In this presentation we develop the optical bench required to use approx.1550nm lasers, and integration with a 532nm system. We will use the optical bench configuration for NGSLR as the baseline, and indicate a possible injection point for the 1550 nm laser. The presentation will include what elements may need to be changed for transmitting the required power on the approx.1550nm wavelength, supporting the alignment of the laser to the telescope, and possible concerns for the telescope optics.

  16. Tracking propagation of ultrashort intense laser pulses in gases via probing of ionization.

    PubMed

    Gizzi, L A; Betti, S; Galimberti, M; Giulietti, A; Giulietti, D; Labate, L; Levato, T; Tomassini, P; Monot, P; Ceccotti, T; De Oliveira, P; Martin, Ph

    2009-05-01

    We use optical interferometry to study the propagation of femtosecond laser pulses in gases. We show the measurements of propagation in a nitrogen gas jet and we compare the results with propagation in He under the same irradiation conditions. We find that in the case of nitrogen, the detailed temporal structure of the laser pulse can be tracked and visualized by measuring the phase and the resulting electron-density map. A dramatically different behavior occurs in He gas jets, where no details of the temporal structure of the laser pulse are visible. These observations are explained in terms of the ionization dynamics of nitrogen compared to helium. These circumstances make N2 gas sensitive to variations in the electric field and, therefore, allow the laser-pulse temporal and spatial structures to be visualized in detail. PMID:19518574

  17. Tracking propagation of ultrashort intense laser pulses in gases via probing of ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Gizzi, L. A.; Betti, S.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Tomassini, P.; Galimberti, M.; Monot, P.; Ceccotti, T.; De Oliveira, P.; Martin, Ph.

    2009-05-15

    We use optical interferometry to study the propagation of femtosecond laser pulses in gases. We show the measurements of propagation in a nitrogen gas jet and we compare the results with propagation in He under the same irradiation conditions. We find that in the case of nitrogen, the detailed temporal structure of the laser pulse can be tracked and visualized by measuring the phase and the resulting electron-density map. A dramatically different behavior occurs in He gas jets, where no details of the temporal structure of the laser pulse are visible. These observations are explained in terms of the ionization dynamics of nitrogen compared to helium. These circumstances make N{sub 2} gas sensitive to variations in the electric field and, therefore, allow the laser-pulse temporal and spatial structures to be visualized in detail.

  18. Laser-tracking interferometer system based on trilateration and a restriction on the position of its laser trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsuji, Toshiyuki; Koseki, Yoshihiko; Goto, Mitsuo; Kurosawa, Tomizo; Tanimura, Yoshihisa

    1998-07-01

    To measure three dimensional coordinate we have been developing a laser tracking interferometer system (LTS). Four laser interferometers chase the movement of a target cat's eye and measure the change in distance between them. The position of the cat's eye is determined from the measured distances based on the principle of trilateration. Taking advantage of measurement redundancy produced by the fourth tracker, the position of the trackers and the initial position of the cat's eye can be estimated by a self-calibration algorithm. A restriction on the arrangement of the laser trackers to perform the self-calibration algorithm is theoretically studied. Finally a preliminary experiment was made to show the measurement error of about 40 micrometers for a 1 m measurement.

  19. Pointing and tracking errors due to localized deformation in inter-satellite laser communication links.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liying; Yang, Yuqiang; Ma, Jing; Yu, Jianjie

    2008-08-18

    Instead of Zernike polynomials, ellipse Gaussian model is proposed to represent localized wave-front deformation in researching pointing and tracking errors in inter-satellite laser communication links, which can simplify the calculation. It is shown that both pointing and tracking errors depend on the center deepness h, the radiuses a and b, and the distance d of the Gaussian distortion and change regularly as they increase. The maximum peak values of pointing and tracking errors always appear around h=0.2lambda. The influence of localized deformation is up to 0.7microrad for pointing error, and 0.5microrad for tracking error. To reduce the impact of localized deformation on pointing and tracking errors, the machining precision of optical devices, which should be more greater than 0.2?, is proposed. The principle of choosing the optical devices with localized deformation is presented, and the method that adjusts the pointing direction to compensate pointing and tracking errors is given. We hope the results can be used in the design of inter-satellite lasercom systems. PMID:18711575

  20. A method to track cortical surface deformations using a laser range scanner.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Tuhin K; Dawant, Benoit M; Duay, Valerie; Cash, David M; Weil, Robert J; Thompson, Reid C; Weaver, Kyle D; Miga, Michael I

    2005-06-01

    This paper reports a novel method to track brain shift using a laser-range scanner (LRS) and nonrigid registration techniques. The LRS used in this paper is capable of generating textured point-clouds describing the surface geometry/intensity pattern of the brain as presented during cranial surgery. Using serial LRS acquisitions of the brain's surface and two-dimensional (2-D) nonrigid image registration, we developed a method to track surface motion during neurosurgical procedures. A series of experiments devised to evaluate the performance of the developed shift-tracking protocol are reported. In a controlled, quantitative phantom experiment, the results demonstrate that the surface shift-tracking protocol is capable of resolving shift to an accuracy of approximately 1.6 mm given initial shifts on the order of 15 mm. Furthermore, in a preliminary in vivo case using the tracked LRS and an independent optical measurement system, the automatic protocol was able to reconstruct 50% of the brain shift with an accuracy of 3.7 mm while the manual measurement was able to reconstruct 77% with an accuracy of 2.1 mm. The results suggest that a LRS is an effective tool for tracking brain surface shift during neurosurgery. PMID:15959938

  1. High-speed, image-based eye tracking with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Yang, Qiang; Arathorn, David W.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; de Boer, Johannes F.; Roorda, Austin

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-speed, image-based tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) that can provide high fidelity structural images, real-time eye tracking and targeted stimulus delivery. The system was designed for diffraction-limited performance over an 8° field of view (FOV) and operates with a flexible field of view of 1°–5.5°. Stabilized videos of the retina were generated showing an amplitude of motion after stabilization of 0.2 arcmin or less across all frequencies. In addition, the imaging laser can be modulated to place a stimulus on a targeted retinal location. We show a stimulus placement accuracy with a standard deviation less than 1 arcmin. With a smaller field size of 2°, individual cone photoreceptors were clearly visible at eccentricities outside of the fovea. PMID:23082300

  2. Impact ignition as a track to laser fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.; Sakaiya, T.; Velikovich, A.; Karasik, M.; Gus'kov, S.; Zmitrenko, N.

    2014-05-01

    In impact ignition, the compressed deuterium-tritium main fuel is ignited by impact with a separately imploded portion of fuel, which is accelerated in a hollow conical target to hyperspeeds of the order of 1000 km s-1. Its kinetic energy is directly converted into thermal energy corresponding to an ignition temperature of about 5 keV upon collision with the compressed fuel. The ignitor shell is irradiated by nanosecond pulses at intensities of between 1015 and 1016 W cm-2 with a wavelength of 0.25-0.35 µm, resulting in ablation pressures of several hundred mega-bars. Hydrodynamics-dominated physics and avoidance of ultra-intense petawatt lasers are notable features of this scheme. Experimental results for velocities exceeding 1000 km s-1, ion temperatures up to 3 keV, and neutron yield increases of 100-fold due to the impact effect indicate the potential of impact ignition for fusion energy production. The overall performance of impact ignition is reviewed with new analyses on the neutron yield and shell acceleration.

  3. Pure-Pursuit Reactive Path Tracking for Nonholonomic Mobile Robots with a 2D Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jesús; Martínez, Jorge L.; Martínez, María A.; Mandow, Anthony

    2009-12-01

    Due to its simplicity and efficiency, the pure-pursuit path tracking method has been widely employed for planned navigation of nonholonomic ground vehicles. In this paper, we investigate the application of this technique for reactive tracking of paths that are implicitly defined by perceived environmental features. Goal points are obtained through an efficient interpretation of range data from an onboard 2D laser scanner to follow persons, corridors, and walls. Moreover, this formulation allows that a robotic mission can be composed of a combination of different types of path segments. These techniques have been successfully tested in the tracked mobile robot Auriga-[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] in an indoor environment.

  4. Dual use of image based tracking techniques: Laser eye surgery and low vision prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    With a concentration on Fourier optics pattern recognition, we have developed several methods of tracking objects in dynamic imagery to automate certain space applications such as orbital rendezvous and spacecraft capture, or planetary landing. We are developing two of these techniques for Earth applications in real-time medical image processing. The first is warping of a video image, developed to evoke shift invariance to scale and rotation in correlation pattern recognition. The technology is being applied to compensation for certain field defects in low vision humans. The second is using the optical joint Fourier transform to track the translation of unmodeled scenes. Developed as an image fixation tool to assist in calculating shape from motion, it is being applied to tracking motions of the eyeball quickly enough to keep a laser photocoagulation spot fixed on the retina, thus avoiding collateral damage.

  5. Dual Use of Image Based Tracking Techniques: Laser Eye Surgery and Low Vision Prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.; Barton, R. Shane

    1994-01-01

    With a concentration on Fourier optics pattern recognition, we have developed several methods of tracking objects in dynamic imagery to automate certain space applications such as orbital rendezvous and spacecraft capture, or planetary landing. We are developing two of these techniques for Earth applications in real-time medical image processing. The first is warping of a video image, developed to evoke shift invariance to scale and rotation in correlation pattern recognition. The technology is being applied to compensation for certain field defects in low vision humans. The second is using the optical joint Fourier transform to track the translation of unmodeled scenes. Developed as an image fixation tool to assist in calculating shape from motion, it is being applied to tracking motions of the eyeball quickly enough to keep a laser photocoagulation spot fixed on the retina, thus avoiding collateral damage.

  6. Doublet Pulse Coherent Laser Radar for Tracking of Resident Space Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Rudd, Van; Shald, Scott; Sandford, Stephen; Dimarcantonio, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the development of a long range ladar system known as ExoSPEAR at NASA Langley Research Center for tracking rapidly moving resident space objects is discussed. Based on 100 W, nanosecond class, near-IR laser, this ladar system with coherent detection technique is currently being investigated for short dwell time measurements of resident space objects (RSOs) in LEO and beyond for space surveillance applications. This unique ladar architecture is configured using a continuously agile doublet-pulse waveform scheme coupled to a closed-loop tracking and control loop approach to simultaneously achieve mm class range precision and mm/s velocity precision and hence obtain unprecedented track accuracies. Salient features of the design architecture followed by performance modeling and engagement simulations illustrating the dependence of range and velocity precision in LEO orbits on ladar parameters are presented. Estimated limits on detectable optical cross sections of RSOs in LEO orbits are discussed.

  7. Laser communication system with acousto-optic tracking and modulation: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, Vladimir V.; Sofka, Jozef

    2009-12-01

    Laser communication systems are highly preferred for broadband applications. This technology uses higher regions of the spectrum, and offers unsurpassed throughput, information security, reduced weight and size of the components, and power savings. Unfortunately, small beam divergence requires precise positioning, which becomes very critical at high data rates. Complex motion patterns of the communicating platforms, vibrations, and atmospheric effects cause significant signal losses due to the pointing errors, beam wander, and other higher order effects. Mitigation of those effects is achieved by fast tracking, which can be successfully combined with signal modulation. In this work, we focus on the application of acousto-optic technology and its effect on communication performance. We present experimental results for a laser communication link affected by pointing distortions. These distortions are generated to emulate specific operation environments with particular spectral characteristics. The acousto-optic technology is used to build an agile tracking system combined with signal modulation in the same device to assure maximum signal reception, in spite of the harsh operational conditions. The received communication signal is recorded and statistically analyzed to calculate the bit error rates. This work presents synthesis of a tracking system and experimental results characterizing the communication performance under uncompensated pointing disturbance and with tracking.

  8. Performance of a laser communication system with acousto-optic tracking: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, V.; Khandekar, R.; Sofka, J.

    2006-02-01

    Laser communication systems hold great promise for broadband applications. This technology uses much higher-than-RF region of the spectrum and allows concentration of the signal within a very small spatial angle, thus offering unsurpassed throughput, information security, reduced weight and size of the components and power savings. Unfortunately, these intrinsic advantages do not come without a price: small beam divergence requires precise positioning, which becomes very critical at high bit rates. Complex motion patterns of the communicating platforms, resident vibrations, and atmospheric effects are known to cause significant signal losses through the mechanisms of the pointing errors, beam wander and other higher-order effects. Mitigation of those effects is achieved through the multiple means of fast tracking and wavefront control. In this paper we focus on the application of a beam steering technology and its effect on the communication performance of the system. We present the results of an experimental study of a laser communication link subjected to pointing distortions. These distortions are generated by a special disturbance element in the optical setup, which recreates specific operation environments with particular spectral characteristics. The acousto-optic technology is used to build an agile tracking system to assure the maximum signal reception in spite of the harsh operational conditions. The received communication signal is recorded and statistically analyzed to calculate the bit-error-rates. This paper presents the synthesis of a tracking system and the experimental results characterizing the communication performance under uncompensated pointing disturbance and with tracking.

  9. Tracking on non-active collaborative objects from San Fernando Laser station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Manuel; Quijano, Manuel; Cortina, Luis M.; Pazos, Antonio A.; Martín-Davila, José

    2016-04-01

    The Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy (ROA) works on satellite geodesy from the early days of the space age, when the first artificial satellite tracking telescope was installed in 1958: the Baker-Nunn camera. In 1975 a French satellite Laser ranging (SLR) station was installed and operated at ROA . Since 1980, ROA has been operating this instrument which was upgraded to a third generation and it is still keep into a continuous update to reach the highest level of operability. Since then ROA has participated in different space geodesy campaigns through the International Laser Service Stations (ILRS) or its European regional organization (EUROLAS), tracking a number of artificial satellites types : ERS, ENVISAT, LAGEOS, TOPEX- POSEIDON to name but a few. Recently we opened a new field of research: space debris tracking, which is receiving increasing importance and attention from international space agencies. The main problem is the relatively low accuracy of common used methods. It is clear that improving the predicted orbit accuracy is necessary to fulfill our aims (avoiding unnecessary anti-collision maneuvers,..). Following results obtained by other colleagues (Austria, China, USA,...) we proposed to share our time-schedule using our satellite ranging station to obtain data which will make orbital elements predictions far more accurate (sub-meter accuracy), while we still keep our tracking routines over active satellites. In this communication we report the actions fulfill until nowadays.

  10. Laser spot tracking based on modified circular Hough transform and motion pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Krstinić, Damir; Skelin, Ana Kuzmanić; Milatić, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Laser pointers are one of the most widely used interactive and pointing devices in different human-computer interaction systems. Existing approaches to vision-based laser spot tracking are designed for controlled indoor environments with the main assumption that the laser spot is very bright, if not the brightest, spot in images. In this work, we are interested in developing a method for an outdoor, open-space environment, which could be implemented on embedded devices with limited computational resources. Under these circumstances, none of the assumptions of existing methods for laser spot tracking can be applied, yet a novel and fast method with robust performance is required. Throughout the paper, we will propose and evaluate an efficient method based on modified circular Hough transform and Lucas-Kanade motion analysis. Encouraging results on a representative dataset demonstrate the potential of our method in an uncontrolled outdoor environment, while achieving maximal accuracy indoors. Our dataset and ground truth data are made publicly available for further development. PMID:25350502

  11. Laser Spot Tracking Based on Modified Circular Hough Transform and Motion Pattern Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Krstinić, Damir; Skelin, Ana Kuzmanić; Milatić, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Laser pointers are one of the most widely used interactive and pointing devices in different human-computer interaction systems. Existing approaches to vision-based laser spot tracking are designed for controlled indoor environments with the main assumption that the laser spot is very bright, if not the brightest, spot in images. In this work, we are interested in developing a method for an outdoor, open-space environment, which could be implemented on embedded devices with limited computational resources. Under these circumstances, none of the assumptions of existing methods for laser spot tracking can be applied, yet a novel and fast method with robust performance is required. Throughout the paper, we will propose and evaluate an efficient method based on modified circular Hough transform and Lucas–Kanade motion analysis. Encouraging results on a representative dataset demonstrate the potential of our method in an uncontrolled outdoor environment, while achieving maximal accuracy indoors. Our dataset and ground truth data are made publicly available for further development. PMID:25350502

  12. A Method of Tracking a Forward Vehicle using a Scanning Laser Radar and a Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Noriko; Nakamura, Satoshi; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Kazumi; Muro, Hideo

    This paper describes a robust tracking method that combines a scanning laser radar (SLR) with a camera to measure headway distances and lateral positions more accurately. With this method, a preceding vehicle is first detected on the basis of the digital data output by the SLR unit, and the vehicle is then tracked by both SLR and the camera. A variable shape template matching method is used in processing the images taken with the camera. The image recognition technique can track the preceding vehicle despite frequent changes in the headway distance and the direction. Robust and highly accurate tracking is achieved by combining the wide angle, high-resolution measurement obtained by image recognition with the SLR distance measurement. The proposed method has been validated on a driving simulator using data recorded on Japanese roads. The preceding vehicle was successfully tracked and its position was measured as expected on curves and on straight roads in general. The results also confirmed that this method has some advantages over detection by SLR alone in difficult detection situations.

  13. Three-dimensional tracking and imaging laser scanner for space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurin, Denis G.; Beraldin, J. A.; Blais, Francois; Rioux, Marc; Cournoyer, Luc

    1999-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a laser range scanner (LARS) as a three-dimensional sensor for space applications. The scanner is a versatile system capable of doing surface imaging, target ranging and tracking. It is capable of short range (0.5 m to 20 m) and long range (20 m to 10 km) sensing using triangulation and time-of-flight (TOF) methods respectively. At short range (1 m), the resolution is sub-millimeter and drops gradually with distance (2 cm at 10 m). For long range, the TOF provides a constant resolution of plus or minus 3 cm, independent of range. The LARS could complement the existing Canadian Space Vision System (CSVS) for robotic manipulation. As an active vision system, the LARS is immune to sunlight and adverse lighting; this is a major advantage over the CSVS, as outlined in this paper. The LARS could also replace existing radar systems used for rendezvous and docking. There are clear advantages of an optical system over a microwave radar in terms of size, mass, power and precision. Equipped with two high-speed galvanometers, the laser can be steered to address any point in a 30 degree X 30 degree field of view. The scanning can be continuous (raster scan, Lissajous) or direct (random). This gives the scanner the ability to register high-resolution 3D images of range and intensity (up to 4000 X 4000 pixels) and to perform point target tracking as well as object recognition and geometrical tracking. The imaging capability of the scanner using an eye-safe laser is demonstrated. An efficient fiber laser delivers 60 mW of CW or 3 (mu) J pulses at 20 kHz for TOF operation. Implementation of search and track of multiple targets is also demonstrated. For a single target, refresh rates up to 137 Hz is possible. Considerations for space qualification of the scanner are discussed. Typical space operations, such as docking, object attitude tracking, and inspections are described.

  14. Motion of a Micro/Nanomanipulator using a Laser Beam Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, Nabil; Folio, David; Ferreira, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study of the control problem of a laser beam illuminating and focusing a micro-object subjected to dynamic disturbances using light intensity for feedback only. The main idea is to guide and track the beam with a hybrid micro/nanomanipulator, which is driven by a control signal generated by processing the beam intensity sensed by a four-quadrant photodiode sensitive detector (PSD). Since the pointing location of the beam depends on real-time control issues related to temperature variation, vibrations, output intensity control, and collimation of the light output, the 2-D beam location to the PSD measurement output must be estimated in real-time. To this aim, a Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is designed to predict the beam location to perform efficient tracking and following control approach. Hence, a robust master/slave control strategy of the dual-stage micro and nanomanipulator system is presented based on sensitivity function decoupling design methodology. The decoupled feedback controller is synthesized and implemented in a 6-DoF micro/nanomanipulator allowing few centimeters displacement range with a nanometer resolution. A relevant case study, related to laser-beam tracking for imaging purposes, validates experimentally the proposed framework.

  15. Detection of visually unrecognizable braking tracks using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, David; Bilík, Martin; Prochazková, Petra; Brada, Michal; Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Jan; Novotný, Karel; Ticová, Barbora; Bradáč, Albert; Semela, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    Identification of the position, length and mainly beginning of a braking track has proven to be essential for determination of causes of a road traffic accident. With the introduction of modern safety braking systems and assistance systems such as the Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) or Electronic Stability Control (ESC), the visual identification of braking tracks that has been used up until the present is proving to be rather complicated or even impossible. This paper focuses on identification of braking tracks using a spectrochemical analysis of the road surface. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was selected as a method suitable for fast in-situ element detection. In the course of detailed observations of braking tracks it was determined that they consist of small particles of tire treads that are caught in intrusions in the road surface. As regards detection of the "dust" resulting from wear and tear of tire treads in the environment, organic zinc was selected as the identification element in the past. The content of zinc in tire treads has been seen to differ with regard to various sources and tire types; however, the arithmetic mean and modus of these values are approximately 1% by weight. For in-situ measurements of actual braking tracks a mobile LIBS device equipped with a special module was used. Several measurements were performed for 3 different cars and tire types respectively which slowed down with full braking power. Moreover, the influence of different initial speed, vehicle mass and braking track length on detected signal is discussed here.

  16. Color changes in CR-39 nuclear track detector by gamma and laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouh, S. A.; Said, A. F.; Atta, M. R.; El-Melleegy, W. M.; El-Meniawy, S.

    2006-07-01

    A study of the effect of gamma and laser irradiation on the color changes of polyallyl diglycol (CR-39) solid-state nuclear track detector was performed. CR-39 detector samples were classified into two main groups. The first group was irradiated with gamma doses at levels between 20 and 300 kGy, whereas the second group was exposed to infrared laser radiation with energy fluences at levels between 0.71 and 8.53 J/cm(2) . The transmission of these samples in the wavelength range 300-2500 nm, as well as any color changes, was studied. Using the transmission data, both the tristimulus and the coordinate values of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) LAB were calculated. Also, the color differences between the non-irradiated samples and those irradiated with different gamma or laser doses were calculated. The results indicate that the CR-39 detector acquires color changes under gamma or laser irradiation, but it has more response to color changes by gamma irradiation. In addition, structural property studies using infrared spectroscopy were performed. The results indicate that the irradiation of a CR-39 detector with gamma or laser radiations causes the cleavage of the carbonate linkage that can be attributed to the H abstraction from the backbone of the polymer, associated with the formation of CO 2 and OH with varying intensities.

  17. Two-dimensional radial laser scanning for circular marker detection and external mobile robot tracking.

    PubMed

    Teixidó, Mercè; Pallejà, Tomàs; Font, Davinia; Tresanchez, Marcel; Moreno, Javier; Palacín, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the use of an external fixed two-dimensional laser scanner to detect cylindrical targets attached to moving devices, such as a mobile robot. This proposal is based on the detection of circular markers in the raw data provided by the laser scanner by applying an algorithm for outlier avoidance and a least-squares circular fitting. Some experiments have been developed to empirically validate the proposal with different cylindrical targets in order to estimate the location and tracking errors achieved, which are generally less than 20 mm in the area covered by the laser sensor. As a result of the validation experiments, several error maps have been obtained in order to give an estimate of the uncertainty of any location computed. This proposal has been validated with a medium-sized mobile robot with an attached cylindrical target (diameter 200 mm). The trajectory of the mobile robot was estimated with an average location error of less than 15 mm, and the real location error in each individual circular fitting was similar to the error estimated with the obtained error maps. The radial area covered in this validation experiment was up to 10 m, a value that depends on the radius of the cylindrical target and the radial density of the distance range points provided by the laser scanner but this area can be increased by combining the information of additional external laser scanners. PMID:23443390

  18. Two-Dimensional Radial Laser Scanning for Circular Marker Detection and External Mobile Robot Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Teixidó, Mercè; Pallejà, Tomàs; Font, Davinia; Tresanchez, Marcel; Moreno, Javier; Palacín, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the use of an external fixed two-dimensional laser scanner to detect cylindrical targets attached to moving devices, such as a mobile robot. This proposal is based on the detection of circular markers in the raw data provided by the laser scanner by applying an algorithm for outlier avoidance and a least-squares circular fitting. Some experiments have been developed to empirically validate the proposal with different cylindrical targets in order to estimate the location and tracking errors achieved, which are generally less than 20 mm in the area covered by the laser sensor. As a result of the validation experiments, several error maps have been obtained in order to give an estimate of the uncertainty of any location computed. This proposal has been validated with a medium-sized mobile robot with an attached cylindrical target (diameter 200 mm). The trajectory of the mobile robot was estimated with an average location error of less than 15 mm, and the real location error in each individual circular fitting was similar to the error estimated with the obtained error maps. The radial area covered in this validation experiment was up to 10 m, a value that depends on the radius of the cylindrical target and the radial density of the distance range points provided by the laser scanner but this area can be increased by combining the information of additional external laser scanners. PMID:23443390

  19. Infrared/laser multi-sensor fusion and tracking based on the multi-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingjian; Hao, Jingya; Yi, Xiang; Wu, Feihong; Li, Min; Qin, Hanlin; Huang, Hanqiao

    2016-03-01

    The state estimation problem of targets detected by infrared/laser composite detection system with different sampling rates was studied in this paper. An effective state estimation algorithm based on data fusion is presented. Because sampling rate of infrared detection system is much higher than that of the laser detection system, the theory of multi-scale analysis is used to establish multi-scale model in this algorithm. At the fine scale, angle information provided by infrared detection system is used to estimate the target state through the unscented Kalman filter. It makes full use of the high frequency characteristic of infrared detection system to improve target state estimation accuracy. At the coarse scale, due to the sampling ratio of infrared and laser detection systems is an integer multiple, the angle information can be fused directly with the distance information of laser detection system to determine the target location. The fused information is served as observation, while the converted measurement Kalman filter (CMKF) is used to estimate the target state, which greatly reduces the complexity of filtering process and gets the optimal fusion estimation. The simulation results of tracking a target in 3-D space by infrared and laser detection systems demonstrate that the proposed algorithm in this paper is efficient and can obtain better performance than traditional algorithm.

  20. Three-dimensional tracking of lesion profile during laser surgery based on shock wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bay, Erwin; Dean Ben, Xosé Luis; Pang, Genny A.; Douplik, Alexandre; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Lack of sensory feedback during laser surgery prevents surgeons from keeping track of the exact lesion profile and cutting depth. As a result, duration and complexity of the treatments are significantly increased. In this study we propose a new method for enabling three-dimensional tracking of the exact lesion profile, based on detection of shock waves emanating from the ablated tissue and subsequent reconstruction of the incision location using time-of-flight data obtained from multiple acoustic detectors. Ablation was performed in fresh bovine tissue samples using a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, delivering 8 ns duration 150mJ pulses at a wavelength of 1064nm and repetition rate of 5Hz. The beam was focused by a 50mm lens on the tissue surface, which resulted in a deep cut of up to 9mm depth. The generated shock waves were detected using a spherical matrix ultrasonic array. The exact cutting profile was subsequently rendered by reconstructing the origin of shockwaves detected during the entire procedure. Different combinations of the detector positions were considered with respect to the resulting reconstruction quality. It was observed that, by utilizing at least 12 detection elements, the lesion profile could be characterized with high accuracy in all three dimensions, which was confirmed by histological evaluations. The proposed method holds promise for delivering highly precise and accurate real-time feedback during laser surgeries.

  1. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image field to be corrected at any retinal coordinates of interest in a field of >25 deg. AO performance was assessed by imaging individuals with a range of refractive errors. In most subjects, image contrast was measurable at spatial frequencies close to the diffraction limit. Closed-loop optical (hardware) tracking performance was assessed by comparing sequential image series with and without stabilization. Though usually better than 10 μm rms, or 0.03 deg, tracking does not yet stabilize to single cone precision but significantly improves average image quality and increases the number of frames that can be successfully aligned by software-based post-processing methods. The new optical interface allows the high-resolution imaging field to be placed anywhere within the wide field without requiring the subject to re-fixate, enabling easier retinal navigation and faster, more efficient AOSLO montage capture and stitching. PMID:21045887

  2. Eye-tracking laser Doppler velocimeter stabilized in two dimensions: principle, design, and construction.

    PubMed

    Mendel, M J; Toi, V V; Riva, C E; Petrig, B L

    1993-07-01

    We developed an eye-tracking laser Doppler velocimeter to minimize eye-movement artifacts in the study of ocular hemodynamics in humans. The instrument compensates for both horizontal and vertical eye motions by using galvanometer mirrors controlled by a dual-Purkinje eye tracker. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated in a preliminary study of retinal arterial blood velocity in a normal subject. The subject's fixation point was adjusted manually to oscillate through a 2.3-deg span at 0.3 Hz. In spite of this motion the pulsatile velocity waveform of the heart cycle could be continuously recorded. Without eye tracking the velocity waveform was lost after the initiation of movement. PMID:8350156

  3. Laser-induced deposition of nanostructured copper tracks from solutions containing oxidising additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, Sergey A.; Araslanova, Svetlana M.; Mironov, Vasilii S.; Gordeychuk, Dmitrii I.

    2015-05-01

    This paper involves the laser-induced chemical liquid phase deposition of metals (LCLD). Organic alcohols with low molecular weights, such as ethanol and ethylene glycol, were used as the reductants. The addition of KBrO3 demonstrates how inorganic oxidizing additives affect the process of copper laser deposition from aqueous solutions. Such additives increase the deposition speed, which is an important challenge in the LCLD method. The deposited copper structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive analysis (EDX), and impedance spectroscopy. The equivalent circuit of copper tracks was constructed using the impedance spectroscopy data. The studies revealed that the structures deposited from the solutions consist of densely agglomerated nanocrystals, which is in contrast to the microcrystalline deposit obtained in the absence of oxidizing additives.

  4. Influence of aero-optical disturbances on acquisition, tracking, and pointing performance characteristics in laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Matthew R.; Goorskey, David J.

    2011-05-01

    We have modeled the imaging performance of an acquisition, tracking, and pointing (ATP) sensor when operating on a high-speed aircraft platform through a turreted laser beam director/telescope. We applied standard scaling relations to wavefront sensor (WFS) data collected from the Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory (AAOL) test platform operating at Mach 0.5 to model aero-optical aberrations for a λ = 1 μm wavelength laser system with a Dap = 30 cm aperture diameter and a 90 cm turret diameter on a platform operating at 30 kft and for speeds of Mach 0.4-0.8. Using these data, we quantified the imaging point spread function (PSF) for each aircraft speed. Our simulation results show Strehl ratios between 0.1-0.8 with substantial scattering of energy out to 7.5× the diffraction-limited core. Analysis of the imaging modulation transfer function (MTF) shows a rapid reduction of contrast for low-to-mid range spatial frequencies with increasing Mach number. Low modulation contrast at higher spatial frequencies limits imaging resolution to > 2× diffraction-limit at Mach 0.5 and approximately 5× diffraction-limit at Mach 0.8. Practical limits to usable spatial frequencies require higher image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the presence of aero-optical disturbances at high Mach number. Propagation of an illuminator laser through these aero-optical aberrations produces intensity modulation in the incident target illumination on scale sizes near the diffraction-limit of the transmitting laser aperture, thereby producing illumination artifacts which can degrade image-contrast-based tracking algorithms.

  5. Orbit determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter using laser ranging and radiometric tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löcher, Anno; Kusche, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) launched in 2009 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) still orbits the Moon in a polar orbit at an altitude of 50 kilometers and below. Its main objective is the detailed exploration of the Moon's surface by means of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) and three high resolution cameras bundled in the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) unit. Referring these observations to a Moon-fixed reference frame requires the computation of highly accurate and consistent orbits. For this task only Earth-based observations are available, primarily radiometric tracking data from stations in the United States, Australia and Europe. In addition, LRO is prepared for one-way laser measurements from specially adapted sites. Currently, 10 laser stations participate more or less regularly in this experiment. For operational reasons, the official LRO orbits from NASA only include radiometric data so far. In this presentation, we investigate the benefit of the laser ranging data by feeding both types of observations in an integrated orbit determination process. All computations are performed by an in-house software development based on a dynamical approach improving orbit and force parameters in an iterative way. Special attention is paid to the determination of bias parameters, in particular of timing biases between radio and laser stations and the drift and aging of the LRO spacecraft clock. The solutions from the combined data set will be compared to radio- and laser-only orbits as well as to the NASA orbits. Further results will show how recent gravity field models from the GRAIL mission can improve the accuracy of the LRO orbits.

  6. Simultaneous Detection and Tracking of Pedestrian from Panoramic Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Schindler, Konrad; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Pedestrian traffic flow estimation is essential for public place design and construction planning. Traditional data collection by human investigation is tedious, inefficient and expensive. Panoramic laser scanners, e.g. Velodyne HDL-64E, which scan surroundings repetitively at a high frequency, have been increasingly used for 3D object tracking. In this paper, a simultaneous detection and tracking (SDAT) method is proposed for precise and automatic pedestrian trajectory recovery. First, the dynamic environment is detected using two different methods, Nearest-point and Max-distance. Then, all the points on moving objects are transferred into a space-time (x, y, t) coordinate system. The pedestrian detection and tracking amounts to assign the points belonging to pedestrians into continuous trajectories in space-time. We formulate the point assignment task as an energy function which incorporates the point evidence, trajectory number, pedestrian shape and motion. A low energy trajectory will well explain the point observations, and have plausible trajectory trend and length. The method inherently filters out points from other moving objects and false detections. The energy function is solved by a two-step optimization process: tracklet detection in a short temporal window; and global tracklet association through the whole time span. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recover the pedestrians trajectories with accurate positions and low false detections and mismatches.

  7. Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 1. Laser Doppler wake vortex tracking at Kennedy Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, M. C.; Wilson, D. J.; Howle, R. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Craven, C. E.; Jetton, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Test operations of the Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) at Kennedy International Airport (KIA) during August 1974 through June 1975 are reported. A total of 1,619 data runs was recorded with a totally operational system during normal landing operations at KIA. In addition, 53 data runs were made during cooperative flybys with the C880 for a grand total of 1672 recorded vortex tracks. Test crews were in attendance at KIA for 31 weeks, of which 25 weeks were considered operational and the other six were packing, unpacking, setup and check out. Although average activity equates to 67 recorded landing operations per week, two periods of complete runway inactivity spanned 20 days and 13 days, respectively. The operation frequency therefore averaged about 88 operations per week.

  8. Tracking through laser-induced clutter for air-to-ground directed energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen'kii, Mikhail; Brinkley, Timothy; Hughes, Kevin; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2003-09-01

    The agility and speed with which directed energy can be retargeted and delivered to the target makes a laser weapon highly desirable in tactical battlefield environments. A directed energy system can effectively damage and possibly destroy relatively soft targets on the ground. In order to accurately point a high-energy beam at the target, the directed energy system must be able to acquire and track targets of interest in highly cluttered environments, under different weather, smoke, and camouflage conditions and in the presence of turbulence and thermal blooming. To meet these requirements, we proposed a concept of a multi spectral tracker, which integrates three sensors: SAR radar, a passive MWIR optical tracker, and a range-gated laser illuminated tracker. In this paper we evaluated the feasibility of the integrated optical tracker and arrived to the following conclusions: a) the contrast enhancement by mapping the original pixel distribution to the desired one enhances the target identification capability, b) a reduction of the divergence of the illuminating beam reduces rms pointing error of a laser tracker, c) a clutter removal algorithm based on active contours is capable of capturing targets in highly cluttered environments, d) the daytime rms pointing error caused by anisoplanatism of the track point to the aim point is comparable to the diffraction-limited beam spot size, f) the peak intensity shift from the optical axis caused by thermal blooming at 5 km range for the air-to-ground engagement scenario is on the order of 8 μrad, and it is 10 μrad at 10 km range, and e) the thermal blooming reduces the peak average power in a 2 cm bucket at 5 km range by a factor of 8, and it reduces the peak average power in the bucket at 10 km range by a factor of 22.

  9. Improving accuracy of overhanging structures for selective laser melting through reliability characterization of single track formation on thick powder beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2016-04-01

    Repeatability and reproducibility of parts produced by selective laser melting is a standing issue, and coupled with a lack of standardized quality control presents a major hindrance towards maturing of selective laser melting as an industrial scale process. Consequently, numerical process modelling has been adopted towards improving the predictability of the outputs from the selective laser melting process. Establishing the reliability of the process, however, is still a challenge, especially in components having overhanging structures. In this paper, a systematic approach towards establishing reliability of overhanging structure production by selective laser melting has been adopted. A calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model is used to simulate the single track formation on a thick powder bed. Single tracks are manufactured on a thick powder bed using same processing parameters, but at different locations in a powder bed and in different laser scanning directions. The difference in melt track widths and depths captures the effect of changes in incident beam power distribution due to location and processing direction. The experimental results are used in combination with numerical model, and subjected to uncertainty and reliability analysis. Cumulative probability distribution functions obtained for melt track widths and depths are found to be coherent with observed experimental values. The technique is subsequently extended for reliability characterization of single layers produced on a thick powder bed without support structures, by determining cumulative probability distribution functions for average layer thickness, sample density and thermal homogeneity.

  10. Rotating blade vibration analysis using photogrammetry and tracking laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwashavanhu, Benjamin; Oberholster, Abrie J.; Heyns, P. Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Online structural dynamic analysis of turbomachinery blades is conventionally done using contact techniques such as strain gauges for the collection of data. To transfer the captured data from the sensor to the data logging system, installation of telemetry systems is required. This is usually complicated, time consuming and may introduce electrical noise into the data. In addition, contact techniques are intrusive by definition and can introduce significant local mass loading. This affects the integrity of the captured measurements. Advances in technology now allow for the use of optical non-contact methods to analyse the dynamics of rotating structures. These include photogrammetry and tracking laser Doppler vibrometry (TLDV). Various investigations to establish the integrity of photogrammetry measurements for rotating structures involved a comparison to data captured using accelerometers. Discrepancies that were noticed were attributed to the intrusive nature of the contact measurement technique. As an extended investigation, the presented work focuses on the validation of photogrammetry applied to online turbomachinery blade measurements, using TLDV measurements. Through a frequency based characterisation approach of the dynamics of the two scanning mirrors inside the scanning head of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV), TLDV is employed in developing a system that can be used to achieve a perfect circular scan with a Polytec SLDV, (PSV 300). Photogrammetry out-of-plane displacements of a laser dot focused on a specific point on a rotating blade are compared to displacements captured by the laser scanning system. It is shown that there is good correlation between the two measurement techniques when applied to rotating structures, both in the time and frequency domains. The presence of slight discrepancies between the two techniques after elimination of accelerometer based errors illustrated that the optical system noise floor of photogrammetry does

  11. Temperature tracking SPICE macro-model for laser and LED driven opto-coupler assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Deveney, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    SPICE 2G.6 compatible models were required for two opto-coupler assemblies in order to perform simulations to assess the design margins of the circuits in which they are used. Both of these assemblies are made up of discrete components, with one employing a laser diode as the light source, while the second uses a LED. Although, in use, these assemblies couple digital-like pulse trains, they are analog devices capable of operating over wider ranges of voltage than digital devices. Robust models which accurately simulate over these voltage ranges were desired. Also for ease of use, models that would track the operation of each of the assemblies over the entire specified temperature range were preferred. In addition to simulating the assembles in their intended mode of operation, it was necessary to reproduce an unwanted noise signal transfer that was observed in an early prototype circuit.

  12. Temperature tracking SPICE macro-model for laser and LED driven opto-coupler assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Deveney, M.F.

    1992-09-01

    SPICE 2G.6 compatible models were required for two opto-coupler assemblies in order to perform simulations to assess the design margins of the circuits in which they are used. Both of these assemblies are made up of discrete components, with one employing a laser diode as the light source, while the second uses a LED. Although, in use, these assemblies couple digital-like pulse trains, they are analog devices capable of operating over wider ranges of voltage than digital devices. Robust models which accurately simulate over these voltage ranges were desired. Also for ease of use, models that would track the operation of each of the assemblies over the entire specified temperature range were preferred. In addition to simulating the assembles in their intended mode of operation, it was necessary to reproduce an unwanted noise signal transfer that was observed in an early prototype circuit.

  13. Full-field tracking and measuring of particle motion in capillary vessels by using time-varying laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Luying; Wang, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    We propose a random perturbation model to describe the variation of laser speckle patterns caused by moving particles in capillary vessels. When passing through probing volume, moving particles encode random perturbations into observed laser speckle patterns. We extract the perturbation envelopes of time-varying laser speckles for tracking the motion of single particle. And, the full-field transverse velocities of flowing particles are obtained by using cross-correlation between the perturbation envelopes. The proposed method is experimentally verified by the use of polymer-microsphere suspension in a glass capillary.

  14. The effect of tracking performance due to temperature distribution of SiC reflectors in periscopic laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yiwei; Fu, Sen; Tao, Kunyu; Jiang, Yijun

    2015-10-01

    Effect of temperature gradient and uniform temperature on tracking performance of reflectors in periscopic laser communication terminals was studied. Zernike polynomials on elliptical area were used to fit wave-front aberration of elliptical reflectors in periscopic laser communication terminals due to temperature distribution. RMS value of the thermal deformation, tracking error and intensity on detectors degradation at receiving terminals caused by thermal deformation were studied in inter-satellite laser communication system. From the result we can know that effect of temperature gradient is the move of peak intensity and a little degradation. The tracking error reaches 2.9μrad when temperature gradient is 14°C/m. The uniform temperature will cause variation of intensity distribution on focus plane of detectors. When the difference between uniform temperature and reference temperature is small, the astigmatism causing by thermal distortion is very important. As the difference becomes bigger, the high-order modes of Zernike polynomials become very important. The distribution of intensity becomes irregular and the area is very big. This will reduce the tracking performance of detectors. This work will contribute to the thermal control of elliptical reflectors in periscopic laser communication terminals on satellites in orbit.

  15. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2009-03-19

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  16. Fast local temperature tracking in electrophysiological preparations by means of controlled laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shien-Fong; Rymer, William Z.

    1992-06-01

    The design and application of a temperature-tracking apparatus using a laser as heating source for electrophysiological preparation are presented. The apparatus provides the ability to follow a given temperature pattern at a local site. The studies were conducted to understand the mechanisms underlying thermal damage to ion channels in the frog nerve node of Ranvier. Main objectives of the temperature controller design are short temperature rise time and precise static temperature control. The temperature controller allows a minimum rise time of 150 ms with an accuracy of +/- 0.2 degree(s)C in the nerve membrane of nodes of Ranvier. The application of the device to nerve membrane thermal damage study showed that after a 5-second exposure to laser-induced hyperthermia at temperature of 48 - 54 degree(s)C, there was a differential suppression of Na and K currents in the nodal membrane currents. Potential applications of the temperature controller design can be found in other research areas in medicine and biophysics that require a stable high temperature heat source for local heating.

  17. The method of axial drift compensation of laser differential confocal microscopy based on zero-tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajie; Cui, Han; Wang, Yun; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian

    2015-08-01

    Laser differential confocal microscopy (DCM) has advantages of high axial resolution and strong ability of focus identification. However, the imaging mechanism of point scanning needs long measurement time, in the process due to itself mechanical instability and the influence of environment vibration the axial drift of object position is inevitable, which will reduce lateral resolution of the DCM. To ensure the lateral resolution we propose an axial drift compensation method based on zero-tracking in this paper. The method takes advantage of the linear region of differential confocal axial response curve, gets axial drift by detecting the laser intensity; uses grating sensor to monitor the real-time axial drift of lifting stage and realizes closed-loop control; uses capacitive sensor of objective driver to measure its position. After getting the axial drift of object, the lifting stage and objective driver will be driven to compensate position according to the axial drift. This method is realized by using Visual Studio 2010, and the experiment demonstrates that the compensation precision of the proposed method can reach 6 nm. It is not only easy to implement, but also can compensate the axial drift actively and real-timely. Above all, this method improves the system stability of DCM effectively.

  18. Facial acquisition by dynamic optical tracked laser imaging: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K; Boerner, B-I; Schwenzer, N F; Müller, A A; Juergens, P; Ringenbach, A; Schkommodau, E; Zeilhofer, H-F

    2009-09-01

    Three-dimensional capture of the surface of soft tissue is a desirable support for documentation and therapy planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery concerning the complex anatomy of the face, particularly cleft lip and palate (CLP). Different scanning systems are used for capturing facial surfaces. These systems are mostly based on a static linear measuring arrangement. Established systems work on the basis of coded white light or linear laser triangulation and digital stereophotogrammetric approaches. Shadowing effects occur with these devices. These effects may be avoided by a radical new approach first used in automotive industries that employs a mobile, flexible handheld laser scanner with simultaneous registration by optical tracking. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of this scanner for surgical procedures on the human face in operating theatre. Five babies aged about 3 months with cleft deformities (one CLP, one bilateral CLP, three isolated cleft lips) were captured directly: twice preoperatively, twice postoperatively and twice after 7 days. An industrial standard specimen and two plaster cast masks of CLP babies were taken and subsequently measured to assess reliability and validity of the device. Masks were measured to reflect the complex surface of the cleft deformity. Data evaluation was done with respect to completeness of the data sets, as well as reliability and validity of the system. Missing data caused by shadowing could be avoided in all images. Even complex areas with undercuts could be reproduced completely and precisely with an accuracy in the sub-millimetre range. PMID:18602359

  19. Tracking the course of the manufacturing process in selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thombansen, U.; Gatej, A.; Pereira, M.

    2014-02-01

    An innovative optical train for a selective laser melting based manufacturing system (SLM) has been designed under the objective to track the course of the SLM process. In this, the thermal emission from the melt pool and the geometric properties of the interaction zone are addressed by applying a pyrometer and a camera system respectively. The optical system is designed such that all three radiations from processing laser, thermal emission and camera image are coupled coaxially and that they propagate on the same optical axis. As standard f-theta lenses for high power applications inevitably lead to aberrations and divergent optical axes for increasing deflection angles in combination with multiple wavelengths, a pre-focus system is used to implement a focusing unit which shapes the beam prior to passing the scanner. The sensor system records synchronously the current position of the laser beam, the current emission from the melt pool and an image of the interaction zone. Acquired data of the thermal emission is being visualized after processing which allows an instant evaluation of the course of the process at any position of each layer. As such, it provides a fully detailed history of the product This basic work realizes a first step towards self-optimization of the manufacturing process by providing information about quality relevant events during manufacture. The deviation from the planned course of the manufacturing process to the actual course of the manufacturing process can be used to adapt the manufacturing strategy from one layer to the next. In the current state, the system can be used to facilitate the setup of the manufacturing system as it allows identification of false machine settings without having to analyze the work piece.

  20. A Study on Along-Track and Cross-Track Noise of Altimetry Data by Maximum Likelihood: Mars Orbiter Laser Altimetry (Mola) Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarmołowski, Wojciech; Łukasiak, Jacek

    2015-12-01

    The work investigates the spatial correlation of the data collected along orbital tracks of Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) with a special focus on the noise variance problem in the covariance matrix. The problem of different correlation parameters in along-track and crosstrack directions of orbital or profile data is still under discussion in relation to Least Squares Collocation (LSC). Different spacing in along-track and transverse directions and anisotropy problem are frequently considered in the context of this kind of data. Therefore the problem is analyzed in this work, using MOLA data samples. The analysis in this paper is focused on a priori errors that correspond to the white noise present in the data and is performed by maximum likelihood (ML) estimation in two, perpendicular directions. Additionally, correlation lengths of assumed planar covariance model are determined by ML and by fitting it into the empirical covariance function (ECF). All estimates considered together confirm substantial influence of different data resolution in along-track and transverse directions on the covariance parameters.

  1. Modeling and control of a two-axis fast steering mirror with piezoelectric stack actuators for laser beam tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Bian, Leixiang; An, Yi; Chen, Gangli; Rui, Xiaoting

    2015-07-01

    This paper outlines an optical beam steering system built using a two-axis fast steering mirror (FSM) with piezoelectric stack actuators to maintain precise pointing control. A novel mathematical model of the FSM is put forward by using a transfer matrix method of a multibody system to describe the dynamics characteristics and a hysteresis model to represent the hysteresis. Based on the proposed model, a model-based hybrid control is applied to force the output angle of the FSM to track the laser beam accurately thereafter. The experimental results are in accordance with the theoretical analysis. The results highlight significantly improved accuracy in the beam tracking control of the FSM.

  2. Bit error rate optimization of an acousto-optic tracking system for free-space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofka, J.; Nikulin, V.

    2006-02-01

    Optical communications systems have been gaining momentum with the increasing demand for transmission bandwidth in the last several years. Optical cable based solutions have become an attractive alternative to copper based system in the most bandwidth demanding applications due to increased bandwidth and longer inter-repeater distances. The promise of similar benefits over radio communications systems is driving the research into free space laser communications. Along with increased communications bandwidth, a free space laser communications system offers lower power consumption and the possibility for covert data links due to the concentration of the energy of the laser into a narrow beam. A narrow beam, however, results in a requirement for much more accurate and agile steering, so that a data link can be maintained in a scenario of communication platforms in relative motion or in the presence of vibrations. This paper presents a laser beam tracking system employing an acousto-optic cell capable of deflecting a laser beam at a very high rate (order of tens of kHz). The tracking system is subjected to vibrations to simulate a realistic implementation, resulting in the increase of BER. The performance of the system can be significantly improved through digital control. A constant gain controller is complemented by a Kalman filter the parameters of which are optimized to achieve the lowest possible BER for a given vibrations spectrum.

  3. Determination of polar motion and earth rotation from laser tracking of satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Dunn, P. J.; Torrence, M.

    1979-01-01

    Laser tracking of the Lageos spacecraft has been used to derive the position of the earth's pole of rotation at intervals during October, November and December 1976. The estimated precision of the results is 0.01 to 0.02 arcseconds in both x and y components, although the formal uncertainty is an order of magnitude better, and there is general agreement with the Bureau International de l'Heure smoothed pole path to about 0.02 arcseconds. Present orbit determination capability of Lageos is limited to about 25 cm rms fit to data over periods of 5 days and about 50 cm over 50 days. The present major sources of error in the perturbations of Lageos are earth and ocean tides followed by the earth's gravity field, and solar and earth reflected radiation pressure. Ultimate accuracy for polar motion and earth rotation from Lageos after improved modeling of the perturbing forces appears to be of order + or - 5 cm for polar motion over a period of about one day and about + or - 0.2 to + or - 0.3 milliseconds in UT for periods up to 2 or 3 months.

  4. Imaging biomolecular interactions by fast three-dimensional tracking of laser-confined carrier particles.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Volkmar; Wong, Wesley P; Halvorsen, Ken; Evans, Evan

    2008-02-19

    The quantitative study of the near-equilibrium structural behavior of individual biomolecules requires high-resolution experimental approaches with longtime stability. We present a new technique to explore the dynamics of weak intramolecular interactions. It is based on the analysis of the 3D Brownian fluctuations of a laser-confined glass bead that is tethered to a flat surface by the biomolecule of interest. A continuous autofocusing mechanism allows us to maintain or adjust the height of the optical trap with nanometer accuracy over long periods of time. The resulting remarkably stable trapping potential adds a well-defined femto-to-piconewton force bias to the energy landscape of molecular configurations. A combination of optical interferometry and advanced pattern-tracking algorithms provides the 3D bead positions with nanometer spatial and >120 Hz temporal resolution. The analysis of accumulated 3D positions has allowed us not only to identify small single biomolecules but also to characterize their nanomechanical behavior, for example, the force-extension relations of short oligonucleotides and the unfolding/refolding transitions of small protein tethers. PMID:18198910

  5. Speed quantification and tracking of moving objects in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Johnny; Roorda, Austin

    2011-03-01

    Microscopic features of the human retina can be resolved noninvasively using an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). We describe an improved method to track and quantify the speed of moving objects in AOSLO videos, which is necessary for characterizing the hemodynamics of retinal capillaries. During video acquisition, the objects of interest are in constant motion relative to the background tissue (object motion). The background tissue is in constant motion relative to the AOSLO, due to continuous eye motion during video recordings (eye motion). The location at which AOSLO acquires data is also in continuous motion, since the imaging source is swept in a raster scan across the retina (raster scanning). We show that it is important to take into consideration the combination of object motion, eye motion, and raster scanning for accurate quantification of object speeds. The proposed methods performed well on both experimental AOSLO videos as well as synthetic videos generated by a virtual AOSLO. These methods improve the accuracy of methods to investigate hemodynamics using AOSLO imaging.

  6. A pulsated weak-resonant-cavity laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking for injection-locked RZ transmission.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Liao, Yu-Sheng; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Liao, Zhi-Wang; Wang, Hai-Lin; Lin, Gong-Cheng

    2012-06-18

    By spectrally slicing a single longitudinal-mode from a master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking functions, the broadened self-injection-locking of a slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is demonstrated to achieve bi-directional transmission in a 200-GHz array-waveguide-grating channelized dense-wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical network system. Both the down- and up-stream slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are non-return-to-zero modulated below threshold and coherently injection-locked to deliver the pulsed carrier for 25-km bi-directional 2.5 Gbits/s return-to-zero transmission. The master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is gain-switched at near threshold condition and delivers an optical coherent pulse-train with its mode linewidth broadened from 0.2 to 0.8 nm by transient wavelength scanning, which facilitates the broadband injection-locking of the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes with a threshold current reducing by 10 mA. Such a transient wavelength scanning induced spectral broadening greatly releases the limitation on wavelength injection-locking range required for the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode. The theoretical modeling and numerical simulation on the wavelength scanning and tracking effects of the master and slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are performed. The receiving power sensitivity for back-to-back transmission at bit-error-rate <10(-10) is -25.6 dBm, and the power penalty added after 25-km transmission is less than 2 dB for all 16 channels. PMID:22714427

  7. Note: Reliable and non-contact 6D motion tracking system based on 2D laser scanners for cargo transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-10-15

    Maritime transportation demands an accurate measurement system to track the motion of oscillating container boxes in real time. However, it is a challenge to design a sensor system that can provide both reliable and non-contact methods of 6-DOF motion measurements of a remote object for outdoor applications. In the paper, a sensor system based on two 2D laser scanners is proposed for detecting the relative 6-DOF motion of a crane load in real time. Even without implementing a camera, the proposed system can detect the motion of a remote object using four laser beam points. Because it is a laser-based sensor, the system is expected to be highly robust to sea weather conditions.

  8. Note: Reliable and non-contact 6D motion tracking system based on 2D laser scanners for cargo transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Maritime transportation demands an accurate measurement system to track the motion of oscillating container boxes in real time. However, it is a challenge to design a sensor system that can provide both reliable and non-contact methods of 6-DOF motion measurements of a remote object for outdoor applications. In the paper, a sensor system based on two 2D laser scanners is proposed for detecting the relative 6-DOF motion of a crane load in real time. Even without implementing a camera, the proposed system can detect the motion of a remote object using four laser beam points. Because it is a laser-based sensor, the system is expected to be highly robust to sea weather conditions.

  9. Performance of free-space laser communication systems as a function of the sampling rate in the tracking loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, V.; Sofka, J.; Khandekar, R.

    2005-08-01

    Laser technology plays an ever-increasing role in aerospace and communication systems and is often viewed as a technology that has the potential for providing the material base for high-bandwidth applications. Laser provides the most logical connectivity channel for mobile systems requiring high data rates, low power consumption, covert operation, and high resistance to jamming. While advancements in modern opto-electronics have resulted in small size, reliable and power efficient lasers and modulators, successful operation of any communication technology hinges upon the ability to develop an equally advanced beam steering/positioning system. In many aerospace applications, when the transmitting optical platform is placed on board of an airplane, the ability to track the target is affected by the complex high-speed maneuvers performed by the aircraft and the resident vibration of the airframe. The tracking system must assure that in spite of the relative motion of both the transmitting and receiving stations and adverse environments, such as vibration, mutual alignment of two systems will be maintained to minimize communication errors. The work presented in this paper concentrates on the development of agile beam steering systems for laser communication terminals. Acousto-optic Bragg cells are used as deflectors while feedback information is generated by a quadrant detector. The control system is synthesized using a relatively simple constant-gain controller augmented with an adaptive Kalman filter to mitigate the effects of measurement noise in the tracking system. Laboratory experiments are conducted to investigate communication performance as a function of the sampling rate in the beam position feedback.

  10. Microstructure and wear resistance of Fe-based WC coating by multi-track overlapping laser induction hybrid rapid cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengfeng; Dai, Xiaoqin; Zheng, Haizhong

    2012-02-01

    The carck-free Fe-based +20 wt% WC coating with large area was produced by mutli-track overlapping laser induction hybrid rapid cladding. The results showed that the maximum laser scanning speed and the maximum feeding rate of powder can be increased to 3500 mm/min and 120 g/min, respectively. The cast WC particles were dissolved almost completely and had a worse wettability with Fe-based metal matrix. The precipitated carbides such as M 12C and M 23C 6 (M=Fe, W, Cr) formed an intergranular network around the primary Fe-based phase enriched with tungsten. The microhardness of coating decreased first, and then increased slightly with an increase in the track. The first track had the highest microhardness (i.e. 870HV 0.2). Moreover, the wear weight of coating approximately had a linear relationship with the sliding distance, and increased with an increase in the sliding speed. The wear rate approximately remained constant with an increase in the sliding distance and was two times lower than that of the hardened steel AISI 1045 with a hardness of 60HRC. The wear mechanism during the dry sliding wear was a combination of oxidation wear and abrasion wear.

  11. Tracking features in retinal images of adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope using KLT-SIFT algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2010-01-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), high-resolution microscopic imaging of living human retina in the single cell level has been achieved. In an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system, with a small field size (about 1 degree, 280 μm), the motion of the eye severely affects the stabilization of the real-time video images and results in significant distortions of the retina images. In this paper, Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) is used to abstract stable point features from the retina images. Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi(KLT) algorithm is applied to track the features. With the tracked features, the image distortion in each frame is removed by the second-order polynomial transformation, and 10 successive frames are co-added to enhance the image quality. Features of special interest in an image can also be selected manually and tracked by KLT. A point on a cone is selected manually, and the cone is tracked from frame to frame. PMID:21258443

  12. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Selective inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsen, K. T.; Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2008-06-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be inactivated by irradiation with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses at a moderate laser power density. By comparing the threshold laser power density for the inactivation of HIV with those of human red blood cells and mouse dendritic cells, we conclude that it is plausible to use the ultrashort pulsed laser to selectively inactivate blood-borne pathogens such as HIV while leaving sensitive materials like human red blood cells unharmed. This finding has important implications in the development of a new laser technology for disinfection of viral pathogens in blood products and in the clinic.

  13. Operational specifications of the L.I.T.E.S. (Laser Illuminated Track Etch Scattering) dosemeter reader.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M. E.; Devine, R. T.; Gepford, H. J.; McKeever, R. J.; Hoffman, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Personnel Dosimetry Operations Team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has accepted the LITES dosimeter reader into its suite of radiation dose measurement instruments. The LITES instrument transmits coherent light from a HeNe laser through the pertinent track etch foil and a photodiode measures the amount of light scattered by the etched tracks. A small beam stop blocks the main laser light, while a lens refocuses the scattered light into the photodiode. Three stepper motors in the current LITES system are used to position a carousel that holds 36 track etch dosimeters. Preliminary work with the LITES system demonstrated the device had a linear response in counting foils subjected to exposures up to 50 mSv (5.0 rem). The United States Department of Energy requires that annual general employee dose not exceed 50 mSv (5.0 rem). On a regular basis, LANL uses the Autoscan 60 reader system (Thermo Electron Corp.) for counting track etch dosimeters. However, LANL uses a 15 hour etch process for CR39 dosimeters, and this produces more and larger track etch pits than the 6 hour etch used by many institutions. Therefore, LANL only uses the Autoscan 60 for measuring neutron dose equivalent up to exposure levels of about 3 mSv (300 mrem). The LITES system has a measured lower limit of detection (LLD) of about 0.6 mSv (60 mrem), and it has a correlation coefficient of R{sup 2} = 0.99 over an exposure range up to 500 mSv (50.0 rem). A series of blind studies were done using three methods: the Autoscan 60 system, manual counting by optical microscope, and the LITES instrument. A collection of track etch dosimeters of unknown NDE (neutron dose equivalent) were analyzed using the three methods, and the (PC) performance coefficient was calculated when the NDE became known. The Autoscan 60 and optical microscope methods had a combined PC = 0.171, and the LITES instrument had a PC = 0.194, where a PC less than or equal to 0.300 is considered satisfactory.

  14. Computational modeling and experimental based parametric study of multi-track laser processing on alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncayo, Marco A.; Santhanakrishnan, Soundarapandian; Vora, Hitesh D.; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, both heat transfer modeling (COMSOL Multiphysics®) and experimental investigations were used to obtain the threshold multiple laser scanning processing parameters (laser power, scanning speed, fill space) for achieving more multi-faceted grains on the alumina's surface. An ytterbium doped Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) was used to perform the experiments for the designed processing conditions such as 32-127×106 J/m2 laser energy densities with fill space values of 3-6×10-4 m. The SEM, EDX and wear results were used to quantify the effect of multiple laser processing variables on the change of microstructures (coarse grains, dendrite, multi-faceted grains) for obtaining the best processing conditions. By controlling the laser energy density with fill space, more multi-faceted grains and high wear resistance were achieved as the essential features for improving the abrasive quality.

  15. Consideration of coordinated solar tracking of an array of compact solar-pumped lasers combined with photovoltaic cells for electricity generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Ichiki, Akihisa; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Ito, Tadashi; Kajino, Tsutomu; Takeda, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Kazuo

    2015-08-01

    A monochromatic laser light with a photon energy just above the band edge of photovoltaic cells can be converted into electricity with minimal thermal loss. To attain efficient conversion of sunlight to laser light, a coordinated solar tracking system for an array of originally designed compact solar-pumped lasers of 50 mm aperture diameter is being constructed. As for the feasibility of this system, a prototype with a holding capacity of 25 compact solar-pumped lasers has been fabricated. The primary requisite of this system is that the angular accuracy of tracking should be below 1 mrad for all 25 compact solar-pumped lasers to sustain their continuous lasing. To realize this, imperative challenges have been elucidated including thermal expansion under sunlight. A prototype fabricated with its main frame made of Super Invar alloy was found to fulfill the requisite by measurement using a three-dimensional coordinate measuring machine.

  16. Co-registration of Laser Altimeter Tracks with Digital Terrain Models and Applications in Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaeser, P.; Haase, I.; Oberst, J.; Neumann, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    We have derived algorithms and techniques to precisely co-register laser altimeter profiles with gridded Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), typically derived from stereo images. The algorithm consists of an initial grid search followed by a least-squares matching and yields the translation parameters at sub-pixel level needed to align the DTM and the laser profiles in 3D space. This software tool was primarily developed and tested for co-registration of laser profiles from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) with DTMs derived from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) stereo images. Data sets can be co-registered with positional accuracy between 0.13 m and several meters depending on the pixel resolution and amount of laser shots, where rough surfaces typically result in more accurate co-registrations. Residual heights of the data sets are as small as 0.18 m. The software can be used to identify instrument misalignment, orbit errors, pointing jitter, or problems associated with reference frames being used. Also, assessments of DTM effective resolutions can be obtained. From the correct position between the two data sets, comparisons of surface morphology and roughness can be made at laser footprint- or DTM pixel-level. The precise co-registration allows us to carry out joint analysis of the data sets and ultimately to derive merged high-quality data products. Examples of matching other planetary data sets, like LOLA with LRO Wide Angle Camera (WAC) DTMs or Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) with stereo models from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) as well as Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) with Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) are shown to demonstrate the broad science applications of the software tool.

  17. Co-registration of laser altimeter tracks with digital terrain models and applications in planetary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gläser, P.; Haase, I.; Oberst, J.; Neumann, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have derived algorithms and techniques to precisely co-register laser altimeter profiles with gridded Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), typically derived from stereo images. The algorithm consists of an initial grid search followed by a least-squares matching and yields the translation parameters at sub-pixel level needed to align the DTM and the laser profiles in 3D space. This software tool was primarily developed and tested for co-registration of laser profiles from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) with DTMs derived from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) stereo images. Data sets can be co-registered with positional accuracy between 0.13 m and several meters depending on the pixel resolution and amount of laser shots, where rough surfaces typically result in more accurate co-registrations. Residual heights of the data sets are as small as 0.18 m. The software can be used to identify instrument misalignment, orbit errors, pointing jitter, or problems associated with reference frames being used. Also, assessments of DTM effective resolutions can be obtained. From the correct position between the two data sets, comparisons of surface morphology and roughness can be made at laser footprint- or DTM pixel-level. The precise co-registration allows us to carry out joint analysis of the data sets and ultimately to derive merged high-quality data products. Examples of matching other planetary data sets, like LOLA with LRO Wide Angle Camera (WAC) DTMs or Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) with stereo models from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) as well as Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) with Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) are shown to demonstrate the broad science applications of the software tool.

  18. Adaptive tracking and compensation of laser spot based on ant colony optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lihong; Ke, Xizheng; Bai, Runbing; Hu, Qidi

    2009-05-01

    Because the effect of atmospheric scattering and atmospheric turbulence on laser signal of atmospheric absorption,laser spot twinkling, beam drift and spot split-up occur ,when laser signal transmits in the atmospheric channel. The phenomenon will be seriously affects the stability and the reliability of laser spot receiving system. In order to reduce the influence of atmospheric turbulence, we adopt optimum control thoughts in the field of artificial intelligence, propose a novel adaptive optical control technology-- model-free optimized adaptive control technology, analyze low-order pattern wave-front error theory, in which an -adaptive optical system is employed to adjust errors, and design its adaptive structure system. Ant colony algorithm is the control core algorithm, which is characteristic of positive feedback, distributed computing and greedy heuristic search. . The ant colony algorithm optimization of adaptive optical phase compensation is simulated. Simulation result shows that, the algorithm can effectively control laser energy distribution, improve laser light beam quality, and enhance signal-to-noise ratio of received signal.

  19. LDRD Final Report for''Tactical Laser Weapons for Defense'' SI (Tracking Code 01-SI-011)

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Zapata, L

    2002-01-30

    The focus of this project was a convincing demonstration of two new technological approaches to high beam quality; high average power solid-state laser systems that would be of interest for tactical laser weapon applications. Two pathways had been identified to such systems that built on existing thin disk and fiber laser technologies. This SI was used as seed funding to further develop and vet these ideas. Significantly, the LLNL specific enhancements to these proposed technology paths were specifically addressed for devising systems scaleable to the 100 kW average power level. In the course of performing this work we have established an intellectual property base that protects and distinguishes us from other competitive approaches to the same end.

  20. Laser Ranging for Effective and Accurate Tracking of Space Debris in Low Earth Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Guillaume; Haag, Herve; Hennegrave, Laurent; Assemat, Francois; Vial, Sophie; Samain, Etienne

    2013-08-01

    The paper presents the results of preliminary design options for an operational laser ranging system adapted to the measurement of the distance of space debris. Thorough analysis of the operational parameters is provided with identification of performance drivers and assessment of enabling design options. Results from performance simulation demonstrate how the range measurement enables improvement of the orbit determination when combined with astrometry. Besides, experimental results on rocket-stage class debris in LEO were obtained by Astrium beginning of 2012, in collaboration with the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA), by operating an experimental laser ranging system supported by the MéO (Métrologie Optique) telescope.

  1. Adapting a ground-based laser ranging system at NASA-GSFC for identification and tracking of orbital debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, D. B.; Stysley, Paul R.; McGarry, Jan F.; Hull, Scott M.; Getzandanner, Kenneth M.; Young, Romae P.

    2013-05-01

    The mitigation of orbital debris was addressed in the most recent release of the National Space Policy directing space faring agencies to pursue technologies that will "mitigate and remove on-orbit debris." No matter what abatement technology is developed and deployed, still lacking is the remote sensing infrastructure to locate and track these objects with adequate precision. We propose using GSFC's ground-based laser ranging facility to provide meter-level or better ranging precision on optically passive 10-30 cm orbital debris targets with the goal of improving current predictions up to 85%. The improved location accuracy also has the immediate benefit of reducing costly false alarms in collision predictions for existing assets.

  2. Conceptual Design for Expert Centres Supporting Optical and Laser Observations in a Space Surveillance and Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flohrer, T.

    One of the goals of ESA's SSA Programme in the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) segment is the successful establishment of expert centres for optical and laser observations. These centres will serve as the focal point for the interfacing with segment-external sensors and assets. They will also provide feedback on the provided data and will be able to request and manage observations. Benefits are expected in the coordination and monitoring of sensors and data providers, as well as through the expert support provision to the SST segment, such as in particular for sensor qualification and calibration. The establishment of the expert centres will have a strong technological focus on the complex networking and integration of heterogeneous sensors in a coherent SST segment, for which the enormous expertise that is available in Europe will be used. We report on the requirements analysis and the plans for the establishment of the centre,that is expected to start in 2015.

  3. Seam tracking with adaptive image capture for fine-tuning of a high power laser welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahdenoja, Olli; Säntti, Tero; Laiho, Mika; Paasio, Ari; Poikonen, Jonne K.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the development of methods for real-time fine-tuning of a high power laser welding process of thick steel by using a compact smart camera system. When performing welding in butt-joint configuration, the laser beam's location needs to be adjusted exactly according to the seam line in order to allow the injected energy to be absorbed uniformly into both steel sheets. In this paper, on-line extraction of seam parameters is targeted by taking advantage of a combination of dynamic image intensity compression, image segmentation with a focal-plane processor ASIC, and Hough transform on an associated FPGA. Additional filtering of Hough line candidates based on temporal windowing is further applied to reduce unrealistic frame-to-frame tracking variations. The proposed methods are implemented in Matlab by using image data captured with adaptive integration time. The simulations are performed in a hardware oriented way to allow real-time implementation of the algorithms on the smart camera system.

  4. Tracking System for Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Webster, C. R.; Menzies, R. T.; Morrison, G. B.; Riccio, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Visible laser tracking system for infrared laser spectometer keeps probe infrared laser beam aimed at moving reflector, thereby keeping reflector image and return laser beam within spectrometer field of view. System includes tracking mirror tilted by stepping motors under microprocessor control to deflect beams toward continually changing reflector position.

  5. Control of a pointing, acquisition, and tracking subsystem for intersatellite laser links ISL2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, R.; Kuel, U.; Hettlage, E.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the dynamical requirements determined for a CO2 lasercom system can be met with the fine pointing assembly (FPA) and the coarse pointing assembly (CPA) described here. The implemented control loops and the corresponding control logic provide the PAT subsystem with a high bandwidth and a short transition time from the acquisition to the tracking mode. It is demonstrated that the maximum angular rate of the LOS in connection with the maximum slew rate of the CPA and the magnification factor of the telescope determine the area around the singular point which the FPA must be able to cover.

  6. Influences of single laser tracks' space on the rolling fatigue contact of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-kai; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Hai-feng; Yang, Wan-shi; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Lu-quan

    2015-09-01

    To improve the fatigue wear resistance of gray cast iron, the surface is modified by Nd:YAG laser to imitate the unique surface of soil creatures (alternative soft and hard phases). After laser treatment, the remelting region is the named unit which is mainly characterized of compact and refinement grains. In the present work, the influence of the unit space on the fatigue wear resistance is experimentally studied. The optimum space is proven to be 2 mm according to the tested results and two kinds of delamination are observed on samples' worn surface. Subsequently, the mechanisms of fatigue wear resistance improvement are suggested: (i) for microscopic behavior, the bionic unit not only delays the initiation of microcracks, but also significantly obstructs the propagation of cracks; (ii) for macroscopic behavior, the hard phase resists the deformation and the soft phase releases the deformation.

  7. Tracking of buried layers during plasma-assisted femtosecond laser drilling of compound targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhvaniya, I. A.; Garmatina, A. A.; Makarov, I. A.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    It was shown that drilling of multi-layered target placed in the air by tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation with high fluence (up to 1000 J/cm2) can be monitored online using plasma-induced X-ray emission and second harmonic of incident laser radiation. The technique based on X-rays registration is appeared to be more flexible than the method based on detection of second harmonic since its accuracy depends crucially on the target type. We demonstrated that the X-ray signal clearly indicates the transition from one layer to another during the microdrilling of targets consisting of 2-4 layers of titanium foil when a laser beam is focused beneath the target surface at a depth comparable to the layer thickness. The diagnostics of microchannel production in the chicken eggshell was performed for the first time. It was found that the presence of albumen beneath the shell accounts for longtime generation of X-ray pulses.

  8. A ground track control algorithm for the Topographic Mapping Laser Altimeter (TMLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, V.; Mcintosh, R.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    The results of an analysis of an algorithm that will provide autonomous onboard orbit control using orbits determined with Global Positioning System (GPS) data. The algorithm uses the GPS data to (1) compute the ground track error relative to a fixed longitude grid, and (2) determine the altitude adjustment required to correct the longitude error. A program was written on a personal computer (PC) to test the concept for numerous altitudes and values of solar flux using a simplified orbit model including only the J sub 2 zonal harmonic and simple orbit decay computations. The algorithm was then implemented in a precision orbit propagation program having a full range of perturbations. The analysis showed that, even with all perturbations (including actual time histories of solar flux variation), the algorithm could effectively control the spacecraft ground track and yield more than 99 percent Earth coverage in the time required to complete one coverage cycle on the fixed grid (220 to 230 days depending on altitude and overlap allowance).

  9. Advanced laser-based tracking device for motor vehicle lane position monitoring and steering assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachalo, William D.; Inenaga, Andrew; Schuler, Carlos A.

    1995-12-01

    Aerometrics is developing an innovative laser-diode based device that provides a warning signal when a motor-vehicle deviates from the center of the lane. The device is based on a sensor that scans the roadway on either side of the vehicle and determines the lateral position relative to the existing painted lines marking the lane. No additional markings are required. A warning is used to alert the driver of excessive weaving or unanticipated departure from the center of the lane. The laser beams are at invisible wavelengths to that operation of the device does not pose a distraction to the driver or other motorists: When appropriate markers are not present on the road, the device is capable of detecting this condition and warn the driver. The sensor system is expected to work well irrespective of ambient light levels, fog and rain. This sensor has enormous commercial potential. It could be marketed as an instrument to warn drivers that they are weaving, used as a research tool to monitor driving patterns, be required equipment for those previously convicted of driving under the influence, or used as a backup sensor for vehicle lateral position control. It can also be used in storage plants to guide robotic delivery vehicles. In this paper, the principles of operation of the sensor, and the results of Aerometrics ongoing testing will be presented.

  10. Diffused transmission of laser beam and image processing tools for alpha-particle track-etch dosimetry in PM-355 SSNTDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Thaer M.; AL-Ahmad, Alaa Y.; Badran, Hussain A.; Emshary, Chassib A.

    2015-08-01

    The present study introduces an optical as well as image processing method that is effective in the study of PM-355 solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTDs) irradiated with α-particles at different times. Laser light with Gaussian extent and 635 nm wavelength is used to accomplish this goal. An imaging processing technique is utilized for the study of the nature and characteristics of a transmitted laser beam through PM-355 SSNTDs. Semi-empirical formulas are obtained which can be used as guide lines to calculate unknown dose. The present method is effective and simple and demands no sophisticated tool methods.

  11. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  12. Comparative study on the intracavity frequency-doubling 532 nm laser based on gray-tracking-resistant KTP and conventional KTP.

    PubMed

    Huang, H-T; Qiu, G; Zhang, B-T; He, J-L; Yang, J-F; Xu, J-L

    2009-11-10

    A comparative study of a frequency-doubling 532 nm laser based on gray-tracking-resistant KTP (GTR-KTP) and conventional KTP is presented. The intracavity GTR-KTP was proved to have better temperature characteristics than that of conventional KTP. Within the normalized output power variation range of 0.8-1.0, GTR-KTP has a temperature tolerance of 35 degrees C, broader than the 21 degrees C obtained with conventional KTP. Under the laser diode (LD) pump power of 180 W, the maximum average output power at 532 nm was 40.6 W for GTR-KTP at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz. In the case of conventional KTP, the maximum available LD pump power was limited to 150 W, with the corresponding maximum green average output power of 27.2 W. PMID:19904338

  13. Prototype of a coherent tracking and detection receiver with wideband vibration compensation for free-space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giggenbach, Dirk; Schex, Anton; Wandernoth, Bernhard

    1996-04-01

    The Optical Communications Group of the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) has investigated the feasibility of a fiberless receiver telescope for high sensitive coherent optical space communication, resulting in an elegant pointing, acquisition and tracking (PAT) concept. To demonstrate the feasibility of this new concept, an optical receiver terminal that coherently obtains both the spatial error signal for tracking and the data signal with only one set of detectors has been built. The result is a very simple and compact setup with few optical surfaces. It does not require fibers for superpositioning and is capable to compensate for microaccelerations up to about one kilohertz.

  14. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  15. A novel micro-processing of waveguide coupler in birefringent crystal by twin tracks of single-scan femtosecond laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chen; Vázquez de Aldana, J. R.; Chen, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Through a novel micro-processing mechanism in birefringent crystals proposed in this work, a coupler containing twin depressed cladding waveguides have been achieved in Nd:GdVO4 laser crystals. By employing single-scan of femtosecond laser writing, twin tracks with different depths separated by a distance of 70μm were produced due to the birefringence of Nd:GdVO4 crystal. The adjacent 30μm-diameter cladding waveguides, which consist of a 2×2 coupler with a separation of 70μm in a 4-mm-long crystal sample, were inscribed simultaneously. The ratio of output power division from both waveguides was approximately 10.5:1 at 633nm. Continuous-wave lasing was realized in the waveguide coupler platform under the direct optical pump at 808nm. This work indicates a great potential for femtosecond laser inscribed symmetry structures such as waveguide couplers in birefringent crystals based on the proposed micro-processing mechanism.

  16. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Inhomogeneous charge redistribution in Xe clusters exposed to an intense extreme ultraviolet free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwayama, H.; Sugishima, A.; Nagaya, K.; Yao, M.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Liu, X.-J.; Yamada, A.; Wang, C.; Ueda, K.; Saito, N.; Nagasono, M.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Ohashi, H.; Kimura, H.; Togashi, T.

    2010-08-01

    The emission of highly charged ions from Xe clusters exposed to intense extreme ultraviolet laser pulses (λ ~ 52 nm) from the free electron laser in Japan was investigated using ion momentum spectroscopy. With increasing average cluster size, we observed multiply charged ions Xez + up to z = 3. From kinetic energy distributions, we found that multiply charged ions were generated near the cluster surface. Our results suggest that charges are inhomogeneously redistributed in the cluster to lower the total energy stored in the clusters.

  17. Source Tracking of Nitrous Oxide using A Quantum Cascade Laser System in the Field and Laboratory Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance. Nitrification and denitrification are two major biological pathways that are responsible for soil emissions of N2O. However, source tracking of in-situ or laboratory N2O production is still challenging to...

  18. A study of the effect of gamma and laser irradiation on the thermal, optical and structural properties of CR-39 nuclear track detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouh, S. A.; Atta, M. R.; El-Melleegy, W. M.

    2004-08-01

    A comparative study of the effect of gamma and laser irradiation on the thermal, optical and structural properties of the CR-39 diglycol carbonate solid state nuclear track detector has been carried out. Samples from CR-39 polymer were classified into two main groups: the first group was irradiated by gamma rays with doses at levels between 20 and 300 kGy, whereas the second group was exposed to infrared laser radiation with energy fluences at levels between 0.71 and 8.53 J/cm(2). Non-isothermal studies were carried out using thermogravimetry, differential thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis to obtain activation energy of decomposition and transition temperatures for the non-irradiated and all irradiated CR-39 samples. In addition, optical and structural property studies were performed on non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples using refractive index and X-ray diffraction measurements. Variation in the onset temperature of decomposition T-o, activation energy of decomposition E-a, melting temperature T-m, refractive index n and the mass fraction of the amorphous phase after gamma and laser irradiation were studied. It was found that many changes in the thermal, optical and structural properties of the CR-39 polymer could be produced by gamma irradiation via degradation and cross-linking mechanisms. Also, the gamma dose has an advantage of increasing the correlation between thermal stability of the CR-39 polymer and bond formation created by the ionizing effect of gamma radiation. On the other hand, higher laser-energy fluences in the range 4.27-8.53 J/cm(2) decrease the melting temperature of the CR-39 polymer and this is most suitable for applications requiring molding of the polymer at lower temperatures.

  19. Correction of laser tracking data for the effects of horizontal refractivity gradients. [in ranging satellite from earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    Pulsed laser ranging systems are being used to measure accurately the distance from the earth to retroreflector equipped satellites. At the lower elevation angles horizontal refractivity gradients can introduce centimeter level errors into the range measurements. A correction formula which compensates for the gradient effects is developed and evaluated using typical meteorological data obtained from weather stations located near Washington, D.C.

  20. Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation in microbial communities using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Doll, Charles G.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-08-25

    This is a manuscript we would like to submit for publication in Environmental Microbiology Reports. This manuscript contains a description of a laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodology developed at PNNL and applied to a microbial system at a PNNL project location – Hot Lake, Washington. I will submit a word document containing the entire manuscript with this Erica input request form.

  1. Preliminary results of tracked photorefractive keratectomy (T-PRK) for mild to moderate myopia with the autonomous technologies excimer laser at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguen, Ezra I.; Salz, James J.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    1997-05-01

    Preliminary results of the correction of myopia up to -7.00 D by tracked photorefractive keratectomy (T-PRK) with a scanning and tracking excimer laser by Autonomous Technologies are discussed. 41 eyes participated (20 males). 28 eyes were evaluated one month postop. At epithelization day mean uncorrected vision was 20/45.3. At one month postop, 92.8 of eyes were 20/40 and 46.4% were 20/20. No eye was worse than 20/50. 75% of eyes were within +/- 0.5 D of emmetropia and 82% were within +/- 1.00 D of emmetropia. Eyes corrected for monovision were included. One eye lost 3 lines of best corrected vision, and had more than 1.00 D induced astigmatism due to a central corneal ulcer. Additional complications included symptomatic recurrent corneal erosions which were controlled with topical hypertonic saline. T-PRK appears to allow effective correction of low to moderate myopia. Further study will establish safety and efficacy of the procedure.

  2. Optical vortex tracking studies of a horizontal axis wind turbine in yaw using laser-sheet, flow visualisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, I.; Parkin, P.; Wang, X.

    Experimental studies have been conducted on a 0.9 m diameter, horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) placed in the open jet of a closed return wind tunnel. The turbine was tested in a three blade and a two blade configuration. The power coefficient of the turbine was measured and wake flow studies conducted for a range of yawed flows by tilting the rotor plane at various angles up to 30° to the incident wind direction. The motion of the shed vorticity was followed using laser-sheet flow visualisation with the overall wake deflection being measured. The results were compared with theoretical predictions and with studies conducted elsewhere.

  3. Preliminary results of tracked laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (T-LASIK) for myopia and hyperopia using the autonomous technologies excimer laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguen, Ezra I.; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Salz, James J.

    2000-06-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the safety and efficacy of LASIK with the LADARVision laser by Autonomous Technologies, (Orlando, FL). The study included four subsets: Spherical myopia -- up to -11.00D, spherical hyperopia -- up to +6.00D. Both myopic and hyperopic astigmatism could be corrected, up to 6.00D of astigmatism. A total of 105 patients participated. Sixty-six patients were myopic and 39 were hyperopic. The mean (+/- SD) age was 42.8 +/- 9.3 years for myopia and 53.2 +/- 9.9 years for hyperopia. At 3 months postop. Sixty-one myopic eyes were available for evaluation. Uncorrected visual acuity was 20/20 in 70% of eyes and 20/40 in 92.9% of all eyes. The refractive outcome was within +/- 0.50D in 73.8% of eyes and within +/- 1.00D in 96.7 of eyes. Thirty-eight hyperopic eyes were available. Uncorrected visual acuity was 20/20 in 42.1% of eyes and 20/40 in 88% of all eyes. The refractive outcome was within +/- 0.50D in 57.9% of eyes and within +/- 1.00D in 86.8% of eyes. Complications were not sight threatening and were discussed in detail. Lasik with the LADARVision laser appears to be safe and effective.

  4. Terrestrial laser scanning point clouds time series for the monitoring of slope movements: displacement measurement using image correlation and 3D feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Pierrick; Jean-Philippe, Malet; André, Stumpf; Anne, Puissant; Julien, Travelletti

    2016-04-01

    Dense multi-temporal point clouds acquired with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) have proved useful for the study of structure and kinematics of slope movements. Most of the existing deformation analysis methods rely on the use of interpolated data. Approaches that use multiscale image correlation provide a precise and robust estimation of the observed movements; however, for non-rigid motion patterns, these methods tend to underestimate all the components of the movement. Further, for rugged surface topography, interpolated data introduce a bias and a loss of information in some local places where the point cloud information is not sufficiently dense. Those limits can be overcome by using deformation analysis exploiting directly the original 3D point clouds assuming some hypotheses on the deformation (e.g. the classic ICP algorithm requires an initial guess by the user of the expected displacement patterns). The objective of this work is therefore to propose a deformation analysis method applied to a series of 20 3D point clouds covering the period October 2007 - October 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (South East French Alps). The dense point clouds have been acquired with a terrestrial long-range Optech ILRIS-3D laser scanning device from the same base station. The time series are analyzed using two approaches: 1) a method of correlation of gradient images, and 2) a method of feature tracking in the raw 3D point clouds. The estimated surface displacements are then compared with GNSS surveys on reference targets. Preliminary results tend to show that the image correlation method provides a good estimation of the displacement fields at first order, but shows limitations such as the inability to track some deformation patterns, and the use of a perspective projection that does not maintain original angles and distances in the correlated images. Results obtained with 3D point clouds comparison algorithms (C2C, ICP, M3C2) bring additional information on the

  5. Tracking isotopic signatures of CO2 at the high altitude site Jungfraujoch with laser spectroscopy: analytical improvements and representative results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, P.; Tuzson, B.; Henne, S.; Emmenegger, L.

    2013-07-01

    We present the continuous data record of atmospheric CO2 isotopes measured by laser absorption spectroscopy for an almost four year period at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.), Switzerland. The mean annual cycles derived from data of December 2008 to September 2012 exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of 11.0 μmol mol-1 for CO2, 0.60‰ for δ13C and 0.81‰ for δ18O. The high temporal resolution of the measurements also allow us to capture variations on hourly and diurnal timescales. For CO2 the mean diurnal peak-to-peak amplitude is about 1 μmol mol-1 in spring, autumn and winter and about 2 μmol mol-1 in summer. The mean diurnal variability in the isotope ratios is largest during the summer months too, with an amplitude of about 0.1‰ both in the δ13C and δ18O, and a smaller or no discernible diurnal cycle during the other seasons. The day-to-day variability, however, is much larger and depends on the origin of the air masses arriving at Jungfraujoch. Backward Lagrangian particle dispersion model simulations revealed a close link between air composition and prevailing transport regimes and could be used to explain part of the observed variability in terms of transport history and influence region. A footprint clustering showed significantly different wintertime CO2, δ13C and δ18O values depending on the origin and surface residence times of the air masses. Several major updates on the instrument and the calibration procedures were performed in order to further improve the data quality. We describe the new measurement and calibration setup in detail and demonstrate the enhanced performance of the analyzer. A measurement precision of about 0.02‰ for both isotope ratios has been obtained for an averaging time of 10 min, while the accuracy was estimated to be 0.1‰, including the uncertainty of the calibration gases.

  6. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification

    SciTech Connect

    Baccou, C. Yahia, V.; Labaune, C.; Depierreux, S.; Neuville, C.; Goyon, C.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Ducret, J. E.; Boutoux, G.; Rafelski, J.

    2015-08-15

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state.

  7. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification.

    PubMed

    Baccou, C; Yahia, V; Depierreux, S; Neuville, C; Goyon, C; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Ducret, J E; Boutoux, G; Rafelski, J; Labaune, C

    2015-08-01

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state. PMID:26329181

  8. Position and orientation tracking system

    DOEpatents

    Burks, Barry L.; DePiero, Fred W.; Armstrong, Gary A.; Jansen, John F.; Muller, Richard C.; Gee, Timothy F.

    1998-01-01

    A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning appaus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle.

  9. Position and orientation tracking system

    DOEpatents

    Burks, B.L.; DePiero, F.W.; Armstrong, G.A.; Jansen, J.F.; Muller, R.C.; Gee, T.F.

    1998-05-05

    A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning apparatus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle. 14 figs.

  10. Elemental bioimaging of thulium in mouse tissues by laser ablation-ICPMS as a complementary method to heteronuclear proton magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking experiments.

    PubMed

    Reifschneider, Olga; Wentker, Kristina S; Strobel, Klaus; Schmidt, Rebecca; Masthoff, Max; Sperling, Michael; Faber, Cornelius; Karst, Uwe

    2015-04-21

    Due to the fact that cellular therapies are increasingly finding application in clinical trials and promise success by treatment of fatal diseases, monitoring strategies to investigate the delivery of the therapeutic cells to the target organs are getting more and more into the focus of modern in vivo imaging methods. In order to monitor the distribution of the respective cells, they can be labeled with lanthanide complexes such as thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclodoecane-α,α,α,α-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (Tm(DOTMA)). In this study, experiments on a mouse model with two different cell types, namely, tumor cells and macrophages labeled with Tm(DOTMA), were performed. The systemic distribution of Tm(DOTMA) of both cell types was investigated by means of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Using the high resolution of 25 μm, distribution maps of Tm in different tissues such as tumor, liver, lung, and spleen as well as in explanted gel pellets were generated and the behavior of the labeled cells inside the tissue was investigated. Additionally, quantitative data were obtained using homemade matrix-matched standards based on egg yolk. Using this approach, limits of detection and quantification of 2.2 and 7.4 ng·g(-1), respectively, and an excellent linearity over the concentration range from 0.01 to 46 μg·g(-1) was achieved. The highest concentration of the label agent, 32.4 μg·g(-1), in tumor tissue was observed in the area of the injection of the labeled tumor cells. Regarding the second experiment with macrophages for cell tracking, Tm was detected in the explanted biogell pellet with relatively low concentrations below 60 ng·g(-1) and in the liver with a relatively high concentration of 10 μg·g(-1). Besides thulium, aluminum was detected with equal distribution behavior in the tumor section due to a contamination resulting from the labeling procedure, which includes the usage of an Al electrode. PMID:25791208

  11. Derailing Tracking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Reviews recent research on student achievement, self-concept, and curriculum and instruction showing the ineffectiveness of tracking and ability grouping. Certain court rulings show that tracking violates the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Innovative alternatives include cooperative learning, mastery learning, peer tutoring,…

  12. Beyond Tracking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Percy; And Others

    1992-01-01

    On the surface, educational tracking may seem like a useful tool for allowing students to work at their own pace, and to avoid discouraging competition, but abuses of the tracking idea have arisen through biased placement practices that have denied equal access to education for minority students. The articles in this issue explore a number of…

  13. Laser jamming technique research based on combined fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Xu; Shanghong, Zhao; Rui, Hou; Shengbao, Zhan; Lei, Shi; Jili, Wu; Shaoqiang, Fang; Yongjun, Li

    2009-06-01

    A compact and light laser jamming source is needed to increase the flexibility of laser jamming technique. A novel laser jamming source based on combined fiber lasers is proposed. Preliminary experimental results show that power levels in excess of 10 kW could be achieved. An example of laser jamming used for an air-to-air missile is given. It shows that the tracking system could complete tracking in only 4 s and came into a steady state with its new tracking target being the laser jamming source.

  14. Rover tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Tracks made by the Sojourner rover are visible in this image, taken by one of the cameras aboard Sojourner on Sol 3. The tracks represent the rover maneuvering towards the rock dubbed 'Barnacle Bill.' The rover, having exited the lander via the rear ramp, first traveled towards the right portion of the image, and then moved forward towards the left where Barnacle Bill sits. The fact that the rover was making defined tracks indicates that the soil is made up of particles on a micron scale.

    Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  16. Optical memory system having track following

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, D.; LaBudde, E.V.

    1984-02-14

    A high density optical storage system is disclosed which employs a laser beam for reading data in a track on a rotating optical disk containing a large number of concentric tracks. Track following is provided using a galvanometer-controlled mirror in the path of the beam which is angularly deflected during track following in response to detected track deviations, whereby the beam is controlled to accurately follow the track. Provision is also made for detecting the angular position of the mirror. A linear motor responsive to the detected angular position moves the mirror in a direction which reduces the deflection required to be provided by the mirror in order to maintain the beam accurately following the track. The mirror is also controlled in response to the rate of change of the linear motor velocity for providing greater system stability.

  17. Doppler tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher Jacob

    This study addresses the development of a methodology using the Doppler Effect for high-resolution, short-range tracking of small projectiles and vehicles. Minimal impact on the design of the moving object is achieved by incorporating only a transmitter in it and using ground stations for all other components. This is particularly useful for tracking objects such as sports balls that have configurations and materials that are not conducive to housing onboard instrumentation. The methodology developed here uses four or more receivers to monitor a constant frequency signal emitted by the object. Efficient and accurate schemes for filtering the raw signals, determining the instantaneous frequencies, time synching the frequencies from each receiver, smoothing the synced frequencies, determining the relative velocity and radius of the object and solving the nonlinear system of equations for object position in three dimensions as a function of time are developed and described here.

  18. The Right Track for Vision Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    More and more people are putting away their eyeglasses and contact lenses as a result of laser vision correction surgery. LASIK, the most widely performed version of this surgical procedure, improves vision by reshaping the cornea, the clear front surface of the eye, using an excimer laser. One excimer laser system, Alcon s LADARVision 4000, utilizes a laser radar (LADAR) eye tracking device that gives it unmatched precision. During LASIK surgery, laser During LASIK surgery, laser pulses must be accurately placed to reshape the cornea. A challenge to this procedure is the patient s constant eye movement. A person s eyes make small, involuntary movements known as saccadic movements about 100 times per second. Since the saccadic movements will not stop during LASIK surgery, most excimer laser systems use an eye tracking device that measures the movements and guides the placement of the laser beam. LADARVision s eye tracking device stems from the LADAR technology originally developed through several Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with NASA s Johnson Space Center and the U.S. Department of Defense s Ballistic Missile Defense Office (BMDO). In the 1980s, Johnson awarded Autonomous Technologies Corporation a Phase I SBIR contract to develop technology for autonomous rendezvous and docking of space vehicles to service satellites. During Phase II of the Johnson SBIR contract, Autonomous Technologies developed a prototype range and velocity imaging LADAR to demonstrate technology that could be used for this purpose.

  19. Laser radar improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelalian, A. V.

    1981-11-01

    A short history of the uses of various laser radars is presented, and appropriate applications of laser and microwave radars are discussed. CO2 laser radar, operating at 10.6 microns, is considered for use in aircraft navigation systems, fire-control systems for armored vehicle and aircraft, missile guidance, severe storm research, line-of-sight command of missiles, wind turbine site surveys, clear-air turbulence monitors for aircraft, and satellite tracking. Microwave radar is all-weather, but is subject to multipath inaccuracies, countermeasures, and angular resolution limitations, so hybrid laser microwave systems look promising for microwave target acquisition and laser tracking. Advantages and disadvantages of the use of ruby, YAG, and CO2 lasers in varying atmospheric conditions are discussed. Development of a laser radar pod for obstacle detection, Doppler navigation, automatic terrain following, hover control, weapon delivery, and precision searching is noted.

  20. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Photoelectron spectroscopy of sequential three-photon double ionization of Ar irradiated by EUV free-electron laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, H.; Gryzlova, E. V.; Motomura, K.; Yamada, A.; Ueda, K.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Strakhova, S. I.; Nagaya, K.; Sugishima, A.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Iwayama, H.; Yao, M.; Saito, N.; Piseri, P.; Mazza, T.; Devetta, M.; Coreno, M.; Nagasono, M.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Ohashi, H.; Kimura, H.; Togashi, T.; Senba, Y.

    2010-06-01

    We have investigated the ionization of the Ar atom by 51 nm extreme-ultraviolet light pulses at the free-electron laser facility, SPring-8 Compact SASE Source test accelerator, in Japan. The angle-resolved photoelectron spectra contain lines due to sequential three-photon double ionization with the second ionization step proceeding via the resonantly enhanced two-photon absorption. The relative intensities of the corresponding photoelectron peaks and their angular dependence are explained in the framework of a three-step model of the process.

  1. Adaptive optics for space debris tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, Francis; D'Orgeville, Celine; Gao, Yue; Gardhouse, William; Paulin, Nicolas; Price, Ian; Rigaut, Francois; Ritchie, Ian T.; Smith, Craig H.; Uhlendorf, Kristina; Wang, Yanjie

    2014-07-01

    Space debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is becoming an increasing threat to satellite and spacecraft. A reliable and cost effective method for detecting possible collisions between orbiting objects is required to prevent an exponential growth in the number of debris. Current RADAR survey technologies used to monitor the orbits of thousands of space debris objects are relied upon to manoeuvre operational satellites to prevent possible collisions. A complimentary technique, ground-based laser LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) have been used to track much smaller objects with higher accuracy than RADAR, giving greater prediction of possible collisions and avoiding unnecessary manoeuvring. Adaptive optics will play a key role in any ground based LIDAR tracking system as a cost effective way of utilising smaller ground stations or less powerful lasers. The use of high power and high energy lasers for the orbital modification of debris objects will also require an adaptive optic system to achieve the high photon intensity on the target required for photon momentum transfer and laser ablation. EOS Space Systems have pioneered the development of automated laser space debris tracking for objects in low Earth orbit. The Australian National University have been developing an adaptive optics system to improve this space debris tracking capability at the EOS Space Systems Mount Stromlo facility in Canberra, Australia. The system is integrated with the telescope and commissioned as an NGS AO system before moving on to LGS AO and tracking operations. A pulsed laser propagated through the telescope is used to range the target using time of flight data. Adaptive optics is used to increase the maximum range and number or targets available to the LIDAR system, by correcting the uplink laser beam. Such a system presents some unique challenges for adaptive optics: high power lasers reflecting off deformable mirrors, high slew rate tracking, and variable off-axis tracking correction. A

  2. Fuzzy Logic Particle Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A new all-electronic Particle Image Velocimetry technique that can efficiently map high speed gas flows has been developed in-house at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Particle Image Velocimetry is an optical technique for measuring the instantaneous two component velocity field across a planar region of a seeded flow field. A pulsed laser light sheet is used to illuminate the seed particles entrained in the flow field at two instances in time. One or more charged coupled device (CCD) cameras can be used to record the instantaneous positions of particles. Using the time between light sheet pulses and determining either the individual particle displacements or the average displacement of particles over a small subregion of the recorded image enables the calculation of the fluid velocity. Fuzzy logic minimizes the required operator intervention in identifying particles and computing velocity. Using two cameras that have the same view of the illumination plane yields two single exposure image frames. Two competing techniques that yield unambiguous velocity vector direction information have been widely used for reducing the single-exposure, multiple image frame data: (1) cross-correlation and (2) particle tracking. Correlation techniques yield averaged velocity estimates over subregions of the flow, whereas particle tracking techniques give individual particle velocity estimates. For the correlation technique, the correlation peak corresponding to the average displacement of particles across the subregion must be identified. Noise on the images and particle dropout result in misidentification of the true correlation peak. The subsequent velocity vector maps contain spurious vectors where the displacement peaks have been improperly identified. Typically these spurious vectors are replaced by a weighted average of the neighboring vectors, thereby decreasing the independence of the measurements. In this work, fuzzy logic techniques are used to determine the true

  3. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  4. Investigation of laser injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Keeler, Natalie; Dennis, Jerome E.; Figueroa, Colin L.; Press, Howard A.; Rockwell, R. James, Jr.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Roach, William P.; Wartick, Ardith L.

    2003-06-01

    Recently a review of multiple laser injury and accident databases was initiated. Last year we reported on preliminary findings in this area. This past year the search for laser injury and accident reports was expanded, and a significant number of additional laser incidents were located. The database from the Food and Drug Administration"s Center for Devices and Radiological Health was supplemented with more up to date information and non-medical laser incidents were added. Rockwell Laser Industries database was verified to not contain duplicates from the new information, as was the Army"s Laser Accidents and Incidents Registry. Information from the Federal Aviation Administration regarding laser accidents and incidents were also included. Incidents not resulting in laser specific injuries has been tracked. This information was not included in our previous report. In this study, case reports are used to show gross trends in laser injury, accident and incident reporting. This study is still in progress, and evaluation is incomplete.

  5. Track Construction Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banke, Ron; Di Gennaro, Guy; Ediger, Rick; Garner, Lanny; Hersom, Steve; Miller, Jack; Nemeth, Ron; Petrucelli, Jim; Sierks, Donna; Smith, Don; Swank, Kevin; West, Kevin

    This book establishes guidelines for the construction and maintenance of tracks by providing information for building new tracks or upgrading existing tracks. Subjects covered include running track planning and construction, physical layout, available surfaces, and maintenance. General track requirements and construction specifications are…

  6. On the Right Track.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieber, Ed

    1983-01-01

    Suggests thinking of "tracks" as clues and using them as the focus of outdoor activities in the urban environment. Provides 24 examples of possible track activities, including: seeds on the ground (track of a nearby tree), litter (track of a litterbug), and peeling paint (track of weathering forces). (JN)

  7. Radio tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, J. C.; Komarek, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The principles and techniques of deep space radio tracking are described along with the uses of tracking data in navigation and radio science. Emphasis is placed on the measurement functions of radio tracking.

  8. Laser geodynamic satellite (LAGEOS II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portelli, C.; Ousley, G. W., Sr.

    1991-01-01

    The Laser Geodynamic Satellite 2 (LAGEOS 2) is nearly identical to the LAGEOS 1 satellite, which was launched by NASA in 1976. However, LAGEOS 2 is completely passive, and is equipped with fused silian corner reflectors for ranging with ground-based lasers. The addition of LAGEOS 2 will provide the GSFC laser network with significantly increased satellite tracking opportunities, because LAGEOS 1 is at a 110-degree inclination and LAGEOS 2 will be at a 52-degree inclination. The flight profile is given, and information is presented in tabular form on the following topics: Deep Space Network support, frequency assignments, telemetry, tracking, and tracking support responsibility.

  9. Solar tracking system

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-07-12

    Solar tracking systems, as well as methods of using such solar tracking systems, are disclosed. More particularly, embodiments of the solar tracking systems include lateral supports horizontally positioned between uprights to support photovoltaic modules. The lateral supports may be raised and lowered along the uprights or translated to cause the photovoltaic modules to track the moving sun.

  10. Formation of ion damage tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombrello, T. A.; Wie, C. R.; Itoh, N.; Nakayama, T.

    1984-01-01

    A new model is proposed to explain both localized damage regions and preferential etching of damage tracks caused by the passage of energetic ions in insulators. The formation of each region of extended defects is initiated by the Auger decay of a vacancy produced in an inner electronic shell of an atom of the insulator by an incident ion. This decay produces an intense source of ionization within a small volume around the decaying atom, which causes decomposition of the material in a manner similar to that observed in pulsed laser irradiation. The resulting chemical or crystalline modification of the material is the latent track, which can be preferentially etched due to its changed structure.

  11. Advanced technology for space communications, tracking, and robotic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1989-01-01

    Technological advancements in tracking, communications, and robotic vision sensors are reviewed. The development of communications systems for multiple access, broadband, high data rate, and efficient operation is discussed. Consideration is given to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite systems, GPS, and communications and tracking systems for the Space Shuttle and the Space Station. The use of television, laser, and microwave sensors for robotics and technology for autonomous rendezvous and docking operations are examined.

  12. 3D visualisation and analysis of single and coalescing tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Brown, Louise; Petford, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionising decay products can cause lung cancer in humans (1). Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) can be used to monitor radon concentrations (2). Radon particles form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable 2D surface image analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (3). The aim of the study was to further investigate track angles and patterns in SSNTDs. A 'LEXT' confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 3D image datasets of five CR-39 plastic SSNTD's. The resultant 3D visualisations were analysed by eye and inclination angles assessed on selected tracks. From visual assessment, single isolated tracks as well as coalescing tracks were observed on the etched detectors. In addition varying track inclination angles were observed. Several different patterns of track formation were seen such as single isolated and double coalescing tracks. The observed track angles of inclination may help to assess the angle at which alpha particles hit the detector. Darby, S et al. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer : collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 European case-control studies. British Medical Journal 2005; 330, 223-226. Phillips, P.S., Denman, A.R., Crockett, R.G.M., Gillmore, G., Groves-Kirkby, C.J., Woolridge, A., Comparative Analysis of Weekly vs. Three monthly radon measurements in dwellings. DEFRA Report No., DEFRA/RAS/03.006. (2004). Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Journal of Microscopy 2010; 237: 1-6.

  13. TrackEye tracking algorithm characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, Michael T.; Shields, Robert W.; Reed, Jack M.

    2004-10-01

    TrackEye is a film digitization and target tracking system that offers the potential for quantitatively measuring the dynamic state variables (e.g., absolute and relative position, orientation, linear and angular velocity/acceleration, spin rate, trajectory, angle of attack, etc.) for moving objects using captured single or dual view image sequences. At the heart of the system is a set of tracking algorithms that automatically find and quantify the location of user selected image details such as natural test article features or passive fiducials that have been applied to cooperative test articles. This image position data is converted into real world coordinates and rates with user specified information such as the image scale and frame rate. Though tracking methods such as correlation algorithms are typically robust by nature, the accuracy and suitability of each TrackEye tracking algorithm is in general unknown even under good imaging conditions. The challenges of optimal algorithm selection and algorithm performance/measurement uncertainty are even more significant for long range tracking of high-speed targets where temporally varying atmospheric effects degrade the imagery. This paper will present the preliminary results from a controlled test sequence used to characterize the performance of the TrackEye tracking algorithm suite.

  14. TrackEye tracking algorithm characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Jack W.; Shields, Rob W; Valley, Michael T.

    2004-08-01

    TrackEye is a film digitization and target tracking system that offers the potential for quantitatively measuring the dynamic state variables (e.g., absolute and relative position, orientation, linear and angular velocity/acceleration, spin rate, trajectory, angle of attack, etc.) for moving objects using captured single or dual view image sequences. At the heart of the system is a set of tracking algorithms that automatically find and quantify the location of user selected image details such as natural test article features or passive fiducials that have been applied to cooperative test articles. This image position data is converted into real world coordinates and rates with user specified information such as the image scale and frame rate. Though tracking methods such as correlation algorithms are typically robust by nature, the accuracy and suitability of each TrackEye tracking algorithm is in general unknown even under good imaging conditions. The challenges of optimal algorithm selection and algorithm performance/measurement uncertainty are even more significant for long range tracking of high-speed targets where temporally varying atmospheric effects degrade the imagery. This paper will present the preliminary results from a controlled test sequence used to characterize the performance of the TrackEye tracking algorithm suite.

  15. Tracking filter algorithm for automatic video tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEver, Mark A.; Kimbrell, James E.

    2006-05-01

    In addition to servo control and power amplification, motion control systems for optical tracking pedestals feature capabilities such as electro-optical tracking using an integrated Automatic Video Tracker (AVT) card. An electro-optical system tracking loop is comprised of sensors mounted on a pointing pedestal, an AVT that detects a target in the sensor imagery, and a tracking filter algorithm that commands the pedestal to follow the target. The tracking filter algorithm receives the target boresight error from the AVT and calculates motion demands for the pedestal servo controller. This paper presents a tracking algorithm based on target state estimation using a Kalman filter. The servo demands are based on calculating the Kalman filter state estimate from absolute line-of-sight angles to the target. Simulations are used to compare its performance to tracking loops without tracking filters, and to other tracking filter algorithms, such as rate feedback loops closed around boresight error. Issues such as data latency and sensor alignment error are discussed.

  16. Satellite tracking and earth dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The SAO laser site in Arequipa continued routine operations throughout the reporting period except for the months of March and April when upgrading was underway. The laser in Orroral Valley was operational through March. Together with the cooperating stations in Wettzell, Grasse, Kootwikj, San Fernando, Helwan, and Metsahove the laser stations obtained a total of 37,099 quick-look observations on 978 passes of BE-C, Starlette, and LAGEOS. The Network continued to track LAGEOS at highest priority for polar motion and Earth rotation studies, and for other geophysical investigations, including crustal dynamics, Earth and ocean tides, and the general development of precision orbit determination. The Network performed regular tracking of BE-C and Starlette for refined determinations of station coordinate and the Earth's gravity field and for studies of solid earth dynamics. Monthly statistics of the passes and points are given by station and by satellite.

  17. Compensating For Movement Of Eye In Laser Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual system for laser surgery of retina includes subsystem that tracks position of retina. Tracking signal used to control galvanometer-driven mirrors keeping laser aimed at desired spot on retina as eye moves. Alternatively or additionally, indication of position used to prevent firing of laser when eye moved too far from proper aiming position.

  18. Advanced communications, tracking, robotic vision technology for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1987-01-01

    Recent advancements in the areas of tracking, communications, and robotics vision sensors being pursued within NASA, as applicable to space programs, are presented. Optical and laser-based communications and tracking systems and applications to space programs are discussed. Communication systems for multiple access, broadband, high data rate, and efficient operations are given. Current efforts at 20/30 GHz and millimeter wave bands are summarized. The use of optical data processing in control system applications for rendezvous and docking is presented. Robotics vision, based on television, laser, and microwave sensors for space applications, is discussed. The fusion of these technologies for remote control, station keeping, tracking, inspection, and satellite repair is detailed.

  19. To Track or Not to Track?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesson, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Background: This paper was written for a graduate level action research course at Muskingum University, located in New Concord, OH. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to determine which method of instruction best serves ALL high school students. Is it more advantageous to track ("ability group") students or not to track students in high…

  20. Calculating track thrust with track functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsi-Ming; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2013-08-01

    In e+e- event shapes studies at LEP, two different measurements were sometimes performed: a “calorimetric” measurement using both charged and neutral particles and a “track-based” measurement using just charged particles. Whereas calorimetric measurements are infrared and collinear safe, and therefore calculable in perturbative QCD, track-based measurements necessarily depend on nonperturbative hadronization effects. On the other hand, track-based measurements typically have smaller experimental uncertainties. In this paper, we present the first calculation of the event shape “track thrust” and compare to measurements performed at ALEPH and DELPHI. This calculation is made possible through the recently developed formalism of track functions, which are nonperturbative objects describing how energetic partons fragment into charged hadrons. By incorporating track functions into soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate the distribution for track thrust with next-to-leading logarithmic resummation. Due to a partial cancellation between nonperturbative parameters, the distributions for calorimeter thrust and track thrust are remarkably similar, a feature also seen in LEP data.

  1. Photographing Track Meets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Erik

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the sport of track and field, because of the sport itself and its relatively easy access to photographers, is an obvious target for cameras. Discusses rules of the track that photographers must follow; picking a location; and equipment. Discusses shooting four specific track and field events and offers behind the scenes photos. (SR)

  2. Solar tracking apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hammons, Burrell E.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a solar tracking device which tracks the position of the sun using paired, partially-shaded photocells. Auxiliary photocells are used for initial acquisition of the sun and for the suppression of false tracking when the sun is obscured by clouds.

  3. Solar tracking apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hammons, B.E.

    The invention relates to a solar tracking device which tracks the position of the sun using paired, partially-shaded photocells. Auxilliary photocells are used for initial acquisition of the sun and for the suppression of false tracking when the sun is obscured by clouds.

  4. Track and Field Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Tony

    2001-01-01

    Discusses planning and design tips that help ensure track and field facilities are successful and well-suited to both school and community use. Examines approaches to determining the best track surface and ways to maximize track and field flexibility with limited space. (GR)

  5. Multi-beam laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack L.; Harding, David J.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    1993-01-01

    Laser altimetry provides a high-resolution, high-accuracy method for measurement of the elevation and horizontal variability of Earth-surface topography. The basis of the measurement is the timing of the round-trip propagation of short-duration pulses of laser radiation between a spacecraft and the Earth's surface. Vertical resolution of the altimetry measurement is determined primarily by laser pulsewidth, surface-induced spreading in time of the reflected pulse, and the timing precision of the altimeter electronics. With conventional gain-switched pulses from solid-state lasers and sub-nsec resolution electronics, sub-meter vertical range resolution is possible from orbital attitudes of several hundred kilometers. Horizontal resolution is a function of laser beam footprint size at the surface and the spacing between successive laser pulses. Laser divergence angle and altimeter platform height above the surface determine the laser footprint size at the surface, while laser pulse repetition-rate, laser transmitter beam configuration, and altimeter platform velocity determine the space between successive laser pulses. Multiple laser transitters in a singlaltimeter instrument provide across-track and along-track coverage that can be used to construct a range image of the Earth's surface. Other aspects of the multi-beam laser altimeter are discussed.

  6. Finite resolution multitarget tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mušicki, Darko; Morelande, Mark R.

    2005-09-01

    Target tracking algorithms have to operate in an environment of uncertain measurement origin, due to the presence of randomly detected target measurements as well as clutter measurements from unwanted random scatterers. A majority of Bayesian multi-target tracking algorithms suffer from computational complexity which is exponential in the number of tracks and the number of shared measurements. The Linear Multi-target (LM) tracking procedure is a Bayesian multi-target tracking approximation with complexity which is linear in the number of tracks and the number of shared measurements. It also has a much simpler structure than the "optimal" Bayesian multi-target tracking, with apparently negligible decrease in performance. A vast majority of target tracking algorithms have been developed with the assumption of infinite sensor resolution, where a measurement can have only one source. This assumption is not valid for real sensors, such as radars. This paper presents a multi-target tracking algorithm which removes this restriction. The procedure utilizes a simple structure of LM tracking procedure to obtain a LM Finite Resolution (LMfr) tracking procedure which is much simpler than the previously published efforts. Instead of calculating the probability of measurement merging for each combination of potentially merging targets, we evaluate only one merging hypotheses for each measurement and each track. A simulation study is presented which compares LMfr-IPDA with LM-IPDA and IPDA target tracking in a cluttered environment utilizing a finite resolution sensor with five crossing targets. The study concentrates on the false track discrimination performance and the track retention capabilities.

  7. Low-cost respiratory motion tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryawala, Mohammed; Del Valle, Misael; Wang, Jiali; Byrne, James; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony

    2008-03-01

    Lung cancer is the cause of more than 150,000 deaths annually in the United States. Early and accurate detection of lung tumors with Positron Emission Tomography has enhanced lung tumor diagnosis. However, respiratory motion during the imaging period of PET results in the reduction of accuracy of detection due to blurring of the images. Chest motion can serve as a surrogate for tracking the motion of the tumor. For tracking chest motion, an optical laser system was designed which tracks the motion of a patterned card placed on the chest by illuminating the pattern with two structured light sources, generating 8 positional markers. The position of markers is used to determine the vertical, translational, and rotational motion of the card. Information from the markers is used to decide whether the patient's breath is abnormal compared to their normal breathing pattern. The system is developed with an inexpensive web-camera and two low-cost laser pointers. The experiments were carried out using a dynamic phantom developed in-house, to simulate chest movement with different amplitudes and breathing periods. Motion of the phantom was tracked by the system developed and also by a pressure transducer for comparison. The studies showed a correlation of 96.6% between the respiratory tracking waveforms by the two systems, demonstrating the capability of the system. Unlike the pressure transducer method, the new system tracks motion in 3 dimensions. The developed system also demonstrates the ability to track a sliding motion of the patient in the direction parallel to the bed and provides the potential to stop the PET scan in case of such motion.

  8. Object tracking with stereo vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Eric

    1994-01-01

    A real-time active stereo vision system incorporating gaze control and task directed vision is described. Emphasis is placed on object tracking and object size and shape determination. Techniques include motion-centroid tracking, depth tracking, and contour tracking.

  9. Vehicle track loading simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupa, Milan; Severa, Libor; Vlach, Radek

    2011-12-01

    The paper describes possible design of the vehicle track computational model and basic testing procedure of the track dynamic loading simulation. The proposed approach leads to an improvement of track vehicle course stability. The computational model is built for MSC. ADAMS, AVT computational simulating system. Model, which is intended for MSC computational system, is built from two basic parts. The first one is represented by geometrical part, while the second one by contact computational part of the model. The aim of the simulating calculation consist in determination of change influence of specific vehicle track constructive parameters on changes of examined qualities of the vehicle track link and changes of track vehicle course stability. The work quantifies the influence of changes of track preloading values on the demanded torque changes of driving sprocket. Further research possibilities and potential are also presented.

  10. Laser-jamming effectiveness analysis of combined-fiber lasers for airborne defense systems.

    PubMed

    Jie, Xu; Shanghong, Zhao; Rui, Hou; Shengbao, Zhan; Lei, Shi; Jili, Wu; Shaoqiang, Fang; Yongjun, Li

    2008-12-20

    The laser-jamming effectiveness of combined fiber lasers for airborne defense systems is analyzed in detail. Our preliminary experimental results are proof of the concept of getting a high-power laser through a beam combination technique. Based on combined fiber lasers, the jamming effectiveness of four-quadrant guidance and imaging guidance systems are evaluated. The simulation results have proved that for a four-quadrant guidance system, the tracking system takes only two seconds to complete tracking, and the new tracking target is the jamming laser; for the imaging guidance system, increasing the power of the jamming laser or the distance between the target and the jamming laser are both efficient ways to achieve a successful laser jamming. PMID:19104536

  11. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M.

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  12. Multibeam Laser Altimeter for Planetary Topographic Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Bufton, J. L.; Harding, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Laser altimetry provides an active, high-resolution, high-accuracy method for measurement of planetary and asteroid surface topography. The basis of the measurement is the timing of the roundtrip propagation of short-duration pulses of laser radiation between a spacecraft and the surface. Vertical, or elevation, resolution of the altimetry measurement is determined primarily by laser pulse width, surface-induced spreading in time of the reflected pulse, and the timing precision of the altimeter electronics. With conventional gain-switched pulses from solid-state lasers and nanosecond resolution timing electronics, submeter vertical range resolution is possible anywhere from orbital altitudes of approximately 1 km to altitudes of several hundred kilometers. Horizontal resolution is a function of laser beam footprint size at the surface and the spacing between successive laser pulses. Laser divergence angle and altimeter platform height above the surface determine the laser footprint size at the surface, while laser pulse repetition rate, laser transmitter beam configuration, and altimeter platform velocity determine the spacing between successive laser pulses. Multiple laser transmitters in a single laser altimeter instrument that is orbiting above a planetary or asteroid surface could provide across-track as well as along-track coverage that can be used to construct a range image (i.e., topographic map) of the surface. We are developing a pushbroom laser altimeter instrument concept that utilizes a linear array of laser transmitters to provide contiguous across-track and along-track data. The laser technology is based on the emerging monolithic combination of individual, 1-sq cm diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser pulse emitters. Details of the multi-emitter laser transmitter technology, the instrument configuration, and performance calculations for a realistic Discovery-class mission will be presented.

  13. Space Station communications and tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Reinhold H.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the existing Space Station communications and tracking system requirements, architecture, and design concepts is provided. Areas which will require innovative solutions to provide cost-effective flight systems are emphasized. Among these are the space-to-space links, the differential global positioning system for determining relative position with free-flying vehicles, multitarget radar, packet/isochronous signal processing, and laser docking systems. In addition, the importance of advanced development, tests, and analyses is summarized.

  14. Tracking toxic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    A new report tracking industrial pollution in North America indicates some good news, in terms of downward trends in the release and transfer of these substances.The July report, which tracks 165 chemicals released in the United States and Canada, shows that the total amount of 3.2 million tonnes of chemical releases and transfers from industrial facilities tracked by the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) decreased by 2% overall from 1995 to 1998.

  15. Tracking in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Sinard, John H

    2013-12-01

    Bar code-based tracking solutions, long present in clinical pathology laboratories, have recently made an appearance in anatomic pathology (AP) laboratories. Tracking of AP "assets" (specimens, blocks, slides) can enhance laboratory efficiency, promote patient safety, and improve patient care. Routing of excess clinical material into research laboratories and biorepositories are other avenues that can benefit from tracking of AP assets. Implementing tracking is not as simple as installing software and turning it on. Not all tracking solutions are alike. Careful analysis of laboratory workflow is needed before implementing tracking to assure that this solution will meet the needs of the laboratory. Such analysis will likely uncover practices that may need to be modified before a tracking system can be deployed. Costs that go beyond simply that of purchasing software will be incurred and need to be considered in the budgeting process. Finally, people, not technology, are the key to assuring quality. Tracking will require significant changes in workflow and an overall change in the culture of the laboratory. Preparation, training, buy-in, and accountability of the people involved are crucial to the success of this process. This article reviews the benefits, available technology, underlying principles, and implementation of tracking solutions for the AP and research laboratory. PMID:23634908

  16. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas is thought to be the cause of about 1100 lung cancer related deaths each year in the UK (1). Radon concentrations can be monitored using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable microscopic analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (2, 3). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs. Six SSNTDs were placed in a chamber with a luminous dial watch for a fixed period. The detectors were etched for between 30 minutes and 4.5 hours using 6M NaOH at a temperature of 90oC. A 'LEXT' OLS4000 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 2D and 3D image datasets of CR-39 plastic SSNTDs. Confocal microscope 3D images were acquired using a x50 or x100 objective lens. Data were saved as images and also spreadsheet files with height measurements. Software was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., USA) to analyse the height data. Comparing the 30 minute and 4 hour etching time detectors, we observed that there were marked differences in track area; the lower the etching time the smaller the track area. The degree to which etching may prevent visualising adjacent tracks also requires further study as it is possible that etching could result in some tracks being subsumed in other tracks. On the other hand if there is too little etching, track sizes would be reduced and hence could be more difficult to image; thus there is a balance required to obtain suitable measurement accuracy. (1) Gray A, Read S, McGale P and Darby S. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them. BMJ 2009; 338: a3110. (2) Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in

  17. Auto adaptative laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Coste, F.; Fabbro, R.; Douay, D.; Sabatier, L.; Lacote, D.

    1996-12-31

    The weld preparation in a laboratory environment for laser welding concerning edge misalignments, edge or gap preparation is no longer valid for industrial configurations where these different parameters are not accurately controlled. Therefore in that case, the achievement of consistent qualities of processing, requires the use of sensors for seam tracking and gap recognition. The authors discuss here preliminary experiments involving the use of these elements in order to pilot a scanning head in view of strongly reducing the precision requirements for gap preparation. This set-up is the first step in the development of an auto-adaptative device for laser welding which will be composed of seam tracking and recognition sensors, scanning laser head and a filler wire device.

  18. Fourteen x fourteen CCD array for optical intersatellite link tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutemy, J. C.; Boucharlat, G.; Dautriche, P.

    1988-06-01

    Optical intersatellite links and the SILEX program are generalized. The main constraints of the acquisition and tracking system are described. The specifications of a charge coupled device array devoted to the tracking, with the capability of high images rates (up to 20,000 im/s) are reviewed. It is shown that a low resolution and high image rate array allow the performances of the intersatellite laser acquisition system to be improved.

  19. Can Tracking Improve Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duflo, Esther; Dupas, Pascaline; Kremer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Tracking students into different classrooms according to their prior academic performance is controversial among both scholars and policymakers. If teachers find it easier to teach a homogeneous group of students, tracking could enhance school effectiveness and raise test scores of both low- and high-ability students. If students benefit from…

  20. On the Wrong Track.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    By any measure--student achievement, social development, or democratic values--ability grouping and tracking practices are indefensible and unsupported by research. Tracking allows schools to practice in-school segregation and perpetuate unequal opportunities and unequal socialization within classrooms. Jonathan Kozol's investigation shows how…

  1. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  2. Explaining cloud chamber tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Broyles, A.A.

    1992-06-16

    The operation of many detection devices is usually explained in terms of the ionization tracks produced by particles despite the fact that the corresponding incident wave functions extended over the entire sensitive regions of the detectors. The mechanisms by which the wave function appears to collapse to a track is analyzed here.

  3. TMDL TRACKING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The TMDL Tracking System database contains information on the waters listed under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act and to track those listed waters through TMDL development. The purpose of the database is to allow EPA, the States/Territories/Tribes, ...

  4. Incentives from Curriculum Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koerselman, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum tracking creates incentives in the years before its start, and we should therefore expect test scores to be higher during those years. I find robust evidence for incentive effects of tracking in the UK based on the UK comprehensive school reform. Results from the Swedish comprehensive school reform are inconclusive. Internationally, I…

  5. Track record in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, S. A.

    1981-02-01

    The use of nuclear-track analysis in meteoritic crystals with reference to several areas of research is reviewed. The applications discussed include: fission-track retention ages and cooling rates of meteoritic parent bodies, cosmic-ray studies, determination of pre-atmospheric sizes of meteorites, and search for superheavy elements.

  6. 2 Tracks for Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The academic work force has been transformed over the past several decades, less by design than out of expediency. In 1969, professors who were either tenured or tenure-track made up 78 percent of the faculty. Those working part time made up only 18.5 percent. By 2009, those proportions had almost flipped, with tenured and tenure-track making up…

  7. UWB Tracking Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Julia; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Phan, Chau; Dusl, John; Ni, Jianjun; Rafford, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    An Ultra-Wideband (UWB) two-cluster Angle of Arrival (AOA) tracking prototype system is currently being developed and tested at NASA Johnson Space Center for space exploration applications. This talk discusses the software development efforts for this UWB two-cluster AOA tracking system. The role the software plays in this system is to take waveform data from two UWB radio receivers as an input, feed this input into an AOA tracking algorithm, and generate the target position as an output. The architecture of the software (Input/Output Interface and Algorithm Core) will be introduced in this talk. The development of this software has three phases. In Phase I, the software is mostly Matlab driven and calls C++ socket functions to provide the communication links to the radios. This is beneficial in the early stage when it is necessary to frequently test changes in the algorithm. Phase II of the development is to have the software mostly C++ driven and call a Matlab function for the AOA tracking algorithm. This is beneficial in order to send the tracking results to other systems and also to improve the tracking update rate of the system. The third phase is part of future work and is to have the software completely C++ driven with a graphics user interface. This software design enables the fine resolution tracking of the UWB two-cluster AOA tracking system.

  8. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Eric Y.

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parameters of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.

  9. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parametersmore » of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.« less

  10. Multiple model adaptive tracking of airborne targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, John E.

    1988-12-01

    Over the past ten years considerable work has been accomplished at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) towards improving the ability of tracking airborne targets. Motivated by the performance advantages in using established models of tracking environment variables within a Kalman filter, an advanced tracking algorithm has been developed based on adaptive estimation filter structures. A multiple model bank of filters that have been designed for various target dynamics, which each accounting for atmospheric disturbance of the Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) sensor data and mechanical vibrations of the sensor platform, outperforms a correlator tracker. The bank of filters provides the estimation capability to guide the pointing mechanisms of a shared aperture laser/sensor system. The data is provided to the tracking algorithm via an (8 x 8)-pixel tracking Field of View (FOV) from the FLIR image plane. Data at each sample period is compared by an enhanced correlator to a target template. These offsets are measurements to a bank of linear Kalman filters which provide estimates of the target's location in azimuth and elevation coordinates based on a Gauss-Markov acceleration model, and a reduced form of the atmospheric jitter model for the disturbance in the IR wavefront carrying future measurements.

  11. Satellite tracking and Earth dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Following an upgrading program, ranging performance capabilities of a satellite-tracking pulsed laser system were assessed in terms of range accuracy, range noise, data yield, and reliability. With a shorter laser pulse duration (2.5 to 3.0 NSEC) and a new analog pulse processing system, the systematic range errors were reduced to 3 to 5 cm and range noise was reduced to 5 to 16 cm and range noise was reduced to 5 to 15 cm on Starlette and BE-C, and 10 to 18 cm on LAGEOS. Maximum pulse repetition rate was increased to 30 pulses per minute and significant improvement was made in signal to noise ratio by installing a 3 A interference filter and by reducing the range gate window to 200 to 400 nsec. The solution to a problem involving leakage of a fraction of the laser oscillator pulse through the pulse chopper was outlined.

  12. Laser techniques for ground to air applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove

    1989-02-01

    Laser techniques used in air defense for rangefinding, tracking, beamriding, and for ground to air applications are examined. Of special interest are the coherent systems which will add classical radar functions at optical wavelengths and allow imaging systems and Doppler functions. Besides target acquisition, future laser systems will also offer a possibility of atmospheric wind sounding and slant path measurements. Lasers can be used for jamming and destruction of optical sensors. Ordnance information about tactical laser weapons is included.

  13. Intercomparison of GEOS 3 tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berbert, J. H.; Carney, D. V.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements and time biases of the GEOS 3 tracking systems in the Atlantic calibration area were determined in relation to the Goddard lasers. In collocation tests the lasers agreed with each other to about 10 cm. Early RAMLAS laser data contained an apparent time bias of 647 microsec. Later, in a laser collocation test, RAMLAS differed from MOBLAS 2 by +11.3 cm and -28 microsec. An overlooked correction reduced the -28 microsec to -8 microsec. The geoceivers initially had range rate biases of 3-6 m/s and constant time biases of several milliseconds. During the first month of GEOS 3 operations the range rate biases decreases monotonically by 2.5 + or - 1.0 m/s. The C band radar biases relative to the lasers were usually within several meters and several tenths of milliseconds. The unified S band system relative biases were usually within + or - 4 mm/s and + or - 0.1 ms. The average and scatter of the altimeter biases recovered on 18 laser reference arcs was - 5.3 + or - 0.6 m.

  14. Extrapolating target tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zandt, James R.

    2012-05-01

    Steady-state performance of a tracking filter is traditionally evaluated immediately after a track update. However, there is commonly a further delay (e.g., processing and communications latency) before the tracks can actually be used. We analyze the accuracy of extrapolated target tracks for four tracking filters: Kalman filter with the Singer maneuver model and worst-case correlation time, with piecewise constant white acceleration, and with continuous white acceleration, and the reduced state filter proposed by Mookerjee and Reifler.1, 2 Performance evaluation of a tracking filter is significantly simplified by appropriate normalization. For the Kalman filter with the Singer maneuver model, the steady-state RMS error immediately after an update depends on only two dimensionless parameters.3 By assuming a worst case value of target acceleration correlation time, we reduce this to a single parameter without significantly changing the filter performance (within a few percent for air tracking).4 With this simplification, we find for all four filters that the RMS errors for the extrapolated state are functions of only two dimensionless parameters. We provide simple analytic approximations in each case.

  15. Electrically tunable lens speeds up 3D orbital tracking

    PubMed Central

    Annibale, Paolo; Dvornikov, Alexander; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    3D orbital particle tracking is a versatile and effective microscopy technique that allows following fast moving fluorescent objects within living cells and reconstructing complex 3D shapes using laser scanning microscopes. We demonstrated notable improvements in the range, speed and accuracy of 3D orbital particle tracking by replacing commonly used piezoelectric stages with Electrically Tunable Lens (ETL) that eliminates mechanical movement of objective lenses. This allowed tracking and reconstructing shape of structures extending 500 microns in the axial direction. Using the ETL, we tracked at high speed fluorescently labeled genomic loci within the nucleus of living cells with unprecedented temporal resolution of 8ms using a 1.42NA oil-immersion objective. The presented technology is cost effective and allows easy upgrade of scanning microscopes for fast 3D orbital tracking. PMID:26114037

  16. Development of Shanghai satellite laser ranging station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Fu-Min; Tan, De-Tong; Xiao, Chi-Kun; Chen, Wan-Zhen; Zhang, J.-H.; Zhang, Z.-P.; Lu, Wen-Hu; Hu, Z.-Q.; Tang, W.-F.; Chen, J.-P.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: improvement of the system hardware; upgrading of the software; the observation status; preliminary daylight tracking capability; testing the new type of laser; and future plans.

  17. Maximum power tracking

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, G.

    1983-03-01

    By definition, a maximum power tracking device causes the photovoltaic array to operate on the locus of maximum power points within a specified accuracy. There are limitations to the application of maximum power tracking. A prerequisite is that the load be capable of absorbing all of the power availble at all times. Battery chargers, electrical heaters, water pumps, and most significantly, returning power to the utility grid, are prime examples of applications that are adaptable to maximum power tracking. Maximum power tracking is available to either dc or ac loads. An inverter equipped with a means of changing input voltage by controlling its input impedance can deliver maximum power to ac loads. The inverter can be fixed or variable frequency and fixed or variable voltage, but must be compatible with the ac load. The discussion includes applications, techniques, and cost factors.

  18. Enhanced optical tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSheery, Tracy

    2008-04-01

    Enhanced tracking is accomplished by increasing the resolution, frame rate and processing capabilities in tracking dynamic regions of interest for vision applications. In many proven algorithms, the ability to distinguish an object and track it is dependent on the system performance in more than one attribute. We have conducted studies on proven techniques such as Active Appearance Models, Principle Component Analysis and Eigen tracking. All perform better as the camera resolution increases, and camera frame rate increases. Additional opportunities have been observed by combining these techniques, taking advantage of Multicore CPUs, and GPU graphic card processing. Results from an 8 Megapixel commercial sensor combined with a Field Programmable Gate array are presented, and algorithm performance compared with down scaled images of the same scenes, and simulated typical 30 hertz frame rates verses the 120 hertz to 300 hertz typical of this smart camera.

  19. Energy Tracking Software Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Davis; Nathan Bird; Rebecca Birx; Hal Knowles

    2011-04-04

    Acceleration has created an interactive energy tracking and visualization platform that supports decreasing electric, water, and gas usage. Homeowners have access to tools that allow them to gauge their use and track progress toward a smaller energy footprint. Real estate agents have access to consumption data, allowing for sharing a comparison with potential home buyers. Home builders have the opportunity to compare their neighborhood's energy efficiency with competitors. Home energy raters have a tool for gauging the progress of their clients after efficiency changes. And, social groups are able to help encourage members to reduce their energy bills and help their environment. EnergyIT.com is the business umbrella for all energy tracking solutions and is designed to provide information about our energy tracking software and promote sales. CompareAndConserve.com (Gainesville-Green.com) helps homeowners conserve energy through education and competition. ToolsForTenants.com helps renters factor energy usage into their housing decisions.

  20. Optical transceiver platform for laser communication experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffelt, Everett L.; Ebben, Thomas H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a laser communication (lasercom) transceiver platform to be used for laboratory experiments. The platform features a directly modulated semiconductor laser, avalanche photodiode receiver, and microprocessor-controlled acquisition and tracking system. The platform provides a test-bed, enabling study in vital areas of lasercom hardware such as system performance versus link distance, optical power, tracking accuracy, and subsystem and component characterization for future system specifications, including critical areas limiting present system performance.

  1. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  2. Long range position and Orientation Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Jansen, J.F.; Burks, B.L.

    1996-02-01

    The long range Position and Orientation Tracking System is an active triangulation-based system that is being developed to track a target to a resolution of 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) and 0.009{degrees}(32.4 arcseconds) over a range of 13.72 m (45 ft.). The system update rate is currently set at 20 Hz but can be increased to 100 Hz or more. The tracking is accomplished by sweeping two pairs of orthogonal line lasers over infrared (IR) sensors spaced with known geometry with respect to one another on the target (the target being a rigid body attached to either a remote vehicle or a remote manipulator arm). The synchronization and data acquisition electronics correlates the time that an IR sensor has been hit by one of the four lasers and the angle of the respective mirror at the time of the hit. This information is combined with the known geometry of the IR sensors on the target to determine position and orientation of the target. This method has the advantage of allowing the target to be momentarily lost due to occlusions and then reacquired without having to return the target to a known reference point. The system also contains a camera with operator controlled lighting in each pod that allows the target to be continuously viewed from either pod, assuming their are no occlusions.

  3. Efficient Illumination for Microsecond Tracking Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dulin, David; Barland, Stephane; Hachair, Xavier; Pedaci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to observe microsecond dynamics at the sub-micron scale, opened by recent technological advances in fast camera sensors, will affect many biophysical studies based on particle tracking in optical microscopy. A main limiting factor for further development of fast video microscopy remains the illumination of the sample, which must deliver sufficient light to the camera to allow microsecond exposure times. Here we systematically compare the main illumination systems employed in holographic tracking microscopy, and we show that a superluminescent diode and a modulated laser diode perform the best in terms of image quality and acquisition speed, respectively. In particular, we show that the simple and inexpensive laser illumination enables less than s camera exposure time at high magnification on a large field of view without coherence image artifacts, together with a good hologram quality that allows nm-tracking of microscopic beads to be performed. This comparison of sources can guide in choosing the most efficient illumination system with respect to the specific application. PMID:25251462

  4. MATERIAL TRACKING USING LANMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, F.

    2010-06-07

    LANMAS is a transaction-based nuclear material accountability software product developed to replace outdated and legacy accountability systems throughout the DOE. The core underlying purpose of LANMAS is to track nuclear materials inventory and report transactions (movement, mixing, splitting, decay, etc.) to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). While LANMAS performs those functions well, there are many additional functions provided by the software product. As a material is received onto a site or created at a site, its entire lifecycle can be tracked in LANMAS complete to its termination of safeguards. There are separate functions to track material movements between and within material balance areas (MBAs). The level of detail for movements within a MBA is configurable by each site and can be as high as a site designation or as detailed as building/room/rack/row/position. Functionality exists to track the processing of materials, either as individual items or by modeling a bulk process as an individual item to track inputs and outputs from the process. In cases where sites have specialized needs, the system is designed to be flexible so that site specific functionality can be integrated into the product. This paper will demonstrate how the software can be used to input material into an account and track it to its termination of safeguards.

  5. CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.; Colombo, O. L.; Ray, Richard D.; Thompson, B.; Nerem, R. S.; Williams, Teresa A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) to be launched in the later part of '01) that combine a new generation of GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers, a high precision three axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and SLR tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the surface forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies. Gravity field modeling status and plans will be discussed.

  6. Laser modified alumina: A computational and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncayo, Marco Antonio

    Laser surface modification involves rapid melting and solidification is an elegant technique used for locally tailoring the surface morphology of alumina in order to enhance its abrasive characteristics. COMSOL Multiphysics RTM based heat transfer modeling and experimental approaches were designed and used in this study for single and multiple laser tracks to achieve densely-packed multi-facet grains via temperature history, cooling rate, solidification, scanning electron micrographs, and wear rate. Multifacet grains were produced at the center of laser track with primary dendrites extending toward the edge of single laser track. The multiple laser tracks study indicates the grain/dendrite size increases as the laser energy density increases resulting in multiplying the abrasive edges which in turn enhance the abrasive qualities.

  7. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-02-11

    opportunity to explain audit items to the laser user and thus the reasons for some of these items. Some examples are given from the audit criteria handout. As an explanatory key to the reader, an Operational Safety Procedure (OSP) as a formally reviewed safety procedure required for all Class 3B and Class 4 laser installations. An ''OSP Binder'' contains all safety documentation related to a given laser operation and serves as a central repository for documents, such as the OSP, interlock logs, lessons learned, contact information etc. ''Unattended Operation'' refers to approved procedures for unattended operation of the laser installation and may include operation beyond normal working hours. ''L-train'' is the LLNL training tracking system.

  8. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  9. OCULUS Sea Track Fusion Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotou, Stylianos C.; Rizogiannis, Constantinos; Katsoulis, Stavros; Lampropoulos, Vassilis; Kanellopoulos, Sotirios; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2015-06-01

    Oculus Sea is a complete solution regarding maritime surveillance and communications at Local as well as Central Command and Control level. It includes a robust and independent track fusion service whose main functions include: 1) Interaction with the User to suggest the fusion of two or more tracks, confirm Track ID and Vessel Metadata creation for the fused track, and suggest de-association of two tracks 2) Fusion of same vessel tracks arriving simultaneously from multiple radar sensors featuring track Association, track Fusion of associated tracks to produce a more accurate track, and Multiple tracking filters and fusion algorithms 3) Unique Track ID Generator for each fused track 4) Track Dissemination Service. Oculus Sea Track Fusion Service adopts a system architecture where each sensor is associated with a Kalman estimator/tracker that obtains an estimate of the state vector and its respective error covariance matrix. Finally, at the fusion center, association and track state estimation fusion are carried out. The expected benefits of this system include multi-sensor information fusion, enhanced spatial resolution, and improved target detection.

  10. Moldless casting by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-09-01

    The principle of laser cladding involves the use of high power carbon-dioxide lasers and powder deposition technology to provide wear and corrosion resistant surface coatings to engineering components. By injecting metal powder into a laser generated melt pool on a moving substrate a solidified metal track can be produced. Deposition of successive tracks produces a multi-layer build. Laser direct casting (LDC) utilizes a coaxial nozzle enabling consistent omnidirectional deposition to produce 3D components from a selection of metal powders. The influence of the principal process parameters over the process features namely, powder catchment efficiency, beam shape and build rates are presented with several successfully generated 3D components. Nickel, stainless steel and satellite powders were deposited at laser powders of 0.4 to 1.4 kW and speeds of 500 to 1000 mm/min achieving build rates of 3 to 9 mm3/s. Fully dense metallurgical structures have been produced with no cracking or porosity and powder catchment efficiencies up to 85% have been achieved.

  11. Magnetic Low-Friction Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetkau, Mark; Bahniwal, Manpreet; Gamblen, James

    2008-05-01

    The standard low-friction tracks used to test Newton's laws are the air track and the low-friction cart track. Both are commercially available and provide low-friction environments to test various physics concepts. At a recent science fair, one of the authors (JG) presented a magnetically levitated cart and track. A literature search found no previous testing of magnetically levitated carts. This paper compares a magnetically levitated cart against the two standard low-friction tracks.

  12. Lunar gravity field recovery: sensitivity studies from simulated tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, A.; Baur, O.

    2012-04-01

    The lunar gravity field is essential for understanding the structure and the thermal evolution of the Moon. Typically, the gravity field is inferred from tracking data to satellites orbiting the Moon. Due to the fact that the Moon is in the state of synchronous rotation with the Earth, direct tracking to the farside is impossible. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), launched in 2009, is equipped with various instruments whose purpose is to prepare for save robotic returns to the Moon. To geolocate LRO, the spacecraft is tracked by means of radiometric techniques (ranges, range rates, angles) and optical laser (laser ranges). We analyzed tracking data to LRO with respect to various aspects, such as the number of observations, their spatial distribution on the lunar surface, and the present noise level. We used these real-data characteristics to simulate tracking data to LRO. We generated three different simulation scenarios: observations were simulated (1) during the exact time spans when LRO was tracked from a specific ground station, (2) whenever the spacecraft was in view from a station, and (3) for the nearside as well as for the farside of the Moon. Based on the resulting trajectories, we estimated three sets of spherical harmonic coefficients representing the lunar gravity field. Moreover, we varied the maximum degree of estimated coefficients and investigated the effect of noise on the estimated parameters. Observation simulation and parameter estimation was accomplished with the software packages GEODYN and SOLVE.

  13. Navigation and geo-tracking system of UAV EO payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Zhen, Kang; Xue, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiajiang; Li, Yingjuan; Tang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    A multi-function system based on inertial measurement unit (IMU) is introduced, which can fulfill navigation, attitude measurement of LOS in payload, platform stabilization and tracking control. The IMU is integrated with electro-optical sensors and a laser range finder on gimbals, which performs attitude calculation and navigation by constructing navigation coordinates in a mathematic platform, and the platform navigation information is obtained by transformation matrix between platform and gimbal coordinates. The platform comprising of gyros, electro-optical sensors and servo mechanism is capable of stabilizing line of sight and could be used to geo-tracking in the relevant field of view (FOV).The system can determine geography coordinates of the host platform and target only with navigation information and laser ranging data. The geo-tracking system always locked the target image at the center of FOV by calculating spatial geometry and adjusting LOS attitude. This tracking is different from TV tracking and geographical reference image tracking, which may be influenced by fog and obscurant. When the UAV is flying over urban or mountain areas for rescue missions, it can avoid the loss of targets due to strong maneuver or LOS obscuration, and reduce the operation load and improve rescue efficiency.

  14. Track recording plastic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarle, Gregory (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Improved nuclear track recording plastic compositions are provided which exhibit greatly decreased surface roughness when etched to produce visible tracks of energetic nuclear particles which have passed into and/or through said plastic. The improved compositions incorporate a small quantity of a phthalic acid ester into the major plastic component which is derived from the polymerization of monomeric di-ethylene glycol bis allyl carbonate. Di-substituted phthalic acid esters are preferred as the added component, with the further perference that the ester substituent has a chain length of 2 or more carbon atoms. The inclusion of the phthalic acid ester to an extent of from about 1-2% by weight of the plastic compositions is sufficient to drastically reduce the surface roughness ordinarily produced when the track recording plastic is contacted by etchants.

  15. Tracks to therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of the structure of particle tracks have led to models of track effects based on radial dose and radiobiological target theory that have been very successful in describing and predicting track effects in physical, chemical, and biological systems. For describing mammalian cellular inactivation two inactivation modes are required, called gamma-kill and ion-kill, the first due to synergistic effects of delta rays from adjacent ion paths thus resembling the effects from gamma rays, and the second to the effects of single ion transits through a cell nucleus. The ion-kill effect is more severe, where the fraction of cells experiencing ion kill is responsible for a decrease in the oxygen enhancement ratio, and an increase in relative biological effectiveness, but these are accompanied by loss of repair, hence to a reduction in the efficiency of fractionation in high LET therapy, as shown by our calculations for radiobiological effects in the "spread out Bragg Peak".

  16. Controlled Document Tracking Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-08-24

    MANTRACK is an automated, controlled document tracking system which does the following and reduces staff time required to perform these tasks: generates transmittal letters/receipts for every controlled copy issued (merged from a current distribution list), tracks the return of transmittal receipts, facilitates the check-in of the large number of transmittal receipts returned (using a barcode reader), generates a reminder list which prompts the cyclic review and evaluation of existing documents, generates overdue reminders for themore » return of past-due transmittal receipts, tracks the number of Procedure Change Directives (PCD) currently in effect for each procedure, generates and maintains current distribution lists for each document, generates a current table of contents when updates to the document (usually a procedure manual) are made.« less

  17. Understanding lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gibilisco, S.

    1989-01-01

    Covering all different types of laser applications-Gibilisco offers an overview of this fascinating phenomenon of light. Here he describes what lasers are and how they work and examines in detail the different kinds of lasers in use today. Topics of particular interest include: the way lasers work; the different kinds of lasers; infrared, ultraviolet and x-ray lasers; use of lasers in industry and manufacturing; use of lasers for long-distance communications; fiberoptic communications; the way laser shows work; the reality of Star Wars; lasers in surgical and medical applications; and holography and the future of laser technology.

  18. Fast Compressive Tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-10-01

    It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We compress sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the compressed domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed compressive tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness. PMID:26352631

  19. Laser characterization with advanced digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piels, Molly; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Zibar, Darko

    2015-01-01

    The use of machine learning techniques to characterize lasers with low output power is reviewed. Optimized phase tracking algorithms that can produce accurate noise spectra are discussed, and a method for inferring the amplitude noise spectrum and rate equation model of the laser under test is presented.

  20. Hazardous waste tracking issues

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, R. )

    1993-08-01

    The concept of cradle-to-grave oversight of hazardous waste was established in 1976 under RCRA. Since then, the multicopy Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest has been a key component in the federal tracking system. The manifests ensure that generators, transporters and TSDFs maintain documentation of hazardous waste shipments. To a large extent, the tracking system has served its intended purpose; nevertheless, certain shortcomings exist. Anyone involved in shipping hazardous waste should be aware of the system's weaknesses and take appropriate measures to compensate for them.

  1. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  2. Computationally efficient Bayesian tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aughenbaugh, Jason; La Cour, Brian

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the progress we have achieved in developing a computationally efficient, grid-based Bayesian fusion tracking system. In our approach, the probability surface is represented by a collection of multidimensional polynomials, each computed adaptively on a grid of cells representing state space. Time evolution is performed using a hybrid particle/grid approach and knowledge of the grid structure, while sensor updates use a measurement-based sampling method with a Delaunay triangulation. We present an application of this system to the problem of tracking a submarine target using a field of active and passive sonar buoys.

  3. The first satellite laser echoes recorded on the streak camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel; Prochazka, Ivan; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the streak camera with the circular sweep for the satellite laser ranging is described. The Modular Streak Camera system employing the circular sweep option was integrated into the conventional Satellite Laser System. The experimental satellite tracking and ranging has been performed. The first satellite laser echo streak camera records are presented.

  4. Dust Devil Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 8 May 2002) The Science This image, centered near 50.0 S and 17.7 W displays dust devil tracks on the surface. Most of the lighter portions of the image likely have a thin veneer of dust settled on the surface. As a dust devil passes over the surface, it acts as a vacuum and picks up the dust, leaving the darker substrate exposed. In this image there is a general trend of many of the tracks running from east to west or west to east, indicating the general wind direction. There is often no general trend present in dust devil tracks seen in other images. The track patterns are quite ephemeral and can completely change or even disappear over the course of a few months. Dust devils are one of the mechanisms that Mars uses to constantly pump dust into the ubiquitously dusty atmosphere. This atmospheric dust is one of the main driving forces of the present Martian climate. The Story Vrrrrooooooooom. Think of a tornado, the cartoon Tasmanian devil, or any number of vacuum commercials that powerfully suck up swirls of dust and dirt. That's pretty much what it's like on the surface of Mars a lot of the time. Whirlpools of wind called

  5. Tracking Speech Sound Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a procedure to aid in the clinical appraisal of child speech. The approach, based on the work by Dinnsen, Chin, Elbert, and Powell (1990; Some constraints on functionally disordered phonologies: Phonetic inventories and phonotactics. "Journal of Speech and Hearing Research", 33, 28-37), uses a railway idiom to track gains in…

  6. Energy rays tracking device

    SciTech Connect

    Monk, R.J.

    1981-05-12

    An energy rays tracking device includes a receiver for fixing a position relative to the direction of maximum energy rays, a prime mover for maintaining the alignment of the receiver and an energy rays user, an energy rays tracker for controlling the power to the prime mover in response to the receiver, a timed tracker for controlling the prime mover when the energy rays tracker is not functioning due to energy rays being too diffused, an energy sensitive element for detecting the presence or absence of energy rays, and a power controller responsive to the energy sensitive element for repositioning the receiver and the energy rays user for the following period of tracking is disclosed. The receiver includes an enclosure which only allows a selected pattern of direct rays to penetrate into the enclosure. A razor sharp edge at the opening of the enclosure maintains the outermost direct energy rays undiffused. A differential sensor sensitive to direct energy rays is installed inside the enclosure for determining the direction of the direct energy rays. In an application for tracking the sun, the time tracker uses a piecewise linear method of tracking. In the return cycle during the night, the return is interspersed with a wash cycle for cleaning the energy rays user.

  7. Personal Tracking Charts

    MedlinePlus

    ... only on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Keep an eye out for allergic reactions. I should take Prezista with food. year keeping track of my periods month mark the Type of Flow in the boxes below L =exceptionally light N =normal h =exceptionally heavy S =spotting O =none ...

  8. Manure Tracking Book

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This document provides an example of the ‘Manure Tracking Book’ that was used by the fifty-four Wisconsin dairy farmers who participated in the “On Farmers’ Ground” nutrient management research project. This Book was used to systematically tract how, when and where farmers spread manure, and factors...

  9. General defocusing particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Barnkob, Rune; Kähler, Christian J; Rossi, Massimiliano

    2015-09-01

    A General Defocusing Particle Tracking (GDPT) method is proposed for tracking the three-dimensional motion of particles in Lab-on-a-chip systems based on a set of calibration images and the normalized cross-correlation function. In comparison with other single-camera defocusing particle-tracking techniques, GDPT possesses a series of key advantages: it is applicable to particle images of arbitrary shapes, it is intuitive and easy to use, it can be used without advanced knowledge of optics and velocimetry theory, it is robust against outliers and overlapping particle images, and it requires only equipment which is standard in microfluidic laboratories. We demonstrate the method by tracking the three-dimensional motion of 2 μm spherical particles in a microfluidic channel using three different optical arrangements. The position of the particles was measured with an estimated uncertainty of 0.1 μm in the in-plane direction and 2 μm in the depth direction for a measurement volume of 1510 × 1270 × 160 μm(3). A ready-to-use GUI implementation of the method can be acquired on . PMID:26201498

  10. Spiral track oven

    SciTech Connect

    Drobilisch, Sandor

    1998-12-20

    Final report on development of a continuously operating oven system in which the parts are progressing automatically on a spiral track for in-line service installation for the production of electronic and/or other components to be heat cured or dried.

  11. Tracking the Invisible Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravois, John

    2006-01-01

    For decades it has been happening everywhere in academe, but nowhere in particular. The sweeping shift toward non-tenure-track academic labor has been one of the most worried-over trends in American higher education. But it has been charted mostly with broad-brush data, which give little indication of the trend's progress at the institutional…

  12. Dust Devil Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03052 Dust Devil Tracks

    These dust devil tracks are located in the region surrounding Hooke Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 46.6S, Longitude 316.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Asset tracking systems.

    PubMed

    2006-11-01

    Asset tracking systems are used in healthcare to find objects--medical devices and other hospital equipment--and to record the physical location of those objects over time. Interest in asset tracking is growing daily, but the technology is still evolving, and so far very few systems have been implemented in hospitals. This situation is likely to change over the next few years, at which point many hospitals will be faced with choosing a system. We evaluated four asset tracking systems from four suppliers: Agility Healthcare Solutions, Ekahau, Radianse, and Versus Technology. We judged the systems' performance for two "levels" of asset tracking. The first level is basic locating--simply determining where in the facility an item can be found. This may be done because the equipment needs routine inspection and preventive maintenance or because it is required for recall purposes; or the equipment may be needed, often urgently, for clinical use. The second level, which is much more involved, is inventory optimization and workflow improvement. This entails analyzing asset utilization based on historical location data to improve the use, distribution, and processing of equipment. None of the evaluated products is ideal for all uses--each has strengths and weaknesses. In many cases, hospitals will have to select a product based on their specific needs. For example, they may need to choose between a supplier whose system is easy to install and a supplier whose tags have a long battery operating life. PMID:17278873

  14. TRACKING Trounces Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation of an article from School Board News, January 6, 2004 edition. The article describes the effort of de-tracking students of varying ability levels, made by officials of South Side High School, in Rockville Centre, New York, and Noble High School, in North Berwick, Maine. Officials from both schools say that the…

  15. Energy Tracking Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Harrer, Benedikt W.; Close, Hunter G.; Daane, Abigail R.; DeWater, Lezlie S.; Robertson, Amy D.; Seeley, Lane; Vokos, Stamatis

    2016-01-01

    Energy is a crosscutting concept in science and features prominently in national science education documents. In the "Next Generation Science Standards," the primary conceptual learning goal is for learners to conserve energy as they "track" the transfers and transformations of energy within, into, or out of the system of…

  16. Tracking Politics with POWER

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Silvio; Batista, David S.; Carvalho, Paula; Couto, Francisco M.; Silva, Mario J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: POWER is an ontology of political processes and entities. It is designed for tracking politicians, political organizations and elections, both in mainstream and social media. The aim of this paper is to propose a data model to describe political agents and their relations over time. Design/methodology/approach: The authors propose a data…

  17. Laser powered interorbital vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. T.; Cooper, J. J.; Eggleston, G. P.; Farkas, M. A.; Hunt, D. C.; King, J.; Nguyen, H.; Rahal, G.; Saw, K.; Tipton, R.

    1989-01-01

    A preliminary design of a low-thrust Laser Powered Interorbital Vehicle (LPIV) intended for cargo transportation between an Earth space station and a lunar base is presented. The selected mission utilizes a spiral trajectory, characteristic of a low-thrust spacecraft, requiring eight days for a lunar rendezvous and an additional nine days for return. The ship's configuration consists primarily of an optical train, two hydrogen plasma engines, a 37.1 m box-beam truss, a payload module, and propellant tanks. The total mass of the vehicle, fully loaded, is 63,300 kg. A single plasma, regeneratively cooled engine design is incorporated into the two 500 N engines. These are connected to the spacecraft by turntables that allow the vehicle to thrust tangential to the flight path. Proper collection and transmission of the laser beam to the thrust chambers is provided through the optical train. This system consists of a 23-m-diameter primary mirror, a convex parabolic secondary mirror, a beam splitter, and two concave parabolic tertiary mirrors. The payload bay is capable of carrying 18,000 kg of cargo and is located opposite the primary mirror on the main truss. Fuel tanks carrying a maximum of 35,000 kg of liquid hydrogen are fastened to tracks that allow the tanks to be moved perpendicular to the main truss. This capability is required to prevent the center of mass from moving out of the thrust vector line. The laser beam is located and tracked by means of an acquisition, pointing, and tracking system that can be locked onto the space-based laser station. Correct orientation of the spacecraft with the laser beam is maintained by control moment gyros and reaction control rockets. In addition, an aerobrake configuration was designed to provide the option of using the atmospheric drag in place of propulsion for a return trajectory.

  18. Long range position and orientation tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Jansen, J.F.; Burks, B.L.; Bernacki, B.E.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The long range position and orientation tracking system (LRPOTS) will consist of two measurement pods, a VME-based computer system, and a detector array. The system is used to measure the position and orientation of a target that may be attached to a robotic arm, teleoperated manipulator, or autonomous vehicle. The pods have been designed to be mounted in the man-ways of the domes of the Fernald K-65 waste silos. Each pod has two laser scanner subsystems as well as lights and camera systems. One of the laser scanners will be oriented to scan in the pan direction, the other in the tilt direction. As the lasers scan across the detector array, the angles of incidence with each detector are recorded. Combining measurements from each of the four lasers yields sufficient data for a closed-form solution of the transform describing the location and orientation of the Content Mobilization System (CMS). Redundant detectors will be placed on the CMS to accommodate occlusions, to provide improved measurement accuracy, and to determine the CMS orientation.

  19. GPS Metric Tracking Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    As Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) applications become more prevalent for land- and air-based vehicles, GPS applications for space vehicles will also increase. The Applied Technology Directorate of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has developed a lightweight, low-cost GPS Metric Tracking Unit (GMTU), the first of two steps in developing a lightweight, low-cost Space-Based Tracking and Command Subsystem (STACS) designed to meet Range Safety's link margin and latency requirements for vehicle command and telemetry data. The goals of STACS are to improve Range Safety operations and expand tracking capabilities for space vehicles. STACS will track the vehicle, receive commands, and send telemetry data through the space-based asset, which will dramatically reduce dependence on ground-based assets. The other step was the Low-Cost Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Transceiver (LCT2), developed by the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), which allows the vehicle to communicate with a geosynchronous relay satellite. Although the GMTU and LCT2 were independently implemented and tested, the design collaboration of KSC and WFF engineers allowed GMTU and LCT2 to be integrated into one enclosure, leading to the final STACS. In operation, GMTU needs only a radio frequency (RF) input from a GPS antenna and outputs position and velocity data to the vehicle through a serial or pulse code modulation (PCM) interface. GMTU includes one commercial GPS receiver board and a custom board, the Command and Telemetry Processor (CTP) developed by KSC. The CTP design is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with embedded processors to support GPS functions.

  20. Tracking Virtual Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, Brent R.; Lorenceau, Jean D.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Current models of smooth pursuit eye movements assume that it is largely driven by retinal image motion. We tested this hypothesis by measuring pursuit of elliptical motion (3.2s, 0.9 Hz, 1.4 deg x 1.6 deg, 4 randomly interleaved phases) of either a small spot ("real" motion) or of a line-figure diamond viewed through apertures such that only the motion of four isolated oblique line segments was visible ("virtual" motion). Each segment moved sinusoidally along a linear trajectory yet subjects perceived a diamond moving along an elliptical path behind the aperture. We found, as expected, that real motion produced accurate tracking (N = 2) with mean gain (over horizontal and vertical) of 0.9, mean phase of -6 deg (lag), mean relative phase (H vs V) of 90 +/- 8 deg (RMS error). Virtual motion behind an X-shaped aperture (N= 4 with one naive) yielded a mean gain of 0.7, mean phase of -11 deg, mean relative phase of 87 +/- 15 deg. We also measured pursuit with the X-shaped aperture using a higher segment luminance which prevents the segments from being grouped into a coherently moving diamond while keeping the motion otherwise identical. In this incoherent case, the same four subjects no longer showed consistent elliptical tracking (RMS error in relative phase rose to 60 deg) suggesting that perceptual coherence is critical. Furthermore, to rule out tracking of the centroid, we also used vertical apertures so that all segment motion was vertical (N = 3). This stimulus still produced elliptical tracking (mean relative phase of 84 +/- 19 deg), albeit with a lower gain (0.6). These data show that humans can track moving objects reasonably accurately even when the trajectory can only be derived by spatial integration of motion signals. Models that merely seek to minimize retinal or local stimulus motion cannot explain these results.

  1. Early experience with a highly mobile Lageos ranging system. [satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, E. C.; Dittmar, D.; Eanes, R.; Ricklefs, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Two portions of the University of Texas Transportable Laser Ranging System (TLRS) are presented: the beam director and the burst mode single photon laser ranging system. The system, optimized for the Lageos target, has satellite track rates varying from approximately 1800 arcsec per sec on low targets to a few arcsec per sec on the highest. Using full aperture, approximately 3 millijoules of laser power per shot can be transmitted without exceeding the eye damage threshold, and a beam divergence of less than 30 arcsec is dictated by these parameters. Position loop response is optimized, and the instrument is capable of tracking the satellite from nearly any firm, flat position. The laser ranging system uses a multiple pulse laser, and power restrictions result in an average return of less than one photoelectron per shot. The use of a simple laser for ranging has virtually eliminated the high percentage of down time.

  2. Energy transmission by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.

    2015-02-01

    Laser spark obtained by using a conical optics is much more appropriate to form conducting channels in atmosphere. Only two types of lasers are actively considered to be used in forming high-conductivity channels in atmosphere, controlled by laser spark: pulsed sub-microsecond gas and chemical lasers (CO2, DF) and short pulse solid-state and UV lasers. Main advantage of short pulse lasers is their ability in forming of superlong ionised channels with a characteristic diameter of ~ 100 mkm in atmosphere along the beam propagation direction. At estimated electron densities below 1016 cm-3 in these filaments and laser wavelengths in the range of 0.5 - 1.0 mm, the plasma barely absorbs laser radiation. In this case, the length of the track composed of many filaments is determined by the laser intensity and may reach many kilometers at a femtosecond pulse energy of ~ 100 mJ. However, these lasers could not be used to form high-conductivity long channels in atmosphere. The ohmic resistance of this type a conducting channels turned out to be very high, and the gas in the channels could not be strongly heated (< 1 J). An electric breakdown controlled by radiation of femtosecond solid-state laser was implemented in only at a length of 3 m with a voltage of 2 MV across the discharge gap (670 kV/m). Not so long ago scientific group from P.N. Lebedev has improved that result, the discharge gap -1m had been broken under KrF laser irradiation when switching high-voltage (up to 390 kV/m) electric discharge by 100-ns UV pulses. Our previous result - 16 m long conducting channel controlled by a laser spark at the voltage - 3 MV - was obtained more than 20years ago in Russia and Japan by using pulsed CO2 laser with energy - 0.5 kJ. An average electric field strength was < 190 kV/m. It is still too much for efficient applications.

  3. Miniature Laser Tracker

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2003-09-09

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  4. Tracking-FCS: Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of individual particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Andrew J.; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2005-10-01

    We exploit recent advances in single-particle tracking to perform fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on individual fluorescent particles, in contrast to traditional methods that build up statistics over a sequence of many measurements. By rapidly scanning the focus of an excitation laser in a circular pattern, demodulating the measured fluorescence, and feeding these results back to a piezoelectric translation stage, we track the Brownian motion of fluorescent polymer microspheres in aqueous solution in the plane transverse to the laser axis. We discuss the estimation of particle diffusion statistics from closed-loop position measurements, and we present a generalized theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the case that the motion of a single fluorescent particle is actively tracked by a time-dependent laser intensity. We model the motion of a tracked particle using Ornstein-Uhlenbeck statistics, using a general theory that contains a umber of existing results as specific cases. We find good agreement between our theory and experimental results, and discuss possible future applications of these techniques to passive, single-shot, single-molecule fluorescence measurements with many orders of magnitude in time resolution.

  5. Two-Photon-Absorption Scheme for Optical Beam Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Farr, William H.

    2011-01-01

    A new optical beam tracking approach for free-space optical communication links using two-photon absorption (TPA) in a high-bandgap detector material was demonstrated. This tracking scheme is part of the canonical architecture described in the preceding article. TPA is used to track a long-wavelength transmit laser while direct absorption on the same sensor simultaneously tracks a shorter-wavelength beacon. The TPA responsivity was measured for silicon using a PIN photodiode at a laser beacon wavelength of 1,550 nm. As expected, the responsivity shows a linear dependence with incident power level. The responsivity slope is 4.5 x 10(exp -7) A/W2. Also, optical beam spots from the 1,550-nm laser beacon were characterized on commercial charge coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imagers with as little as 13.7 microWatts of optical power (see figure). This new tracker technology offers an innovative solution to reduce system complexity, improve transmit/receive isolation, improve optical efficiency, improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and reduce cost for free-space optical communications transceivers.

  6. Remote sensing of water tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochim, E. D.; Prakash, A.; Kane, D. L.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    Water tracks are an intrinsic part of the surficial drainage network in the foothills of the Brooks Range, Alaska. They preferentially transport water off hillslopes and represent the interplay between hydrology, vegetation, geomorphology, and permafrost characteristics. This research on mapping the location of water tracks builds on previous work which demonstrated that different types of water tracks exist due to difference primarily driven by geomorphology. We used a combination method where spectral classifications, texture, and topography were fed into random forests to identify the water track classes. The most accurate distributions were obtained for the organic-rich and wide water track classes. The distinct linear shapes of the water tracks could also be visualized for many of the classes, especially in areas where the water tracks were particularly discrete. The biggest challenges to mapping the water tracks were due to class imbalances and high variability within and overlapping between classes. This research presents a significant step forward in understanding periglacial landscape dynamics.

  7. The accuracy of automatic tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastrov, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that tracking accuracy changes similarly to the rate of change of the curve of the measurement conversion. The problem that internal noise increases along with the signals processed by the tracking device and that tracking accuracy thus drops were considered. The main prerequisite for solution is consideration of the dependences of the output signal of the tracking device sensor not only on the measured parameter but on the signal itself.

  8. Track-to-track association in decentralized tracking systems with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, Anders; Karlsson, Mathias

    2000-07-01

    In air combat, information advantage over the opponent is vital for the success of the operation. For that reason, modern fighter aircraft have extensive sensor suites to track other objects. In order to form a unified picture of the vicinity; all sensor information is fused. Since system modularity and high computational performance are key issues in the application, a decentralized tracking approach, where the information from the decentralized trackers is fused in a central node, is preferable. Furthermore, in order to improve the sensor tracking performance, it is often desired to feed back information to the sensors from the central node. In this paper, track-to-track association in such a decentralized tracking system with feedback is addressed. The central fusion node has to associate the sensor tracks to each other to be able to fuse them. In a system without feedback, the track-to-track association algorithm bases its conclusions on the assumption that the estimation errors of the tracks from different local trackers are not correlated. However, when information is fed back to the local trackers, this assumption is not valid, since the sensor tracks then consist of common information. System configurations that deal with this problem are proposed and tested in a fighter aircraft application. One approach is to extract the uncorrelated information from the sensor data and use that in the association process. Another approach is to keep parallel trackers in the sensors that only contain the local sensor information. Both approaches produce sensor tracks that contain the same information as the sensor tracks in a system without feedback. Also, a track-to-track association algorithm that recursively uses information from multiple time steps is proposed. The use of multiple time step data separates it from conventional track-to-track association algorithms that mostly use only current information. The result is an algorithm that improves the performance and

  9. GEOS 3 STDN S band Doppler tracking investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, B.

    1979-01-01

    GEOS 3S Doppler band and laser ranging data, acquired from August 1975 to March 1976 in the spacecraft altimeter calibration area, are examined. An evaluation of two-way and three-way Doppler data, for the positioning of Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network S band stations is presented, as well as the Goddard Space Flight Center laser system that is used to reference the exact position of the Doppler stations. The two-way and three-way Doppler tracking devices, situated at Rosman and Bermuda, have yielded data for the recovery of GEOS 3 arc height with an uncertainty of only 1 m. Attention is given to the effects of beacon signal frequency instability, controlled by a temperature sensitive auxiliary crystal oscillator on board the spacecraft, and to the one-way range rate tracking noise that was found to be within a range of 2 to 10 cm/s. 1- and 2-way passes and their different arc meters are graphed, showing the Doppler tracking interval. It was concluded that other accurate computations and recovery of station coordinates could be performed employing tracking data from S band stations.

  10. Track Initiation for Electro-Optical Tracking of Space Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2016-03-01

    Aimed at the track initiation for the electro-optical tracking of space objects, and based on modified Hough transformation, a track initiation algorithm without prior information is proposed to realize the fully robotic identification and tracking of moving objects. The method is valid for the tracking of multi-target as well as with a non-continuous sequence. Simulation shows that the method is effective and applicable for operational usage, and is especially good for the search and discovery of new objects.

  11. Satellite (IRLS) tracking of elk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechner, H. K.

    1972-01-01

    The practicability of tracking free roaming animals in natural environments by satellite systems is reported. Satellite systems combine continuous tracking with simultaneous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters through a combination of radio tracking and biotelemetric ground systems that lead to a better understanding of animal behavior and migration patterns.

  12. Footstep detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Succi, George P.; Clapp, Daniel; Gampert, Robert; Prado, Gervasio

    2001-09-01

    Persons or vehicles moving over ground generate a succession of impacts; these soil disturbances propagate away from the source as seismic waves. These seismic waves are especially useful in detecting footsteps which cannot be detected acoustically. Footstep signals can be distinguished from other seismic sources, such as vehicles or wind noise, by their impulsive nature. Even in noisy environments, statistical measures of the seismic amplitude distribution, such as kurtosis, can be used to identify a footstep. These detection methods can be used even with single component geophones. Moreover, the seismic signal is a vector wave that can be used to track the source bearing. To do such tracking a three-component measurement is needed. If multiple sources are separated in angle, we can use this bearing information to estimate the number of walkers.

  13. Longwall shearer tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulsen, P. D. (Inventor); Stein, R. J.; Pease, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    A tracking system for measuring and recording the movements of a longwall shearer vehicle includes an optical tracking assembly carried at one end of a desired vehicle path and a retroreflector assembly carried by the vehicle. Continuous horizontal and vertical light beams are alternately transmitted by means of a rotating Dove prism to the reflector assembly. A vertically reciprocating reflector interrupts the continuous light beams and converts these to discrete horizontal and vertical light beam images transmitted at spaced intervals along the path. A second rotating Dove prism rotates the vertical images to convert them to a second series of horizontal images while the first mentioned horizontal images are left unrotated and horizontal. The images are recorded on a film.

  14. On particle track detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Gruhn, T. A.; Andrus, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Aqueous sodium hydroxide is widely used to develop charged particle tracks in polycarbonate film, particularly Lexan. The chemical nature of the etching process for this system has been determined. A method employing ultra-violet absorbance was developed for monitoring the concentration of the etch products in solution. Using this method it was possible to study the formation of the etching solution saturated in etch products. It was found that the system super-saturates to a significant extent before precipitation occurs. It was also learned that the system approaches its equilibrium state rather slowly. It is felt that both these phenomena may be due to the presence of surfactant in the solution. In light of these findings, suggestions are given regarding the preparation and maintenance of the saturated etch solution. Two additional research projects, involving automated techniques for particle track analysis and particle identification using AgCl crystals, are briefly summarized.

  15. Motion Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Integrated Sensors, Inc. (ISI), under NASA contract, developed a sensor system for controlling robot vehicles. This technology would enable a robot supply vehicle to automatically dock with Earth-orbiting satellites or the International Space Station. During the docking phase the ISI-developed sensor must sense the satellite's relative motion, then spin so the robot vehicle can adjust its motion to align with the satellite and slowly close until docking is completed. ISI used the sensing/tracking technology as the basis of its OPAD system, which simultaneously tracks an object's movement in six degrees of freedom. Applications include human limb motion analysis, assembly line position analysis and auto crash dummy motion analysis. The NASA technology is also the basis for Motion Analysis Workstation software, a package to simplify the video motion analysis process.

  16. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made. PMID:23513759

  17. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  18. Optical tracking telescope compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbart, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    In order to minimize the effects of parameter variations in the dynamics of an optical tracking telescope, a model referenced parameter adaptive control system is described that - in conjunction with more traditional forms of compensation - achieves a reduction of rms pointing error by more than a factor of six. The adaptive compensation system utilizes open loop compensation, closed loop compensation, and model reference compensation to provide the precise input to force telescope axis velocity to follow the ideal velocity.

  19. Approximate Bayesian multibody tracking.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Oswald

    2006-09-01

    Visual tracking of multiple targets is a challenging problem, especially when efficiency is an issue. Occlusions, if not properly handled, are a major source of failure. Solutions supporting principled occlusion reasoning have been proposed but are yet unpractical for online applications. This paper presents a new solution which effectively manages the trade-off between reliable modeling and computational efficiency. The Hybrid Joint-Separable (HJS) filter is derived from a joint Bayesian formulation of the problem, and shown to be efficient while optimal in terms of compact belief representation. Computational efficiency is achieved by employing a Markov random field approximation to joint dynamics and an incremental algorithm for posterior update with an appearance likelihood that implements a physically-based model of the occlusion process. A particle filter implementation is proposed which achieves accurate tracking during partial occlusions, while in cases of complete occlusion, tracking hypotheses are bound to estimated occlusion volumes. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm is efficient, robust, and able to resolve long-term occlusions between targets with identical appearance. PMID:16929730

  20. Energy Tracking Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Harrer, Benedikt W.; Close, Hunter G.; Daane, Abigail R.; DeWater, Lezlie S.; Robertson, Amy D.; Seeley, Lane; Vokos, Stamatis

    2016-02-01

    Energy is a crosscutting concept in science and features prominently in national science education documents. In the Next Generation Science Standards, the primary conceptual learning goal is for learners to conserve energy as they track the transfers and transformations of energy within, into, or out of the system of interest in complex physical processes. As part of tracking energy transfers among objects, learners should (i) distinguish energy from matter, including recognizing that energy flow does not uniformly align with the movement of matter, and should (ii) identify specific mechanisms by which energy is transferred among objects, such as mechanical work and thermal conduction. As part of tracking energy transformations within objects, learners should (iii) associate specific forms with specific models and indicators (e.g., kinetic energy with speed and/or coordinated motion of molecules, thermal energy with random molecular motion and/or temperature) and (iv) identify specific mechanisms by which energy is converted from one form to another, such as incandescence and metabolism. Eventually, we may hope for learners to be able to optimize systems to maximize some energy transfers and transformations and minimize others, subject to constraints based in both imputed mechanism (e.g., objects must have motion energy in order for gravitational energy to change) and the second law of thermodynamics (e.g., heating is irreversible). We hypothesize that a subsequent goal of energy learning—innovating to meet socially relevant needs—depends crucially on the extent to which these goals have been met.

  1. Fast Track Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Fast Track Study supports the efforts of a Special Study Group (SSG) made up of members of the Advanced Project Management Class number 23 (APM-23) that met at the Wallops Island Management Education Center from April 28 - May 8, 1996. Members of the Class expressed interest to Mr. Vem Weyers in having an input to the NASA Policy Document (NPD) 7120.4, that will replace NASA Management Institute (NMI) 7120.4, and the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. The APM-23 SSG was tasked with assisting in development of NASA policy on managing Fast Track Projects, defined as small projects under $150 million and completed within three years. 'Me approach of the APM-23 SSG was to gather data on successful projects working in a 'Better, Faster, Cheaper' environment, within and outside of NASA and develop the Fast Track Project section of the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. Fourteen interviews and four other data gathering efforts were conducted by the SSG, and 16 were conducted by Strategic Resources, Inc. (SRI), including five interviews at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and one at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). The interviews were compiled and analyzed for techniques and approaches commonly used to meet severe cost and schedule constraints.

  2. Respiration tracking in radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikard, Achim; Shiomi, Hiroya; Adler, John

    2004-10-01

    Respiratory motion is difficult to compensate for with conventional radiotherapy systems. An accurate tracking method for following the motion of the tumor is of considerable clinical relevance. We investigate methods to compensate for respiratory motion using robotic radiosurgery. In this system the therapeutic beam is moved by a robotic arm, and follows the moving target through a combination of infrared tracking and synchronized x-ray imaging. Infrared emitters are used to record the motion of the patient's skin surface. The position of internal gold fiducials is computed repeatedly during treatment, via x-ray image processing. We correlate the motion between external and internal markers. From this correlation model we infer the placement of the internal target during time intervals where no x-ray images are taken. Fifteen patients with lung tumors have recently been treated with a fully integrated system implementing this new method. The clinical trials confirm our hypothesis that internal motion and external motion are indeed correlated. In a preliminar study we have extended our work to tracking without implanted fiducials, based on algorithms for computing deformation motions and digitally reconstructed radiographs.

  3. NEKF IMM tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Mark W.; Stubberud, Allen R.

    2003-12-01

    Highly maneuvering threats are a major concern for the Navy and the DoD and the technology discussed in this paper is intended to help address this issue. A neural extended Kalman filter algorithm has been embedded in an interacting multiple model architecture for target tracking. The neural extended Kalman filter algorithm is used to improve motion model prediction during maneuvers. With a better target motion mode, noise reduction can be achieved through a maneuver. Unlike the interacting multiple model architecture which uses a high process noise model to hold a target through a maneuver with poor velocity and acceleration estimates, a neural extended Kalman filter is used to predict corrections to the velocity and acceleration states of a target through a maneuver. The neural extended Kalman filter estimates the weights of a neural network, which in turn are used to modify the state estimate predictions of the filter as measurements are processed. The neural network training is performed on-line as data is processed. In this paper, the simulation results of a tracking problem using a neural extended Kalman filter embedded in an interacting multiple model tracking architecture are shown. Preliminary results on the 2nd Benchmark Problem are also given.

  4. NEKF IMM tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Mark W.; Stubberud, Allen R.

    2004-01-01

    Highly maneuvering threats are a major concern for the Navy and the DoD and the technology discussed in this paper is intended to help address this issue. A neural extended Kalman filter algorithm has been embedded in an interacting multiple model architecture for target tracking. The neural extended Kalman filter algorithm is used to improve motion model prediction during maneuvers. With a better target motion mode, noise reduction can be achieved through a maneuver. Unlike the interacting multiple model architecture which uses a high process noise model to hold a target through a maneuver with poor velocity and acceleration estimates, a neural extended Kalman filter is used to predict corrections to the velocity and acceleration states of a target through a maneuver. The neural extended Kalman filter estimates the weights of a neural network, which in turn are used to modify the state estimate predictions of the filter as measurements are processed. The neural network training is performed on-line as data is processed. In this paper, the simulation results of a tracking problem using a neural extended Kalman filter embedded in an interacting multiple model tracking architecture are shown. Preliminary results on the 2nd Benchmark Problem are also given.

  5. ORION Low Cost Laser Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phipps, Claude R.

    1996-01-01

    We show that laser-target interaction physics demands the shortest laser pulse of which hardware is capable (but not less than 100 ps) in the ORION ground-based laser concept. We compare two leading ways to achieve such pulses - SRS/SBS cascade compression and grating compression - with the standard MOPA approach, and conclude that the first of these is most robust. However, the state of the art in laser devices will require a year or two to implement these ideas. We present a pulse format and beam footprint protocol which will solve the conflict between relativistic lookahead and beam tilt and should permit all-laser active acquisition and tracking in ORION.

  6. Satellite-tracking and earth-dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiffenbach, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    The following activities in Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's (SAO) earth-dynamics programs are covered: (1) satellite-tracking network operations; (2) satellite geodesy and geophysics programs; (3) atmospheric research. Approximately 46,000 successful range measurements were acquired by the SAO laser stations in Peru, South Africa, Brazil, and Arizona. The Peole satellite-tracking campaign conducted in conjunction with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales was completed in August 1973. The SAO network obtained 4482 validated returns of 310 arcs of Peole. These data are of particular value for obtaining more accurate gravity-field and zonal-harmonics coefficients.

  7. Quality of Slab Track Construction - Track Alignment Design and Track Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šestáková, Janka

    2015-05-01

    The slab track superstructure design (without ballast) is a perspective construction especially for building tunnels and bridges in the modernized sections of railway tracks in Slovakia. Monitoring of the structure described in this article is focused on the transition areas between standard structure with ballast and slab track construction.

  8. 3D imaging of particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionizing decay products is known to cause lung cancer in human. In the U.K., it has been suggested that 3 to 5 % of total lung cancer deaths can be linked to elevated radon concentrations in the home and/or workplace. Radon monitoring in buildings is therefore routinely undertaken in areas of known risk. Indeed, some organisations such as the Radon Council in the UK and the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA, advocate a ‘to test is best' policy. Radon gas occurs naturally, emanating from the decay of 238U in rock and soils. Its concentration can be measured using CR?39 plastic detectors which conventionally are assessed by 2D image analysis of the surface; however there can be some variation in outcomes / readings even in closely spaced detectors. A number of radon measurement methods are currently in use (for examples, activated carbon and electrets) but the most widely used are CR?39 solid state nuclear track?etch detectors (SSNTDs). In this technique, heavily ionizing alpha particles leave tracks in the form of radiation damage (via interaction between alpha particles and the atoms making up the CR?39 polymer). 3D imaging of the tracks has the potential to provide information relating to angle and energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high resolution 3D imaging of SSNTDs. A ‘LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR?39 plastic detectors. 3D visualisation and image analysis enabled characterisation of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of SSNTDs. Keywords: Radon; SSNTDs; confocal laser scanning microscope; 3D imaging; LEXT

  9. Thermal Tracking of Sports Players

    PubMed Central

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    We present here a real-time tracking algorithm for thermal video from a sports game. Robust detection of people includes routines for handling occlusions and noise before tracking each detected person with a Kalman filter. This online tracking algorithm is compared with a state-of-the-art offline multi-target tracking algorithm. Experiments are performed on a manually annotated 2-minutes video sequence of a real soccer game. The Kalman filter shows a very promising result on this rather challenging sequence with a tracking accuracy above 70% and is superior compared with the offline tracking approach. Furthermore, the combined detection and tracking algorithm runs in real time at 33 fps, even with large image sizes of 1920 × 480 pixels. PMID:25076219

  10. Thermal tracking of sports players.

    PubMed

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B

    2014-01-01

    We present here a real-time tracking algorithm for thermal video from a sports game. Robust detection of people includes routines for handling occlusions and noise before tracking each detected person with a Kalman filter. This online tracking algorithm is compared with a state-of-the-art offline multi-target tracking algorithm. Experiments are performed on a manually annotated 2-minutes video sequence of a real soccer game. The Kalman filter shows a very promising result on this rather challenging sequence with a tracking accuracy above 70% and is superior compared with the offline tracking approach. Furthermore, the combined detection and tracking algorithm runs in real time at 33 fps, even with large image sizes of 1920 × 480 pixels. PMID:25076219

  11. A Shuttle based laser system for space communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Bruno, Ronald C.

    1988-01-01

    A key element of NASA-Goddard's plan for future laser space communications is the Space Shuttle-based Laser Technology Experiments Facility (LTEF), which will be designed to communicate with a cooperative laser system under development for the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) and will conduct a comprehensive set of acquisition, tracking, and communication experiments. Attention is presently given to the challenges faced by designers in achieving LTEF acquisition of the ACTS downlink beacon laser.

  12. Back on Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    An artificial, laser-fed star now shines regularly over the sky of Paranal, home of ESO's Very Large Telescope, one of the world's most advanced large ground-based telescopes. This system provides assistance for the adaptive optics instruments on the VLT and so allows astronomers to obtain images free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere, regardless of the brightness and the location on the sky of the observed target. Now that it is routinely offered by the observatory, the skies seem much sharper to astronomers. In order to counteract the blurring effect of Earth's atmosphere, astronomers use the adaptive optics technique. This requires, however, a nearby reference star that has to be relatively bright, thereby limiting the area of the sky that can be surveyed. To surmount this limitation, astronomers now use at Paranal a powerful laser that creates an artificial star, where and when they need it. Two of the Adaptive Optics (AO) science instruments at the Paranal observatory, NACO and SINFONI, have been upgraded to work with the recently installed Laser Guide Star (LGS; see ESO 07/06) and have delivered their first scientific results. This achievement opens astronomers' access to a wealth of new targets to be studied under the sharp eyes of AO. "These unique results underline the advantage of using a Laser Guide Star with Adaptive Optics instruments, since they could not be obtained with Natural Guide Stars," says Norbert Hubin, head of the Adaptive Optics group at ESO. "This is also a crucial milestone towards the multi-laser systems ESO is designing for the VLT and the future E-ELT" (see e.g. ESO 19/07). ESO PR Photo 27a/07 ESO PR Photo 27a/07 An Ultra Luminous Merger (NACO-LGS/VLT) The Laser Guide Star System installed at Paranal uses the PARSEC dye laser developed by MPE-Garching and MPIA-Heidelberg, while the launch telescope and the laser laboratory was developed by ESO. "It is great to see the whole system working so well together," emphasises Richard

  13. 49 CFR 213.331 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Track surface. 213.331 Section 213.331... Track surface. (a) For a single deviation in track surface, each track owner shall maintain the surface of its track within the limits prescribed in the following table: Track surface (inches) Class...

  14. 49 CFR 213.331 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Track surface. 213.331 Section 213.331... Track surface. (a) For a single deviation in track surface, each track owner shall maintain the surface of its track within the limits prescribed in the following table: Track surface (inches) Class...

  15. 49 CFR 213.63 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Track surface. 213.63 Section 213.63..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.63 Track surface. Each owner of the track to which this part applies shall maintain the surface of its track within the limits prescribed...

  16. 49 CFR 213.63 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Track surface. 213.63 Section 213.63..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Geometry § 213.63 Track surface. Each owner of the track to which this part applies shall maintain the surface of its track within the limits prescribed...

  17. The Central laser facility at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Arqueros, F.; Bellido, J.; Covault, C.; D'Urso, D.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal, P.; Fick, B.; Guarino, F.; Malek, M.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Matthews, J.; Meyhandan, R.; Monasor, M.; Mostafa, M.; Petrinca, P.; Roberts, M.; Sommers, P.; Travnicek, P.; Valore, L.; Verzi, V.; Wiencke, Lawrence; /Utah U.

    2005-07-01

    The Central Laser Facility is located near the middle of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. It features a UV laser and optics that direct a beam of calibrated pulsed light into the sky. Light scattered from this beam produces tracks in the Auger optical detectors which normally record nitrogen fluorescence tracks from cosmic ray air showers. The Central Laser Facility provides a ''test beam'' to investigate properties of the atmosphere and the fluorescence detectors. The laser can send light via optical fiber simultaneously to the nearest surface detector tank for hybrid timing analyses. We describe the facility and show some examples of its many uses.

  18. Recent Results from CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Nerem, R. S.; Thompson, B.; Pavlis, E.; Williams, T. A.; Colombo, O. L.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE to be launched in the early part of 02') that combine a new generation of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a high precision three-axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the non-gravitational forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three-axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies.

  19. Satellite Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the Center for Aerospace Sciences of the University of North Dakota (UND), Grand Forks, used three NASA Computer programs (SANDTRACKS, ODG, NORAD) to develop a Satellite Tracking System for real time utilization of TIROS weather/environment satellite information. SANDTRACKS computes the satellite's position relative to the Earth. ODG allows plotting a view of Earth as seen by the satellite. NORAD computes sight direction, visibility times and maximum elevation angle during each orbit. With the system, UND's Earth System Science Institute will be able to routinely monitor agricultural and environmental conditions of the Northern Plains.

  20. Tracking the GLOMR satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, Keith W.; Oneil, Jason C.

    1987-01-01

    The task of day-to-day low orbiting satellite tracking utilizing the NAVSPASUR orbital elements is discussed and methods for improving pass time predictions are presented. Estimates are needed for preprogramming of satellite-initiated communications scheduling which requires an accuracy of approximately 30 seconds. This can be achieved by removing the variance associated with the NAVSPASUR D sub 2 (decay) term. Finally, the shock evidenced in GLOMR's orbit on February 7, 1986 is documented and attributed to a severe solar storm with immediately enhanced drag. GLOMR's life expectancy in orbit is now estimated to have dropped approximately 17% by the end of orbit in early February, 1987.

  1. Adaptive Objectness for Object Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Pengpeng; Pang, Yu; Liao, Chunyuan; Mei, Xue; Ling, Haibin

    2016-07-01

    Object tracking is a long standing problem in vision. While great efforts have been spent to improve tracking performance, a simple yet reliable prior knowledge is left unexploited: the target object in tracking must be an object other than non-object. The recently proposed and popularized objectness measure provides a natural way to model such prior in visual tracking. Thus motivated, in this paper we propose to adapt objectness for visual object tracking. Instead of directly applying an existing objectness measure that is generic and handles various objects and environments, we adapt it to be compatible to the specific tracking sequence and object. More specifically, we use the newly proposed BING objectness as the base, and then train an object-adaptive objectness for each tracking task. The training is implemented by using an adaptive support vector machine that integrates information from the specific tracking target into the BING measure. We emphasize that the benefit of the proposed adaptive objectness, named ADOBING, is generic. To show this, we combine ADOBING with seven top performed trackers in recent evaluations. We run the ADOBING-enhanced trackers with their base trackers on two popular benchmarks, the CVPR2013 benchmark (50 sequences) and the Princeton Tracking Benchmark (100 sequences). On both benchmarks, our methods not only consistently improve the base trackers, but also achieve the best known performances. Noting that the way we integrate objectness in visual tracking is generic and straightforward, we expect even more improvement by using tracker-specific objectness.

  2. Tracking with the LHCb spectrometer: Detector performance and track reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuning, N.; LHCb Collaboration

    2007-10-01

    The LHCb experiment aims to measure CP violation and rare B-decays. For this, a tracking system is constructed consisting of a silicon micro-strip vertex locator close to the interaction point, and tracking detectors around a dipole magnet. The resulting tracking performance is estimated from simulation to yield 95% efficiency. The momentum and impact parameter resolutions vary between 0.35% and 0.5%, and 20 and 160 μm, respectively.

  3. Putting Off-Track Youths Back on Track to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Adria; Allen, Lili

    2011-01-01

    Back on Track, developed by Jobs for the Future, is a design for schools to not only re-engage off-track and out-of-school youths to graduate from high school, but also to put them on a clear, supported path to a college education. Two schools that have combined Back on Track with the early college model, in which students can earn both a high…

  4. Satellite-tracking and Earth dynamics research programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The activities carried out by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) are described. The SAO network continued to track LAGEOS at highest priority for polar motion and Earth rotation studies, and for other geophysical investigations, including crustal dynamics, Earth and ocean tides, and the general development of precision orbit determination. The network performed regular tracking of several other retroreflector satellites including GEOS-1, GEOS-3, BE-C, and Starlette for refined determinations of station coordinates and the Earth's gravity field and for studies of solid Earth dynamics. A major program in laser upgrading continued to improve ranging accuracy and data yield. This program includes an increase in pulse repetition rate from 8 ppm to 30 ppm, a reduction in laser pulse width from 6 nsec to 2 to 3 nsec, improvements in the photoreceiver and the electronics to improve daylight ranging, and an analog pulse detection system to improve range noise and accuracy. Data processing hardware and software are discussed.

  5. The Laser of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, G.; Nielsen, B. S.; Westergaard, J.; Gaardhøje, J. J.

    The large TPC (95 m3) of the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC was commissioned in summer 2006. The first tracks were observed both from the cosmic ray muons and from the laser rays injected into the TPC. In this article the basic principles of operating the 266 nm lasers are presented, showing the installation and adjustment of the optical system and describing the control system. To generate the laser tracks, a wide laser beam is split into several hundred narrow beams by fixed micro-mirrors at stable and known positions throughout the TPC. In the drift volume, these narrow beams generate straight tracks at many angles. Here we describe the generation of the first tracks and compare them with simulations.

  6. 9. BUILDING 65 ADDITION. LASER SAFETY TEAM. FLOOR PLAN, ELEVATIONS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BUILDING 65 ADDITION. LASER SAFETY TEAM. FLOOR PLAN, ELEVATIONS, ETC. March 21, 1973 - Frankford Arsenal, Building No. 65, South of Tacony Street between Bridge Street & tracks of former Pennsylvania Railroad, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. Missile tracking and range safety: Tracking Interferometer Pathfinder System (TIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowgiallo, David J.; Rauen, Stephen; Peters, Wendy M.; Polisensky, Emil J.

    2013-05-01

    The tracking of missiles at close range proximity has been an ongoing challenge for many launch environments. The ability to provide accurate missile trajectory information is imperative for range safety and early termination of flight. In an effort to provide a potential solution to tracking issues that have plagued many traditional techniques, the Tracking Interferometer Pathfinder System (TIPS) was developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. The paper herein describes the design, field test, and results of an interferometer deployed for missile tracking.

  8. Laser Doppler And Range Systems For Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, P. W.; Gagliardi, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Report discusses two types of proposed laser systems containing active transponders measuring distance (range) and line-of-sight velocity (via Doppler effect) between deep space vehicle and earth-orbiting satellite. Laser system offers diffraction advantage over microwave system. Delivers comparable power to distant receiver while using smaller transmitting and receiving antennas and less-powerful transmitter. Less subject to phase scintillations caused by passage through such inhomogeneous media as solar corona. One type of system called "incoherent" because range and Doppler measurements do not require coherence with laser carrier signals. Other type of system called "coherent" because successful operation requires coherent tracking of laser signals.

  9. Inter-satellite laser link simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lanjuan; Guan, Hui; Wang, Zhilin

    2015-11-01

    The characteristic of satellite communication link was firstly described and four application modes were put forward. By comparison, it is suggested that microwave link is used in satellite-to-ground communication and laser link is used in inter-satellite communication. Secondly the condition and composition of laser link establishment was analyzed and laser link model was set up, and the principle and composition of APT system was described. Finally, based on STK and MATLAB platform, the process of inter-satellite laser link establishment was designed, and setting the scene of TDRS capturing and tracking user's satellite as an example, simulation was realized and demonstrated.

  10. Cassini Archive Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, Diane; Sayfi, Elias; Tinio, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    The Cassini Archive Tracking System (CATS) is a computer program that enables tracking of scientific data transfers from originators to the Planetary Data System (PDS) archives. Without CATS, there is no systematic means of locating products in the archive process or ensuring their completeness. By keeping a database of transfer communications and status, CATS enables the Cassini Project and the PDS to efficiently and accurately report on archive status. More importantly, problem areas are easily identified through customized reports that can be generated on the fly from any Web-enabled computer. A Web-browser interface and clearly defined authorization scheme provide safe distributed access to the system, where users can perform functions such as create customized reports, record a transfer, and respond to a transfer. CATS ensures that Cassini provides complete science archives to the PDS on schedule and that those archives are available to the science community by the PDS. The three-tier architecture is loosely coupled and designed for simple adaptation to multimission use. Written in the Java programming language, it is portable and can be run on any Java-enabled Web server.

  11. Integrated Management Tracking System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-03-30

    The Integrated Management Tracking System (IMTS) is a "Web Enabled" Client/Server Business application that provides for the Identification and Resolution of commitments, situations, events and problems. The IMTS engine is written with Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP) for IIS4. The system provides for reporting, entering, editing, closing and administration over a Intranet, Extranet or Internet. This Application facilitates: Electronic assignment, acceptance and tracking to completion. Email notifications of assigned action. Establishment of Due Dates. Electronicmore » search and retrieval based on keywords in combination with user specified database parameters (Document Type, Date Ranges, etc.). Coded for Trending and Reporting. User selected reports. Various levels of access for reports and administration. The "Server" side of this application consists of a Microsoft Access database running on a NT Server with Internet Information Server (IIS). As the "Client" side of the application runs on any Web browser, this solution is a cost effective, user friendly application that lends itself to organizations not physically colocated in one location providing information immediately available to everyone at once.« less

  12. Automated call tracking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, C.

    1993-03-01

    User Services groups are on the front line with user support. We are the first to hear about problems. The speed, accuracy, and intelligence with which we respond determines the user`s perception of our effectiveness and our commitment to quality and service. To keep pace with the complex changes at our sites, we must have tools to help build a knowledge base of solutions, a history base of our users, and a record of every problem encountered. Recently, I completed a survey of twenty sites similar to the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC). This informal survey reveals that 27% of the sites use a paper system to log calls, 60% employ homegrown automated call tracking systems, and 13% use a vendor-supplied system. Fifty-four percent of those using homegrown systems are exploring the merits of switching to a vendor-supplied system. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidelines for evaluating a call tracking system. In addition, insights are provided to assist User Services groups in selecting a system that fits their needs.

  13. Integrated Management Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Terrance

    2000-03-30

    The Integrated Management Tracking System (IMTS) is a "Web Enabled" Client/Server Business application that provides for the Identification and Resolution of commitments, situations, events and problems. The IMTS engine is written with Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP) for IIS4. The system provides for reporting, entering, editing, closing and administration over a Intranet, Extranet or Internet. This Application facilitates: Electronic assignment, acceptance and tracking to completion. Email notifications of assigned action. Establishment of Due Dates. Electronic search and retrieval based on keywords in combination with user specified database parameters (Document Type, Date Ranges, etc.). Coded for Trending and Reporting. User selected reports. Various levels of access for reports and administration. The "Server" side of this application consists of a Microsoft Access database running on a NT Server with Internet Information Server (IIS). As the "Client" side of the application runs on any Web browser, this solution is a cost effective, user friendly application that lends itself to organizations not physically colocated in one location providing information immediately available to everyone at once.

  14. NORAD satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Joseph J. F.

    1987-01-01

    NORAD routinely tracks about 6000 orbiting objects. During the last 30 days of orbital time, prior to reentry, special perturbations are used in the orbital update procedure. Besides routine orbit determination, NORAD does special tasks such as predicting satellite orbit conjunctions within 20 km, ephimerides of weather satellites, satellite decay predictions and other studies. Since their mission is operational, they do not store the data from their analyses. The ballistic coefficient is not known for most of the orbiting objects. If a ballistic coefficient were derived that was consistent with one density model, it might give erroneous results if used with a different density model. Given the ballistic coefficient, density values could, in principle, be obtained from their tracking data. The densities would represent an integrated mean over the orbital path near perigee. They would be model dependent and would not necessarily represent the real density. In summary, the primary need is for reliable forecasts of solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic activity (Ap) in the 1 to 4 week time scale. Forecasts over longer time spans would also be useful for special projects.

  15. Advanced technology for space communications and tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1988-01-01

    Technological advances in the communications and tracking areas being developed by NASA and applicable to future missions and associated space operations are discussed. The applications scenarios considered include the Space Shuttle, Space Station, lunar base, and Mars missions. Performance goals and conceptual designs are discussed, and the relevance of optical, laser, and millimeter wave-based implementations to the various applications are examined. Recommendations for future systems developments are addressed.

  16. Initial alignment method for free space optics laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yuta; Tashiro, Yuki; Izumi, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Koichi; Tsujimura, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    The authors have newly proposed and constructed an active free space optics transmission system. It is equipped with a motor driven laser emitting mechanism and positioning photodiodes, and it transmits a collimated thin laser beam and accurately steers the laser beam direction. It is necessary to introduce the laser beam within sensible range of the receiver in advance of laser beam tracking control. This paper studies an estimation method of laser reaching point for initial laser beam alignment. Distributed photodiodes detect laser luminescence at respective position, and the optical axis of laser beam is analytically presumed based on the Gaussian beam optics. Computer simulation evaluates the accuracy of the proposed estimation methods, and results disclose that the methods help us to guide the laser beam to a distant receiver.

  17. REC Tracking Systems Design Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Meredith Wingate

    2004-02-03

    OAK-B135 The Design Guide is presented in three parts. Section II describes the need for REC tracking, the two principal tracking methods available, and, in simple terms, the operation of certificate-based systems. Section III presents the major issues in the design of certificate-based tracking systems and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of alternative solutions. Finally, Section IV offers design principles or recommendations for most of these issues.

  18. Solar Array Tracking Control

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-06-22

    SolarTrak used in conjunction with various versions of 68HC11-based SolarTrack hardware boards provides control system for one or two axis solar tracking arrays. Sun position is computed from stored position data and time from an on-board clock/calendar chip. Position feedback can be by one or two offset motor turn counter square wave signals per axis, or by a position potentiometer. A limit of 256 counts resolution is imposed by the on-board analog to digital (A/D)more » convertor. Control is provided for one or two motors. Numerous options are provided to customize the controller for specific applications. Some options are imposed at compile time, some are setable during operation. Software and hardware board designs are provided for Control Board and separate User Interface Board that accesses and displays variables from Control Board. Controller can be used with range of sensor options ranging from a single turn count sensor per motor to systems using dual turn-count sensors, limit sensors, and a zero reference sensor. Dual axis trackers oriented azimuth elevation, east west, north south, or polar declination can be controlled. Misalignments from these orientations can also be accommodated. The software performs a coordinate transformation using six parameters to compute sun position in misaligned coordinates of the tracker. Parameters account for tilt of tracker in two directions, rotation about each axis, and gear ration errors in each axis. The software can even measure and compute these prameters during an initial setup period if current from a sun position sensor or output from photovoltaic array is available as an anlog voltage to the control board''s A/D port. Wind or emergency stow to aj present position is available triggered by digital or analog signals. Night stow is also available. Tracking dead band is adjustable from narrow to wide. Numerous features of the hardware and software conserve energy for use with battery powered systems.« less

  19. The High Altitude Balloon Experiment demonstration of acquisition, tracking, and pointing technologies (HABE-ATP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiduk, D.; Caylor, M.; Williamson, D.; Larson, L.

    1995-01-01

    The High Altitude Balloon Experiment demonstration of Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing (HABE-ATP) is a system built around balloon-borne payload which is carried to a nominal 26-km altitude. The goal is laser tracking thrusting theater and strategic missiles, and then pointing a surrogate laser weapon beam, with performance levels end a timeline traceable to operational laser weapon system requirements. This goal leads to an experiment system design which combines hardware from many technology areas: an optical telescope and IR sensors; an advanced angular inertial reference; a flexible multi-level of actuation digital control system; digital tracking processors which incorporate real-time image analysis and a pulsed, diode-pumped solid state tracking laser. The system components have been selected to meet the overall experiment goals of tracking unmodified boosters at 50- 200 km range. The ATP system on HABE must stabilize and control a relative line of sight between the platform and the unmodified target booster to a 1 microrad accuracy. The angular pointing reference system supports both open loop and closed loop track modes; GPS provides absolute position reference. The control system which positions the line of sight for the ATP system must sequence through accepting a state vector handoff, closed-loop passive IR acquisition, passive IR intermediate fine track, active fine track, and then finally aimpoint determination and maintenance modes. Line of sight stabilization to fine accuracy levels is accomplished by actuating wide bandwidth fast steering mirrors (FSM's). These control loops off-load large-amplitude errors to the outer gimbal in order to remain within the limited angular throw of the FSM's. The SWIR acquisition and MWIR intermediate fine track sensors (both PtSi focal planes) image the signature of the rocket plume. After Hard Body Handover (HBHO), active fine tracking is conducted with a visible focal plane viewing the laser-illuminated target

  20. Laser applications in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, Leonard J.

    1985-09-01

    beam makes the laser superior to all conventional destructive instruments. 4)|The coagulative properties of certain chromophoric lasers has allowed a new attack on certain vascular tumors and malformations of the brain and spinal cord which had been operated only with trepidation or not at all. Early reports are sobering but encouraging. 5)|Finally, the use of the laser with tissue photosensitization, albeit it in its infancy, offers great promise. This is particularly true in the case of primary brain cancer, where the infiltration of tumorous tissue among normal pathways precludes the classical oncologic surgery practice of resection of a "safe margin". The ability to track and destroy these cells, without affecting adjacent cells, may be the greatest single contribution of the laser to neurosurgery in the future. The present applications of the laser are relatively crude by comparison with what is expected. Endoscopic laser surgery, both vascular and subarachnoid, will diminish morbidity and improve results. From the exotic treatment of aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations of the brain to the mundane care of herniated disks of the spine, it is anticipated that the laser will play an important role. The use of a laser, coupled with computerized imagining devices, will allow increasing precision in arrival to and treatment of deep seated lesions of the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord. The use of different wavelengths, perhaps in the X-ray and ultraviolet spectra, will allow increasing precision with decreasing invasion. Manipulation of wavelength, time, and treatment area will allow subcellular surgery, perhaps in the treatment of personality disorders and movement disorders as well as epilepsy. Tissue welding will allow heightened regenerative and recuperative powers to be exploited. The possibility of laser biostimulation must also be considered. In short, it appears that the future of the laser in neurosurgery is limited only by the imagination of the

  1. Requirements for laser countermeasures against imaging seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, William D.

    2014-10-01

    Conventional anti-aircraft infrared seekers all operate on the principle of detecting the position of a IR source by modulating the FOV to encode the track of the target. This is a fundamental susceptibility of this class of seeker that renders them vulnerable to laser jamming. There are several DIRCM systems available that meet these requirements and provide a high degree of protection against reticle seekers. The latest generation of IR seekers use imaging technology that discriminates the target position in an essentially different manner. This class of seeker is not susceptible to DIRCM jamming. This paper examines the effectiveness of laser jamming against imaging seekers to derive requirements for laser countermeasures. Imaging seekers processing techniques that can be used to track the target and reject countermeasures are entirely defined by the on-board software of the seeker. Imaging seekers may be vulnerable to higher power laser jamming. The effect of laser dazzle appears to degrade the image quality. However, actual scatter levels can be modelled and it can be shown that usable information is still available to the seeker under dazzle. If neither decoy expendables nor dazzle lasers are expected to be effective against imaging seekers then the logical next step is to increase the laser power to produce damage. Estimates are provided to indicate the laser power levels that would be required against an imaging seeker focal plane. Although it is possible to design seekers that are hardened against laser damage, it is not clear that such designs are practical.

  2. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore » can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less

  3. Solar tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.R.; Scott, D.R.

    1981-04-01

    A solar tracker for a solar collector is described in detail. The collector is angularly oriented by a motor wherein the outputs of two side-by-side photodetectors are discriminated as to three ranges: a first corresponding to a low light or darkness condition a second corresponding to light intensity lying in an intermediate range and a third corresponding to light above an intermediate range, direct sunlight. The first output drives the motor to a selected maximum easterly angular position the second enables the motor to be driven westerly at the Earth rotational rate and the third output, the separate outputs of the two photodetectors, differentially controls the direction of rotation of the motor to effect actual tracking of the Sun. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  4. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  5. Microencapsulated cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Arifin, Dian R.; Kedziorek, Dorota A.; Fu, Yingli; Chan, Kannie W. Y.; McMahon, Michael T.; Weiss, Clifford R.; Kraitchman, Dara L.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Microencapsulation of therapeutic cells has been widely pursued to achieve cellular immunoprotection following transplantation. Initial clinical studies have shown the potential of microencapsulation using semi-permeable alginate layers, but much needs to be learned about the optimal delivery route, in vivo pattern of engraftment, and microcapsule stability over time. In parallel with noninvasive imaging techniques for ‘naked’ (i.e. unencapsulated) cell tracking, microcapsules have now been endowed with contrast agents that can be visualized by 1H MRI, 19F MRI, X-ray/computed tomography and ultrasound imaging. By placing the contrast agent formulation in the extracellular space of the hydrogel, large amounts of contrast agents can be incorporated with negligible toxicity. This has led to a new generation of imaging biomaterials that can render cells visible with multiple imaging modalities. PMID:23225358

  6. Solar tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R.; Scott, D. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar tracker for a solar collector is described in detail. The collector is angularly oriented by a motor wherein the outputs of two side-by-side photodetectors are discriminated as to three ranges: a first corresponding to a low light or darkness condition; a second corresponding to light intensity lying in an intermediate range; and a third corresponding to light above an intermediate range, direct sunlight. The first output drives the motor to a selected maximum easterly angular position; the second enables the motor to be driven westerly at the Earth rotational rate; and the third output, the separate outputs of the two photodetectors, differentially controls the direction of rotation of the motor to effect actual tracking of the Sun.

  7. Geo Issue Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakpour, Mohammad; Paulik, Christoph; Hahn, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Communication about remote sensing data quality between data providers and users as well as between the users is often difficult. The users have a hard time figuring out if a product has known problems over their region of interest and data providers have to spend a lot of effort to make this information available, if it exists. Scientific publications are one tool for communicating with the users base but they are static and mostly one way. As a data provider it is also often difficult to make feedback, received from users, available to the complete user base. The Geo Issue Tracking System (GeoITS) is an Open Source Web Application which has been developed to mitigate these problems. GeoITS combines a mapping interface (Google Maps) with a simple wiki platform. It allows users to give region specific feedback on a remote sensing product by drawing a polygon on the map and describing the problems they had using the remote sensing product in this area. These geolocated wiki entries are then viewable by other users as well as the data providers which can modify and extend the entries. In this way the conversations between the users and the data provider are no longer hidden in e.g. emails but open for all users of the dataset. This new kind of communication platform can enable better cooperation between users and data providers. It will also provide data providers with the ability to track problems their dataset might have in certain areas and resolve them with new product releases. The source code is available via http://github.com/TUW-GEO/geoits_dev A running instance can be tried at https://geoits.herokuapp.com/

  8. Analysis of SILEX tracking sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Rajul P.; Beard, Christopher I.; Purll, David J.

    1990-07-01

    Two tracking sensor breadbroads have been developed for the European SILEX program. Critical requirements to be met by these sensors include the determination of the 1-sigma position of the focused laser spot on the detector surface to accuracies of less than 100 nm, with update frequencies as high as 8 kHz, and the minimum optical power level of 110 pW. The design is based on the use of a 14 x 14 pixel CCD array, where the spot position is determined to small subpixel accuracies over the central 2 x 2 pixel area via a centroiding algorithm executed in a microprocessor. Coarse position measurements are also made over the full area at rates up to 2 kHz.

  9. A simple apparatus for quick qualitative analysis of CR39 nuclear track detectorsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Gaillard, S. A.; Letzring, S. A.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2008-10-01

    Quantifying the ion pits in Columbia Resin 39 (CR39) nuclear track detector from Thomson parabolas is a time consuming and tedious process using conventional microscope based techniques. A simple inventive apparatus for fast screening and qualitative analysis of CR39 detectors has been developed, enabling efficient selection of data for a more detailed analysis. The system consists simply of a green He-Ne laser and a high-resolution digital single-lens reflex camera. The laser illuminates the edge of the CR39 at grazing incidence and couples into the plastic, acting as a light pipe. Subsequently, the laser illuminates all ion tracks on the surface. A high-resolution digital camera is used to photograph the scattered light from the ion tracks, enabling one to quickly determine charge states and energies measured by the Thomson parabola.

  10. A simple apparatus for quick qualitative analysis of CR39 nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Gaillard, S. A.; Letzring, S. A.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2008-10-15

    Quantifying the ion pits in Columbia Resin 39 (CR39) nuclear track detector from Thomson parabolas is a time consuming and tedious process using conventional microscope based techniques. A simple inventive apparatus for fast screening and qualitative analysis of CR39 detectors has been developed, enabling efficient selection of data for a more detailed analysis. The system consists simply of a green He-Ne laser and a high-resolution digital single-lens reflex camera. The laser illuminates the edge of the CR39 at grazing incidence and couples into the plastic, acting as a light pipe. Subsequently, the laser illuminates all ion tracks on the surface. A high-resolution digital camera is used to photograph the scattered light from the ion tracks, enabling one to quickly determine charge states and energies measured by the Thomson parabola.

  11. Development of a novel laser range scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Lennon, Brian; Simpson, Amber L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2011-03-01

    Laser range scanning an organ surface intraoperatively provides a cost effective and accurate means of measuring geometric changes in tissue. A novel laser range scanner with integrated tracking was designed, developed, and analyzed with the goal of providing intraoperative surface data during neurosurgery. The scanner is fitted with passive spheres to be optically tracked in the operating room. The design notably includes a single-lens system capable of acquiring the geometric information (as a Cartesian point cloud) via laser illumination and charge-coupled device (CCD) collection, as well as the color information via visible light collection on the same CCD. The geometric accuracy was assessed by scanning a machined phantom of known dimensions and comparing relative distances of landmarks from the point cloud to the known distances. The ability of the scanner to be tracked was first evaluated by perturbing its orientation in front of the optical tracking camera and recording the number of spheres visible to the camera at each orientation, and then by observing the variance in point cloud locations of a fixed object when the tracking camera is moved around the scanner. The scanning accuracy test resulted in an RMS error of 0.47 mm with standard deviation of 0.40 mm. The sphere visibility test showed that four diodes were visible in most of the probable operating orientations, and the overall tracking standard deviation was observed to be 1.49 mm. Intraoperative collection of cortical surface scans using the new scanner is currently underway.

  12. 3D imaging of neutron tracks using confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Flowers, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Neutron detection and neutron flux assessment are important aspects in monitoring nuclear energy production. Neutron flux measurements can also provide information on potential biological damage from exposure. In addition to the applications for neutron measurement in nuclear energy, neutron detection has been proposed as a method of enhancing neutrino detectors and cosmic ray flux has also been assessed using ground-level neutron detectors. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (or SSNTDs) have been used extensively to examine cosmic rays, long-lived radioactive elements, radon concentrations in buildings and the age of geological samples. Passive SSNTDs consisting of a CR-39 plastic are commonly used to measure radon because they respond to incident charged particles such as alpha particles from radon gas in air. They have a large dynamic range and a linear flux response. We have previously applied confocal microscopy to obtain 3D images of alpha particle tracks in SSNTDs from radon track monitoring (1). As a charged particle traverses through the polymer it creates an ionisation trail along its path. The trail or track is normally enhanced by chemical etching to better expose radiation damage, as the damaged area is more sensitive to the etchant than the bulk material. Particle tracks in CR-39 are usually assessed using 2D optical microscopy. In this study 6 detectors were examined using an Olympus OLS4100 LEXT 3D laser scanning confocal microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan). The detectors had been etched for 2 hours 50 minutes at 85 °C in 6.25M NaOH. Post etch the plastics had been treated with a 10 minute immersion in a 2% acetic acid stop bath, followed by rinsing in deionised water. The detectors examined had been irradiated with a 2mSv neutron dose from an Am(Be) neutron source (producing roughly 20 tracks per mm2). We were able to successfully acquire 3D images of neutron tracks in the detectors studied. The range of track diameter observed was between 4

  13. Learning to track multiple targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Tao, Dacheng; Song, Mingli; Zhang, Luming; Bu, Jiajun; Chen, Chun

    2015-05-01

    Monocular multiple-object tracking is a fundamental yet under-addressed computer vision problem. In this paper, we propose a novel learning framework for tracking multiple objects by detection. First, instead of heuristically defining a tracking algorithm, we learn that a discriminative structure prediction model from labeled video data captures the interdependence of multiple influence factors. Given the joint targets state from the last time step and the observation at the current frame, the joint targets state at the current time step can then be inferred by maximizing the joint probability score. Second, our detection results benefit from tracking cues. The traditional detection algorithms need a nonmaximal suppression postprocessing to select a subset from the total detection responses as the final output and a large number of selection mistakes are induced, especially under a congested circumstance. Our method integrates both detection and tracking cues. This integration helps to decrease the postprocessing mistake risk and to improve performance in tracking. Finally, we formulate the entire model training into a convex optimization problem and estimate its parameters using the cutting plane optimization. Experiments show that our method performs effectively in a large variety of scenarios, including pedestrian tracking in crowd scenes and vehicle tracking in congested traffic. PMID:25051561

  14. Retention Tracking Using Institutional Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillibridge, Fred

    2008-01-01

    This chapter presents a sophisticated approach for tracking student cohorts from entry through departure within an institution. It describes how a researcher can create a student tracking model to perform longitudinal research on student cohorts. (Contains 3 tables and 2 figures.)

  15. Making Sense of Dinosaur Tracks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Ann Haley; McDowell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    What do paleontologists, dinosaur tracks, and the nature of science have in common? They're combined here in an inquiry activity where students use methods of observation and inference to devise evidence-based explanations for the data they collect about dinosaur tracks, much like the methods used by paleontologists. Students then debate the…

  16. Airborne ballistic camera tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redish, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    An operational airborne ballistic camera tracking system was tested for operational and data reduction feasibility. The acquisition and data processing requirements of the system are discussed. Suggestions for future improvements are also noted. A description of the data reduction mathematics is outlined. Results from a successful reentry test mission are tabulated. The test mission indicated that airborne ballistic camera tracking systems are feasible.

  17. SRNL Tagging and Tracking Video

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-06-15

    SRNL generates a next generation satellite base tracking system. The tagging and tracking system can work in remote wilderness areas, inside buildings, underground and other areas not well served by traditional GPS. It?s a perfect response to customer needs and market demand.

  18. Manchester transition tracking loop (MTTL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, A.; Ma, L. N.; Huey, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    In new tracking loop, separate phase detection algorithm is incorporated for acquisition; programmed acquisition-to-track sequence includes automatic bandwidth switching. Additionally, system has very effective phase detection signal-to-noise ratio and can operate at any rate by changing master clock frequency. All system parameters remain constant.

  19. CONTRACT ADMINISTRATIVE TRACKING SYSTEM (CATS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Contract Administrative Tracking System (CATS) was developed in response to an ORD NHEERL, Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED)-recognized need for an automated tracking and retrieval system for Cost Reimbursable Level of Effort (CR/LOE) Contracts. CATS is an Oracle-based app...

  20. Drift and proportional tracking chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaros, J. A.

    1980-11-01

    The many techniques exploited in constructing tracking chambers, particle detectors which measure the trajectories and momenta of charged particles, are discussed. In high energy interactions, the final states are dominated by closely collimated jets of high multiplicity, requiring good track-pair resolution in the tracking chamber. High energy particles deflect very little in limited magnetic field volumes, necessitating good spatial resolution for accurate momentum measurements. The colliding beam technique requires a device easily adapted to full solid angle coverage, and the high event rates expected in some of these machines put a premium on good time resolution. Finally, the production and subsequent decays of the tau, charmed and beautiful mesons provide multiple vertex topologies. To reconstruct these vertices reliably requires improvements in spatial resolution and track pair resolution. The proportional counter and its descendant, the drift chamber, are considered as tracking chambers. The physics of this device are discussed in order to understand its performance limitations and promises.

  1. COCOA: tracking in aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Saad; Shah, Mubarak

    2006-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming a core intelligence asset for reconnaissance, surveillance and target tracking in urban and battlefield settings. In order to achieve the goal of automated tracking of objects in UAV videos we have developed a system called COCOA. It processes the video stream through number of stages. At first stage platform motion compensation is performed. Moving object detection is performed to detect the regions of interest from which object contours are extracted by performing a level set based segmentation. Finally blob based tracking is performed for each detected object. Global tracks are generated which are used for higher level processing. COCOA is customizable to different sensor resolutions and is capable of tracking targets as small as 100 pixels. It works seamlessly for both visible and thermal imaging modes. The system is implemented in Matlab and works in a batch mode.

  2. Multiple vehicle detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betke, Margrit; Haritaoglu, Ismail; Davis, Larry S.

    1997-02-01

    A hard real time vision system has been developed that recognizes and tracks multiple cars from video sequences taken from a car driving on highways and country roads. Recognition is accomplished by combining the analysis of single image frames with the analysis of the motion information provided by multiple consecutive image frames. In single image frames, cars are recognized by matching deformable gray-scale templates, by detecting image features, such as corners, and by evaluating how these features relate to each other. Cars are also recognized by tracking motion parameters that are typical for cars. The vision system utilizes the hard real-time operating system Maruti which guarantees that the timing constraints on the various vision processes are satisfied. The dynamic creation and termination of tracking processes optimizes the amount of computational resources spent and allows fast detection and tracking of multiple cars. Experimental results demonstrate robust, real-time recognition and tracking over thousands of image frames.

  3. Constant magnification optical tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A constant magnification optical tracking system for continuously tracking of a moving object is described. In the tracking system, a traveling objective lens maintains a fixed relationship with an object to be optically tracked. The objective lens was chosen to provide a collimated light beam oriented in the direction of travel of the moving object. A reflective surface is attached to the traveling objective lens for reflecting an image of the moving object. The object to be tracked is a free-falling object which is located at the focal point of the objective lens for at least a portion of its free-fall path. A motor and control means is provided for mantaining the traveling objective lens in a fixed relationship relative to the free-falling object, thereby keeping the free-falling object at the focal point and centered on the axis of the traveling objective lens throughout its entire free-fall path.

  4. Teacher's Guide for Tracks. Elementary Science Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, David; And Others

    This teacher's guide suggests activities that provide opportunities for students in grades 4-6 to study animal tracks. Methods are explained for using sets of 52 Track Cards which show life-size drawings of tracks made by 14 animals; sets of 10 large Mystery Track Cards with life-size drawings of the prints of large mammals; and a Track Picture…

  5. 49 CFR 213.331 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Track surface. 213.331 Section 213.331... Track surface. (a) For a single deviation in track surface, each owner of the track to which this subpart applies shall maintain the surface of its track within the limits prescribed in the...

  6. 49 CFR 213.331 - Track surface.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Track surface. 213.331 Section 213.331... Track surface. (a) For a single deviation in track surface, each owner of the track to which this subpart applies shall maintain the surface of its track within the limits prescribed in the...

  7. Earth-Image Tracking in the IR for Deep Space Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Yinging; Lee, Shinhak; Ortiz, Gerard G.

    2005-01-01

    Sub-microradian level laser beam pointing to an Earth-based receiver is required for deep space optical communications. This requires a beacon emanated from Earth towards the spacecraft. The beacon could be a laser or reflected sunlight from Earth. Earth image tracking in the visible is hampered by significant albedo variations and/or crescent Earth image yielding large central errors. Here, we report results of Earth-image tracking in the infrared (8 to 13 micron) region of the spectrum with the aim of substantially alleviating the two challenges mentioned earlier.

  8. The smart IV stand design through human tracking mobile robot system by CDS cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Seong-Hyeon; Choe, Jong-Hun; Seo, Suk-Hyun; Kim, Won-Hoe; Lee, Hong-Kyu; Park, Se-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Vision-based recognition of the object as a general interface gives us high cost and complicated problem. This research suggests human tracking system by Arduino, and Laser-CdS cell system track wire that pass laser line. In this paper, we review existing literature on application systems of recognition which involves many interdisciplinary studies. We conclude that our method can only reduce cost, but is easy way to trace people's location with the use of wire. Furthermore, we apply several recognition systems including CdS-based mobile robot that is applied IV stand used at the hospital effectively.

  9. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. The beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being recombined with the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones.

  10. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors--I: Track Characteristics and Formation Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lal, Nand

    1991-01-01

    Heavily ionizing charged particles produce radiation damage tracks in a wide variety of insulating materials. The experimental properties of these tracks and track recorders are described. The mechanisms by which the tracks are produced are discussed. (Author/KR)

  11. Engineering cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The lack of sensitive biocompatible particle track detectors has so far limited parallel detection of physical energy deposition and biological response. Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3:C,Mg single crystals combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution limited by light diffraction. Here we report the development of next generation cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods The biocompatibility of FNTDs was tested using six different cell lines, i.e. human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549), glioblastoma (U87), androgen independent prostate cancer (PC3), epidermoid cancer (A431) and murine (VmDk) glioma SMA-560. To evaluate cell adherence, viability and conformal coverage of the crystals different seeding densities and alternative coating with extracellular matrix (fibronectin) was tested. Carbon irradiation was performed in Bragg peak (initial 270.55 MeV u−1). A series of cell compartment specific fluorescence stains including nuclear (HOECHST), membrane (Glut-1), cytoplasm (Calcein AM, CM-DiI) were tested on Cell-Fit-HDs and a single CLSM was employed to co-detect the physical (crystal) as well as the biological (cell layer) information. Results The FNTD provides a biocompatible surface. Among the cells tested, A549 cells formed the most uniform, viable, tightly packed epithelial like monolayer. The ion track information was not compromised in Cell-Fit-HD as compared to the FNTD alone. Neither cell coating and culturing, nor additional staining procedures affected the properties of the FNTD surface to detect ion tracks. Standard immunofluorescence and live staining procedures could be employed to co-register cell biology and ion track information. Conclusions The Cell-Fit-Hybrid Detector system is a promising platform for a multitude of studies linking biological response to energy deposition at high level of optical microscopy

  12. High-energy laser activities at MBDA Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohring, Bernd; Dietrich, Stephan; Tassini, Leonardo; Protz, Rudolf; Geidek, Franz; Zoz, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    At MBDA Germany a concept for a high-energy laser weapon system is investigated, which is based on existing industrial laser sources. Due to the enormous progress in the field of high-power fiber lasers, commercial industrial fiber lasers are now available delivering a nearly-diffraction limited beam quality with power levels of up to 10 kW. By using a geometric beam coupling scheme, a number of individual high-power fiber laser beams are combined together using one common beam director telescope. A total laser beam power of more than 100 kW can be achieved, which is sufficient for an operational laser weapon system. The individual beams from the different lasers are steered by servo-loops using fast tip-tilt mirrors. This principle enables the concentration of the total laser beam power at one common focal point on a distant target, also allowing fine tracking of target movements and first-order compensation of turbulence effects on laser beam propagation. The proposed beam combination concept was demonstrated by using different experimental set-ups. A number of experiments were performed successfully to investigate laser beam target interaction and target fine tracking, also at large distances and at moving targets. Content and results of these investigations are reported, which demonstrate the complete engagement sequence for a C-RAM scenario. This includes subsequent steps of target acquisition by radar and IR optics, followed by large angle coarse tracking, active fine tracking and destruction of the target by the laser system. This successful implementation of geometric beam combining is an important step for the realization of a laser weapon system in the near future.

  13. Results of laser ranging collocations during 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of laser ranging collocations is to compare the ability of two satellite laser ranging systems, located in the vicinity of one another, to measure the distance to an artificial Earth satellite in orbit over the sites. The similar measurement of this distance is essential before a new or modified laser system is deployed to worldwide locations in order to gather the data necessary to meet the scientific goals of the Crustal Dynamics Project. In order to be certain the laser systems are operating properly, they are periodically compared with each other. These comparisons or collocations are performed by locating the lasers side by side when they track the same satellite during the same time or pass. The data is then compared to make sure the lasers are giving essentially the same range results. Results of the three collocations performed during 1983 are given.

  14. Muon tracking underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistoni, G.; Campana, P.; Chiarella, V.; Denni, U.; Iarocci, E.

    1986-04-01

    The design and performance of plastic streamer tubes for use in large underground particle-physics experiments such as the muon, astrophysics, and cosmic-ray observatory (MACRO) being developed for Gran Sasso Laboratory are reported. The large (1000 sq m or more) detector area required to achieve high-angular-resolution muon tracking in MACRO is covered by modules with eight 3 x 3-cm-cross section active streamer-tube cells each, similar to those used in the Mt. Blanc Laboratory detector. The MACRO modules have a maximum length of 12 m; and the cells have 60-micron-diameter wires, two conducting graphite sides, and two insulating sides (electrodeless electric-field shaping). The results of performance tests flowing 3:1 He:n-pentane through a tube module are presented graphically. Spatial resolution 1 cm and time resolution 100 ns are obtained, and the ability of the streamer tubes to detect large ionization losses with respect to the minimum is demonstrated.

  15. Tracking Earthquake Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    In assessing their risk to society, earthquakes are best characterized as cascades that can propagate from the natural environment into the socio-economic (built) environment. Strong earthquakes rarely occur as isolated events; they usually cluster in foreshock-mainshock-aftershock sequences, seismic swarms, and extended sequences of large earthquakes that propagate along major fault systems. These cascades are regulated by stress-mediated interactions among faults driven by tectonic loading. Within these cascades, each large event can itself cause a chain reaction in which the primary effects of faulting and ground shaking induce secondary effects, including tsunami, landslides, liquefaction, and set off destructive processes within the built environment, such as fires and radiation leakage from nuclear plants. Recent earthquakes have demonstrated how the socio-economic effects of large earthquakes can reverberate for many years. To reduce earthquake risk and improve the resiliency of communities to earthquake damage, society depends on five geotechnologies for tracking earthquake cascades: long-term probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), short-term (operational) earthquake forecasting, earthquake early warning, tsunami warning, and the rapid production of post-event information for response and recovery (see figure). In this presentation, I describe how recent advances in earthquake system science are leading to improvements in this geotechnology pipeline. In particular, I will highlight the role of earthquake simulations in predicting strong ground motions and their secondary effects before and during earthquake cascades

  16. Digital Video Disc Recorder Using Second Harmonic Generation Green Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Joong Eon; Park, In Sik; Oh, Young Nam; Lee, Seung Hoon; Seong, Pyong Yong; Jang, Yoon Ki; Shin, Dong Ho

    1993-11-01

    A prototype of a digital video disc recorder (D-VDR) with laser-disc-quality video and compact-disc-quality audio is developed and demonstrated using a second harmonic generation (SHG) green laser, narrow-track magneto-optical disk (MOD), mark edge recording and data compression.

  17. Space-time dynamics estimation from space mission tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkx, D.; Noomen, R.; Visser, P. N. A. M.; Gurvits, L. I.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: Many physical parameters that can be estimated from space mission tracking data influence both the translational dynamics and proper time rates of observers. These different proper time rates cause a variability of the time transfer observable beyond that caused by their translational (and rotational) dynamics. With the near-future implementation of transponder laser ranging, these effects will become increasingly important, and will require a re-evaluation of the common data analysis practice of using a priori time ephemerides, which is the goal of this paper. Methods: We develop a framework for the simultaneous estimation of the initial translational state and the initial proper time of an observer, with the goal of facilitating robust tracking data analysis from next-generation space missions carrying highly accurate clocks and tracking equipment. Using our approach, the influence of physical parameters on both translational and time dynamics are considered at the same level in the analysis, and mutual correlations between the signatures of the two are automatically identified. We perform a covariance analysis using our proposed method with simulated laser data from Earth-based stations to both a Mars and Mercury lander. Results: Using four years of tracking data for the Mars lander simulations, we find a difference between our results using the simultaneous space-time dynamics estimation and the classical analysis technique (with an a priori time ephemeris) of around 0.1% in formal errors and correlation coefficients. For a Mercury lander this rises to around 1% for a one-month mission and 10% for a four-year mission. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, we find that using an a priori time ephemeris of representative accuracy will result in estimation errors that are orders of magnitude above the formal error when processing highly accurate laser time transfer data.

  18. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  19. Decoupling direct tracking control system for super-multilayer optical disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yukinobu; Ogata, Takeshi; Imagawa, Seiji

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the decoupling direct tracking control method for the super multi-layer optical disk. The disk includes multiple recording layers and a servo layer with a guiding groove, and data is recorded on each recording layer right above the groove of the servo layer by using two laser beams. However, some disturbances such as disk tilt or lens shift might cause displacement between the two focal points. And due to scratches or finger prints on the disk surface, two focal point's coupling actions destabilize the tracking control. We developed new tracking control method for preventing any displacement and destabilization by the coupling action.

  20. Utilization of satellite-satellite tracking data for determination of the geocentric gravitational constant (GM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. F.; Oh, I. H.

    1979-01-01

    Range rate tracking of GEOS 3 through the ATS 6 satellite was used, along with ground tracking of GEOS 3, to estimate the geocentric gravitational constant (GM). Using multiple half day arcs, a GM of 398600.52 + or - 0.12 cu km/sq sec was estimated using the GEM 10 gravity model, based on speed of light of 299792.458 km/sec. Tracking station coordinates were simultaneously adjusted, leaving geopotential model error as the dominant error source. Baselines between the adjusted NASA laser sites show better than 15 cm agreement with multiple short arc GEOS 3 solutions.

  1. Interaction of ion tracks in spatial and temporal proximity.

    PubMed

    Kreipl, Maximilian Stephan; Friedland, Werner; Paretzke, Herwig G

    2009-11-01

    In the present work, a systematic analysis of the impact of spatial and temporal proximity of ion tracks on the yield of higher-order radiolytic species as well as of DNA damage patterns is presented. This potential impact may be of concern when laser-driven particle accelerators are used for ion radiation therapy. The biophysical Monte Carlo track structure code PARTRAC was used and, to this end, extended in two aspects: first, the temporal information about track evolution has been included in the track structure module and, second, the simulation code has been modified to enable parallel multiple track processing during simulation of subsequent modelling stages. Depending on the spatial and temporal separation between ion-track pairs, the yield of chemical species has been calculated for incident protons with start energies of 20 MeV, for He(2+) ions with start energies of 1 and 20 MeV, and for 60 MeV C(6+) ions. Provided the overlap of the considered ion tracks is sufficient in all four dimensions (space and time), the yield of hydroxyl radicals was found to be reduced compared to that of single tracks, for all considered ion types. The biological endpoints investigated were base damages, single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and clustered lesions for incident pairs of protons and He(2+) ions, each with start energies of 20 MeV. The yield of clustered lesions produced by 20 MeV protons turned out to be influenced by the spatial separation of the proton pair; in contrast, no influence was found for different start times of the protons. The yield of single-strand breaks and base hits was found neither to depend on the spatial separation nor on the temporal separation between the incident protons. For incident 20 MeV He(2+) ions, however, a dependence on the spatial and temporal separation of the ion pair was found for all considered biological endpoints. Nevertheless, spatial proximity conditions where such intertrack effects were obtained are not met in

  2. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.; Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    We can now produce intense, coherent light at wavelengths where no conventional lasers exist. The recent successes of devices known as free-electron lasers mark a striking confluence of two conceptual developments that themselves are only a few decades old. The first of these, the laser, is a product of the fifties and sixties whose essential characteristics have made it a staple resource in almost every field of science and technology. In a practical sense, what defines a laser is its emission of monochromatic, coherent light (that is, light of a single wavelength, with its waves locked in step) at a wavelength in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A second kind of light, called synchrotron radiation, is a by-product of the age of particle accelerators and was first observed in the laboratory in 1947. As the energies of accelerators grew in the 1960s and 70s, intense, incoherent beams of ultraviolet radiation and x--rays became available at machines built for high-energy physics research. Today, several facilities operate solely as sources of synchrotron light. Unlike the well-collimated monochromatic light emitted by lasers, however, this incoherent radiation is like a sweeping searchlight--more accurately, like the headlight of a train on a circular track--whose wavelengths encompass a wide spectral band. Now, in several laboratories around the world, researchers have exploited the physics of these two light sources and have combined the virtues of both in a single contrivance, the free-electron laser, or FEL (1). The emitted light is laserlike in its narrow, sharply peaked spectral distribution and in its phase coherence, yet it can be of a wavelength unavailable with ordinary lasers. Furthermore, like synchrotron radiation, but unlike the output of most conventional lasers, the radiation emitted by free-electron lasers can be tuned, that is, its wavelength can be easily varied across a wide range. The promise of this

  3. Industrial laser marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belforte, David A.

    1990-05-01

    Introduction: Gary Forrest As with medical, we have a specific individual, Dave Belforte, who, in addition to writing for Laser Focus, publishes with Laser Focus the Industrial Laser Review. Again, this is an area that has some really unique aspects to it which is why we have a specialist at the magazine who tracks this as well as having his own business interests. I just have one quick example. One of the things that I've noticed and I've put this in your handout is it's always interesting to me to see why how the lasers actually impact on finished goods that people buy. So I just clipped out one recent article that mentions some of the different areas when lasers are used in automotive production. There's an ad for the Infinity car of course they've had a strange ad program anyway, but the latest version is "Look at the paint." It's a super high gloss paint. I know in Japan, what I would call laser priming, the use of laser in surface preparation of the metal to obtain a super high gloss is something that's become popular. Now I don't know whether the Infinity is using that or not but it's another example as Moe Levitt indicated earlier lasers have moved into the industrial segment maybe not in the volume that people would like but in a quality sense that is definitely starting to have an impact on the people who are buying those finished products. So I'll give you Dave for the details. David Belforte: The answer is yes, the Infinity has a body which has been processed in what is called laser texturizing process. In Japan, it's known as a mirror finish, and it's not actually applied to the steel of the car. It's a texturizing process on the rolls that reduce the steel down to body thickness. They emboss on that steel a regular pattern which tends to trap radiated light and reflect it back to your eye in a much more intense pattern to give you what appears to be brighter paint. But that was not developed in Japan. It was developed in Belgium actually.

  4. Laser therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it allows health care providers to safely treat tissue without injuring the surrounding area. Lasers are often used to: Treat varicose veins Improve ...

  5. Laser microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  6. Neural network tracking and extension of positive tracking periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanan, Jay C.; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Moreels, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Feature detectors have been considered for the role of supplying additional information to a neural network tracker. The feature detector focuses on areas of the image with significant information. Basically, if a picture says a thousand words, the feature detectors are looking for the key phrases (keypoints). These keypoints are rotationally invariant and may be matched across frames. Application of these advanced feature detectors to the neural network tracking system at JPL has promising potential. As part of an ongoing program, an advanced feature detector was tested for augmentation of a neural network based tracker. The advance feature detector extended tracking periods in test sequences including aircraft tracking, rover tracking, and simulated Martian landing. Future directions of research are also discussed.

  7. High resolution track etch autoradiography

    DOEpatents

    Solares, Guido; Zamenhof, Robert G.

    1994-01-01

    A detector assembly for use in obtaining alpha-track autoradiographs, the detector assembly including a substantially boron-free substrate; a detector layer deposited on the substantially boron-free substrate, the detector layer being capable of recording alpha particle tracks and exhibiting evidence of the alpha tracks in response to being exposed to an etchant, the detector layer being less than about 2 microns thick; and a protective layer deposited on the detector layer, the protective layer being resistant to the etchant and having a thickness of about 0.5 to 1 microns.

  8. High resolution track etch autoradiography

    DOEpatents

    Solares, G.; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1994-12-27

    A detector assembly is disclosed for use in obtaining alpha-track autoradiographs, the detector assembly including a substantially boron-free substrate; a detector layer deposited on the substantially boron-free substrate, the detector layer being capable of recording alpha particle tracks and exhibiting evidence of the alpha tracks in response to being exposed to an etchant, the detector layer being less than about 2 microns thick; and a protective layer deposited on the detector layer, the protective layer being resistant to the etchant and having a thickness of about 0.5 to 1 microns. 13 figures.

  9. Frequency-Tracking-Error Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Frequency-tracking-error detector compares average period of output signal from band-pass tracking filter with average period of signal of frequency 100 f(sub 0) that controls center frequency f(sub 0) of tracking filter. Measures difference between f(sub 0) and frequency of one of periodic components in output of bearing sensor. Bearing sensor is accelerometer, strain gauge, or deflectometer mounted on bearing housing. Detector part of system of electronic equipment used to measure vibrations in bearings in rotating machinery.

  10. Abrasion resistant track shoe grouser

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Keith D; Diekevers, Mark S; Afdahl, Curt D; Steiner, Kevin L; Barnes, Christopher A

    2013-04-23

    A track shoe for a track-type vehicle. The track shoe includes a base plate and a grouser projecting away from the base plate. A capping surface structure of substantially horseshoe shaped cross-section is disposed across a distal portion of the grouser. The capping surface structure covers portions of a distal edge surface and adjacent lateral surfaces. The capping surface structure is formed from an material characterized by enhanced wear resistance relative to portions of the grouser underlying the capping surface structure.

  11. Sun Tracking Systems: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chou, Po-Cheng; Chiang, Che-Ming; Lin, Chiu-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The output power produced by high-concentration solar thermal and photovoltaic systems is directly related to the amount of solar energy acquired by the system, and it is therefore necessary to track the sun's position with a high degree of accuracy. Many systems have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 20 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the sun tracking system field and then describes some of the more significant proposals for closed-loop and open-loop types of sun tracking systems. PMID:22412341

  12. The Automatic Library Tracking Database

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, Mark R; Jones, Nicholas A; Hadri, Bilel

    2010-01-01

    A library tracking database has been developed and put into production at the National Institute for Computational Sciences and the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (both located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.) The purpose of the library tracking database is to track which libraries are used at link time on Cray XT5 Supercomputers. The database stores the libraries used at link time and also records the executables run in a batch job. With this data, many operationally important questions can be answered such as which libraries are most frequently used and which users are using deprecated libraries or applications. The infrastructure design and reporting mechanisms are presented along with collected production data.

  13. High-dynamic GPS tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, S.; Statman, J. I.

    1988-01-01

    The results of comparing four different frequency estimation schemes in the presence of high dynamics and low carrier-to-noise ratios are given. The comparison is based on measured data from a hardware demonstration. The tested algorithms include a digital phase-locked loop, a cross-product automatic frequency tracking loop, and extended Kalman filter, and finally, a fast Fourier transformation-aided cross-product frequency tracking loop. The tracking algorithms are compared on their frequency error performance and their ability to maintain lock during severe maneuvers at various carrier-to-noise ratios. The measured results are shown to agree with simulation results carried out and reported previously.

  14. Visual object recognition and tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chu-Yin (Inventor); English, James D. (Inventor); Tardella, Neil M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    This invention describes a method for identifying and tracking an object from two-dimensional data pictorially representing said object by an object-tracking system through processing said two-dimensional data using at least one tracker-identifier belonging to the object-tracking system for providing an output signal containing: a) a type of the object, and/or b) a position or an orientation of the object in three-dimensions, and/or c) an articulation or a shape change of said object in said three dimensions.

  15. Communications and tracking technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on communications and tracking technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. The objective is to develop devices, components, and analytical methods to enhance and enable technology to meet space station evolutionary requirements for multiple access (proximity) communications, space-to-ground communications, and tracking as it pertains to rendezvous and docking as well as potential orbital debris warning systems. Topics covered include: optical communications and tracking; monolithic microwave integrated circuit systems; traveling wave tube technology; advanced modulation and coding; and advanced automation.

  16. Tracking a person over time is tracking what?

    PubMed

    Brook, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Tracking persons, that is, determining that a person now is or is not a specific earlier person, is extremely common and widespread in our way of life and extremely important. If so, figuring out what we are tracking, what it is to persist as a person over a period of time, is also important. Trying to figure this out will be the main focus of this chapter. PMID:25164580

  17. Laser- based Insect Tracker (LIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Leonardo; Sinha, Shiva; van Steveninck, Rob De Ruyter

    2011-03-01

    Insects are excellent model systems for studying learning and behavior, and the potential for genetic manipulation makes the fruitfly especially attractive. Many aspects of fruitfly behavior have been studied through video based tracking methods. However, to our knowledge no current system incorporates signals for behavioral conditioning in freely moving flies. We introduce a non-video based method that enables tracking of single insects over large volumes (> 8000cm3 at high spatial (<1mm) and temporal (<1ms) resolution for extended periods (>1 hour). The system uses a set of moveable mirrors that steer a tracking laser beam. Tracking is based on feedback from a four-quadrant sensor, sampling the beam after it bounces back from a retro reflector. Through the same mirrors we couple a high speed camera for flight dynamics analysis and an IR laser for aversive heat conditioning. Such heat shocks, combined with visual stimuli projected on a screen surrounding the flight arena, enable studies of learning and memory. By sampling the long term statistics of behavior, the system augments quantitative studies of behavioral phenotypes. Preliminary results of such studies will be presented.

  18. Nonablative lasers.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Keyvan; Rivas, Maria Patricia; Bouzari, Navid; Faghih, Sahar

    2006-06-01

    The trend toward minimally invasive rejuvenation techniques has led to the widespread use of nonablative lasers. Nonablative lasers can be classified in two groups based on their wavelengths: lasers emitting light in the visible range, and those emitting in the infrared range. In this review, different laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) systems are presented and critically discussed along with findings of the studies in the literature. PMID:17173583

  19. Defect detection in laser powder deposition components by laser thermography and laser ultrasonic inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santospirito, SP; Łopatka, Rafał; Cerniglia, Donatella; Słyk, Kamil; Luo, Bin; Panggabean, Dorothée.; Rudlin, John

    2013-03-01

    Laser Powder Deposition (LDP) techniques are being adopted within aerospace and automotive manufacturing to produce innovative precision components. Non-destructive techniques (NDT) for detecting and quantifying flaws within these components enables performance and acceptance criteria to be verified, improving product safety and reducing ongoing maintenance and product repair costs. In this work, software enabled techniques are presented for in-process analysis of NDT laser ultrasonic signals and pulsed laser thermography images of sequential metallic LPD layers. LPD tracks can be as thin as 200μm while deposited at a rate of 500 mm/min, requiring ultrafast inspection and processing times. The research developed analysis algorithms that allow senior engineers to develop inspection templates and profiles for in-process inspection, as well as an end-to-end, user friendly interface for engineers to perform complete manual Laser Ultrasonic or Laser Thermographic inspections. Several algorithms are offered to quantify the flaw size. location and severity. The identified defects can be imported into a sentencing engine which then automatically compares analysis results against the user defined acceptance criteria so that the manufacturing products can be verified. Where both laser ultrasonic and laser thermographic NDT data is available further statistical tools could increase the confidence level of the inspection decision.

  20. Track-to-Track Data Association using Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, I.; Roscoe, C.; Wilkins, M.; Schumacher, P.

    In this paper, we build on recent work to further investigate the use of mutual information to solve various association problems in space situational awareness. Specifically, we solve the track-to-track association (TTTA) problem where we seek to associate a given set of tracks at one point in time with another set of tracks at a different time instance. Both sets of tracks are uncertain and are probabilistically described using multivariate normal distributions. This allows for a closed-form solution, based on the unscented transform and on mutual information. Future work will focus on developing a similar solution when uncertainty is analytic but not Gaussian or when it is completely non-analytic -e.g., when the uncertainty is described using a particle cloud. The proposed solution is inspired by a similar solution based on the unscented transform and mutual information for the observation-to-observation association (OTOA) problem that was developed by the authors in the past. This solution can be adjusted to address the classical observation-to-track association problem (OTTA), which will be the focus of future research. We will demonstrate the main result in simulation for LEO, MEO, GTO, and GEO orbit regimes to show general applicability.

  1. Laser generating metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  2. Hybrid multitarget tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Aswinikumar; Hassebrook, Laurence G.; Ghosal, Sugata; Kim, Michael

    1992-11-01

    A common function for human being is to detect the movement of an object against a stationary background and then to lock on to and trace its motion. This natural process becomes very tedious in industrial or military environments where the database of images to be searched is huge or where the function is to be repeated continuously. Thus automation can assist people carrying out such tasks. This is the case in security systems, military reconnaissance, military targeting, aircraft tracking, assembly line manufacturing systems, and quality control. We present a hybrid system to do such tasks. The technique is simulated on computer using numerical algorithms and is successful under many situations. For implementation an ideal system using optical components is presented. This hybrid system employs three main subsystems which are combined in such a way as to compensate for each other's drawbacks yet enhance each other's virtues. The first system is a velocity correlation system which correlates two adjacent frames in a sequence of image frames. The resultant velocity correlations are searched to find the potential velocity profiles at which an object may be moving. These velocity profiles are then processed by the multi-frame mean subsystem which performs a geometric (or arithmetic mean) operation on the image frames. These frames are displaced by the selected velocity profiles and thereby aligning the object in the given frames for detection. Algorithms have been developed and tested to perform this technique on selected databases. Also algorithms to synthesize test images have been developed and the results are presented.

  3. Environmental exposure tracking sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, Teresa; Everhart, Joel; McFerran, Jace

    2009-03-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) has developed environmental exposure tracking (EET) sensors using shape memory polymer (SMP) to monitor the degradation of perishable items, such as munitions, medicines or foods, by measuring the cumulative exposure to temperature and moisture. SMPs are polymers whose qualities have been altered to give them dynamic shape "memory" properties. Under thermal or moisture stimuli, SMP exhibits a radical change from a rigid thermoset to a highly flexible, elastic state. The dynamic response of the SMP can be tailored to match the degradation profile of the perishable item. SMP-based EET sensors require no digital memory or internal power supply and provide the capability of inexpensive, long-term life cycle monitoring thermal and moisture exposure over time. In a Phase I and II SBIR effort with the Navy, CRG demonstrated the feasibility of SMP-based EET sensor with two material systems. These material systems required different activation stimuli, heat or water vapor pressure. CRG developed the ability to tailor these materials to customize the dynamic response to match various degradation profiles of munitions. CRG optimized and characterized the SMP formulations and sensor design configuration to develop a suite of data from which any degradation profile can be met. CRG's EET sensors are capable of monitoring temperatures from -30 °C to 260 °C. The prototypes monitor cumulative thermal exposure and provide real-time information in a visually readable or a remotely interrogated version. CRG is currently scaling up the manufacture of the sensors for munitions reliability applications with the Navy.

  4. Laser driver

    SciTech Connect

    Culpepper, C.F.

    1989-03-14

    A laser driver for a laser diode is described, consisting of: an impedance matched input buffer amplifier to which a modulation signal is applied; and a current source coupled to the output of the impedance matched input buffer amplifier, the output of the current source providing an essentially constant amplitude a.c. current component coupled to drive the laser diode.

  5. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  6. Investigations on Manufacturability and Process Reliability of Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, H.; Zaeh, M. F.

    Selective laser melting is a layer-wise manufacturing process that enables the use of complex geometric shapes in part design and production. An infrared laser beam is focused on a thin layer of metallic powder and selectively deflected in order to scan the cross-section of the parts being built. The process quality is dominated by the consolidation of powder particles through laser beam interaction, the part geometry itself and the arrangement of multiple parts. In this paper, the manufacturability is investigated by characterizing single melt tracks and the buildup of thin wall structures consisting of a few aligned scan tracks.

  7. On LEO Debris Orbit Prediction Performance Using Tracking Data from a Single Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, J.

    2014-09-01

    Debris laser ranging during terminator time periods has become routine practice for some tracking stations. Processing tracking data from Mt Stromlo has shown that an orbit prediction accuracy of 20 arc seconds in the along-track direction for the next 24 hours was achievable for low Earth orbiting (LEO) debris using 2 passes of debris laser ranging data from a single station, separated by about 24 hours. The radial prediction error was in the order of tens of meter, for the Mt Stromlo and Shanghai tracking stations, respectively. The accuracies were determined by comparing the predicted orbits with subsequent tracking data from the same station. This accuracy assessment might be over-optimistic for other parts of orbits far away from the station because the generated orbit is only constrained by the data above the tracking station. Therefore, a verification is needed to confirm the achievability of the debris orbit prediction accuracy using the accurate debris laser data from a single station. In this paper, the verification results using satellite laser ranging (SLR) data from a single tracking station are presented. Starlette and Larets are chosen for this study and they have perigee altitudes of 815km and 690km, respectively. The SLR data is downloaded from the website of International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) Network. The similar data scenario is assumed. That is, SLR data of only two passes separated by about 24 hours is used to determine the orbits and then the orbits are propagated forward for 7 days. The SLR data is corrupted with random errors of 1m standard deviation to reflect realistic debris laser ranging accuracy. The predicted orbits are then compared with the accurate Consolidated Prediction Format (CPF) orbits generated by the ILRS data centers. The study confirms that accuracy of 20 arc seconds in the along-track direction for 1-2 day orbit predictions, and tens of meter in the radial direction, are achievable. For the lower Larets satellite

  8. The Physics of Fast Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Bob

    2007-01-01

    Toys can provide motivational contexts for learning and teaching about physics. A cheap car track provides an almost frictionless environment from which a quantitative study of conservation of energy and circular motion can be made.

  9. Automatic electronic fish tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, P. W.; Hoffman, E.; Merriner, J. V.; Richards, C. E.; Lovelady, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A newly developed electronic fish tracking system to automatically monitor the movements and migratory habits of fish is reported. The system is aimed particularly at studies of effects on fish life of industrial facilities which use rivers or lakes to dump their effluents. Location of fish is acquired by means of acoustic links from the fish to underwater Listening Stations, and by radio links which relay tracking information to a shore-based Data Base. Fish over 4 inches long may be tracked over a 5 x 5 mile area. The electronic fish tracking system provides the marine scientist with electronics which permit studies that were not practical in the past and which are cost-effective compared to manual methods.

  10. Tracking Code for Microwave Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21

    To study microwave instability the tracking code is developed. For bench marking, results are compared with Oide-Yokoya results [1] for broad-band Q = 1 impedance. Results hint to two possible mechanisms determining the threshold of instability.

  11. FFTF Asbestos Location Tracking Program

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.A.

    1994-09-15

    An Asbestos Location Tracking Program was prepared to list, locate, and determine Asbestos content and to provide baseline {open_quotes}good faith{close_quotes} for yearly condition inspections for the FFTF Plant and buildings and grounds.

  12. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  13. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  14. Tracking subsystem test requirements survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. H.; Tatosian, C. G.; Bynum, M. C.; Zook, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the test and checkout requirements of the tracking portion of the communications and tracking subsystem was performed to evaluate adequacy of planned tests and test requirement documents. Emphasis is placed on identifying test completeness, duplications, and omissions. Items that may save time, aid in testing, and present a more complete integrated test program are also noted. The results of this survey are summarized.

  15. Tracking Sensor Developments For Optical Intersatellite Links - An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purll, David J.; Mathur, Rajul P.

    1990-04-01

    Optical communication between satellites in orbit requires highly accurate tracking of an incoming laser beam, to allow the generation of necessary control signals for the pointing mechanisms. For the SILEX system planned by ESA the tracking sensor is required to determine the position of the centre of the focused laser spot with a la noise error within 0.1,um on the CCD detector (equivalent to a mispointing of 0.07μrad), for the nominal bandwidth of 8kHz and the minimum optical power of 110pw. This implies the determination of the centre position to small sub-pixel accuracies, achieved via mathematical interpolation from the fractions of the optical signal falling in the centre 4 pixels. This paper updates a previous paper'. It discusses the development of the tracking sensor breadboards by BAe and Sira. The detector unit, which uses the new 14x14 pixel CCD developed by Thomson-CSF, provides for fine adjustments of the CCD position. It also houses the electronics for CCD output buffering and amplification. The electronics unit carries out the processing of the video signal, to determine the coarse position of the spot over the 14x14 pixel area, and a very accurate position over the central 2x2 pixel area via an algorithm executed in a microprocessor. The paper presents some performance results including new results from the second breadboard, and routes to the design of flight sensors.

  16. Tracking subsystem of the SOFIA telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Hermann; Braeuninger, Christoph; Dierks, Andreas; Erdmann, Matthias; Erhard, Markus; Lattner, Klaus; Schmolke, Juergen

    2000-06-01

    The Tracking Subsystem of the SOFIA telescope consists of three high performance imagers and a dedicated tracking control unit. There are two boresighted imagers for target acquisition and tracking, one with a wide (6 degrees) and one with a fine (70 arcmin) field-of-view, and one main- telescope-optics sharing imager with a narrow field-of-view (8 arcmin) for high performance tracking. From the recorded stellar images, tracking error signals are generated by the tracker controller. The tracker controller has several features to support various tracking schemes such as tracking the telescope as an inertial platform, on- axis/offset tracking, and limb tracking. The tracker has three modes, i.e. positioning, tracking and `override'. Special features are the handling of so-called areas-of- interest in the inertial reference frame and the external imager synchronization. The paper presents the design and functional/operational performance of the imagers and the tracking control unit.

  17. The global light system laser station prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Patrick R.

    We describe the design and fabrication of a prototype Global Light System (GLS) laser station for the JEM-EUSO project. The GLS will consist of a network of ground-based Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and steered lasers to monitor and calibrate the cosmic ray detector planned for install on the International Space Station (ISS). The GLS units will generate optical signatures in the atmosphere that are comparable to tracks from cosmic ray extensive air showers (EASs). Unlike an EAS, the number, time, energy, location and direction (for lasers) of GLS events can be specified as JEM-EUSO passes 400 km overhead. Laser tracks from the GLS prototype will be recorded by prototype detectors in ground-to-ground tests. Distant tracks with low angular speed are of particular interest because these are the types of EAS tracks that will be measured by JEM-EUSO. To do these ground-to-ground tests, the prototype detectors will need to measure the laser through the atmosphere at low elevation viewing angles. The beam energy can be adjusted from 1 to 90 mJ to compensate for this additional atmospheric attenuation. The frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser produces 355 nm (7 ns pulse) light. This wavelength is near the center of the UV EAS fluorescence spectrum. The system is housed in a utility trailer that can be transported by a small truck for domestic campaigns or shipped in an industry standard 20 foot container for global deployment. In operation mode, the laser platform inside the trailer is isolated mechanically to maintain beam pointing accuracy. A retractable two stage steering head can point in any direction above the horizon. A slip ring eliminates cable wrap problems. The GLS prototype will be used to test the EUSO-TA detector and will also be used in preflight tests of the EUSO-balloon payload planned for a super pressure balloon mission.

  18. Fast-Tracking Colostomy Closures.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2015-12-01

    There have been very few studies on applying fast-track principles to colostomy closures. We believe that outcome may be significantly improved with multimodal interventions in the peri-operative care of patients undergoing this procedure. A retrospective study was carried out comparing patients who had undergone colostomy closures by the fast-track and traditional care protocols at our centre. We intended to analyse peri-operative period and recovery in colostomy closures to confirm that fast-track surgery principles improved outcomes. Twenty-six patients in the fast-track arm and 24 patients in the traditional care arm had undergone colostomy closures. Both groups were comparable in terms of their baseline parameters. Patients in the fast-track group were ambulatory and accepted oral feeding earlier. There was a significant reduction in the duration of stay (4.73 ± 1.43 days vs. 7.21 ± 1.38 days, p = 0.0000). We did not observe a rise in complications or 30-day re-admissions. Fast-track surgery can safely be applied to colostomy closures. It shows earlier ambulation and reduction in length of hospital stay. PMID:27011527

  19. Analysis of railway track vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, K.; Yamada, M.

    1989-04-01

    Analytical formulae are developed for estimating the amplitudes of the vibrations generated in railway tracks by wheels and rail discontinuities or by unevennesses on their surfaces. Rails are assumed to be supported elastically on concrete sleepers by resilient rail-pads inserted between them. The elasticities and the masses of track materials and those of the roadbed are also taken into consideration. It is shown that after an impulse is applied to the track, not only is a vibration with a comparatively low natural frequency generated, but also traveling waves with higher frequencies, and the latter propagate lengthwise along the track or downwards into the roadbed. With the assumption that the power spectral density of the unevennesses on the rail surface is in proportion to the third power of the wavelength, or to (wavenumber) -3, the amplitudes of the vibrations in railway tracks supported by rail-pads and roadbeds with various magnitudes of elastic constants are analyzed and the values for each one-third octave band are estimated. The velocity of the vibration takes on a maximum value for the band with a center frequency of 63 Hz, which corresponds to the resonant frequency of the system composed of the wheel and the track. As the frequency increases beyond this value, the velocity of the vibration takes on a second maximum value at a frequency of about 1000 Hz. These estimates are compared with the data obtained from field measurements and reasonably good correlations are found between them.

  20. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  1. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  2. Glass lasers.

    PubMed

    Snitzer, E

    1966-10-01

    After a general discussion of the merits of glass vs. crystals as host materials for laser ions, a summary is given of the various glass lasers. Because of its importance as an efficient, room temperature laser the properties of neodymium are considered in greater detail. This includes the nonlaser properties of Nd(3+) in glass, the spectral and temporal emission characteristics of Nd(3+) lasers, and Nd(3+) laser configurations. Separate sections deal with the other two room temperature lasers which use Yb(3+) or Er(3+). The problem of thermal stability of laser cavities is also discussed. Finally, a survey is given of the glasses that are useful as Faraday rotators. PMID:20057584

  3. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  4. An augmented reality assistance platform for eye laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Ee Ping Ong; Lee, Jimmy Addison; Jun Cheng; Beng Hai Lee; Guozhen Xu; Laude, Augustinus; Teoh, Stephen; Tock Han Lim; Wong, Damon W K; Jiang Liu

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a novel augmented reality assistance platform for eye laser surgery. The aims of the proposed system are for the application of assisting eye doctors in pre-planning as well as providing guidance and protection during laser surgery. We developed algorithms to automatically register multi-modal images, detect macula and optic disc regions, and demarcate these as protected areas from laser surgery. The doctor will then be able to plan the laser treatment pre-surgery using the registered images and segmented regions. Thereafter, during live surgery, the system will automatically register and track the slit lamp video frames on the registered retina images, send appropriate warning when the laser is near protected areas, and disable the laser function when it points into the protected areas. The proposed system prototype can help doctors to speed up laser surgery with confidence without fearing that they may unintentionally fire laser in the protected areas. PMID:26737252

  5. Pointing and tracking space mechanism for laser communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunschvig, A.; Deboisanger, M.

    1994-01-01

    Space optical communication is considered a promising technology regarding its high data rate and confidentiality capabilities. However, it requires today complex satellite systems involving highly accurate mechanisms. This paper aims to highlight the stringent requirements which had to be fulfilled for such a mechanism, the way an existing design has been adapted to meet these requirements, and the main technical difficulties which have been overcome thanks to extensive development tests throughout the C/D phase initiated in 1991. The expected on-orbit performance of this mechanism is also presented.

  6. 49 CFR 212.203 - Track inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specific qualifications: (1) A comprehensive knowledge of track nomenclature, track inspection techniques... CFR part 213), to make reports of those inspections, and to recommend the institution of enforcement...: (i) Track maintenance standards accepted in the industry; and (ii) The Track Safety Standards (49...

  7. 49 CFR 212.203 - Track inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specific qualifications: (1) A comprehensive knowledge of track nomenclature, track inspection techniques... CFR part 213), to make reports of those inspections, and to recommend the institution of enforcement...: (i) Track maintenance standards accepted in the industry; and (ii) The Track Safety Standards (49...

  8. 49 CFR 212.203 - Track inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specific qualifications: (1) A comprehensive knowledge of track nomenclature, track inspection techniques... CFR part 213), to make reports of those inspections, and to recommend the institution of enforcement...: (i) Track maintenance standards accepted in the industry; and (ii) The Track Safety Standards (49...

  9. 49 CFR 213.323 - Track gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Track gage. 213.323 Section 213.323 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.323 Track gage....

  10. 49 CFR 213.323 - Track gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Track gage. 213.323 Section 213.323 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.323 Track gage....

  11. 49 CFR 213.4 - Excepted track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... required to be placarded by the Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR part 172), are moved over the track... be placarded by the Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR part 172); and (4) The gage on excepted... TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS General § 213.4 Excepted track. A track owner may designate a segment...

  12. 49 CFR 213.4 - Excepted track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... required to be placarded by the Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR part 172), are moved over the track... be placarded by the Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR part 172); and (4) The gage on excepted... TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS General § 213.4 Excepted track. A track owner may designate a segment...

  13. 49 CFR 213.4 - Excepted track.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... required to be placarded by the Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR part 172), are moved over the track... be placarded by the Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR part 172); and (4) The gage on excepted... TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS General § 213.4 Excepted track. A track owner may designate a segment...

  14. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For...

  15. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For...

  16. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For...

  17. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For...

  18. 49 CFR 213.359 - Track stiffness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Train Operations at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.359 Track stiffness. (a) Track shall have a sufficient vertical strength to withstand the maximum vehicle loads generated at maximum permissible train speeds, cant deficiencies and surface defects. For...

  19. Trigonometric bearings-only tracking for a single stationary observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Terry; Chan, Y. T.

    2002-07-01

    A single, stationary observer cannot determine a unique target track with bearings-only measurements. In the land environment, for tactical reasons, the observer typically remains stationary but can measure the target range by a laser rangefinder (LRF). Bearings-only tracking of a non-maneuvering target is a non-linear problem. Solutions by iteration or the extended Kalman filter suffer from a high computation load and possible filter divergence. In contrast, the pseudo-linear formulation permits the application of a linear Kalman filter but the range estimate has a bias, which eliminates through instrumental variables. The development in showed that even though a target track is indeterminate due to a stationary observer, a unique target heading is still available from the bearings-only measurements. Then after an LRF range measurement, Rl, future estimates of target position and velocity become determinant. This paper gives a new tracking scheme for a stationary observer that gives the range estimate as a function of Rl, the target heading and bearings. The estimation equation comes from the trigonometric Law of Sines and is simple to implement. The estimator is unbiased and simulation experiments have shown that the estimates are close to the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound.

  20. Remote estimation of blood pulse pressure via temporal tracking of reflected secondary speckles pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiderman, Yevgeny; Horovitz, Israel; Burshtein, Natanel; Teicher, Mina; Garcia, Javier; Mico, Vicente; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel technique for remote noncontact blood pulse pressure measurement. It is based on tracking both temporal and amplitude changes of reflected secondary speckle produced in human skin when illuminated by a laser beam. The implemented technique extracts the difference between the systolic and the diastolic blood pressure. Experimental results are presented showing good agreement when compared with conventional measurement methods.

  1. Technology forecasting for space communication. [analysis of systems for application to Spacecraft Data and Tracking Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine techniques for application to space communication. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) optical communication systems, (2) laser communications for data acquisition networks, (3) spacecraft data rate requirements, (4) telemetry, command, and data handling, (5) spacecraft tracking and data network antenna and preamplifier cost tradeoff study, and (6) spacecraft communication terminal evaluation.

  2. Design and implementation of a financial planning and tracking system for the Nova Project

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, F.

    1982-01-01

    The Nova project is a 185 million dollar DOE funded project to build an experimental facility to demonstrate the thermonuclear ignition of laser fusion targets. This paper describes the design and implementation considerations for the project's computerized performance measurement financial planning and tracking system and critiques its actual operation.

  3. PDT - PARTICLE DISPLACEMENT TRACKING SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative velocity measurement technique for measuring instantaneous planar cross sections of a flow field. The technique offers very high precision (1%) directionally resolved velocity vector estimates, but its use has been limited by high equipment costs and complexity of operation. Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) is an all-electronic PIV data acquisition and reduction procedure which is simple, fast, and easily implemented. The procedure uses a low power, continuous wave laser and a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) camera to electronically record the particle images. A frame grabber board in a PC is used for data acquisition and reduction processing. PDT eliminates the need for photographic processing, system costs are moderately low, and reduced data are available within seconds of acquisition. The technique results in velocity estimate accuracies on the order of 5%. The software is fully menu-driven from the acquisition to the reduction and analysis of the data. Options are available to acquire a single image or 5- or 25-field series of images separated in time by multiples of 1/60 second. The user may process each image, specifying its boundaries to remove unwanted glare from the periphery and adjusting its background level to clearly resolve the particle images. Data reduction routines determine the particle image centroids and create time history files. PDT then identifies the velocity vectors which describe the particle movement in the flow field. Graphical data analysis routines are included which allow the user to graph the time history files and display the velocity vector maps, interpolated velocity vector grids, iso-velocity vector contours, and flow streamlines. The PDT data processing software is written in FORTRAN 77 and the data acquisition routine is written in C-Language for 80386-based IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS v3.0 or higher. Machine requirements include 4 MB RAM (3 MB Extended), a single or

  4. Effect of width and boundary conditions on meeting maneuvers on two-way separated cycle tracks.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alfredo; Gomez, Fernando Agustin; Llorca, Carlos; Angel-Domenech, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Cycle track design guidelines are rarely based on scientific studies. In the case of off-road two-way cycle tracks, a minimum width must facilitate both passing and meeting maneuvers, being meeting maneuvers the most frequent. This study developed a methodology to observe meeting maneuvers using an instrumented bicycle, equipped with video cameras, a GPS tracker, laser rangefinders and speed sensors. This bicycle collected data on six two-way cycle tracks ranging 1.3-2.15m width delimitated by different boundary conditions. The meeting maneuvers between the instrumented bicycle and every oncoming bicycle were characterized by the meeting clearance between the two bicycles, the speed of opposing bicycle and the reaction of the opposing rider: change in trajectory, stop pedaling or braking. The results showed that meeting clearance increased with the cycle track width and decreased if the cycle track had lateral obstacles, especially if they were higher than the bicycle handlebar. The speed of opposing bicycle shown the same tendency, although were more disperse. Opposing cyclists performed more reaction maneuvers on narrower cycle tracks and on cycle tracks with lateral obstacles to the handlebar height. Conclusions suggested avoiding cycle tracks narrower than 1.6m, as they present lower meeting clearances, lower bicycle speeds and frequent reaction maneuvers. PMID:25779982

  5. MIDIR (Mid-Infrared) laser, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Douglas; Jeffers, William; Shellan, Jeffrey

    1988-04-01

    Advances in sensor technology have led to a proliferation of electro-optical systems operating in the mid-infrared (3 to 5 micron). Examples are search and track sets, missile seekers, laser designators, and high energy lasers. To counter enemy use of such systems, jamming and collecting systems which employ lasers of modest power operating within the spectral pass-band of the threat are required. A modulated, wavelength agile, compact, mid-infrared laser of moderate average output powers is extremely attractive for infrared countermeasures and OPTINT collections applications. A unique electric discharge gain generator design has been investigated which promises significant improvements in efficiency, compactness and reliability for pulsed gas laser systems with high peak power and moderate average power outputs.

  6. Studies of avalanche photodiodes for scintillating fibre tracking readout

    SciTech Connect

    Fenker, H; Thomas, J

    1993-01-01

    Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) operating in ``Geiger Mode`` have been studied in a fibre tracking readout environment. A fast recharge circuit has been developed for high rate data taking, and results obtained from a model fibre tracker in the test beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented. A high rate calibrated light source has been developed using a commercially available laser diode and has been used to measure the efficiency of the devices. The transmission of the light from a 1mm fibre onto a 0.5mm diameter APD surface has been identified as the main problem in the use of these particular devices for scintillating fibre tracking in the Superconducting Supercollider environment. Solutions to this problem are proposed.

  7. Detection and tracking of moving objects hidden from view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Tonolini, Francesco; Henderson, Robert; Leach, Jonathan; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect motion and track a moving object hidden around a corner or behind a wall provides a crucial advantage when physically going around the obstacle is impossible or dangerous. Previous methods have demonstrated that it is possible to reconstruct the shape of an object hidden from view. However, these methods do not enable the tracking of movement in real time. We demonstrate a compact non-line-of-sight laser ranging technology that relies on the ability to send light around an obstacle using a scattering floor and then detect the return signal from a hidden object within only a few seconds of acquisition time. By detecting this signal with a single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) camera, we follow the movement of an object located a metre away from the camera with centimetre precision. We discuss the possibility of applying this technology to a variety of real-life situations in the near future.

  8. Bayesian multi-target tracking and sequential object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Walter

    2008-04-01

    The paper considers the following problem: given a 3D model of a reference target and a sequence of images of a 3D scene, identify the object in the scene most likely to be the reference target and determine its current pose. Finding the best match in each frame independently of previous decisions is not optimal, since past information is ignored. Our solution concept uses a novel Bayesian framework for multi target tracking and object recognition to define and sequentially update the probability that the reference target is any one of the tracked objects. The approach is applied to problems of automatic lock-on and missile guidance using a laser radar seeker. Field trials have resulted in high target hit probabilities despite low resolution imagery and temporarily highly occluded targets.

  9. Selecting and tracking multiple objects.

    PubMed

    Scimeca, Jason M; Franconeri, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    When interacting with the world, people can dynamically split attention across multiple objects in the environment, both when the objects are stationary and when the objects are moving. This type of visual processing is commonly studied in lab settings using either static selection tasks or moving tracking tasks. We describe performance limits that are common to both tasks, including limits on capacity, crowding, visual hemifield arrangement, and speed. Because these shared limits on performance suggest common underlying mechanisms, we examine a set of models that might account for limits across both. We also review cognitive neuroscience data relevant to these limits, which can provide constraints on the set of models. Finally, we examine performance limits that are unique to tracking tasks, such as trajectory encoding, and identity encoding. We argue that a complete model of multiple object tracking must account for both those limits shared between static selection and dynamic tracking, as well as limits unique to tracking. It must also provide neurally plausible mechanisms for the underlying processing resources. PMID:26263067

  10. Feature Tracking Using Reeb Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.; Pascucci, Valerio

    2010-08-02

    Tracking features and exploring their temporal dynamics can aid scientists in identifying interesting time intervals in a simulation and serve as basis for performing quantitative analyses of temporal phenomena. In this paper, we develop a novel approach for tracking subsets of isosurfaces, such as burning regions in simulated flames, which are defined as areas of high fuel consumption on a temperature isosurface. Tracking such regions as they merge and split over time can provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. However, the convoluted nature of the temperature isosurface and its rapid movement make this analysis particularly challenging. Our approach tracks burning regions by extracting a temperature isovolume from the four-dimensional space-time temperature field. It then obtains isosurfaces for the original simulation time steps and labels individual connected 'burning' regions based on the local fuel consumption value. Based on this information, a boundary surface between burning and non-burning regions is constructed. The Reeb graph of this boundary surface is the tracking graph for burning regions.

  11. Track structure in biological models.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B

    1986-01-01

    High-energy heavy ions in the galactic cosmic radiation (HZE particles) may pose a special risk during long term manned space flights outside the sheltering confines of the earth's geomagnetic field. These particles are highly ionizing, and they and their nuclear secondaries can penetrate many centimeters of body tissue. The three dimensional patterns of ionizations they create as they lose energy are referred to as their track structure. Several models of biological action on mammalian cells attempt to treat track structure or related quantities in their formulation. The methods by which they do this are reviewed. The proximity function is introduced in connection with the theory of Dual Radiation Action (DRA). The ion-gamma kill (IGK) model introduces the radial energy-density distribution, which is a smooth function characterizing both the magnitude and extension of a charged particle track. The lethal, potentially lethal (LPL) model introduces lambda, the mean distance between relevant ion clusters or biochemical species along the track. Since very localized energy depositions (within approximately 10 nm) are emphasized, the proximity function as defined in the DRA model is not of utility in characterizing track structure in the LPL formulation. PMID:11537218

  12. Storm tracks near marginal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Novak, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    The variance of atmospheric storm tracks is characterised by intermittent bursts of activity interspersed with relatively quiescent periods. Most of the poleward heat transport by storm tracks is due to a limited number of strong heat flux events, which occur in a quasi-periodic fashion. This behaviour is in contradiction with the usual conceptual model of the storm tracks, which relies on high growth rate background flows which then spawn weather systems that grow in an exponential or non-normal fashion. Here we present a different conceptual model of the atmospheric storm tracks which is built on the observation that, when including diabatic and other dissipative effects, the storm track region is in fact most of the time marginally stable. The ensuing model is a nonlinear oscillator, very similar to Volterra-Lotka predator-prey models. We demonstrate the extensions of this model to a stochastically driven nonlinear oscillator. The model produces quasi-periodic behaviour dominated by intermittent heat flux events. Perhaps most surprisingly, we will show strong evidence from re-analysis data for our conceptual model: the re-analysis data produces a phase-space plot that is very similar indeed to the phase-space plot for our nonlinear oscillator model.

  13. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In the embodiment of the invention claimed herein, the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being combined with either the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser.

  14. Office of Tracking and Data Acquisition. [deep space network and spacecraft tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Office of Tracking and Data Acquisition (OTDA) and its two worldwide tracking network facilities, the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network and the Deep Space Network, are described. Other topics discussed include the NASA communications network, the tracking and data relay satellite system, other OTDA tracking activities, and OTDA milestones.

  15. Cotton phenotyping with lidar from a track-mounted platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Andrew N.; Gore, Michael A.; Thompson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    High-Throughput Phenotyping (HTP) is a discipline for rapidly identifying plant architectural and physiological responses to environmental factors such as heat and water stress. Experiments conducted since 2010 at Maricopa, Arizona with a three-fold sensor group, including thermal infrared radiometers, active visible/near infrared reflectance sensors, and acoustic plant height sensors, have shown the validity of HTP with a tractor-based system. However, results from these experiments also show that accuracy of plant phenotyping is limited by the system's inability to discriminate plant components and their local environmental conditions. This limitation may be overcome with plant imaging and laser scanning which can help map details in plant architecture and sunlit/shaded leaves. To test the capability for mapping cotton plants with a laser system, a track-mounted platform was deployed in 2015 over a full canopy and defoliated cotton crop consisting of a scanning LIDAR driven by Arduinocontrolled stepper motors. Using custom Python and Tkinter code, the platform moved autonomously along a pipe-track at 0.1 m/s while collecting LIDAR scans at 25 Hz (0.1667 deg. beam). These tests showed that an autonomous LIDAR platform can reduce HTP logistical problems and provide the capability to accurately map cotton plants and cotton bolls. A prototype track-mounted platform was developed to test the use of LIDAR scanning for High- Throughput Phenotyping (HTP). The platform was deployed in 2015 at Maricopa, Arizona over a senescent cotton crop. Using custom Python and Tkinter code, the platform moved autonomously along a pipe-track at <1 m/s while collecting LIDAR scans at 25 Hz (0.1667 deg. beam). Scanning data mapped the canopy heights and widths, and detected cotton bolls.

  16. Laser pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    A method of determining the emissivity of a hot target from a laser-based reflectance measurement which is conducted simultaneously with a measurement of the target radiance is described. Once the correct radiance and emissivity are determined, one calculates the true target temperature from these parameters via the Planck equations. The design and performance of a laser pyrometer is described. The accuracy of laser pyrometry and the effect of ambient radiance are addressed.

  17. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  18. Laser polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmler, A.; Willenborg, E.; Wissenbach, K.

    2012-03-01

    A new approach to polish metallic freeform surfaces is polishing by means of laser radiation. In this technology a thin surface layer is molten and the surface tension leads to a material flow from the peaks to the valleys. No material is removed but reallocated while molten. As the typical processing time is 1 min/cm2 laser polishing is up to 30 times faster than manual polishing. Reducing the roughness by laser polishing is achieved for several different materials such as hot work steels for the die and molding industries or titanium alloys for medical engineering. Enhancing the appearance of design surfaces is achieved by creating a dual-gloss effect by selective laser polishing (SLP). In comparison to conventional polishing processes laser polishing opens up the possibility of selective processing of small areas (< 0.1 mm2). A dual-gloss effect is based on a space-resolved change in surface roughness. In comparison to the initial surface the roughness of the laser polished surface is reduced significantly up to spatial wavelengths of 80 microns and therefore the gloss is raised considerably. The surface roughness is investigated by a spectral analysis which is achieved by a discrete convolution of the surface profile with a Gaussian loaded function. The surfaces roughness is split into discrete wavelength intervals and can be evaluated and optimized. Laser polishing is carried out by using a special tailored five-axis mechanical handling system, combined with a three axis laser scanning system and a fibre laser.

  19. Biocavity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  20. Laser apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Owen; Stogran, Edmund M.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus is described wherein an active laser element, such as the disc of a face-pumped laser, is mounted in a housing such that the weight of the element is supported by glass spheres which fill a chamber defined in the housing between the walls of the housing and the edges of the laser element. The uniform support provided by the spheres enable the chamber and the pump side of the laser element to be sealed without affecting the alignment or other optical properties of the laser element. Cooling fluid may be circulated through the sealed region by way of the interstices between the spheres. The spheres, and if desired also the cooling fluid may contain material which absorbs radiation at the wavelength of parasitic emissions from the laser element. These parasitic emissions enter the spheres through the interface along the edge surface of the laser element and it is desirable that the index of refraction of the spheres and cooling fluid be near the index of refraction of the laser element. Thus support, cooling, and parasitic suppression functions are all accomplished through the use of the arrangement.

  1. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abgrall, N.

    2015-01-16

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation.more » In summary, a web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.« less

  2. Fuzzy logic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1993-01-01

    Fuzzy logic has proven to be a simple and robust method for process control. Instead of requiring a complex model of the system, a user defined rule base is used to control the process. In this paper the principles of fuzzy logic control are applied to Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Two frames of digitally recorded, single exposure particle imagery are used as input. The fuzzy processor uses the local particle displacement information to determine the correct particle tracks. Fuzzy PTV is an improvement over traditional PTV techniques which typically require a sequence (greater than 2) of image frames for accurately tracking particles. The fuzzy processor executes in software on a PC without the use of specialized array or fuzzy logic processors. A pair of sample input images with roughly 300 particle images each, results in more than 200 velocity vectors in under 8 seconds of processing time.

  3. Frequency Synthesizer For Tracking Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Digital frequency-synthesizing subsystem generates trains of pulses, free of jitter, for use as frequency-control signals in tracking filters. Part of assembly of electronic equipment used to measure vibrations in bearings in rotating machinery. Designed to meet requirements for tracking narrow-band cage-rotation and ball-pass components of vibrations, as discussed in "Frequency-Tracking Error Detector" (MFS-29538) and "Ball-Pass Cage-Modulation Detector" (MFS-29539). Synthesizer includes preset counter, output of which controls signal for ball-pass filter. Input to this preset counter updated every 2 microseconds: responds almost immediately, effectively eliminating relatively long response time (lock-in time) and phase jitter.

  4. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, N.

    2015-01-16

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. In summary, a web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

  5. Cell crawling on filamentous tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jorge; Schwarz, Jennifer; Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments suggest that the migration of some cells in three dimensions has strong resemblance to one-dimensional migration. Motivated by this observation, we simulate a one-dimensional model cell made of beads and springs that moves on a tense semiflexible filamentous track. Physical parameters, such as the spring constants and friction coefficients, are calculated using effective theories. We investigate the mechanical feedback between the model cell and this track, as mediated by the active myosin-driven contractility and the catch/slip bond behavior of the focal adhesions, as the model cell crawls. We then compare our calculations of cell speed and the amount of deformation in the track with experiments.

  6. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, J.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J. Diaz; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O`Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Petersburg, R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Soin, A.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provide a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

  7. Proton shadow camera using CR-39 track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1983-09-01

    We have developed a capability for imaging proton sources of moderate energy (6 MeV), with moderate spatial resolution (approx. = 9 ..mu..m), as a diagnostic for laser fusion research. Our technique involves the use of Fresnel zone plate coded imaging coupled with nuclear track detectors (CR-39). We report on a series of test experiments in which a zone plate shadow camera successfully produced images of a proton source distribution. The zone plate shadow patterns were optically reconstructed in higher order producing diffraction-limited point response images with FWHM values of approx. = 9 ..mu..m for a 6 MeV proton source.

  8. Using molecular alignment to track ultrafast collisional relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.

    2014-06-01

    Field-free molecular alignment has been used in order to track the collisional relaxation occurring in a molecular gas. CO2 molecules were initially irradiated by a short linearly polarized laser pulse resulting in the increase of their rotational energy. The evolution of the subsequent ultrafast relaxation process was optically probed after irradiating the sample with a second, weaker, short pulse leading to the alignment of the preheated molecules. Using classical molecular dynamic simulations, we were able to quantitatively reproduce the experimental shapes and amplitudes of the recorded revival transients for a time interval extending from 25 to 500 ps until thermalization of the gas sample is reached.

  9. Magnetic Launch Assist Experimental Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this photograph, a futuristic spacecraft model sits atop a carrier on the Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly known as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) System, experimental track at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Engineers at MSFC have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies that would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at very high speeds. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would electromagnetically drive a space vehicle along the track. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. This track is an advanced linear induction motor. Induction motors are common in fans, power drills, and sewing machines. Instead of spinning in a circular motion to turn a shaft or gears, a linear induction motor produces thrust in a straight line. Mounted on concrete pedestals, the track is 100-feet long, about 2-feet wide, and about 1.5-feet high. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  10. Tracking animals to their death.

    PubMed

    Hays, Graeme C

    2014-01-01

    Migration may be a high-risk period. In a study involving three species of raptor migrating from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa, Klaassen et al. (2014) satellite-tracked 51 out of 69 birds to their deaths and showed that rate of mortality during migration was 6x that during stationary phases when birds were on their winter and summer grounds. Travel across the Sahara was particularly risky. Satellite tracking has also been used to infer mortality in other taxa (e.g. sea turtles) and may allow high-risk hotspots to be identified for wide-ranging species. PMID:24192383

  11. Solid state nuclear track detection

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, S.A.; Bull, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a basic work on the technique variously known as 'nuclear track analysis', 'track-etch technique', or 'solid state nuclear tract detection'. This has greatly expanded in range, scope and depth since the early 1960's, soon after its discovery, until there is hardly a field now in which it has not found an actual or potential use. Such applications range from archaeology, geology, space physics, medicine and biology to reactor physics and nuclear physics-to name but a few.

  12. Tracking Cancer Genetic Evolution using OncoTrack

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, Asoke K.; Agarwal, Mahima; Buetow, Kenneth H.; Denèfle, Patrice P.

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult for existing methods to quantify, and track the constant evolution of cancers due to high heterogeneity of mutations. However, structural variations associated with nucleotide number changes show repeatable patterns in localized regions of the genome. Here we introduce SPKMG, which generalizes nucleotide number based properties of genes, in statistical terms, at the genome-wide scale. It is measured from the normalized amount of aligned NGS reads in exonic regions of a gene. SPKMG values are calculated within OncoTrack. SPKMG values being continuous numeric variables provide a statistical metric to track DNA level changes. We show that SPKMG measures of cancer DNA show a normative pattern at the genome-wide scale. The analysis leads to the discovery of core cancer genes and also provides novel dynamic insights into the stage of cancer, including cancer development, progression, and metastasis. This technique will allow exome data to also be used for quantitative LOH/CNV analysis for tracking tumour progression and evolution with a higher efficiency. PMID:27412732

  13. Tracking Cancer Genetic Evolution using OncoTrack.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Asoke K; Agarwal, Mahima; Buetow, Kenneth H; Denèfle, Patrice P

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult for existing methods to quantify, and track the constant evolution of cancers due to high heterogeneity of mutations. However, structural variations associated with nucleotide number changes show repeatable patterns in localized regions of the genome. Here we introduce SPKMG, which generalizes nucleotide number based properties of genes, in statistical terms, at the genome-wide scale. It is measured from the normalized amount of aligned NGS reads in exonic regions of a gene. SPKMG values are calculated within OncoTrack. SPKMG values being continuous numeric variables provide a statistical metric to track DNA level changes. We show that SPKMG measures of cancer DNA show a normative pattern at the genome-wide scale. The analysis leads to the discovery of core cancer genes and also provides novel dynamic insights into the stage of cancer, including cancer development, progression, and metastasis. This technique will allow exome data to also be used for quantitative LOH/CNV analysis for tracking tumour progression and evolution with a higher efficiency. PMID:27412732

  14. USA Track & Field Coaching Manual. USA Track & Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Track and Field, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    This book presents comprehensive, ready-to-apply information from 33 world-class coaches and experts about major track and field events for high school and college coaches. The volume features proven predictive testing procedures; detailed event-specific technique instruction; carefully crafted training programs; and preparation and performance…

  15. Combining structured light and ladar for pose tracking in THz sensor management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engström, Philip; Axelsson, Maria; Karlsson, Mikael

    2013-05-01

    Stand-off 3D THz imaging to detect concealed treats is currently under development. The technology can provide high resolution 3D range data of a passing subject showing layers of clothes and if there are concealed items. However, because it is a scanning sensor technology with a narrow field of view, the subjects pose and position need to be accurately tracked in real time to focus the system and map the imaged THz data to specific body parts. Structured light is a technique to obtain 3D range information. It is, for example, used in the Microsoft Kinect for pose tracking of game players in real time. We demonstrate how structured light can contribute to a THz sensor management system and track subjects in real time. The main advantage of structured light is its simplicity, the disadvantages are the sensitivity to lighting conditions and material properties as well as a relatively low accuracy. Time of flight laser scanning is a technique that complements structured light well, the accuracy is usually much higher and it is less sensitive to lighting conditions. We show that by combining the techniques it is possible to create a robust real time pose tracking system for THz sensor management. We present a concept system based on the Microsoft Kinect and a SICK LMS-511 laser scanner. The laser scanner is used for 2D tracking of the subjects, this tracking is then used to initialize and validate the Microsoft Kinect pose tracking. We have evaluated the sensors individually in both static and dynamic scenes and present their advantages and drawbacks.

  16. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  17. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  18. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment On This Page What is laser light? What is laser therapy, and how is it ... future hold for laser therapy? What is laser light? The term “ laser ” stands for light amplification by ...

  19. Video Based Sensor for Tracking 3-Dimensional Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R. T.; Book, Michael L.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    Video-Based Sensor for Tracking 3-Dimensional Targets The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASAs) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been developing and testing video-based sensors for automated spacecraft guidance for several years, and the next generation of video sensor will have tracking rates up to 100 Hz and will be able to track multiple reflectors and targets. The Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) developed over the past several years has performed well in testing and met the objective of being used as the terminal guidance sensor for an automated rendezvous and capture system. The first VGS was successfully tested in closed-loop 3-degree-of-freedom (3- DOF) tests in 1989 and then in 6-DOF open-loop tests in 1992 and closed-loop tests in 1993-4. Development and testing continued, and in 1995 approval was given to test the VGS in an experiment on the Space Shuttle. The VGS flew in 1997 and in 1998, performing well for both flights. During the development and testing before, during, and after the flight experiments, numerous areas for improvement were found. The VGS was developed with a sensor head and an electronics box, connected by cables. The VGS was used in conjunction with a target that had wavelength-filtered retro-reflectors in a specific pattern, The sensor head contained the laser diodes, video camera, and heaters and coolers. The electronics box contained a frame grabber, image processor, the electronics to control the components in the sensor head, the communications electronics, and the power supply. The system works by sequentially firing two different wavelengths of laser diodes at the target and processing the two images. Since the target only reflects one wavelength, it shows up well in one image and not at all in the other. Because the target's dimensions are known, the relative positions and attitudes of the target and the sensor can be computed from the spots reflected from the target. The system was designed to work from I

  20. Laser Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  1. Suppression of biodynamic interference in head-tracked teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifshitz, S.; Merhav, S. J.; Grunwald, A. J.; Tucker, G. E.; Tischler, M. B.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of helmet-tracked sights to provide pointing commands for teleoperation of cameras, lasers, or antennas in aircraft is degraded by the presence of uncommanded, involuntary heat motion, referred to as biodynamic interference. This interference limits the achievable precision required in pointing tasks. The noise contributions due to biodynamic interference consists of an additive component which is correlated with aircraft vibration and an uncorrelated, nonadditive component, referred to as remnant. An experimental simulation study is described which investigated the improvements achievable in pointing and tracking precision using dynamic display shifting in the helmet-mounted display. The experiment was conducted in a six degree of freedom motion base simulator with an emulated helmet-mounted display. Highly experienced pilot subjects performed precision head-pointing tasks while manually flying a visual flight-path tracking task. Four schemes using adaptive and low-pass filtering of the head motion were evaluated to determine their effects on task performance and pilot workload in the presence of whole-body vibration characteristic of helicopter flight. The results indicate that, for tracking tasks involving continuously moving targets, improvements of up to 70 percent can be achieved in percent on-target dwelling time and of up to 35 percent in rms tracking error, with the adaptive plus low-pass filter configuration. The results with the same filter configuration for the task of capturing randomly-positioned, stationary targets show an increase of up to 340 percent in the number of targets captured and an improvement of up to 24 percent in the average capture time. The adaptive plus low-pass filter combination was considered to exhibit the best overall display dynamics by each of the subjects.

  2. Coordinated Analyses of Diverse Components in Whole Stardust Cometary Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Keller, Lindsay P.; Messenger, Scott R.; Clemett, Simon J.; Nguyen, Lan-Anh N.; Frank, David

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of samples returned from Comet 81P/Wild-2 by the Stardust spacecraft have resulted in a number of surprising findings that show the origins of comets are more complex than previously suspected. However, these samples pose new experimental challenges because they are diverse and suffered fragmentation, thermal alteration, and fine scale mixing with aerogel. Questions remain about the nature of Wild-2 materials, such as the abundances of organic matter, crystalline materials, and presolar grains. To overcome these challenges, we have developed new sample preparation and analytical techniques tailored for entire aerogel tracks. We have successfully ultramicrotomed entire "carrot" and "bulbous" type tracks along their axis while preserving their original shapes. This innovation allowed us to examine the distribution of fragments along the track from the entrance hole all the way to the terminal particle (TP). We will present results of our coordinated analysis of the "carrot" type aerogel tracks #112 and #148, and the "bulbous" type aerogel tracks #113, #147 and #168 from the nanometer to the millimeter scale. Scanning TEM (STEM) was used for elemental and detailed mineralogy characterization, NanoSIMS was used for isotopic analyses, and ultrafast two-step laser mass spectrometry (ultra L2MS) was used to investigate the nature and distribution of organic phases. The isotopic measurements were performed following detailed TEM characterization for coordinated mineralogy. This approach also enabled spatially resolving the target sample from fine-scale mixtures of compressed aerogel and melt. Eight of the TPs of track #113 are dominated by coarse-grained enstatite (En90) that is largely orthoenstatite with minor, isolated clinoenstatite lamellae. One TP contains minor forsterite (Fo88) and small inclusions of diopside with % levels of Al, Cr and Fe. Two of the TPs contain angular regions of fine-grained nepheline surrounded by enstatite. Their O isotopic

  3. Coordinated Analyses of Diverse Components in Whole Stardust Cometary Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S. R.; Clemett, S. J.; Nguyen, L. N.; Frank, D.

    2011-12-01

    Analyses of samples returned from Comet 81P/Wild-2 by the Stardust spacecraft have resulted in a number of surprising findings that show the origins of comets are more complex than previously suspected. However, these samples pose new experimental challenges because they are diverse and suffered fragmentation, thermal alteration, and fine scale mixing with aerogel. Questions remain about the nature of Wild-2 materials, such as the abundances of organic matter, crystalline materials, and presolar grains. To overcome these challenges, we have developed new sample preparation and analytical techniques tailored for entire aerogel tracks [Nakamura-Messenger et al. 2011]. We have successfully ultramicrotomed entire "carrot" and "bulbous" type tracks along their axis while preserving their original shapes. This innovation allowed us to examine the distribution of fragments along the track from the entrance hole all the way to the terminal particle (TP). We will present results of our coordinated analysis of the "carrot" type aerogel tracks #112 and #148, and the "bulbous" type aerogel tracks #113, #147 and #168 from the nanometer to the millimeter scale. Scanning TEM (STEM) was used for elemental and detailed mineralogy characterization, NanoSIMS was used for isotopic analyses, and ultrafast two-step laser mass spectrometry (ultra L2MS) was used to investigate the nature and distribution of organic phases. The isotopic measurements were performed following detailed TEM characterization for coordinated mineralogy. This approach also enabled spatially resolving the target sample from fine-scale mixtures of compressed aerogel and melt. Eight of the TPs of track #113 are dominated by coarse-grained enstatite (En90) that is largely orthoenstatite with minor, isolated clinoenstatite lamellae. One TP contains minor forsterite (Fo88) and small inclusions of diopside with % levels of Al, Cr and Fe. Two of the TPs contain angular regions of fine-grained nepheline surrounded by

  4. Compact Fiber Laser for 589nm Laser Guide Star Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D.; Drobshoff, D.; Mitchell, S.; Brown, A.

    Laser guide stars are crucial to the broad use of astronomical adaptive optics, because they facilitate access to a large fraction of possible locations on the sky. Lasers tuned to the 589 nm atomic sodium resonance can create an artificial beacon at altitudes of 95-105 km, thus coming close to reproducing the light path of starlight. The deployment of multiconjugate adaptive optics on large aperture telescopes world-wide will require the use of three to nine sodium laser guide stars in order to achieve uniform correction over the aperture with a high Strehl value. Current estimates place the minimum required laser power at > 10 W per laser for a continuous wave source, though a pulsed format, nominally 6?s in length at ~ 16.7 kHz, is currently preferred as it would enable tracking the laser through the Na layer to mitigate spot elongation. The lasers also need to be compact, efficient, robust and turnkey. We are developing an all-fiber laser system for generating a 589 nm source for laser-guided adaptive optics. Fiber lasers are more compact and insensitive to alignment than their bulk laser counterparts, and the heat-dissipation characteristics of fibers, coupled with the high efficiencies demonstrated and excellent spatial mode characteristics, make them a preferred candidate for many high power applications. Our design is based on sum-frequency mixing an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser operating at 1583 nm with a 938 nm Nd:silica fiber laser in a periodically poled crystal to generate 589 nm. We have demonstrated 14 W at 1583 nm with an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser, based on a Koheras single frequency fiber oscillator amplified in an IPG Photonics fiber amplifier. The Nd:silica fiber laser is a somewhat more novel device, since the Nd3+ ions must operate on the resonance transition (i.e. 4F3/2-4I9/2), while suppressing ASE losses at the more conventional 1088 nm transition. Optimization of the ratio of the fiber core and cladding permits operation of the laser at room

  5. Towards Better Student Tracking Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Development Agency, London (England).

    The Further Education (FE) sector in the United Kingdom has devoted time, energy, and resources in recent years to the development and improvement of information systems known as management-information systems. This report presents the findings of a research project on the use of management-information systems in student tracking. The project was…

  6. Etching fission tracks in zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique has been developed whereby fission tracks can be etched in zircon with a solution of sodium hydroxide at 220??C. Etching time varied between 15 minutes and 5 hours. Colored zircon required less etching time than the colorless varieties.

  7. Bifurcation of tracked scalar waves

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J.; Lindquist, B.; McBryan, O.A.; Tryggvason, G.

    1986-05-01

    The dynamic evolution of tracked waves by a front-tracking algorithm may lead on either numerical or physical grounds to intersections of the waves. The correct resolution of these intersections is described locally by the solution of Riemann problems and requires a bifurcation of the topology defined by the tracked waves. An algorithm is described which is appropriate for the resolution of scalar tracked waves, such as material discontinuities, contact dicontinuities in gas dynamics, or constituent concetration waves including oil-water banks in oil reservoirs Even here the algorithm is not fully general, and the resolution of the intersections of an arbitrary set of curves in the plane for the above range of physical problems remains unsolved. However with the assumption that the set of intersections to be resolved is a small perturbation (resulting for example from a small time step in an evolution) of a valid, non-intersecting front, the algorithm seems to be general. In any case examples will be presented that show that complicated interfaces can be generated automatically from simple ones through successive bifurcations. 15 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Fast-Track Teacher Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Franklin Dean

    2001-01-01

    Schools need a Renaissance human-resources director to implement strategic staffing and fast-track teacher-recruitment plans. The HR director must attend to customer satisfaction, candidate supply, web-based recruitment possibilities, stabilization of newly hired staff, retention of veteran staff, utilization of retired employees, and latest…

  9. Tracking Success in Youth Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieder, Corinne H.

    1979-01-01

    Youthwork, Incorporated, was created by the Youth Employment and Demonstration Projects Act of 1977 (YEDPA) to keep track of youth employment and training programs. Privately-owned Youthwork administers federal demonstration grants across the country to help provide job guidance, work experience credit, private sector involvement, and…

  10. Haptic Tracking Permits Bimanual Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Dawson, Amanda A.; Challis, John H.

    2006-01-01

    This study shows that in a novel task--bimanual haptic tracking--neurologically normal human adults can move their 2 hands independently for extended periods of time with little or no training. Participants lightly touched buttons whose positions were moved either quasi-randomly in the horizontal plane by 1 or 2 human drivers (Experiment 1), in…

  11. Math on the Fast Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Quincy

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how a math-assessment software has allowed his school to track the academic progress of its students. The author relates that in the first year that the software was deployed, schoolwide averages in terms of national standing on the math ITBS rose from the 42nd to 59th percentile. In addition, a significant…

  12. Long distance tracking of birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    The application of radio telemetry techniques to the long distance tracking of birds is discussed. The types of equipment developed and methods for attachment to a bird are described. The operating range of the radio transmitter receiver system is examined, and methods for acquiring and analyzing the data are explained.

  13. Real-time face tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yufeng; Wilder, Joseph

    1998-10-01

    A real-time face tracker is presented in this paper. The system has achieved 15 frames/second tracking using a Pentium 200 PC with a Datacube MaxPCI image processing board and a Panasonic RGB color camera. It tracks human faces in the camera's field of view while people move freely. A stochastic model to characterize the skin color distribution of human skin is used to segment the face and other skin areas from the background. Median filtering is then used to clean up the background noise. Geometric constraints are applied to the segmented image to extract the face from the background. To reduce computation and achieve real-time tracking, 1D projections (horizontal and vertical) of the image are analyzed instead of the 2D image. Run-length- encoding and frequency domain analysis algorithms are used to separate faces from other skin-like blobs. The system is robust to illumination intensity variations and different skin colors. It can be applied to many human-computer interaction applications such as sound locating, lip- reading, gaze tracking and face recognition.

  14. Program Tracks Cost Of Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, Lemuel E., III

    1993-01-01

    Travel Forecaster is menu-driven, easy-to-use computer program that plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost of business-related travel of division or branch of organization and compiles information into data base to aid travel planner. Ability of program to handle multiple trip entries makes it valuable time-saving device.

  15. Space Object Tracking (SPOT) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivitz, Robert; Kendrick, Richard; Mason, James; Bold, Matthew; Kubo, Tracy; Bock, Kevin; Tyler, David

    2014-07-01

    Lockheed Martin has built a Space Object Tracking (SPOT) facility at our Santa Cruz test site in Northern California. SPOT consists of three 1 meter optical telescopes controlled by a common site management system to individually or cooperatively task each system to observe orbital debris and earth orbiting satellites. The telescopes are mounted in Az/El fork mounts capable of rapid repointing and arc-sec class open loop tracking. Each telescope is installed in a separate clam shell dome and has aft mounted benches to facilitate installing various instrument suites. The telescope domes are mounted on movable rail carts that can be positioned arbitrarily along tracks to provide variable baselines for sparse aperture imaging. The individual telescopes achieved first light in June 2012 and have been used since to observe satellites and orbital debris. Typical observations consist of direct photometric imaging at visible and near infrared wavelengths, and also include spectroscopic and hypertemporal measurements. Rayleigh beacon adaptive optical systems for atmospheric aberration correction and high rate J-Band trackers for each telescope will be added in 2015. Coherent combinations of the three telescopes as an interferometric imaging array using actively stabilized free space variable delay optical paths and fringe tracking sensors is also planned. The first narrow band (I band) interferometric fringes will be formed in the summer of 2014, with wide band (R, I, H) interferometric imaging occurring by early 2015.

  16. Mode S baseline radar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancus, E. F.; Baker, L. H.

    1982-11-01

    The baseline performance characteristics of the moving target detector (MTD) and radar data acquisition system (RDAS) as an integral part of the Mode S sensor, were determined. The MTD and RDAS were separately evaluated to determine their capability to provide radar data suitable for utilization by the Mode S sensor and automated radar terminal system (ARTS). The design modifications made to the Mode S sensor to provide the capability of interfacing to either an MTD or RDAS were evaluated to determine if they were in compliance with the Federal Aviation Administration engineering requirement, FAA-ER-240-26. Radar baseline technical performance data was provided to characterize the MTD, RDAS, Mode S, and ARTS. The minimum radar tracking requirements are studied to determine if they are adequate to provide reliable radar track data to an air traffic control facility. It was concluded that the Mode S sensor, when integrated with an MTD-2 radar digitizer, can provide reliable primary radar track data to the ARTS III system for automated radar track acquisition.

  17. The GEM Silicon Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.B.

    1993-09-01

    The GEM Collaboration has produced a baseline design for the GEM detector. The baseline design of the GEM Silicon Tracking System (STS) is discussed in this article. Mechanical and electrical engineering progress on the GEM STS is described. Results from simulations of detector performance and the implications on engineering issues are described.

  18. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  19. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  20. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzuto, D.

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an R{Phi} tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against {gamma} {yields} e {sup +} e{sup {minus}} events.