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Sample records for laser-induced dynamic gratings

  1. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, E.A.

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  2. Femtosecond laser induced damage characterization of transmission volume phase gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Matos, Ó.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Izquierdo, J. G.; Vaveliuk, P.; Bañares, L.; Calvo, M. L.

    2014-07-01

    A procedure to characterize the induced damage and the incubation effects in volume transmission gratings under femtosecond laser pulse train illumination is presented. It was also developed a formalism that explains the damage processes. Our proposal was employed on glass gratings to show the effectiveness of the method and its potential to design transmission gratings with enhanced laser induced damage threshold. This procedure is able to be extended to any transmission grating composed by chemically non-uniform material, opening up new perspectives to femtosecond laser pulse shaping.

  3. Investigation of ultrafast photothermal surface expansion and diffusivity in GaAs via laser-induced dynamic gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    This thesis details the first direct ultrafast measurements of the dynamic thermal expansion of a surface and the temperature dependent surface thermal diffusivity using a two-color reflection transient grating technique. Studies were performed on p-type, n-type, and undoped GaAs(100) samples over a wide range of temperatures. By utilizing a 90 fs ultraviolet probe with visible excitation beams, the effects of interband saturation and carrier dynamics become negligible; thus lattice expansion due to heating and subsequent contraction caused by cooling provided the dominant influence on the probe. At room temperature a rise due to thermal expansion was observed, corresponding to a maximum net displacement of {approximately} 1 {Angstrom} at 32 ps. The diffracted signal was composed of two components, thermal expansion of the surface and heat flow away from the surface, thus allowing a determination of the rate of expansion as well as the surface thermal diffusivity, D{sub S}. By varying the fringe spacing of the grating, this technique has the potential to separate the signal contributions to the expansion of the lattice in the perpendicular and parallel directions. In the data presented here a large fringe spacing was used, thus the dominant contribution to the rising edge of the signal was expansion perpendicular to the surface. Comparison of he results with a straightforward thermal model yields good agreement over a range of temperatures (20--300{degrees}K). Values for D{sub S} in GaAs were measured and found to be in reasonable agreement with bulk values above 50{degrees}K. Below 50{degrees}K, D{sub S} were determined to be up to an order of magnitude slower than the bulk diffusivity due to increased phonon boundary scattering. The applicability and advantages of the TG technique for studying photothermal and photoacoustic phenomena are discussed.

  4. Single shot thermometry using laser induced thermal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Pubo; Guan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenrong; Wang, Sheng; Li, Guohua; Ye, Jingfeng; Hu, Zhiyun

    2015-05-01

    With the concern of environmental protection and reducing the fossil fuel consumption, combustion processes need to be more efficient and less contaminable. Therefore, the ability to obtain important thermophysical parameters is crucial to combustion research and combustor design. Traditional surveying techniques were difficult to apply in a confined space, especially the physically intrusions of detectors can alter the combustion processes. Laser-based diagnostic techniques, like CARS, SVRS, PLIF and TDLAS, allow the in situ, non-intrusive, spatially and temporally resolved measurements of combustion parameters in hostile environments. We report here a new non-intrusive optical diagnostic technique, based on laser-induced thermal grating. Thermal gratings generated in NO2/N2 binary mixtures, arise from the nonlinear interaction between the medium and the light radiation from the interference of two pulsed, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers (532 nm). This leads to the formation of a dynamic grating through the resonant absorption and the subsequent collisional relaxation. By the temporally resolved detection of a continuous wave, frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 probe laser beam (671 nm) diffracted by LITG. The temporal behavior of the signal is a function of the local temperature and other properties of gas, various parameters of the target gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal. The accurate singleshot temperature measurements were carried out at different test conditions using a stainless steel pressurized cell, data averaged on 100 laser shots were compared with simultaneously recorded thermocouple data, and the results were consistent with each other. The LITG signal is shown to grow with increasing the gas pressure and is spatially coherent, which makes the LITG thermometry technique a promising candidate in high pressure environments.

  5. Properties and Applications of Laser-Induced Gratings in Rare Earth Doped Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Edward Grady

    Scope and method of study. Four-wave-mixing techniques were used in an attempt to create permanent laser-induced grating in Pr^{3+}-, Nd ^{3+}-, Eu^ {3+}-, and Er^{3+ }-doped glasses. The permanent laser-induced grating signal intensity and build-up and erase times were investigated as function of the write beam crossing angle, write beam power, and temperature. Thermal lensing measurements were conducted on Eu^{3+} - and Nd^{3+}-doped glasses and room temperature Raman and resonant Raman spectra were obtained for Eu^{3+}-doped glasses. The permanent laser-induced grating signal intensity was studied in Eu^{3+} -doped alkali-metal glasses as a function of the alkali -metal network modifier ion and a model was developed by treating the sample as a two-level system. Optical device applications of the permanent laser-induced gratings were studied by creating some simple devices. Findings and conclusions. Permanent laser-induced gratings were created in the Pr^{3+ }- and Eu^{3+} -doped glasses. The permanent laser-induced grating is associated with a structural phase change of the glass host. The structural change is produced by high energy phonons which are emitted by radiationless relaxation processes of the rare earth ion. Nd^{3+} and Er^{3+} relax nonradiatively by the emission of phonons of much lower energy which are unable to produce the structural phase change needed to form a permanent laser-induced grating. The difference in energy of the emitted phonons is responsible for the differing characteristics of the thermal lensing experiments. The model does a good job of predicting the experimental results for the asymmetry and other parameters of the two-level system. The application of these laser -induced gratings for optical devices demonstrates their importance to optical technology.

  6. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-07-11

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency rejection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multi-layer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  7. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-05-26

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency reflection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multilayer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  8. Development of Laser-induced Grating Spectroscopy for Underwater Temperature Measurement in Shock Wave Focusing Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Saito, Tsutomu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2003-01-01

    In Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) underwater shock wave focusing generates high pressures at very short duration of time inside human body. However, it is not yet clear how high temperatures are enhanced at the spot where a shock wave is focused. The estimation of such dynamic temperature enhancements is critical for the evaluation of tissue damages upon shock loading. For this purpose in the Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center a technique is developed which employs laser induced thermal acoustics or Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy. Unlike most of gasdynamic methods of measuring physical quantities this provides a non-invasive one having spatial and temporal resolutions of the order of magnitude of 1.0 mm3 and 400 ns, respectively. Preliminary experiments in still water demonstrated that this method detected sound speed and hence temperature in water ranging 283 K to 333 K with errors of 0.5%. These results may be used to empirically establish the equation of states of water, gelatin or agar cells which will work as alternatives of human tissues.

  9. Phase-controlled, heterodyne laser-induced transient grating measurements of thermal transport properties in opaque material

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Jeremy A.

    The methodology for a heterodyned laser-induced transient thermal grating technique for non-contact, non-destructive measurements of thermal transport in opaque material is presented. Phase-controlled heterodyne detection ...

  10. Laser-induced damage of multilayer dielectric gratings with picosecond laser pulses under vacuum and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fanyu; Jin, Yunxia; Huang, Haopeng; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Shijie; He, Hongbo

    2015-10-01

    In this study, laser damage tests of multilayer dielectric gratings (MDGs) are performed in vacuum (5×10-4 Pa) and in air at a wavelength of 1053 nm with pulse widths of 0.56 ps ~9.7 ps. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of MDGs in vacuum/air ranges from 2.1/2.2 J/cm2 to 4.4/4.8 J/cm2 for laser beams of normal incidence. The LIDT of MDGs follows a ?0.26 scaling in the pulse width regime considered. The typical damage morphologies in the two environments caused by the near threshold pulse were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM); the results indicate that the damage features of MDGs in vacuum are the same as those in air. The testing results reveal that a clean vacuum environment neither changes the laser damage mechanism nor lowers the LIDT of MDGs.

  11. Surface plasmon scattering on polymer-bimetal layer covered fused silica gratings generated by laser induced backside wet etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóháti, H.; Sipos, Á.; Szekeres, G.; Mathesz, A.; Szalai, A.; Jójárt, P.; Budai, J.; Vass, Cs.; K?házi-Kis, A.; Csete, M.; Bor, Zs.

    2009-03-01

    Large amplitude fused silica gratings are prepared by combining the UV laser induced backside wet etching technique (LIBWE) and the two-beam interference method. The periodic patterning of fused silica surfaces is realized by s-polarized fourth harmonic beams of a Nd:YAG laser, applying saturated solution of naphthalene in methyl-methacrylate as liquid absorber. Atomic force microscopy is utilized to analyze how the modulation amplitude of the grating can be controlled by the fluence and number of laser pulses. Three types of plasmonic structures are prepared by a bottom-up method, post-evaporating the fused silica gratings by gold-silver bimetal layers, spin-coating the metal structures by thin polycarbonate films, and irradiating the multilayers by UV laser. The effect of the bimetal and polymer-coated bimetal gratings on the surface plasmon resonance is investigated in a modified Kretschmann arrangement allowing polar and azimuthal angle scans. It is demonstrated experimentally that scattering on rotated gratings results in additional minima on the resonance curves of plasmons excited by second harmonic beam of a continuous Nd:YAG laser. The azimuthal angle dependence proves that these additional minima originate from back-scattering. The analogous reflectivity minima were obtained by scattering matrix method calculations realized taking modulation depths measured on bimetal gratings into account.

  12. Generation of inhomogeneous bulk plane acoustic modes by laser-induced thermoelastic grating near mechanically free surface

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, Vitalyi

    2010-06-15

    The detailed theoretical description of how picosecond plane shear acoustic transients can be excited by ultrafast lasers in isotropic media is presented. The processes leading to excitation of inhomogeneous plane bulk compression/dilatation (c/d) and shear acoustic modes by transient laser interference pattern at a mechanically free surface of an elastically isotropic medium are analyzed. Both pure modes are dispersive. The modes can be evanescent or propagating. The mechanical displacement vector in both propagating modes is oriented obliquely to the mode propagation direction. Consequently the c/d mode is not purely longitudinal and shear mode is not purely transversal. Each of the propagating modes has a plane wave front parallel to the surface and the amplitude harmonically modulated along the surface. Inhomogeneous shear acoustic mode cannot be generated in isotropic medium by thermal expansion and is excited by mode conversion of laser-generated inhomogeneous c/d acoustic mode incident on the surface. The spectral transformation function of the laser radiation conversion into shear modes has one of its maxima at a frequency corresponding to transmission from laser-induced generation of propagating to laser-induced generation of evanescent c/d modes. At this particular frequency the shear waves are due to their Cherenkov emission by bulk longitudinal acoustic waves skimming along the laser-irradiated surface, which are generated by laser-induced gratings synchronously. There exists an interval of frequencies where only shear acoustic modes are launched in the material by laser-induced grating, while c/d modes generated by thermoelastic optoacoustic conversion are evanescent. Propagating picosecond plane shear acoustic fronts excited by interference pattern of fs-ps laser pulses can be applied for the determination of the shear rigidity by optoacoustic echoes diagnostics of thin films and coatings. Theoretical predictions are correlated with available results of experiments and of numerical modeling.

  13. Dynamical behavior of laser-induced nanoparticles during remote processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Tobias; Dickmann, Klaus; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Laser remote processing is used in a wide field of industrial applications. Among other things, it is characterized by flexible beam guidance in combination with high processing velocities. But in most cases process gas support in the interaction zone is omitted. Consequently, interaction mechanism between the vapor plume and the incident laser radiation can dynamically affect the process stability. Referring to remote welding with high brilliant laser sources having a wavelength around 1 ?m, the interaction between the incident laser radiation and formed particles plays an important role. The presented work shows results of the investigation of the laser-induced particle formation during the laser welding of stainless steel with a 2 kW fiber laser under remote conditions. It is therefore concentrated on the dynamical behavior of the laser-induced particle formation and the dependence of the particle formation on the laser beam power. TEM images of formed particles were analyzed. In addition, the radiation of a LED was directed through the vapor plume. On the one hand, the dynamic of the attenuation was considered. On the other hand, the Rayleigh approximation was used in order to evaluate the detected signals.

  14. Ultrafast dynamics of the laser-induced solid-to-liquid phase transition in aluminum

    E-print Network

    Mazur, Eric

    Ultrafast dynamics of the laser-induced solid-to-liquid phase transition in aluminum A thesis dynamics of the laser-induced solid-to-liquid phase transition in aluminum Eric Mazur Maria Kandyla Abstract This dissertation reports the ultrafast dynamics of aluminum during the solid-to- liquid phase

  15. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianqian; Zhong, Fachun; Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  16. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianqian Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang; Zhong, Fachun

    2015-02-16

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  17. Time-resolved measurement of the local equivalence ratio in a gaseous propane injection process using laser-induced gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Thomas; Kiefer, Johannes; Weikl, Markus C.; Leipertz, Alfred; Kozlov, Dimitrii N.

    2006-12-01

    For the first time laser-induced gratings (LIGs) have been used for the investigation of a non-stationary pulse-repetitive injection process of gaseous propane, C3H8, into air. By recording and evaluating single-shot LIG signals it was possible to determine, on a cycle-averaged basis, the temporal evolution of the local (within a probe volume 300 µm in diameter and 10 mm in length) equivalence ratio and by this the fuel-air ratio. Two different data treatment strategies, subject to C3H8 concentration range, were first tested at stationary conditions and then used to evaluate the LIG signals obtained during the injection process. The relative standard deviation of single-shot measurements were estimated to be 0.14 and 0.32 at 0.8 % and 10 % of propane concentration, respectively.

  18. Effect of collisions on the dynamics of laser-induced conversions of polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Al'minderov, V.V.; Milikh, G.M.; Trakhtenberg, L.I.

    1986-11-01

    Special features of the dynamics of laser-induced conversions (LIC) of polyatomic molecules in gases have been studied. It was found that an increase in pressure leads not only to a change in the LIC rate, but also affects the selectivity of the process. The effect of collisions shows on the character of the diffusion across the levels of the energy quasicontinuum which results from the interaction of various vibrational modes. In this paper they examine the dynamics of the LIC of polyatomic molecules, taking into account diffusion across the energy levels of the quasicontinuum and unimolecular decomposition. The effects of collisions on laser-induced diffusion in the quasicontinuum and on the dissociation occurring even after switching off the exciting pulse are evaluated.

  19. Laser-Induced Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Magnetic Films.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ka; Bauer, Gerrit E W

    2015-11-01

    We present a theory for the coherent magnetization dynamics induced by a focused ultrafast laser beam in magnetic films, taking into account nonthermal (inverse Faraday effect) and thermal (heating) actuation. The dynamic conversion between spin waves and phonons is induced by the magnetoelastic coupling that allows efficient propagation of angular momentum. The anisotropy of the magnetoelastic coupling renders characteristic angle dependences of the magnetization propagation that are strikingly different for thermal and nonthermal actuation. PMID:26588408

  20. Laser-Induced Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Magnetic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ka; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present a theory for the coherent magnetization dynamics induced by a focused ultrafast laser beam in magnetic films, taking into account nonthermal (inverse Faraday effect) and thermal (heating) actuation. The dynamic conversion between spin waves and phonons is induced by the magnetoelastic coupling that allows efficient propagation of angular momentum. The anisotropy of the magnetoelastic coupling renders characteristic angle dependences of the magnetization propagation that are strikingly different for thermal and nonthermal actuation.

  1. Laser-induced spatiotemporal dynamics of magnetic films

    E-print Network

    Shen, Ka

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory for the coherent magnetization dynamics induced by a focused ultrafast laser beam in magnetic films, taking into account nonthermal (inverse Faraday effect) and thermal (heating) actuation. The dynamic conversion between spin waves and phonons is induced by the magnetoelastic coupling that allows efficient propagation of angular momentum. The anisotropy of the magnetoelastic coupling renders characteristic angle dependences of the magnetization propa-gation that are strikingly different for thermal and nonthermal actuation.

  2. Laser-induced perturbation into molecular dynamics localized in neuronal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Chie; Takeda, Naoko; Kudoh, Suguru N.; Taguchi, Takahisa

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics at synaptic terminals in neuronal cells is essential for synaptic plasticity and subsequent modulation of cellular functions in a neuronal network. For realizing artificial control of living neuronal network, we demonstrate laser-induced perturbation into molecular dynamics in the neuronal cells. The optical trapping of cellular molecules such as synaptic vesicles or neural cell adhesion molecules labeled with quantum dots was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The trapping and assembling dynamics was revealed that the molecular motion was constrained at the focal spot of a focused laser beam due to optical trapping force. Our method has a potential to manipulate synaptic transmission at single synapse level.

  3. Dynamics of laser induced metal nanoparticle and pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Peláez, R. J. Kuhn, T.; Rodríguez, C. E.; Afonso, C. N.

    2015-02-09

    Discontinuous metal films are converted into either almost round, isolated, and randomly distributed nanoparticles (NPs) or fringed patterns of alternate non transformed film and NPs by exposure to single pulses (20?ns pulse duration and 193?nm wavelength) of homogeneous or modulated laser beam intensity. The dynamics of NPs and pattern formation is studied by measuring in real time the transmission and reflectivity of the sample upon homogeneous beam exposure and the intensity of the diffraction orders 0 and 1 in transmission configuration upon modulated beam exposure. The results show that laser irradiation induces melting of the metal either completely or at regions around intensity maxima sites for homogeneous and modulated beam exposure, respectively, within ?10?ns. The aggregation and/or coalescence of the initially irregular metal nanostructures is triggered upon melting and continues after solidification (estimated to occur at ?80?ns) for more than 1??s. The present results demonstrate that real time transmission rather than reflectivity measurements is a valuable and easy-to-use tool for following the dynamics of NPs and pattern formation. They provide insights on the heat-driven processes occurring both in liquid and solid phases and allow controlling in-situ the process through the fluence. They also evidence that there is negligible lateral heat release in discontinuous films upon laser irradiation.

  4. Dynamics of femtosecond laser-induced melting of silver

    SciTech Connect

    Chan Wailun; Averback, Robert S.; Cahill, David G.; Lagoutchev, Alexei

    2008-12-01

    We use optical third-harmonic generation to measure the melting dynamics of silver following femtosecond laser excitation. The dynamics reveals an unusual two-step process that is associated with the extreme electronic temperatures and very short time and length scales. In the first, which lasts a few picoseconds, the electron and phonon systems begin to equilibrate, and a thin surface layer undergoes melting. Heat conduction during this period is strongly suppressed by electron scattering from d-band excitations. In the second stage, the surface region remains above the melting temperature for a surprisingly long time, 20-30 ps, with the melt front propagating into the bulk at a velocity of {approx_equal}350 m s{sup -1}. In this stage, the electron and phonon systems again fall out of equilibrium and conduction of heat away from the surface region is now limited by the weak electron-phonon (e-p) coupling. From our model calculation, we propose that the melt depths in noble metals irradiated by femtosecond lasers are limited to thicknesses on the order of two to three times of the optical-absorption depth of the light.

  5. Dynamics of laser induced micro bubble clusters on tissue phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Andreas; Zegelin, Andrea; Ptaszynski, Lars; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    Selective retina treatment (SRT) is a laser based method to treat retinal diseases associated with disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) while preserving photoreceptors and choroid. Applying microsecond laser pulses to the 100- 200 strongly absorbing melanin granules inside the RPE cells induces transient micro bubbles which disrupt the cells. Aim of this work is to understand bubble dynamics in clusters with respect to the influence of the adjacent retina. Bubble dynamics were investigated in vitro on porcine RPE. An about 200 ?m thick layer of agarose gel was applied to the RPE layer in order to simulate the mechanical properties of retina. Different laser pulse durations from 1 ns (532 nm, Nd:YAG) to 1.7 ?s (527 nm, Nd:YLF) were used. The bubbles were investigated interferometrically (fiber interferometer @ 830 nm) and with fast flash photography (25 ns flash duration). Bubble lifetimes were measured. The results show that with retina phantoms the bubble formation threshold was reached at 2.5 times higher irradiation than without retina phantom for 1.7 ?s laser pulses. The microbubbles generated with 1 ns laser pulses were almost not influenced by the agarose layer. Irradiation twofold over bubble formation threshold resulted in 3.5 times longer bubble lifetimes for ?s and 2 times longer for ns pulse durations, respectively.

  6. Time-resolved diffraction profiles and atomic dynamics in short-pulse laser-induced structural transformations: Molecular dynamics study

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Time-resolved diffraction profiles and atomic dynamics in short-pulse laser-induced structural on the atomic-level structural rearrangements available from the simulations to the diffraction spectra measured of the irradiated surface and provides limited direct information on atomic structural rearrangements. Recent

  7. Micro Dynamics of Pulsed Laser Induced Bubbles in Dusty Plasma Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.-W.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Tseng, Y.-P.; I Lin

    2008-09-07

    We experimentally study the micro dynamics of the laser induced plasma bubble in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dust particles suspended in a low pressure rf Ar glow discharge. The plume from the ablation of the suspended dust particles pushes away dust particle and generates a dust-free plasma bubble. It then travels downward. The spatio-temporal evolution of the dust density fluctuation surrounding the bubble is monitored by directly tracking dust motion through optical video microscopy. The micro dynamics of the bubble associated dust acoustic type solitary oscillation in the wake field is investigated and discussed.

  8. Femtosecond diffraction dynamics of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krueger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2013-02-04

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration, 800 nm center wavelength) is studied experimentally using a transillumination femtosecond time-resolved (0.1 ps-1 ns) pump-probe diffraction approach. This allows to reveal the generation dynamics of near-wavelength-sized LIPSS showing a transient diffraction at specific spatial frequencies even before a corresponding permanent surface relief was observed. The results confirm that the ultrafast energy deposition to the materials surface plays a key role and triggers subsequent physical mechanisms such as carrier scattering into self-trapped excitons.

  9. Investigating the dynamics of laser induced sparks in atmospheric helium using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedanovska, E.; Nersisyan, G.; Morgan, T. J.; Hüwel, L.; Murakami, T.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Riley, D.; Graham, W. G.

    2015-01-01

    We have used optical Rayleigh and Thomson scattering to investigate the expansion dynamics of laser induced plasma in atmospheric helium and to map its electron parameters both in time and space. The plasma is created using 9 ns duration, 140 mJ pulses from a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm, focused with a 10 cm focal length lens, and probed with 7 ns, 80 mJ, and 532 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses. Between 0.4 ?s and 22.5 ?s after breakdown, the electron density decreases from 3.3 × 1017 cm-3 to 9 × 1013 cm-3, while the temperature drops from 3.2 eV to 0.1 eV. Spatially resolved Thomson scattering data recorded up to 17.5 ?s reveal that during this time the laser induced plasma expands at a rate given by R ˜ t0.4 consistent with a non-radiative spherical blast wave. This data also indicate the development of a toroidal structure in the lateral profile of both electron temperature and density. Rayleigh scattering data show that the gas density decreases in the center of the expanding plasma with a central scattering peak reemerging after about 12 ?s. We have utilized a zero dimensional kinetic global model to identify the dominant particle species versus delay time and this indicates that metastable helium and the He2+ molecular ion play an important role.

  10. Dynamics of the laser-induced nanostructuring of thin metal layers: experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Klöppel, M.; Smausz, T.; Csizmadia, T.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.; Hopp, B.

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructures are of increasing importance in manifold application fields such as electronics, optics and beyond. However, the fast and cost-effective production of nanostructures is a big technological challenge for laser machining. One promising approach is laser irradiation of thin metal layers, which allows the fabrication of metal nanostructures induced by a melting and transformation process. The influence of laser parameters (laser fluence, laser pulse number) on the morphology of the nanopatterned film and the dynamics of the nanostructure formation during excimer laser irradiation of a 20 nm chromium film on fused silica were studied. The dynamics of nanopatterning, comprising hole and droplet formation, were investigated by time-dependent reflection and transmission measurements as well as time-dependent optical microscopy. The resulting patterns were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, for an optimization of this process a better understanding of the underlying physical phenomena is necessary. Therefore, experimental data of laser-induced nanopatterning were compared with results of physical simulations that consider the heat equation (laser-solid interaction including melting and evaporation) and the Navier-Stokes equation (transformation processes of the molten phase). The simulations, making use of laser fluence-dependent effective material parameters (surface tension and viscosity), are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Dynamic optical coupler using a Dammann grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Caihui; Zhou, Changhe; Ru, Huayi

    2005-01-01

    Driven by the fast development of fiber communication networks, there exists a strong need for a dynamic coupler with a large number of output ports. In our work, we developed a dynamic optical coupler by employing a specially designed Dammann grating that consists of two areas, which are the Dammann-grating area and the blank area. When incoming beams entirely impinge on the Dammann-grating area of the plate, this device demonstrates 1×8 dynamic optical coupler with good uniformity of 0.03 and low insertion loss of about 10.7 dB for each channel as a splitter at the wavelength of 1550 nm. When incoming beams entirely impinge on the blank area of the plate, this device achieves a low insertion loss of 0.43 dB as a combiner. Therefore, this device can achieve the beam splitter and combiner as a switch between them according to the relative shift between two areas of the plate. The experimental results are reported in detail in this paper.

  12. Simultaneous measurements of terahertz emission and magneto-optical Kerr effect for resolving ultrafast laser-induced demagnetization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, T. J.; Mikhaylovskiy, R. V.; Tsukamoto, A.; Rasing, Th.; Kimel, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Simultaneous detection of terahertz (THz) emission and transient magneto-optical response is employed to study ultrafast laser-induced magnetization dynamics in three different types of amorphous metallic alloys: Co, GdFeCo, and NdFeCo. A satisfactory agreement between the dynamics revealed with the help of these two techniques is obtained for Co and GdFeCo. For NdFeCo the THz emission indicates faster dynamics than the magneto-optical response. This observation indicates that in addition to spin dynamics of Fe, ultrafast laser excitation of NdFeCo triggers faster magnetization dynamics of Nd originating from its orbital momentum.

  13. Laser-Induced Forward Transfer Using Triazene Polymer Dynamic Releaser Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, James Shaw; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander; Nagel, Matthias; Nueesch, Frank

    2010-10-08

    This article presents a short review of the use of triazene polymer as a dynamic release layer (DRL) for laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), before looking at the latest research in more detail. The field of triazene polymer ablation only started around 20 years ago and has grown rapidly into a number of different application areas. Most promisingly, triazene ablation has been refined as a method for propulsion, bringing the benefits of LIFT to the deposition of sensitive transfer materials. The key to understanding LIFT with a triazene DRL is to understand the more fundamental nature of triazene polymer ablation in both frontside and backside orientations. This article focuses on the most recent experimental results on LIFT with a triazene DRL: the effect of picosecond pulse lengths compared with nanosecond pulse lengths; the effect of reduced air pressure; and the improvements in transfer in terms of range of transfer materials, and transfer across a gap. The results all help improve fundamental understanding of triazene-based LIFT, and the transfer of functioning OLEDs demonstrates the capability of the technique.

  14. Speckle photography during dynamic impact of an energetic material using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, B.W.; Laabs, G.W.; Henson, B.F.; Funk, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Laser and white light speckle photography have been used to observe surface displacement in a number of materials and over a varied range of strain rates. However, each suffers from limitations. We have developed a novel application of speckle photography in very difficult environments by using laser-induced fluorescence to generate the speckle pattern. This permits confinement of the free surface without undue degradation of the correlation upon which speckle methods are based. We have applied this method to measure the surface displacement of a reactive material during dynamic deformation at moderate strain rates. Conventional methods were tried but were unsuccessful, necessitating a novel approach. To the best of our knowledge, neither high-speed laser nor white light speckle photography has been performed using energetic materials. These measurements are very difficult because of the low material strength (yield strength {approximately}8{endash}80 MPa), and because significant out-of-plane motion and surface disruption occur during fracture, and early during the deformation process. We report results from experiments in which these major problems have been overcome. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Observation of Laser Induced Magnetization Dynamics in Co/Pd Multilayers with Coherent X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Benny

    2012-04-05

    We report on time-resolved coherent x-ray scattering experiments of laser induced magnetization dynamics in Co/Pd multilayers with a high repetition rate optical pump x-ray probe setup. Starting from a multi-domain ground state, the magnetization is uniformly reduced after excitation by an intense 50 fs laser pulse. Using the normalized time correlation, we study the magnetization recovery on a picosecond timescale. The dynamic scattering intensity is separated into an elastic portion at length scales above 65 nm which retains memory of the initial domain magnetization, and a fluctuating portion at smaller length scales corresponding to domain boundary motion during recovery.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the dynamics of a pulsed planar sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckner, M.J.; Malik, S.M. ); Conrad, J.R. ); Breun, R.A. )

    1994-04-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) the ion density near the edge of an expanding plasma sheath has been measured. These measurements utilized a transition of N[sup +][sub 2] [the P12 component of the [ital X] [sup 2][Sigma][sup +][sub [ital g

  17. Dynamics of primary and secondary microbubbles created by laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Y.; Antkowiak, M.; Venugopalan, V.; Gunn-Moore, F. J.; Dholakia, K.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle is a unique system for studying cavitation dynamics. It offers additional degrees of freedom, namely the nanoparticle material, its size, and the relative position between the laser focus and the center of the optically trapped nanoparticle. We quantify the spatial and temporal dynamics of the cavitation and secondary bubbles created in this system and use hydrodynamic modeling to quantify the observed dynamic shear stress of the expanding bubble. In the final stage of bubble collapse, we visualize the formation of multiple submicrometer secondary bubbles around the toroidal bubble on the substrate. We show that the pattern of the secondary bubbles typically has its circular symmetry broken along an axis whose unique angle rotates over time. This is a result of vorticity along the jet towards the boundary upon bubble collapse near solid boundaries.

  18. Dynamic ultramicroscopy of laser-induced flows in colloidal solutions of plasmon-resonance particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosov, I V; Tuchin, V V; Nefedov, I S; Khlebtsov, B N

    2008-06-30

    A method is proposed for visualisation of the velocity fields of colloidal plasmon-resonance nanoparticles moving in a laser beam. The method uses the particle image velocimetry for processing ultramicroscopic images. Particles in a thick layer of colloidal solution are illuminated by a slit laser ultramicroscopic source with a large numerical aperture providing a high contrast of particle images and visualisation of the transverse velocity distribution in laser-induced flows with a high spatial resolution. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  19. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  20. Ultrafast laser-induced dynamics of noncollinear spin structures in amorphous NdFeCo and PrFeCo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J.; Tsukamoto, A.; Kirilyuk, A.; Maan, J. C.; Rasing, Th.; Christianen, P. C. M.; Kimel, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The fanned out, noncollinear spin structure of the Fe(Co) sublattice in amorphous NdFeCo and PrFeCo alloys is shown to strongly affect its ultrafast laser-induced magnetization dynamics. An overshooting effect is discovered at low applied magnetic fields, where the magnetization temporarily increases above its equilibrium value. We explain this phenomenon by considering the dynamics of the noncollinear spin structure. After femtosecond laser excitation the system first reconstructs magnetic order on a time scale of 50-150 ps arriving at a state with a smaller opening angle of the fan. Subsequently, the original opening angle is restored on a time scale of nanoseconds. Increasing the field up to 0.6 T we can fully close the fan and therewith suppress the overshooting behavior.

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the dynamics of a pulsed planar sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeckner, M. J.; Malik, Shamim M.; Conrad, J. R.; Breun, R. A.

    1994-04-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) the ion density near the edge of an expanding plasma sheath has been measured. These measurements utilized a transition of N+2 [the P12 component of the X 2?+g(?=0)?B 2?+u(?=0) band] in a N2 plasma. The strength of the laser-induced fluorescence was used as a measure of the temporally and spatially varying ion density. The expanding sheath was produced by applying a -5 kV pulse to a polished planar electrode in the plasma source ion implantation device [J. R. Conrad et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 8, 3146 (1990)]. The laser beam was aligned normal to the surface and was reflected off the center of the electrode. The LIF diagnostic used here is nonperturbing whereas previous researchers have used Langmuir probes, which perturb the plasma, to make their measurements. As such, the data reported here represent a benchmark measurement of pulsed sheaths and allow a better comparison between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions. It has been found that the sheath edge moves approximately 16 times faster than the ion-acoustic velocity during the early part of the pulse, t<1 ?s, and then slows to approximately the ion-acoustic velocity after 6 ?s. In addition to the LIF measurements, a biased probe was used far from the cathode to determine the sheath edge location. Good agreement is found when the LIF and probe data are compared. The LIF data also are compared to the predictions of a simulation that is based on a time-varying two-fluid model of the sheath [G. A. Emmert and M. A. Henry, J. Appl. Phys. 71, 113 (1992)]. While the predictions of the model show moderate agreement with the data, substantial discrepancies are observed. These discrepancies are attributed to a number of physical phenomena that are not included in the present model.

  2. Research towards development of a dynamic reflectometer for control of laser-induced retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Pierce, Vicky G.; Ferguson, R. D.; Birngruber, Reginald

    1992-08-01

    Laser-induced photocoagulation is used routinely to treat a variety of retinal disorders. In this procedure, absorption by the retina and choroid of focused laser light creates thermal lesions that provide the therapeutic effect. The treatment endpoint is determined by the ophthalmoscopical visibility of the coagulation resulting from the increased diffuse reflectivity of the fundus at the lesion site. To date, it is impossible, prior to treatment, to predict the effectiveness of a specific dosage of laser radiation -- the result can be assessed only after the exposure, and only subjectively. To avoid side effects like hemorrhage, macular pucker, and post-coagulative retinal detachments that can result from excessive local heating, a device for automatically controlling the laser exposure parameters is needed. Preliminary research aimed toward development of such a device has now been completed. The technique employs a simple electro-optical detector to monitor the changing reflectivity of the lesion during the laser exposure, and couples that information to a microcontroller which automatically adjusts the laser exposure parameters. The first results of a clinically realistic device are reported.

  3. High-resolution imaging of ejection dynamics in laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, R.; Visser, C. W.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Sun, C.; Huis in't Veld, A. J.; Lohse, D.

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is a 3D direct-write method suitable for precision printing of various materials. As the ejection mechanism of picosecond LIFT has not been visualized in detail, the governing physics are not fully understood yet. Therefore, this article presents an experimental imaging study on the ejection process of gold-based LIFT. The LIFT experiments were performed using a 6.7 picosecond Yb:YAG laser source equipped with a SHG. The beam was focused onto a 200 nm thick gold donor layer. The high magnification images were obtained using bright field illumination by a 6 ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser source and a 50× long-distance microscope objective that was combined with a 200 mm tube lens. For laser fluence levels up to two times the donor-transfer-threshold, the ejection of a single droplet was observed. The typical droplet radius was estimated to be less than 3 ?m. A transition of ejection features towards higher fluence, indicates a second fluence-regime in the ejection process. For higher laser fluence, the formation of an elongated gold jet was observed. This jet fragments into multiple relatively small droplets, resulting in a spray of particles on the receiving substrate.

  4. Simulation of laser-induced coupled electron-nuclear dynamics and time-resolved harmonic spectra in complex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lisinetskaya, Polina G.; Mitric, Roland

    2011-03-15

    We present a theoretical approach for the simulation of time-resolved harmonic spectra, including the effect of nuclear dynamics, which is applicable to complex systems involving many nuclear degrees of freedom. The method is based on the combination of our semiclassical field-induced surface hopping approach for the treatment of laser-induced nuclear dynamics with the time-dependent density functional theory for electron dynamics. We apply our method to the simulation of ultrafast nonadiabatic dynamics and time-resolved harmonic spectra in small silver clusters (Ag{sub 2} and Ag{sub 8}), which exhibit discrete molecularlike electronic transitions. We demonstrate that the harmonic signal is highly sensitive to the nuclear dynamics and thus can be used as a probe of coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, which is complementary to common pump-probe methods such as time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Our simulations allowed us also to determine the mechanism and the time scale of nonradiative relaxation in the 'magic' Ag{sub 8} cluster and have provided a fundamental insight into ultrafast dynamics of metal nanoclusters in the size regime where 'each atom counts'. The excited-state dynamics of Ag{sub 8} involves an isomerization process from the initial structure with T{sub d} symmetry to the quadratic antiprism structure with D{sub 4d} symmetry which takes place on a time scale of {approx}3600 fs and is clearly identified in a time-resolved harmonic signal. Our theoretical approach is generally applicable for the prediction of time-resolved harmonic spectra in complex systems with many nuclear degrees freedom and should serve to stimulate new ultrafast experiments utilizing harmonic signals as a probe for nonadiabatic processes in molecular systems.

  5. Dynamic Optical Grating Device and Associated Method for Modulating Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic optical grating device and associated method for modulating light is provided that is capable of controlling the spectral properties and propagation of light without moving mechanical components by the use of a dynamic electric and/or magnetic field. By changing the electric field and/or magnetic field, the index of refraction, the extinction coefficient, the transmittivity, and the reflectivity fo the optical grating device may be controlled in order to control the spectral properties of the light reflected or transmitted by the device.

  6. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 ?m) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  7. Laser-induced dissociation dynamics of triatomic molecule in electronic excited states: A full-dimensional quantum mechanics study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaopeng; Yang, Chuanlu; Zheng, Yujun

    2015-12-14

    We present a detailed theoretical approach to investigate the laser-induced dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule on its electronic excited state in full dimensional case. In this method, the time evolution of the time-dependent system is propagated via combined the split operator method and the expansion of Chebyshev polynomials (or short-time Chebyshev propagation) and the system wave functions are expanded in terms of molecular rotational bases. As an example of the application of this formalism, the dissociation dynamics of H3 (+)?H2 (+)+H induced by ultrashort UV laser pulses are investigated on new Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces. Our numerical results show that the signals of dissociation products will be easier to observe as the increasing of field strength. Driving by a 266 nm laser beam, the calculated central value of kinetic-energy-release is 2.04 eV which shows excellent agreement with the experimental estimation of 2.1 eV. When the H3 (+) ion is rotationally excited, the spatial distribution of product fragments will become well converged. PMID:26671377

  8. Transient Grating Measurements of Excitonic Dynamics in Single-Walled

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    Transient Grating Measurements of Excitonic Dynamics in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Dark) by identifying the dark exciton (D) as the population relaxation bottleneck in semiconducting-SWNT (S population transfer to 1D dark exciton. In metallic tubes, cooling is completed on the time scale of 1 ps

  9. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kuta, Jadwiga; Wander, Matthew C F.; Wang, Zheming; Jiang, Siduo; Wall, Nathalie; Clark, Aurora E.

    2011-11-08

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to examine trends in trivalent lanthanide [Ln(III)] sorption to quartz surface SiOH0 and SiO- sites across the 4f period. Complementary laser induced fluorescence studies examined Eu(III) sorption to quartz at varying ionic strength such that the surface sorbed species could be extrapolated at zero ionic strength, the conditions under which the simulations are performed. This allowed for direct comparison of the data, enabling a molecular understanding of the surface sorbed species and the role of the ion surface charge density upon the interfacial reactivity. Thus, this combined theoretical and experimental approach aids in the prediction of the fate of trivalent radioactive contaminants at temporary and permanent nuclear waste storage sites. Potential of mean force molecular dynamics, as well as simulations of pre-sorbed Ln(III) species agrees with the spectroscopic study of Eu(III) sorption, indicating that strongly bound inner-sphere complexes are formed upon sorption to an SiO- site. The coordination shell of the ion contains 6-7 waters of hydration and it is predicted that surface OH groups dissociate from the quartz and bind within the inner coordination shell of Eu(III). Molecular simulations predict less-strongly bound inner2 sphere species in early lanthanides and more strongly bound species in late lanthanides, following trends in the ionic radius of the 4f ions. The participation of surface dissociated OHgroups within the inner coordination shell of the Ln(III) ion is, however, consistent across the series studied. Sorption to a fully protonated quartz surface is not predicted to be favorable by any Ln(III), except perhaps Lu.

  10. Dynamics of charge clouds ejected from laser-induced warm dense gold nanofilms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Correa, Alfredo A; Li, Junjie; Tang, Shao; Ping, Yuan; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Li, Dong; Zhou, Qiong; Cao, Jianming

    2014-10-01

    We report a systematic study of the ejected charge dynamics surrounding laser-produced 30-nm warm dense gold films using single-shot femtosecond electron shadow imaging and deflectometry. The results reveal a two-step dynamical process of the ejected electrons under high pump fluence conditions: an initial emission and accumulation of a large amount of electrons near the pumped surface region, followed by the formation of hemispherical clouds of electrons on both sides of the film, which escape into the vacuum at a nearly isotropic and constant velocity with an unusually high kinetic energy of more than 300 eV. We also developed a model of the escaping charge distribution that not only reproduces the main features of the observed charge expansion dynamics but also allows us to extract the number of ejected electrons remaining in the cloud. PMID:25375431

  11. Dynamics of charge clouds ejected from laser-induced warm dense gold nanofilms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Jun; Li, Junjie; Correa, Alfredo A.; Tang, Shao; Ping, Yuan; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Li, Dong; Zhou, Qiong; Cao, Jianming

    2014-10-24

    We report the first systematic study of the ejected charge dynamics surrounding laser-produced 30-nm warm dense gold films using single-shot femtosecond electron shadow imaging and deflectometry. The results reveal a two-step dynamical process of the ejected electrons under the high pump fluence conditions: an initial emission and accumulation of a large amount of electrons near the pumped surface region followed by the formation of hemispherical clouds of electrons on both sides of the film, which are escaping into the vacuum at a nearly isotropic and constant velocity with an unusually high kinetic energy of more than 300 eV. We alsomore »developed a model of the escaping charge distribution that not only reproduces the main features of the observed charge expansion dynamics but also allows us to extract the number of ejected electrons remaining in the cloud.« less

  12. Dynamics of charge clouds ejected from laser-induced warm dense gold nanofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jun; Li, Junjie; Correa, Alfredo A.; Tang, Shao; Ping, Yuan; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Li, Dong; Zhou, Qiong; Cao, Jianming

    2014-10-24

    We report the first systematic study of the ejected charge dynamics surrounding laser-produced 30-nm warm dense gold films using single-shot femtosecond electron shadow imaging and deflectometry. The results reveal a two-step dynamical process of the ejected electrons under the high pump fluence conditions: an initial emission and accumulation of a large amount of electrons near the pumped surface region followed by the formation of hemispherical clouds of electrons on both sides of the film, which are escaping into the vacuum at a nearly isotropic and constant velocity with an unusually high kinetic energy of more than 300 eV. We also developed a model of the escaping charge distribution that not only reproduces the main features of the observed charge expansion dynamics but also allows us to extract the number of ejected electrons remaining in the cloud.

  13. Molecular dynamics studies of ultrafast laser-induced phase and structural change in crystalline silicon

    E-print Network

    Xu, Xianfan

    the equilibrium melting temperature by several hundred degrees. After the melted layer was solidified, some melted 2012 Keywords: Molecular dynamics simulation Ultrafast laser Melting Resolidification a b s t r a c to model the crystalline silicon. The temperature development in silicon when heated by an ultrafast laser

  14. Laser-induced damage in biological tissue: Role of complex and dynamic optical properties of the medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Elharith M.

    Since its invention in the early 1960's, the laser has been used as a tool for surgical, therapeutic, and diagnostic purposes. To achieve maximum effectiveness with the greatest margin of safety it is important to understand the mechanisms of light propagation through tissue and how that light affects living cells. Lasers with novel output characteristics for medical and military applications are too often implemented prior to proper evaluation with respect to tissue optical properties and human safety. Therefore, advances in computational models that describe light propagation and the cellular responses to laser exposure, without the use of animal models, are of considerable interest. Here, a physics-based laser-tissue interaction model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal temperature and pressure rise during laser exposure to biological tissues. Our new model also takes into account the dynamic nature of tissue optical properties and their impact on the induced temperature and pressure profiles. The laser-induced retinal damage is attributed to the formation of microbubbles formed around melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the damage mechanism is assumed to be photo-thermal. Selective absorption by melanin creates these bubbles that expand and collapse around melanosomes, destroying cell membranes and killing cells. The Finite Element (FE) approach taken provides suitable ground for modeling localized pigment absorption which leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution within pigmented cells following laser pulse exposure. These hot-spots are sources for localized thermo-elastic stresses which lead to rapid localized expansions that manifest themselves as microbubbles and lead to microcavitations. Model predictions for the interaction of lasers at wavelengths of 193, 694, 532, 590, 1314, 1540, 2000, and 2940 nm with biological tissues were generated and comparisons were made with available experimental data for the retina, cornea or the skin. Good agreement between model and experimental results established the validity of the model.

  15. Rapid Laser Induced Crystallization of Amorphous NiTi Films Observed by Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy (DTEM)

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrange, T; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D; Reed, B W; Grummon, D S

    2010-03-01

    The crystallization processes of the as-deposited, amorphous NiTi thin films have been studied in detail using techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry and, in-situ TEM. The kinetic data have been analyzed in terms of Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolomogrov (JMAK) semi-empirical formula. The kinetic parameters determined from this analysis have been useful in defining process control parameters for tailoring microstructural features and shape memory properties. Due to the commercial push to shrink thin film-based devices, unique processing techniques have been developed using laser-based annealing to spatially control the microstructure evolution down to sub-micron levels. Nanosecond, pulse laser annealing is particularly attractive since it limits the amount of peripheral heating and unwanted microstructural changes to underlying or surrounding material. However, crystallization under pulsed laser irradiation can differ significantly from conventional thermal annealing, e.g., slow heating in a furnace. This is especially true for amorphous NiTi materials and relevant for shape memory thin film based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications. There is little to no data on the crystallization kinetics of NiTi under pulsed laser irradiation, primarily due to the high crystallization rates intrinsic to high temperature annealing and the spatial and temporal resolution limits of standard techniques. However, with the high time and spatial resolution capabilities of the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the rapid nucleation events occurring from pulsed laser irradiation can be directly observed and nucleation rates can be quantified. This paper briefly explains the DTEM approach and how it used to investigate the pulsed laser induced crystallization processes in NiTi and to determine kinetic parameters.

  16. Dynamics Of A Laser-Induced Plume Self-Similar Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D.; Djebli, M.

    2008-09-23

    The dynamics of a laser ablation plume during the first stage of its expansion, just after the termination of the laser pulse is modeled. First, we suppose the laser fluence range low enough to consider a neutral vapor. The expansion of the evaporated material is described by one-component fluid and one-dimensional Euler equations. The vapor is assumed to follow an ideal gas flow. For high energetic ions, the charge separation can be neglected and the hydrodynamics equations can be solved using self-similar formulation. The obtained ordinary differential equations are solved numerically. Secondly, the effect of ionization is investigated when the evaporated gas temperature is sufficiently high. In this case, Saha equation is included in the formulation of the model. We find a self-similar solution for a finite value of the similarity variable which depends on the laser ablation parameters.

  17. Electron-electron dynamics in laser-induced nonsequential double ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.; Schomerus, H.; Liu, X.; Becker, W.

    2004-04-01

    For the description of nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of rare-gas atoms by a strong linearly polarized laser field, the quantum-mechanical S-matrix diagram that incorporates rescattering impact ionization is evaluated in the strong-field approximation. We employ a uniform approximation, which is a generalization of the standard saddle-point approximation. We systematically analyze the manifestations of the electron-electron interaction in the momentum distributions of the ejected electrons: for the interaction, by which the returning electron frees the bound electron, we adopt either a (three-body) contact interaction or a Coulomb interaction, and we do or do not incorporate the mutual Coulomb repulsion of the two electrons in their final state. In particular, we investigate the correlation of the momentum components parallel to the laser-field polarization, with the transverse momentum components either restricted to certain finite ranges or entirely summed over. In the latter case, agreement with experimental data is best for the contact interaction and without final-state repulsion. In the former, if the transverse momenta are restricted to small values, comparison of theory with the data shows evidence of Coulomb effects. We propose that experimental data selecting events with small transverse momenta of both electrons are particularly promising in the elucidation of the dynamics of NSDI. Also, a classical approximation of the quantum-mechanical S matrix is formulated and shown to work very well inside the classically allowed region.

  18. All-optical signal processing using dynamic Brillouin gratings.

    PubMed

    Santagiustina, Marco; Chin, Sanghoon; Primerov, Nicolay; Ursini, Leonora; Thévenaz, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The manipulation of dynamic Brillouin gratings in optical fibers is demonstrated to be an extremely flexible technique to achieve, with a single experimental setup, several all-optical signal processing functions. In particular, all-optical time differentiation, time integration and true time reversal are theoretically predicted, and then numerically and experimentally demonstrated. The technique can be exploited to process both photonic and ultra-wide band microwave signals, so enabling many applications in photonics and in radio science. PMID:23549159

  19. Dynamics of a femtosecond/picosecond laser-induced aluminum plasma out of thermodynamic equilibrium in a nitrogen background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Vincent; Bultel, Arnaud; Annaloro, Julien; Chambrelan, Cédric; Edouard, Guillaume; Grisolia, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the experimental studies, the assessment of the ability of ultra-short (femto or picosecond) laser pulses to provide correct estimates of the elemental composition of unknown samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy requires the modeling of a typical situation. The present article deals with this modeling for aluminum in nitrogen. A spherical layer model is developed. The central aluminum plasma is produced by the ultra-short pulse. This plasma is described using our collisional-radiative model CoRaM-Al in an upgraded version involving 250 levels. Its expansion and relaxation take place in nitrogen, where the formation and the propagation of a shock wave are taken into account. In this shocked nitrogen layer, the equilibrium conditions are assumed. Mass, momentum and energy conservation equations written under an Eulerian form are used to correctly model the global dynamics. Energy losses are due to radiative recombination, thermal Bremsstrahlung and spontaneous emission. These elementary processes are implemented. The only input parameters are the pulse energy E0, the ablated mass M of the sample and the pressure p0 of the surrounding gas. The equilibrium composition involving N2, N, N2+, N+ and free electrons of the shocked nitrogen layer is calculated from the thermodynamic database of our collisional-radiative model CoRaM-N2. The conditions E0 = 10 mJ and M ? 10- 10 kg corresponding to a 532 nm laser pulse are chosen. The model assumes the initial equilibrium of the aluminum plasma produced by the laser pulse absorbed by the sample. Then, owing to the significant overpressure with respect to the background gas (p0 is assumed atmospheric), the surrounding gas starts to be compressed while the propagation of a shock wave takes place. The shock layer maximum pressure is obtained at approximately 20 ns. At this characteristic time, the nitrogen pressure is around 400 times the atmospheric pressure. A shock velocity of 7 km s- 1 is predicted. The central plasma is characterized by a rapidly decreasing pressure, which leads for a while to a very low temperature (3500 K) with respect to the initial one (65,000 K). Then, the aluminum plasma is in a moderate nonequilibrium situation for Al. For Al+, the nonequilibrium degree is higher and the excited states are very weakly populated. Then, the aluminum plasma temperature increases due to the compression by the shock layer. Later, the pressure converges to p0 owing to the momentum transfer with the shock layer, and the shock velocity decreases. The central plasma progressively tends to equilibrium. A maximum expansion of approximately 1 mm in radius and a lifetime of 40 ?s are predicted for the aluminum plasma.

  20. Nine Orders of Magnitude Dynamic Range: Picomolar to Millimolar Concentration Measurement in Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection Employing Cascaded Avalanche Photodiode Photon Counters

    PubMed Central

    Dada, Oluwatosin O.; Essaka, David C.; Hindsgaul, Ole; Palcic, Monica M.; Prendergast, Jillian; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic range of capillary electrophoresis analysis is ultimately limited by molecular shot noise at low concentrations and by concentration-induced band broadening at high concentrations. We report a system that approaches these fundamental limits. A laser-induced fluorescence detector is reported that employs a cascade of four fiber-optic beam-splitters connected in series to generate a primary signal and four attenuated signals, each monitored by a single-photon counting avalanche photodiode. Appropriate scaling of the signals from the five photodiodes produces a linear optical calibration curve for 5-carboxyl-tetramethylrhodamine from the concentration detection limit of 1 pM to the upper limit of 1 mM. Mass detection limits are 120 yoctomoles (70 molecules) injected into the instrument. The very-wide dynamic range instrument was used to study the metabolic products of the fluorescently labeled glycosphingolipid GM1-TMR produced by single cells isolated from the rat cerebellum. PMID:21410138

  1. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    LIBS-1 Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;LIBS-2 Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES of species at a distance or in hard­to­reach or hazardous environments. Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

  2. Tunable and reconfigurable multi-tap microwave photonic filter based on dynamic Brillouin gratings in fibers.

    PubMed

    Sancho, J; Primerov, N; Chin, S; Antman, Y; Zadok, A; Sales, S; Thévenaz, L

    2012-03-12

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate new architectures to realize multi-tap microwave photonic filters, based on the generation of a single or multiple dynamic Brillouin gratings in polarization maintaining fibers. The spectral range and selectivity of the proposed periodic filters is extensively tunable, simply by reconfiguring the positions and the number of dynamic gratings along the fiber respectively. In this paper, we present a complete analysis of three different configurations comprising a microwave photonic filter implementation: a simple notch-type Mach-Zehnder approach with a single movable dynamic grating, a multi-tap performance based on multiple dynamic gratings and finally a stationary grating configuration based on the phase modulation of two counter-propagating optical waves by a common pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS). PMID:22418495

  3. Direct methods for dynamic monitoring of secretions from single cells by capillary electrophoresis and microscopy with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.

    1997-10-08

    Microscale separation and detection methods for real-time monitoring of dynamic cellular processes (e.g., secretion) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microscopic imaging were developed. Ultraviolet laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) provides simple, sensitive and direct detection of neurotransmitters and proteins without any derivatization. An on-column CE-LINF protocol for quantification of the release from single cell was demonstrated. Quantitative measurements of both the amount of insulin released from and the amount remaining in the cell ({beta}TC3) were achieved simultaneously. Secretion of catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E)) from individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was determined using the on-column CE-LINF. Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved by LINF imaging microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution. The secretion of serotonin from individual leech Retzius neurons was directly characterized by LINF microscopy with high spatial resolution.

  4. Analog asymmetrization of profile of thin dynamic holographic grating in liquid-crystal matrix transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venediktov, V. Yu.; Laskin, V. A.; Pasechnik, I. M.; Savinov, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    The recording of dynamic holographic grating in an electrically addressed matrix liquid-crystal spatial light modulator, which asymmetrizes the grating profile due to the application of optical feedback (nonlinear or adaptive interferometer) with television closing of feedback loop, has been studied.

  5. Laser-induced electron localization in H2(+): mixed quantum-classical dynamics based on the exact time-dependent potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Abedi, Ali; Maitra, Neepa T; Gross, E K U

    2015-10-28

    We study the exact nuclear time-dependent potential energy surface (TDPES) for laser-induced electron localization with a view to eventually developing a mixed quantum-classical dynamics method for strong-field processes. The TDPES is defined within the framework of the exact factorization [A. Abedi, N. T. Maitra, and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2010, 105, 123002] and contains the exact effect of the couplings to the electronic subsystem and to any external fields within a scalar potential. We compare its features with those of the quasistatic potential energy surfaces (QSPES) often used to analyse strong-field processes. We show that the gauge-independent component of the TDPES has a mean-field-like character very close to the density-weighted average of the QSPESs. Oscillations in this component are smoothened out by the gauge-dependent component, and both components are needed to yield the correct force on the nuclei. Once the localization begins to set in, the gradient of the exact TDPES tracks one QSPES and then switches to the other, similar to the description provided by surface-hopping between QSPESs. We show that evolving an ensemble of classical nuclear trajectories on the exact TDPES accurately reproduces the exact dynamics. This study suggests that the mixed quantum-classical dynamics scheme based on evolving multiple classical nuclear trajectories on the exact TDPES will be a novel and useful method to simulate strong field processes. PMID:26467353

  6. Laser-induced electron localization in H$_2^+$: Mixed quantum-classical dynamics based on the exact time-dependent potential energy surface

    E-print Network

    Yasumitsu Suzuki; Ali Abedi; Neepa T. Maitra; E. K. U. Gross

    2015-06-12

    We study the exact nuclear time-dependent potential energy surface (TDPES) for laser-induced electron localization with a view to eventually developing a mixed quantum-classical dynamics method for strong-field processes. The TDPES is defined within the framework of the exact factorization [A. Abedi, N. T. Maitra, and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 123002 (2010)] and contains the exact effect of the couplings to the electronic subsystem and to any external fields within a scalar potential. We compare its features with those of the quasistatic potential energy surfaces (QSPES) often used to analyse strong-field processes. We show that the gauge-independent component of the TDPES has a mean-field-like character very close to the density-weighted average of the QSPESs. Oscillations in this component are smoothened out by the gauge-dependent component, and both components are needed to yield the correct force on the nuclei. Once the localization begins to set in, the gradient of the exact TDPES tracks one QSPES and then switches to the other, similar to the description provided by surface-hopping between QSPESs. We show that evolving an ensemble of classical nuclear trajectories on the exact TDPES accurately reproduces the exact dynamics. This study suggests that the mixed quantum-classical dynamics scheme based on evolving multiple classical nuclear trajectories on the exact TDPES will be a novel and useful method to simulate strong field processes.

  7. Experimental study on pressure, stress state, and temperature-dependent dynamic behavior of shear thickening fluid subjected to laser induced shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianqian; Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments by measuring the back free surface velocities of aluminum-shear thickening fluid (STF)-aluminum assembled targets. The results showed that the attenuation behavior of shock wave in the STF was dependent on shock pressure, stress state, and test temperature. The measured back free particle velocities of the targets and shock wave velocities in the STF decreased with the decrease in shock pressure while shocked at the same stress state and the same test temperature. In addition, two types of dragging mechanisms in the STF were observed while shocked at different stress states. For a uniaxial strain state, the impact induced jamming behavior in the STF is the dragging mechanism for the attenuation of shock wave, and a critical shock pressure was required for the impact induced thickening behavior. However, while the shock wave transformed from a uniaxial strain state to a dilatation state after transmitted to a certain distance, beside the dragging effect of impact induced jamming behavior, a strong dragging effect, induced by shear induced thickening behavior, was also observed.

  8. Periodic Evolution of a Xe I Population in an Oscillatory Discharge: Comparison between Time-Synchronized Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Measurements and A Dynamic Collisional-Radiative Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Chris V.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2014-10-01

    We study the evolution of the Xe I 6 s '[ 1 / 2 ] 1 - 6 p '[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (834.68 nm air) transition lineshape in a plasma discharge oscillating at 60 Hz using time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements and a collisional-radiative model. Two different time-synchronized LIF techniques based on phase sensitive detection of the fluorescence signal are applied, yielding consistent results. The maximum observed peak fluorescence intensity occurs at low values of the discharge current, although the peak intensity drops to zero at zero discharge current. The peak intensity also decreases at the discharge current maximum. A dynamic collisional-radiative model of the weakly ionized xenon discharge is also implemented, based on a set of rate equations. The proper electron impact cross-sections and radiative decay rates are identified from the literature and used to compute accurate rate coefficients with the Boltzmann solver Bolsig+, including the time-varying electric field. The time evolution of the probed excited state density predicted by the model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  9. Laser-Induced Incandescence Calibration via Gravimetric Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, R. L.; Zhou, Z.; Choi, M. Y.

    1995-01-01

    Various beam imaging and/or sheet forming optics delivered light at 1064 nm from a pulsed Nd:YAG laser for use either as a beam of 3 mm radius or as a laser sheet. Imaging measurements were performed with a grated intensified array camera equipped with an ultraviolet f4.5 lens and a 40 mm extension tube. Point measurements were performed using an ultraviolet 250 mm focal length lens to collect and focus the laser induced incandescence (LII) signal into a 1 meter long quartz optical fiber which directed the LII signal to a 1/4 meter monochromator. An aperture preceding the lens restricted the signal collection region to 1 cm along the laser beam at the center of the gravimetric chimney. Signals from the PMT were processed by a boxcar integrator whereas the images were captured digitally using a frame-grabber with 16 MByte of on-board memory. Both 'point' and planar measurements were made with detector gates of 250 ns to minimize possible morphology bias in collection of the LII signal. Additionally, the imaging measurements were performed with broadband spectral collection of the LII signal to maximize the signal and again minimize any potential effects of morphology dependent heating and/or cooling rates. Digital delay generators controlled the firing of he laser, detector gates and data acquisition. Neutral density filters were used for both sets of measurements to maintain signal levels within linear dynamic ranges of the detectors, the range being determined prior to experiments.

  10. Dynamic Fracture of Borosilicate Glass with Plasma Confinement geometry in Pure Water by Laser-induced Shock Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    In order to characterize dynamic fracture of borosilicate glass, we performed laser-shock-experiments of both an aluminum-ablator mounted glass and a glass with plasma confinement geometry in pure water by Q-switched Nd3+:YAG laser. The incident beam with 440 mJ were focused onto the target approximately 300 ?m in diameter. The dynamic fracture of the glass targets is observed with high-speed digital framing-camera photography. For the aluminum-ablator mounted glass, propagation of the shock wave in water was observed, and the shock-wave velocity is obtained to be 1.65 +/- 0.02 km/s using image processing. Shock-pressure applied the target is estimated to be 180 MPa by Hugoniot relation. For the glass with plasma confinement geometry, generation of the micro-fragments from the rear side of the target was observed. This result indicates that shock-induced fragmentation by laser irradiation is enhanced by the plasma confinement effect. The soft-recovered fragments are separated according the size with PET mesh having deferent mesh size. As a result, the glass with plasma confinement geometry generated smaller fragment than the aluminum-ablator mounted glass.

  11. The Effect of an External Magnetic Field on the Plume Expansion Dynamics of Laser-Induced Aluminum Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, Hussain; Li, Qi; Hao, Zuoqiang; Gao, Xun; Lin, Jingquan

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the plasma morphology induced by a Nd:YAG laser with the aim of improving the understanding of the formation and dynamics of the plasma in two cases, with and without a magnetic field. Single laser pulse production of a plasma in the absence and presence of a magnetic field was performed with an aluminum target in air. A fast photography technique was employed to obtain information about the expansion dynamics and confinement of the aluminum plasma in each case. The generation of the laser plasma was allowed to expand at two locations with different magnetic field strengths, which correspond to the strength 0.58 T in the center of two magnetic poles and 0.83 T at a distance of 4 mm from the upper pole (N). The plume showed lateral confinement at longer delays when the target was placed at the center of the two poles. When the target was placed at a distance of 4 mm from the upper pole it was observed that the plume was divided into two lobes at the initial stage and traveled towards the center of the magnetic field with further elapse of time. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61178022), the Research Foundation for Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Nos. 20112216120006, 20122216120009 and 20122216110007) and also the Project of 14KP007

  12. Dynamics of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon by high spatial and temporal resolution imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, X.; Jia, T. Q. Peng, N. N.; Feng, D. H.; Zhang, S. A.; Sun, Z. R.

    2014-04-14

    The formation dynamics of periodic ripples induced by femtosecond laser pulses (pulse duration ??=?50 fs and central wavelength ??=?800?nm) are studied by a collinear pump-probe imaging technique with a temporal resolution of 1?ps and a spatial resolution of 440?nm. The ripples with periods close to the laser wavelength begin to appear upon irradiation of two pump pulses at surface defects produced by the prior one. The rudiments of periodic ripples emerge in the initial tens of picoseconds after fs laser irradiation, and the ripple positions keep unmoved until the formation processes complete mainly in a temporal span of 1500?ps. The results suggest that the periodic deposition of laser energy during the interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and sample surface plays a dominant role in the formation of periodic ripples.

  13. On-chip optical mode conversion based on dynamic grating in photonic-phononic hybrid waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guodong; Zhang, Ruiwen; Sun, Junqiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a scheme for reversible and tunable on-chip optical mode conversion based on dynamic grating in a hybrid photonic-phononic waveguide. The dynamic grating is built up through the acousto-optic effect and the theoretical model of the optical mode conversion is developed by considering the geometrical deformation and refractive index change. Three kinds of mode conversions are able to be realized using the same hybrid waveguide structure in a large bandwidth by only changing the launched acoustic frequency. The complete mode conversion can be achieved by choosing a proper acoustic power under a given waveguide length. PMID:25996236

  14. Thermophysical and gas-dynamic characteristics of laser-induced gasplasma flows under femtosecond laser ablation of titanium in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Loktionov, E Yu; Protasov, Yu S; Protasov, Yu Yu

    2014-03-28

    We report the results of experimental investigation of thermophysical and gas-dynamic characteristics of the gas-plasma flows induced by ultrashort (45 – 60 fs) laser pulse irradiation (the radiation wavelength ? = 400, 800 nm) of a titanium target in vacuum (?5 × 10{sup -4} mbar). The use of combined interferometric technique and complex experimental data processing allowed us to estimate the momentum coupling coefficient (C{sub m} ? 10{sup -4} N W{sup -1}), the efficiency of laser energy conversion to the kinetic energy of the gas-plasma flow (65% – 85%), the spatiotemporal distributions of the particle density (n{sub e} = 10{sup 18} – 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) and velocity ((v)=4 – 9 km s{sup -1}), the static (10{sup 6} – 10{sup 8} Pa) and total (10{sup 7} – 10{sup 11} Pa) pressure and temperature (T=7 – 50 kK) in the flow. Our data are compared with published data obtained by other methods. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  15. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad; Margot, Joëlle

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon) and pressure (from ˜5 × 10-7 Torr up to atmosphere) is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at ? = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  16. Quenched by ice: Transient grating measurements of vibronic dynamics in bromine-doped ice

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    Quenched by ice: Transient grating measurements of vibronic dynamics in bromine-doped ice I. U April 2006; published online 25 May 2006 In both water and in ice, the absorption spectra of bromine of the trapped molecule in its electronic B 3 0u state in ice. Independent of the initial excitation energy

  17. Laser-induced dispersion control.

    PubMed

    Rasskazov, Gennady; Ryabtsev, Anton; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-06-01

    An intense laser pulse is used to control the spectral phase of a weak probe pulse as they overlap in fused silica. The laser-induced linear chirp is controlled by the delay time between pulses. Dependence from intensity and spectral phase of the pump pulse is also studied. Experimental data is validated by numerical simulation based on optical Kerr effect. Results show that laser-induced pulse shaping is possible and may be useful for intracavity pulse compression and shaping in enhancement cavities. PMID:24876014

  18. Detection, Evaluation, and Optimization of Optical Signals Generated by Fiber Optic Bragg Gratings Under Dynamic Excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Lekki, John; Lock, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic response of a fiber optic Bragg grating to mechanical vibrations is examined both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical expressions describing the consequences of changes in the grating's reflection spectrum are derived for partially coherent beams in an interferometer. The analysis is given in terms of the dominant wavelength, optical bandwidth, and optical path difference of the interfering signals. Changes in the reflection spectrum caused by a periodic stretching and compression of the grating were experimentally measured using an unbalanced Michelson interferometer, a Michelson interferometer with a non-zero optical path difference. The interferometer's sensitivity to changes in dominant wavelength of the interfering beams was measured as a function of interferometer unbalance and was compared to theoretical predictions. The theoretical analysis enables the user to determine the optimum performance for an unbalanced interferometer.

  19. Super-resolution imaging in digital holography by using dynamic grating with a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiaowen; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Rong, Lu; Chang, Shifeng

    2015-03-01

    A super-resolution imaging method using dynamic grating based on liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) is developed to improve the resolution of a digital holographic system. The one-dimensional amplitude cosine grating is loaded on the SLM, which is placed between the object and hologram plane in order to collect more high-frequency components towards CCD plane. The point spread function of the system is given to confirm the separation condition of reconstructed images for multiple diffraction orders. The simulation and experiments are carried out for a standard resolution test target as a sample, which confirms that the imaging resolution is improved from 55.7 ?m to 31.3 ?m compared with traditional lensless Fourier transform digital holography. The unique advantage of the proposed method is that the period of the grating can be programmably adjusted according to the separation condition.

  20. Asymmetrisation of the profile of a thin dynamic holographic grating in a TV-locked optical feedback loop

    SciTech Connect

    Venediktov, Vladimir Yu; Ivanova, Natalya L; Freigang, N N; Laskin, V A

    2009-10-31

    A system for recording a dynamic holographic grating in an optically addressed liquid-crystal spatial light modulator is studied. The system provides the asymmetrisation of the grating profile by using a TV-locked optical feedback loop (nonlinear or adaptive interferometer). (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Single grating x-ray imaging for dynamic biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kaye S.; Paganin, David M.; Parsons, David W.; Donnelley, Martin; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Siu, Karen K. W.

    2012-07-01

    Biomedical studies are already benefiting from the excellent contrast offered by phase contrast x-ray imaging, but live imaging work presents several challenges. Living samples make it particularly difficult to achieve high resolution, sensitive phase contrast images, as exposures must be short and cannot be repeated. We therefore present a single-exposure, high-flux method of differential phase contrast imaging [1, 2, 3] in the context of imaging live airways for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) treatment assessment [4]. The CF study seeks to non-invasively observe the liquid lining the airways, which should increase in depth in response to effective treatments. Both high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to track micron size changes in a liquid that is not easily differentiated from the tissue on which it lies. Our imaging method achieves these goals by using a single attenuation grating or grid as a reference pattern, and analyzing how the sample deforms the pattern to quantitatively retrieve the phase depth of the sample. The deformations are mapped at each pixel in the image using local cross-correlations comparing each 'sample and pattern' image with a reference 'pattern only' image taken before the sample is introduced. This produces a differential phase image, which may be integrated to give the sample phase depth.

  2. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    We have used combined vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence detection to study dissociation dynamics of hydroxylamine (NH[sub 2]OH), have performed our first laser induced grating experiments on water, and have begun assembling a new apparatus for preparing vibrationally excited molecules with simulated Raman excitation. We study role of vibrational excitation in photodissociation dynamics by using a vibrational state preparation technique, such as vibrational overtone excitation or stimulated Raman excitation, to create molecules with particular nuclear motions and then to excite that molecule to a dissociative electronic state.

  3. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, F.F.

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  4. Photochromism of spirooxazine-doped polymers studied by monitoring dynamics of holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Zheng, Meiling; Fu, Shencheng; Shi, Feng; Wang, Xiuli; Zhan, Naiyan

    2015-03-01

    As an organic photochromic material, spirooxazine attracted widespread attention because of its high fatigue resistance and thermal stability. In this paper, the photochromism of spirooxazine was studied by monitoring the dynamics of holographic gratings in spirooxazine-doped polymer films. A theoretical description for the transformation of spirooxazine and merocyanine molecules was carried out, which agrees well with the experimental results. The photochromism of spirooxazine-doped different matrixes were studied, the photochromic rate and fatigue resistance of spirooxazine-doped SiO2 films were found to be better than spirooxazine-doped PMMA films.

  5. Characterization of temperature-dependent birefringence in polarization maintaining fibers based on Brillouin dynamic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Song, Kwang Yong

    2015-07-01

    Temperature dependence of birefringence in various types of polarization-maintaining fibers (PMF's) is rigorously investigated by the spectral analysis of Brillouin dynamic grating (BDG). PANDA, Bowtie, and PM photonic crystal fibers are tested in the temperature range of -30 to 150 ºC, where nonlinear temperature dependence is quantified for each fiber to an accuracy of ±7.6 × 10-8. It is observed that the amount of deviation from the linearity varies according to the structural parameters of the PMF's and the existence of acrylate jacket. Experimental confirmation of the validity of the BDG-based birefringence measurement is also presented in comparison to the periodic lateral force method.

  6. Laser induced melting and crystallization of boron doped amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Nebel, C.E.; Schoeniger, S.; Dahlheimer, B.; Stutzmann, M.

    1997-07-01

    Transient reflectivity experiments have been performed to measure the dynamics of laser-induced melting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and the crystallization to {micro}c-Si of films with different thicknesses on Corning 7059 glass. The laser-induced melting takes place with a velocity of 13 to 24 m/s, while the solidification is about a factor 10 slower. The crystallization starts at the Si/glass interface and at the surface. In the center of the films Si remains liquid for an extended period of time. The crystallization dynamics point towards an heterogeneous morphology of laser-crystallized Si, where the surface and the interface layers are composed of small grains and the bulk of larger grains.

  7. Fiber Bragg Grating Based System for Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Bashir Ahmed; Ali, Jalil; Abdul Rahman, Rosly

    In this study, a fiber Bragg grating sensor for temperature measurement is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In particular, we point out that the method is well-suited for monitoring temperature because they are able to withstand a high temperature environment, where standard thermocouple methods fail. The interrogation technologies of the sensor systems are all simple, low cost and effective as well. In the sensor system, fiber grating was dipped into a water beaker that was placed on a hotplate to control the temperature of water. The temperature was raised in equal increments. The sensing principle is based on tracking of Bragg wavelength shifts caused by the temperature change. So the temperature is measured based on the wavelength-shifts of the FBG induced by the heating water. The fiber grating is high temperature stable excimer-laser-induced grating and has a linear function of wavelength-temperature in the range of 0-285°C. A dynamic range of 0-285°C and a sensitivity of 0.0131 nm/°C almost equal to that of general FBG have been obtained by this sensor system. Furthermore, the correlation of theoretical analysis and experimental results show the capability and feasibility of the purposed technique.

  8. Dynamic trapping of terahertz waves by silicon-filled metallic grating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yinghao; Liu, Jinsong; He, Jian; Yao, Jianquan

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the feasibility of dynamic trapping of terahertz waves using a silicon-filled metallic grating structure. Using the dispersion relation analysis and the two-dimensional finite element method simulations, we reveal that, if a graded refractive index distribution in the grooves is optical induced, the device has the ability to dynamic trap terahertz waves of different frequencies at different positions (so-called trapping rainbow). Moreover, we demonstrate that the trapped position of a certain frequency of the terahertz waves can be moved continuously along the grooves in subwavelength scale by ingenious control of the distributions of the refractive indices of silicon filled in the grooves. Our design has the potential for the construction of active plasmonic terahertz devices, such as optical controlled terahertz filter, router and demultiplexer in a broadband terahertz communication system.

  9. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules. Technical progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    We have used combined vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence detection to study dissociation dynamics of hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH), have performed our first laser induced grating experiments on water, and have begun assembling a new apparatus for preparing vibrationally excited molecules with simulated Raman excitation. We study role of vibrational excitation in photodissociation dynamics by using a vibrational state preparation technique, such as vibrational overtone excitation or stimulated Raman excitation, to create molecules with particular nuclear motions and then to excite that molecule to a dissociative electronic state.

  10. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  11. Interaction between jets during laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Patrascioiu, A.; Florian, C.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.; Hennig, G.; Delaporte, P.

    2014-07-07

    Simultaneous two-beam laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was carried out for various inter-beam separations, analyzing both the resulting printing outcomes and the corresponding liquid transfer dynamics. In a first experiment, droplets of an aqueous solution were printed onto a substrate at different inter-beam distances, which proved that a significant departure from the single-beam LIFT dynamics takes places at specific separations. In the second experiment, time-resolved imaging analysis revealed the existence of significant jet-jet interactions at those separations; such interactions proceed through a dynamics that results in remarkable jet deflection for which a possible onset mechanism is proposed.

  12. Coherent pulse compression Brillouin dynamic gratings reflectometry for slope-assisted, fast and distributed fiber strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, A.; Langer, T.; Tur, M.

    2015-09-01

    The performance of optical time-domain sensing technique, employing the slope of Brillouin dynamic gratings in polarization-maintaining fibers, is significantly enhanced using coherent pulse compression techniques. The strain sensitivity of the reflectivity of a coded probe, orthogonally polarized to the pumps which generated the grating, depends on both pumps and probe detuning. Employing a 64 bit Golay code, the system sensitivity was enhanced eightfold, while retaining the high sampling rate of 1MHz. We report the measurement of 750Hz strain vibrations (limited by the bandwidth of the vibration source) with a spatial resolution of 20cm (limited by the bandwidth of the balanced photoreceivers).

  13. Dynamic assessment of women pelvic floor function by using a fiber Bragg grating sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Luis A.; Araújo, Francisco M.; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Natal Jorge, Renato M.; Fernandes, António A.

    2006-02-01

    We present a novel sensing system consisting of an intravaginal probe and an optoelectronic measurement unit, which allows an easy, comfortable and quantitative dynamic evaluation of women pelvic floor muscle strength. The sensing probe is based on a silicone cylinder that transduces radial muscle pressure into axial load applied to a fiber Bragg grating strain sensor. The performance of a first sensor probe prototype with temperature referentiation and of the autonomous, portable optoelectronic measurement unit with data logging capabilities and graphical user interface is disclosed. The presented results refer to an ongoing collaboration work between researchers from the Medical, Optoelectronics and Mechanical areas, directed to the development of equipment that can assist in medical practice and help in the research of primary mechanisms responsible for several pelvic floor disorders, in particular urogenital prolapses.

  14. Reaction dynamics of V(a {sup 4}F{sub J})+NO{yields}VO(X {sup 4}{sigma}{sup -})+N studied by a crossed-beam laser-induced fluorescence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Yamashiro, R.; Matsumoto, Y.; Honma, Kenji

    2006-05-28

    The dynamics of the reaction, V(a {sup 4}F{sub J})+NO{yields}VO(X {sup 4}{sigma}{sup -})+N was studied by using a crossed-beam technique at 16.4 kJ/mol of collision energy. The V atomic beam was generated by laser vaporization and crossed with the O{sub 2} beam at a right angle. The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the transition of VO(B {sup 4}{pi}-X {sup 4}{sigma}) was used to determine the rotational state distribution of the reaction product in the vibrational ground state. Almost pure V(a {sup 4}F{sub J}) beam was obtained by using the mixture of NH{sub 3} with N{sub 2} as a carrier gas. Comparing the LIF spectra of VO measured for two carrier gases, i.e., NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} and pure N{sub 2}, it was concluded that the vibrational ground state of VO(X {sup 4}{sigma}{sup -}) is formed almost entirely from the reaction of V(a {sup 4}F{sub J}) and the contribution of the metastable V(a {sup 6}D{sub J}) is negligible. The observed rotational distribution was similar to a statistical prior prediction, and suggested that the title reaction proceeds via a long-lived intermediate, which is consistent with an electron transfer mechanism.

  15. High pressure sensing and dynamics using high speed fiber Bragg grating interrogation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Lalone, B. M.; Marshall, B. R.; Grover, M.; Stevens, G.; Udd, E.

    2014-06-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are developing into useful sensing tools for measuring high pressure dynamics in extreme environments under shock loading conditions. Approaches using traditional diode array coupled FBG interrogation systems are often limited to readout speeds in the sub-MHz range. For shock wave physics, required detection speeds approaching 100 MHz are desired. We explore the use of two types of FBG sensing systems that are aimed at applying this technology as embedded high pressure probes for transient shock events. Both approaches measure time resolved spectral shifts in the return light from short (few mm long) uniform FBGs at 1550 nm. In the first approach, we use a fiber coupled spectrometer to demultiplex spectral channels into an array (up to 12) of single element InGaAs photoreceivers. By monitoring the detectors during a shock impact event with high speed recording, we are able to track the pressure induced spectral shifting in FBG down to a time resolution of 20 ns. In the second approach, developed at the Special Technologies Lab, a coherent mode-locked fiber laser is used to illuminate the FBG sensor. After the sensor, wavelength-to-time mapping is accomplished with a chromatic dispersive element, and entire spectra are sampled using a single detector at the modelocked laser repetition rate of 50 MHz. By sampling with a 12 GHz InGaAs detector, direct wavelength mapping in time is recorded, and the pressure induced FBG spectral shift is sampled at 50 MHz. Here, the sensing systems are used to monitor the spectral shifts of FBGs that are immersed into liquid water and shock compressed using explosives. In this configuration, the gratings survive to pressures approaching 50 kbar. We describe both approaches and present the measured spectral shifts from the shock experiments.

  16. High Pressure Sensing and Dynamics Using High Speed Fiber Bragg Grating Interrogation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Lalone, B. M.; Marshall, B. R.; Grover, M.; Stevens, G. D.; Udd, E.

    2014-06-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are developing into useful sensing tools for measuring high pressure dynamics in extreme environments under shock loading conditions. Approaches using traditional diode array coupled FBG interrogation systems are often limited to readout speeds in the sub-MHz range. For shock wave physics, required detection speeds approaching 100 MHz are desired. We explore the use of two types of FBG sensing systems that are aimed at applying this technology as embedded high pressure probes for transient shock events. Both approaches measure time resolved spectral shifts in the return light from short (few mm long) uniform FBGs at 1550 nm. In the first approach, we use a fiber coupled spectrometer to demultiplex spectral channels into an array (up to 12) of single element InGaAs photoreceivers. By monitoring the detectors during a shock impact event with high speed recording, we are able to track the pressure induced spectral shifting in FBG down to a time resolution of 20 ns. In the second approach, developed at the Special Technologies Lab, a coherent mode-locked fiber laser is used to illuminate the FBG sensor. After the sensor, wavelength-to-time mapping is accomplished with a chromatic dispersive element, and entire spectra are sampled using a single detector at the modelocked laser repetition rate of 50 MHz. By sampling with a 12 GHz InGaAs detector, direct wavelength mapping in time is recorded, and the pressure induced FBG spectral shift is sampled at 50 MHz. Here, the sensing systems are used to monitor the spectral shifts of FBGs that are immersed into liquid water and shock compressed using explosives. In this configuration, the gratings survive to pressures approaching 50 kbar. We describe both approaches and present the measured spectral shifts from the shock experiments.

  17. Confinement and re-expansion of laser induced plasma in transverse magnetic field: Dynamical behaviour and geometrical aspect of expanding plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Narayan; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2015-10-01

    We present dynamical behaviour of aluminium plasma across 0.45 T magnetic field at low ambient pressure using fast imaging technique. The present finding related to the plume dynamics, splitting pattern and geometry of plume is significantly different from reported results on similar experiments. In vacuum, after the initial expansion, the plume is tending to stagnation and begins to re-expand with constant velocity. The above behaviour is correlated with the plume expansion in diamagnetic limit and E × B drift in non-diamagnetic regime. Two slab like structures, moving with different velocities are observed in presence of both the magnetic field and ambient gas.

  18. Laser-induced formation of micro-pores in the tissues for cartilage repair and treatment of glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil; Baum, Olga; Shnirelman, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Laser-induced formation of pores in cartilage and sclera tissues is a basis of novel technologies for treatment of arthritis and glaucoma. The presented theoretical model describes dynamics of the pore formation and allows optimizing laser settings.

  19. Laser-induced caesium-137 decay

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Simakin, A V; Shafeev, G A

    2014-08-31

    Experimental data are presented on the laser-induced beta decay of caesium-137. We demonstrate that the exposure of a gold target to a copper vapour laser beam (wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm, pulse duration of 15 ns) for 2 h in an aqueous solution of a caesium-137 salt reduces the caesium-137 activity by 70%, as assessed from the gamma activity of the daughter nucleus {sup 137m}Ba, and discuss potential applications of laser-induced caesium-137 decay in radioactive waste disposal. (letters)

  20. Experimental investigations on nonlinear dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to optical injection and fiber Bragg grating feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jian; Zhong, Zhu-Qiang; Wei, Li-Xia; Wu, Zheng-Mao; Xia, Guang-Qiong

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear dynamical characteristics of a slave semiconductor laser (S-SL) subject to optical injection from a master SL (M-SL) and optical feedback from a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) are investigated experimentally. First, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of the S-SL subject to only optical injection. Through varying the injection coefficient and fixing the frequency detuning between the M-SL and S-SL, some dynamical states with typical characteristics are recorded and identified. Next, the variations of these dynamical states are further investigated with the introduction of a FBG feedback, and the according results show that these dynamical states may be changed after a FBG feedback is introduced into the S-SL. Finally, after collecting the mappings of the dynamical states of S-SL in the parameter space of injection coefficient and frequency detuning under different FBG feedback coefficients, the influences of FBG feedback on the nonlinear dynamics of the S-SL are analyzed.

  1. Attosecond pump-probe transition-state spectroscopy of laser-induced molecular dissociative ionization: Adiabatic versus nonadiabatic dressed-state dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, C.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Dion, F.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Serov, V. N.; Atabek, O.

    2013-11-01

    We discuss how a recent pump-probe study [Kelkensberg , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.123005 103, 123005 (2009)] of the dissociative ionization of H2, under the combined effect of a single extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse and an intense near-infrared pulse, actually represents a transition-state spectroscopy of the strong-field dissociation step, i.e., of the (probe-pulse-)dressed H2+ molecular ion. The way the dissociation dynamics is influenced by the duration of the near-infrared probe pulse, and by the time delay between the two pulses, is discussed in terms of adiabatic versus nonadiabatic preparation and transport of time-parametrized Floquet resonances associated with the dissociating molecular ion. Under a long probe pulse, the field-free vibrational states of the initial wave packet are transported, in a one-to-one manner, onto the Floquet resonances defined by the field intensity of the probe pulse and propagated adiabatically under the pulse. As the probe pulse duration shortens, nonadiabatic transitions between the Floquet resonances become important and manifest themselves in two respects: first, as a vibrational shake-up effect occurring near the peak of the short pulse, and second, through strong interference patterns in the fragment's kinetic energy spectrum, viewed as a function of the time delay between the pump and the probe pulses.

  2. Excitation nonlinearities in emission reabsorption laser-induced fluorescence techniques

    E-print Network

    Hidrovo, Carlos H.

    Excitation nonlinearities in emission reabsorption laser-induced fluorescence techniques Carlos H intensity with excitation intensity on emission reabsorption laser-induced fluorescence ERLIF are investigated. Excitation nonlinearities arise mainly as a consequence of the depletion of the ground

  3. Fast dynamic interferometric lithography for large submicrometric period diffraction gratings production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gâté, Valentin; Bernaud, Gerard; Veillas, Colette; Cazier, Anthony; Vocanson, Francis; Jourlin, Yves; Langlet, Michel

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes a successful technological transfer, from a state laboratory to an industrial company, for writing long and large submicron period gratings (potentially square-meter sized), implemented in an industrial direct laser beam writing equipment at 355 nm wavelength (Dilase 750 from KLOE SA company). The writing head, which has been inserted in the machine, consists of a phase mask which enables it to project a set of fringes pattern of small area onto a photoresist-coated substrate. As the substrate is continuously moving, one-dimensional or two-dimensional gratings can be fabricated over large areas limited only by the machine's stage displacement range. The optical scheme is described from the beam shaping to the printing processes and the phase mask optimization. In order to demonstrate the technology, 600 nm period gratings of over 20 cm in length have been fabricated. Such submicron structures can be used in solar cell modules for photon trapping and as antireflection coatings.

  4. Enhancement of high-harmonic generation by laser-induced cluster vibration

    E-print Network

    Enhancement of high-harmonic generation by laser-induced cluster vibration Yen-Mu Chen,1,2 Ming a new tool for studying the vibrational dynamics of nanometer atomic clusters. © 2007 Optical Society vibration was reported [8], and the results indicate that HHG is a very sensitive probe for vibrational

  5. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Andria; Lawhead, Carlos; Ujj, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition of materials. Recent technical developments resulted in equipment used on the MARS Rover by NASA. It is capable of measuring the emission spectra of laser induced plasma created by energetic laser pulses focused on the sample (rocks, metals, etc.). We have develop a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy setup and investigated the necessary experimental and methodological challenges needed to make such material identification measurements. 355 and 532 nm laser pulses with 5 ns temporal duration was used to generate micro-plasma from which compositions can be determined based on known elemental and molecular emission intensities and wavelengths. The performance of LIBS depends on several parameters including laser wavelength, pulse energy, pulse duration, time interval of observation, geometrical configuration of collecting optics, and the properties of ambient medium. Spectra recorded from alloys (e.g. US penny coin) and pure metals will be presented. Special thanks for the financial support of the Office of Undergraduate Research of UWF.

  6. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  7. Nanorod Surface Plasmon Enhancement of Laser-Induced Ultrafast Demagnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haitian; Hajisalem, Ghazal; Steeves, Geoffrey M.; Gordon, Reuven; Choi, Byoung C.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast laser-induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films were measured using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser in a pump-probe magneto-optic Kerr effect setup. The effect of plasmon resonance on the transient magnetization was investigated by drop-coating the ferromagnetic films with dimensionally-tuned gold nanorods supporting longitudinal surface plasmon resonance near the central wavelength of the pump laser. With ~4% nanorod areal coverage, we observe a >50% increase in demagnetization signal in nanorod-coated samples at pump fluences on the order of 0.1?mJ/cm2 due to surface plasmon-mediated localized electric-field enhancement, an effect which becomes more significant at higher laser fluences. We were able to qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations using finite-difference time-domain simulations and mean-field theory. This dramatic enhancement of ultrafast laser-induced demagnetization points to possible applications of nanorod-coated thin films in heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  8. Nanorod Surface Plasmon Enhancement of Laser-Induced Ultrafast Demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haitian; Hajisalem, Ghazal; Steeves, Geoffrey M.; Gordon, Reuven; Choi, Byoung C.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser-induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films were measured using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser in a pump-probe magneto-optic Kerr effect setup. The effect of plasmon resonance on the transient magnetization was investigated by drop-coating the ferromagnetic films with dimensionally-tuned gold nanorods supporting longitudinal surface plasmon resonance near the central wavelength of the pump laser. With ~4% nanorod areal coverage, we observe a >50% increase in demagnetization signal in nanorod-coated samples at pump fluences on the order of 0.1?mJ/cm2 due to surface plasmon-mediated localized electric-field enhancement, an effect which becomes more significant at higher laser fluences. We were able to qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations using finite-difference time-domain simulations and mean-field theory. This dramatic enhancement of ultrafast laser-induced demagnetization points to possible applications of nanorod-coated thin films in heat-assisted magnetic recording. PMID:26515296

  9. Post-treatment techniques for enhancing mode-coupling in long period fiber gratings induced by CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xizhen; Tang, Jian; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Kaiming; Fu, Cailing; Wang, Qiao; Liu, Shen; Liao, Changrui; Lian, Jiarong; Wang, Yiping

    2015-12-01

    Two promising post-treatment techniques, i.e. applying tensile strain and rising temperature, are demonstrated to enhance the mode-coupling efficiency of the CO2-laser-induced long period fiber gratings (LPFGs) with periodic grooves. Such two post-treatment techniques can be used to enhance the resonant attenuation of the grating to achieve a LPFG-based filter with an extremely large attenuation and to tailor the transmission spectrum of the CO2-laser-induced LPFG after grating fabrication.

  10. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  11. Laser induced surface stress on water droplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Neng; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2014-10-01

    Laser induced stress on spherical water droplets is studied. At mechanical equilibrium, the body stress vanishes therefore we consider only the surface stress. The surface stress on sub-wavelength droplets is slightly weaker along the light propagation direction. For larger droplets, due to their light focusing effect, the forward stress is significantly enhanced. For a particle roughly 3 micron in radius, when it is excited at whispering gallery mode with Q ? 10? by a 1 Watt Gaussian beam, the stress can be enhanced by two orders of magnitude, and can be comparable with the Laplace pressure. PMID:25321955

  12. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  13. Laser induced electron diffraction: a tool for molecular orbital imaging

    E-print Network

    Michel Peters; Tung Nguyen-Dang; Eric Charron; Arne Keller; Osman Atabek

    2012-03-18

    We explore the laser-induced ionization dynamics of N2 and CO2 molecules subjected to a few-cycle, linearly polarized, 800\\,nm laser pulse using effective two-dimensional single active electron time-dependent quantum simulations. We show that the electron recollision process taking place after an initial tunnel ionization stage results in quantum interference patterns in the energy resolved photo-electron signals. If the molecule is initially aligned perpendicular to the field polarization, the position and relative heights of the associated fringes can be related to the molecular geometrical and orbital structure, using a simple inversion algorithm which takes into account the symmetry of the initial molecular orbital from which the ionized electron is produced. We show that it is possible to extract inter-atomic distances in the molecule from an averaged photon-electron signal with an accuracy of a few percents.

  14. Diffraction by dual-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Skigin, Diana C; Depine, Ricardo A

    2007-03-20

    The dynamical characteristics of dual-period perfectly conducting gratings are explored. Gratings with several grooves (reflection) or slits (transmission) within each period are considered. A scalar approach is proposed to derive the general characteristics of the diffracted response. It was found that compound gratings can be designed to cancel as well as to intensify a given diffraction order. These preliminary estimations for finite gratings are validated by numerical examples for infinitely periodic reflection and transmission gratings with finite thickness, performed using an extension of the rigorous modal method to compound gratings, for both polarization cases. PMID:17334426

  15. Structural health monitoring of composite-based UAVs using simultaneous fiber optic interrogation by static Rayleigh-based distributed sensing and dynamic fiber Bragg grating point sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tur, Moshe; Sovran, Ido; Bergman, Arik; Motil, Avi; Shapira, Osher; Ben-Simon, Uri; Kressel, Iddo

    2015-09-01

    Embedded fiber-optic strain sensing networks for airworthy assessment of operational Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are presented. Sensing is based on in-flight fiber Bragg grating technology, as well as on on-ground Rayleigh backscattering distributed strain sensing. While the in-flight instrumentation monitors loads, looking for excessive values, the Rayleigh-based technique is used for high spatial resolution strain distribution along the UAV wings, under prescribed loading. Consistency of measurements over time indicates structural integrity. Simultaneous strain measurements using both distributed Rayleigh and fiber Bragg gratings, on the same fiber, promises to combine high spatial resolution, though practically static measurements with dynamic, though discrete ones.

  16. Comparison of two hyperspectral imaging and two laser-induced fluorescence instruments for the detection of zinc stress and

    E-print Network

    Schuerger, Andrew C.

    Comparison of two hyperspectral imaging and two laser-induced fluorescence instruments hyperspectral imagers, laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS), and laser-induced fluorescence imaging reserved. Keywords: Heavy metals; Spectral reflectance; Hyperspectral imaging; Laser-induced fluorescence

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  18. Laser-Induced Incandescence: Detection Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental LII (laser-induced incandescence) measurements were performed in a laminar gasjet flame to test the sensitivity of different LII signal collection strategies to particle size. To prevent introducing a particle size dependent bias in the LII signal, signal integration beginning with the excitation laser pulse is necessary . Signal integration times extending to 25 or 100 nsec after the laser pulse do not produce significant differences in radial profiles of the LII signal due to particle size effects with longer signal integration times revealing a decreased sensitivity to smaller primary particles. Long wavelength detection reduces the sensitivity of the LII signal to primary particle size. Excitation of LII using 1064 nm light is recommended to avoid creating photochemical interferences thus allowing LII signal collection to occur during the excitation pulse without spectral interferences.

  19. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  20. Shadowgraphic studies of triazene assisted laser-induced forward transfer of ceramic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, K. S.; May-Smith, T. C.; Banks, D. P.; Grivas, C.; Eason, R. W.; Fardel, R.; Nagel, M.; Lippert, T.

    2009-06-01

    The laser-induced forward transfer process of solid ceramic donor materials (gadolinium gallium oxide and ytterbium doped yttrium aluminium oxide) was studied using triazene polymer as a sacrificial layer by means of a time-resolved nanosecond-shadowgraphy technique. The dependence of the ablation dynamics and quality of the ejected donor material on the laser fluence and thickness of the sacrificial and donor layers were investigated and discussed.

  1. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao; Wei, Hui; Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Lu, Ruifeng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-10-01

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. With picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement.

  2. Reconstruction of two-dimensional molecular structure with laser-induced electron diffraction from laser-aligned polyatomic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Wei, Hui; Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Lu, Ruifeng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the transient process of molecules has been a basic way to investigate photochemical reactions and dynamics. Based on laser-induced electron diffraction and partial one-dimensional molecular alignment, here we provide two effective methods for reconstructing two-dimensional structure of polyatomic molecules. We demonstrate that electron diffraction images in both scattering angles and broadband energy can be utilized to retrieve complementary structure information, including positions of light atoms. With picometre spatial resolution and the inherent femtosecond temporal resolution of lasers, laser-induced electron diffraction method offers significant opportunities for probing atomic motion in a large molecule in a typical pump-probe measurement. PMID:26503116

  3. Recording and self-enhancement of dynamic polarization gratings in degenerate four-wave-mixing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozols, A.; Belyaev, A.; Kokars, V.; Augustovs, P.; Traskovskis, K.; Saharov, D.

    2014-10-01

    Scalar and vectorial degenerate four-wave-mixing (DFWM) in azobenzene molecular K-RJ-4-3 [N,N-bis(5,5,5- tryphenylpentyl)-4-((4-tritylphenyl)diazenyl)aniline] and in chalcogenide a-As2S3 glassy films is experimentally investigated. A coherent self-enhancement (CSE) of holographic gratings (HG) in this geometry was experimentally confirmed, for the first time to our knowledge, thus establishing a new method of HG recording, the DFWM CSE recording. Scalar linear s-s, p-p and circular R-R(right) polarizations and orthogonal linear s-p and circular L(left)-R polarizations were used for HG recording with 2 ?m period at 532 nm. In the case of K-RJ-4-3 film L-R polarizations were the most efficient enabling the maximum DFWM efficiency ?max=14.5% whereas in the case of a-As2S3 film s-s polarizations were the best with ?max=6.0%. DFWM CSE recording has exhibited a different polarization dependence compared to normal DWFM recording. CSE factor ?/?0 (?0 being the initial ?) was the highest for K-RJ-4-3 film (6.8) with s-s polarizations compared to 3 for a-As2S3 film with p-p polarizations. Two-wave HG recording was also studied for comparison.

  4. Modeling chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, S. V.; Gornushkin, I. B.

    2015-11-01

    Under the assumption of local thermal equilibrium, a numerical algorithm is proposed to find the equation of state for laser-induced plasmas (LIPs) in which chemical reactions are permitted in addition to ionization processes. The Coulomb interaction in plasma is accounted for by the Debye-Hückel method. The algorithm is used to calculate the equation of state for LIPs containing carbon, silicon, nitrogen, and argon. The equilibrium reaction constants are calculated using the latest experimental and ab initio data of spectroscopic constants for the molecules {N}_2, {C}_2, {Si}_2, {CN}, {SiN}, {SiC} and their ions. The algorithm is incorporated into a fluid dynamic numerical model based on the Navier-Stokes equations describing an expansion of LIP plumes into an ambient gas. The dynamics of LIP plumes obtained by the ablation of SiC, solid silicon, or solid carbon in an ambient gas containing {N}_2 and Ar is simulated to study formation of molecules and molecular ions.

  5. Improved Imaging With Laser-Induced Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J.

    1993-01-01

    System tests specimen of material nondestructively by laser-induced eddy-current imaging improved by changing method of processing of eddy-current signal. Changes in impedance of eddy-current coil measured in absolute instead of relative units.

  6. Classical cutoffs for laser-induced nonsequential double ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D.B.; Becker, W.

    2003-12-01

    Classical cutoffs for the momenta of electrons ejected in laser-induced nonsequential double ionization are derived for the recollision-impact-ionization scenario. Such simple cutoff laws can aid in the interpretation of the observed electron spectra.

  7. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  8. Laser-induced lipolysis on adipose cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efrain; Gutierrez, O.; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, J.; Isaza, Carolina; Ramirez, Hugo; Rebolledo, Aldo F.; Criollo, Willian; Ortiz, C.

    2004-10-01

    Recently, a new liposuction technique, using a low-level laser (LLL) device and Ultrawet solution prior to the procedure, demonstrated the movement of fat from the inside to the outside of the adipocyte (Neira et al., 2002). To determine the mechanisms involved, we have performed Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy studies; Light transmittance measurements on adipocyte dilutions; and a study of laser light propagation in adipose tissue. This studies show: 1. Cellular membrane alterations. 2. LLL is capable to reach the deep adipose tissue layer, and 3. The tumescence solution enhances the light propagation by clearing the tissue. MRI studies demonstrated the appearance of fat on laser treated abdominal tissue. Besides, adipocytes were cultivated and irradiated to observe the effects on isolated cells. These last studies show: 1. 635 nm-laser alone is capable of mobilizing cholesterol from the cell membrane; this action is enhanced by the presence of adrenaline and lidocaine. 2. Intracellular fat is released from adipocytes by co joint action of adrenaline, aminophyline and 635 nm-laser. Results are consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides the modification of the cellular membranes.

  9. Picosecond polarization-selective transient grating experiments in sodium-seeded flames

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    techniques such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) ,2V3laser induced fluorescence (LIF),4 the laser beams (CARS and FWM), of a different frequency than some or all of the laser beams (LIF, CARS) Electric field picture for one fringe of an intensity grating. The electric field amplitude varies

  10. Determination of Young’s modulus using optical fiber long-period gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, L.; Osório, Jonas H.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Curvature sensitive CO2-laser induced long-period fiber gratings (LPGs) were employed to measure the Young’s moduli of materials. Two techniques, ‘bar resonance’ and ‘through transmission’, were used. In the first case, flexural vibrations of bars made of various industrial materials arranged in a cantilever configuration were probed by the LPG. The measured response allowed us to obtain the bar’s vertical movement as a function of time, its frequency components and the bar material’s Young’s modulus. In the second case, the optical response of LPGs was used to determine the propagation velocities of perturbations along a bar, which allowed the straightforward calculation of the Young’s modulus. The values obtained show good agreement with the ones reported in the literature. The results obtained in this paper demonstrate the feasibility of using LPGs to dynamically characterize a material’s elastic properties. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the use of long-period fiber gratings for dynamically determining Young’s modulus values.

  11. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krueger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2012-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on two different silica polymorphs (single-crystalline synthetic quartz and commercial fused silica glass) upon irradiation in air with multiple linearly polarized single- and double-fs-laser pulse sequences ({tau} = 150 fs pulse duration, {lambda} = 800 nm center wavelength, temporal pulse separation {Delta}t < 40 ps) is studied experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct types of fs-LIPSS [so-called low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL)] with different spatial periods and orientations were identified. Their appearance was characterized with respect to the experimental parameters peak laser fluence and number of laser pulses per spot. Additionally, the 'dynamics' of the LIPSS formation was addressed in complementary double-fs-pulse experiments with varying delays, revealing a characteristic change of the LSFL periods. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a Sipe-Drude model considering the carrier dependence of the optical properties of fs-laser excited silica. This new approach provides an explanation of the LSFL orientation parallel to the laser beam polarisation in silica - as opposed to the behaviour of most other materials.

  12. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several ?m depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (?=10.6 ?m) and a XeCl excimer laser (?=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features as purity, thickness, and surface morphology.

  13. Single cell transfection by laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped gold nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Ploschner, Martin; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-03-01

    Cell selective introduction of therapeutic agents remains a challenging problem. Cavitation-based therapies including ultrasound-induced sonoporation and laser-induced optoporation have led the way for novel approaches to provide the potential of sterility and cell selectivity compared with viral or biochemical counterparts. Acoustic streaming, shockwaves and liquid microjets associated with the cavitation dynamics are implicated in gene and drug delivery. These approaches, however, often lead to non-uniform and sporadic molecular uptake that lacks refined spatial control and suffers from a significant loss of cell viability. Here we demonstrate spatially controlled cavitation instigated by laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped single gold nanoparticle. Our unique approach employs optical tweezers to trap a single nanoparticle, which when irradiated by a nanosecond laser pulse is subject to laser-induced breakdown followed by cavitation. Using this method for laser-induced cavitation, we can gain additional degrees of freedom for the cavitation process - the particle material, its size, and its position relative to cells or tissues. We show the energy breakdown threshold of gold nanoparticles of l00nm with a single nanosecond laser pulse at 532 nm is three orders of magnitude lower than that for water, which leads to gentle nanocavitation enabling single cell transfection. We optimize the shear stress to the cells from the expanding bubble to be in the range of 1-10 kPa for transfection by precisely positioning a trapped gold nanoparticle, and thus nanobubble, relative to a cell of interest. The method shows transfection of plasmid-DNA into individual mammalian cells with an efficiency of 75%.

  14. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M.; Rodriguez, A.

    2014-05-07

    The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800?nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600?nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300?nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100?nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

  15. Laser induced surface modification of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Subhadarshi

    Purpose of this work is to improve surface related properties of aluminum alloys by employing laser. Two approaches were taken to achieve this goal. First approach involves a rapid solidification induced by laser. A high power laser was used to melt the surface layer of A319. In-situ high-speed infrared thermographs captured during laser surface melting of A319 enabled estimation of maximum temperature, temperature gradient and cooling rate. The cooling rate thus estimated provided a range of cell size that closely matched with the experimentally observed cell size. The high cooling rate (>105) resulted in extensive refinement of microstructure in the laser-melted layer. Instrumented indentation technique was used to measure hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) of the laser-melted layer. Berkovich tip was used to indent the material for 100-nm, 200-nm, 500-nm, and 1000-nm depths. The H and the E were found to be 1.22 GPa and 78.2 GPa, respectively, for 1000-nm indentation depths. The variances associated with H and E were minimal. Also, H and E increased with decreasing depth of indentation. Closer examination suggested that when the heterogeneity in the material was in the scale of indentation depth, significant scattering took place and the hard phase Si influenced the average hardness. The improvement in mechanical properties manifested in better wear resistance. In second approach, laser was used for coating of iron oxide on A319 to produce a Fe3O4/Al reaction composite coating. Infrared thermography was employed thermal studies. Electron microscopy indicated reactions between oxide particles and aluminum-forming Fe-Al intermetallics, Al 2O3, and various intermediate products. Analysis of the coating, fractured in vacuuo, indicated substantial toughness of the material due to extremely refined microstructure with finely distributed reaction products and strong interfacial bonding between particles and the matrix. Mechanical properties of the coating were evaluated by instrumented indentation techniques. Hardness and elastic modulus values were found to be uniform at 1.24 and 76 GPa, respectively. No radial cracking was observed for either the Berkovich or cube-corner indenters. These results indicate that the laser-induced rapidly solidified composite material is tough and fracture resistant.

  16. Laser induced incandescence and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eseller, Kemal Efe

    In this doctoral dissertation, two laser-based sensors were evaluated for different applications. Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) is a technique which can provide non-intrusive quantitative measurement of soot and it provides a unique diagnostic tool to characterize engine performance. Since LII is linearly proportional to the soot volume fraction, it can provide in situ, real time measurement of soot volume fraction with high temporal and spatial resolution. LII has the capability to characterize soot formation during combustion. The soot volume fraction from both flames and a soot generator was investigated with LII. The effects of experimental parameters, such as laser fluence, gate delay, gate width and various laser beam focusing, on LII signal was studied. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), a diagnostic tool for in situ elemental analysis, has been evaluated for on-line, simultaneous, multi-species impurity monitoring in hydrogen. LIBS spectra with different impurity levels of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen were recorded and the intensity of the spectral lines of Ar, O, N, and H observed were used to form calibration plots for impurities in hydrogen measurements. An ungated detection method for LIBS has been developed and applied to equivalence ratio measurements of CH4/air and biofuel/air. LIBS has also been used to quantitatively analyze the composition of a slurry sample. The quenching effect of water in slurry samples causes low LIBS signal quality with poor sensitivity. Univariate and multivariate calibration was performed on LIBS spectra of dried slurry samples for elemental analysis of Mg, Si and Fe. Calibration results show that the dried slurry samples give good correlation between spectral intensity and elemental concentration.

  17. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  18. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  19. Ultrafast Molecular Imaging by Laser Induced Electron Diffraction

    E-print Network

    Michel Peters; Tung Nguyen-Dang; Christian Cornaggia; Sébastien Saugout; Eric Charron; Arne Keller; Osman Atabek

    2011-06-08

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structure of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time-scale using the laser induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO2 molecule excited by a near infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond-lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  20. Theory of laser-induced excitation transfer and atomic association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, H. P.; Dahler, John S.; Jones, Dumont M.

    1984-09-01

    Formulas are derived for the differential and integral cross sections associated with laser-induced excitation transfer. The theory is patterned closely after our recent treatment of laser-induced chemi-ionization. It is found that cross sections specific to single-photon absorption are proportional to the square of the cosine of the angle between the laser polarization and the initial relative velocity of the two colliding atoms. The distortion by a laser of the cross section for an elastic scattering event also is treated. Finally, a cross-section formula is derived for a collision-induced two-photon absorption, mediated by a single intermediate electronic state.

  1. Laser Induced Material Modification in the Bulk KDP Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Radousky, H.B.; Staggs, M.; Runkel, M.; Burnham, A.

    1999-12-16

    Laser induced material modifications in the bulk and on the surface of KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) and DKDP (70-80% deuterated KDP) are studied using fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. Photoluminescence is observed at damaged regions following above threshold exposure with an emission peak centered at 550-nm. In addition, surfaces exposed to >100 high power, 355-nm laser pulses reveal a reduced surface finishing quality as evidenced by an associated emission under UV photoexcitation. The emission spectra from the laser-induced damage sites and the laser degraded surfaces are similar suggesting the generation of similar defect species.

  2. Airborne simultaneous spectroscopic detection of laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence from chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The airborne laser-induced spectral emission bands obtained simultaneously from water Raman backscatter and the fluorescence of chlorophyll and other naturally occurring waterborne pigments are reported here for the first time. The importance of this type data lies not only in its single-shot multispectral character but also in the application of the Raman line for correction or calibration of the spatial variation of the laser penetration depth without the need for in situ water attenuation measurements. The entire laser-induced fluorescence and Raman scatter emissions resulting from each separate 532-nm 10-nsec laser pulse are collected and spectrally dispersed in a diffraction grating spectrometer having forty photomultiplier tube detectors. Results from field experiments conducted in the North Sea and the Chesapeake Bay/Potomac River are presented. Difficulties involving the multispectral resolution of the induced emissions are addressed, and feasible solutions are suggested together with new instrument configurations and future research directions.

  3. Quantitative characterization of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor flowfield using unified, laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    A calibrated, nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence (LIIF) was used to quantify the steady, compressible flowfield of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor. The combustor was configured with single and staged, transverse-air injection into a supersonic-air freestream behind a rearward-facing step. Pressure, temperature, two-velocity components, and injectant mole fraction were measured with high spatial resolution in the three-dimensional flowfields. These experimental results provide a benchmark set of data for validation of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes being developed to model supersonic combustor flowfields.

  4. Molecular-level mechanisms of nanoparticle detachment in laser-induced plasma shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Dong; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2006-04-24

    Detachment and detachment mechanisms of nanoparticles from flat surfaces subjected to shock waves are investigated by employing molecular gas dynamic simulations using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method and experimental transient pressure data. Two mechanisms for nanoparticle detachment based on rolling moment resistance of the adhesion bond and the elastic restitution effect are introduced. As a result of present simulations, it is computationally demonstrated that the pulsed laser-induced shock waves can generate sufficient rolling moments to detach sub-100-nm particles and initiate removal. The transient moment exerted on a 60 nm polystyrene latex particle on a silicon substrate is presented and discussed.

  5. Laser-Induced Distortions and Disturbance Propagation of Delocalized Electronic States in Monatomic Carbon Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gong-Xian; Gong, Xiu-Fang

    2012-06-01

    Tight-binding electron-ion dynamics of carbon chains pumped by intense laser pulses are performed to study the interactions between monatomic carbon chains and lasers. Laser-induced distortions of carbon chains, which are enhanced by a long wavelength laser, are investigated. The carbon chains with a strong laser beam focused on one terminal are simulated to study the disturbance of electronic states. By the superposition of delocalized ? band states, the disturbance propagates from the illuminated area to the non-illuminated area in a velocity of about 106 m/s at 0 K, and this velocity is weakened at room temperature due to the localization effect of thermal fluctuation.

  6. Degenerate two-wave mixing via a dynamic grating in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, E Yu; Litvinov, Rudol'f V; Khat'kov, N D; Zagrebin, L V; Shestov, S S

    2009-05-31

    Optical-gradient-force-induced spatially inhomogeneous disturbances of the dielectric permittivity of a suspension of spherical nanoparticles are analysed in the Maxwell Garnett approximation. Degenerate two-wave mixing in such media is shown to cause the formation of a spatial nanoparticle grating and the associated permittivity grating in the colloid. Relations are derived for the complex coupling constant of the waves. Codirectional and contradirectional two-wave mixing in suspensions of light-absorbing nanoparticles is considered. The two-beam coupling gain at 640 nm in various suspensions of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles may reach {approx}10 cm{sup -1}. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  7. In Search of Multi-Peaked Reflective Spectrum with Optic Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor for Dynamic Strain Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Hsiang

    2006-01-01

    In a typical optic fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain measurement, unless in an ideal static laboratory environment, the presence of vibration or often disturbance always exists, which often creates spurious multiple peaks in the reflected spectrum, resulting in a non-unique determination of strain value. In this report we attempt to investigate the origin of this phenomenon by physical arguments and simple numerical simulation. We postulate that the fiber gratings execute small amplitude transverse vibrations changing the optical path in which the reflected light traverses slightly and non-uniformly. Ultimately, this causes the multi-peak reflected spectrum.

  8. Hydraulic Capacity of an ADA Compliant Street Drain Grate

    SciTech Connect

    Lottes, Steven A.; Bojanowski, Cezary

    2015-09-01

    Resurfacing of urban roads with concurrent repairs and replacement of sections of curb and sidewalk may require pedestrian ramps that are compliant with the American Disabilities Act (ADA), and when street drains are in close proximity to the walkway, ADA compliant street grates may also be required. The Minnesota Department of Transportation ADA Operations Unit identified a foundry with an available grate that meets ADA requirements. Argonne National Laboratory’s Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center used full scale three dimensional computational fluid dynamics to determine the performance of the ADA compliant grate and compared it to that of a standard vane grate. Analysis of a parametric set of cases was carried out, including variation in longitudinal, gutter, and cross street slopes and the water spread from the curb. The performance of the grates was characterized by the fraction of the total volume flow approaching the grate from the upstream that was captured by the grate and diverted into the catch basin. The fraction of the total flow entering over the grate from the side and the fraction of flow directly over a grate diverted into the catch basin were also quantities of interest that aid in understanding the differences in performance of the grates. The ADA compliant grate performance lagged that of the vane grate, increasingly so as upstream Reynolds number increased. The major factor leading to the performance difference between the two grates was the fraction of flow directly over the grates that is captured by the grates.

  9. Dynamic bending rigidity of a 200-bp DNA in 4 mM ionic strength: a transient polarization grating study.

    PubMed Central

    Naimushin, A N; Fujimoto, B S; Schurr, J M

    2000-01-01

    DNA may exhibit three different kinds of bends: 1) permanent bends; 2) slowly relaxing bends due to fluctuations in a prevailing equilibrium between differently curved secondary conformations; and 3) rapidly relaxing dynamic bends within a single potential-of-mean-force basin. The dynamic bending rigidity (kappa(d)), or equivalently the dynamic persistence length, P(d) = kappa(d)/k(B)T, governs the rapidly relaxing bends, which are responsible for the flexural dynamics of DNA on a short time scale, t < or = 10(-5) s. However, all three kinds of bends contribute to the total equilibrium persistence length, P(tot), according to 1/P(tot) congruent with 1/P(pb) + 1/P(sr) + 1/P(d), where P(pb) is the contribution of the permanent bends and P(sr) is the contribution of the slowly relaxing bends. Both P(d) and P(tot) are determined for the same 200-bp DNA in 4 mM ionic strength by measuring its optical anisotropy, r(t), from 0 to 10 micros. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization anisotropy (FPA) measurements yield r(t) for DNA/ethidium complexes (1 dye/200 bp) from 0 to 120 ns. A new transient polarization grating (TPG) experiment provides r(t) for DNA/methylene blue complexes (1 dye/100 bp) over a much longer time span, from 20 ns to 10 micros. Accurate data in the very tail of the decay enable a model-independent determination of the relaxation time (tau(R)) of the end-over-end tumbling motion, from which P(tot) = 500 A is estimated. The FPA data are used to obtain the best-fit pairs of P(d) and torsion elastic constant (alpha) values that fit those data equally well, and which are used to eliminate alpha as an independent variable. When the relevant theory is fitted to the entire TPG signal (S(t)), the end-over-end rotational diffusion coefficient is fixed at its measured value and alpha is eliminated in favor of P(d). Neither a true minimum in chi-squared nor a satisfactory fit could be obtained for P(d) anywhere in the range 500-5000 A, unless an adjustable amplitude of azimuthal wobble of the methylene blue was admitted. In that case, a well-defined global minimum and a reasonably good fit emerged at P(d) = 2000 A and (1/2) = 25 degrees. The discrimination against P(d) values <1600 A is very great. By combining the values, P(tot) = 500 A and P(d) = 2000 A with a literature estimate, P(pb) = 1370 A, a value P(sr) = 1300 A is estimated for the contribution of slowly relaxing bends. This value is analyzed in terms of a simple model in which the DNA is divided up into domains containing m bp, each of which experiences an all-or-none equilibrium between a straight and a uniformly curved conformation. With an appropriate estimate of the average bend angle per basepair of the curved conformation, a lower bound estimate, m = 55 bp, is obtained for the domain size of the coherently bent state. Previous measurements suggest that this coherent bend is not directional, or phase-locked, to the azimuthal orientation of the filament. PMID:10692335

  10. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  11. Ultrafast laser-induced structural changes in anisotropic solids

    E-print Network

    von der Linde, D.

    microscopy has been used to study laser- induced structural changes in graphite and tellurium. In both of fast structural changes in laser-excited graphite and tellurium exploiting the optical anisotropy of the anisotropic optical properties of single crystalline graphite and tellurium after excitation with single 100

  12. Laser induced electron acceleration in vacuum K. P. Singha)

    E-print Network

    Singh, Kunwar Pal

    Laser induced electron acceleration in vacuum K. P. Singha) Department of Physics, Indian Institute acceleration by a plane polarized laser wave has been studied in vacuum. Relativistic equations of motion have been solved exactly for electron trajectory and energy as a function of laser intensity, phase

  13. Plasma erosion rate diagnostics using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, C. J.; Turley, R. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    An optical technique for measuring the sputtering rate of a molybdenum surface immersed in a xenon plasma has been developed and demonstrated. This approach, which may be useful in real-time wear diagnostics for ion thrusters, relies on laser-induced fluorescence to determine the density of sputtered molybdenum atoms.

  14. Laser-Induced Fano Resonance Scattering in Silicon Nanowires

    E-print Network

    Xiong, Qihua

    Laser-Induced Fano Resonance Scattering in Silicon Nanowires R. Gupta,*, Q. Xiong,, C. K. Adu, U. J spectrum of small-diameter (5-15 nm) silicon nanowires. At low power densities, a Lorentzian line such as nanowire field-effect transistors,1 lasers,2 light-emitting diodes,3 chemical sensors,4 and logic gate

  15. Laser-induced copper deposition with weak reducing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemirovsky, V. A.; Fateev, S. A.; Logunov, L. S.; Tumkin, I. I.; Safonov, S. V.; Khairullina, E. M.

    2013-11-01

    The study showed that organic alcohols with 1,2,3,5,6 hydroxyl groups can be used as reducing agents for laser-induced copper deposition from solutions (LCLD).Multiatomic alcohols, sorbitol, xylitol, and glycerol, are shown to be effective reducing agents for performing LCLD at glass-ceramic surfaces. High-conductivity copper tracks with good topology were synthesized.

  16. Using Laser-Induced Incandescence To Measure Soot in Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.; Sankar, Subramanian V.

    2005-01-01

    An instrumentation system exploits laser-induced incandescence (LII) to measure the concentration of soot particles in an exhaust stream from an engine, furnace, or industrial process that burns hydrocarbon fuel. In comparison with LII soot-concentration-measuring systems, this system is more complex and more capable.

  17. Dynamic Bending Rigidity of a 200-bp DNA in 4 mM Ionic Strength: A Transient Polarization Grating Study

    E-print Network

    Schurr, J. Michael

    anywhere in the range 500­5000 Å, unless an adjustable amplitude of azimuthal wobble of the methylene blue) from 0 to 120 ns. A new transient polarization grating (TPG) experiment provides r(t) for DNA/methylene blue complexes (1 dye/100 bp) over a much longer time span, from 20 ns to 10 s. Accurate data

  18. Near-field optical properties of multilayer ridge metal/multilayer-dielectric gratings for pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guana, Heyuan; Huang, Chenze; Chen, Zhe; Jin, Yunxia; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2015-07-01

    The multilayer ridge metal/multilayer-dielectric gratings (MMDGs) for pulse compressors show high efficiency, broad bandwidths, large fabrication tolerances and high laser-induced damage thresholds. The diffraction efficiency, bandwidth, and near-field distribution of the multilayer structure ridge MMDG are theoretically investigated. Simulation results show that the film structure of the grating ridge has a great influence on the bandwidth and near-field distribution. The maximum electric field is located in the high-index layer of the grating ridge with high -1st diffraction efficiency. As the thickness of the high-index layer decreases, the maximum electric field moves to the low-index layer of the grating ridge with. Base on the results, the sandwich ridge MMDG is an ideal pulse compression grating for chirped pulse amplification systems.

  19. Investigating the role of superdiffusive currents in laser induced demagnetization of ferromagnets with nanoscale magnetic domains

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, N.; Malinowski, G.; Mauchain, J.; Hehn, M.; Vodungbo, B.; Lüning, J.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Thiaville, A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the loss of magnetic order and the microscopic mechanisms involved in laser induced magnetization dynamics is one of the most challenging topics in today's magnetism research. While scattering between spins, phonons, magnons and electrons have been proposed as sources for dissipation of spin angular momentum, ultrafast spin dependent transport of hot electrons has been pointed out as a potential candidate to explain ultrafast demagnetization without resorting to any spin dissipation channel. Here we use time resolved magneto-optical Kerr measurements to extract the influence of spin dependent transport on the demagnetization dynamics taking place in magnetic samples with alternating domains with opposite magnetization directions. We unambiguously show that whatever the sample magnetic configuration, the demagnetization takes place during the same time, demonstrating that hot electrons spin dependent transfer between neighboring domains does not alter the ultrafast magnetization dynamics in our systems with perpendicular anisotropy and 140?nm domain sizes. PMID:24722395

  20. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1990-01-01

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages.

  1. Laser induced ponderomotive convection in water

    E-print Network

    Shneider, M N

    2015-01-01

    A new mechanism for inducing convection during IR laser interaction with water or any absorbing polar liquid is described theoretically. The numerical simulations performed using the developed model show that the ponderomotive force produces water flow in the direction of the laser beam propagation. In the later stage of interaction, when water temperature rises, the Archimedes force becomes first comparable and then dominant producing convection directed against the vector of gravitational acceleration (upward). The theoretical estimates and the numerical simulations predict fluid dynamics that is similar to the observed in the previous experiments.

  2. Laser Induced Aluminum Surface Breakdown Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Sijun; Wang, Ten-See (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Laser powered propulsion systems involve complex fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer processes. Based on an unstructured grid, pressure-based computational aerothermodynamics; platform, several sub-models describing such underlying physics as laser ray tracing and focusing, thermal non-equilibrium, plasma radiation and air spark ignition have been developed. This proposed work shall extend the numerical platform and existing sub-models to include the aluminum wall surface Inverse Bremsstrahlung (IB) effect from which surface ablation and free-electron generation can be initiated without relying on the air spark ignition sub-model. The following tasks will be performed to accomplish the research objectives.

  3. Laser-induced incandescence calibration via gravimetric sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, M. Y.; Vander Wal, R. L.; Zhou, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Absolute calibration of laser-induced incandescence (LII) is demonstrated via comparison of LII signal intensities with gravimetrically determined soot volume fractions. This calibration technique does not rely upon calculated or measured optical characteristics of soot. The variation of the LII signal with gravimetrically measured soot volume fractions ranging from 0.078 to 1.1 ppm established the linearly of the calibration. With the high spatial and temporal resolution capabilities of laser-induced incandescence (LII), the spatial and temporal fluctuations of the soot field within a gravimetric chimney were characterized. Radial uniformity of the soot volume fraction, f(sub v) was demonstrated with sufficient averaging of the single laser-shot LII images of the soot field thus confirming the validity of the calibration method for imaging applications. As illustration, instantaneous soot volume fractions within a Re = 5000 ethylene/air diffusion flame measured via planar LII were established quantitatively with this calibration.

  4. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  5. Laser induced trapping of excitons in coupled quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammack, A. T.; Griswold, M.; Butov, L. V.; Ivanov, A. L.; Smallwood, L. E.; Gossard, A. C.

    2006-03-01

    Optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles plays a major role in single particle studies in physics, chemistry, and biology [1]. An exciting recent outgrowth of the technique has been the experimental implementation of atom Bose- Einstein Condensation [2,3]. In this contribution, we report proposal and demonstration of laser induced trapping for a new system - a cold gas of excitons in coupled quantum wells. We report trapping a cold gas of excitons in laser induced traps and on the formation of a highly degenerate Bose gas of excitons in the trap. [1] A. Ashkin, IEEE Journal on Selected Items in Quantum Electronics/ 6, 841 (2000). [2] E. A. Cornell, C. E. Wieman, Rev. Mod. Phys./ 74, 875 (2002). [3] W. Ketterle, Rev. Mod. Phys./ 74, 1131 (2002).

  6. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  7. Bioaerosol detection and classification using dual excitation wavelength laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Per; Wästerby, Pär.; Gradmark, Per-Åke; Hedborg, Julia; Larsson, Anders; Landström, Lars

    2015-05-01

    We present results obtained by a detection system designed to measure laser-induced fluorescence from individual aerosol particles using dual excitation wavelengths. The aerosol is sampled from ambient air and via a 1 mm diameter nozzle, surrounded by a sheath air flow, confined into a particle beam. A continuous wave blue laser at 404 nm is focused on the aerosol beam and two photomultiplier tubes monitor the presence of individual particles by simultaneous measuring the scattered light and any induced fluorescence. When a particle is present in the detection volume, a laser pulse is triggered from an ultraviolet laser at 263 nm and the corresponding fluorescence spectrum is acquired with a spectrometer based on a diffraction grating and a 32 channel photomultiplier tube array with single-photon sensitivity. The spectrometer measures the fluorescence spectra in the wavelength region from 250 to 800 nm. In the present report, data were measured on different monodisperse reference aerosols, simulants of biological warfare agents, and different interference aerosol particles, e.g. pollen. In the analysis of the experimental data, i.e., the time-resolved scattered and fluorescence signals from 404 nm c.w. light excitation and the fluorescence spectra obtained by a pulsed 263 nm laser source, we use multivariate data analysis methods to classify each individual aerosol particle.

  8. Coherent microwave radiation from a laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.

    2012-12-24

    We propose a method for generation of coherent monochromatic microwave/terahertz radiation from a laser-induced plasma. It is shown that small-scale plasma, located in the interaction region of two co-propagating plane-polarized laser beams, can be a source of the dipole radiation at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the lasers. This radiation is coherent and appears as a result of the so-called optical mixing in plasma.

  9. Excimer laser induced oxidation of ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarassy, E.; White, C.W.; Slaoui, A.; Fuchs, C.; Siffert, P.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1988-10-31

    We have investigated laser-induced oxidation of ion-implanted Si using a repetitively pulsed ArF laser, working at low-energy density (100--500 mJ/cm/sup 2/). Oxidation is observed at energy densities between the melt threshold and that required for epitaxial recrystallization of the amorphous layer. At these energy densities, oxidation is not observed on virgin silicon. The factors that influence the oxidation process are discussed.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for specimen analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Akshaya; Yu-Yueh, Fang; Burgess, Shane C.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-08-15

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus, a system and a method for detecting the presence or absence of trace elements in a biological sample using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. The trace elements are used to develop a signature profile which is analyzed directly or compared with the known profile of a standard. In one aspect of the invention, the apparatus, system and method are used to detect malignant cancer cells in vivo.

  11. Lasing effects in a laser-induced plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagli, Lev; Gaft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We have studied coherent emission from optically pumped preliminarily created laser induced plasma and demonstrate the possibility to create laser sources based on laser plasma as an active medium. The effect was studied in detail with Al plasma, and preliminary but promising results were also obtained with other atoms from the 13th and 14th groups of the periodic table. These lasers may be used as coherent light sources in a variety of optical applications.

  12. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  13. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Helps Diagnose Plasma Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Mattosian, J. N.; Gaeta, C. J.; Turley, R. S.; Williams, J. D.; Williamson, W. S.

    1994-01-01

    Technique developed to provide in situ monitoring of rates of ion sputter erosion of accelerator electrodes in ion thrusters also used for ground-based applications to monitor, calibrate, and otherwise diagnose plasma processes in fabrication of electronic and optical devices. Involves use of laser-induced-fluorescence measurements, which provide information on rates of ion etching, inferred rates of sputter deposition, and concentrations of contaminants.

  14. Correlation between grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shunchun; Dong, Meirong; Lu, Jidong; Li, Jun; Dong, Xuan

    2013-12-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) which is used traditionally as a spectrochemical analytical technique was employed to analyze the grade of pearlite spheroidization. Three 12Cr1MoV steel specimens with different grades of pearlite spheroidization were ablated to produce plasma by pulse laser at 266 nm. In order to determine the optimal temporal condition and plasma parameters for correlating the grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra, a set of spectra at different delays were analyzed by the principal component analysis method. Then, the relationship between plasma temperature, intensity ratios of ionic to atomic lines and grade of pearlite spheroidization was studied. The analysis results show that the laser induced spectra of different grades of pearlite spheroidization can be readily identifiable by principal component analysis in the range of 271.941-289.672 nm with 1000 ns delay time. It is also found that a good agreement exists between the Fe ionic to atomic line ratios and the tensile strength, whereas there is no obvious difference in the plasma temperature. Therefore, LIBS may be applied not only as a spectrochemical analytical technique but also as a new way to estimate the grade of pearlite spheroidization.

  15. Wavelength dependence of femtosecond laser-induced damage threshold of optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gallais, L. Douti, D.-B.; Commandré, M.; Batavi?i?t?, G.; Pupka, E.; Š?iuka, M.; Smalakys, L.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Melninkaitis, A.

    2015-06-14

    An experimental and numerical study of the laser-induced damage of the surface of optical material in the femtosecond regime is presented. The objective of this work is to investigate the different processes involved as a function of the ratio of photon to bandgap energies and compare the results to models based on nonlinear ionization processes. Experimentally, the laser-induced damage threshold of optical materials has been studied in a range of wavelengths from 1030?nm (1.2?eV) to 310?nm (4?eV) with pulse durations of 100 fs with the use of an optical parametric amplifier system. Semi-conductors and dielectrics materials, in bulk or thin film forms, in a range of bandgap from 1 to 10?eV have been tested in order to investigate the scaling of the femtosecond laser damage threshold with the bandgap and photon energy. A model based on the Keldysh photo-ionization theory and the description of impact ionization by a multiple-rate-equation system is used to explain the dependence of laser-breakdown with the photon energy. The calculated damage fluence threshold is found to be consistent with experimental results. From these results, the relative importance of the ionization processes can be derived depending on material properties and irradiation conditions. Moreover, the observed damage morphologies can be described within the framework of the model by taking into account the dynamics of energy deposition with one dimensional propagation simulations in the excited material and thermodynamical considerations.

  16. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    SciTech Connect

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M.; Strum, G.

    2012-08-15

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  17. Laser induced shock studies at RRCAT, Indore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, P. A.; Arora, V.; Bagchi, S.; Prasad, Y. B. S. R.; Barnwal, S.; Gupta, P. D.

    2012-07-01

    The knowledge of material response under shock compression is important in terms of proper understanding of the process and in view of the wide range of technological applications associated with it. At the Laser Plasma Division, RRCAT, Indore, among other things, we are also involved in studying the material response from two different perspectives. On one front, we have developed capability for acquiring Equation of State (EOS) of materials using laser generated shock waves with long pulse lasers (>200 ps). On the other front, we have started shock experiments on single crystals using time resolved x-ray diffraction technique, using ultra-short pulse lasers (< 1 ps). In these initial experiments, characteristic sub-picosecond, high brightness K? x-ray pulses generated by Ti: sapphire femtosecond laser produced plasmas of different target materials (Ti, Fe, and Cu) were used to probe the effect of compression generated by moderately intense (GW/cm2) sub-nanosecond laser (200 ps) pulse irradiation on the crystal surface. The dynamics of the shock propagation is manifested in terms of the temporal evolution of the rocking curve of shocked sample. The shock velocity deduced from these measurements is 12 km/s, consistent with the predicted velocities and probe depth. The observed maximum compression is 0.4 % which corresponds to a pressure of 0.8 GPa.

  18. Dynamical studies of the mechanisms for optical nonlinearities of methyl-red dye doped blue phase liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Khoo, Iam Choon

    2015-08-24

    Dynamical grating diffraction experiments and reflection/transmission polarization spectroscopy have been conducted on azo-dye doped Blue-Phase Liquid Crystal (BPLC) to investigate the mechanisms responsible for laser induced refractive index changes. The underlying mechanisms for the transient grating diffraction components are attributed to thermal indexing and lattice distortion, whereas the persistent component is due to lattice distortion/expansion caused by laser excited dye molecule isomerization. These mechanisms were distinguishable by their response dynamics and gave rise to the observed reflection spectra and photonic bandgap shift, polarization dependency and optical activity. Some preliminary studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using these mechanisms for coherent holographic and direct image writing operations. PMID:26368144

  19. A wide dynamics and fast scan interrogating method for a fiber Bragg grating sensor network implemented using code division multiple access.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngbok; Jeon, Sie-Wook; Kwon, Won-Bae; Park, Chang-Soo

    2012-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor network employing the code division multiple access (CDMA) technique to identify information from individual sensors. To detect information without considering time delays between sensors, a sliding correlation method is applied, in which two different signals with the same pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) pattern, but slightly different frequencies, are applied to the source and detector sides. Moreover, for time domain detection, a wavelength-to-time conversion technique using a wavelength dispersive medium is introduced. The experimental results show that the proposed sensor network has a wide strain dynamic range of 2,400 ?? and a low crosstalk of 950:1. PMID:22778619

  20. Two-dimensional fluorescence-detected coherent spectroscopy with absolute phasing by confocal imaging of a dynamic grating and 27-step phase-cycling.

    PubMed

    De, Arijit K; Monahan, Daniele; Dawlaty, Jahan M; Fleming, Graham R

    2014-05-21

    We present a novel experimental scheme for two-dimensional fluorescence-detected coherent spectroscopy (2D-FDCS) using a non-collinear beam geometry with the aid of "confocal imaging" of dynamic (population) grating and 27-step phase-cycling to extract the signal. This arrangement obviates the need for distinct experimental designs for previously developed transmission detected non-collinear two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy (2D-CS) and collinear 2D-FDCS. We also describe a novel method for absolute phasing of the 2D spectrum. We apply this method to record 2D spectra of a fluorescent dye in solution at room temperature and observe "spectral diffusion." PMID:24852531

  1. Fiber-bragg grating-loop ringdown method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Chuji (Starkville, MS)

    2008-01-29

    A device comprising a fiber grating loop ringdown (FGLRD) system of analysis is disclosed. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) or Long-Period grating (LPG) written in a section of single mode fused silica fiber is incorporated into a fiber loop. By utilizing the wing areas of the gratings' bandwidth as a wavelength dependent attenuator of the light transmission, a fiber grating loop ringdown concept is formed. One aspect of the present invention is temperature sensing, which has been demonstrated using the disclosed device. Temperature measurements in the areas of accuracy, stability, high temperature, and dynamic range are also described.

  2. Renewable liquid reflection grating

    DOEpatents

    Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Toor, Arthur

    2003-10-07

    A renewable liquid reflection grating. Electrodes are operatively connected to a conducting liquid in an arrangement that produces a reflection grating and driven by a current with a resonance frequency. In another embodiment, the electrodes create the grating by a resonant electrostatic force acting on a dielectric liquid.

  3. Catwalk grate lifting tool

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, Larry W. (615 Sandpit Rd., Leesville, SC 29070)

    1992-01-01

    A device for lifting catwalk grates comprising an elongated bent member with a handle at one end and a pair of notched braces and a hook at the opposite end that act in conjunction with each other to lock onto the grate and give mechanical advantage in lifting the grate.

  4. Catwalk grate lifting tool

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, L.W.

    1992-08-11

    A device is described for lifting catwalk grates comprising an elongated bent member with a handle at one end and a pair of notched braces and a hook at the opposite end that act in conjunction with each other to lock onto the grate and give mechanical advantage in lifting the grate. 10 figs.

  5. Enhancement of airborne shock wave by laser-induced breakdown of liquid column in laser shock cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Deoksuk; Kim, Dongsik; Park, Jin-Goo

    2011-04-01

    In laser shock cleaning (LSC), the shock wave is generated by laser-induced breakdown of the ambient gas. The shock wave intensity has thus been a factor limiting the performance of the LSC process. In this work, a novel method of amplifying a laser-induced plasma-generated shock wave by the breakdown of a liquid column is proposed and analyzed. When the laser beam is focused on a microscale liquid column, a shock wave having a significantly amplified intensity compared to that generated by air breakdown alone can be generated in air. Therefore, substantially amplified cleaning force can be obtained. The dynamics of a shock wave induced by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was analyzed by laser flash shadowgraphy. The peak pressure of the laser-induced shock wave was approximately two times greater than that of air breakdown at the same laser fluence. The proposed method of shock wave generation is expected to be useful in various applications of laser shock processing, including surface cleaning.

  6. Simulation and characterization of laser induced deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yajun

    2006-04-01

    Laser induced deformation processes include laser forming (LF) and laser shock processing. LF is a recently developed and highly flexible thermal forming technique, and laser shock processing is an innovative mechanical process in which shock waves up to 10GPa are generated by a confined laser ablation process. The generated high pressure imparts beneficial residual stress into the surface layer of metal parts as well as shapes thin metal parts. In laser forming, it has been known that microstructural evolution has an important effect on the deformation process, and that the typical thermal cycles in laser forming are much steeper than those in other thermal mechanical processes like welding and hot rolling. In this study, microstructural evolution in laser forming has been investigated, and a thermal-microstructural-mechanical model is developed to predict microstructural changes (phase transformations and recrystallization) and their effects on flow behavior and deformation. Grain structure and phase transformation in heat affected zone (HAZ) is experimentally characterized, and measurement of bending curvature also helps to validate the proposed model. Based on the similar methodology, two different materials have been studied: AISI 1010 low carbon steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. In the case of Ti-6A1-4V alloy, the initial phase ratio of Ti-alpha and Ti-beta need to be measured by X-ray diffraction. In laser shock processing, under shock loading solid material behavior is fluidlike and shock-solid interactions play a key role in determining the induced residual stress distributions and the final deformed shape. In this work shock-solid interactions under high pressure and thus high strain rate in laser shock processing are studied and simulated based on conservation's law, equation of state and elastoplasticity of material. A series of carefully controlled experiments, including spatially resolved residual stress measurement by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and measurement of local & global bending curvatures, is conducted to validate the model. Based on numerical results, the attenuation and shock velocity variation of shock wave in laser shock processing are further analyzed. In addition, based on the well validated shock wave propagation model, opposing dual sided laser shock peening has also been investigated. In opposing dual sided LSP, the workpiece can be simultaneously irradiated or irradiated with different time lags to create different surface residual stress patterns by virtue of the interaction between the opposing shock waves. In order to better understand the wave-wave interactions under different conditions, the residual stress profiles corresponding to various workpiece thicknesses and various irradiation times were evaluated. The dynamics and anisotropy in micro scale laser peen forming of single crystal Al has been also studied based on meso scale crystal plasticity integrated with consideration of dynamics and pressure dependent crystal elastic moduli.

  7. Quantitative measurement of transverse injector and free stream interaction in a nonreacting SCRAMJET combustor using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary quantitative study of the compressible flowfield in a steady, nonreacting model SCRAMJET combustor using laser-induced iodine fluorescence (LIIF) is reported. Measurements of density, temperature, and velocity were conducted with the calibrated, nonintrusive, optical technique for two different combustor operating conditions. First, measurements were made in the supersonic flow over a rearward-facing step without transverse injection for comparison with calculated pressure profiles. The second configuration was staged injection behind the rearward-facing step at an injection dynamic pressure ratio of 1.06. These experimental results will be used to validate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes being developed to model supersonic combustor flowfields.

  8. Dynamics of femtosecond laser induced voidlike structures in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Mermillod-Blondin, A.; Bonse, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Hertel, I. V.; Meshcheryakov, Yu. P.; Bulgakova, N. M.; Audouard, E.; Stoian, R.

    2009-01-26

    Focused ultrafast laser irradiation of fused silica usually induces a spatially modulated refractive index variation in the bulk material. Strong energy concentration leads to the localized formation of a lower-density cavitylike depressed structure surrounded by compacted matter. We report on applying time-resolved phase contrast microscopy to investigate the timescale of the void formation. We indicate a temporal behavior consistent with shock wave generation and subsequent rarefaction.

  9. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA); Nguyen, Hoang T. (Livermore, CA); Boyd, Robert (Livermore, CA); Shore, Bruce W. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  10. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  11. Q-Switched Alexandrite Laser-induced Chrysiasis

    PubMed Central

    Victor Ross, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chyriasis is an uncommon side effect that occurs in patients who are receiving prolonged treatment with either intravenous or intramuscular gold as a distinctive blue-gray pigmentation of light-exposed skin. Laser-induced chrysiasis is a rarely described phenomenon in individuals who have received systemic gold and are subsequently treated with a Q-switched laser. Purpose: To describe the characteristics of patients with laser-induced chrysiasis. Methods: The authors describe a 60-year-old woman who developed chrysiasis at Q-switched alexandrite laser treatment sites. They also reviewed the medical literature using PubMed, searching the terms chrysiasis, gold, and laser-induced. Patient reports and previous reviews of these subjects were critically assessed and the salient features are presented. Results: Including the authors’ patient, laser-induced chrysiasis has been described in five Caucasian arthritis patients (4 women and 1 man); most of the patients had received more than 8g of systemic gold therapy during a period of 3 to 13 years. Gold therapy was still occurring or had been discontinued as long as 26 years prior to laser treatment. All of the patients immediately developed blue macules at the Q-switched laser treatment site. Resolution of the dyschromia occurred in a 70-year-old woman after two treatment sessions with a long-pulsed ruby laser and the authors’ patient after a sequential series of laser sessions using a long-pulsed alexandrite laser, followed by a nonablative fractional laser and an ablative carbon dioxide laser. Conclusion: Laser-induced chrysiasis has been observed following treatment with Q-switched lasers in patients who are receiving or have previously been treated with systemic gold. It can occur decades after treatment with gold has been discontinued. Therefore, inquiry regarding a prior history of treatment with gold—particularly in older patients with arthritis—should be considered prior to treatment with a Q-switched laser. Also, treatment with a long-pulsed laser should be entertained in patients with either idiopathic or laser-induced chrysiasis. (JClinAesthetDermatol. 2015;8(9):48-53.) Chrysiasis is a distinctive blue-gray pigmentation of light exposed skin occurring in individuals who are receiving parenteral gold therapy.1 The 755nm Q-switched alexandrite laser is effective for the treatment of facial lentigines since the melanin granules absorb a high proportion of the laser energy and other chromophores offer little competitive absorption.2 The authors describe a woman who developed chrysiasis at Q-switched alexandrite laser treatment sites and whose dyschromia was successfully treated with a sequential series of laser sessions using a long-pulsed alexandrite laser, followed by a nonablative fractional laser and an ablative carbon dioxide laser. PMID:26430491

  12. Laser induced fluorescence in a pulsed argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, Earl; Biloiu, Costel; Compton, Christopher; Doss, Forrest; Venture, Daniel; Heard, John; Choueiri, Edgar; Spektor, Rostislav

    2005-02-01

    A time-resolved laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for pulsed argon plasmas is described. A low power, tunable diode laser pumps a three level Ar II transition sequence at a wavelength of 668.6138 nm. With a standard LIF system designed for steady-state plasmas (e.g., 4 kHz optical chopper, 20 kHz band-width detector, and a lock-in amplifier), we demonstrate that the evolution of the ion velocity distribution can be resolved with a time resolution of 1 ms through a combination of time-series averaging and post-acquisition digital signal processing.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence detection using a Fizeau interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R. L.; Smith, Eric H.; Mudge, Jason; Benson, Larry

    2005-08-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used for decades to classify and identify a variety of materials. The traditional fluorescence detection method involves the use of narrow band filters or a spectrometer combined with a telescope. We propose using a multi-aperture telescope operated in Fizeau imaging mode for the projection of a pump wavelength and the collection of the fluorescence photons. The phased array is operated such that the array is optically phased for the pump wavelength and de-phased at the fluorescent wavelength thereby spatially distributing the two wavelengths in the image plane. This allows single shot identification of fluorescent modes.

  14. Interaction of laser-induced stress waves with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, A. H.; Fairand, B. P.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of high intensity laser induced stress waves on the hardness and tensile strength of 2024 and 7075 aluminum and on the fatigue properties of 7075 aluminum were investigated. Laser shocking increases the hardness of the underaged 2024-T351 but has little or no effect on the peak aged 2024-T351 and 7075-T651 or the overaged 7075-T73. The fretting fatigue life of fastener joints of 7075-T6 was increased by orders of magnitude by laser shocking the region around the fastener hole; the fatigue crack propagation rates were decreased by laser shocking.

  15. Optimization of confocal laser induced fluorescence in a plasma.

    PubMed

    VanDervort, R; Elliott, D; McCarren, D; McKee, J; Soderholm, M; Sears, S; Scime, E

    2014-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature, and density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, a LIF measurement requires two ports on a plasma device; one for laser injection and one for emission collection. Proper alignment of LIF optics is time consuming and sensitive to mechanical vibration. We describe a confocal configuration for LIF that requires a single port and requires no alignment. The measurement location is scanned radially by physically moving the entire optical structure. Confocal LIF measurements are compared to traditional LIF measurements over the same radial range. PMID:25430315

  16. Optimization of confocal laser induced fluorescence in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanDervort, R.; Elliott, D.; McCarren, D.; McKee, J.; Soderholm, M.; Sears, S.; Scime, E.

    2014-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature, and density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, a LIF measurement requires two ports on a plasma device; one for laser injection and one for emission collection. Proper alignment of LIF optics is time consuming and sensitive to mechanical vibration. We describe a confocal configuration for LIF that requires a single port and requires no alignment. The measurement location is scanned radially by physically moving the entire optical structure. Confocal LIF measurements are compared to traditional LIF measurements over the same radial range.

  17. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  18. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  19. Laser-Induced Nuclear Orientation of 1-?s 85Rbm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimkaveg, G.; Quivers, W. W., Jr.; Dasari, R. R.; Holbrow, C. H.; Pappas, P. G.; Attili, M. A.; Thomas, J. E.; Murnick, D. E.; Feld, M. S.

    1984-12-01

    Frequency-resolved laser-induced gamma-ray anisotropy has been achieved and used to measure the D1 hyperfine structure of the 1-?s isomer 85Rbm. The magnetic dipole moment obtained is (6.046+/-0.010)?N and the isomer shift relative to 85Rb is -52+/-9 MHz. The experiment was performed with a sealed cell containing radioactive 85Kr (3 mCi) and natural Rb(~ 10 mTorr). This method is simple and convenient and promises to be of wide usefulness.

  20. A phenomenological theory of nonphotochemical laser induced nucleation.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Marco; Karpov, Victor G

    2012-10-21

    We present a theory of electric field driven phase transitions that occur via nucleation of needle-shaped, metallic particles. The predictions of this theory have much in common with the observations related to nonphotochemical laser induced nucleation (NPLIN). That connection is rather paradoxical because the final NPLIN products are dielectric crystals. By elaborating on the unique features of field induced transitions and the complexities of liquid systems, we discuss how our theory may provide some insight into the open question of the NPLIN mechanism. A qualitative description of the post nucleation stage and conjectures about the microscopic nature of the metallic particles in liquids are also provided. PMID:22955565

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of alcohols and protein solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Melikechi, N.; Ding, H.; Marcano, O. A.; Rock, S.

    2008-04-15

    We report on the use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the study of organic samples that exhibit similar elemental composition. We evaluate the method for its potential application for the measurement of small spectroscopic differences between samples such as alcohols and water solution of proteins. We measure differences in the relative amplitudes of the oxygen peaks for alcohols and find that these correlate with the relative amount of oxygen atoms within the molecule. We also show that the spectra of proteins reveal differences that can be used for their detection and identification.

  2. Remote sensing of phytoplankton using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Babichenko, S.; Poryvkina, L.; Arikese, V. ); Kaitala, S. ); Kuosa, H. )

    1993-06-01

    The results of remote laser sensing of brackish-water phytoplankton on board a research vessel are presented. Field data of laser-induced fluorescence of phytoplankton obtained during the several cruises in the mouth of tile Gulf of Finland are compared with the results of standard chlorophyll a analysis of water samples and phytoplankton species determination by microscopy. The approach of fluorescence excitation by tunable laser radiation is applied to study the spatial distribution of a natural phytoplankton community. The remote analysis of the pigment composition of a phytoplankton community using the method of selective pigment excitation is described. The possibility of elaborating methods of quantitative laser remote biomonitoring is discussed.

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the Hg3 excimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niefer, R. J.; Supronowicz, J.; Atkinson, J. B.; Krause, L.

    1986-09-01

    The first observation of a laser-induced fluorescence band, excited by absorption from a low-lying state of the Hg3 excimer using a 'pump-and-probe' method, is reported. A study of the fluorescence intensity as a function of the time separation between the 'pump' and 'probe' laser pulses provides clear evidence for the presence of both Hg3 and Hg2 molecules in the laser-excited mercury vapor. The fluorescence may be due to trimer emission or to dimer emission following dissociation of a trimer state.

  4. Search for Laser-Induced Formation of Antihydrogen Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Ejsing, A. M.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.

    2006-11-24

    Antihydrogen can be synthesized by mixing antiprotons and positrons in a Penning trap environment. Here an experiment to stimulate the formation of antihydrogen in the n=11 quantum state by the introduction of light from a CO{sub 2} continuous wave laser is described. An overall upper limit of 0.8% with 90% C.L. on the laser-induced enhancement of the recombination has been found. This result strongly suggests that radiative recombination contributes negligibly to the antihydrogen formed in the experimental conditions used by the ATHENA Collaboration.

  5. Experimental investigation of a supersonic swept ramp injector using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1990-01-01

    Planar measurements of injectant mole fraction and temperature have been conducted in a nonreacting supersonic combustor configured with underexpanded injection in the base of a swept ramp. The temperature measurements were conducted with a Mach 2 test section inlet in streamwise planes perpendicular to the test section wall on which the ramp was mounted. Injection concentration measurements, conducted in cross flow planes with both Mach 2 and Mach 2.9 free stream conditions, dramatically illustrate the domination of the mixing process by streamwise vorticity generated by the ramp. These measurements, conducted using a nonintrusive optical technique (laser-induced iodine fluorescence), provide an accurate and extensive experimental data base for the validation of computation fluid dynamic codes for the calculation of highly three-dimensional supersonic combustor flow fields.

  6. Laser-induced shock wave can spark triboluminescence of amorphous sugars.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Seto, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Noboru

    2008-07-24

    We investigated the triboluminescence (TL) of sugars using an innovative experimental approach: the laser-induced shock wave (LISW) technique. We found that the LISW could induce very bright TL in crystalline sugars, the intensity of which was shown to be 10(5) times higher than that obtained by conventional manual hand rubbing. We also applied the LISW technique to amorphous sugar samples. Although it was supposed that TL could not be excited in amorphous solids of sugars having isotropic structures, we revealed that LISW could induce bright TL in amorphous sugars similar to that induced in crystalline sugars. On the basis of the experimental results showing the dynamic behavior of the sample fracture combined with those of the TL, we discuss these novel TL mechanisms in sugars. We believe that the shock wave technique opens a new channel for investigating the nature of TL. PMID:18582023

  7. Trapping and manipulation of microparticles using laser-induced convection currents and photophoresis.

    PubMed

    Flores-Flores, E; Torres-Hurtado, S A; Páez, R; Ruiz, U; Beltrán-Pérez, G; Neale, S L; Ramirez-San-Juan, J C; Ramos-García, R

    2015-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate optical trapping and manipulation of microparticles suspended in water due to laser-induced convection currents. Convection currents are generated due to laser light absorption in an hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a:Si-H) thin film. The particles are dragged towards the beam's center by the convection currents (Stokes drag force) allowing trapping with powers as low as 0.8 mW. However, for powers >3 mW trapped particles form a ring around the beam due to two competing forces: Stokes drag and thermo-photophoretic forces. Additionally, we show that dynamic beam shaping can be used to trap and manipulate multiple particles by photophotophoresis without the need of lithographically created resistive heaters. PMID:26504655

  8. Measuring the dispersion of a surface layer by breaking waves using planar laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marson, Alan E.; Schlicke, Ted; Greated, Clive A.

    2004-06-01

    Surface films can be found all over the world, from the algae blooms of the Mediterranean to oil or sewage pollution near harbours and cities. In this paper the experimental method of planar laser induced fluorescence is used to measure how breaking waves disperse these films. The method for preparing and extracting quantitative results from laboratory experiments is presented with sample results for depth, area and fractal dimension from mild spilling breakers. Two cases are examined, a single isolated breaker and an identical breaking wave occurring 32 s after an initial breaker has disturbed the film. Presented at the Rank Prize Fund Mini-Symposium on Optics in Fluid Dynamics, Meteorology and the Atmosphere, held at Grasmere, UK, on 12-15 August 2002.

  9. Spectral selective radio frequency emissions from laser induced breakdown of target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinoth Kumar, L.; Manikanta, E.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.

    2014-08-11

    The radio frequency emissions scanned over broad spectral range (30?MHz–1?GHz) from single shot nanosecond (7?ns) and picosecond (30 ps) laser induced breakdown (LIB) of different target materials (atmospheric air, aluminum, and copper) are presented. The dominant emissions from ns-LIB, compared to those from the ps-LIB, indicate the presence and importance of atomic and molecular clusters in the plasma. The dynamics of laser pulse-matter interaction and the properties of the target materials were found to play an important role in determining the plasma parameters which subsequently determine the emissions. Thus, with a particular laser and target material, the emissions were observed to be spectral selective. The radiation detection capability was observed to be relatively higher, when the polarization of the input laser and the antenna is same.

  10. Trapping and manipulation of microparticles using laser-induced convection currents and photophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Flores, E.; Torres-Hurtado, S. A.; Páez, R.; Ruiz, U.; Beltrán-Pérez, G.; Neale, S. L.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Ramos-García, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate optical trapping and manipulation of microparticles suspended in water due to laser-induced convection currents. Convection currents are generated due to laser light absorption in an hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a:Si-H) thin film. The particles are dragged towards the beam's center by the convection currents (Stokes drag force) allowing trapping with powers as low as 0.8 mW. However, for powers >3 mW trapped particles form a ring around the beam due to two competing forces: Stokes drag and thermo-photophoretic forces. Additionally, we show that dynamic beam shaping can be used to trap and manipulate multiple particles by photophotophoresis without the need of lithographically created resistive heaters. PMID:26504655

  11. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, A. A.; Shcherbina, M. E.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Kirichenko, N. A.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 1014 particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  12. Simulated characterization of soot in the flame based on laser induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yanping; Chen, Jun; Yang, Huinan; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2014-12-01

    The unburned carbon particle, formed due to incomplete combustion of fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass, raises great environmental and health problems. During the measurement of flames, a non-intrusive and in situ optical method is preferred rather than probe sampling method. Also the method with high spatial resolution and high temporal resolution is required for fast dynamic reactions such as combustion research. The technique based on laser-induced incandescence (LII) has been developed to characterize the soot particles. In this work, the simulation of LII signals have been did. In the simulation, different parameters have been applied and acquired corresponding results. The method provides theoretical results to analyze LII signals, and will eventually use in experimentation

  13. Systematic investigation of sustained laser-induced incandescence in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Zhi Han; Sow, Chorng-Haur; Lee, Andrielle; Zhu, Yanwu; Lim, Kassandra Yu Yan

    2010-03-15

    A focused laser beam irradiating on aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in moderate vacuum results in bright and sustained laser-induced incandescence (LII) in CNTs. The incandescence corresponds to blackbody radiation from laser-heated CNTs at {approx}2400 K. Post-LII craters with well-defined ring boundaries in the CNT array were observed and examined with scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The enhanced purity of CNTs after LII as indicated by Raman spectroscopy studies was attributed to the removal of amorphous carbons on the as-grown CNTs during LII. A dynamic study of the crater formation further elucidates the nature of such craters. Through a systematic study of the effect of vacuum level and gaseous environment on LII, we discovered the process of thermal runaway during LII in CNTs. Thermal runaway is a threat to a sustained LII and can be prevented in nitrogen and argon environments. Oxygen was found to be responsible for thermal runaway reactions.

  14. Investigation of laser-induced iodine fluorescence for the measurement of density in compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is an attractive nonintrusive approach for measuring molecular number density in compressible flows although this technique does not produce a signal that is directly related to the number density. Saturation and frequency detuned excitation are explored as means for minimizing the quenching effect using iodine as the molecular system because of its convenient absorption spectrum. Saturation experiments indicate that with available continuous wave laser sources of Gaussian transverse intensity distribution only partial saturation could be achieved in iodine at the pressures of interest in gas dynamics. Using a fluorescence lineshape theory, it is shown that for sufficiently large detuning of a narrow bandwidth laser from a molecular transition, the quenching can be cancelled by collisional broadening over a large range of pressures and temperatures. Experimental data obtained in a Mach 4.3 underexpanded jet of nitrogen seeded with iodine for various single mode argon laser detunings from a strong iodine transition at 5145 A are discussed.

  15. Effect of damping on the laser induced ultrafast switching in rare earth-transition metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Oniciuc, Eugen; Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Cimpoesu, Dorin; Stancu, Alexandru

    2014-06-02

    In this paper, we present simulations of thermally induced magnetic switching in ferrimagnetic systems performed with a Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch (LLB) equation for damping constant in a wide range of values. We have systematically studied the GdFeCo ferrimagnet with various concentrations of Gd and compared for some values of parameters the LLB results with atomistic simulations. The agreement is remarkably good, which shows that the dynamics described by the ferrimagnetic LLB is a reasonable approximation of this complex physical phenomenon. As an important element, we show that the LLB is able to also describe the intermediate formation of a ferromagnetic state which seems to be essential to understand laser induced ultrafast switching. The study reveals the fundamental role of damping during the switching process.

  16. Analytical application of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikechi, Noureddine; Markushin, Yuri

    2015-05-01

    We report on significant advantages provided by femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analytical applications in fields as diverse as protein characterization and material science. We compare the results of a femto- and nanosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of dual-elemental pellets in terms of the shot-to-shot variations of the neutral/ionic emission line intensities. This study is complemented by a numerical model based on two-dimensional random close packing of disks in an enclosed geometry. In addition, we show that LIBS can be used to obtain quantitative identification of the hydrogen composition of bio-macromolecules in a heavy water solution. Finally, we show that simultaneous multi-elemental particle assay analysis combined with LIBS can significantly improve macromolecule detectability up to near single molecule per particle efficiency. Research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (0630388), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NX09AU90A). Our gratitude to Dr. D. Connolly, Fox Chase Cancer Center.

  17. Ion mobility spectrometry coupled to laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Frankevich, Vladimir; Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; Barylyuk, Konstantin; Zenobi, Renato

    2013-01-01

    We report on interfacing a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to simultaneously retrieve two-dimensional information on the electrical mobility and fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions. The fact that the separation of ions within DMA takes place in space rather than in time allows for the continuous selection of ion beams within a narrow range of mobilities that are further analyzed by LIF. Combination of DMA with LIF is simple and robust. It allows one to detect fluorescence from specified ions, including clusters, which would not survive in a mass spectrometer. Complex mixtures of fluorescent compounds can be separated by the DMA and studied by LIF. LIF is a sensitive technique and useful in the study of molecular interactions. DMA with LIF detection can be used for studies of gas-phase fluorescence of small molecules such as different dyes and their conjugates. This unique instrument combination may also provide a powerful platform for probing fluorescent proteins in the gas phase, which is of great fundamental interest for better understanding of their physical and chemical properties. In the present work, we have studied the gas-phase laser-induced fluorescence of mobility-selected rhodamine 6G ions. PMID:23198857

  18. Laser-induced nucleation of carbon dioxide bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Martin R.; Jamieson, William J.; Leckey, Claire A.; Alexander, Andrew J.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed experimental study of laser-induced nucleation (LIN) of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles is presented. Water and aqueous sucrose solutions supersaturated with CO2 were exposed to single nanosecond pulses (5 ns, 532 nm, 2.4-14.5 MW cm-2) and femtosecond pulses (110 fs, 800 nm, 0.028-11 GW cm-2) of laser light. No bubbles were observed with the femtosecond pulses, even at high peak power densities (11 GW cm-2). For the nanosecond pulses, the number of bubbles produced per pulse showed a quadratic dependence on laser power, with a distinct power threshold below which no bubbles were observed. The number of bubbles observed increases linearly with sucrose concentration. It was found that filtering of solutions reduces the number of bubbles significantly. Although the femtosecond pulses have higher peak power densities than the nanosecond pulses, they have lower energy densities per pulse. A simple model for LIN of CO2 is presented, based on heating of nanoparticles to produce vapor bubbles that must expand to reach a critical bubble radius to continue growth. The results suggest that non-photochemical laser-induced nucleation of crystals could also be caused by heating of nanoparticles.

  19. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  20. Dynamic Strain Measurements on Automotive and Aeronautic Composite Components by Means of Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lamberti, Alfredo; Chiesura, Gabriele; Luyckx, Geert; Degrieck, Joris; Kaufmann, Markus; Vanlanduit, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the internal deformations occurring in real-life composite components is a very challenging task, especially for those components that are rather difficult to access. Optical fiber sensors can overcome such a problem, since they can be embedded in the composite materials and serve as in situ sensors. In this article, embedded optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are used to analyze the vibration characteristics of two real-life composite components. The first component is a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer automotive control arm; the second is a glass fiber-reinforced polymer aeronautic hinge arm. The modal parameters of both components were estimated by processing the FBG signals with two interrogation techniques: the maximum detection and fast phase correlation algorithms were employed for the demodulation of the FBG signals; the Peak-Picking and PolyMax techniques were instead used for the parameter estimation. To validate the FBG outcomes, reference measurements were performed by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer. The analysis of the results showed that the FBG sensing capabilities were enhanced when the recently-introduced fast phase correlation algorithm was combined with the state-of-the-art PolyMax estimator curve fitting method. In this case, the FBGs provided the most accurate results, i.e., it was possible to fully characterize the vibration behavior of both composite components. When using more traditional interrogation algorithms (maximum detection) and modal parameter estimation techniques (Peak-Picking), some of the modes were not successfully identified. PMID:26516854

  1. Nanosecond laser-induced ablation and laser-induced shockwave structuring of polymer foils down to sub-?m patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.; Engisch, L.

    2015-03-01

    Micro- and nanostructures exhibit a growing commercial interest where a fast, cost-effective, and large-area production is attainable. Laser methods have a great potential for the easy fabrication of surface structures into flexible polymer foils like polyimide (PI). In this study two different concepts for the structuring of polymer foils using a KrF excimer laser were tested and compared: the laser-induced ablation and the laser-induced shock wave structuring. The direct front side laser irradiation of these polymers allows the fabrication of different surface structures. For example: The low laser fluence treatment of PI results in nano-sized cone structures where the cone density can be controlled by the laser parameters. This allows inter alia the laser fabrication of microscopic QR code and high-resolution grey-tone images. Furthermore, the laser treatment of the front side of the polymer foil allows the rear side structuring due to a laserinduced shock wave. The resultant surface structures were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as white light interferometry (WLI).

  2. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  3. Determining Pad-Wafer Contact using Dual Emission Laser Induced Fluorescence Caprice Gray1

    E-print Network

    White, Robert D.

    Determining Pad-Wafer Contact using Dual Emission Laser Induced Fluorescence Caprice Gray1 , Chris operating during CMP requires knowledge of the nature of the pad-wafer contact. Dual Emission Laser Induced Fluorescence (DELIF) can be used to study the fluid layer profile between the polishing pad and the wafer

  4. Spatio-TEmporally REsolved Optical Laser Induced Damage (STEREO LID) technique for material characterization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yejia; Emmert, Luke A; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2015-08-24

    A technique for measuring the ablation and laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) by identifying the temporal onset of damage and location of initiation within the beam profile is demonstrated. This new method, dubbed Spatio-TEmporally REsolved Optical Laser Induced Damage (STEREO LID), is compared to traditional damage tests and its advantages are exemplified. PMID:26368139

  5. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Modeling of dual emission laser induced fluorescence for slurry

    E-print Network

    White, Robert D.

    across the full visual spectrum. The fluorescent light is filtered such that one camera collects the highRESEARCH ARTICLE Modeling of dual emission laser induced fluorescence for slurry thickness-Verlag 2011 Abstract Dual emission laser induced fluorescence (DELIF) is a technique for measuring

  7. Carbon dioxide UV laser-induced fluorescence in high-pressure flames

    E-print Network

    Lee, Tonghun

    Carbon dioxide UV laser-induced fluorescence in high-pressure flames W.G. Bessler a , C. Schulz a; in final form 16 May 2003 Published online 10 June 2003 Abstract Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of carbon dioxide is investigated with excitation between 215 and 255 nm with spectrally resolved detection in 5

  8. Planar measurement of flow field parameters in a nonreacting supersonic combustor using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence, has been used to obtain planar measurements of flow field parameters in the supersonic mixing flow field of a nonreacting supersonic combustor. The combustor design used in this work was configured with staged transverse sonic injection behind a rearward-facing step into a Mach 2.07 free stream. A set of spatially resolved measurements of temperature and injectant mole fraction has been generated. These measurements provide an extensive and accurate experimental data set required for the validation of computational fluid dynamic codes developed for the calculation of highly three-dimensional combustor flow fields.

  9. Plume splitting and rebounding in a high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Anmin; Jiang Yuanfei; Liu Hang; Jin Mingxing; Ding Dajun

    2012-07-15

    The dynamics of plasma plume formed by high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The laser wavelength is 10.6 {mu}m. Measurements were made using 3 ns gated fast photography as well as space and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The behavior of the plasma plume was studied with a laser energy of 3 J and 10 J. The results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is very complicated. The splitting and rebounding of the plasma plume is observed to occur early in the plumes history.

  10. Enthalpy Distributions of Arc Jet Flow Based on Measured Laser Induced Fluorescence, Heat Flux and Stagnation Pressure Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Leonard E.; Milhoan, James D.; Oelke, Lance; Godfrey, Dennis; Larin, Maksim Y.; Scott, Carl D.; Grinstead, Jay H.; DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The centerline total enthalpy of arc jet flow is determined using laser induced fluorescence of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. Each component of the energy, kinetic, thermal, and chemical can be determined from LIF measurements. Additionally, enthalpy distributions are inferred from heat flux and pressure probe distribution measurements using an engineering formula. Average enthalpies are determined by integration over the radius of the jet flow, assuming constant mass flux and a mass flux distribution estimated from computational fluid dynamics calculations at similar arc jet conditions. The trends show favorable agreement, but there is an uncertainty that relates to the multiple individual measurements and assumptions inherent in LIF measurements.

  11. Biopolymer holographic diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savi? Ševi?, Svetlana; Panteli?, Dejan

    2008-03-01

    Surface-relief diffraction gratings are holographically recorded in dextran sensitized with ammonium dichromate (DCD). DCD was exposed with single-frequency 200 mW diode pumped ND-YAG laser, at 532 nm. The diffraction grating profiles were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that different surface profiles could be obtained. Gratings with 330 lines/mm spatial frequencies were made. Existence of higher harmonics in Fourier Transform of non-sinusoidal profiles shows that DCD is capable of recording spatial frequencies up to 1320 lines/mm (four times fundamental frequency). The measured maximum relief depth of the DCD grating is 402 nm.

  12. Neuroprotective therapy for argon-laser-induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai; Solberg, Yoram; Turetz, Yosef

    1999-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment of the central retina is often complicated by an immediate side effect of visual impairment, caused by the unavoidable laser-induced destruction of the normal tissue lying adjacent to the lesion and not affected directly by the laser beam. Furthermore, accidental laser injuries are at present untreatable. A neuroprotective therapy for salvaging the normal tissue might enhance the benefit obtained from treatment and allow safe perifoveal photocoagulation. We have developed a rat model for studying the efficacy of putative neuroprotective compounds in ameliorating laser-induced retinal damage. Four compounds were evaluated: the corticosteroid methylprednisolone, the glutamate-receptor blocker MK-801, the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, and the calcim-overload antagonist flunarizine. The study was carried out in two steps: in the first, the histopathological development of retinal laser injuries was studied. Argon laser lesions were inflicted in the retinas of 18 pigmented rats. The animals were sacrificed after 3, 20 or 60 days and their retinal lesions were evaluated under the light microscope. The laser injury mainly involved the outer layers of the retina, where it destroyed significant numbers of photoreceptor cells. Over time, evidence of two major histopathological processes was observed: traction of adjacent nomral retinal cells into the central area of the lesion forming an internal retinal bulging, and a retinal pigmented epithelial proliferative reaction associated with subretinal neovascularization and invations of the retinal lesion site by phagocytes. The neuroprotective effects of each of the four compounds were verified in a second step of the study. For each drug tested, 12 rats were irradiated wtih argon laser inflictions: six of them received the tested agent while the other six were treated with the corresponding vehicle. Twenty days after laser expsoure, the rats were sacrificed and their lesions were subjected to image-analysis morphometry. The extent of retianl damage was assessed by measuring the lesion diameter and the amount of photoreceptor cell loss in the outer nuclear layer. Methylprednisolone and MI-801 were shown to ameliorate laser-induced retinal damage, whereas both superoxide dismutase and flunarizine were ineffective. Furthermore, MK-801 diminished the proliferative reaction of the retinal pigment epithelial cells. On the basis of our results we suggest that the pigmented rat model is suitable for studying and screening various compounds for their neuroprotective efficacy in treating retinal laser injury. We further suggest that glutamate might play a key role in mediating retinal injury induced by laser irradiation.

  13. Effect of Cholesterol on Viscoelastic Properties of Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine Multibilayers As Measured by a Laser-Induced Ultrasonic Probet

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    As Measured by a Laser-Induced Ultrasonic Probet M. Y.El-Sayed, T. A. Guion, and M. D. Fayer* Department Received February 27, 1986 ABSTRACT: Using a novel laser-induced ultrasonic probe, we have examined

  14. Dynamic Strain Measurements on Automotive and Aeronautic Composite Components by Means of Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Alfredo; Chiesura, Gabriele; Luyckx, Geert; Degrieck, Joris; Kaufmann, Markus; Vanlanduit, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the internal deformations occurring in real-life composite components is a very challenging task, especially for those components that are rather difficult to access. Optical fiber sensors can overcome such a problem, since they can be embedded in the composite materials and serve as in situ sensors. In this article, embedded optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are used to analyze the vibration characteristics of two real-life composite components. The first component is a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer automotive control arm; the second is a glass fiber-reinforced polymer aeronautic hinge arm. The modal parameters of both components were estimated by processing the FBG signals with two interrogation techniques: the maximum detection and fast phase correlation algorithms were employed for the demodulation of the FBG signals; the Peak-Picking and PolyMax techniques were instead used for the parameter estimation. To validate the FBG outcomes, reference measurements were performed by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer. Sensors 2015, 15 27175 The analysis of the results showed that the FBG sensing capabilities were enhanced when the recently-introduced fast phase correlation algorithm was combined with the state-of-the-art PolyMax estimator curve fitting method. In this case, the FBGs provided the most accurate results, i.e. it was possible to fully characterize the vibration behavior of both composite components. When using more traditional interrogation algorithms (maximum detection) and modal parameter estimation techniques (Peak-Picking), some of the modes were not successfully identified. PMID:26516854

  15. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  16. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption of Natural and Functionalized Biochromophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) has recently been established as a tool for analytical chemistry. It is capable of launching intact, neutral, or low charged molecules into a high vacuum environment. This makes it ideally suited to mass spectrometry. LIAD can be used with fragile biomolecules and very massive compounds alike. Here, we apply LIAD time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) to the natural biochromophores chlorophyll, hemin, bilirubin, and biliverdin and to high mass fluoroalkyl-functionalized porphyrins. We characterize the variation in the molecular fragmentation patterns as a function of the desorption and the VUV postionization laser intensity. We find that LIAD can produce molecular beams an order of magnitude slower than matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD), although this depends on the substrate material. Using titanium foils we observe a most probable velocity of 20 m/s for functionalized molecules with a mass m = 10?000 Da. PMID:25946522

  17. Pulsed laser-induced formation of silica nanogrids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Silica grids with micron to sub-micron mesh sizes and wire diameters of 50 nm are fabricated on fused silica substrates. They are formed by single-pulse structured excimer laser irradiation of a UV-absorbing silicon suboxide (SiO x ) coating through the transparent substrate. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) superstrate (cover layer) coated on top of the SiO x film prior to laser exposure serves as confinement for controlled laser-induced structure formation. At sufficiently high laser fluence, this process leads to grids consisting of a periodic loop network connected to the substrate at regular positions. By an additional high-temperature annealing, the residual SiO x is oxidized, and a pure SiO2 grid is obtained. PACS 81.07.-b; 81.07.Gf; 81.65.Cf PMID:24581305

  18. A Spectral Analysis of Laser Induced Fluorescence of Iodine

    E-print Network

    Bayram, S B

    2015-01-01

    When optically excited, iodine absorbs in the 490- to 650-nm visible region of the spectrum and, after radiative relaxation, it displays an emission spectrum of discrete vibrational bands at moderate resolution. This makes laser-induced fuorescence spectrum of molecular iodine especially suitable to study the energy structure of homonuclear diatomic molecules at room temperature. In this spirit, we present a rather straightforward and inexpensive experimental setup and the associated spectral analysis which provides an excellent exercise of applied quantum mechanics fit for advanced laboratory courses. The students would be required to assign spectral lines, fill a Deslandres table, process the data to estimate the harmonic and anharmonic characteristics of the ground vibronic state involved in the radiative transitions, and thenceforth calculate a set of molecular constants and discuss a model of molecular vibrator.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy expands into industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Reinhard; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Brunk, Markus; Connemann, Sven; Meinhardt, Christoph; Scharun, Michael; Sturm, Volker; Makowe, Joachim; Gehlen, Christoph

    This paper presents R&D activities in the field of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for industrial applications and shows novel LIBS systems running in routine operation for inline process control tasks. Starting with a comparison of the typical characteristics of LIBS with XRF and spark-discharge optical emission spectrometry, the principal structure of LIBS machines embedded for inline process monitoring will be presented. A systematic requirement analysis for LIBS systems following Ishikawa's scheme was worked out. Stability issues are studied for laser sources and Paschen-Runge spectrometers as key components for industrial LIBS systems. Examples of industrial applications range from handheld LIBS systems using a fiber laser source, via a set of LIBS machines for inline process control tasks, such as scrap analysis, coal analysis, liquid slag analysis and finally monitoring of drill dust.

  20. Hydroxylapatite nanoparticles obtained by fiber laser-induced fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; Comesaña, R.; Pou, J.

    2009-03-01

    This work presents the results of laser-induced fragmentation of hydroxylapatite microparticles in water dissolution. Calcined fish bones in form of powder, which were previously milled to achieve microsized particles, were used as precursor material. Two different laser sources were employed to reduce the size of the suspended particles: a pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a Ytterbium doped fiber laser working in continuous wave mode. The morphology as well as the composition of the obtained particles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HRTEM). The results show that nanometric particles of hydroxylapatite and ?-tricalcium phosphate as small as 10 nm diameter can be obtained.

  1. Laser-induced stress transients: applications for molecular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flotte, Thomas J.; Lee, Shun; Zhang, Hong; McAuliffe, Daniel J.; Douki, Tina; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    1995-05-01

    Lasers can be used to enhance the delivery of a number of molecules. Other investigators have demonstrated local release of molecules from liposomes following laser irradiation, microbeam disruption of the cell membrane to increase cell transport, microbeam ablation of the zona pellucida surrounding the ovum to increase the chances of fertilization, and increased transcutaneous transport following ablation of the stratum corneum. Our experiments have shown that laser-induced stress transients can be utilized as a vector for intracellular delivery of molecules that may or may not normally cross the cell membrane. These two conditions have been tested with Photofrin and DNA. This technology may have applications in cell and molecular biology, cancer therapy, gene therapy, and others.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  3. Analysis of fresco by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneve, L.; Diamanti, A.; Grimaldi, F.; Palleschi, G.; Spizzichino, V.; Valentini, F.

    2010-08-01

    The laser-based techniques have been shown to be a very powerful tool for artworks characterization and are used in the field of cultural heritage for the offered advantages of minimum invasiveness, in situ applicability and high sensitivity. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, in particular, has been applied in this field to many different kinds of ancient materials with successful results. In this work, a fragment of a Roman wall painting from the archaeological area of Pompeii has been investigated by LIBS. The sample elemental composition resulting from LIBS measurements suggested the presence of certain pigments. The ratio of the intensities of different lines related to some characteristic elements is proposed as an indicator for pigment recognition. The depth profiling permitted to put in evidence the presence of successive paint layers with different compositions. A comparison with the results obtained by the microscopy inspection of the sample has been done.

  4. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): applications in environmental issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couris, Stelios; Hatziapostolou, A.; Anglos, Dmitrios; Mavromanolakis, A.; Fotakis, Costas

    1996-11-01

    Results are presented from three different applications of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in problems of environmental interest. In one case, LIBS is applied in the on-line control of the nickel recovery process, by monitoring the nickel content of molten ferronickel slabs, in a laboratory scale experiment. In a second case, LIBS is used in the identification of polymer materials, and on the basis of spectral features, criteria are proposed for the distinction among different types of plastic materials. Also, in preliminary experiments, the use of LIBS with respect to the detection of heavy and toxic metals in paints and the possibility of performing depth profile analysis of multiple paint layers is examined.

  6. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  7. Flexible Boron-Doped Laser-Induced Graphene Microsupercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiwei; Ye, Ruquan; Mann, Jason A; Zakhidov, Dante; Li, Yilun; Smalley, Preston R; Lin, Jian; Tour, James M

    2015-06-23

    Heteroatom-doped graphene materials have been intensely studied as active electrodes in energy storage devices. Here, we demonstrate that boron-doped porous graphene can be prepared in ambient air using a facile laser induction process from boric acid containing polyimide sheets. At the same time, active electrodes can be patterned for flexible microsupercapacitors. As a result of boron doping, the highest areal capacitance of as-prepared devices reaches 16.5 mF/cm(2), 3 times higher than nondoped devices, with concomitant energy density increases of 5-10 times at various power densities. The superb cyclability and mechanical flexibility of the device are well-maintained, showing great potential for future microelectronics made from this boron-doped laser-induced graphene material. PMID:25978090

  8. Laser-induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    PubMed

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-09-21

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free-standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be employed in an optofluidic diaphragm pump, the interfaces behaving like a vibrating membrane and the liquid in-between being the fluid to be pumped. Such a pump could then be used in delicate micro-equipment, in chips where temperature variations are detrimental and even in biological systems. PMID:25017934

  9. Terahertz generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-K.; Kim, Jae Hun; Yang, C.-E.; Yin, Stuart Shizhuo; Hui Rongqing; Ruffin, Paul

    2008-12-08

    An investigation of the terahertz wave generation in multiple laser-induced air plasmas is presented. First, it is demonstrated that the intensity of the terahertz wave increases as the number of air plasmas increases. Second, the physical mechanism of this enhancement effect of the terahertz generation is studied by quantitatively measuring the intensity of the generated terahertz wave as a function of phase difference between adjacent air plasmas. It is found out that the superposition is the main mechanism to cause this enhancement. Thus, the results obtained in this paper not only provide a technique to generate stronger terahertz wave but also enable a better understanding of the mechanism of the terahertz generation in air plasma.

  10. Estimating intercellular surface tension by laser-induced cell fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Masashi; Onami, Shuichi

    2011-12-01

    Intercellular surface tension is a key variable in understanding cellular mechanics. However, conventional methods are not well suited for measuring the absolute magnitude of intercellular surface tension because these methods require determination of the effective viscosity of the whole cell, a quantity that is difficult to measure. In this study, we present a novel method for estimating the intercellular surface tension at single-cell resolution. This method exploits the cytoplasmic flow that accompanies laser-induced cell fusion when the pressure difference between cells is large. Because the cytoplasmic viscosity can be measured using well-established technology, this method can be used to estimate the absolute magnitudes of tension. We applied this method to two-cell-stage embryos of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and estimated the intercellular surface tension to be in the 30-90 µN m-1 range. Our estimate was in close agreement with cell-medium surface tensions measured at single-cell resolution.

  11. OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence from Microgravity Droplet Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael; Wegge, Jason; Kang, Kyung-Tae

    1997-01-01

    Droplet combustion under microgravity conditions has been extensively studied, but laser diagnostics have just begun to be employed in microgravity droplet experiments. This is due in part to the level of difficulty associated with laser system size, power and economic availability. Hydroxyl radical (OH) is an important product of combustion, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has proved to be an adequate and sensitive tool to measure OH. In this study, a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser and a doubled dye laser, compact and reliable enough to perform OH PLIF experiments aboard a parabolic flight-path aircraft, has been developed and successfully demonstrated in a methanol droplet flame experiment. Application to microgravity conditions is planned aboard parabolic flight-path aircraft.

  12. Femtosecond laser-induced surface structures on carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Sajzew, Roman; Schröder, Jan; Kunz, Clemens; Engel, Sebastian; Müller, Frank A; Gräf, Stephan

    2015-12-15

    The influence of different polarization states during the generation of periodic nanostructures on the surface of carbon fibers was investigated using a femtosecond laser with a pulse duration ?=300??fs, a wavelength ?=1025??nm, and a peak fluence F=4??J/cm2. It was shown that linear polarization results in a well-aligned periodic pattern with different orders of magnitude concerning their period and an alignment parallel and perpendicular to fiber direction, respectively. For circular polarization, both types of uniform laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) patterns appear simultaneously with different dominance in dependence on the position at the fiber surface. Their orientation was explained by the polarization-dependent absorptivity and the geometrical anisotropy of the carbon fibers. PMID:26670499

  13. On the cutoff law of laser induced high harmonic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dong-Sheng; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Jingtao; Gao, Ju; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Sun, Zhenrong

    2015-04-01

    The currently well accepted cutoff law for laser induced high harmonic spectra predicts the cutoff energy as a linear combination of two interaction energies, the ponderomotive energy U p and the atomic biding energy I p , with coefficients 3.17 and 1.32, respectively. Even though, this law has been there for twenty years or so, the background information for these two constants, such as how they relate to fundamental physics and mathematics constants, is still unknown. This simple fact, keeps this cutoff law remaining as an empirical one. Based on the cutoff property of Bessel functions and the Einstein photoelectric law in the multiphoton case, we show these two coefficients are algebraic constants, and , respectively. A recent spectra calculation and an experimental measurement support the new cutoff law.

  14. Laser-induced modification of transparent crystals and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakova, N M; Stoian, Razvan; Rosenfeld, A

    2010-12-29

    We analyse the processes taking place in transparent crystals and glasses irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses in the regimes typical of various applications in optoelectronics and photonics. We consider some phenomena, which have been previously described by the authors within the different model representations: charging of the dielectric surface due to electron photoemission resulting in a Coulomb explosion; crater shaping by using an adaptive control of the laser pulse shape; optimisation of the waveguide writing in materials strongly resistant to laser-induced compaction under ordinary irradiation conditions. The developed models and analysis of the processes relying on these models include the elements of the solid-state physics, plasma physics, thermodynamics, theory of elasticity and plasticity. Some important experimental observations which require explanations and adequate description are summarised. (photonics and nanotechnology)

  15. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vivek K.; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K.; Thakur, Surya N.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  16. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lucia, Frank C.; Harmon, Russell S.; McNesby, Kevin L.; Winkel, Raymond J.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2003-10-01

    A number of energetic materials and explosives have been studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). They include black powder, neat explosives such as TNT, PETN, HMX, and RDX (in various forms), propellants such as M43 and JA2, and military explosives such as C4 and LX-14. Each of these materials gives a unique spectrum, and generally the spectra are reproducible shot to shot. We observed that the laser-produced microplasma did not initiate any of the energetic materials studied. Extensive studies of black powder and its ingredients by use of a reference spectral library have demonstrated excellent accuracy for unknown identification. Finally, we observed that these nitrogen- and oxygen-rich materials yield LIBS spectra in air that have correspondingly different O:N peak ratios compared with air. This difference can help in the detection and identification of such energetic materials.

  17. Laser-induced microbubble poration of localized single cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qihui; Hu, Wenqi; Ohta, Aaron T

    2014-05-01

    Laser-induced microbubbles were used to porate the cell membranes of localized single NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Microsecond laser pulses were focused on an optically absorbent substrate, creating a vapour microbubble that oscillated in size at the laser focal point in a fluidic chamber. The shear stress accompanying the bubble size oscillation was able to porate nearby cells. Cell poration was demonstrated with the delivery of FITC-dextran dye with various molecular weights. Under optimal poration conditions, the cell poration efficiency was up to 95.2 ± 4.8%, while maintaining 97.6 ± 2.4% cell viability. The poration system is able to target a single cell without disturbing surrounding cells. PMID:24632785

  18. Elemental Analysis of Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Mohammed Ashraf; Dastageer, Mohamed A.

    The chemical and elemental composition of soil is very complex as it contains many constituents like minerals, organic matters, living organisms, fossils, air and water. Considering the diversity of soil contents, quality and usability, a systematic scientific study on the elemental and chemical composition of soil is very important. In order to study the chemical composition of soil, Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied recently. The important features of LIBS system and its applications for the measurement of nutrients in green house soil, on-line monitoring of remediation process of chromium polluted soil, determination of trace elements in volcanic erupted soil samples collected from ancient cenozoic lava eruption sites and detection of toxic metals in Gulf war oil spill contaminated soil using LIBS are described in this chapter.

  19. Discriminating crude oil grades using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hussein, A.; Marzouk, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of crude oil using laser-based analytical techniques such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has become of great interest to various specialists in different fields such as geology, petro-chemistry and environmental science. In this work, a detailed study is presented wherein the implementation of an efficient and simple LIBS technique to identify the elemental constituents of crude oil and to distinguish between different grades of petroleum crude oil is discussed. Laser-induced plasma (LIP) technique has been used in this work for direct measurements of atomic, ionic and molecular species in dry crude oil samples with API gravities ranging between 18 and 36. The technique was implemented using the first harmonic of a pulsed Nd-YAG laser source. Atomic and molecular emission bands were observed, consisting of characteristic spectral lines of atoms and diatomic molecular bands, namely from C, H, Si, Na, Ca, Mg, AL, Fe, Ti, Mo, C2 and CN. The intensities of high-resolution spectral lines for some atoms and molecules of elements such as Ca, Na, Fe, Mo, C2 and CN were evaluated at different wavelengths along the obtained spectra. The molecular bands and the elemental spectral lines were used to assess the possibility of adopting the LIBS technique in differentiating between crude oil samples with different American Petroleum Institute (API) gravity values. The results indicate the presence of a distinct correlation between the API gravity values of the various oil samples and the spectral line intensities of the elements and some molecular radical constituents. In addition, the possibility of identifying the API gravity values of unknown oil samples is also indicated.

  20. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  1. Laser induced damage of fused silica polished optics due to a droplet forming organic contaminant

    SciTech Connect

    Bien-Aime, Karell; Neauport, Jerome; Tovena-Pecault, Isabelle; Fargin, Evelyne; Labrugere, Christine; Belin, Colette; Couzi, Michel

    2009-04-20

    We report on the effect of organic molecular contamination on single shot laser induced damage density at the wavelength of 351 nm, with a 3 ns pulse length. Specific contamination experiments were made with dioctylphthalate (DOP) in liquid or gaseous phase, on the surface of fused silica polished samples, bare or solgel coated. Systematic laser induced damage was observed only in the case of liquid phase contamination. Different chemical and morphological characterization methods were used to identify and understand the damage process. We demonstrate that the contaminant morphology, rather than its physicochemical nature, can be responsible for the decrease of laser induced damage threshold of optics.

  2. Non-linear optical studies of adsorbates: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiangdong.

    1989-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we have established a systematic procedure to apply the surface optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique to study surface dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, we have developed a novel technique for studies of molecular surface diffusions. In this technique, the laser-induced desorption with two interfering laser beams is used to produce a monolayer grating of adsorbates. The monolayer grating is detected with diffractions of optical SHG. By monitoring the first-order second-harmonic diffraction, we can follow the time evolution of the grating modulation from which we are able to deduce the diffusion constant of the adsorbates on the surface. We have successfully applied this technique to investigate the surface diffusion of CO on Ni(111). The unique advantages of this novel technique will enable us to readily study anisotropy of a surface diffusion with variable grating orientation, and to investigate diffusion processes of a large dynamic range with variable grating spacings. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that optical infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) from surfaces can be used as a viable surface vibrational spectroscopic technique. We have successfully recorded the first vibrational spectrum of a monolayer of adsorbates using optical infrared-visible SFG. The qualitative and quantitative correlation of optical SFG with infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies are examined and experimentally demonstrated. We have further investigated the possibility to use transient infrared-visible SFG to probe vibrational transients and ultrafast relaxations on surfaces. 146 refs.

  3. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM); Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM); Senturia, Stephen D. (Brookline, MA)

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  4. Experimental and numerical study of laser induced spallation into aluminum and copper targets

    SciTech Connect

    Boustie, M.; Cottet, F. )

    1991-06-01

    Laser driven shocks can lead to the dynamic failure, called spallation, of materials which undergo a dynamic tension at the crossing of two rarefaction waves. We present here a numerical and experimental study of ductile material scabbing with the particular laser shock conditions (very short durations and very high induced pressure levels). A cumulative damage criterion is implemented into both numerical codes SHYLAC and RADIOSS. Experiments have been carried out by laser irradiation of thin foils of pure aluminum, copper, and iron by laser pulses with the three durations at medium height 0.6, 2.5, and 27 ns, generating an incident flux ranging from 5{times}10{sup 11} to 5{times}10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. The validity of the cumulative damage criterion is asserted by the consistency of numerical and experimental results for aluminum whose criterion parameters are known. The unknown constants for copper are determined by fitting the numerical simulations to the experimental data. The material influence on the scab thickness and on the spallation threshold is analyzed. Experimental laser induced spallation data given by irradiation of a rear stepped target have been validated experimentally and numerically.

  5. Laser-induced incandescence measurements in a fired diesel engine at 3 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxx, I. G.; Heinold, O.; Geigle, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced incandescence (LII) was performed at 3 kHz in an optically accessible cylinder of a fired diesel engine using a commercially available diode-pumped solid-state laser and an intensified CMOS camera. The resulting images, acquired every 3° of crank angle, enabled the spatiotemporal tracking of soot structures during the expansion/exhaust stroke of the engine cycle. The image sequences demonstrate that soot tends to form in thin sheets that propagate and interact with the in-cylinder flow. These sheets tend to align parallel to the central axis of the cylinder and are frequently wrapped into conical spirals by aerodynamic swirl. Most of the soot is observed well away from the cylinder walls. Quantitative soot measurements were beyond the scope of this study but the results demonstrate the practical utility of using kHz-rate LII to acquire ensemble-averaged statistical data with high crank angle resolution over a complete engine cycle. Based on semi-quantitative measures of soot distribution, it was possible to identify soot dynamics related to incomplete charge exchange. This study shows that long-duration, multi-kHz acquisition rate LII measurements are viable in a fired diesel engine with currently available laser and camera technology, albeit only in the expansion and exhaust phase of the cycle at present. Furthermore, such measurements yield useful insight into soot dynamics and therefore constitute an important new tool for the development and optimization of diesel engine technology.

  6. Semiconductor laser asymmetry cutting glass with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) makes the material to produce an uneven temperature field, maximum temperature can't soften or melt the material, induces the thermal stress, then the crack separates along the cutting path. One of the problems in laser asymmetry cutting glass with LITP is the cutting deviation along scanning trajectory. This study lays great emphasis on considering the dynamic extension of crack to explain the reason of the cutting deviation in laser asymmetry cutting glass, includes asymmetric linear cutting and a quarter of a circular curve cutting. This paper indicates the experiments of semiconductor laser asymmetry cutting glass with LITP. Optical microscope photographs of the glass sheet are obtained to examine the cutting deviation. The extended finite element method (XFEM) is used to simulate the dynamic propagation of crack; the crack path does not have to be specified a priori. The cutting deviation mechanism and the crack propagation process are studied by the stress fields using finite element software ABAQUS. This work provides a theoretical basis to investigate the cutting deviation in laser asymmetry cutting glass. In semiconductor laser asymmetry cutting glass, the tensile stress is the basis of crack propagation, then the compressive stress not only makes the crack to extend stably, but also controls the direction of crack propagation.

  7. Direct evidences for inner-shell electron-excitation by laser induced electron recollision

    E-print Network

    Deng, Yunpei; Jia, Zhengmao; Komm, Pavel; Zheng, Yinhui; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Marcus, Gilad

    2015-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulses, generated by a process known as laser-induced electron recollision, are a key ingredient for attosecond metrology, providing a tool to precisely initiate and probe sub-femtosecond dynamics in the microcosms of atoms, molecules and solids[1]. However, with the current technology, extending attosecond metrology to scrutinize the dynamics of the inner-shell electrons is a challenge, that is because of the lower efficiency in generating the required soft x-ray \\hbar\\omega>300 eV attosecond bursts and the lower absorption cross-sections in this spectral range. A way around this problem is to use the recolliding electron to directly initiate the desired inner-shell process, instead of using the currently low flux x-ray attosecond sources.Such an excitation process occurs in a sub-femtosecond timescale, and may provide the necessary "pump" step in a pump-probe experiment[2]. Here we used a few cycle infrared \\lambda_{0}~1800nm source[3] and observed direct evidences for i...

  8. Detection of zinc and lead in water using evaporative preconcentration and single-particle laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, Samu T.; Saarela, Jaakko; Toivonen, Juha

    2013-08-01

    A novel laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)-based measurement method for metals in water is demonstrated. In the presented technology a small amount of sodium chloride is dissolved in the sample solution before spraying the sample into a tubular oven. After water removal monodisperse dry NaCl aerosol particles are formed where trace metals are present as additives. A single-particle LIBS analysis is then triggered with a scattering based particle detection system. Benefits are the highly increased metal concentration in the LIBS focal volume and the static NaCl-matrix which can be exploited in the signal processing procedure. Emitted light from the emerged plasma plume is collected with wide angle optics and dispersed with a grating spectrometer. In an aqueous solution, the respective limits of detection for zinc and lead were 0.3 ppm and 0.1 ppm using a relatively low 14 mJ laser pulse energy. Zn/Na peak intensity ratio calibration curve for zinc concentration was also determined and LIBS signal dependence on laser pulse energy was investigated.

  9. Development of an ion drift chamber for Laser Induced Fluorescence studies 

    E-print Network

    Cain, Benjamin J

    1998-01-01

    The use of Laser Induced Fluorescence to image ions in a gas has been proposed for a possible new type of subatomic particle detector.1 As a means to investigate this idea, an ion drift chamber has been developed that ...

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  11. Analysis of human nails by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied to analyze human fingernails using nanosecond laser pulses. Measurements on 45 nail samples are carried out and 14 key species are identified. The elements detected with the present system are: Al, C, Ca, Fe, H, K, Mg, N, Na, O, Si, Sr, Ti as well as CN molecule. Sixty three emission lines have been identified in the spectrum that are dominated by calcium lines. A discriminant function analysis is used to discriminate among different genders and age groups. This analysis demonstrates efficient discrimination among these groups. The mean concentration of each element is compared between different groups. Correlation between concentrations of elements in fingernails is calculated. A strong correlation is found between sodium and potassium while calcium and magnesium levels are inversely correlated. A case report on high levels of sodium and potassium in patients with hyperthyroidism is presented. It is shown that LIBS could be a promising technique for the analysis of nails and therefore identification of health problems.

  12. In-situ hydrocarbon delineation using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Taer, A.D.; Hastings, R.W.; Brown, A.Y.; Frend, R.

    1996-12-01

    An investigation of hydrocarbons in soils was conducted at an active Shell Oil Company petroleum products terminal, located in Carson, California. An investigation approach involving Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT) technologies was implemented to provide real-time, in-situ characterization of site stratigraphy, hydrocarbon distribution and importantly, hydrocarbon product differentiation. The area of investigation is located along a property boundary, where a plume of separate phase hydrocarbons has been actively recovered for several years. CPT/LIF technology was selected for the investigation since previous delineation efforts using hydrocarbon fingerprinting methods proved inconclusive. Additionally, the CPT/LIF technology had the potential to provide a cost effective solution to accomplish project objectives. Based on the information obtained during this investigation, it was determined that the plume of separate phase hydrocarbons along the northern property boundary is from a source distinctly different than any identified hydrocarbons known to be from on-site sources. In addition, the plume was determined to not be connected with any other known on-site hydrocarbon plumes. The results of this CPT/LIF investigation were consistent with the known hydrogeologic conditions. This evaluation determined that CPT/LIF technology was very effective in addressing project objectives and resulted in a significant cost savings.

  13. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (< ~2.5?°C) in temperature at the surface of the skin, examined by both thermal camera and the Monte Carlo simulation, indicate that laser does not evoke heat-induced nociceptive sensation. In the human EEG study, brain responses to both mechanical and laser stimulation are consistent, along with subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli. PMID:26047142

  14. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF.

  15. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in industrial and security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; Liu Chunyi; Plumer, John R.; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers rapid, localized chemical analysis of solid or liquid materials with high spatial resolution in lateral and depth profiling, without the need for sample preparation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares algorithms were applied to identify a variety of complex organic and inorganic samples. This work illustrates how LIBS analyzers can answer a multitude of real-world needs for rapid analysis, such as determination of lead in paint and children's toys, analysis of electronic and solder materials, quality control of fiberglass panels, discrimination of coffee beans from different vendors, and identification of generic versus brand-name drugs. Lateral and depth profiling was performed on children's toys and paint layers. Traditional one-element calibration or multivariate chemometric procedures were applied for elemental quantification, from single laser shot determination of metal traces at {approx}10 {mu}g/g to determination of halogens at 90 {mu}g/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation. The effectiveness of LIBS for security applications was demonstrated in the field by testing the 50-m standoff LIBS rasterizing detector.

  16. Laser induced alignment of state-selected CH3I.

    PubMed

    He, Lanhai; Bulthuis, Jaap; Luo, Sizuo; Wang, Jia; Lu, Chunjing; Stolte, Steven; Ding, Dajun; Roeterdink, Wim G

    2015-10-01

    Hexapole state selection is used to prepare CH3I molecules in the |JKM? = |1±1?1? state. The molecules are aligned in a strong 800 nm laser field, which is linearly polarised perpendicular to the weak static extraction field E of the time of flight setup. The molecules are subsequently ionised by a second time delayed probe laser pulse. It will be shown that in this geometry at high enough laser intensities the Newton sphere has sufficient symmetry to apply the inverse Abel transformation to reconstruct the three dimensional distribution from the projected ion image. The laser induced controllable alignment was found to have the upper and lower extreme values of ?P2(cos??)? = 0.7 for the aligned molecule and -0.1 for the anti-aligned molecule, coupled to ?P4(cos??)? between 0.3 and 0.0. The method to extract the alignment parameters ?P2(cos??)? and ?P4(cos??)? directly from the velocity map ion images will be discussed. PMID:26314900

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence for discrimination of crops and weeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    2000-11-01

    This paper reports the use of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of plants to discriminate between crops and weeds for potential use in an intelligent crop spraying system. Past and current work in intelligent crop spraying has concentrated on using multi-spectral reflectance data in particular using near infrared (NIR) and color. Texture and shape image processing has also been used with limited success and is usually computationally expensive. Also, most of these approaches are error prone since they rely on ambient solar illumination and so are susceptible to errors caused by cloud variations, shadows and other non-uniformities. There are several commercial spraying systems available that detect presence or absence of plants using the NIR 'red-edge' effect without discrimination between species. 'Weedseeker' and 'Detectspray' are two examples of such systems, the 'Weedseeker' system being one of the few active systems, incorporating its own light source. However, both systems suffer from poor spatial resolution. The use of plant or chlorophyll fluorescence for discrimination between species is a relatively under researched area. This paper shows that LIF of several crops and weeds can be used to discriminate between species. Spectra are presented for two crop and two weed species over a range of discrete laser excitation wavelengths. The technique can be directly implemented with a laser imaging system for real-time detection and discrimination of crops and weeds.

  18. Infrared laser induced plasma diagnostics of silver target

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmat, L. Nadeem, Ali; Ahmed, I.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, the optical emission spectra of silver (Ag) plasma have been recorded and analyzed using the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. The emission line intensities and plasma parameters were investigated as a function of lens to sample distance, laser irradiance, and distance from the target surface. The electron number density (n{sub e}) and electron temperature (T{sub e}) were determined using the Stark broadened line profile and Boltzmann plot method, respectively. A gradual increase in the spectral line intensities and the plasma parameters, n{sub e} from 2.89?×?10{sup 17} to 3.92?×?10{sup 17?}cm{sup ?3} and T{sub e} from 4662 to 8967?K, was observed as the laser irradiance was increased 2.29?×?10{sup 10}–1.06?×?10{sup 11} W cm{sup ?2}. The spatial variations in n{sub e} and T{sub e} were investigated from 0 to 5.25?mm from the target surface, yielding the electron number density from 4.78?×?10{sup 17} to 1.72?×?10{sup 17?}cm{sup ?3} and electron temperature as 9869–3789?K. In addition, the emission intensities and the plasma parameters of silver were investigated by varying the ambient pressure from 0.36 to 1000 mbars.

  19. Laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ming Hui; Sugioka, Koji; Wu, Dong Jiang; Chew, K. J.; Lu, Y. F.; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Chong, Tow Chong

    2003-02-01

    It is a high challenge to fabricate glass microstructures in Photonics and LCD industries. Different from direct ablation with ultrafast or short wavelength lasers, laser-induced-plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA) is one of the potential candidates for transparent substrate microfabrication with conventional visible laser sources. In the processing, laser beam goes through glass substrate first and then irradiates on a solid target behind. For laser fluence above target ablation threshold, plasma generated from target ablation flies forward at a high speed. At a small target-to-substrate distance, there are strong interactions among laser light, target plasma and glass substrate at its rear side surface. With target materials deposition on glass surface or even doping into the substrate, light absorption characteristic at the interaction zone is modified, which causes the glass ablation. LIPAA is used to get color printing of characters, structures and even images on the glass substrate. It is also used to obtain the glass surface metallization for electrodes and circuits fabrication. Potential application of this technique to fabricate functional microstructures, such as micro-Total-Analysis-System (TAS) for DNA analysis and holographic diffuser for IR wireless home networking, is also discussed.

  20. Ophthalmic manifestations of laser-induced eye injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Michael

    1996-04-01

    The basis for almost all laser-induced eye injuries is the concentration of the radiation in the visible and near infra red range on the retina. The effect of this concentration is that the energy required to produce a visible retinal lesion is minuscule, about 50 microjoule for a Q- switched 532 nm laser. Even at lower energies the radiation can cause dazzle and flash blindness. At higher energies it can produce lesions which are ophthalmoscopically invisible, and at even higher energies, lesions that are visible and permanent. Higher energies still produce vitreous hemorrhage. The functional results of visible lesions depend not only on the energy impinging on the retina but mostly on the location of the injury. Foveal lesions will cause permanent reduction in visual functions, extrafoveal injuries will cause temporary visual incapacitation, and lesions further away from the macula may cause unnoticeable damage. Temporary incapacitation by intraocular hemorrhage can be engendered by a lesion anywhere in the eye. The latter is usually absorbed spontaneously or can be surgically removed by vitrectomy. An over-threshold injury anywhere on the posterior pole of the eye will lead to severance of the retinal nerve fiber layer, and thus to blind spots in parts of the retina unaffected by the original lesion. A common late, visually devastating, effect of laser lesions is retinal scarring which may lead to retinal holes, retinal detachment and delayed blindness.

  1. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the cylindrical Hall thruster plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spektor, R.; Diamant, K. D.; Beiting, E. J.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-09-01

    An investigation of a fully cylindrical Hall thruster was performed using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure ion velocity profiles in the plume. The measurements confirm a previously reported 9% increase in the exhaust energy when the cathode keeper draws an excess current (overrun mode). Furthermore, the velocity directions in the plume remain relatively unchanged for the cusped and direct magnetic field configuration in both overrun and nonoverrun modes. Previously reported plume narrowing in the overrun mode was confirmed and found to be due to the shift of the acceleration and ionization regions toward the anode. The electric field inferred from the LIF measurements allowed calculation of the electron E ×B drift. Close to the centerline of the thruster, electrons drift azimuthally with velocity decreasing away from the centerline, thus creating shear. This shear can be a source of plasma instabilities and influence electron transport. Further away from the centerline, electrons drift in the opposite direction with their velocity increasing with increasing radius. In that region, electrons rotate without shear.

  2. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyac?, ?smail Hakk?; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, U?ur; Çak?r, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique. PMID:25794738

  3. Laser-induced porous graphene films from commercial polymers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian; Peng, Zhiwei; Liu, Yuanyue; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Ye, Ruquan; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Yakobson, Boris I.; Tour, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis and patterning of carbon nanomaterials cost effectively is a challenge in electronic and energy storage devices. Here report a one-step, scalable approach for producing and patterning porous graphene films with 3-dimensional networks from commercial polymer films using a CO2 infrared laser. The sp3-carbon atoms are photothermally converted to sp2-carbon atoms by pulsed laser irradiation. The resulting laser-induced graphene (LIG) exhibits high electrical conductivity. The LIG can be readily patterned to interdigitated electrodes for in-plane microsupercapacitors with specific capacitances of >4 mF·cm?2 and power densities of ~9 mW·cm?2. Theoretical calculations partially suggest that enhanced capacitance may result from LIG’s unusual ultra-polycrystalline lattice of pentagon-heptagon structures. Combined with the advantage of one-step processing of LIG in air from commercial polymer sheets, which would allow the employment of a roll-to-roll manufacturing process, this technique provides a rapid route to polymer-written electronic and energy storage devices. PMID:25493446

  4. Independent component analysis classification of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forni, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre; Gasnault, Olivier; Wiens, Roger C.; Cousin, Agnès; Clegg, Samuel M.; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Lasue, Jérémie

    2013-08-01

    The ChemCam instrument on board Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover uses the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique to remotely analyze Martian rocks. It retrieves spectra up to a distance of seven meters to quantify and to quantitatively analyze the sampled rocks. Like any field application, on-site measurements by LIBS are altered by diverse matrix effects which induce signal variations that are specific to the nature of the sample. Qualitative aspects remain to be studied, particularly LIBS sample identification to determine which samples are of interest for further analysis by ChemCam and other rover instruments. This can be performed with the help of different chemometric methods that model the spectra variance in order to identify a the rock from its spectrum. In this paper we test independent components analysis (ICA) rock classification by remote LIBS. We show that using measures of distance in ICA space, namely the Manhattan and the Mahalanobis distance, we can efficiently classify spectra of an unknown rock. The Mahalanobis distance gives overall better performances and is easier to manage than the Manhattan distance for which the determination of the cut-off distance is not easy. However these two techniques are complementary and their analytical performances will improve with time during MSL operations as the quantity of available Martian spectra will grow. The analysis accuracy and performances will benefit from a combination of the two approaches.

  5. Femtosecond laser induced nanostructuring for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaoudi, H.; Das, S. K.; Lange, J.; Heinrich, F.; Schrader, S.; Frohme, M.; Grunwald, R.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of periodical nanostructures with femtosecond laser pulses was used to create highly efficient substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). We report about the structuring of silver and copper substrates and their application to the SERS of DNA (herring sperm) and protein molecules (egg albumen). The maximum enhancement factors were found on Ag substrates processed with the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a 1-kHz Ti:sapphire laser and structure periods near the SHG wavelength. In the case of copper, however, the highest enhancement was obtained with long-period ripples induced with at fundamental wavelength. This is explained by an additional significant influence of nanoparticles on the surface. Nanostructured areas in the range of 1.25 mm2 were obtained in 10 s. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fast Fourier Transform and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the role of the chemical modification of the metal structures is addressed. Thin oxide layers resulting from working in atmosphere which improve the biocompatibility were indicated by vibration spectra. It is expected that the detailed study of the mechanisms of laser-induced nanostructure formation will stimulate further applications of functionalized surfaces like photocatalysis, selective chemistry and nano-biology.

  6. Elemental analysis of cotton by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, Emily R.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the elemental characterization of unprocessed cotton. This research is important in forensic and fraud detection applications to establish an elemental fingerprint of U.S. cotton by region, which can be used to determine the source of the cotton. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a LIBS method for the elemental analysis of cotton. The experimental setup consists of a Nd:YAG laser that operates at the fundamental wavelength as the LIBS excitation source and an echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The relative concentrations of elements Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, and Sr from both nutrients and environmental contributions were determined by LIBS. Principal component analysis was used to visualize the differences between cotton samples based on the elemental composition by region in the U.S. Linear discriminant analysis of the LIBS data resulted in the correct classification of >97% of the cotton samples by U.S. region and >81% correct classification by state of origin.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence of collagen and cholestrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, N.; Carp, C.; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and fluorescence lifetime of collagen and cholesterol solutions when excited with 337.1 nm radiation emitted by subnanosecond (700 psec) nitrogen pulsed laser are reported: absorption and excitation spectra of these biomolecules were obtained, too. The fluorescence excitation of collagen and cholesterol solutions was performed focusing the laser radiation on a CeramOptec quartz optical fiber with a core of 1000 micrometers . The fluorescence emission was collected using quartz optical fiber with a core of 800 micrometers . The collagen fluorescence spectra, at concentrations between 0.1 mg/ml and 5.0 mg/ml in acetic acid of initial concentrations 0.01%, 0.1% and 1%, respectively, in distilled water, exhibit a peak at 415 nm with FWHM of about 100 nm; the cholesterol fluorescence spectra, at concentrations from 0.1 mg/ml to 5.0 mg/ml in isopropyl alcohol, have a peak at 395 nm and FWHM of 60 nm. The higher values of LIF signals for cholesterol are due to the higher quantum yield. The measurements of LIF lifetimes were performed using a fast PIN photodiode with a rise time of about 200 psec. For collagen solutions a fluorescence lifetime of 5 nsec was obtained; for cholesterol solutions the measured fluorescence lifetime was 6 nsec. The overall errors in fluorescence lifetime measurements was 6%.

  8. Laser induced damage and fracture in fused silica vacuum windows

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Hurst, P.A.; Heggins, D.D.; Steele, W.A.; Bumpas, S.E.

    1996-11-01

    Laser-induced damage, that initiates catastrophic fracture, has been observed in large ({le}61 cm dia) fused silica lenses that also serve as vacuum barriers in Nova and Beamlet lasers. If the elastic stored energy in the lens is high enough, the lens will fracture into many pieces (implosion). Three parameters control the degree of fracture in the vacuum barrier window: elastic stored energy (tensile stress), ratio of window thickness to flaw depth, and secondary crack propagation. Fracture experiments were conducted on 15-cm dia fused silica windows that contain surface flaws caused by laser damage. Results, combined with window failure data on Beamlet and Nova, were used to develop design criteria for a ``fail-safe`` lens (that may catastrophically fracture but not implode). Specifically, the window must be made thick enough so that the peak tensile stress is less than 500 psi (3.4 MPa) and the thickness/critical flaw size is less than 6. The air leak through the window fracture and into the vacuum must be rapid enough to reduce the load on the window before secondary crack growth occurs. Finite element stress calculations of a window before and immediately following fracture into two pieces show that the elastic stored energy is redistributed if the fragments ``lock`` in place and thereby bridge the opening. In such cases, the peak stresses at the flaw site can increase, leading to further (i.e. secondary) crack growth.

  9. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M. P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.; Varoli, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50-75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  10. Laser-Induced Incandescence Measurements in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    A low-gravity environment offers advantages to investigations concerned with soot growth or flame radiation by eliminating of buoyancy-induced convection. Basic to each type of study is knowledge of spatially resolved soot volume fraction, (f(sub v). Laser-induced incandescence (LII) has emerged as a diagnostic for soot volume fraction determination because it possesses high temporal and spatial resolution, geometric versatility and high sensitivity. Implementation and system characterization of LII in a drop tower that provides 2.2 sec of low-gravity (micro)g) at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described here. Validation of LII for soot volume fraction determination in (micro)g is performed by comparison between soot volume fraction measurements obtained by light extinction [20] and LII in low-gravity for a 50/50 mixture (by volume) of 0 acetylene/nitrogen issuing into quiescent air. Quantitative soot volume fraction measurements within other laminar flames of ethane and propane and a turbulent diffusion flame in (micro)g via LII are also demonstrated. An analysis of LII images of a turbulent acetylene diffusion flame in 1-g and (micro)g is presented.

  11. Dust Removal on Mars Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Anderson, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Dust coatings on the surface of Mars complicate and, if sufficiently thick, mask the spectral characteristics and compositional determination of underlying material from in situ and remote sensing instrumentation. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) portion of the Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instrument, aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, will be the first active remote sensing technique deployed on Mars able to remove dust. ChemCam utilizes a 5 ns pulsed 1067 nm high-powered laser focused to less than 400 m diameter on targets at distances up to 7 m [1,2]. With multiple laser pulses, dust and weathering coatings can be remotely analyzed and potentially removed using this technique [2,3]. A typical LIBS measurement during MSL surface operations is planned to consist of 50 laser pulses at 14 mJ, with the first 5 to 10 pulses used to analyze as well as remove any surface coating. Additionally, ChemCam's Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) is capable of resolving 200 m details at a distance of 2 m, or 1 mm at 10 m [1,4]. In this study, we report on initial laboratory experiments conducted to characterize the removal of dust coatings using similar LIBS parameters as ChemCam under Mars-like conditions. These experiments serve to better understand the removal of surface dust using LIBS and to facilitate the analysis of ChemCam LIBS spectral data and RMI images.

  12. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Glass and Crystal Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prakash; Sandoval, Alejandra; Carter, Michael; Kumar, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    Different types of quartz crystals and rare earth ions doped glasses have been identified using the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. LIBS is a real time technique, can be used to identify samples in solid, liquid and gas phases. The advantage of LIBS technique is that no sample preparation is required and laser causes extremely minimal damage to the sample surface. The LIBS spectrum of silicate glasses, prepared by sol-gel method and doped with different concentration of rare earth ions, has been recorded. The limit of detection of rare earth ions in glass samples has been calculated. Total 10 spectrums of each sample were recorded and then averaged to get a final spectrum. The ocean optics LIBS2500 plus spectrometer along with a Q- switched Nd: YAG laser (Quantel, Big Sky) were used to record the LIBS spectrum. This spectrometer can analyze the sample in the spectral range of 200 nm to 980 nm. The spectrum was processed by OOILIBS-plus (v1.0) software. This study has application in the industry where different crystals can be easily identified before they go for shaping and polishing. Also, concentration of rare earth ions in glass can be monitored in real time for quality control.

  13. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W, A. Farooq; M, Atif; W, Tawfik; M, S. Alsalhi; Z, A. Alahmed; M, Sarfraz; J, P. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria.

  14. Laser-induced backside wet cleaning technique for glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Tsu-Shien; Tsai, Chwan-Huei

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the laser-induced backside wet cleaning techniques for glass substrates. Two kinds of laser cleaning techniques are proposed in this study. The first involves applying an Nd:YAG laser to the backside of the substrate which is submerged in water. A metal plate is placed below the glass substrate. Most of the laser energy will be absorbed by the metal plate. The metal then vaporizes the water and generates a turbulent bubble flow. The bubble flow removes the alumina particles from the surface of the glass substrate. The second involves using a CO2 laser to generate turbulent bubble flow to remove the particles. Both methods were successfully demonstrated for the removal of submicron particles of 0.5 ?m in size. The phenomena of bubble generation and diffusion are presented in the paper. Because the laser is applied to the backside of the substrate, the damage due to the laser heat can be significantly reduced. The quality and efficient of the backside processing is better than those of the front side processing. The proposed techniques have great potential to provide an improved solution for glass cleaning.

  15. Drift mechanism of laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgovsky, L.

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum is possible due to the ejection of electrons from the beam as a consequence of the transverse drift orthogonal to the propagation direction. The transverse drift is derived from the general solution of the equations of motion of the electrons in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave with arbitrary polarization. It is shown that the energy gain is proportional to the square of the field strength additionally modulated by the function of the injection and ejection phases. In particular, for a linearly polarized beam this function is reduced to the squared difference between the cosines of these phases. The finite laser pulse duration restricts the range of the field strength suitable for direct electron acceleration in vacuum within certain limits. It is demonstrated that the high efficiency of energy transfer from the laser wave into the kinetic energy of the accelerated electrons demands phase matching between the electron quiver phase at the exit point and the phase of the energy transfer.

  16. Measurement of Formaldehyde by Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cryer, D. R.; Ingham, T.; Whalley, L. K.; Heard, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Gas phase formaldehyde (HCHO) is a key species in the troposphere. It is formed as an intermediate product during the removal of almost all volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by the hydroxyl radical (OH) and is a tracer of overall oxidising capacity. A new instrument has been developed for the measurement of [HCHO] by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and deployed in the field. Ultra-violet (UV) radiation from a tuneable fibre laser was used to excite HCHO in a low pressure cell (~130 Torr) at ca. 353 nm with fluorescence collected between 390 - 550 nm. The resulting fluorescence was detected by a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and processed by photon counting techniques. The instrument performance will be described in detail in addition to a novel calibration method where a known quantity of HCHO was produced through photolysis of methanol (CH3OH) vapour in the presence of oxygen. The instrument was first deployed in June 2014 at a suburban site in York (UK). Data from this campaign and interpretation will be presented in addition to observations from more recent field measurements.

  17. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-06-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (< ~2.5?°C) in temperature at the surface of the skin, examined by both thermal camera and the Monte Carlo simulation, indicate that laser does not evoke heat-induced nociceptive sensation. In the human EEG study, brain responses to both mechanical and laser stimulation are consistent, along with subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli.

  18. Enhancing the analytical performance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, D.A.; Chinni, R.C.; Pichahchy, A.E.; Thornquist, H.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work is to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a method of elemental analysis in which powerful laser pulses are focused on a sample to form a microplasma. LIBS is perhaps the most versatile elemental analysis method, applicable to a variety of different real-world analysis problems. Therefore, it is important to enhance the capabilities of the method as much as possible. Accomplishments include: (1) demonstration of signal enhancements of 5--30 times from soils and metals using a double pulse method; (2) development of a model of the observed enhancement obtained using double pulses; (3) demonstration that the analytical performance achievable using low laser-pulse energies (10 and 25 mJ) can match that achievable using an energy of 100 mJ; and (4) demonstration that time-gated detection is not necessary with LIBS.

  19. Optofluidic tunable lenses using laser-induced thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingming; Jian, Aoqun; Li, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xuming

    2015-12-15

    This paper reports a new design of optofluidic tunable lens using a laser-induced thermal gradient. It makes use of two straight chromium strips at the bottom of the microfluidic chamber to absorb the continuous pump laser to heat up the moving benzyl alcohol solution, creating a 2D refractive index gradient in the entrance part between the two hot strips. This design can be regarded as a cascade of a series of refractive lenses, and is distinctively different from the reported liquid lenses that mimic the refractive lens design and the 1D gradient index lens design. CFD simulation shows that a stable thermal lens can be built up within 200 ms. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the continuous tuning of focal length from initially infinite to the minimum 1.3 mm, as well as the off-axis focusing by offsetting the pump laser spot. Data analyses show the empirical dependences of the focal length on the pump laser intensity and the flow velocity. Compared with previous studies, this tunable lens design enjoys many merits, such as fast tuning speed, aberration-free focusing, remote control, and enabling the use of homogeneous fluids for easy integration with other optofluidic systems. PMID:26584422

  20. Oxide nanoparticles synthesis via laser-induced plasma in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Taku; Weihs, Hansel; Honda, Mitsuhiro; Kulinich, Sergei; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2014-10-01

    Laser ablation in fluids has recently attracted a lot of attention as one of synthetic techniques to prepare new attractive nanomaterials, with the ability to control both product chemistry and morphology in many systems. In this study, we generated laser-induced plasma in H2O - ethanol mixtures, while ablating metal targets to produce oxide nanoparticles and to study the effect of the medium on their properties. The ablated targets used in this study were Zn or Sn plates. A nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 532 nm (10 Hz, 20--30 mJ/pulse) was applied to irradiate the targets. The liquid media were maintained at 0.1 to 30 MPa to study the effect of pressure. We found that the H2O/ethanol ratio (at atmospheric pressure) can control the properties of the produced ZnO nanoparticles, such as defects and oxidation degree. The properties were examined by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopies, and so on. More details will be presented at the symposium.

  1. Laser induced focusing for over-dense plasma beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Peter; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Mulser, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The capability of ion acceleration with high power, pulsed lasers has become an active field of research in the past years. In this context, the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism has been the topic of numerous theoretical and experimental publications. Within that mechanism, a high power, pulsed laser beam hits a thin film target. In contrast to the target normal sheath acceleration, the entire film target is accelerated as a bulk by the radiation pressure of the laser. Simulations predict heavy ion beams with kinetic energy up to GeV, as well as solid body densities. However, there are several effects which limit the efficiency of the RPA: On the one hand, the Rayleigh-Taylor-instability limits the predicted density. On the other hand, conventional accelerator elements, such as magnetic focusing devices are too bulky to be installed right after the target. Therefore, we present a new beam transport method, suitable for RPA-like/over-dense plasma beams: laser induced focusing.

  2. Intraoperative metastases detection by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Young, J. D.; Chandra, Mudjianto; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Beeder, Clain; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1991-06-01

    The authors studied the ability of Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) for the intraoperative identification of metastases using a photosensitizing agent Photofrin IIr to enhance spectroscopic detection. A He-Cd laser source (442 nm) was used to produce low-power illumination of tissue via a hand-held 400 micrometers fiberoptic probe. Through the same fiber, reflected and emitted light was returned to an optical multi-channel analyzer (OMA III) for analysis. Spectroscopic signals were displayed on a screen for immediate examination. Lobund Wistar rats, inoculated with Pollard rat adenocarcinoma cells, were used as an animal model. Photofrin IIr was administered intraperitoneal 24 or 48 hours prior to surgical exploration in doses varying from 0.75-7.5 mg/kg. Metastases detection was performed during abdominal exploration directed to ipsilateral and contralateral inguinal, iliac, para-aortic and renal lymph nodes. Nineteen tissue samples, identified as abnormal by LIFS, were removed for histologic analysis; 11 of these samples were larger than 5mm and histologic examination revealed malignancy in all cases. While LIFS signals showed malignancy in 8 tissue samples with dimensions less than 5mm, histology confirmed this in only 3. However, serial histologic sections were not performed. From the initial results, it was concluded that LIFS detection of malignant tissue is feasible and enhanced by the addition of Photofrin IIr. LIFS may be a promising technique for the intraoperative detection of primary malignant and metastatic tissue.

  3. Laser-induced thermoelastic effects can evoke tactile sensations.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Kim, Sung-Phil; Min Bae, Young; Park, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Seungmoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Hwa Park, Seung; Yeom, Dong-Il; Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Humans process a plethora of sensory information that is provided by various entities in the surrounding environment. Among the five major senses, technology for touch, haptics, is relatively young and has relatively limited applications largely due to its need for physical contact. In this article, we suggest a new way for non-contact haptic stimulation that uses laser, which has potential advantages such as mid-air stimulation, high spatial precision, and long working distance. We demonstrate such tactile stimulation can be enabled by laser-induced thermoelastic effects by means of physical and perceptual studies, as well as simulations. In the physical study, the mechanical effect of laser on a human skin sample is detected using low-power radiation in accordance with safety guidelines. Limited increases (< ~2.5?°C) in temperature at the surface of the skin, examined by both thermal camera and the Monte Carlo simulation, indicate that laser does not evoke heat-induced nociceptive sensation. In the human EEG study, brain responses to both mechanical and laser stimulation are consistent, along with subjective reports of the non-nociceptive sensation of laser stimuli. PMID:26047142

  4. DYNAMICS OF X-RAY-EMITTING EJECTA IN THE OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT PUPPIS A REVEALED BY THE XMM-NEWTON REFLECTION GRATING SPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tamagawa, Toru; Ohira, Yutaka; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2013-05-10

    Using the unprecedented spectral resolution of the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) on board XMM-Newton, we reveal dynamics of X-ray-emitting ejecta in the oxygen-rich supernova remnant Puppis A. The RGS spectrum shows prominent K-shell lines, including O VII He{alpha} forbidden and resonance, O VIII Ly{alpha}, O VIII Ly{beta}, and Ne IX He{alpha} resonance, from an ejecta knot positionally coincident with an optical oxygen-rich filament (the so-called {Omega} filament) in the northeast of the remnant. We find that the line centroids are blueshifted by 1480 {+-} 140 {+-} 60 km s{sup -1} (the first and second term errors are measurement and calibration uncertainties, respectively), which is fully consistent with that of the optical {Omega} filament. Line broadening at 654 eV (corresponding to O VIII Ly{alpha}) is obtained to be {sigma} {approx}< 0.9 eV, indicating an oxygen temperature of {approx}< 30 keV. Analysis of XMM-Newton MOS spectra shows an electron temperature of {approx}0.8 keV and an ionization timescale of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} s. We show that the oxygen and electron temperatures as well as the ionization timescale can be reconciled if the ejecta knot was heated by a collisionless shock whose velocity is {approx}600-1200 km s{sup -1} and was subsequently equilibrated due to Coulomb interactions. The RGS spectrum also shows relatively weak K-shell lines of another ejecta feature located near the northeastern edge of the remnant, from which we measure redward Doppler velocities of 650 {+-} 70 {+-} 60 km s{sup -1}.

  5. Color separation gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farn, Michael W.; Knowlden, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the theory, fabrication and test of a binary optics 'echelon'. The echelon is a grating structure which separates electromagnetic radiation of different wavelengths, but it does so according to diffraction order rather than by dispersion within one diffraction order, as is the case with conventional gratings. A prototype echelon, designed for the visible spectrum, is fabricated using the binary optics process. Tests of the prototype show good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  6. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  7. On chemical reactions in the laser-induced breakdown of a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, M. A.; Ovchinnikov, O. B.; Margulis, I. M.

    2006-06-01

    It is shown experimentally that a laser-induced breakdown of a liquid is accompanied by chemical reactions initiated by radicals and excited species formed in the spark. It is found that, in water, the laser-induced breakdown is accompanied by the dissociation of water and dissolved nitrogen molecules with the formation of HNO2 and HNO3, while, in a FeSO4 aqueous solution, by the Fe2+ ? Fe3+ oxidation reaction. It is assumed that the mechanism of the process is analogous to that of the action of ionizing radiations and the chemical action of ultrasonically induced cavitation (it is proposed that this mechanism of chemical action of a laser-induced spark proposed be termed indirect). Energy yields of these reactions are found to be of the same order of magnitude as for sonochemical redox reactions. It is shown that the laser-induced breakdown of an aqueous solution of maleic acid is accompanied by its stereoisomerization into fumaric acid, a process catalyzed by small amounts of an alkyl bromide. It is established that, for the formation of fumaric acid in a laser-induced spark, the energy yield is about five orders of magnitude higher than that typical of the above-mentioned redox reactions in the laser-induced spark.

  8. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction bymultilayer gratings

    E-print Network

    André, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings working by reflection or by transmission is investigated. The study is performed by generalizing the time-dependent coupled-wave theory previously developed for one-dimensional photonic crystal [Andr{\\'e} J-M and Jonnard P, J. Opt. 17, 085609 (2015)] and also by extending the Takagi-Taupin approach of the dynamical theory of diffraction. The indicial response is calculated. It presents a time-delay with a transient time that is a function of the extinction length for reflection geometry and of the extinction length combined with the thickness of the grating for transmission geometry.

  9. Laser-induced synergistic effects around absorbing nanoclusters in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Letfullin, Renat R.; Galitovskay, Elena

    2005-04-01

    Background and Objective: The application of nanotechnology for laser thermal-based killing of abnormal cells (e.g. cancer cells) targeted with absorbing nanoparticles (e.g. gold solid nanospheres, nanoshells, or rod) is becoming an extensive area of research. We develop an approach to enhance the efficiency of selective nanophotothermolysis of cancer cells through laser-induced synergistic effects around gold nanoparticles aggregated in nanoclusters on cell membrane. Study Design/Materials and Methods: A concept of selective target damages by laser-induced synergistic interaction of optical, thermal, and acoustic fields around clustered nanoparticles is presented with focus on overlapping bubbles from nanoparticles aggregated on cell's membrane. The experimental verification of this concept in vitro was performed by the use a tunable laser pulses (420-570 nm, 8-12 ns, 0.1-300 ?J, laser flux of 0.1-10 J/cm2) for irradiation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells targeted with primary antibodies to which selecttively 40-nm gold nanoparticles were attached by the means of secondary antibodies. The photothermal, electron and atomic force microscopes in combination with viability test (annexin -V-Propidium iodide) were employed to study the nanoparticle's spatial organization, the dynamics of microbubble formations around the particle's clusters, and cells damage. Results: An aggregation of nanoparticles on cell membrane was observed with simultaneous increase bubble formation phenomena, and red-shifted absorption due to plasmon-plasmon resonances into nanoclusters. It led to a significant enhancement, at least two orders of magnitude, of the efficiency of selectively killing cancer cells with nanosecond laser pulses. Conclusion: Described approach allows using relatively small nanoparticles which would be easier delivery to target site with further creation of nanoclusters with larger sizes which provide more profound thermal and related phenomena leading to more efficient laser killing of cancer cells. This nanocluster model might be promising also for treatment or modification different targets (e.g. bacteria, virus, vascular lesions, fat, etc.) as well as teh use different type energy deposition (focused ultrasound, microwave, magnetic field, etc.).

  10. Laser-induced charge-disproportionated metallic state in LaCoO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, M.; Karolak, M.; Trabant, C.; Holldack, K.; Föhlisch, A.; Kummer, K.; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A. T.; Spiwek, M.; Belozerov, A.; Poteryaev, A.; Lichtenstein, A.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the origin of the spin transition in LaCoO3 is one of the long-standing aims in condensed matter physics. Aside from its fundamental interest, a detailed description of this crossover will have a direct impact on the interpretation of the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) and the properties of the high-temperature metallic phase in this compound, which has shown to have important applications in environmentally friendly energy production. To date, the spin transition has been investigated mainly as a function of temperature in thermal equilibrium. These results have hinted at dynamical effects. In this paper, we have investigated the SMT by means of pump-probe soft x-ray reflectivity experiments at the O K , Co L , and La M edges and theoretical calculations within a DFT++ formalism. The results point towards a laser-induced metallization in which the optical transitions stabilize a metallic state with high-spin configuration and increased charge disproportionation.

  11. Production of aerosols by optical catapulting: Imaging, performance parameters and laser-induced plasma sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhamid, M.; Fortes, F. J.; Fernández-Bravo, A.; Harith, M. A.; Laserna, J. J.

    2013-11-01

    Optical catapulting (OC) is a sampling and manipulation method that has been extensively studied in applications ranging from single cells in heterogeneous tissue samples to analysis of explosive residues in human fingerprints. Specifically, analysis of the catapulted material by means of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers a promising approach for the inspection of solid particulate matter. In this work, we focus our attention in the experimental parameters to be optimized for a proper aerosol generation while increasing the particle density in the focal region sampled by LIBS. For this purpose we use shadowgraphy visualization as a diagnostic tool. Shadowgraphic images were acquired for studying the evolution and dynamics of solid aerosols produced by OC. Aluminum silicate particles (0.2-8 ?m) were ejected from the substrate using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, while time-resolved images recorded the propagation of the generated aerosol. For LIBS analysis and shadowgraphy visualization, a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm and 532 nm was employed, respectively. Several parameters such as the time delay between pulses and the effect of laser fluence on the aerosol production have been also investigated. After optimization, the particle density in the sampling focal volume increases while improving the aerosol sampling rate till ca. 90%.

  12. Temperature effect on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra of molten and solid salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Cynthia; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Scott, Jill R.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been investigated as a potential analytical tool to improve operations and safeguards for electrorefiners, such as those used in processing spent nuclear fuel. This study set out to better understand the effect of sample temperature and physical state on LIBS spectra of molten and solid salts by building calibration curves of cerium and assessing self-absorption, plasma temperature, electron density, and local thermal equilibrium (LTE). Samples were composed of a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, an internal standard of MnCl2, and varying concentrations of CeCl3 (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 wt.% Ce) under different temperatures (773, 723, 673, 623, and 573 K). Analysis of salts in their molten form is preferred as plasma plumes from molten samples experienced less self-absorption, less variability in plasma temperature, and higher clearance of the minimum electron density required for local thermal equilibrium. These differences are attributed to plasma dynamics as a result of phase changes. Spectral reproducibility was also better in the molten state due to sample homogeneity.

  13. Measurement of membrane tension of free standing lipid bilayers via laser-induced surface deformation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takei, Tomohiko; Yaguchi, Tatsuya; Fujii, Takuya; Nomoto, Tomonori; Toyota, Taro; Fujinami, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive measurement of the membrane tension of free-standing black lipid membranes (BLMs), with sensitivity on the order of ?N m(-1), was achieved using laser-induced surface deformation (LISD) spectroscopy. A BLM was vertically formed via the folding method and aqueous phases with different refractive indices were added on each side in order to induce radiation pressure by a laser beam. The dynamic response of the deformed BLMs was measured under periodic intensity modulation and their tensions could be estimated. The dependence of membrane tension on the cholesterol concentration of BLMs composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine was investigated, with the membrane tension increasing from 1.3 ?N m(-1) to 68.1 ?N m(-1) when the cholesterol concentration increased from zero to 33%. These tension values are much smaller than some of those previously reported, because this method does not suppress membrane fluctuation unlike other conventional methods. Our LISD system can be a promising tool for the measurement of membrane tension in BLMs. PMID:26371704

  14. Temperature effect on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra of molten and solid salts

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia Hanson; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Jill R. Scott

    2014-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been investigated as a potential analytical tool to improve operations and safeguards for electrorefiners, such as those used in processing spent nuclear fuel. This study set out to better understand the effect of sample temperature and physical state on LIBS spectra of molten and solid salts by building calibration curves of cerium and assessing self-absorption, plasma temperature, electron density, and local thermal equilibrium (LTE). Samples were composed of a LiCl–KCl eutectic salt, an internal standard of MnCl2, and varying concentrations of CeCl3 (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 wt.% Ce) under different temperatures (773, 723, 673, 623, and 573 K). Analysis of salts in their molten form is preferred as plasma plumes from molten samples experienced less self-absorption, less variability in plasma temperature, and higher clearance of the minimum electron density required for local thermal equilibrium. These differences are attributed to plasma dynamics as a result of phase changes. Spectral reproducibility was also better in the molten state due to sample homogeneity.

  15. Model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the major idea and mathematical aspects of model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are presented. In particular, a computational framework and its major components developed by authors in recent years are reviewed. The framework provides the backbone for not only treatment planning but also real-time surgical monitoring and control with a focus on MR thermometry enabled predictive control and applications to image-guided LITT, or MRgLITT. Although this computational framework is designed for LITT in treating prostate cancer, it is further applicable to other thermal therapies in focal lesions induced by radio-frequency (RF), microwave and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). Moreover, the model-based dynamic closed-loop predictive control algorithms in the framework, facilitated by the coupling of mathematical modelling and computer simulation with real-time imaging feedback, has great potential to enable a novel methodology in thermal medicine. Such technology could dramatically increase treatment efficacy and reduce morbidity. PMID:22098360

  16. Effect of focusing conditions on laser-induced shock waves at titanium-water interface.

    PubMed

    Nath, Arpita; Khare, Alika

    2011-07-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of laser-induced shock waves at a titanium-water interface was analyzed using a beam deflection setup. The focusing conditions of the source laser were varied, and its effect onto the dynamics of shock waves was elucidated. For a tightly focused condition, the speed of the shock wave was ~6.4 Km/s, whereas for a defocused condition the velocities reduced to <3 km/s at the vicinity of the titanium-water interface. When the laser is focused a few millimeters above the target, i.e., within the water, the emission of dual shock waves was observed toward the rear side of the focal volume. These shock waves originate from the titanium-water interface as well as from the pure water breakdown region, respectively. The shock wave pressure is estimated from the shock wave velocity using the Newton's second law across a shock wave discontinuity. The shock wave pressure for a tightly focused condition was 18 GPa, whereas under a defocused condition the pressure experienced was ?1 GPa in the proximity of target. PMID:21743529

  17. Effect of focusing conditions on laser-induced shock waves at titanium-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Arpita; Khare, Alika

    2011-07-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of laser-induced shock waves at a titanium-water interface was analyzed using a beam deflection setup. The focusing conditions of the source laser were varied, and its effect onto the dynamics of shock waves was elucidated. For a tightly focused condition, the speed of the shock wave was {approx}6.4 Km/s, whereas for a defocused condition the velocities reduced to <3 km/s at the vicinity of the titanium-water interface. When the laser is focused a few millimeters above the target, i.e., within the water, the emission of dual shock waves was observed toward the rear side of the focal volume. These shock waves originate from the titanium-water interface as well as from the pure water breakdown region, respectively. The shock wave pressure is estimated from the shock wave velocity using the Newton's second law across a shock wave discontinuity. The shock wave pressure for a tightly focused condition was 18 GPa, whereas under a defocused condition the pressure experienced was {<=}1 GPa in the proximity of target.

  18. Cooling profiles of laser induced temperature fields for superconducting vanadium nitrate products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emetere, Moses Eterigho

    2015-05-01

    The flexibility of vanadium nitrate makes it a good constituent for emerging superconductors. Its thermal instability engenders a disordered structure when doped by insulating constituents. The physics of the heat source i.e. the probe laser was theoretical derived to avoid deficiency of the superconducting material at low laser energy density. The mathematical experimentation was accomplished by queering the energy balance and heat conductivity of the individual constituents of the reagent. In-depth analysis of the layered distribution of laser induced temperature fields was carried out by cooling the compound via the forced convective cooling technique to about 150 °C. The material was gradual heated via the laser probe to its superconducting state. The structural defect which explained different state of the thermal outcomes were explained and proven to correspond with experimental outcomes. The temperature distribution under the irradiating laser intensity (0.45 W) shows an effective decay rate probability density function which is peculiar to the concept of photoluminescence. The dynamics of the electronic structure of thermally-excited superconducting materials is hinged on the complementary stoichiometry signatures, thermal properties amongst others. The maximum possible critical temperatures of the inter-layer were calculated to be about 206 K.

  19. Paper-based colorimetric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay fabricated by laser induced forward transfer

    PubMed Central

    Katis, Ioannis N.; Holloway, Judith A.; Madsen, Jens; Faust, Saul N.; Garbis, Spiros D.; Smith, Peter J. S.; Voegeli, David; Bader, Dan L.; Eason, Robert W.; Sones, Collin L.

    2014-01-01

    We report the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) of antibodies from a liquid donor film onto paper receivers for application as point-of-care diagnostic sensors. To minimise the loss of functionality of the active biomolecules during transfer, a dynamic release layer was employed to shield the biomaterial from direct exposure to the pulsed laser source. Cellulose paper was chosen as the ideal receiver because of its inherent bio-compatibility, liquid transport properties, wide availability and low cost, all of which make it an efficient and suitable platform for point-of-care diagnostic sensors. Both enzyme-tagged and untagged IgG antibodies were LIFT-printed and their functionality was confirmed via a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Localisation of the printed antibodies was exhibited, which can allow the creation of complex 2-d patterns such as QR codes or letters for use in a final working device. Finally, a calibration curve was determined that related the intensity of the colour obtained to the concentration of active antibodies to enable quantitative assessment of the device performance. The motivation for this work was to implement a laser-based procedure for manufacturing low-cost, point-of-care diagnostic devices on paper. PMID:24926392

  20. Pump-probe detection of laser-induced microbubble formation in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Roegener, Jan; Brinkmann, Ralf; Lin, Charles P

    2004-01-01

    Microsecond laser pulses are currently being investigated in a new ophthalmic procedure for treatment of disorders associated with the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The precise mechanism for microsecond laser-induced RPE damage, however, has not been determined. We have previously shown that short pulse laser irradiation in the nanosecond to picosecond time domain causes transient microbubble formation around melanin granules in pigmented cells. Nanosecond time-resolved microscopy was previously used to visualize the intracellular cavitation dynamics. However, this technique is difficult to use with microsecond laser exposures, especially when multiple laser pulses are applied in a rapid sequence as in the clinical setting. Here we describe a simple pump-probe method for detecting transient light scattering signal from individual RPE cells when they are irradiated with nanosecond and microsecond laser pulses. For single 12 ns pulses the threshold for bubble detection was the same as the ED(50) threshold for cell death. For 6 micros pulse duration the threshold for bubble detection was about 10% higher than the threshold for cell death. With repetitive pulse trains at 500 Hz the ED(50) decreased about 25% for 10 and 100 pulses. Cells die when a single bubble was detected in a multiple pulse sequence. PMID:15065904

  1. Gold coated nano gratings for atom optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonij, Vincent; Perreault, John; Kornilov, Oleg; Cronin, Alex

    2007-06-01

    The Van der Waals (VdW) interaction between neutral atoms is important to the dynamics of mechanical systems on nanometer scales. We used diffraction of sodium atoms from nano gratings to measure the Van der Waals potentials for atoms and different surfaces with improved precision. Atoms passing through the grating acquire an additional phase shift due to the attractive potential between the atoms and the grating bars, causing the diffraction pattern to be modified [1]. Previous measurements reported the VdW coefficient for sodium atoms and a silicon-nitride(SiNx) surface [2]. In our experiment we used a SiNx grating coated with a 2 nm layer of gold and we were able to measure a 40% increase in the VdW coefficient due to the gold. We also improved precision by combing results from the sodium diffraction experiment with results from a diffraction experiment with helium atoms on the same gratings. [1] R. E. Grisenti, W. Schollkopf, J. P. Toennies, G. C. Hegerfeldt, and T. Kohler. Phys. Rev. Lett., 83(9):1755, 1999. [2] J. D. Perreault, A. D. Cronin, and T. A. Savas. Phys. Rev. A, 71(5):053612, 2005.

  2. Laser Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the ASTRAL Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Munoz, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    A Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic is presented in this poster. The ion temperature measurements are made in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source using a diode laser based LIF diagnostic. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device (Langmuir Probe, Spectrometer, LIF system). The LIF diagnostic makes use of a diode laser with the following characteristics: 1.5 MHz bandwidth, Littrow external cavity, mode-hop free tuning range up to 16 GHz, total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a precision wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, a new LIF scheme has been developed. The laser tuned at 686.354 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F5/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 state. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 terms (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT.

  3. Coherence in ultrafast laser-induced periodic surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Li, Chen; Faure, Nicolas; Cheng, Guanghua; Stoian, Razvan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast laser irradiation can trigger anisotropically structured nanoscaled gratinglike arrangements of matter, the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs). We demonstrate here that the formation of LIPSS is intrinsically related to the coherence of the laser field. Employing several test materials that allow large optical excursions, we observe the effect of randomizing spatial phase in generating finite domains of ripples. Using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain methods, we evaluate energy deposition patterns below a material's rough surface and show that modulated pattern, i.e., a spatially ordered electromagnetic solution, results from the coherent superposition of waves. By separating the field scattered from a surface rough topography from the total field, the inhomogeneous energy absorption problem is reduced to a simple interference equation. We further distinguish the contribution of the scattered near field and scattered far field on various types of inhomogeneous energy absorption features. It is found that the inhomogeneous energy absorption which could trigger the low-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (LSFLs) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (HSFLs) of periodicity ? >? /Re(n ˜) are due to coherent superposition between the scattered far field (propagation) and the refracted field, while HSFLs of ? ? ) related to a feedback-driven topography evolution. Those results strongly suggest the electromagnetic interpretation of LIPSSs in interplay with an evolving surface topography.

  4. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained for a 15-m thick cloud of live BG located at a range of 400 m.

  5. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows extracting the best experimental conditions to obtain an efficient particle production and to avoid stability or oxidation problems. PMID:23742134

  6. Characterisation of CFRP surface contamination by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Pawel H.; Sawczak, Miroslaw; Wandowski, Tomasz; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw M.; Cenian, Adam

    2014-03-01

    The application of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in aeronautics has been increasing. The CFRP elements are joint using rivets and adhesive bonding. The reliability of the bonding limits the use of adhesive bonding for primary aircraft structures, therefore it is important to assess the bond quality. The performance of adhesive bonds depends on the physico-chemical properties of the adhered surfaces. This research is focused on characterization of surfaces before bonding. In-situ examination of large surface materials, determine the group of methods that are preferred. The analytical methods should be non-destructive, enabling large surface analysis in relatively short time. In this work a spectroscopic method was tested that can be potentially applied for surface analysis. Four cases of surface condition were investigated that can be encountered either in the manufacturing process or during aircraft service. The first case is related to contamination of CFRP surface with hydraulic fluid. This fluid reacts with water forming a phosphoric acid that can etch the CFRP. Second considered case was related to silicone-based release agent contamination. These agents are used during the moulding process of composite panels. Third case involved moisture content in CFRP. Moisture content lowers the adhesion quality and leads to reduced performance of CFRP resulting in reduced performance of the adhesive bond. The last case concentrated on heat damage of CFRP. It was shown that laser induced fluorescence method can be useful for non-destructive evaluation of CFRP surface and some of the investigated contaminants can be easily detected.

  7. Laser induced spark ignition of methane-oxygen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santavicca, D. A.; Ho, C.; Reilly, B. J.; Lee, T.-W.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an experimental study of laser induced spark ignition of methane-oxygen mixtures are presented. The experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure and 296 K under laminar pre-mixed and turbulent-incompletely mixed conditions. A pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser was used as the ignition source. Laser sparks with energies of 10 mJ and 40 mJ were used, as well as a conventional electrode spark with an effective energy of 6 mJ. Measurements were made of the flame kernel radius as a function of time using pulsed laser shadowgraphy. The initial size of the spark ignited flame kernel was found to correlate reasonably well with breakdown energy as predicted by the Taylor spherical blast wave model. The subsequent growth rate of the flame kernel was found to increase with time from a value less than to a value greater than the adiabatic, unstretched laminar growth rate. This behavior was attributed to the combined effects of flame stretch and an apparent wrinkling of the flame surface due to the extremely rapid acceleration of the flame. The very large laminar flame speed of methane-oxygen mixtures appears to be the dominant factor affecting the growth rate of spark ignited flame kernels, with the mode of ignition having a small effect. The effect of incomplete fuel-oxidizer mixing was found to have a significant effect on the growth rate, one which was greater than could simply be accounted for by the effect of local variations in the equivalence ratio on the local flame speed.

  8. Analysis of slags using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghapi, Hervé K.; Ayyalasomayajula, Krishna K.; Yueh, Fang Y.; Singh, Jagdish P.; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Jain, Jinesh C.; Nakano, Jinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the analysis of gasification slags was investigated by comparing LIBS results to the results of an ICP-OES analyzer. A small amount of slag sample was placed on a piece of double sided adhesive tape attached to a glass microscope slide and analyzed for Al, Ca, Fe, Si, and V which are major elements found in slags. The partial least squares regression (PLS-R) and univariate simple linear regression (SLR) calibration methods indicated that apart from V (accuracy up to + 20%) the accuracy of analysis varies within 0.35-6.5% for SLR and 0.06-10% for PLS-R. A paired-sample t-test within the 95% confidence level yielded p-values greater than 0.05, meaning no appreciable statistical difference was observed between the univariate SLR with internal standardization and the multivariate PLS-R for most of the analytes. From the results obtained in this work, LIBS response varies depending on the element and the technique used for quantitative analysis. Simultaneous use of the univariate calibration curves with internal standard (intensity ratio) and PLS regression in multi-elemental analysis can help reduce the matrix effect of slags associated to their high variation in concentration. Overall, these results demonstrate the capability of LIBS as an alternative technique for analyzing gasification slags. Estimated limits of detection for Al, Ca, Fe, Si and V were 0.167, 0.78, 0.171, 0.243 and 0.01 wt.%, respectively.

  9. Measurement of high viscosity with laser induced surface deformation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitake, Y.; Mitani, S.; Sakai, K.; Takagi, K.

    2005-01-15

    A technique for viscosity measurement was developed based on the principle of laser-induced surface deformation. Light incident into liquids increases its momentum due to the difference in refractive index and gives the surface an upward force as a reaction. The plane surface thus swells up and deforms, and the shape is determined so that the force is balanced with the surface tension and the gravity. On sudden laser irradiation, the deformation inevitably accompanies a viscous flow and exhibits a relaxational behavior with a delay time, which gives the viscosity. Theoretical prediction of the step-response function was given that takes surface tension waves excited by the laser into consideration. Nd-yttritium-aluminum-garnet laser with 0.6 W output was focused to {approx}200 {mu}m beam waist and used for the pumping. The deformation process was observed sensitively with another probe laser illuminating the activated area. This system was tested with the standard liquids for viscosity ranging from 1 to 10{sup 6} cSt. The results demonstrated the validity of this technique, though a correction for the inertia effect was needed in the range lower than 10 cSt. Further, effect of the thermal expansion by a slight optical absorption was discussed. This technique is especially useful at high viscosities since the measurement takes only a few seconds even in the specimen with 10{sup 6} cSt. Besides the rapidity, it has a great advantage of a noncontact feature and is appropriate for measuring the liquids that strongly dislike contamination. It has also potential applications in industries, measurement of liquids isolated in a production line, for instance.

  10. Improved assessment of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Hassanain S.; Barnett, Joshua M.; Penn, John S.; Kim, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop and evaluate new methods of analyzing laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV), in order to make recommendations for improving the reporting of experimental CNV in the literature. Six laser burns of sufficient power to rupture Bruch's membrane were concentrically placed in each eye of 18 adult Norway rats. Eyes received intravitreal injections of either triamcinolone acetonide, ketorolac, or balanced salt solution (BSS). Fluorescein angiography (FA) was performed 2 and 3 weeks after injection, followed by choroidal flat mount preparation. Vascular leakage on FAs and vascular budding on choroidal mounts were quantified by measuring either the cross-sectional area of each CNV lesion contained within the best-fitting polygon using Adobe Photoshop (Lasso Technique or Quick Selection Technique), or the area of bright pixels within a lesion using Image-Pro Plus. On choroidal mounts, the Lasso Technique and Image-Pro Plus detected a significant difference in lesion size between either ketorolac or triamcinolone when compared to BSS, while the Quick Selection Technique did not (Lasso Technique, 0.78 and 0.64; Image-Pro Plus, 0.77 and 0.65). On FA, the Lasso Technique and Quick Selection Technique detected a significant difference in lesion size between either ketorolac or triamcinolone when compared to BSS, while Image-Pro Plus did not (Lasso Tool, 0.81 and 0.54; Quick Selection Tool, 0.76 and 0.57). Choroidal mounts and FA are both valuable for imaging experimental CNV. Adobe Photoshop and Image-Pro Plus are both able to detect subtle differences in CNV lesion size, when images are not manipulated. The combination of choroidal mounts and FA provides a more comprehensive assessment of CNV anatomy and physiology. PMID:20553963

  11. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  12. Remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for lunar exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, J.; Wiens, R. C.; Clegg, S. M.; Vaniman, D. T.; Joy, K. H.; Humphries, S.; Mezzacappa, A.; Melikechi, N.; McInroy, R. E.; Bender, S.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an active analytical technique that makes use of a laser pulse to analyze materials of interest at a distance by creating a plasma, which emits photons at characteristic emission line wavelengths. We validate the technique for planetary exploration under vacuum conditions. We review the capability and advantages of the LIBS technique for lunar regolith analysis at 1.5 m distance from a lunar rover, and we characterize its potential for the detection of resources for future exploration, such as the determination of regolith water content. The limits of detection determined for the major elements (typically <1 wt %) help to determine regolith parent material such as feldspathic highland rocks, rocks from the ancient magmatic high magnesian suite (Mg-suite), Fe-rich mare basalts or potassium, rare earth element, and phosphorus-rich (KREEP-rich) samples. Compositional parameters commonly used to classify lunar regoliths such as TiO2, Al2O3, and K2O abundances are readily determined by LIBS. Certain elements support regolith analysis: For example, Ba and Zr can be used to confirm KREEP-like composition, while quantifying the Ni and Co content can be used to infer the amount of meteoritic material. Finally, it is shown that the ice content of lunar soil produces strong H emissions with the LIBS techniques at the 25 wt % H2O level, while measurements on altered basalts give a limit of detection of about 1 wt % for H2O content. This demonstrates that the 5.6 wt % water content detected by the recent LCROSS experiment should be easily detectable and quantifiable by LIBS analysis.

  13. Standoff laser-induced thermal emission of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán-Freyle, Nataly Y.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Figueroa-Navedo, Amanda; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    A laser mediated methodology for remote thermal excitation of analytes followed by standoff IR detection is proposed. The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of using laser induced thermal emission (LITE) from vibrationally excited explosives residues deposited on surfaces to detect explosives remotely. Telescope based FT-IR spectral measurements were carried out to examine substrates containing trace amounts of threat compounds used in explosive devices. The highly energetic materials (HEM) used were PETN, TATP, RDX, TNT, DNT and ammonium nitrate with concentrations from 5 to 200 ?g/cm2. Target substrates of various thicknesses were remotely heated using a high power CO2 laser, and their mid-infrared (MIR) thermally stimulated emission spectra were recorded. The telescope was configured from reflective optical elements in order to minimize emission losses in the MIR frequencies and to provide optimum overall performance. Spectral replicas were acquired at a distance of 4 m with an FT-IR interferometer at 4 cm- 1 resolution and 10 scans. Laser power was varied from 4-36 W at radiation exposure times of 10, 20, 30 and 60 s. CO2 laser powers were adjusted to improve the detection and identification of the HEM samples. The advantages of increasing the thermal emission were easily observed in the results. Signal intensities were proportional to the thickness of the coated surface (a function of the surface concentration), as well as the laser power and laser exposure time. For samples of RDX and PETN, varying the power and time of induction of the laser, the calculated low limit of detections were 2 and 1 ?g/cm2, respectively.

  14. Electro-optical tunable waveguide Bragg gratings in lithium niobate induced by femtosecond laser writing.

    PubMed

    Horn, W; Kroesen, S; Herrmann, J; Imbrock, J; Denz, C

    2012-11-19

    We report the fabrication of femtosecond laser-induced, first-order waveguide Bragg gratings in lithium niobate in the low repetition rate regime. Type-II waveguides are written into an x-cut lithium niobate wafer and structured periodically to achieve narrowband reflections at wavelengths around 1550 nm. Additionally, electrodes are employed to allow for electro-optic tuning of the spectral response. We demonstrate wavelength control of the central reflection peak by applying a static external electric field. A maximum shift of the reflection peak of ?? = 625 pm is observed. PMID:23187546

  15. Suppression of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization by intravitreal injection of tristetraprolin

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong Wun; Han, Yong Seop; Chung, In Young; Kim, Seong Jae; Seo, Seong Wook; Yoo, Ji Myong; Park, Jong Moon

    2014-01-01

    AIM To examine the effect of intravitreal adenoviral vector-mediated tristetraprolin (Ad-TTP) on VEGF mRNA expression in a rat model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization. METHODS Ad-TTP was prepared using a commercial kit. Retinal laser-induced photocoagulation (10 spots per eye) was performed on rats in this experimental choroidal neovascularization (CNV) model. Rats were divided into four groups: control (single intravitreal injection of balanced salt solution, n=10), laser-induced CNV (photocoagulation only, n=20), laser-induced CNV plus Ad-TTP injection (photocoagulation plus a single intravitreal Ad-TTP injection, n=20) and Ad-TTP injection only (n=10). Changes in choroidal morphology were evaluated in ten rats in the laser only and the laser plus Ad-TTP groups. Two weeks after laser injury, the size of CNV was calculated by perfusion with high-molecular-weight fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran. VEGF mRNA expression in retina-choroid tissue from ten rats in each group was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS Two weeks after treatment, the area of laser-induced CNV was reduced by approximately 60% in the rats given the Ad-TTP injection compared with that in the laser-only group. There was a tendency toward decreased VEGF mRNA expression in the Ad-TTP injection groups. CONCLUSION A single intravitreal injection of Ad-TTP significantly suppressed CNV size in this experimental laser-induced CNV model. Ad-TTP injection also decreased VEGF mRNA expression compared with that in the laser-induced CNV group. The present study is meaningful as the first study to investigate the effect of tristetraprolin delivered via intravitreal injection. PMID:25540745

  16. Experimental study of the spectral characteristics of laser-induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhaoxiang; Wu Jinquan; Sun Fenglou; Gong Shunsheng

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of laser-induced air, N2, and O2 plasma spectra are investigated spectroscopically. The study concentrates mainly on the temporal behavior of laser-induced plasma after breakdown. We used delayed spectra and spectra evolution for this study. Except for the general one-beam laser-induced breakdown experiment, a second laser beam was added to further probe the behavior of plasma during its decay. We report the experimental results of spectra composition, spectra time evolution, and spectra affected by a second laser beam. We determined that all the laser-induced air plasma spectra are from a continuous spectrum and some line spectra superposed on the continuous spectrum. The stronger short wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons in the plasma, and the weaker long wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by electron and ion recombination. Line spectra originate from excited molecules, atoms, and their first-order ions, but no line spectra form higher-order ions. The results show that the temporal behavior of some spectra is a decay-rise-redecay pattern. With the two laser beam experiment we found that all the spectra intensities are enhanced by the second laser beam, but the response of various spectra to the delay of the second laser beam is quite different, in particular, the intensity increments of some spectra increase with the delay of the second laser beam. Some microscopic processes of laser-induced plasma obtained from the experimental results are discussed. These results are useful for a better understanding of some laser-induced air plasma related applications, such as laser-guided lightning and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  17. Experimental and calculative estimation of femtosecond laser induced-impulsive force in culture medium solution with motion analysis of polymer micro-beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Takeshi; Maruyama, Akihiro; Uedan, Hirohisa; Iino, Takanori; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh

    2015-03-01

    A new methodology to estimate the dynamics of femtosecond laser-induced impulsive force generated into water under microscope was developed. In this method, the position shift of the bead in water before and after the femtosecond laser irradiation was investigated experimentally and compared with motion equation assuming stress wave propagation with expansion and collapse the cavitation bubble. In the process of the comparison, parameters of force and time of the stress wave were determined. From these results, dynamics of propagations of shock and stress waves, cavitation bubble generation, and these actions to micro-objects were speculated.

  18. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842?m at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  19. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  20. Grateful Med: getting started.

    PubMed

    Shearer, B; McCann, L; Crump, W J

    1990-01-01

    When a local medical library is not available, it is often necessary for physicians to discover alternate ways to receive medical information. Rural physicians, particularly, can make use of a computer program called Grateful Med that provides access to the same literature available to physicians in large cities. This program permits the user to perform database searches on the National Library of Medicine database (MEDLINE), corresponding to the primary index to medical literature, Index Medicus. In this article, we give the procedure for procuring a National Library of Medicine password and for making efficient use of the Grateful Med program. PMID:2407046

  1. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in Geochemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis is being applied to an increasing number of geochemical problems, including mineral and rock analysis on the Mars rover Curiosity, elemental concentrations in ore minerals, identification of ore minerals, provenance determination of gems and other conflict minerals, geochemical mapping, correlation of rock units, and sample screening. LIBS is a laser ablation technique in which the photons emitted from electron transitions in the cooling plasma are diffracted and recorded as a spectrum. LIBS has several characteristics that set it apart from traditional, lab-based techniques. First, LIBS is relatively simple and requires no sample preparation, resulting in analysis that is portable, in situ, real-time, rapid, and inexpensive (in terms of equipment purchase, maintenance, and operating personnel). Second, each LIBS spectrum contains an enormous amount of information about the material. Most elements emit photons in the typical LIBS spectral range (200-1000 nm). Spectral interferences for which corrections are necessary in traditional techniques are additional, useful information in the LIBS spectrum, and recent work has demonstrated that some isotopic ratios can be measured with LIBS data. Thus, LIBS spectra are detailed chemical fingerprints of materials and the use of multivariate analysis can resolve issues that have been untouchable using traditional techniques. A good example is determination of country of origin for rubies and sapphires. Concentrations of key trace elements, as analyzed by LA-ICP-MS, have been used with marginal success to demonstrate that different deposits yield rubies or sapphires with unique, identifiable compositions. However, the fields for each deposit overlap in the 2- or 3-component diagrams commonly used. In contrast, it is possible to determine country of origin with greater than 90% accuracy using LIBS data, in which the intensities of 13,700 wavelengths are used as variables in multivariate analysis. Because LIBS spectra can accurately compare materials to each other, LIBS has great potential for rapid, field-based correlation, chemical mapping, and screening samples for further analysis. It also has potential for analytical situations in which we currently use high-precision data to ask the question "Are these materials the same or different?" For instance, trace element concentrations are used to identify sub-populations within detrital zircons of the same age. LIBS data may more easily distinguish such sub-populations.

  2. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the C3N radical.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Kennosuke; Endo, Yasuki

    2007-11-14

    Electronic spectra of the C3N radical have been observed for the first time in the near ultraviolet wavelength region by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. Seventeen vibronic bands of the B 2Pii-X 2Sigma+ electronic transition system of C3N were identified in LIF spectra of products in a discharge of HC3N. The origin of the B 2Pii state was determined to be 27,929.985(1) cm(-1) from rovibrational analyses. It was found that observations of two types of 2Sigma vibronic levels, which have 2Sigma+ and 2Sigma+/- symmetries originated from excitations of the nu4 trans-bending mode (omega4=369.1(20) cm(-1)) with a large Renner-Teller (RT) interaction (epsilon4=-0.1549(50)), and the nu5 cis-bending mode (omega5=163.24(84) cm(-1)) with a small Renner-Teller interaction (epsilon5=-0.0503(68)), respectively. Vibronic levels, with excitations of the C-C stretching (omega3=869.7 cm(-1)) mode, were also identified. The spin-orbit interaction constant was determined to be Aso=-36.7(50) cm(-1) from the RT analysis. In dispersed fluorescence spectra from B 2Pii, vibrational structures of the low-lying electronically excited A 2Pii state were clearly observed with a strong progression due to the nu3' mode, together with those of the X 2Sigma+ state with weak intensities. The origin of A 2Pii, T0=1844(3) cm(-1), and the vibrational frequencies, omega3'=883(3) cm(-1) and omega5'=121(3) cm(-1) for A 2Pii, and omega3"=1054(3) cm(-1), omega4"=405(3) cm(-1), and omega5"=131(3) cm(-1) for X 2Sigma+, were determined. Time profiles of fluorescence from B 2Pii have short (50-200 ns) and long (>1 micros) decay components with quantum beats, indicating that there is a competition between radiative decay and the nonradiative internal conversion to vibrationally highly excited A 2Pii and X 2Sigma+. PMID:18020636

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in gases using ungated detection in combination with polarization filtering and online background correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, J.; Tröger, J. W.; Seeger, T.; Leipertz, A.; Li, B.; Li, Z. S.; Aldén, M.

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative and fast analysis of gas mixtures is an important task in the field of chemical, security and environmental analysis. In this paper we present a diagnostic approach based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A polarization filter in the signal collection system enables sufficient suppression of elastically scattered light which otherwise reduces the dynamic range of the measurement. Running the detector with a doubled repetition rate as compared to the laser online background correction is obtained. Quantitative measurements of molecular air components in synthetic, ambient and expiration air are performed and demonstrate the potential of the method. The detection limits for elemental oxygen and hydrogen are in the order of 15 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of various carbon nanostructures (GO, G and nanodiamond) in Rd6G solution.

    PubMed

    Bavali, A; Parvin, P; Mortazavi, S Z; Nourazar, S S

    2015-05-01

    The effect of carbon nanostructures such as graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and nanodiamond (ND) on the spectral properties of Rhodamine 6G (Rd6G) emission due to the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated. It is shown that the addition of carbon nano- structures lead to sensible Red/Blue shifts which depend on the optical properties and surface functionality of nanoparticles. The current theories such as resonance energy transfer (RET), fluorescence quenching and photon propagation in scattering media support the experimental findings. Stern-Volmer curves for dynamic and static quenching of Rd6G molecules embedded with G, GO and nanodiamond are correlated with spectral shifts. Furthermore, time evolution of the spectral shift contributes to determine loading/release rates of fluorescent species with large S-parameter on the given nano-carriers. PMID:26137372

  5. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of various carbon nanostructures (GO, G and nanodiamond) in Rd6G solution

    PubMed Central

    Bavali, A.; Parvin, P.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Nourazar, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of carbon nanostructures such as graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and nanodiamond (ND) on the spectral properties of Rhodamine 6G (Rd6G) emission due to the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated. It is shown that the addition of carbon nano- structures lead to sensible Red/Blue shifts which depend on the optical properties and surface functionality of nanoparticles. The current theories such as resonance energy transfer (RET), fluorescence quenching and photon propagation in scattering media support the experimental findings. Stern-Volmer curves for dynamic and static quenching of Rd6G molecules embedded with G, GO and nanodiamond are correlated with spectral shifts. Furthermore, time evolution of the spectral shift contributes to determine loading/release rates of fluorescent species with large S-parameter on the given nano-carriers. PMID:26137372

  6. Direct visualization of secretion from single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.; Yeung, E.S.

    1998-03-01

    Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved with laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy. By monitoring the native fluorescence of catecholamines excited by the 275 nm laser line with an intensified charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera, we obtained good temporal and spatial resolution simultaneously without using additional fluorescent probes. Large variations were found among individual cells in terms of the amounts of catecholamines secreted and the rates of secretion. Different regions of a cell also behave differently during the secretion process. However, the degree of this local heterogeneity is smaller than in neurons and neuralgia. The influence of deep-ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation on cells is also discussed. This quantitative imaging technique provides a useful noninvasive approach for the study of dynamic cellular changes and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretory processes. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  7. Optical diagnostics of the laser-induced phase transformations in thin germanium films on silicon, sapphire, and fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, H. A.; Batalov, R. I.; Bayazitov, R. M.; Faizrakhmanov, I. A.; Ivlev, G. D.; Prokop'ev, S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The in-situ procedure is used to study the modification of thin (200-600 nm) germanium films induced by nanosecond pulses of a ruby laser. The films are produced using the ion-beam or magnetron sputtering on single-crystalline silicon (Si), sapphire (Al2O3), and fused silica (?-SiO2) substrates. The results on the dynamics of the laser-induced processes are obtained using the optical probing of the irradiated region at wavelengths of ? = 0.53 and 1.06 ?m. The results of probing make it possible to determine the threshold laser energy densities that correspond to the Ge and Si melting and the generation of the Ge ablation plasma versus the amount of deposited Ge and thermophysical parameters of the substrate. The reflection oscillograms are used to obtain the dependences of the melt lifetime on the laser-pulse energy density.

  8. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustic Measurements in a Highly Back-Pressured Scramjet Isolator Model: A Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert J.; Baurle, Robert A.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2008-01-01

    Under the Propulsion Discipline of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Hypersonics Project, a test apparatus, for testing a scramjet isolator model, is being constructed at NASA's Langley Research Center. The test apparatus will incorporate a 1-inch by 2-inch by 15-inch-long scramjet isolator model supplied with 2.1 lbm/sec of unheated dry air through a Mach 2.5 converging-diverging nozzle. The planned research will incorporate progressively more challenging measurement techniques to characterize the flow field within the isolator, concluding with the application of the Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustic (LITA) measurement technique. The primary goal of this research is to use the data acquired to validate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models employed to characterize the complex flow field of a scramjet isolator. This paper describes the test apparatus being constructed, pre-test CFD simulations, and the LITA measurement technique.

  9. Gratings and waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, K. A.; Erwin, J. K.; Li, L.; Burke, J. J.; Ramanujam, N.

    1993-01-01

    Our immediate objective is to understand the limitations of guided-wave and grating coupler devices in their application to optical data storage. Our long-range goal is to develop and validate design codes for integrated optic devices. The principal research activity was in the development of numerical models for the design of a blue wavelength integrated optical source for data storage applications.

  10. Laser-induced plasmas in ambient air for incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruth, Albert A; Dixneuf, Sophie; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-03-01

    The emission from a laser-induced plasma in ambient air, generated by a high power femtosecond laser, was utilized as pulsed incoherent broadband light source in the center of a quasi-confocal high finesse cavity. The time dependent spectra of the light leaking from the cavity was compared with those of the laser-induced plasma emission without the cavity. It was found that the light emission was sustained by the cavity despite the initially large optical losses of the laser-induced plasma in the cavity. The light sustained by the cavity was used to measure part of the S(1) ? S(0) absorption spectrum of gaseous azulene at its vapour pressure at room temperature in ambient air as well as the strongly forbidden ?-band in molecular oxygen: b(1)?(g)(+)(?'=2)?X(3)?(g)(-)(?''=0). PMID:25836833

  11. High-resolution printing of functional microdots by double-pulse laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narazaki, Aiko; Kurosaki, Ryozo; Sato, Tadatake; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    For high-resolution printing, we have developed a novel way of functional microdots deposition based on laser-induced forward transfer, which is referred to laser-induced dot transfer (LIDT). LIDT is one of promising additive manufacturing techniques because it can realize flexible patterning of micron and submicron-sized dots at atmospheric room-temperature conditions. Recently we have achieved printing of functional oxide microdots by a double-pulse LIDT with the first pulse for preheat and the second pulse for transfer, resulting in more precise control of laser-induced hightemperature and thermal-stress in a source film. In this paper, temporal temperature distributions during the transfer process have been investigated using a finite element method approach. High-resolution printing of functional microdots is promising for future optoelectronic integrations.

  12. Analysis of plutonium oxide surrogate residue using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hongbo; Yueh, Fang Yu; Miller, Tracy; Singh, Jagdish P.; Zeigler, Kristine E.; Marra, James C.

    2008-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental composition of a CeO 2 composite powder for process control verification during lanthanide borosilicate glass fabrication. Cerium oxide is used as a surrogate for plutonium oxide, which along with other canister contents will be combined with frit to make glass. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy data for the composition of the CeO 2 batch containing concentrations of Ce, Cr, Si, Fe, Ta, Ni, Zn, Al Mg, Gd, and W were quantitatively determined from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra of both pellet and powder samples. The results of both forms were compared and it was determined that the pellet data gave slightly better precision than the powder sample.

  13. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of Cu at the micron/sub-micron scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Vassilia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    While femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy has been studied in the macro-scale (i.e. ablation crater sizes of tens to hundreds of micrometers), the spectral emission mechanisms at the micron/sub-micron scale remain largely unknown, mainly because of the challenges associated with spectral emission acquisition from the limited amounts of ablated mass at these small lengthscales. In this work we study the limits of detection, the laser-induced plasma properties and spectral emission efficiency of Cu at the micron/submicron scale. Although the corresponding number electron densities and temperatures are similar to those reported for macroscale laser ablation, our findings suggest less efficient luminous spectral emission per ablated volume as we scale down in laser energy and crater sizes. These results provide a first insight into fs laser-induced plasma properties at the micron/sub-micron scale regime.

  14. Anti-SPARC oligopeptide inhibits laser-induced CNV in mice

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Hironori; Luo, Ling; Simonis, Jacquelyn; Singh, Nirbhai; Taylor, Ethan Will; Ambati, Balamurali K.

    2010-01-01

    It is known that SPARC gates VEGF-A signal transduction towards KDR, the primary angiogenic VEGF receptor. We sought to determine whether inhibition of SPARC activity using anti-SPARC peptide could inhibit laser-induced CNV by promoting binding of VEGF-A to FLT-1. We created anti-SPARC L-peptide and retro-inverso anti-SPARC D-peptide. Anti-SPARC peptides or PBS were injected intravitreally one day before or after laser induction. Intravitreal injection of anti-SPARC L-peptide one day before laser induction promotes Flt-1 phosphorylation and inhibited laser-induced CNV and anti-SPARC D-peptide had no effect. Injection one day after laser injury did not affect size of laser-induced CNV. Inhibition of SPARC activity could be complementary to existing anti–CNV therapy. PMID:20005890

  15. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1998-05-26

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating is disclosed. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers). 14 figs.

  16. Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water

    E-print Network

    E. V. Barmina; P. G. Kuzmin; S. F. Timashev; G. A. Shafeev

    2013-06-03

    The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 10E10-10E13 Watts per square centimeter. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

  17. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 ; Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing; State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  18. On-Demand Patterning of Indium Tin Oxide Microdots by Laser-Induced Dot Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narazaki, Aiko; Kurosaki, Ryozo; Sato, Tadatake; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-01

    Laser-induced dot transfer is an innovative micropatterning technique that realizes on-demand microdot deposition under room-temperature atmospheric conditions. Based on this method, we have developed site- and size-controlled micropatterning of oxide materials. As a model case, indium tin oxide (ITO) microdots were arrayed on a receiver substrate. A nanosecond, 266 nm laser pulse was focused onto the interface between the ITO film and transparent support, causing the ejection of a single ITO microdroplet. The dependence of the transferred structures on the film thickness as well as the laser-induced film temperature distribution has been investigated by both experimental and finite elemental approaches.

  19. Using laser-induced Coulomb explosion of aligned chiral molecules to determine their absolute configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lauge; Nielsen, Jens H.; Slater, Craig S.; Lauer, Alexandra; Brouard, Mark; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    The absolute configuration of chiral molecules in the gas phase is determined by femtosecond laser-induced Coulomb explosion and recording of the emission direction of critical ionic fragments. The spatial orientation of the 3 ,5 -dibromo -3',5'-diflouro -4'-cyanobiphenyl molecules studied is determined by a combination of laser-induced alignment and time-of-flight measurement of F+ion recoils. Hereby, the enatiomeric state of the molecules could be uniquely identified through analysis of the correlation of the angular distribution of F+andBr+ ions. The method will apply to a range of molecules and allow imaging of chiral changes on ultrafast time scales.

  20. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Nanofibers and Laser-Induced Incandescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Kathy (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randy L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; Berger, Gordon M.; Patel, Premal D.

    2004-01-01

    Laser induced incandescence applied to a heterogeneous, multi-element reacting flows is characterized by a) temporally resolved emission spectra, time-resolved emission at selected detection wavelengths and fluence dependence. Laser fluences above 0.6 Joules per square centimeter at 1064 nm initiate laser-induced vaporization, yielding a lower incandescence intensity, as found through fluence dependence measurements. Spectrally derived temperatures show that values of excitation laser fluence beyond this value lead to a super-heated plasma, well above the vaporization of temperature of carbon. The temporal evolution of the emission signal at these fluences is consistent with plasma dissipation processes, not incandescence from solid-like structures.

  1. Laser-Induced Adiabat Shaping by Relaxation in Inertial Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K; Betti, R.

    2003-03-11

    The theory of laser-induced adiabat shaping is carried out for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. It is shown that a significant improvement of the stability characteristics of ICF implosions can be achieved by shaping the adiabat inside the imploding shell. The optimized adiabat profile has the maximum on the outer ablation surface to lower Rayleigh-Taylor growth rates, and the minimum on the shell inner surface for high compressibility and high neutron yields. Laser-induced adiabat shaping is produced via relaxation using a weak pre-pulse followed by laser shut-off and the main laser pulse.

  2. Laser-Induced Adiabat Shaping by Relaxation in Inertial Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.; Betti, R.

    2004-01-01

    TOAK-B135 The theory of laser-induced adiabat shaping is carried out for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. It is shown that a significant improvement of the stability characteristics of ICF implosions can be achieved by shaping the adiabat inside the imploding shell. The optimized adiabat profile has a maximum on the outer ablation surface to lower Rayleigh-Taylor growth rates, and a minimum on the shell inner surface for high compressibility and high neutron yields. Laser-induced adiabat shaping is produced via relaxation using a weak prepulse followed by laser shut-off and the main laser pulse.

  3. Mechanisms of Laser-Induced Dissection and Transport of Histologic Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Alfred; Lorenz, Kathrin; Horneffer, Verena; Hüttmann, Gereon; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Gebert, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Rapid contact- and contamination-free procurement of histologic material for proteomic and genomic analysis can be achieved by laser microdissection of the sample of interest followed by laser-induced transport (laser pressure catapulting). The dynamics of laser microdissection and laser pressure catapulting of histologic samples of 80 ?m diameter was investigated by means of time-resolved photography. The working mechanism of microdissection was found to be plasma-mediated ablation initiated by linear absorption. Catapulting was driven by plasma formation when tightly focused pulses were used, and by photothermal ablation at the bottom of the sample when defocused pulses producing laser spot diameters larger than 35 ?m were used. With focused pulses, driving pressures of several hundred MPa accelerated the specimen to initial velocities of 100–300 m/s before they were rapidly slowed down by air friction. When the laser spot was increased to a size comparable to or larger than the sample diameter, both driving pressure and flight velocity decreased considerably. Based on a characterization of the thermal and optical properties of the histologic specimens and supporting materials used, we calculated the evolution of the heat distribution in the sample. Selected catapulted samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy or analyzed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We found that catapulting of dissected samples results in little collateral damage when the laser pulses are either tightly focused or when the laser spot size is comparable to the specimen size. By contrast, moderate defocusing with spot sizes up to one-third of the specimen diameter may involve significant heat and ultraviolet exposure. Potential side effects are maximal when samples are catapulted directly from a glass slide without a supporting polymer foil. PMID:17766336

  4. Thermal loading of laser induced plasma shockwaves on thin films in nanoparticle removal

    SciTech Connect

    Varghese, Ivin; Zhou Dong; Peri, M. D. Murthy; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2007-06-01

    Damage concerns, such as substrate/film material alterations, damage, and delamination of thin films, have become a central problem in sub-100 nm particle removal applications. In the laser induced plasma (LIP) removal technique both LIP shockwave and radiation heating are potential sources of thermomechanical damage. The specific objective of current study is to conduct a computational investigation of the LIP shockwave effect on the thermoelastic response of a thin chromium (Cr) film deposited on a quartz substrate and to identify the conditions leading to the onset of plastic film deformations. The experimentally characterized shockwave pressure and temperature (approximated from gas dynamic relations) were prescribed as boundary conditions in the computational analysis. From the shockwave arrival times for different travel distances, the shockwave radius as well as the velocity were obtained as a function of the shockwave propagation time. Radial (and circumferential) stresses, caused by thermal expansion of the Cr film, were most dominant and, hence, of damage concern. It is determined that the resultant temperature rise utilizing a 1064 nm Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser (450 mJ) due to the film-shockwave interactions was not sufficiently high to initiate film and/or substrate damage. No material alteration/damage of the Cr film is predicted due to the temperature and pressure of LIP shockwaves at the firing distance of 2 mm, with a high strain rate gain factor of two (minimum), though damage was observed experimentally for 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser at the pulse energy of 370 mJ. Reported results indicate that the leading cause of observed thin film damage during nanoparticle removal is almost certainly radiation heating from the LIP core.

  5. Femtosecond Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Studies of Nitropyrazoles: The Effect of Varying Nitro Groups.

    PubMed

    Rao, Epuru Nageswara; Sunku, Sreedhar; Venugopal Rao, Soma

    2015-11-01

    The technique of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (FLIBS) was employed to investigate seven explosive molecules of nitropyrazole in three different atmospheres: ambient air, nitrogen, and argon. The FLIBS data illustrated the presence of molecular emissions of cyanide (CN) violet bands, diatomic carbon (C2) Swan bands, and atomic emission lines of C, H, O, and N. To understand the plasma dynamics, the decay times of molecular and atomic emissions were determined from time-resolved spectral data obtained in three atmospheres: air, argon, and nitrogen. The CN decay time was observed to be longest in air, compared to nitrogen and argon atmospheres, for the molecules pyrazole (PY) and 4-nitropyrazole (4-NPY). In the case of C2 emission, the decay time was observed to be the longest in argon, compared to the air and nitrogen environments, for the molecules PY, 4-NPY, and 1-methyl-3,4,5-trinitropyrazole. The intensities of the CN, C2, C, H, O, and N emission lines and various molecular/atomic intensity ratios such as CN/C2, CN(sum)/C2(sum), CN/C, CN(sum)/C, C2/C, C2(sum)/C, (C2 + C) / CN, (C2(sum) + C)/CN(sum), O/H, O/N, and N/H were also deduced from the LIBS spectra obtained in argon atmosphere. A correlation between the observed decay times and molecular emission intensities with respect to the number of nitro groups, the atmospheric nitrogen content, and the oxygen balance of the molecules was investigated. The relationship among the LIBS signal intensity, the molecular/atomic intensity ratios, and the oxygen balance of these organic explosives was also explored. PMID:26647058

  6. Time-domain laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy apparatus for clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Jo, Javier A.; Vaitha, Russel; Shastry, Kumar; Marcu, Laura

    2004-01-01

    We report the design and development of a compact optical fiber-based apparatus for in situ time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (tr-LIFS) of biological systems. The apparatus is modular, optically robust, and compatible with the clinical environment. It incorporates a dual output imaging spectrograph, a gated multichannel plate photomultiplier (MCP-PMT), an intensified charge-coupled-device (ICCD) camera, and a fast digitizer. It can accommodate various types of light sources and optical fiber probes for selective excitation and remote light delivery/collection as required by different applications. The apparatus allows direct recording of the entire fluorescence decay with high sensitivity (nM range fluorescein dye concentration with signal-to-noise ratio of 46) and with four decades dynamic range. It is capable of resolving a broad range of fluorescence lifetimes from hundreds of picoseconds (as low as 300 ps) using the MCP-PMT coupled to the digitizer to milliseconds using the ICCD. The data acquisition and analysis process is fully automated, enabling fast recording of fluorescence intensity decay across the entire emission spectrum (0.8 s per wavelength or ˜40 s for a 200 nm wavelength range at 5 nm increments). The spectral and temporal responses of the apparatus were calibrated and its performance was validated using fluorescence lifetime standard dyes (Rhodamin B, 9-cyanoanthracene, and rose Bengal) and tissue endogenous fluorophores (elastin, collagen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide). Fluorescence decay lifetimes and emission spectra of all tested compounds measured with the current tr-LIFS apparatus were found in good agreement with the values reported in the literature. The design and performance of tr-LIFS apparatus have enabled in vivo studies of atherosclerotic plaques and brain tumors.

  7. Competitive quenching fluorescence immunoassay for chlorophenols based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Nichkova, Mikaela; Feng, Jun; Sanchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M Pilar; Hammock, Bruce D; Kennedy, Ian M

    2003-01-01

    An improved biomonitoring system for the analysis of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) in urine samples has been developed. The principle of the biosensor device is the detection of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in single microdroplets by a homogeneous quenching fluorescence immunoassay (QFIA). The competitive immunoassay occurs in microdroplets (d = 58,4 microm) produced by a piezoelectric generator system with 10-microm-diameter orifice. A continuous Ar ion laser (488 nm) excites the fluorescent tracer; its fluorescence is detected by a spectrometer attached to a 512 x 512 cooled, charge-coupled device camera. Fluorescence is quenched by specific binding of TCP polyclonal antibodies to the fluorescent tracer (hapten A-fluorescein); the quenching effect is diminished by the presence of the analyte. Thus, an increase in the signal is produced in a positive dose-dependent manner when TCP is present in the sample. In 10 mM PBS buffer, the IC50 of the LIF-microdroplet QFIA is 0.45 microg L(-1) reaching a LOD of 0.04 microg L(-1). The QFIA with the same reagents performed in microtiter plate format achieved a LOD of 0.36 microg L(-1) in buffer solution. Performance in human urine was similar to that observed in the buffer. A LOD of 1.6 ,g L(-1), with a dynamic range between 4 and 149.5 microg L(-1) in urine, was obtained without any sample treatment other than dilution with the assay buffer. The detectability achieved is sufficient for occupational exposure risk assessment. PMID:12530822

  8. Short-pulse-laser-induced optical damage and fracto-emission of amorphous, diamond-like carbon films

    E-print Network

    von der Linde, D.

    Short-pulse-laser-induced optical damage and fracto-emission of amorphous, diamond-like carbon online 16 March 2005 Short-pulse-laser-induced damage and ablation of thin films of amorphous, diamond as compared to bulk materials. Often the primary mechanism of material removal is not the trans- formation

  9. Use of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fs-LIBS) for micro-crack analysis on the surface

    E-print Network

    Kassel, Universität

    Use of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fs-LIBS) for micro-crack analysis in revised form 10 March 2010 Accepted 12 March 2010 Available online 16 March 2010 Keywords: Short crack Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy Fatigue crack growth TiAl Intermetallics a b s t r a c t It is well

  10. Laser-induced backside wet etching of silica glass with ns-pulsed DPSS UV laser at the repetition rate of 40 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Gumpenberger, Thomas; Kurosaki, Ryozo

    2007-04-01

    Surface micro-structuring of silica glass plates was performed by using laser- induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) upon irradiation with a single-mode laser beam from a diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) UV laser with 40 kHz repetition rate at 266 nm. We have succeeded in a well-defined micro-pattern formation without debris and microcrack generation around the etched area on the basis of a galvanometer scanning system for the laser beam. Bubble dynamics after liquid ablation was monitored by impulse pressure detection with a fast- response piezoelectric pressure gauge.

  11. Dark current and light illumination effects on grating formation during periodic long-term operation in photorefractive polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihara, T.; Mamiya, J.; Kawamoto, M.; Sassa, T.

    2014-01-14

    Photorefractive grating formation dynamics in long-timescale writing and the effects of periodic writing through the control of writing beam irradiation or electric field application were investigated using typical photorefractive polymers. Both dark current and writing beam irradiation affected grating formation dynamics. Dark current in polymers changed the effective trap density over time through deep trap filling and/or detrapping and thus affected grating formation considerably. The writing beam irradiation also affected grating development in the presence of an electric field owing to the accumulation of filled deep traps. However, grating development recovered after the elimination of the electric field freed up the filled deep traps.

  12. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  13. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser induced fluorescence imaging techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential use of laser-induced fluorescence imaging techniques was investigated for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on poultry carcasses. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging f...

  14. Recognition of edible oil by using BP neural network and laser induced fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Tao-tao; Chen, Si-ying; Zhang, Yin-chao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He; Zhang, Hong-yan; Liu, Xiao-hua; Wang, Yuan; Bu, Zhi-chao

    2013-09-01

    In order to accomplish recognition of the different edible oil we set up a laser induced fluorescence spectrum system in the laboratory based on Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, and then collect the fluorescence spectrum of different edible oil by using that system. Based on this, we set up a fluorescence spectrum database of different cooking oil. It is clear that there are three main peak position of different edible oil from fluorescence spectrum chart. Although the peak positions of all cooking oil were almost the same, the relative intensity of different edible oils was totally different. So it could easily accomplish that oil recognition could take advantage of the difference of relative intensity. Feature invariants were extracted from the spectrum data, which were chosen from the fluorescence spectrum database randomly, before distinguishing different cooking oil. Then back propagation (BP) neural network was established and trained by the chosen data from the spectrum database. On that basis real experiment data was identified by BP neural network. It was found that the overall recognition rate could reach as high as 83.2%. Experiments showed that the laser induced fluorescence spectrum of different cooking oil was very different from each other, which could be used to accomplish the oil recognition. Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, combined BP neural network?was fast, high sensitivity, non-contact, and high recognition rate. It could become a new technique to accomplish the edible oil recognition and quality detection.

  15. Highly efficient accelerator of dense matter using laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration

    E-print Network

    Liska, Richard

    Highly efficient accelerator of dense matter using laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration J-rays generated by a guided laser wakefield accelerator inside capillary tubes Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 191106 (2012) 2D particle-in-cell simulations of ion acceleration in laser irradiated submicron clusters including

  16. EFFECT OF LASER INDUCED CRYSTALLINITY MODIFICATION ON BIODEGRADATION PROFILE OF POLY(L-LACTIC ACID)

    E-print Network

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    EFFECT OF LASER INDUCED CRYSTALLINITY MODIFICATION ON BIODEGRADATION PROFILE OF POLY(L-LACTIC ACID(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is promising in drug delivery applications, while its induction period of biodegradation attention due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. Being biodegradable, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA

  17. Study of mid IR fiber transmission and mode patterns under laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.; Chong, Yat C.; Zhou, Hongyi

    1990-01-01

    Mid IR fiber transmission and exit radiation mode patterns at various incident CO2 laser power levels appear to be effective diagnostic tools for monitoring laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering in various mid IR fibers. Such processes are deemed to be essential mechanisms for fiber-optic amplifiers and switches as potential replacements of current repeaters and bistable devices.

  18. Laser-induced decompression shock development in fused silica Junlan Wang,a)

    E-print Network

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    March 2003 Laser-induced weak shock formation in fused silica is studied using standard wave mechanics. A decompression shock forms and greatly enhances interfacial failure of a thin film deposited on the substrate is the longitudinal wave speed in film ,10 the development of a shock with an extremely rapid rise or fall time

  19. Particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements on lobed jet mixing flows

    E-print Network

    Hu, Hui

    Particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements on lobed jet mixing-induced ¯uores- cence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used to accomplish ¯ow visualisation character- istics downstream of a lobed nozzle/mixer systematically by using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV

  20. Laser induced fluorescence of the ferroelectric plasma source assisted hollow anode discharge

    E-print Network

    V, electron diodes with active plasma cathodes2,4 i.e., when the cathode plasma is produced prior the plasma sources described in Refs. 4 and 11­13, where either thermionic cathode or magnetron or arc plasmaLaser induced fluorescence of the ferroelectric plasma source assisted hollow anode discharge V

  1. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S. (Ames, IA); Kuhr, Werner G. (Riverside, CA)

    1996-02-20

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  2. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edwards (Ames, IA); Kuhr, Werner G. (Riverside, CA)

    1991-04-09

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  3. MULTISPECTRAL LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE IMAGING SYSTEM FOR LARGE BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presented is a detailed description of a common aperture, multispectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging system developed to allow detection of fecal matter on agricultural products. With an expanded, 355 nm, Nd:YAG laser beam as the excitation source, fluorescence emission images in the blue, gr...

  4. Model of laser-induced temperature changes in solid-state optical refrigerators

    E-print Network

    Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    laser gain materials,2 display and lamp phosphors,3 solid-state lighting devices,4­6 luminescent biomarkers,7­9 and fiber lasers and amplifiers. Light-induced heating also plays a key role in laser ablation,10 photothermal therapy,11­13 laser-induced damage of tissue, and thermal lensing. While

  5. A LASER-INDUCED ULTRASONIC PROBE OF THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ALIGNED LIPID

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    A LASER-INDUCED ULTRASONIC PROBE OF THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ALIGNED LIPID MULTIBILAYERS generates a longitudinal ultrasonic wave whose wavelength depends on the crossing angle. In these experiments, the acoustic wave propagates parallel to the bilayer planes. The ultrasonic velocity

  6. Investigation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser-induced aluminum plasma by Thomson scattering technique

    E-print Network

    Investigation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser-induced aluminum plasma by Thomson-084 Kraków, Poland a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 November 2013 Accepted measurements, performed for the time interval between 600 ns and 3 s, show electron density and temperature

  7. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    E-print Network

    Scharer, John E.

    Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF argon fluoride laser it to the microwave case. However, no research has been carried out to date on plasma formation measurements for air

  8. Use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the analysis of poultry products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy is evaluated as a potential method to characterize a wide range of poultry product quality and safety characteristics. In one part of this study, breast meat quality indices, including pH and water holding capacity, were treated as dependent variables for correla...

  9. Application of laser induced plasma spectroscopy for nuclear material analysis and detection: a comprehensive review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lixuan; Ma, Caihong; Gao, Zhi-Xing; Tang, Xiuzhang

    2015-02-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) made a great progress as a potential technology for nuclear analysis and detection. In this article, the instrumentation of LIPS for In-situ and stand-off application was introduced. The application of LIPS in nuclear industry was reviewed, such as international nuclear safeguard, nuclear materials analysis, hazard material detection and monitoring process, etc.

  10. Miniature endoscope for simultaneous optical coherence tomography and laser-induced

    E-print Network

    Barton, Jennifer K.

    .8 developed a large-diameter 1.5-cm rigid endoscopic probe in which autofluorescence imagingMiniature endoscope for simultaneous optical coherence tomography and laser-induced fluorescence.0-mm-diameter endoscopic package. OCT provides 18- m resolution cross-sectional structural information

  11. Pump probe imaging of nanosecond laser induced bubbles in agar gel

    E-print Network

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    ,10196-204(2002). 4. A. Vogel and V. Venugopalan, "Mechanisms of pulsed laser ablation of biological tissues:YAG laser induced bubbles formed by a 9ns, 532nm laser pulse tightly focused inside the bulk of the gel the laser pulse as the pulse energy increases. The bubble created reaches a quasi-stable size that has

  12. Laser-induced motion in nanoparticle suspension droplets on a surface Mathias Dietzel and Dimos Poulikakosa

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    Laser-induced motion in nanoparticle suspension droplets on a surface Mathias Dietzel and Dimos nanoparticle suspension droplet "nano-ink" spreading on a flat surface upon local heating through a laser beam is investigated numerically. The laser diameter, laser intensity, and the absorption coefficient of the nano

  13. Observation of an isotope effect in femtosecond laser-induced desorption of O2 Pd,,111...

    E-print Network

    Heinz, Tony F.

    Observation of an isotope effect in femtosecond laser-induced desorption of O2 ÕPd,,111... Daniel P of the 16 O2 and 18 O2 isotopic species is characterized for the saturated Pd 111 surface at a base American Vacuum Society. DOI: 10.1116/1.1580486 I. INTRODUCTION The use of different isotopes of a given

  14. Nanohole induced microfiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Jihua; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Xinliang

    2012-12-17

    We demonstrate the fabrication of high-index-contrast microfiber Bragg gratings (MFBGs) using phase-mask technique under seconds' femtosecond laser ablation to drill periodic nanoholes in microfibers and study the aging properties of the gratings at room temperature. These sub-micrometer-diameter holes, benefited from the resolution of femtosecond laser micromachining beyond-diffraction limit, results in an effective negative refractive index change ?n ~-10(-3). Transmission dips over -23 dB are achieved for the gratings with excellent Gaussian apodization and 3-dB reflection bandwidths up to 1.14 nm. Moreover, the grating reflectivity increased by 3 dB, the resonant wavelength blue-shifted 1.35 nm after two weeks' placement of grating at room temperature and these gratings exhibit excellent stability in the following time. This makes them attractive elements in sensing, nanophotonics and nonlinear optics. PMID:23263100

  15. Grating-structured metallic microsprings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Liu, Zhaoqian; Huang, Gaoshan; Liu, Ran; Mei, Yongfeng

    2014-08-21

    We fabricate grating-structured metallic microsprings with well-defined helical angles and diameters, which are self-rolled from strained nanomembranes patterned with gratings. The grating structures on the metal membrane, replicated from the imprinted polymer layer beneath, give rise to the controlled rolling direction after selective etching of the underlying sacrificial layer. The rolling direction of the grating-structured thin metal film is always perpendicular to the long side edge of gratings, offering a good way to roll up strained strips into well controlled three-dimensional (3D) microsprings simply by altering the dimension and orientation of the structured strips. The mechanical elasticity of these grating-structured metallic microsprings is verified for the potential application as a flow rate sensor. Our work may stimulate rigorous synthesis of highly functional and complex 3D helical micro and nanostructures, and hint a broad range of applications such as environmental sensors, micro-/nanoscale robots, metamaterials, etc. PMID:24728100

  16. Index grating lifetime in photorefractive GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Partovi, Afshin

    1988-01-01

    The index grating lifetime in liquid encapsulated Czochralski-grown undoped semi-insulating GaAs was measured using a beam coupling technique. The largest lifetime measure was about 8 s under a read beam intensity of 0.7 mW/sq cm with the grating periodicity being 0.63 microns. The measured value decreases to milliseconds as the read beam intensity and the grating periodicity increase to about 10 mW/sq cm and 4 microns, respectively. This range of grating lifetime in this material is adequate for its use in real-time spatial light modulators, reconfigurable beam steering devices, and dynamic memory elements, for optical computing. In addition, the results suggest that the lifetime is sensitive to residual imperfections in the crystal.

  17. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics Theory and Expected Experimental Errors when Applied to a Scramjet Isolator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert Jeffrey; Baurle, Robert A.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2011-01-01

    A scramjet isolator model test apparatus is being assembled in the Isolator Dynamics Research Lab (IDRL) at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The test apparatus is designed to support multiple measurement techniques for investigating the flow field in a scramjet isolator model. The test section is 1-inch high by 2-inch wide by 24-inch long and simulates a scramjet isolator with an aspect ratio of two. Unheated, dry air at a constant stagnation pressure and temperature is delivered to the isolator test section through a Mach 2.5 planar nozzle. The isolator test section is mechanically back-pressured to contain the resulting shock train within the 24-inch isolator length and supports temperature, static pressure, and high frequency pressure measurements at the wall. Additionally, nonintrusive methods including laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), spontaneous Raman scattering, particle image velocimetry, and schlieren imaging are being incorporated to measure off-wall fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and transport properties of the flow field. Interchangeable glass and metallic sidewalls and optical access appendages permit making multiple measurements simultaneously. The measurements will be used to calibrate computational fluid dynamics turbulence models and characterize the back-pressured flow of a scramjet isolator. This paper describes the test apparatus, including the optical access appendages; the physics of the LITA method; and estimates of LITA measurement uncertainty for measurements of the speed of sound and temperature.

  18. 2-dimensional ion velocity distributions measured by laser-induced fluorescence above a radio-frequency biased silicon wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Nathaniel B.; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Zhang, Yiting; Kushner, Mark J.

    2013-08-15

    The dynamics of ions traversing sheaths in low temperature plasmas are important to the formation of the ion energy distribution incident onto surfaces during microelectronics fabrication. Ion dynamics have been measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in the sheath above a 30 cm diameter, 2.2 MHz-biased silicon wafer in a commercial inductively coupled plasma processing reactor. The velocity distribution of argon ions was measured at thousands of positions above and radially along the surface of the wafer by utilizing a planar laser sheet from a pulsed, tunable dye laser. Velocities were measured both parallel and perpendicular to the wafer over an energy range of 0.4–600 eV. The resulting fluorescence was recorded using a fast CCD camera, which provided resolution of 0.4 mm in space and 30 ns in time. Data were taken at eight different phases during the 2.2 MHz cycle. The ion velocity distributions (IVDs) in the sheath were found to be spatially non-uniform near the edge of the wafer and phase-dependent as a function of height. Several cm above the wafer the IVD is Maxwellian and independent of phase. Experimental results were compared with simulations. The experimental time-averaged ion energy distribution function as a function of height compare favorably with results from the computer model.

  19. Imaging laser-induced thermal fields and effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.

    1995-05-01

    Laser light interaction with biological tissues is a combination of optical, thermal and mechanical effects depending on the energy applied per unit of volume per unit of time. Visualization of the phenomena with a high temporal and spatial resolution, contributes to a better understanding of the mechanism of action, especially when pulsed lasers are involved. For this goal, setups were developed based on Schlieren techniques to image the interaction of pulsed (CO2, Holmium and Excimer) and CW (CO2, Nd:YAG, Cu-vapor) lasers with physiological media and biological tissues. In a 'fast' Schlieren setup, images of shock waves and fast expanding and imploding vapor bubbles were captured using very short light flashes (10 ns-10 microseconds). These recordings suggest that these explosive vapor bubbles seem to be the main dynamism for tissue ablation. In a 'color' Schlieren setup, very small changes in optical density of the media induced by temperature gradients, were color coded. Calibration of the color images to absolute temperatures were performed by using calculated temperature distributions and by thermocouple measurements. Cameras with high speed shutters (0.1-50 ms) enabled the recording of dynamic images of the thermal relaxation and heat diffusion in tissues during variation of pulse length and repetition rate. Despite pulse lengths < ms, heat generation in tissue was considerable already at pulse repetition rates above a few Hz. Similar Schlieren techniques were applied to study the thermal characteristics of laser probes, e.g. for the treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH). In combination with thermal modeling an optimal therapy might be predicted. Schlieren techniques, generating high-speed and 'thermal' images, can provide a good understanding of the ablation mechanism and the thermo-dynamics during laser-tissue interaction with continuous wave and pulse lasers.

  20. Laser-induced Coulomb mirror effect: Applications for proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Velchev, I.; Fourkal, E.; Ma, C.-M.

    2007-03-15

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the temporal evolution of the uncompensated charge on an ultra-thin (400 nm) foil target ionized by a relativistically intense laser pulse is studied in detail. The analysis reveals a new dynamic regime of acceleration of light ions/protons that allows particles to experience the maximum acceleration potential created by the laser. As an alternative to the conventional double-layer target, a new target geometry in which the proton energy is enhanced by {approx_equal}30% is proposed.

  1. A new compact instrument for Raman, laser-induced breakdown, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of works of art and their constituent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osticioli, I.; Mendes, N. F. C.; Nevin, A.; Zoppi, A.; Lofrumento, C.; Becucci, M.; Castellucci, E. M.

    2009-07-01

    A small, potentially transportable prototype instrument capable of carrying out Raman, laser-induced breakdown (LIB), and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy using a single pulsed laser source was developed for the analysis of cultural heritage objects. The purpose of this instrumentation is to perform fast and reliable analysis of surfaces with minimum damage to an object. For this purpose, a compact (51×203×76 mm) nanosecond Q-switched neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (8 ns, 20 Hz, 0.01-115 mJ/pulse) was used as an irradiation source. The use of a nanosecond-gated detector sensitive between 180 and 900 nm allows the acquisition of elemental emissions in LIB spectroscopy and can also be employed for both LIF and time-resolved Raman spectroscopy. In this work, attention is focused on the description of the instrument and its optical components, and two examples of applications for the analysis of pigments and binding media used in works of art are presented.

  2. Hyperspectral laser-induced flourescence imaging for assessing internal quality of kiwi fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Muhua; Liao, Yifeng; Zhou, Xiaomei

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on non-destructive methods for predicting quality of kiwifruits using fluorescence imaging. The method is based on hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging in the region between 700 and 1110 nm, and estimates the kiwifruits quality in terms of internal sugar content and firmness. A station for acquiring hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging has been designed and carefully choosing each component. The fluorescence imaging acquired by the station has been pre-processed by selecting regions of interest (ROIs) of 50 100 × pixels. A line regressing prediction method estimates the quality of kiwifruit samples. The results obtained in classification show that the station and prediction model enables the correct discrimination of kiwifruits internal sugar content and firmness with a percentage of r= 98.5%, SEP=0.4 and r=99.9%, SEP=0.62.

  3. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  4. Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence on an oscillatory xenon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-11-15

    A novel approach to time-synchronizing laser-induced fluorescence measurements to an oscillating current in a 60 Hz xenon discharge lamp using a continuous wave laser is presented. A sample-hold circuit is implemented to separate out signals at different phases along a current cycle, and is followed by a lock-in amplifier to pull out the resulting time-synchronized fluorescence trace from the large background signal. The time evolution of lower state population is derived from the changes in intensity of the fluorescence excitation line shape resulting from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 6s{sup Prime }[1/2]{sub 1}{sup 0}-6p{sup Prime }[3/2]{sub 2} xenon atomic transition at {lambda}= 834.68 nm. Results show that the lower state population oscillates at twice the frequency of the discharge current, 120 Hz.

  5. [A multivariate nonlinear model for quantitative analysis in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing-Long; Fu, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jing-Ge; Ni, Zhi-Bo; He, Wen-Gan; Xu, Jun; Rao Rui-zhong; Dong, Rui-Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Most quantitative models used in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are based on the hypothesis that laser-induced plasma approaches the state of local thermal equilibrium (LTE). However, the local equilibrium is possible only at a specific time segment during the evolution. As the populations of each energy level does not follow Boltzmann distribution in non-LTE condition, those quantitative models using single spectral line would be inaccurate. A multivariate nonlinear model, in which the LTE is not required, was proposed in this article to reduce the signal fluctuation and improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis. This multivariate nonlinear model was compared with the internal calibration model which is based on the LTE condition. The content of Mn in steel samples was determined by using the two models, respectively. A minor error and a minor relative standard deviation (RSD) were observed in multivariate nonlinear model. This result demonstrates that multivariate nonlinear model can improve measurement accuracy and repeatability. PMID:25752066

  6. Nano- and microdot array formation by laser-induced dot transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narazaki, Aiko; Sato, Tadatake; Kurosaki, Ryozo; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-01

    Fabrication of FeSi 2 nano- and microdot array was performed by utilizing droplet ejection through laser-induced forward transfer, which we named laser-induced dot transfer (LIDT). An amorphous FeSi 2 alloy source film on a transparent support was illuminated from the support by a nanosecond excimer laser pulse patterned into migcrogrid form, resulting in size- and site-controlled dot deposition. Micro-Raman spectroscopy confirmed ?-FeSi 2 semiconducting crystalline phase even on unheated substrates. Moreover, the microdots exhibited near-infrared photoluminescence at the peak wavelength of 1.57 ?m, which comes from the ?-FeSi 2 crystalline phase precipitated during the LIDT process. The dot size was successfully reduced to approximately 500 and 300 nm in diameter and height, respectively. This technique is useful for integrating functional nano- and microdots under atmospheric room-temperature conditions.

  7. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of environmental samples by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorov, N. B.; Popov, A. M.; Zaytsev, S. M.; Labutin, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    The key achievements in the determination of trace amounts of components in environmental samples (soils, ores, natural waters, etc.) by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry are considered. Unique capabilities of this method make it suitable for rapid analysis of metals and alloys, glasses, polymers, objects of cultural heritage, archaeological and various environmental samples. The key advantages of the method that account for its high efficiency are demonstrated, in particular, a small amount of analyzed material, the absence of sample preparation, the possibility of local and remote analysis of either one or several elements. The use of chemometrics in laser-induced breakdown spectrometry for qualitative sample classification is described in detail. Various approaches to improving the figures of merit of quantitative analysis of environmental samples are discussed. The achieved limits of detection for most elements in geochemical samples are critically evaluated. The bibliography includes 302 references.

  8. Effect of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability on maximum reachable temperatures in laser-induced bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechiman, Ludmila M.; Bonetto, Fabián J.; Rosselló, Juan M.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced bubbles provide an effective vehicle to achieve high-energy concentrations and maximum temperatures in bubble luminescence phenomena. One limitation to the temperatures that can be achieved is the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) during the instants previous to the bubble maximum compression. For a given fluid, the control parameters of the experiment are: the bubble maximum radius, the bubble ambient radius, the initial perturbations of the bubble, and the liquid pressure at infinity. In this work, experiments using laser-induced bubbles in a highly viscous phosphoric acid were performed in order to determine the achievable parameters values in the phase space. The effect of Rmax, R0, a2i, a3i, and p? on the maximum temperature achieved by the gas contents inside the bubble were numerically determined. The results show for each static pressure an optimum region for maximum temperatures of the gas contents bounded by the RTI.

  9. Short pulse, high power microwave radiation source with a laser-induced sheet plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated the short pulse, high power microwave radiation source using an ultraviolet laser-induced sheet plasma mirror in a gas-filled x-band rectangular waveguide from the conventional microwave sources and components. A laser-induced sheet plasma with an overdense plasma acts as a plasma mirror. The long pulse propagating in the gas-filled waveguide was sliced by the sheet plasma mirror at two different points along the waveguide. We observed about twice the power of the pulse by adding the two sliced microwave pulses produced by this scheme. A maximum peak power of 200 kW with a pulse duration of 10 ns (full width at half maximum) from the long microwave pulse source with a pulse duration of 0.8 mus was observed.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence of formaldehyde in combustion using third harmonic Nd:YAG laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Christian; Nygren, Jenny; Bai, Xiao; Li, Zhongshan; Bladh, Henrik; Axelsson, Boman; Denbratt, Ingemar; Koopmans, Lucien; Bengtsson, Per-Erik; Aldén, Marcus

    2003-12-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is an important intermediate species in combustion processes and it can through laser-induced fluorescence measurements be used for instantaneous flame front detection. The present study has focussed on the use of the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as excitation wavelength for formaldehyde, and different dimethyl ether (C2H6O) flames were used as sources of formaldehyde in the experiments. The investigations included studies of the overlap between the laser profile and the absorption lines of formaldehyde, saturation effects and the potential occurrence of laser-induced photochemistry. The technique was applied for detection of formaldehyde in an internal combustion engine operated both as a spark ignition engine and as a homogenous charge compression ignition engine. PMID:14607232

  11. Note: A novel technique for analysis of aqueous solutions by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rusak, D A; Anthony, T P; Bell, Z T

    2015-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates typically consist of gold or silver nanoparticles deposited on a non-conductive substrate. In Raman spectroscopy, the nanoparticles produce an enhancement of the electromagnetic field which, in turn, leads to greater electronic excitation of molecules in the local environment. Here, we show that these same surfaces can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio obtained in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. In this case, the SERS substrates not only lower breakdown thresholds and lead to more efficient plasma initiation but also provide an appropriately wettable surface for the deposition of the liquid. We refer to this technique as surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. PMID:26628187

  12. Note: A novel technique for analysis of aqueous solutions by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusak, D. A.; Anthony, T. P.; Bell, Z. T.

    2015-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates typically consist of gold or silver nanoparticles deposited on a non-conductive substrate. In Raman spectroscopy, the nanoparticles produce an enhancement of the electromagnetic field which, in turn, leads to greater electronic excitation of molecules in the local environment. Here, we show that these same surfaces can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio obtained in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. In this case, the SERS substrates not only lower breakdown thresholds and lead to more efficient plasma initiation but also provide an appropriately wettable surface for the deposition of the liquid. We refer to this technique as surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  13. Multiple pulse nanosecond laser induced damage study in LiB3O5 crystals.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Frank R; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandré, Mireille

    2010-12-20

    Multiple pulse nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of LiB3O5 (LBO) crystals was investigated at 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of cleaved damage sites confirmed the presence of different zones that have already been reported in the case of KH2PO4 (KDP). Multi pulse measurements reveal a strong decrease of the damage threshold with increasing pulse number at 1064 nm (fatigue effect). A weaker fatigue effect was observed at 532 nm and no fatigue effect was found at 355 nm. This observation is best explained by an inherently statistical light matter interaction generating laser induced damage. Finally, a polarization dependent damage threshold anisotropy was evidenced at all three wavelengths, being strongest at 1064 nm. The results indicate the importance of Li+ vacancy stabilized color centers for the damage mechanism. PMID:21196955

  14. In-situRaman study of laser-induced graphene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herziger, Felix; Mirzayev, Rasim; Poliani, Emanuele; Maultzsch, Janina

    2015-11-01

    We present in-situ Raman measurements of laser-induced oxidation in exfoliated single-layer graphene. By using high-power laser irradiation, we can selectively and in a controlled way initiate the oxidation process and investigate its evolution over time. Our results show that the laser-induced oxidation process is divided into two separate stages, namely tensile strain due to heating and subsequent $p$-type doping due to oxygen binding. We discuss the temporal evolution of the $D/G$-mode ratio during oxidation and explain the unexpected steady decrease of the defect-induced $D$ mode at long irradiation times. Our results provide a deeper understanding of the oxidation process in single-layer graphene and demonstrate the possibility of sub-$\\mu$m patterning of graphene by an optical method.

  15. Laser induced cell fusion in combination with optical tweezers: the laser cell fusion trap.

    PubMed

    Steubing, R W; Cheng, S; Wright, W H; Numajiri, Y; Berns, M W

    1991-01-01

    A single-beam gradient force optical trap was combined with a pulsed UV laser microbeam in order to perform laser induced cell fusion. This combination offers the possibility to selectively fuse two single cells without critical chemical or electrical treatment. The optical trap was created by directing a Nd:YAG laser, at a wavelength of 1.06 microns, into a microscope and focusing the laser beam with a high numerical aperture objective. The UV laser microbeam, produced by a nitrogen-pumped dye laser (366 nm), was collinear with the trapping beam. Once inside the trap, two cells could be fused with several pulses of the UV laser microbeam, attenuated to an energy of approximately 1 microJ/pulse in the object plane. This method of laser induced cell fusion should provide increased selectivity and efficiency in generating viable hybrid cells. PMID:1764975

  16. Identification of inks and structural characterization of contemporary artistic prints by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oujja, M.; Vila, A.; Rebollar, E.; García, J. F.; Castillejo, M.

    2005-08-01

    Identification of the inks used in artistic prints and the order in which different ink layers have been applied on a paper substrate are important factors to complement the classical stylistic aspects for the authentication of this type of objects. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is investigated to determine the chemical composition and structural distribution of the constituent materials of model prints made by applying one or two layers of several blue and black inks on an Arches paper substrate. By using suitable laser excitation conditions, identification of the inks was possible by virtue of emissions from key elements present in their composition. Analysis of successive spectra on the same spot allowed the identification of the order in which the inks were applied on the paper. The results show the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the chemical and structural characterization of artistic prints.

  17. Impurity and laser-induced damage in the growth sectors of rapidly grown DKP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, M.; Torres, R.; Runkel, M.; Woods, B.; Hutcheon, I.; Zaitseva, N.; DeYoreo, J.

    1997-02-13

    We report the experimental results of impurity contamination and laser-induced damage investigations on rapidly grown potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals. Using absorption spectroscopy and chemical analysis, we determined the impurity distribution in the different growing sectors of KDP single crystals. The level of impurity was dependent on starting materials and growth rate. We also studied influence of impurities on laser-induced damage in fast grown KDP. The laser damage threshold (LDT) in the impurity-rich prismatic sector is same as in the high purity pyramidal sector within experimental error. Meanwhile, the LDT at the boundary of the prismatic and pyramidal sectors is less than half of that in the bulk. Furthermore, we found that the thermal annealing of the crystal eliminated the weakness of this sector boundary and increased its LDT to the same level as in the bulk of the crystal. Result suggests that the laser damage occurred in the vicinity of a high; localized strain field.

  18. Transcutaneous laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy of nodular goiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Seliverstov, Oleg V.; Revel-Muroz, Jean A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Giniatulin, Ravil U.

    2000-05-01

    In the experiment on 41 dogs the possibilities of Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and diode lasers (805 nm) usage for thermotherapy of thyroid gland was grounded. We founded the regimes of laser irradiation causing local destruction of thyroid glands without damage of surrounding organs and tissues. An intratissue dynamic thermometry control in the thyroid and surrounding tissues and their histological analysis were used for determination of the operating mode. The thermometry was performed with the help of an original setup, specimens for the analysis were taken in the period from 1 - 3 to 130 days after the laser irradiation. The results of the experiments gave occasion to the use of intrathyroid local laser hyperthermia in the treatment of 15 patients with recurrent nodal and multinodal euthyroid goiter and 2 patients with inoperable (incurable) medullary thyroid cancer. The laser thermotherapy was fulfilled transcutaneously with ultrasonic control. No complications were registered during the irradiation and the nearest postoperative period. The dynamic ultrasonic examination of the patients carried out for 3 - 18 months showed a positive effect in all cases.

  19. Characterization of refractive index change and fabrication of long period gratings in pure silica fiber by femtosecond laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Farid; Joe, Hang-Eun; Min, Byung-Kwon; Jun, Martin B. G.

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast laser induced refractive index (RI) change in the core of a standard telecommunication fiber is quantified using the spectral shift of an in-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based Fabry-Perot cavity. Measured RI change is used to design and then fabricate long period grating (LPG) in pure silica core single mode fiber (SMF) employing identical laser irradiation conditions used in core index characterization. A core length of 100 ?m within the 10 mm long cavity structure is scanned with ultrafast laser pulses, and the corresponding spectral shift is used to calculate index modification. The index change of 0.000449 found in characterization process is used to simulate the LPG in pure silica fiber. Identical index modulation written in pure silica fiber by femtosecond laser radiation provides a rejection band that is in good agreement with the simulation results. The fabricated LPG sensors are also characterized for ambient temperature and RI.

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectra in the infrared region from 750 to 2000 nm using a cooled InGaAs diode array detector.

    PubMed

    Radziemski, Leon J; Cremers, David A; Bostian, Melissa; Chinni, Rosemarie C; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2007-11-01

    Emissions from a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) plasma were examined in the region from 750 nm to 2000 nm. A Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm and 75 mJ per pulse were used to initiate the plasma. The detector was an InGaAs 1024 element diode array cooled to -100 degrees C. An f/4 spectrometer with gratings blazed for this region was used as the dispersive element. Survey spectra of soils, uranium, and other selected samples were taken in air and in a flow cell purged with argon at a local pressure of 0.84 x 10(5) Pa. Strong infrared lines of neutral aluminum, carbon, potassium, silicon, sulfur, and uranium, as well as once ionized lines of calcium, were observed out to 1670 nm. For potassium, the detection limits of the infrared (IR) system were compared with those obtained from a standard intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) spectrometer arrangement, using the 766-770 nm doublet. Detection limits with the IR system were twice as high as those obtained from the ICCD detector. PMID:18028691

  1. Luminescence in the fluoride-containing phosphate-based glasses: a possible origin of their high resistance to nanosecond pulse laser-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Lu, Min; Gao, Fei; Guo, Haitao; Xu, Yantao; Hou, Chaoqi; Zhou, Zhiwei; Peng, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Fusion power offers the prospect of an almost inexhaustible source of energy for future generations. It was reported that fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were achieved, but so far great deal of scientific and engineering challenges have to be overcome for realizing fusion power generation. There is a bottleneck for color-separation gratings in NIF and other similar inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers. Here we show a series of high performance phosphate-based glasses that can transmit the third harmonic frequency (3?) laser light with high efficiency meanwhile filter the fundamental (1?) and the second harmonic frequency (2?) laser lights through direct absorption, and especially they exhibit excellent damage threshold induced by nanosecond pulse laser compared with that of the fused silica used in NIF. Yellowish-orange fluorescence emits during the laser-material interaction process, and it can be tailored through regulating the glass structure. Study on its structural origin suggests that the fluorescence emission is a key factor that conduces to the high laser-induced damage resistance of these glasses. The results also indicated the feasibility of utilizing these high performance glasses in novel color separation optics, allowing novel design for the final optics assembly in ICF lasers. PMID:25716328

  2. Application of a ratiometric laser induced fluorescence (LIF) thermometry for micro-scale temperature measurement for natural convection flows 

    E-print Network

    Lee, Heon Ju

    2004-11-15

    A ratiometric laser induced fluorescence (LIF) thermometry applied to micro-scale temperature measurement for natural convection flows. To eliminate incident light non-uniformity and imperfection of recording device, two fluorescence dyes are used...

  3. Non-Gated Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Provides a Powerful Segmentation Tool on Concomitant Treatment of Characteristic and Continuum Emission

    E-print Network

    Myakalwar, Ashwin Kumar

    We demonstrate the application of non-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for characterization and classification of organic materials with similar chemical composition. While use of such a system introduces ...

  4. DETERMINATION OF ALIPHATIC AMINES IN WATER USING DERIVATIZATION WITH FLUORESCEIN ISOTHIOCYANATE AND CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection-oriented derivatization of aliphatic amines and amine functional groups in coumpounds of environmental interest was studied using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) with separation/determination by capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence. Determinative level...

  5. Laser-induced copper deposition from aqueous and aqueous–organic solutions: state of the art and prospects of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemirovsky, V. A.; Skripkin, M. Yu; Tveryanovich, Yu S.; Mereshchenko, A. S.; Gorbunov, A. O.; Panov, M. S.; Tumkin, I. I.; Safonov, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    Information about the factors influencing laser-induced deposition of metals, primarily copper, from aqueous and aqueous–organic solutions are generalized and described systematically. Laser-induced deposition techniques and mechanisms of chemical and laser-induced deposition of local copper and other metal structures onto the dielectric surface are considered. The effects of the solution composition, the nature of the reducing agent and the properties of the dielectric surface on the deposition process are discussed. Possible photochemical reactions induced by laser radiation and the role of these reactions in the photoreduction of metals are considered. The key trends and prospects in the development of laser-induced chemical liquid phase deposition are mentioned. The bibliography includes 132 references.

  6. Journal of Luminescence 122123 (2007) 1416 Femtosecond laser-induced reduction in Eu-doped sodium

    E-print Network

    Hamilton, Douglas S.

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Luminescence 122­123 (2007) 14­16 Femtosecond laser-induced reduction in Eu-doped sodium of Eu3+ to Eu2+ in sodium borate glasses by irradiation of near-infrared femtosecond laser. Glass composition of sodium borate was 85B2O3­15Na2O. The glasses were doped with 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5mol% Eu2O3

  7. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gert-Willem; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-07-15

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 ?m and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified drop's shape is crucial for 3D printing and is discussed as a function of the laser energy. PMID:26045211

  8. Determination of defect densities from spatiotemporally resolved optical-laser induced damage measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yejia; Emmert, Luke A; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    A procedure is developed to retrieve defect densities of optical coatings and surfaces from spatiotemporally resolved optical-laser induced damage (STEREO-LID) measurements. In STEREO-LID, the temporal onset and location of nanosecond laser damage initiation is measured for each excitation event. The power of STEREO-LID relative to traditional damage tests resulting in damage probabilities is characterized with LID data from Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:26368096

  9. Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence and Raman imaging inside a hydrogen engine.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sascha Ronald; Koch, Peter; Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-12-10

    We report on the simultaneous and two-dimensional measurement of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman scattering (Ramanography) applied inside a hydrogen internal combustion (IC) engine. Two different LIF tracer molecules, triethylamine (TEA) and trimethylamine (TMA), were used for the LIF experiments. The LIF and Raman results were found to be in very good agreement. The simultaneous application of Ramanography and LIF imaging indicated that TMA is the more suitable LIF tracer molecule, compared to TEA. PMID:20011004

  10. Growth mechanisms for laser induced contamination on space optics in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Adrian P.; Pettazzi, Federico; Alves, Jorge; Wernham, Denny; Riede, W.; Schroeder, H.; Allenspacher, P.; Kheyrandish, H.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the growth mechanisms for laser induced contamination of space optics in vacuum, particularly during the early stages of the deposit formation. Experiments have been performed in vacuum to study the influence of the environmental conditions and the condition of the optical surface, using a variety of physical and chemical techniques. In particular, different methods of conditioning the surface prior to irradiation and cleaning the surface after irradiation have been tested.

  11. Development of bio-photonic sensor based on laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan Kyu

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been shown to be potentially useful for identifying microorganisms in real time. It is a selective and sensitive technique because the excitation is performed at one wavelength while the emission is monitored at longer wavelengths so that background from the excitation source can be eliminated. This specialized optical property of LIF can be applied to development of an optical sensor capable of quickly, non-invasively, and quantitatively probing complex biochemical transformations in microorganisms. Various bio-photonic optical fiber sensors based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy were developed as diagnostic tools for microorganisms. In the first phase, the enhancement of the sensitivity and selectivity of the optical sensor system focused on diagnosis of human breast cancer cell lines and Azotobacter vinelandii (an aerobic soil-dwelling organism). Auto-fluorescence spectra from human breast cancer cell lines and Azotobacter vinelandii corresponding to different growth environments were investigated. Then, the study has expanded to include the use of gold nanoparticles for specific DNA detection. The use of gold nanoparticles opens a door into construction of a compact, highly specific, inexpensive and user-friendly optical fiber senor for specific DNA detection. An optical fiber laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) sensor based has been developed to detect single-strand (ss) DNA hybridization at the femtomolar level. Effects of various experimental parameters and configuration were investigated in order to optimize sensor performance and miniaturize sensor size. Key words. Laser induced fluorescence, human breast cancer cell lines, Azotobacter vinelandii, DNA, gold nanoparticles.

  12. New energy levels of atomic niobium by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, I. K.; Ba?ar, Gö; Er, A.; Güzelçimen, F.; Ba?ar, Gü; Kröger, S.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy was applied in order to find new energy levels of the niobium atom. A continuous wave tuneable titanium-sapphire laser in the wavelength range from 750 to 865 nm and a hollow-cathode lamp were used. We discovered four energy levels of even parity, three lying levels below 19 000 cm-1 and one at much higher energy. Additionally hyperfine structure data of six levels of odd parity were determined.

  13. Analysis of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of in vitro plant tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana Celia; Gutiérrez-Pulido, Humberto; Rodríguez-Domínguez, José Manuel; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín; Cervantes-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for monitoring the development and stress detection of in vitro tissue cultures in a nondestructive and noninvasive way. The changes in LIF spectra caused by the induction of organogenesis, the increase of the F690/F740 ratio as a result of the stress originated in the organogenic explants due to shoot emergence, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and shoot development were detected by LIF through closed containers of Saintpaulia ionantha.

  14. Laser-induced two-photon blackbody radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zych, L. J.; Young, J. F.; Harris, S. E.; Lukasik, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental measurements of a new type of vacuum-ultraviolet radiation source are reported. It is shown that the maximum source brightness, within its narrow linewidth, is that of a blackbody at the temperature of a metastable storage level. The laser-induced emission at 569 A from a He glow discharge corresponded to a metastable temperature of 22,700 K and was over 100 times brighter than the 584-A He resonance line.

  15. High Spatial Resolution Laser Cavity Extinction and Laser Induced Incandescence in Low Soot Producing Flames

    E-print Network

    Tian, B.; Gao, Y.; Balusamy, S.; Hochgreb, Simone

    2015-06-26

    measurements and (c) are relatively simple 6 B. Tian et al. and inexpensive to set up. Thus they have been used to monitor unsteady soot formation in diesel engines during the cycle [21–23], as well as in heavily sooting flames [24], requiring only continuous... myjournal manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) High Spatial Resolution Laser Cavity Extinction and Laser Induced Incandescence in Low Soot Producing Flames B. Tian, Y. Gao, S. Balusamy, S. Hochgreb Department of Engineering, University...

  16. Mechanism of thin layer damage due to collision of laser induced near surface shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Spesivtsev, B.; Gribin, S.; Assaoul, V.; Efremov, A.

    1997-12-01

    The problem of laser induced damage for thin layer on surface of condensed medium is considered. Specific mechanism of the damage at the place between light absorbing inhomogenities is discussed in terms of irradiated collision of shock waves induced by micro explosions of the irradiated inhomogenities. Collision of shock waves stimulats air ionization and absorbtion for laser irradiation. The process could lead to microexplosion far from initial microexplosions.

  17. Elemental analysis in environmental land samples by stand-off laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiao; Ahmad, S. R.

    2014-06-01

    The stand-off detection and analysis of environmental land samples have been demonstrated using laser-induced breakdown spectrometry. The samples of interest have included soils and vegetation powder. Elements Hg, As, Pb, Zn, Cd and Cr have been spectrally analysed with a focus on Hg as a trace contaminant in the samples. It is found that element Fe, usually contained in land samples, is a main source of spectral interference for Hg detection due to its ever present iron emission line at 253.68 nm that is closely adjacent to the strongest Hg emission line at 253.65 nm, and hence, a high resolution of spectral detection is necessary. The strong spectral signals from Bremsstrahlung emission in laser-induced plasma and atomic emission of Fe of high concentration caused a significant reduction in detection resolution in the use of image intensifier of an ICCD. The limit of detection at ~8 ppm for Hg detection in soil samples with iron as a minor constituent has been achieved, using an optical chopper and a CCD detector for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) signal detection. Such detection method in LIBS system has shown a great advantage in determining trace elements from interfering elemental constituents in land sample matrixes.

  18. Enhanced efficiency of laser shock cleaning process by geometrical confinement of laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Deoksuk; Oh, Joon Ho; Lee, Jong-Myoung; Kim, Dongsik

    2009-07-01

    Surface cleaning based on the laser-induced breakdown of gas and subsequent plasma and shock wave generation can remove small particles from solid surfaces. Accordingly, several studies were performed to expand the cleaning capability of the process. In this work, the cleaning process using laser-induced plasma (LIP) under geometrical confinement is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Two-dimensional numerical analysis is conducted to examine the behavior of the LIP shock wave under geometrical confinement for several geometries. As a result of the analysis, we propose a simple and practical method to amplify the intensity of laser-induced shock. In the proposed method, a flat quartz plate placed close to the focal point of the laser pulse confines the expansion of the LIP, allowing the plasma to expand only in one direction. As a consequence of the plasma confinement, the intensity of the shock wave produced is increased significantly. Experiments demonstrate that the enhanced shock wave can remove smaller particles from the surface better than the existing process.

  19. Plasma diagnostics from self-absorbed doublet lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, C. A.; Garcimuño, M.; Díaz Pace, D. M.; Bertuccelli, G.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a generalized approach is developed and applied for plasma characterization and quantitative purposes in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) experiences by employing a selected pair of spectral lines belonging to the same multiplet. It is based on the comparison between experimental ratios of line parameters and the theoretical calculus obtained under the framework of a homogeneous plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The applicability of the method was illustrated by using the atomic resonance transitions 279.55-280.27 nm of Mg II, which are usually detected in laser-induced plasma (LIP) during laser ablation of many kinds of targets. The laser induced plasmas were produced using a Nd:YAG laser from a pressed pellet of powdered calcium hydroxide with a concentration of 300 ppm of Mg. The experimental ratios for peak intensities, total intensities and Stark widths were obtained for different time windows and matched to the theoretical calculus. The temperature and the electron density of the plasma, as well as the Mg columnar density (the atom/ion concentration times the length of the plasma along the line-of-sight), were determined. The results were interpreted under the employed approach.

  20. Application Prospects and Microstructural Features in Laser-Induced Rapidly Solidified High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Pan, Ye; He, Yi-Zhu; Wu, Ji-Li; Yue, T. M.; Guo, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Recently, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) have attracted much interest in the materials community, as they offer massive opportunities to observe new phenomena, explore new structure, and develop new materials. Particularly, it is attractive to prepare high-performance HEA coatings by laser-induced rapid solidification, which can be formed on the surface of components and parts in a variety of sizes and shapes with a lower cost in comparison with those bulk material fabrication methods. From the technical point of view, laser-induced rapid solidification could hamper the compositional segregation, improve the solubility in solid-solution phases, and lead to the strengthening effect by the grain refinement. This article reviews the recent work on the typical microstructural features and the mechanical and chemical properties in laser-induced rapidly solidified HEAs, and these data are compared with conventional Co- and Ni-based alloy coatings. The article concludes with suggestions for future research and development in HEAs, from considerations of their characteristic properties.

  1. Quantitative analysis of essential oils of Thymus daenensis using laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khoshroo, H; Khadem, H; Bahreini, M; Tavassoli, S H; Hadian, J

    2015-11-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are used for the investigation of different genotypes of Thymus daenensis native to the Ilam province of Iran. Different genotypes of T. daenensis essential oils, labeled T1 through T7, possess slight differences with regard to the composition of the thymol. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is performed to determine the concentration of each constituent as a reference method. The Raman spectra of different concentrations of pure thymol dissolved in hexane as standard samples are obtained via a laboratory prototype Raman spectroscopy setup for the calculation of the calibration curve. The regression coefficient and limit of detection are calculated. The possibility of the differentiation of different genotypes of T. daenensis is also examined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, although we do not know the exact amounts of their components. All the fluorescence spectral information is used jointly by cluster analysis to differentiate between 7 genotypes. Our results demonstrate the acceptable precision of Raman spectroscopy with GC-MS and corroborate the capacity of Raman spectroscopy in applications in the quantitative analysis field. Furthermore, the cluster analysis results show that laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is an acceptable technique for the rapid classification of different genotypes of T. daenensis without having any previous information of their exact amount of constituents. So, the ability to rapidly and nondestructively differentiate between genotypes makes it possible to efficiently select high-quality herbs from many samples. PMID:26560783

  2. Stoichiometric changes in KH2PO4 crystals during laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Kucheyev, S O; DeMange, P; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Nelson, A J; Demos, S G

    2004-08-31

    The structure of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} single crystals (so-called KDP) irradiated with {approx} 3-ns, 355-nm laser pulses with fluences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold is studied by a combination of Raman scattering, photoluminescence, and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies. We compare spectra from the as-grown material, surface and bulk laser-induced damage sites, as well as from KPO{sub 3} references. Results show that irradiation with fluences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold leads to stoichiometric changes at surface damage sites but not at bulk damage sites. New spectroscopic features are attributed to dehydration products. For the laser irradiation conditions used in this study, the decomposed near-surface layer absorbs photons at {approx} 3.4 eV (364 nm). These results may explain the recently reported fact that surface laser damage sites in KDP crystals tend to grow with subsequent exposure to high-power laser pulses, while bulk damage sites do not.

  3. Decomposition of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} crystals during laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R.A.; Kucheyev, S.O.; DeMange, P.; Bostedt, C.; Buuren, T. van; Nelson, A.J.; Demos, S.G.

    2005-04-25

    The structure of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} single crystals (so-called KDP) irradiated with {approx}3 ns, 355 nm laser pulses with fluences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold is studied by a combination of Raman scattering, photoluminescence, and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies. We compare spectra from the as-grown material, surface and bulk laser-induced damage sites, as well as from KPO{sub 3} references. Results show that irradiation with fluences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold leads to decomposition of KDP at surface damage sites but not at bulk damage sites. New spectroscopic features are attributed to dehydration products. For the laser irradiation conditions used in this study, the decomposed near-surface layer absorbs photons at {approx}3.4 eV (364 nm). These results may explain the recently reported fact that surface laser damage sites in KDP crystals tend to grow with subsequent exposure to high-power laser pulses, while bulk damage sites do not.

  4. Stoichiometric changes to KH2PO4 during laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Kucheyev, S O; DeMange, P; Carr, C W; Demos, S G

    2004-11-15

    The local structure of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} crystals (so-called KDP) at laser-induced damage sites created by irradiation with {approx} 3-ns, 355-nm laser pulses is studied by a combination of Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopies. We compare spectra from pristine material, surface and bulk laser-induced damage sites, as well as from KPO{sub 3} references. Results show that irradiation with uences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold leads to stoichiometric changes at surface damage sites but not at bulk damage sites. New spectroscopic features are attributed to dehydration products. For the laser irradiation conditions used in this study, the decomposed near-surface layer absorbs photons at {approx} 3.4 eV (364 nm). These results may help explain the recently reported observation that surface laser damage sites in KDP crystals tend to grow with subsequent exposure to high-power laser pulses, while bulk damage sites do not.

  5. Laser induced plasma on copper target, a non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Oumeziane, Amina Ait Liani, Bachir; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive numerical model for the UV laser ablation of metal targets, it focuses mainly on the prediction of laser induced plasma thresholds, the effect of the laser-plasma interaction, and the importance of the electronic non-equilibrium in the laser induced plume and its expansion in the background gas. This paper describes a set of numerical models for laser-matter interaction between 193-248 and 355?nm lasers and a copper target. Along with the thermal effects inside the material resulting from the irradiation of the latter with the pulsed laser, the laser-evaporated matter interaction and the plasma formation are thoroughly modelled. In the laser induced plume, the electronic nonequilibrium and the laser beam absorption have been investigated. Our calculations of the plasmas ignition thresholds on copper targets have been validated and compared to experimental as well as theoretical results. Comparison with experiment data indicates that our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the inclusion of electronic non-equilibrium in our work indicated that this important process must be included in models of laser ablation and plasma plume formation.

  6. Quantitative elasticity measurement of urinary bladder wall using laser-induced surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Zhang, Fan; Song, Shaozhen; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong; Nabi, Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of urinary bladder elasticity is essential to its functions, including the storage and voiding phases of the micturition cycle. The bladder stiffness can be changed by various pathophysiological conditions. Quantitative measurement of bladder elasticity is an essential step toward understanding various urinary bladder disease processes and improving patient care. As a nondestructive, and noncontact method, laser-induced surface acoustic waves (SAWs) can accurately characterize the elastic properties of different layers of organs such as the urinary bladder. This initial investigation evaluates the feasibility of a noncontact, all-optical method of generating and measuring the elasticity of the urinary bladder. Quantitative elasticity measurements of ex vivo porcine urinary bladder were made using the laser-induced SAW technique. A pulsed laser was used to excite SAWs that propagated on the bladder wall surface. A dedicated phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) system remotely recorded the SAWs, from which the elasticity properties of different layers of the bladder were estimated. During the experiments, series of measurements were performed under five precisely controlled bladder volumes using water to estimate changes in the elasticity in relation to various urinary bladder contents. The results, validated by optical coherence elastography, show that the laser-induced SAW technique combined with PhS-OCT can be a feasible method of quantitative estimation of biomechanical properties. PMID:25574440

  7. Laser induced micro plasma processing of polymer substrates for biomedical implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, P. W.; Rosowski, A.; Murphy, M.; Irving, M.; Sharp, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of a new hybrid laser processing technique; Laser Induced Micro Plasma Processing (LIMP2). A transparent substrate is placed on top of a medium that will interact with the laser beam and create a plasma. The plasma and laser beam act in unison to ablate material and create micro-structuring on the "backside" of the substrate. We report the results of a series of experiments on a new laser processing technique that will use the same laser-plasma interaction to micromachining structures into glass and polymer substrates on the "topside" of the substrate and hence machine non-transparent material. This new laser processing technique is called Laser Induced Micro Plasma Processing (LIMP2). Micromachining of biomedical implants is proving an important enabling technology in controlling cell growth on a macro-scale. This paper discusses LIMP2 structuring of transparent substrate such as glasses and polymers for this application. Direct machining of these materials by lasers in the near infrared is at present impossible. Laser Induced Micro Plasma Processing (LIMP2) is a technique that allows laser operating at 1064 nm to machine microstructures directly these transparent substrates.

  8. Laser induced electron acceleration in an ion-channel guiding

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi; Taghavi, Amin; Hanifpour, Maryam

    2011-09-15

    Direct electron acceleration by a propagating laser pulse of circular polarization in an ion-channel guiding is studied by developing a relativistic three-dimensional single particle code. The electron chaotic dynamic is also studied using time series, power spectrum, and Liapunov exponent. It is found that the electron motion is regular (non-chaotic) for laser pulse with short time duration, while for long enough time duration, the electron motion may be chaotic. In the case of non-chaotic motion, the electron can gain and retain very high energy in the presence of ion-channel before reaching the steady-state, whereas in the case of chaotic motion, the electron gains energy and then loses it very rapidly in an unpredictable manner.

  9. Laser induced ion emission from wide bandgap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, S. R.; Leraas, J. A.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2007-05-01

    At fluences well below the threshold for plasma formation, we have characterized the direct desorption of atomic ions from fused silica surfaces during 157 nm irradiation by time-resolved mass spectroscopy. The principal ions are Si + and O +. The emission intensities are dramatically increased by treatments that increase the density of surface defects. Molecular dynamics simulations of the silica surface suggest that silicon ions bound at surface oxygen vacancies (analogous to E' centers) provide suitable configurations for the emission of Si +. We propose that emission is best understood in terms of a hybrid mechanism involving both antibonding chemical forces (Menzel-Gomer-Redhead model) and repulsive electrostatic forces on the adsorbed ion after laser excitation of the underlying defect.

  10. Spinor condensates with a laser-induced quadratic Zeeman effect

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, L.; Fattori, M.; Stuhler, J.; Pfau, T.

    2007-05-15

    We show that an effective quadratic Zeeman effect for trapped atoms can be generated by proper laser configurations and, in particular, by the dipole trap itself. The induced quadratic Zeeman effect leads to a rich ground-state phase diagram, e.g., for a degenerate {sup 52}Cr gas, can be used to induce topological defects by controllably quenching across transitions between phases of different symmetries, allows for the observability of the Einstein-de Haas effect for relatively large magnetic fields, and may be employed to create S=1/2 systems with spinor dynamics. Similar ideas could be explored in other atomic species opening an exciting new control tool in spinor systems.

  11. KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption in silica glasses produced by melting synthetic silica powder

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuu, Nobu; Sasaki, Toshiya; Kojima, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Jun-ichiro; Nakamura, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Hideharu

    2013-07-07

    KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption of silica glasses produced by electric melting and flame fusion of synthetic silica powder were investigated. The growth of KrF-laser-induced absorption was more gradual than that of ArF-laser-induced absorption. Induced absorption spectra exhibited a peak at about 5.8 eV, of which the position and width differed slightly among samples and laser species. Widths of ArF-laser-induced absorption spectra were wider than those of KrF-laser-induced spectra. KrF-laser-induced absorption is reproducible by two Gaussian absorption bands peaking at 5.80 eV with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.62 eV and at 6.50 eV with FWHM of 0.74 eV. For reproduction of ArF-laser-induced absorption, Gaussian bands at 5.41 eV with FWHM of 0.62 eV was necessary in addition to components used for reproducing KrF-laser-induced absorption. Based on the discussion of the change of defect structures evaluated from change of absorption components, we proposed that the precursor of the 5.8-eV band ascribed to E Prime center ({identical_to}Si{center_dot}) is {identical_to}Si-H HO-Si{identical_to} structures formed by the reaction between strained Si-O-Si bonds and interstitial H{sub 2} molecules during the irradiation.

  12. Grating-structured metallic microsprings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; LiuThe First Two Authors Contributed Equally To This Work., Zhaoqian; Huang, Gaoshan; Liu, Ran; Mei, Yongfeng

    2014-07-01

    We fabricate grating-structured metallic microsprings with well-defined helical angles and diameters, which are self-rolled from strained nanomembranes patterned with gratings. The grating structures on the metal membrane, replicated from the imprinted polymer layer beneath, give rise to the controlled rolling direction after selective etching of the underlying sacrificial layer. The rolling direction of the grating-structured thin metal film is always perpendicular to the long side edge of gratings, offering a good way to roll up strained strips into well controlled three-dimensional (3D) microsprings simply by altering the dimension and orientation of the structured strips. The mechanical elasticity of these grating-structured metallic microsprings is verified for the potential application as a flow rate sensor. Our work may stimulate rigorous synthesis of highly functional and complex 3D helical micro and nanostructures, and hint a broad range of applications such as environmental sensors, micro-/nanoscale robots, metamaterials, etc.We fabricate grating-structured metallic microsprings with well-defined helical angles and diameters, which are self-rolled from strained nanomembranes patterned with gratings. The grating structures on the metal membrane, replicated from the imprinted polymer layer beneath, give rise to the controlled rolling direction after selective etching of the underlying sacrificial layer. The rolling direction of the grating-structured thin metal film is always perpendicular to the long side edge of gratings, offering a good way to roll up strained strips into well controlled three-dimensional (3D) microsprings simply by altering the dimension and orientation of the structured strips. The mechanical elasticity of these grating-structured metallic microsprings is verified for the potential application as a flow rate sensor. Our work may stimulate rigorous synthesis of highly functional and complex 3D helical micro and nanostructures, and hint a broad range of applications such as environmental sensors, micro-/nanoscale robots, metamaterials, etc. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00316k

  13. Nanofibers with Bragg gratings from equidistant holes

    E-print Network

    Kien, Fam Le; Hakuta, K

    2011-01-01

    We study nanofibers with Bragg gratings from equidistant holes. We calculate analytically and numerically the reflection and transmission coefficients for a single grating and also for a cavity formed by two gratings. We show that the reflection and transmission coefficients of the gratings substantially depend on the number of holes, the hole length, the hole depth, the grating period, and the light wavelength. We find that the reflection and transmission coefficients of the gratings depend on the orientation of the polarization vector of light with respect to the holes. Such a dependence is a result of the fact that the cross section of the gratings is not cylindrically symmetric.

  14. 20 kHz toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of a jet in nearly sonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. A.; Troutman, V. A.; Mungal, M. G.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-10-01

    This manuscript describes continuous, high-repetition-rate (20 kHz) toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in an expansion tube impulse flow facility. Cinematographic image sequences are acquired that visualize an underexpanded jet of hydrogen in Mach 0.9 crossflow, a practical flow configuration relevant to aerospace propulsion systems. The freestream gas is nitrogen seeded with toluene; toluene broadly absorbs and fluoresces in the ultraviolet, and the relatively high quantum yield of toluene produces large signals and high signal-to-noise ratios. Toluene is excited using a commercially available, frequency-quadrupled (266 nm), high-repetition-rate (20 kHz), pulsed (0.8-0.9 mJ per pulse), diode-pumped solid-state Nd:YAG laser, and fluorescence is imaged with a high-repetition-rate intensifier and CMOS camera. The resulting PLIF movie and image sequences are presented, visualizing the jet start-up process and the dynamics of the jet in crossflow; the freestream duration and a measure of freestream momentum flux steadiness are also inferred. This work demonstrates progress toward continuous PLIF imaging of practical flow systems in impulse facilities at kHz acquisition rates using practical, turn-key, high-speed laser and imaging systems.

  15. Time-resolved imaging of material response during laser-induced bulk damage in SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Negres, R A

    2008-10-24

    We report on time resolved imaging of the dynamic events taking place during laser-induced damage in the bulk of fused silica samples with nanosecond temporal resolution and one micron spatial resolution. These events include: shock/pressure wave formation and propagation, transient absorption, crack propagation and formation of residual stress fields. The work has been performed using a time-resolved microscope system that utilizes a probe pulse to acquire images at delay times covering the entire timeline of a damage event. Image information is enhanced using polarized illumination and simultaneously recording the two orthogonal polarization image components. For the case of fused silica, an electronic excitation is first observed accompanied by the onset of a pressure wave generation and propagation. Cracks are seen to form early in the process and reach their final size at about 25 ns into the damage event. In addition, changes that in part are attributed to transient absorption in the modified material are observed for delays up to about 200 microseconds.

  16. Time-Resolved Imaging of Material Response Following Laser-Induced Breakdown in the Bulk and Surface of Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R N; Negres, R A; DeMange, P; Demos, S G

    2010-02-04

    Optical components within high energy laser systems are susceptible to laser-induced material modification when the breakdown threshold is exceeded or damage is initiated by pre-existing impurities or defects. These modifications are the result of exposure to extreme conditions involving the generation of high temperatures and pressures and occur on a volumetric scale of the order of a few cubic microns. The response of the material following localized energy deposition, including the timeline of events and the individual processes involved during this timeline, is still largely unknown. In this work, we investigate the events taking place during the entire timeline in both bulk and surface damage in fused silica using a set of time-resolved microscopy systems. These microscope systems offer up to 1 micron spatial resolution when imaging static or dynamic effects, allowing for imaging of the entire process with adequate temporal and spatial resolution. These systems incorporate various pump-probe geometries designed to optimize the sensitivity for detecting individual aspects of the process such as the propagation of shock waves, near-surface material motion, the speed of ejecta, and material transformations. The experimental results indicate that the material response can be separated into distinct phases, some terminating within a few tens of nanoseconds but some extending up to about 100 microseconds. Overall the results demonstrate that the final characteristics of the modified region depend on the material response to the energy deposition and not on the laser parameters.

  17. Fiber Grating Environmental Sensing System

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Whitten L. (Fairview, OR); Udd, Eric (Fairview, OR)

    2003-07-29

    Fiber grating environmental measurement systems are comprised of sensors that are configured to respond to changes in moisture or chemical content of the surrounding medium through the action of coatings and plates inducing strain that is measured. These sensors can also be used to monitor the interior of bonds for degradation due to aging, cracking, or chemical attack. Means to multiplex these sensors at high speed and with high sensitivity can be accomplished by using spectral filters placed to correspond to each fiber grating environmental sensor. By forming networks of spectral elements and using wavelength division multiplexing arrays of fiber grating sensors may be processed in a single fiber line allowing distributed high sensitivity, high bandwidth fiber optic grating environmental sensor systems to be realized.

  18. Simultaneous visualization of water and hydrogen peroxide vapor using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence and photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Olof; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    A concept based on a combination of photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) and two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is for the first time demonstrated for simultaneous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and water (H2O) vapor. Water detection is based on two-photon excitation by an injection-locked krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser (248.28 nm), which induces broadband fluorescence (400-500 nm) from water. The same laser simultaneously photodissociates H2O2, whereupon the generated OH fragments are probed by LIF after a time delay of typically 50 ns, by a frequency-doubled dye laser (281.91 nm). Experiments in six different H2O2/H2O mixtures of known compositions show that both signals are linearly dependent on respective species concentration. For the H2O2 detection there is a minor interfering signal contribution from OH fragments created by two-photon photodissociation of H2O. Since the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O2 is found to be at least ?24,000 times higher than the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O at room temperature, this interference is negligible for most H2O/H2O2 mixtures of practical interest. Simultaneous single-shot imaging of both species was demonstrated in a slightly turbulent flow. For single-shot imaging the minimum detectable H2O2 and H2O concentration is 10 ppm and 0.5%, respectively. The proposed measurement concept could be a valuable asset in several areas, for example, in atmospheric and combustion science and research on vapor-phase H2O2 sterilization in the pharmaceutical and aseptic food-packaging industries. PMID:25358016

  19. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings working by reflection or by transmission is investigated. The study is performed by generalizing the time-dependent coupled-wave theory previously developed for one-dimensional photonic crystals (André J-M and Jonnard P 2015 J. Opt. 17 085609) and also by extending the Takagi–Taupin approach of the dynamical theory of diffraction. The indicial response is calculated. It presents a time delay with a transient time that is a function of the extinction length for reflection geometry and of the extinction length combined with the thickness of the grating for transmission geometry.

  20. A novel long-period fiber grating sensor for large strain measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Genda; Xiao, Hai; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Yinan

    2009-03-01

    Critical buildings such as hospitals and police stations must remain functional immediately following a major earthquake event. Due to earthquake effects, they often experience large strains, leading to progressive collapses. Therefore, monitoring and assessing the large strain condition of critical buildings is of paramount importance to post-earthquake responses and evacuations in earthquake-prone regions. In this study, a novel large strain sensor based on the long period fiber grating (LPFG) technology is proposed and developed. CO2 laser induced LPFG sensors are characterized for such mechanical properties as strain sensitivity in extension and flexure, sensor stability, and measurement range. For practical applications, the need for LPFG sensor packaging is identified and verified in laboratory implementations. By introducing various strain transfer mechanisms, the strain sensitivity of LPFG sensors can be customized for different applications at corresponding strain transfer ratios.

  1. Flip-chip assembly of VCSELs to silicon grating couplers via laser fabricated SU8 prisms.

    PubMed

    Kaur, K S; Subramanian, A Z; Cardile, P; Verplancke, R; Van Kerrebrouck, J; Spiga, S; Meyer, R; Bauwelinck, J; Baets, R; Van Steenberge, G

    2015-11-01

    This article presents the flip-chip bonding of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) to silicon grating couplers (GCs) via SU8 prisms. The SU8 prisms are defined on top of the GCs using non-uniform laser ablation process. The prisms enable perfectly vertical coupling from the bonded VCSELs to the GCs. The VCSELs are flip-chip bonded on top of the silicon GCs employing the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)-assisted thermocompression technique. An excess loss of < 1 dB at 1.55 µm measured from the bonded assemblies is reported in this paper. The results of high speed transmission experiments performed on the bonded assemblies with clear eye openings up to 20 Gb/s are also presented. PMID:26561097

  2. Laser generation of gas bubbles: Photoacoustic and photothermal effects recorded in transient grating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frez, Clifford; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2008-11-14

    Absorption of high power laser radiation by colloidal suspensions or solutions containing photoreactive chemicals can result in bubble production. Here, transient grating experiments are reported where picosecond and nanosecond lasers are used to initiate photoinduced processes that lead to bubble formation. Irradiation of colloidal Pt suspensions is found to produce water vapor bubbles that condense back to liquid on a nanosecond time scale. Laser irradiation of Pt suspensions supersaturated with CO{sub 2} liberates dissolved gas to produce bubbles at the sites of the colloidal particles. Laser induced chemical reactions that produce bubbles are found in suspensions of particulate C in water, and in the sensitized decarboxylation of oxalic acid. Theory based on linear acoustics as well as the Rayleigh-Plesset equation is given for description of the bubble motion.

  3. The diffraction grating in the Ivory optomechanical modeling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatheway, Alson E.

    2013-09-01

    In imaging spectrometers it is important that both the image of the far-field object and the image of the slit be stable on the detector plane. Lenses and mirrors contribute to the motions of these images but motions of the diffraction grating also have their own influences on these image motions. This paper develops the vector equations for the images (spectra) of the diffraction grating and derives their optomechanical influence coefficients from them. The Ivory Optomechanical Modeling Tools integrates the diffraction grating into the larger optical imaging system and formats the whole system's influence coefficients suitably for both spreadsheet and finite element analysis methods. Their application is illustrated in an example of a spectrometer exposed to both static and dynamic disturbances.

  4. Liquid crystal gratings from nematic to blue phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan-qing; Hu, Wei; Lin, Xiao-wen; Srivastava, Abhishek; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2012-10-01

    Some of our recent progress on liquid crystal (LC) gratings, from nematic to blue phase, is reviewed in this invited talk. The first kind of grating is fabricated by periodically adjusting the LC directors to form alternate micro phase retarders and polarization rotators in a cell placed between crossed polarizers. The second one is demonstrated by means of photoalignment technique with alternate orthogonal homogeneously-aligned domains. To improve the response time of the gratings, several approaches are also proposed by using dual-frequency addressed nematic LC, ferroelectric LC and blue phase LC, which shows great performance including high transmittance, polarization independency and submillisecond response. At last, to obtain other controllable LC microstructures rather than simple 1D/2D gratings, we develop a micro-lithography system with a digital micro-mirror device as dynamic mask forms. It may instantly generate arbitrary micro-images on photoalignment layers and further guides the LC molecule orientations. Besides normal phase gratings, more complex patterns such as quasicrystal structures are demonstrated. Some new applications such as tunable multiport optical switching and vector beam generations are expected.

  5. Immunotherapy for choroidal neovascularization in a laser-induced mouse model simulating exudative (wet) macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Puran S.; Hu, Zhiwei; Tezel, Tongalp H.; Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kang, Shin Goo; Cruz, Jose M. C.; Bora, Nalini S.; Garen, Alan; Kaplan, Henry J.

    2003-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness after age 55 in the industrialized world. Severe loss of central vision frequently occurs with the exudative (wet) form of AMD, as a result of the formation of a pathological choroidal neovasculature (CNV) that damages the macular region of the retina. We tested the effect of an immunotherapy procedure, which had been shown to destroy the pathological neovasculature in solid tumors, on the formation of laser-induced CNV in a mouse model simulating exudative AMD in humans. The procedure involves administering an Icon molecule that binds with high affinity and specificity to tissue factor (TF), resulting in the activation of a potent cytolytic immune response against cells expressing TF. The Icon binds selectively to TF on the vascular endothelium of a CNV in the mouse and pig models and also on the CNV of patients with exudative AMD. Here we show that the Icon dramatically reduces the frequency of CNV formation in the mouse model. After laser treatment to induce CNV formation, the mice were injected either with an adenoviral vector encoding the Icon, resulting in synthesis of the Icon by vector-infected mouse cells, or with the Icon protein. The route of injection was i.v. or intraocular. The efficacy of the Icon in preventing formation of laser-induced CNV depends on binding selectively to the CNV. Because the Icon binds selectively to the CNV in exudative AMD as well as to laser-induced CNV, the Icon might also be efficacious for treating patients with exudative AMD.

  6. Quasi-resonance enhancement of laser-induced-fluorescence diagnosis of endometriosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Ralph H., Jr.; Vancaillie, Thierry G.

    1990-05-01

    Endometriosis, a common disease in women in the reproductive age group, is defined pathologically by the presence of endometrial tissue (inner lining of the uterus) outside the uterus. The displaced tissue is histologically identical to endometrium. In addition to being a highly prevalent disease, this disease is associated with many distressing and debilitating symptoms. Motivated by the need to improve diagnosis by endoscopic imaging instrumentation, we have previously used several drugs to cause selective laser-induced fluorescence of active surgically induced endometriosis in the rabbit model in vivo using ultraviolet-wavelength (351.1 and 363.8 nm) excitation from an argon-ion laser. In the present study we have investigated methods of enhancing differentiation between normal and abnormal tissue by using other excitation wavelengths. In addition to an enhanced capability for detecting abnormal tissue, there are several other advantages associated with using visible-wavelength excitation, such as deeper penetration into the tissue, as well as increased equipment performance, reliability, versatility, and availability. The disadvantage is that because only wavelengths longer than the excitation wavelength can be used for detection, some of the spectral information is lost. Because human endomeiriosis samples were somewhat limited in quantity, as well as specimen size, we used normal ovarian tissue for the laser-induced-fluorescence differentiation-enhancement studies. Positive enhancement of the laser-induced- fluorescence differentiation was found in human ovarian tissue in vitro utilizing 514.5-nm excitation from an argonion laser. Additionally, preliminary verification of this concept was accomplished in active surgically induced endometriosis in the rabbit model in vivo with visible argon-ion laser excitation of two tetracycline-based drugs. Future experiments with other drug treatments and excitation/detection parameters are planned.

  7. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time. PMID:25182866

  8. A study of the mechanism of metal deposition by the laser-induced forward transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, F. J.; Bohandy, J.; Kim, B. F.; Jette, A. N.; Thompson, P.

    1987-10-01

    The mechanism of the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique for transferring metal features from a film to a substrate is examined by using the one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation with a moving solid-melt boundary to model the heating, melting, and vaporization of the metal film by the laser. For typical LIFT conditions the calculations show that the back of the film (i.e., the part exposed to the laser) will reach the boiling point before the film melts through, which supports the qualitative picture that the LIFT process involves vapor-driven propulsion of metal from the film onto the target.

  9. Laser induced deflection technique for absolute thin film absorption measurement: optimized concepts and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Mühlig, Christian; Kufert, Siegfried; Bublitz, Simon; Speck, Uwe

    2011-03-20

    Using experimental results and numerical simulations, two measuring concepts of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique are introduced and optimized for absolute thin film absorption measurements from deep ultraviolet to IR wavelengths. For transparent optical coatings, a particular probe beam deflection direction allows the absorption measurement with virtually no influence of the substrate absorption, yielding improved accuracy compared to the common techniques of separating bulk and coating absorption. For high-reflection coatings, where substrate absorption contributions are negligible, a different probe beam deflection is chosen to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. Various experimental results for the two different measurement concepts are presented. PMID:21460979

  10. Simultaneous two-dimensional laser-induced-fluorescence measurements of argon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A. K.; Galante, Matthew; McCarren, Dustin; Sears, Stephanie; Scime, E. E.

    2010-10-15

    Recent laser upgrades on the Hot Helicon Experiment at West Virginia University have enabled multiplexed simultaneous measurements of the ion velocity distribution function at a single location, expanding our capabilities in laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics. The laser output is split into two beams, each modulated with an optical chopper and injected perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Light from the crossing point of the beams is transported to a narrow-band photomultiplier tube filtered at the fluorescence wavelength and monitored by two lock-in amplifiers, each referenced to one of the two chopper frequencies.

  11. Surface patterning by pulsed-laser-induced transfer of metals and compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Zsolt; Mogyorosi, Peter; Szoerenyi, Tamas

    1990-08-01

    Besults of a systematic study on Q-switched nthy laser induced rrrn2 area transfer of supported titanium and chranium thin films and Ge/Se multilayer structures are reported. The appearance of the prints is governed by film-support adhesion and source-target spacing. Best quality prints are produced by ablating well adhering ntal films in close proximity ( spacing < 15 pm) to the target to be patterned. Transfer fran stacked elenntaxy layers as a source offers a unique possibility of depositing acinpound films by mixing the constituents and transferring the material onto the target substrate in a single step.

  12. Discrimination of moist oil shale and limestone using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, P.; Piip, K.; Lepp, A.; Lissovski, A.; Aints, M.; Laan, M.

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced plasma emission spectra of Estonian oil shale and associated limestone with varying moisture content were studied. Time gated spectra excited by 1064 nm laser radiation were recorded. Spectral lines for determination of plasma parameters were selected. Moisture causes the reduction of the intensity of the total emission, and increases the intensity of the H? line. It was found that the effect of the moisture content on the plasma temperature and electron concentration was inconsiderable. Using the ratio of intensities of H? and Mg spectral lines, it was possible to distinguish reliably between limestone and oil shale independently of their moisture content.

  13. Planar temperature measurement in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced iodine fluorescence technique that is suitable for the planar measurement of temperature in cold nonreacting compressible air flows is investigated analytically and demonstrated in a known flow field. The technique is based on the temperature dependence of the broadband fluorescence from iodine excited by the 514-nm line of an argon-ion laser. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 245 K were measured in the calibration flow field. This technique makes complete, spatially resolved surveys of temperature practical in highly three-dimensional, low-temperature compressible flows.

  14. Polymer/carbon nanotube composite patterns via laser induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Boutopoulos, Christos; Pandis, Christos; Pissis, Polycarpos; Zergioti, Ioanna; Giannakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-25

    Direct and high spatial resolution printing of polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite layers has been demonstrated by means of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT). Laser irradiation of composite target materials, such as poly(acrylic acid)/CNT and polyvinylpyrrolidone/CNT, enabled dry deposition of well resolved composite pixels onto glass substrates. The dispersion of the CNT into the deposited composite pixels was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The LIFT technique was also employed for the accurate deposition of polymer/CNT composite pixels onto aluminum microelectrodes for the fabrication of chemical sensors based on polymer/CNT compounds.

  15. Ultraviolet and infrared femtosecond laser induced periodic surface structures on thin polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Vazquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Moreno, Pablo

    2012-01-23

    This work demonstrates the formation of femtosecond laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) by multipulse irradiation with the fundamental and 3rd harmonic of a linearly polarized Ti:sapphire laser (795 and 265 nm) on thin films of the polymers poly (ethylene terephthalate), poly (trimethylene terephthalate), and poly (carbonate bisphenol A) prepared by spin-coating. LIPSS, inspected by atomic force microscopy, are formed upon multiple pulse UV and IR irradiation with wavelength-sized period in a narrow range of fluences below the ablation threshold. Control and tunability of the size and morphology of the periodic structures become thus possible ensuring photochemical integrity of polymer films.

  16. LIFES: Laser Induced Fluorescence and Environmental Sensing. [remote sensing technique for marine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, W. R.; Stephenson, D. G.; Measures, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    A laboratory investigation has been conducted to evaluate the detection and identification capabilities of laser induced fluorescence as a remote sensing technique for the marine environment. The relative merits of fluorescence parameters including emission and excitation profiles, intensity and lifetime measurements are discussed in relation to the identification of specific targets of the marine environment including crude oils, refined petroleum products, fish oils and algae. Temporal profiles displaying the variation of lifetime with emission wavelength have proven to add a new dimension of specificity and simplicity to the technique.

  17. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  18. Detection of indoor biological hazards using the man-portable laser induced breakdown spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Chase A.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Snyder, Emily Gibb; De Lucia, Frank C. Jr.; Gullett, Brian; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2008-11-01

    The performance of a man-portable laser induced breakdown spectrometer was evaluated for the detection of biological powders on indoor office surfaces and wipe materials. Identification of pure unknown powders was performed by comparing against a library of spectra containing biological agent surrogates and confusant materials, such as dusts, diesel soot, natural and artificial sweeteners, and drink powders, using linear correlation analysis. Simple models constructed using a second technique, partial least squares discriminant analysis, successfully identified Bacillus subtilis (BG) spores on wipe materials and office surfaces. Furthermore, these models were able to identify BG on materials not used in the training of the model.

  19. Correlation between laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signal and moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Gigant, Lionel; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin

    2012-07-01

    The possibility of using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for measuring the moisture content of fresh food samples is studied. The normalized line emission of oxygen is highly correlated with the moisture content of the sample, cheese in our case, and can be used as a moisture marker in situations where oxygen interference from the matrix is not a critical issue. The linear correlation between the oxygen signal and the moisture content in the sample shows great potential for using LIBS as an alternative spectroscopic method for moisture monitoring.

  20. Laser-induced damage in photopolymers thin films with ultrashort pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, Albertas; Batavi?iÅ«tÄ--, GintarÄ--; Å ?iuka, Mindaugas; Melninkaitis, Andrius; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2014-05-01

    We characterize laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in transparent photopolymers by a sub-ps laser pulses of 515 nm wavelength representing case of high light intensities. Five different photopolymers (SZ2080, OrmoComp, SU-8, PDMS and PMMA) widely used in the laser lithography are investigated. The relationship of the damage threshold and optical band-gap energy of the polymers indicating possible damage mechanism is considered. Incubation model validating damage threshold dependence on the number of laser pulses is studied as well. The obtained characteristic values of LIDT reveal potential of photopolymers and their possible applications in high power laser systems.

  1. Self-absorption reduction in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using laser-stimulated absorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Ming; Guo, Lian-Bo; Li, Chang-Mao; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Xin-Yan; Hao, Zhong-Qi; Li, Xiang-You; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Yong-Feng

    2015-11-15

    The self-absorption effect is one of the main bottlenecks for the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. In this Letter, LIBS assisted by laser-stimulated absorption (LSA-LIBS) is proposed to solve this problem. The process of LSA in self-absorption reduction is discussed and confirmed. The serious self-absorption phenomena of spectral lines (K, Mn, and Al) were not observed in LSA-LIBS. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of K, Mn, and Al was reduced by about 58%, 25%, and 52%, respectively. The results demonstrate the capability of this approach to self-absorption reduction in the LIBS technique. PMID:26565840

  2. Laser Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Ion Velocity in Magnetic Cusped Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Natalia; Cappelli, Mark; Hargus, William, Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Cusped Field Thrusters (CFTs) are magnetized plasma accelerators that use strong cusps to shape the magnetic field and hence the electrostatic potential. The cusped magnetic field lines meter the electron transport to the anode and reduce the energetic ion flux towards the dielectric channel walls, thereby reducing the effects of erosion. This work presents time averaged laser induced fluorescence velocity measurements of the ions in the plumes of three CFT variants. These include the Cylindrical Hall Thruster (CHT), Cylindrical Cusped Field Thruster (CCFT), and Diverging Cusped Field Thruster (DCFT). Results indicate that magnetic cusps form equipotential surfaces, and that the majority of ion acceleration occurs outside of the thruster channels.

  3. Influence of irradiation dose on laser-induced surface nanostructures on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamova, Olga; Bounhalli, Mourad; Reif, Juergen

    2013-08-01

    We report on the dependence of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on an increase of incident pulse number. On silicon, the patterns evolve from linear, parallel sub-wavelength ripples, grossly perpendicular to the laser polarization, via coalesced wider features parallel to the polarization, to a crater with periodically structured, pillar-like walls. Closer inspection of the patterns indicates that the different features always continue to exhibit reminiscence to the preceding lower-dose patterns, suggesting that, indeed, all patterns can be created by ONE single GENERAL formation process, as in self-organized structure formation, and the different structures/feature sizes are NOT due to DIFFERENT mechanisms.

  4. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  5. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Soft Tissues of the Oral Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Bernard, Rodney; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Ongole, Ravikiran; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    The present study deals with the in vivo measurement of auto-fluorescence from different anatomical sites of oral cavities of healthy volunteers, using a homebuilt Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Spectroscopy setup. Excitation wave length of 325 nm from a He-Cd laser was used as the source. From the 7 anatomical sites (say buccal mucosa, tongue, palate etc) of each oral cavity of 113 subjects, 1266 fluorescence spectra were recorded. The spectra were analysed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to see the correlation between different sites.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for real time and online elemental analysis

    E-print Network

    Rai, V N; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, J P

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a laser based diagnostics used to study atomic emission from the expanding plasma plume formed during the laser-matter interaction. It provides valuable information about the composition of the target material. LIBS has proved its potential application in the analysis of impurities, pollutants and toxic elements in various types of matrices of different samples (solid, liquid and gases), even those present under difficult and harsh environmental conditions. This article reviews some recent developments in the field, and its wide application in various fields of research and analysis.

  7. Low power continuous wave laser induced optical nonlinearities in saffron ( Crocus Sativus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasibov, H.; Mamedbeili, I.

    2010-12-01

    We report on the low power CW laser induced nonlinear optical responses of Saffron (stigmata of Crocus Savitus L.) ethanol and methanol extracts. The optical nonlinearities were investigated by performing Z-scan measurements at 470 and 535 nm wavelengths. At both wavelengths the material has a strong nonlinear refraction, mainly of thermal origin. However, only at 470 nm wavelength the material exhibit pronounced saturable nonlinear absorption. Long-term (70 days) stability measurements indicated that the nonlinearities in the Saffron extracts are due to their nonvolatile components. This study shows that there is great potential for Saffron extracts to be used in nonlinear photonic applications.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence studies of water processed by a reverse osmosis purification unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharikova, Anna V.; Killinger, Dennis K.

    2005-11-01

    A UV (266 nm) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system with high sensitivity has been used to record fluorescent spectra (300 nm - 700 nm) of various water samples, such as distilled, tap and river water. Large fluorescence peaks corresponding to the fluorescence of Dissolved Organic Compounds (DOCs) were observed in river samples. Significant differences in spectra between different brands of drinking and distilled bottled water were also observed. The LIF system is currently used to measure the trace species in water processed by Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit (ROWPU). Initial spectra of the input and output water are presented.

  9. Calibrating the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument for carbonate minerals on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, Nina L.; Wiens, Roger C.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Ollila, Ann M.; Humphries, Seth D.; Newsom, Horton E.; Barefield, James E.

    2010-05-01

    The ChemCam instrument suite onboard the NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover includes the first laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for extraterrestrial applications. Here we examine carbonate minerals in a simulated martian environment to better understand the LIBS signature of these materials on Mars. Both chemical composition and rock type are determined using multivariate analysis techniques. Composition is confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. Our results show that ChemCam can recognize and differentiate between different types of carbonate materials on Mars.

  10. Spatially optimized gene transfection by laser-induced breakdown of optically trapped nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Lee, Woei Ming; ?ižmár, Tomáš; Campbell, Paul; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle with a nanosecond laser pulse. Controllable cavitation within a microscope sample was achieved, generating shear stress to monolayers of live cells. This efficiently permeabilize their plasma membranes. We show that this technique is an excellent tool for plasmid-DNA transfection of cells with both reduced energy requirements and reduced cell lysis compared to previously reported approaches. Simultaneous multisite targeted nanosurgery of cells is also demonstrated using a spatial light modulator for parallelizing the technique.

  11. Quantitative determination of uranium and europium in glass matrix by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, E. C.; Lee, D. H.; Yun, J.-I.; Kim, J. G.; Yeon, J. W.; Song, K.

    2011-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was applied to the quantitative determination of the elemental composition of glass samples containing U and Eu as a surrogate for highly radioactive glass waste. The emission intensities of both major and minor elements in the samples were measured simultaneously in the wavelength range from 200 to 780 nm by using an echelle spectrometer. Calibration curves for the concentration determination were obtained from the emission intensities at 358.488 nm for U I, and 459.403 nm for Eu I. Limits of detection for U and Eu were ~ 150 and ~ 4.2 parts per million, respectively.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of different brands of cigarettes using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyad, M. H.; Saleem, M.; Shah, M.; Baig, M. A.; Shaikh, N. M.

    2008-05-20

    In this work the technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used for the elemental analysis of cigarettes. For this purpose emission spectra have been measured of eleven different kinds of cigarette brands sold and/or produced in Pakistan. Analysis of the spectral peaks observed shows that Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Cr, Fe, Sr and Ba are contained in all brands. Exhibiting the LIBS results, the powerful potential of this method for the identification of the elemental content of cigarettes is demonstrated.

  13. Sub-Microsecond Temperature Measurement in Liquid Water Using Laser Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alderfer, David W.; Herring, G. C.; Danehy, Paul M.; Mizukaki, Toshiharu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Using laser-induced thermal acoustics, we demonstrate non-intrusive and remote sound speed and temperature measurements over the range 10 - 45 C in liquid water. Averaged accuracy of sound speed and temperature measurements (10 s) are 0.64 m/s and 0.45 C respectively. Single-shot precisions based on one standard deviation of 100 or greater samples range from 1 m/s to 16.5 m/s and 0.3 C to 9.5 C for sound speed and temperature measurements respectively. The time resolution of each single-shot measurement was 300 nsec.

  14. Sensitive detection of H2 molecules by two-photon excited laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Maeda, M.; Kajiki, Y.; Muraoka, K.; Akazaki, M.

    1987-06-01

    The sensitive detection of H2 molecules was demonstrated by means of twophoton excited laser-induces fluorescence spectroscopy with a narrow-band ArF excimer laser. A detection limit of 2×1014 cm-3 was obtained with an excitation power of ˜150 kW. This is already comparable with that obtained by the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). This technique was successfully applied to measure a spatial distribution of H2 in a town-gas burner.

  15. Common-Path Heterodyne Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics for Seedless Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, G. C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a novel technique for the detection of heterodyne laser-induced thermal acoustics signals, which allows the construction of a highly stable seedless laser velocimeter. A common-path configuration is combined with quadrature detection to provide flow direction, greatly improve robustness to misalignment and vibration, and give reliable velocity measurement at low flow velocities. Comparison with Pitot tube measurements in the freestream of a wind tunnel shows root-mean-square errors of 0.67 m/s over the velocity range 0.55 m/s.

  16. Laser-induced shockwave paired with FRET: a method to study cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Preece, Daryl; Shi, Linda; Khatibzadeh, Nima; Rosales, Derrick; Pan, Yijia; Lei, Lie; Wang, Yingxiao; Berns, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Cells within the body are subject to various forces; however, the details concerning the way in which cells respond to mechanical stimuli are not well understood. We demonstrate that laser-induced shockwaves (LIS) combined with biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a promising new approach to study biological processes in single live cells. As "proof-of-concept," using a FRET biosensor, we show that in response to LIS, cells release intracellular calcium. With the parameters used, cells retain their morphology and remain viable. LIS combined with FRET permits observation of the cells immediate response to a sudden shear force. PMID:25639252

  17. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the classification of unknown powders

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Emily Gibb; Munson, Chase A.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; De Lucia, Frank C. Jr.; Gullett, Brian; Miziolek, Andrzej

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to discern between two biological agent surrogates (Bacillus atrophaeus and ovalbumin) and potential interferent compounds (mold spores, humic acid, house dust, and Arizona road dust). Multiple linear regression and neural network analysis models were constructed by using B. atrophaeus and ovalbumin spectra, and limits of detection were calculated. Classification of the agent surrogates' LIBS spectra was attempted by using a neural network model. False negative rates of 0% were observed for B. atrophaeus (100 colony forming units) spore spectra with the neural network model used for classification.

  18. Temporal evolution of femtosecond laser induced plasma filament in air and N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Papeer, J.; Botton, M.; Zigler, A.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.

    2013-12-09

    We present single shot, high resolution, time-resolved measurements of the relaxation of laser induced plasma filaments in air and in N{sub 2} gas. Based on the measurements of the time dependent electromagnetic signal in a waveguide, an accurate and simple derivation of the electron density in the filament is demonstrated. This experimental method does not require prior knowledge of filament dimensions or control over its exact spatial location. The experimental results are compared to numerical simulations of air plasma chemistry. Results reveal the role of various decay mechanisms including the importance of O{sub 4}{sup +} molecular levels.

  19. Equivalent of a cartilage tissue for simulations of laser-induced temperature fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kondyurin, A V; Sviridov, A P

    2008-07-31

    The thermal and optical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels and cartilages are studied by the method of IR laser radiometry. The thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and the effective absorption coefficient at a wavelength of 1.56 {mu}m measured for polyacrylamide gel with 70% water content and the degree of cross-linking 1:9 and for the nasal septum cartilage proved to be close. This allows the use of polyacrylamide hydrogels as equivalents of cartilages in simulations of laser-induced temperature fields. (biophotonics)

  20. Comparison of brass alloys composition by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnotta, Stefano; Grifoni, Emanuela; Legnaioli, Stefano; Lezzerini, Marco; Lorenzetti, Giulia; Palleschi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we face the problem of assessing similarities in the composition of different metallic alloys, using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. The possibility of determining the degree of similarity through the use of artificial neural networks and self-organizing maps is discussed. As an example, we present a case study involving the comparison of two historical brass samples, very similar in their composition. The results of the paper can be extended to many other situations, not necessarily associated with cultural heritage and archeological studies, where objects with similar composition have to be compared.