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Sample records for laser-polarized noble gas

  1. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We pursued advanced technology development of laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This new multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation-as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 129Xe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We pursued two technology development specific aims: (1) development of low-field (less than 0.01 T) noble gas MRI of humans; and (2) development of functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized noble gas and related techniques.

  2. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (e.g., of lung ventilation) as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (He-3 and Xe-129) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We are pursuing two specific aims in this research. The first aim is to develop a low-field (< 0.01 T) instrument for noble gas MRI of humans, and the second aim is to develop functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized Xe-129 and related techniques.

  3. Low-field MRI of laser polarized noble gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Pomeroy, V. R.; Mair, R. W.; Hinton, D. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Stoner, R. E.; Hersman, F. W.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    NMR images of laser polarized 3He gas were obtained at 21 G using a simple, homebuilt instrument. At such low fields magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of thermally polarized samples (e.g., water) is not practical. Low-field noble gas MRI has novel scientific, engineering, and medical applications. Examples include portable systems for diagnosis of lung disease, as well as imaging of voids in porous media and within metallic systems.

  4. Low-field MRI of laser polarized noble gas.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C H; Wong, G P; Pomeroy, V R; Mair, R W; Hinton, D P; Hoffmann, D; Stoner, R E; Hersman, F W; Cory, D G; Walsworth, R L

    1998-10-26

    NMR images of laser polarized 3He gas were obtained at 21 G using a simple, homebuilt instrument. At such low fields magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of thermally polarized samples (e.g., water) is not practical. Low-field noble gas MRI has novel scientific, engineering, and medical applications. Examples include portable systems for diagnosis of lung disease, as well as imaging of voids in porous media and within metallic systems. PMID:11543589

  5. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  6. A system for low field imaging of laser-polarized noble gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, G. P.; Tseng, C. H.; Pomeroy, V. R.; Mair, R. W.; Hinton, D. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Stoner, R. E.; Hersman, F. W.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a device for performing MRI with laser-polarized noble gas at low magnetic fields (<50 G). The system is robust, portable, inexpensive, and provides gas-phase imaging resolution comparable to that of high field clinical instruments. At 20.6 G, we have imaged laser-polarized (3)He (Larmor frequency of 67 kHz) in both sealed glass cells and excised rat lungs, using approximately 0.1 G/cm gradients to achieve approximately 1 mm(2) resolution. In addition, we measured (3)He T(2)(*) times greater than 100 ms in excised rat lungs, which is roughly 20 times longer than typical values observed at high ( approximately 2 T) fields. We include a discussion of the practical considerations for working at low magnetic fields and conclude with evidence of radiation damping in this system. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  7. Biomedical magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy with laser polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, R.C.; Rosen, M.S.; Coulter, K.P.; Chupp, T.E.; Swanson, S.D.; Agranoff, B.W.; Prince, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    In the past year, a great deal of attention has been drawn to the use of laser polarized noble gases to produce magnetic resonance images of rodent and human lungs. Initial demonstrations proved the principle that air space images can be produced with noble gases polarized to several percent. (The noble gas density is thousands of times greater than the proton polarization of order 10{sup {minus}5} at 2 Tesla.) The manifold motivations include improvement of pulmonary and circulatory diagnostic radiology techniques as well as study of physiological function including neurological response. The authors have undertaken a program of development and application of MR imaging and spectroscopy using laser polarized gases with several goals including development of techniques and technologies to facilitate research and eventual medical applications. This talk will describe this multi-disciplinary program combining laser and optical physics, magnetic resonance tomography, neurophysiology and medical science.

  8. Single-shot diffusion measurement in laser-polarized Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peled, S.; Tseng, C. H.; Sodickson, A. A.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.; Cory, D. G.

    1999-01-01

    A single-shot pulsed gradient stimulated echo sequence is introduced to address the challenges of diffusion measurements of laser polarized 3He and 129Xe gas. Laser polarization enhances the NMR sensitivity of these noble gases by >10(3), but creates an unstable, nonthermal polarization that is not readily renewable. A new method is presented which permits parallel acquisition of the several measurements required to determine a diffusive attenuation curve. The NMR characterization of a sample's diffusion behavior can be accomplished in a single measurement, using only a single polarization step. As a demonstration, the diffusion coefficient of a sample of laser-polarized 129Xe gas is measured via this method. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Laser-polarized noble gases: a powerful probe for biology, medicine, and subatomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    For over a decade, laser-polarized noble gases such as ^3He and ^129Xe have proven useful for a wide range of scientific inquiries. These include investigations of pulmonary disease using the polarized gas as a signal source for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), measurements of various aspects of nucleon structure, and tests of fundamental symmetries. Early efforts were often limited by expensive and bulky laser systems, but ongoing advancements in solid-state lasers have enabled increasingly large volumes of polarized gas to be produced with steadily improved polarization. Equally important have been advances in the fundamental understanding of spin exchange. This has led, for example, to the introduction of hybrid mixtures of alkali metals that can increase the efficiency of spin exchange by an order of magnitude. As a consequence of these advances, the figure of merit for polarized nuclear targets has increased by roughly three orders of magnitude in comparison to early accelerator-based experiments. And in MRI applications, it has become possible to pursue increasingly sophisticated imaging protocols that provide a wide range of diagnostic information. Even the earliest noble-gas MR images of the gas space of the human lung provided unprecedented resolution. More recent work includes the use of diffusion-sensitizing pulse sequences to study lung microstructure, and tagging techniques that enable the visualization (in real-time MRI movies) of gas flow during breathing. The range of applications of laser-polarized noble gases is continuing to grow, and it is notable that with an improved understanding of the underlying physics, it is quite likely that the capabilities of this useful technology will expand for some time to come.

  10. Investigation of laser polarized xenon magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-based investigations of a new biomedical diagnostic technology: nuclear magnetic resonance of laser polarized noble gas are addressed. The specific research tasks discussed are: (1) Development of a large-scale noble gas polarization system; (2) biomedical investigations using laser polarized noble gas in conventional (high magnetic field) NMR systems; and (3) the development and application of a low magnetic field system for laser polarized noble gas NMR.

  11. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  12. Genesis Noble Gas Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    The original thrust of our Genesis funding was to extend and refine the noble gas analytical capabilities of this laboratory to improve the precision and accuracy of noble gas measurements in order to optimize the scientific return from the Genesis Mission. This process involved both instrumental improvement (supplemented by a SRLIDAP instrument grant) and refinement of technique. The Genesis landing mishap shifted our emphasis to the irregular aluminum heat shield material from the flat collector wafers. This has required redesign of our laser extraction cells to accommodate the longer focal lengths required for laser extraction from non-flat surfaces. Extraction of noble gases from solid aluminum surfaces, rather than thin coatings on transparent substrates has required refinement of controlled-depth laser ablation techniques. Both of these bring new problems, both with potentially higher blanks form larger laser cells and the larger quantities of evaporated aluminum which can coat the sapphire entrance ports. This is mainly a problem for the heavy noble gases where larger extraction areas are required, necessitating the new aluminum vapor containment techniques described below. With the Genesis Mission came three new multiple multiplier noble gas mass spectrometers to this laboratory, one built solely by us (Supergnome-M), one built in collaboration with Nu-Instruments (Noblesse), and one built in collaboration with GVI (Helix). All of these have multiple multiplier detection sections with the Nu-Instruments using a pair of electrostatic quad lenses for isotope spacing and the other two using mechanically adjustable positions for the electron multipliers. The Supergnome-M and Noblesse are installed and running. The GVI instrument was delivered a year late (in March 2005) and is yet to be installed by GVI. As with all new instruments there were some initial development issues, some of which are still outstanding. The most serious of these are performance issues

  13. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Marissa M.; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical basis for reconstructing paleotemperatures from the open-system behavior of cosmogenic noble gases produced in minerals at Earth's surface. Experimentally-determined diffusion kinetics predicts diffusive loss of cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne from common minerals like quartz and feldspars at ambient temperatures; incomplete retention has also been observed empirically in field studies. We show that the theory of simultaneous production and diffusion that applies to radiogenic noble gases in minerals-the basis of thermochronology-can also be applied to cosmogenic noble gases to reconstruct past surface temperatures on Earth. We use published diffusion kinetics and production rates for 3He in quartz and 21Ne in orthoclase to demonstrate the resolving power of cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry with respect to exposure duration, temperature, and diffusion domain size. Calculations indicate that, when paired with a quantitatively retained cosmogenic nuclide such as 21Ne or 10Be, observations of cosmogenic 3He in quartz can constrain temperatures during surface exposure in polar and high altitude environments. Likewise, 21Ne retention in feldspars is sensitive to temperatures at lower latitudes and elevations, expanding the potential geographic applicability of this technique to most latitudes. As an example, we present paired measurements of 3He and 10Be in quartz from a suite of Antarctic sandstone erratics to test whether the abundances of cosmogenic 3He agree with what is predicted from first principles and laboratory-determined diffusion kinetics. We find that the amounts of cosmogenic 3He present in these samples are consistent with the known mean annual temperature (MAT) for this region of Antarctica between -25 and -30 °C. These results demonstrate the method's ability to record paleotemperatures through geologic time.

  14. Towards a Noble Gas Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korver, Anna; Walker, Thad

    2014-05-01

    Noble gas NMR detected by alkali co-magnetometers has the potential for measurement of precession frequencies at the pHz level. This is done by eliminating the dominant known sources of systematic errors: alkali frequency shifts and quadrupole shifts. We present results of successful synchronous pumping of noble gas nuclei and measurements of alkali co-magnetometer sensitivity levels that project a 131-Xe noise level of 100 nHz /√{ Hz} . Future dual noble-gas co-magnetometry promises to improve the noise level by a factor of 10 or more. This research is supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  16. Noble gas fractionation during subsurface gas migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Larson, Toti E.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of shale gas production and geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage requires identification of subsurface gas sources. Noble gases provide a powerful tool to distinguish different sources if the modifications of the gas composition during transport can be accounted for. Despite the recognition of compositional changes due to gas migration in the subsurface, the interpretation of geochemical data relies largely on zero-dimensional mixing and fractionation models. Here we present two-phase flow column experiments that demonstrate these changes. Water containing a dissolved noble gas is displaced by gas comprised of CO2 and argon. We observe a characteristic pattern of initial co-enrichment of noble gases from both phases in banks at the gas front, followed by a depletion of the dissolved noble gas. The enrichment of the co-injected noble gas is due to the dissolution of the more soluble major gas component, while the enrichment of the dissolved noble gas is due to stripping from the groundwater. These processes amount to chromatographic separations that occur during two-phase flow and can be predicted by the theory of gas injection. This theory provides a mechanistic basis for noble gas fractionation during gas migration and improves our ability to identify subsurface gas sources after post-genetic modification. Finally, we show that compositional changes due to two-phase flow can qualitatively explain the spatial compositional trends observed within the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir and some regional compositional trends observed in drinking water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett shale regions. In both cases, only the migration of a gas with constant source composition is required, rather than multi-stage mixing and fractionation models previously proposed.

  17. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  18. Study of Gas-Fluidization Dynamics with Laser-Polarized 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Rosen, M. S.; Candela, D.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2004-07-01

    We report initial NMR studies of gas dynamics in a particle bed fluidized by laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas. We have made preliminary measurements of two important characteristics: gas exchange between the bubble and emulsion phases; and the gas velocity distribution in the bed. We used T2* contrast to differentiate the bubble and emulsion phases by choosing solid particles with large magnetic susceptibility, in order. Experimental tests demonstrated that this method was successful in eliminating 129Xe magnetization in the emulsion phase, which enabled us to observe the time-dependence of the bubble magnetization. By employing the pulsed field gradient method, we also measured the gas velocity distribution within the bed. These results clearly show the onset of bubbling and can be used to deduce information about gas and particle motion in the fluidized bed.

  19. Study of gas-fluidization dynamics with laser-polarized 129Xe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruopeng; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Candela, Donald; Mair, Ross William; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    We report initial NMR studies of gas dynamics in a particle bed fluidized by laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas. We have made preliminary measurements of two important characteristics: gas exchange between the bubble and emulsion phases and the gas velocity distribution in the bed. We used T2* contrast to differentiate the bubble and emulsion phases by choosing solid particles with large magnetic susceptibility. Experimental tests demonstrated that this method was successful in eliminating 129Xe magnetization in the emulsion phase, which enabled us to observe the time dependence of the bubble magnetization. By employing the pulsed field gradient method, we also measured the gas velocity distribution within the bed. These results clearly show the onset of bubbling and can be used to deduce information about gas and particle motion in the fluidized bed. PMID:15833613

  20. Noble Gas Temperature Proxy for Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noble gases in groundwater appear to offer a practical approach for quantitatively determining past surface air temperatures over recharge areas for any watershed. The noble gas temperature (NGT) proxy should then permit a paleothermometry of a region over time. This terrestria...

  1. Noble gas diffusion in silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, J.; Burnard, P.; Laporte, D.

    2013-12-01

    Fractionated noble gas relative abundances (Ne/Ar, Kr/Ar and Xe/Ar) and isotopic compositions (40Ar/36Ar, 38Ar/36Ar, 20Ne/22Ne, 21Ne/22Ne) are found in volcanic materials, notably in pumices (1-3). This has generally been interpreted as fractionation resulting from diffusion. However, there is some disagreement as to whether this fractionation occurs during high temperature magmatic processes (3) or due to diffusion of air into solidified pyroclastic deposits (2). We show that differences in relative noble gas diffusivities (e.g. D4He vs D40Ar, where D is the diffusivity) and isotopic diffusivities (e.g. D40Ar vs D36Ar) reduce at high temperatures (Fig). These results predict minimal fractionation of noble gases during magmatic processes. However, it is important to note that these diffusivities were measured in silicate glasses; the relative noble diffusivities in silicate liquids are poorly known. We have developed a new experimental protocol which will to determine the diffusivities of the noble gases and their isotopes in the liquid state. A graphite crucible c. 0.3 mm diameter and c. 20mm deep is filled with powdered glass of the desired composition, heated to 1773 K for 15 minutes and quenched to form a glass cylinder within the crucible. The crucible is then placed in a low pressure (1 bar) controlled atmosphere vertical furnace and heated at high temperatures (1673-1773K) for 2 hours in a pure N2 atmosphere. At this point noble gases (He and Ar) are introduced into the furnace and allowed to diffuse into the cylinder of liquid for durations of between 30 and 90. After quenching, the glass cylinder, preserving its' diffusion profile, is sawed into c. 1mm thick discs which are measured by conventional noble gas mass spectrometry for noble gas abundances (He, Ar) and isotopes (40,38,36Ar). The results will be presented at the conference. References 1 Kaneoka, I. Earth Planet Sci Letts 48, 284-292 (1980). 2 Pinti, D. L., Wada, N. & Matsuda, J. J. Volcan

  2. Nuclear Structure of the Noble Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Nakyeong

    Modern physics usually pictures the nuclear structure as about sphere and treats various detailed situation as perturbative, which may be obscured. In addition, the explanation why 235U undergoes nuclear fission and 238U does not is too difficult and unclear for the people to understand. However, in this paper, we introduce a new approach on the nuclear structure of the noble gas, which simultaneously can explain several phenomena that is obscurely elucidated by modern physics. We consider a 1:1 ratio between protons and neutrons and need the concept of the symmetry of the nuclear structure, because the electron's shell of the noble gas is fully occupied. From these, we can predict the number of neutrons of each noble gas exactly

  3. Solubility of noble gases in serpentine - Implications for meteoritic noble gas abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaikowski, A.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the solubilities of the noble gases from synthesis and solubility studies of the sheet silicate mineral serpentine in carbonaceous chondrites is presented. Hydrothermal synthesis and exchange experiments were made at 340C and 1 kbar with noble gas partial pressures from 2 times 10 to the -8th power to 0.1 atm. The measured distribution coefficients for noble gases are not sufficiently high to account for the trapped noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites by exchange in solar nebula if meteoritic minerals have comparable distribution coefficients. Also, serpentine gains and loses noble gases to approach equilibrium values with the terrestrial atmosphere, indicating that this exposure may have influenced the noble gas abundances in phyllosilicate minerals of these chondrites. The dispersion of K-Ar ages of carbonaceous chondrites could be the result of phyllosilicates approaching equilibrium solubility of atmospheric Ar-40.

  4. Noble gas geochemistry in thermal springs

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M.; Reynolds, J.H. ); Smith, S.P. )

    1988-07-01

    The composition of noble gases in both gas and water samples collected from Horseshoe Spring, Yellowstone National Park, was found to be depth dependent. The deeper the sample collection within the spring, the greater the enrichment in Kr, Xe, radiogenic {sup 4}He, and {sup 40}Ar and the greater the depletion in Ne relative to {sup 36}Ar. The compositional variations are consistent with multi-component mixing. The dominant component consists of dissolved atmospheric gases acquired by the pool at the surface in contact with air. This component is mixed in varying degree with two other components, one each for gas and water entering the bottom of the pool. The two bottom components are not in equilibrium. In Horseshoe Spring, the bubbles entering at the bottom strip the atmospheric-derived pool gases from the surrounding water while en route to the surface. If the original bottom bubbles are noble gas, as in the case of Horseshoe, the acquired pool gases can then quickly obliterate the original bubble composition. These results are used to demonstrate that Yellowstone spring surface gas samples, and perhaps similarity sampled thermal springs from other hydrothermal systems, have gas abundances that depend more on spring morphology than processes occurring deeper in the hydrothermal system.

  5. Noble gas storage and delivery system for ion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Dwight Douglas (Inventor); Ramos, Charlie (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method and system for storing and delivering a noble gas for an ion propulsion system where an adsorbent bearing a noble gas is heated within a storage vessel to desorb the noble gas which is then flowed through a pressure reduction device to a thruster assembly. The pressure and flow is controlled using a flow restrictor and low wattage heater which heats an adsorbent bed containing the noble gas propellant at low pressures. Flow rates of 5-60 sccm can be controlled to within about 0.5% or less and the required input power is generally less than 50 W. This noble gas storage and delivery system and method can be used for earth orbit satellites, and lunar or planetary space missions.

  6. Diffusive separation of noble gases and noble gas abundance patterns in sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B.M.; van Soest, M.C.

    2004-06-14

    The mechanisms responsible for noble gas concentrations, abundance patterns, and strong retentivity in sedimentary lithologies remain poorly explained. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of noble gases is modeled and examined as an explanation for the absolute and relative abundances of noble gases observed in sediments. Since the physical properties of the noble gases are strong functions of atomic mass, the individual diffusion coefficients, adsorption coefficients and atomic radii combine to impede heavy noble gas (Xe) diffusion relative to light noble gas (Ne) diffusion. Filling of lithic grains/half-spaces by diffusive processes thus produces Ne enrichments in the early and middle stages of the filling process with F(Ne) values similar to that observed in volcanic glasses. Emptying lithic grains/half-spaces produces a Xe-enriched residual in the late (but not final) stages of the process producing F(Xe) values similar to that observed in shales. 'Exotic but unexceptional' shales that exhibit both F(Ne) and F(Xe) enrichments can be produced by incomplete emptying followed by incomplete filling. This mechanism is consistent with literature reported noble gas abundance patterns but may still require a separate mechanism for strong retention. A system of labyrinths-with-constrictions and/or C-, Si-nanotubes when combined with simple adsorption can result in stronger diffusive separation and non-steady-state enrichments that persist for longer times. Enhanced adsorption to multiple C atoms inside C-nanotubes as well as dangling functional groups closing the ends of nanotubes can provide potential mechanisms for 'strong retention'. We need new methods of examining noble gases in rocks to determine the role and function of angstrom-scale structures in both the diffusive enrichment process and the 'strong retention' process for noble gas abundances in terrestrial rocks.

  7. LaRC results on nuclear pumped noble gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The recent experiment and theoretical results obtained for noble gas nuclear laser systems are presented. It is shown that the noble gas lasers are among the easiest systems to pump by nuclear excitation and as a result, all of the noble gases except He have lased under nuclear excitation. The noble gas systems are not ideal for high-power applications but they do give valuable insight into the operation and pumping mechanisms associated with nuclear lasers. At present, the Ar-Xe system is the best noble gas candidate for (U-235)F6 pumping. It appears that the quenching of Ar-Xe lasing is a result of the fluorine and not the uranium or fission fragments themselves. Thus, to achieve lasing with UF6, a fluorine compatible system must be found.

  8. Theoretical study of metal noble-gas positive ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical calculations have been performed to determine the spectroscopic constant for the ground and selected low-lying electronic states of the transition-metal noble-gas ions Var(+), FeAr(+), CoAr(+), CuHe(+), CuAr(+), and CuKr(+). Analogous calculations have been performed for the ground states of the alkali noble-gas ions LiAr(+), LiKr(+), NaAr(+), and KAr(+) and the alkaline-earth noble-gas ion MgAr(+) to contrast the difference in binding energies between the simple and transition-metal noble-gas ions. The binding energies increase with increasing polarizability of the noble-gas ions, as expected for a charge-induced dipole bonding mechanism. It is found that the spectroscopic constants of the X 1Sigma(+) states of the alkali noble-gas ions are well described at the self-consistent field level. In contrast, the binding energies of the transition-metal noble-gas ions are substantially increased by electron correlation.

  9. The Thermochemical Stability of Ionic Noble Gas Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents calculations that suggest stoichiometric, ionic, and noble gas-metal compounds may be stable. Bases calculations on estimated values of electron affinity, anionic radius for the noble gases and for the Born exponents of resulting crystals. Suggests the desirability of experiments designed to prepare compounds containing anionic,…

  10. Development of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.

    1998-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging using the MR signal from hyperpolarized noble gases 129Xe and 3He may become an important new diagnostic technique. Alex Pines (adapting the hyperpolarization technique pioneered by William Happer) presented MR spectroscopy studies using hyperpolarized 129Xe. The current authors recognized that the enormous enhancement in the detectability of 129Xe, promised by hyperpolarization, would solve the daunting SNR problems impeding their attempts to use 129Xe as an in vivo MR probe, especially in order to study the action of general anesthetics. It was hoped that hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI would yield resolutions equivalent to that achievable with conventional 1H 2O MRI, and that xenon's solubility in lipids would facilitate investigations of lipid-rich tissues that had as yet been hard to image. The publication of hyperpolarized 129Xe images of excised mouse lungs heralded the emergence of hyperpolarized noble-gas MRI. Using hyperpolarized 3He, researchers have obtained images of the lung gas space of guinea pigs and of humans. Lung gas images from patients with pulmonary disease have recently been reported. 3He is easier to hyperpolarize than 129Xe, and it yields a stronger MR signal, but its extremely low solubility in blood precludes its use for the imaging of tissue. Xenon, however, readily dissolves in blood, and the T1 of dissolved 129Xe is long enough for sufficient polarization to be carried by the circulation to distal tissues. Hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved-phase tissue spectra from the thorax and head of rodents and humans have been obtained, as have chemical shift 129Xe images from the head of rats. Lung gas 129Xe images of rodents, and more recently of humans, have been reported. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) may elucidate the link between the structure of the lung and its function. The technique may also be useful in identifying ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with pulmonary embolism, in staging and tracking the

  11. Dating native gold by noble gas analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermann, S.; Eugster, O.; Hofmann, B.; Thalmann, CH.; Reimold, W. U.

    1993-01-01

    Our recent work on He, Ne, and Ar in Alpine gold samples has demonstrated that gold is extremely retentive for He and could thus, in principle, be used for U/Th-He-4 dating. For vein-type gold from Brusson, Northern Italy, we derived a U/Th-He-4 age of 36 Ma, in agreement with the K-Ar formation age of associated muscovites and biotites. However, in placer gold from the Napf area, Central Switzerland, we observed large excesses of both He-4 and radiogenic Ar-40 (Ar-40 sub rad, defined as Ar-40-295.5-Ar-.36). The gas release systematics indicate two distinct noble gas components, one of which is released below about 800 C and the other one at the melting point of gold (1064 C). We now present results of He and Xe measurements in a 1 g placer gold sample from the river Kruempelgraben, as well as He and Ar data for Brusson vein-type gold and for gold from the Lily Gold Mine, South Africa. We calculate reasonable U/Th-He-4 as well as U-Xe ages based on those gases which are released at approximately 800 C. Probably the low-temperature components represent in-situ-produced radiogenic He and fission Xe, whereas the gases evolving when gold melts have been trapped during gold formation. Therefore, only the low-temperature components are relevant for dating purposes.

  12. The Noble Gas Fingerprint in a UK Unconventional Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKavney, Rory; Gilfillan, Stuart; Györe, Domokos; Stuart, Fin

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been an unprecedented expansion in the development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Concerns have arisen about the effect of this new industry on groundwater quality, particularly focussing on hydraulic fracturing, the technique used to increase the permeability of the targeted tight shale formations. Methane contamination of groundwater has been documented in areas of gas production1 but conclusively linking this to fugitive emissions from unconventional hydrocarbon production has been controversial2. A lack of baseline measurements taken before drilling, and the equivocal interpretation of geochemical data hamper the determination of possible contamination. Common techniques for "fingerprinting" gas from discrete sources rely on gas composition and isotopic ratios of elements within hydrocarbons (e.g. δ13CCH4), but the original signatures can be masked by biological and gas transport processes. The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are inert and controlled only by their physical properties. They exist in trace quantities in natural gases and are sourced from 3 isotopically distinct environments (atmosphere, crust and mantle)3. They are decoupled from the biosphere, and provide a separate toolbox to investigate the numerous sources and migration pathways of natural gases, and have found recent utility in the CCS4 and unconventional gas5 industries. Here we present a brief overview of noble gas data obtained from a new coal bed methane (CBM) field, Central Scotland. We show that the high concentration of helium is an ideal fingerprint for tracing fugitive gas migration to a shallow groundwater. The wells show variation in the noble gas signatures that can be attributed to differences in formation water pumping from the coal seams as the field has been explored for future commercial development. Dewatering the seams alters the gas/water ratio and the degree to which noble gases degas from the formation water. Additionally the

  13. Noble gas atmospheric monitoring at reprocessing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhleh, C.W.; Perry, R.T. Jr.; Poths, J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-05-01

    The discovery in Iraq after the Gulf War of the existence of a large clandestine nuclear-weapon program has led to an across-the-board international effort, dubbed Programme 93+2, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. One particularly significant potential change is the introduction of environmental monitoring (EM) techniques as an adjunct to traditional safeguards methods. Monitoring of stable noble gas (Kr, Xe) isotopic abundances at reprocessing plant stacks appears to be able to yield information on the burnup and type of the fuel being processed. To estimate the size of these signals, model calculations of the production of stable Kr, Xe nuclides in reactor fuel and the subsequent dilution of these nuclides in the plant stack are carried out for two case studies: reprocessing of PWR fuel with a burnup of 35 GWd/tU, and reprocessing of CAND fuel with a burnup of 1 GWd/tU. For each case, a maximum-likelihood analysis is used to determine the fuel burnup and type from the isotopic data.

  14. Noble gas transport during devolatilization of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Smye, A.; Shuster, D. L.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Hesse, M. A.; Cooper, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Here we examine the role of slab dehydration in determining the elemental pattern of recycled noble gases. As a first step, we apply newly reported measurements of He-Ne-Ar (light noble gases) solubility and diffusivity in amphibole to parameterize a 1D diffusive-reaction transport model that simulates noble gas behavior during fluid loss from down-going oceanic crust. Recent experiments demonstrate that noble gases are highly soluble in ring-structured minerals, such as amphibole and other common hydrothermal products in slabs [1]. These results suggest that ring-structured minerals have the potential to strongly influence the budget of noble gases input into subduction zones and the elemental fractionations associated with volatile loss from slabs New measurements of He-Ne-Ar solubility in a suite of amphiboles have been completed utilizing the methodology described in [1]. These new measurements confirm that all light noble gases are highly soluble in amphibole, and that noble gas solubility correlates with the availability of unoccupied ring sites. New experimental measurements of He and Ne diffusivity have also been completed using a step-degassing approach at the Berkeley Geochronology Center. These measurements suggest that vacant ring sites in amphibole act to slow noble gas diffusion. We combine the newly acquired He and Ne diffusivity measurements with literature values for Ar diffusivity [2] to parameterize the diffusive-reaction transport model. Application of these data to the diffusive-reaction transport model yields several new insights. The relative mobility of Ne compared to Ar allows for efficient extraction of Ne from "hot" slabs by shallow depths (<50 km), while Ar is effectively retained to deeper depths, potentially past sub-arc conditions. Noble gas partition coefficients sharply increase with depth, following their increasing non-ideality in supercritical fluids, causing noble gases to partition back into minerals from any fluids retained in

  15. Developments in Noble Gas mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D.; Schwieters, J. B.; Lloyd, N. S.

    2010-12-01

    D. HAMILTON*, J.B. SCHWIETERS, D. TUTTAS, M. KRUMMEN, M. DEERBERG, N.S. LLOYD1 1Thermo Fisher Scientific, Hanna-Kunath-Str. 11, 28199 Bremen, Germany (*correspondence: Doug.Hamilton@ThermoFisher.com) Recent advances in ion optics and electronic design have added features to the new range of Noble Gas mass spectrometers from Thermo Fisher Scientific that will enable the scientific community to resolve a number of existing analytical limitations. The first development relates to detector technology. Because instrument transmission and ion source efficiency can be very high, detector noise can be the limiting factor for ultra-small sample analysis. Faraday cup detectors are the detectors of choice for high accuracy and high precision isotope ratio measurements because of their unmatched stability and linearity and because of the electronic cross calibration network available to precisely and accurately cross calibrate the multiple Faraday detector channels against each other. Today, most IOMS systems are equipped with current amplifiers using a 1011 Ohm resistor coupled to the feedback loop of a high stability and temperature-stabilized operational amplifier. In this paper we will describe our latest investigations in Faraday cup measurements utilising 1012 & 1013 resistors for signal intensities in the range of 1 pA to 1 fA. The second development relates to a new beam deflection technology added to the ARGUS VI mass spectrometer that enables a fixed collector array to be given some of the properties of a mechanically adjustable array. This enables multidynamic multicollector measurements to be taken utilising a fixed array thus enabling the end user to perform vital detector crosscalibrations “in run”. Lastly we will describe early results on a new high resolution platform and the capabilities of this platform to finally deal with certain isotopic interferences in both the Argon and Neon spectra.

  16. Noble-gas-rich separates from the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    Predominantly carbonaceous HF/HCl-resistant residues from the Allende meteorite are studied. Samples are characterized by SEM/EDXA, X-ray diffraction, INAA, C, S, H, N, and noble gas analyses. Isotopic data for carbon show variations no greater than 5%, while isotopic data from noble gases confirm previously established systematics. Noble gas abundances correlate with those of C and N, and concomitant partial loss of C and normal trapped gas occur during treatments with oxidizing acids. HF/HCl demineralization of bulk meteorite results in similar fractional losses of C and trapped noble gases, which leads to the conclusion that various macromolecular carbonaceous substances serve as the main host phase for normal trapped noble gases and anomalous gases in acid-resistant residues, and as the carrier of the major part of trapped noble gases lost during HF/HCl demineralization. Limits on the possible abundances of dense mineralic host phases in the residues are obtained, and considerations of the nucleogenetic origin for CCF-XE indicate that carbonaceous host phases and various forms of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites may have a presolar origin.

  17. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  18. Optimizing Noble Gas-Water Interactions via Monte Carlo Simulations.

    PubMed

    Warr, Oliver; Ballentine, Chris J; Mu, Junju; Masters, Andrew

    2015-11-12

    In this work we present optimized noble gas-water Lennard-Jones 6-12 pair potentials for each noble gas. Given the significantly different atomic nature of water and the noble gases, the standard Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules produce inaccurate unlike molecular interactions between these two species. Consequently, we find simulated Henry's coefficients deviate significantly from their experimental counterparts for the investigated thermodynamic range (293-353 K at 1 and 10 atm), due to a poor unlike potential well term (εij). Where εij is too high or low, so too is the strength of the resultant noble gas-water interaction. This observed inadequacy in using the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules is countered in this work by scaling εij for helium, neon, argon, and krypton by factors of 0.91, 0.8, 1.1, and 1.05, respectively, to reach a much improved agreement with experimental Henry's coefficients. Due to the highly sensitive nature of the xenon εij term, coupled with the reasonable agreement of the initial values, no scaling factor is applied for this noble gas. These resulting optimized pair potentials also accurately predict partitioning within a CO2-H2O binary phase system as well as diffusion coefficients in ambient water. This further supports the quality of these interaction potentials. Consequently, they can now form a well-grounded basis for the future molecular modeling of multiphase geological systems. PMID:26452070

  19. Solubility investigations in support of ultrasensitive noble gas detector development.

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K. C.

    1998-08-05

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Cincinnati (UC) have been developing a new class of ultrasensitive noble gas detectors that are based upon the ANL discovery that corn oil has a high affinity for heavy noble gas absorption at room temperature, but releases the noble gases with warming or by other low-energy-input means. Environmental applications for this new class of fluid-based detectors include ultrahigh sensitivity radioxenon detectors for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Surveillance, improved fission gas detectors for enhanced environmental surveillance in the vicinity of DOE, DOD, and NRC-licensed facilities, and improved integrating Rn detectors for earthquake prediction. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the solubility phenomena of heavy noble gases (Rn, Xe, and Kr) in triglyceride oils. It is the authors' intention that the findings presented herein may be used to guide future selection, development, and refinement of vegetable and other hydrocarbon oils to bring further enhancements to noble gas detection efficiencies.

  20. Defining Noble Gas Partitioning for Carbon Capture and Storage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, O.; Masters, A.; Rochelle, C.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    For viable CCS implementation variables such as CO2 dissolution rates, reactions with the host rock and the extent of groundwater interaction must be accurately constrained. Noble gases play an important role in these systems [e.g. 1,2]. Their application, however, requires accurate Henry's constants within dense CO2-H2O systems. Current interpretations use pure noble gas-H2O partitioning data [3,4] and assume CO2-noble gas interactions are negligible, even at high (>700 kg/m3) CO2 densities [2]. To test this assumption we experimentally determined noble gas CO2-H2O partitioning for the 170-656 kg/m3 CO2 density range; representative of most CCS environments. Contrary to assumption, CO2 density significantly affected noble gas partition coefficients. For helium, increasing CO2 density resulted in a negative deviation trend from CO2-free values whilst for argon, krypton and xenon strong, positive deviations were observed. At 656 kg/m3 these deviations were -35%, 74%, 114% and 321% respectively. This is interpreted as the CO2 phase acting as a polar solvent inducing polarisation in the noble gases. Deviation trends are well defined using a 2nd order polynomial. The effect of a dense CO2 phase can now be incorporated into existing noble gas models. We also present results from a Gibbs-Ensemble Monte Carlo molecular simulation to model partitioning for this binary system. This fundamental technique makes predictions based on the pair-potentials of interaction between the molecules. Here it gives the phase compositions and Henry coefficients for noble gases. With a proven ability in accurately replicating both the CO2-H2O system and low pressure noble gas Henry constants the focus is now on fully optimising the model to match high pressure observations. [1] Gilfillan et al. (2009) Nature 458 614-618 [2] Gilfillan et al. (2008) GCA 72 1174-1198 [3] Crovetto et al. (1982) J.Chem.Phys. 76 1077-1086 [4] Ballentine et al. in Porcelli et al. (eds.) (2002) Rev.Min.Geo. 47 539-614.

  1. Isotopic mass-dependence of noble gas diffusion coefficients inwater

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-06-25

    Noble gas isotopes are used extensively as tracers inhydrologic and paleoclimatic studies. These applications requireknowledge of the isotopic mass (m) dependence of noble gas diffusioncoefficients in water (D), which has not been measured but is estimatedusing experimental D-values for the major isotopes along with an untestedrelationship from kinetic theory, D prop m-0.5. We applied moleculardynamics methods to determine the mass dependence of D for four noblegases at 298 K, finding that D prop m-beta with beta<0.2, whichrefutes the kinetic theory model underlying all currentapplications.

  2. An Air Noble Gas Component in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarda, P.

    2005-12-01

    Noble gas geochemistry has for long attempted to recover isotopic signatures of mantle components through analyses of basalt glass or xenoliths, but this quest has been plagued by the occurrence of a conspicuous air component, which appears to have both the isotopic and elemental composition of air (except for helium). It is classically considered to be air added to samples close to the surface, in a poorly understood process called "contamination", due to the interaction of rocks and melts with air or water on emplacement. Focusing on Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (and Ocean Island Basalts), gases are mostly borne by vesicles and a number of puzzling observations can be made: - vesicles appear to be heterogeneous at the scale of a centimeter, as shown by stepwise crushing experiments, some vesicles having air, some having mantle gases, some having mixtures of both, - vesicles appear over-pressured (P > 1 bar) in fresh samples, as shown by highly vesiculous samples such as Popping Rocks, - the air component appears to be borne by the largest vesicles, as it is recovered in the first steps of stepwise crushing analyses, - larger samples seem to have more of the air component than smaller ones, - in Popping Rocks, the air component borne by the largest vesicles is overwhelming, - the isotopic composition of Pb-Sr-Nd in Popping Rocks was interpreted as indicating a recycled component (related to the HIMU and EM1 mantle end-members). The air noble gas component was suggested recently to be not seawater, but modern air located in fractures of the glass, which should have opened on cooling and resealed immediately [1]. This model faces some difficulties, such as keeping pressure high in the vesicles. I suggest another interpretation, namely that a large part of the air noble gases in oceanic basalts is recycled in origin [2]. It would have been carried down into the mantle at subduction zones, even if most (typically 90%) of the air noble gases in the slab returns to the

  3. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-02-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  4. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  5. Noble Gas Compositions in Muong Nong-type Tektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, K.; Matsuda, J.; Koeberl, C.

    1993-07-01

    Tektites are natural silica-rich glasses and are thought to be produced during meteorite collisions with the Earth, similar to impact glasses. They occur in four geographically restricted areas and can be divided in three subgroups: normal or splash-form tektites, aerodynamically shaped tektites, and Muong Nong-type tektites [1]. Splash-form and aerodynamically shaped tektites are several grams in weight and are generally homogeneous in chemistry. On the other hand, Muong Nong-type tektites are up to several kilograms in weight, are irregular in shape, and show layered structure. They are inhomogeneous in chemistry and are enriched in volatile elements such as halogens, boron, zinc, etc., compared to splash-form tektites [1]. Muong Nong-type tektites have larger vesicles than splash-form and aerodynamically shaped tektites. This shows that Muong Nong-type tektites are different from splash-form and aerodynamically shaped tektites in several aspects. We measured noble gas compositions in splash-form tektites [2] and impact glasses [3,4]. Although Ne concentrations in tektites and impact glasses were similar to each other, heavy noble gas (Ar, Kr, and Xe) concentrations in tektites were about 2 orders of magnitude lower than those in impact glasses. In this study, we studied noble gas compositions in some Muong Nong-type tektites in order to compare them with splash-form tektites. Muong Nong-type tektite samples used in this study originated from Ubon Ratchatani in East Thailand, near the border of Laos. Geochemical studies of the samples were made by Koeberl [5]. We measured noble gas concentrations and Ne and Ar isotopic compositions in four Muong Nong-type tektites using mass spectrometry. Noble gases were extracted by three methods: laser probe, crushing, and stepwise heating. Chipped samples of two Muong Nong-type tektites were used in laser probe analysis. We used 160-380 mg of samples for noble gas analysis by crushing and stepwise-heating methods. Noble gas

  6. The Origin of Noble Gas Isotopic Heterogeneity in Icelandic Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Honda, M.; McDougall, I.

    2001-01-01

    Two models for generation of heterogeneous He, Ne and Ar isotopic ratios in Icelandic basalts are evaluated using a mixing model and the observed noble gas elemental ratios in Icelandic basalts,Ocean island Basalt (OIBs) and Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORBs). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Noble-gas hydrides: new chemistry at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Räsänen, Markku; Gerber, R Benny

    2009-01-20

    Noble-gas chemistry has been undergoing a renaissance in recent years, due in large part to noble-gas hydrides, HNgY, where Ng = noble-gas atom and Y = electronegative fragment. These molecules are exceptional because of their relatively weak bonding and large dipole moments, which lead to strongly enhanced effects of the environment, complexation, and reactions. In this Account, we discuss the matrix-isolation synthesis of noble-gas hydrides, their spectroscopic and structural properties, and their stabilities.This family of species was discovered in 1995 and now has 23 members that are prepared in noble-gas matrices (HXeBr, HKrCl, HXeH, HXeOH, HXeO, etc.). The preparations of the first neutral argon molecule, HArF, and halogen-free organic noble-gas molecules (HXeCCH, HXeCC, HKrCCH, etc.) are important highlights of the field. These molecules are formed by the neutral H + Ng + Y channel. The first addition reaction involving HNgY molecules was HXeCC + Xe + H --> HXeCCXeH, and this led to the first hydride with two noble-gas atoms (recently extended by HXeOXeH). The experimental synthesis of HNgY molecules starts with production of H and Y fragments in solid noble gas via the UV photolysis of suitable precursors. The HNgY molecules mainly form upon thermal mobilization of the fragments.One of the unusual properties of these molecules is the hindered rotation of some HNgY molecules in solid matrices; this has been theoretically modeled. HNgY molecules also have unusual solvation effects, and the H-Xe stretching mode shifts to higher frequencies (up to about 150 cm-1) upon interaction with other species.The noble hydrides have a new bonding motif: HNgY molecules can be represented in the form (H-Ng)+Y-, where (H-Ng)+ is mainly covalent, whereas the interaction between (HNg)+ and Y- is predominantly ionic. The HNgY molecules are highly metastable species representing high-energy materials. The decomposition process HNgY --> Ng + HY is always strongly exoergic

  8. Nanopore sculpting with noble gas ions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qun; Ledden, Brad; Krueger, Eric; Golovchenko, Jene A; Li, Jiali

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate that 3 keV ion beams, formed from the common noble gasses, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, can controllably "sculpt" nanometer scale pores in silicon nitride films. Single nanometer control of structural dimensions in nanopores can be achieved with all ion species despite a very wide range of sputtering yields and surface energy depositions. Heavy ions shrink pores more efficiently and make thinner pores than lighter ions. The dynamics of nanopore closing is reported for each ion species and the results are fitted to an adatom diffusion model with excellent success. We also present an experimental method for profiling the thickness of the local membrane around the nanopore based on low temperature sputtering and data is presented that provides quantitative measurements of the thickness and its dependence on ion beam species. PMID:21331305

  9. Noble Gas Tracing of Fluid Transport in Shale Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Gardner, W. P.; Kuhlman, K. L.; Robinson, D. G.; Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fluid transport mechanisms in a shale reservoir using natural noble gas tracers. Noble gas tracing is promising due to sensitivity of transport to: pore structure and sizes; phase partitioning between groundwater and liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing and creation of surface area. A time-series of over thirty wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells with different oil-to-gas ratios, along with production data (i.e., flowrate and pressure). Tracer and production data sets can be combined to infer production flow regimes, to estimate reservoir transport parameters, and to improve forecasts of production decline. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Light noble gas dissolution into ring structure-bearing materials and lattice influences on noble gas recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Colin R. M.; Parman, Stephen W.; Kelley, Simon P.; Cooper, Reid F.

    2015-06-01

    Light noble gas (He-Ne-Ar) solubility has been experimentally determined in a range of materials with six-member, tetrahedral ring structures: beryl, cordierite, tourmaline, antigorite, muscovite, F-phlogopite, actinolite, and pargasite. Helium solubility in these materials is relatively high, 4 × 10-10 to 3 × 10-7 mol g-1 bar-1, which is ∼100 to 100,000× greater than He solubility in olivine, pyroxene, or spinel. Helium solubility broadly correlates with the topology of ring structures within different minerals. Distinctive He-Ne-Ar solubility patterns are associated with the different ring structure topologies. Combined, these observations suggest ring structures have a strong influence on noble gas solubility in materials and could facilitate the recycling of noble gases, along with other volatiles (i.e., water, chlorine, and fluorine), into the mantle. Measurements of Ne and Ar solubility in antigorite, however, are highly variable and correlated with each other, suggesting multiple factors contribute the solubility of noble gases in serpentine-rich materials.

  11. Nuclear monitoring by nonradioactive noble gas sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fearey, B.L.; Nakhleh, C.W.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The perceived importance of measuring the xenon and krypton isotopics of nuclear activities has increased substantially in recent years. We have performed a systems analysis and theoretical simulation of the production, atmospheric dispersion, and isotopic abundances of noble-gas fission products, addressing several questions of interest, including: the relative isotopic variation as a function of nuclear fuel composition, reactor operational history, reactor type, distance from stack, and ambient meteorological conditions. Of particular importance in this analysis was the question of back-calculating process parameters of interest given noble-gas isotopic data. An analysis of the effect of measurement uncertainties was also performed. The results of these analyses indicate that this monitoring concept should be experimentally feasible.

  12. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  13. Possible solar noble-gas component in Hawaiian basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A.; Clague, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    THE noble-gas elemental and isotopic composition in the Earth is significantly different from that of the present atmosphere, and provides an important clue to the origin and history of the Earth and its atmosphere. Possible candidates for the noble-gas composition of the primordial Earth include a solar-like component, a planetary-like component (as observed in primitive meteorites) and a component similar in composition to the present atmosphere. In an attempt to identify the contributions of such components, we have measured isotope ratios of helium and neon in fresh basaltic glasses dredged from Loihi seamount and the East Rift Zone of Kilauea1-3. We find a systematic enrichment in 20Ne and 21Ne relative to 22Ne, compared with atmospheric neon. The helium and neon isotope signatures observed in our samples can be explained by mixing of solar, present atmospheric, radiogenic and nucleogenic components. These data suggest that the noble-gas isotopic composition of the mantle source of the Hawaiian plume is different from that of the present atmosphere, and that it includes a significant solar-like component. We infer that this component was acquired during the formation of the Earth.

  14. Noble Gas Analysis in the Quest to Find "Regolithic" Howardites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, Julia A.; Hermann, S.; Herrin, J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Ott, U.

    2011-01-01

    The howardite meteorites consist of approximately 200 polymict breccias of eucrite (basaltic) and diogenite (orthopyroxenitic) material (collectively, the HED group) that originate from the asteroid belt. Infrared reflectance spectroscopy of asteroids and laboratory studies of HEDs have indicated that the asteroid 4-Vesta is the likely parent body, and the partially-demolished south pole may be the source region. Asteroid regolith formation processes may be responsible for a number of observed petrological features including impact melt clasts, reworked clasts and mosaisicm. We have identified such features in a study of 30 howardites and polymict eucrites, and developed a regolith grading scheme based on petrology. However, the true regolithic nature of the howardite suite is not well defined, and previous research has suggested correlations between Ni contents of 300 - 1200 micron / g, a minimal variation in Al2O3 content around 8-9 wt% and the presence of solar wind noble gases are key hallmarks of an ancient regolith on Vesta . Through combined petrological, compositional and noble gas research, we aim to better understand howardite petrological diversity, regolith formation processes on parent asteroids, and to establish what defines a truly "regolithic" howardite. Our research will play an integral part in the interpretation of data gathered by the Dawn mission. Here we report the preliminary results from our noble gas analyses of four howardites: LEW 85313, EET 99408, MET 96500 and PCA 02066. Bulk major element compositional data have been collected, further petrological data for the HED group are reported by our colleagues, whilst trace-element analyses are underway. Our work will investigate the extent of whether previously described Ni, Al2O3 and noble gas characteristics are in fact indicative of a "regolithic" howardite.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of convection in laser-polarized xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the flow and diffusion of laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas undergoing convection above evaporating laser-polarized liquid xenon. The large xenon NMR signal provided by the laser-polarization technique allows more rapid imaging than one can achieve with thermally polarized gas-liquid systems, permitting shorter time-scale events such as rapid gas flow and gas-liquid dynamics to be observed. Two-dimensional velocity-encoded imaging shows convective gas flow above the evaporating liquid xenon, and also permits the measurement of enhanced gas diffusion near regions of large velocity variation.

  16. Cucurbit[6]uril: A Possible Host for Noble Gas Atoms.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2015-08-27

    Density functional and ab initio molecular dynamics studies are carried out to investigate the stability of noble gas encapsulated cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) systems. Interaction energy, dissociation energy and dissociation enthalpy are calculated to understand the efficacy of CB[6] in encapsulating noble gas atoms. CB[6] could encapsulate up to three Ne atoms having dissociation energy (zero-point energy corrected) in the range of 3.4-4.1 kcal/mol, whereas due to larger size, only one Ar or Kr atom encapsulated analogues would be viable. The dissociation energy value for the second Ar atom is only 1.0 kcal/mol. On the other hand, the same for the second Kr is -0.5 kcal/mol, implying the instability of the system. The noble gas dissociation processes are endothermic in nature, which increases gradually along Ne to Kr. Kr encapsulated analogue is found to be viable at room temperature. However, low temperature is needed for Ne and Ar encapsulated analogues. The temperature-pressure phase diagram highlights the region in which association and dissociation processes of Kr@CB[6] would be favorable. At ambient temperature and pressure, CB[6] may be used as an effective noble gas carrier. Wiberg bond indices, noncovalent interaction indices, electron density, and energy decomposition analyses are used to explore the nature of interaction between noble gas atoms and CB[6]. Dispersion interaction is found to be the most important term in the attraction energy. Ne and Ar atoms in one Ng entrapped analogue are found to stay inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation at 298 K. However, during simulation Ng2 units in Ng2@CB[6] flip toward the open faces of CB[6]. After 1 ps, one Ne atom of Ne3@CB[6] almost reaches the open face keeping other two Ne atoms inside. At lower temperature (77 K), all the Ng atoms in Ngn@CB[6] remain well inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation time (1 ps). PMID:25989462

  17. Noble gas encapsulation: clathrate hydrates and their HF doped analogues.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sukanta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The significance of clathrate hydrates lies in their ability to encapsulate a vast range of inert gases. Although the natural abundance of a few noble gases (Kr and Xe) is poor their hydrates are generally abundant. It has already been reported that HF doping enhances the stability of hydrogen hydrates and methane hydrates, which prompted us to perform a model study on helium, neon and argon hydrates with their HF doped analogues. For this purpose 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues are taken as the model clathrate hydrates, which are among the building blocks of sI, sII and sH types of clathrate hydrate crystals. We use the dispersion corrected and gradient corrected hybrid density functional theory for the calculation of thermodynamic parameters as well as conceptual density functional theory based reactivity descriptors. The method of the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation is used through atom centered density matrix propagation (ADMP) techniques to envisage the structural behaviour of different noble gas hydrates on a 500 fs timescale. Electron density analysis is carried out to understand the nature of Ng-OH2, Ng-FH and Ng-Ng interactions. The current results noticeably demonstrate that the noble gas (He, Ne, and Ar) encapsulation ability of 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues is thermodynamically favourable. PMID:25047071

  18. NOBLE GAS PRODUCTION FROM MERCURY SPALLATION AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Joe R; Lu, Wei; Schwahn, Scott O

    2013-01-01

    Calculations for predicting the distribution of the products of spallation reactions between high energy protons and target materials are well developed and are used for design and operational applications in many projects both within DOE and in other arenas. These calculations are based on theory and limited experimental data that verifies rates of production of some spallation products exist. At the Spallation Neutron Source, a helium stream from the mercury target flows through a system to remove radioactivity from this mercury target offgas. The operation of this system offers a window through which the production of noble gases from mercury spallation by protons may be observed. This paper describes studies designed to measure the production rates of twelve noble gas isotopes within the Spallation Neutron Source mercury target.

  19. Neutron detection by scintillation of noble-gas excimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, Jacob Collin

    Neutron detection is a technique essential to homeland security, nuclear reactor instrumentation, neutron diffraction science, oil-well logging, particle physics and radiation safety. The current shortage of helium-3, the neutron absorber used in most gas-filled proportional counters, has created a strong incentive to develop alternate methods of neutron detection. Excimer-based neutron detection (END) provides an alternative with many attractive properties. Like proportional counters, END relies on the conversion of a neutron into energetic charged particles, through an exothermic capture reaction with a neutron absorbing nucleus (10B, 6Li, 3He). As charged particles from these reactions lose energy in a surrounding gas, they cause electron excitation and ionization. Whereas most gas-filled detectors collect ionized charge to form a signal, END depends on the formation of diatomic noble-gas excimers (Ar*2, Kr*2,Xe* 2) . Upon decaying, excimers emit far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons, which may be collected by a photomultiplier tube or other photon detector. This phenomenon provides a means of neutron detection with a number of advantages over traditional methods. This thesis investigates excimer scintillation yield from the heavy noble gases following the boron-neutron capture reaction in 10B thin-film targets. Additionally, the thesis examines noble-gas excimer lifetimes with relationship to gas type and gas pressure. Experimental data were collected both at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, and on a newly developed neutron beamline at the Maryland University Training Reactor. The components of the experiment were calibrated at NIST and the University of Maryland, using FUV synchrotron radiation, neutron imaging, and foil activation techniques, among others. Computer modeling was employed to simulate charged-particle transport and excimer photon emission within the experimental apparatus. The observed excimer

  20. Using 220Rn to calibrate liquid noble gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Yamashita, M.; Takeda, A.; Kishimoto, K.; Moriyama, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we describe 220Rn calibration source that was developed for liquid noble gas detectors. The key advantage of this source is that it can provide 212Bi-212 Po consecutive events, which enables us to evaluate the vertex resolution of a detector at low energy by comparing low-energy events of 212Bi and corresponding higher-energy α-rays from 212Po. Since 220Rn is a noble gas, a hot metal getter can be used when introduced using xenon as the carrier gas. In addition, no long-life radioactive isotopes are left behind in the detector after the calibration is complete; this has clear advantage over the use of 222Rn which leaves longlife radioactivity, i.e., 210Pb. Using a small liquid xenon test chamber, we developed a system to introduce 220Rn via the xenon carrier gas; we demonstrated the successful introduction of 6 × 102 220Rn atoms in our test environment.

  1. Imaging with SiPMs in noble-gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahlali, N.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; González, K.; Garcia, A. N. C.; Soriano, A.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photosensors widely used for imaging in a variety of high energy and nuclear physics experiments. In noble-gas detectors for double-beta decay and dark matter experiments, SiPMs are attractive photosensors for imaging. However they are insensitive to the VUV scintillation emitted by the noble gases (xenon and argon). This difficulty is overcome in the NEXT experiment by coating the SiPMs with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) to convert the VUV light into visible light. TPB requires stringent storage and operational conditions to prevent its degradation by environmental agents. The development of UV sensitive SiPMs is thus of utmost interest for experiments using electroluminescence of noble-gas detectors. It is in particular an important issue for a robust and background free ββ0ν experiment with xenon gas aimed by NEXT. The photon detection efficiency (PDE) of UV-enhanced SiPMs provided by Hamamatsu was determined for light in the range 250-500 nm. The PDE of standard SiPMs of the same model (S10362-33-50C), coated and non-coated with TPB, was also determined for comparison. In the UV range 250-350 nm, the PDE of the standard SiPM is shown to decrease strongly, down to about 3%. The UV-enhanced SiPM without window is shown to have the maximum PDE of 44% at 325 nm and 30% at 250 nm. The PDE of the UV-enhanced SiPM with silicon resin window has a similar trend in the UV range, although it is about 30% lower. The TPB-coated SiPM has shown to have about 6 times higher PDE than the non-coated SiPM in the range 250-315 nm. This is however below the performance of the UV-enhanced prototypes in the same wavelength range. Imaging in noble-gas detectors using UV-enhanced SiPMs is discussed.

  2. The Noble-Abel Stiffened-Gas equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Métayer, Olivier; Saurel, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Hyperbolic two-phase flow models have shown excellent ability for the resolution of a wide range of applications ranging from interfacial flows to fluid mixtures with several velocities. These models account for waves propagation (acoustic and convective) and consist in hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations. In this context, each phase is compressible and needs an appropriate convex equation of state (EOS). The EOS must be simple enough for intensive computations as well as boundary conditions treatment. It must also be accurate, this being challenging with respect to simplicity. In the present approach, each fluid is governed by a novel EOS named "Noble Abel stiffened gas," this formulation being a significant improvement of the popular "Stiffened Gas (SG)" EOS. It is a combination of the so-called "Noble-Abel" and "stiffened gas" equations of state that adds repulsive effects to the SG formulation. The determination of the various thermodynamic functions and associated coefficients is the aim of this article. We first use thermodynamic considerations to determine the different state functions such as the specific internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Then we propose to determine the associated coefficients for a liquid in the presence of its vapor. The EOS parameters are determined from experimental saturation curves. Some examples of liquid-vapor fluids are examined and associated parameters are computed with the help of the present method. Comparisons between analytical and experimental saturation curves show very good agreement for wide ranges of temperature for both liquid and vapor.

  3. Mixed noble gas effect on cut green peppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, L. V.; Zhang, M.; Karangwa, E.; Chesereka, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing attempts at using gas which leads to hydrate formation as a preservative tool in fresh-cut fruits and vegetables have been reported. In this study, changes in some physical and biochemical properties of fresh-cut green peppers under compressed noble gas treatments were examined. Mixed argonkrypton and argon treatments were performed before cold storage at 5°C for 15 days. Mass loss and cell membrane permeability were found to be the lowest in mixed argon-krypton samples. Besides, a lower CO2 concentration and vitamin C loss were detected in gastreated samples compared to untreated samples (control). While the total phenol degradation was moderately reduced, the effect of the treatment on polyphenoloxidase activity was better at the beginning of the storage period. The minimum changes in quality observed in cut peppers resulted from both mixed and gas treatment alone.

  4. Structural Measurements from Images of Noble Gas Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadman, Robert V.; Kadlecek, Stephen J.; Emami, Kiarash; MacDuffie Woodburn, John; Vahdat, Vahid; Ishii, Masaru; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of externally polarized noble gases such as ^3He has been used for pulmonary imaging for more than a decade. Because gas diffusion is impeded by the alveoli, the diffusion coefficient of gas in the lung, measured on a time scale of milliseconds, is reduced compared to that of the same gas mixture in the absence of restrictions. When the alveolar walls decay, as in emphysema, diffusivity in the lung increases. In this paper, the relationship between diffusion measurements and the size of the restricting structures will be discussed. The simple case of diffusion in an impermeable cylinder, a structure similar to the upper respiratory airways in mammals, has been studied. A procedure will be presented by which airways of order 2 mm in diameter may be accurately measured; demonstration experiments with plastic tubes will also be presented. The additional developments needed before this technique becomes practical will be briefly discussed.

  5. PHYSICS PROCESSES IN DISRUPTION MITIGATION USING MASSIVE NOBLE GAS INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. HUMPHREYS; D.G. WHYTE; T.C. JERNIGAN; T.E.EVANS; D.S. GRAY; E.M. HOLLMANN; A.W. HYATT; A.G. KELLMAN; C.J. LASNIER; P.B. PARKS; P.L. TAYLOR

    2002-07-01

    Methods for detecting imminent disruptions and mitigating disruption effects using massive injection of noble gases (He, Ne, or Ar) have been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak [1]. A jet of high injected gas density (> 10{sup 24} m{sup -3}) and pressure (> 20 kPa) penetrates the target plasma at the gas sound speed ({approx}300-500 m/s) and increases the atom/ion content of the plasma by a factor of > 50 in several milliseconds. UV line radiation from the impurity species distributes the plasma energy uniformly on the first wall, reducing the thermal load to the divertor by a factor of 10. Runaway electrons are almost completely eliminated by the large density of free and bound electrons supplied by the gas injection. The small vertical plasma displacement before current quench and high ratio of current decay rate to vertical growth rate result in a 75% reduction in peak halo current amplitude and attendant forces.

  6. DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    WHYTE, DG; JERNIGAN, TC; HUMPHREYS, DA; HYATT, AW; LASNIER, CJ; PARKS, PB; EVANS, TE; TAYLOR, PL; KELLMAN, AG; GRAY, DS; HOLLMANN, EM

    2002-10-01

    OAK A271 DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION. High-pressure gas jets of neon and argon are used to mitigate the three principal damaging effects of tokamak disruptions: thermal loading of the divertor surfaces, vessel stress from poloidal halo currents and the buildup and loss of relativistic electrons to the wall. The gas jet penetrates as a neutral species through to the central plasma at its sonic velocity. The injected gas atoms increase up to 500 times the total electron inventory in the plasma volume, resulting in a relatively benign radiative dissipation of >95% of the plasma stored energy. The rapid cooling and the slow movement of the plasma to the wall reduce poloidal halo currents during the current decay. The thermally collapsed plasma is very cold ({approx} 1-2 eV) and the impurity charge distribution can include > 50% fraction neutral species. If a sufficient quantity of gas is injected, the neutrals inhibit runaway electrons. A physical model of radiative cooling is developed and validated against DIII-D experiments. The model shows that gas jet mitigation, including runaway suppression, extrapolates favorably to burning plasmas where disruption damage will be more severe. Initial results of real-time disruption detection triggering gas jet injection for mitigation are shown.

  7. INGAS: Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System for radioxenon measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doost-Mohammadi, V.; Afarideh, H.; Etaati, G. R.; Safari, M. J.; Rouhi, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System (INGAS) will be introduced. This system is based on beta-gamma coincidence technique and consists of a well-type NaI(Tl) as gamma or X radiation detector and a cylindrical plastic scintillator to detect beta or conversion electron. Standard NIM modules were utilized to detect coincidence events of detectors. Both the beta and gamma detectors were appropriately calibrated. The efficiency curve of gamma detector for volume geometry was obtained by comparing the results of gamma point sources measurements and simulations of GATE V7.0 Monte Carlo code. The performance of detection system was checked by injection of 222Rn and 131mXe gaseous source in the detection cell. The minimum detectable activity of the system for 133Xe is 1.240±0.024 mBq for 24 h measurement time.

  8. Development of a Liquefied Noble Gas Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, Ezra; White, Aaron; Aidala, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Liquefied noble gas detectors have been used for various applications in recent years for detecting neutrinos, neutrons, photons, and potentially dark matter. The University of Michigan is developing a detector with liquid argon to produce scintillation light and ionization electrons. Our data collection method will allow high-resolution energy measurement and spatial reconstruction of detected particles by using multi-pixel silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and a cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire endplate. We have already designed a liquid argon condenser and purification unit surrounded by an insulating vacuum, constructed circuitry for temperature and pressure sensors, and created software to obtain high-accuracy sensor readouts. The status of detector development will be presented. Funded through the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project.

  9. Photoionization of the outer electrons in noble gas endohedral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M. Ya. Baltenkov, A. S.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2008-08-15

    We suggest a prominent modification of the outer shell photoionization cross section in noble gas (NG) endohedral atoms NG-C{sub n} under the action of the electron shell of fullerene C{sub n}. This shell leads to two important effects: a strong enhancement of the cross section due to fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and to prominent oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of a photoelectron from the NG by the fullerene shell. Both factors lead to powerful maxima in the outer shell ionization cross sections of NG-C{sub n}, which we call giant endohedral resonances. The oscillator strength reaches a very large value in the atomic scale, 25. We consider atoms of all noble gases except He. The polarization of the fullerene shell is expressed in terms of the total photoabsorption cross section of the fullerene. The photoelectron reflection is taken into account in the framework of the so-called bubble potential, which is a spherical {delta}-type potential. It is assumed in the derivations that the NG is centrally located in the fullerene. It is also assumed, in accordance with the existing experimental data, that the fullerene radius R{sub C} is much larger than the atomic radius r{sub A} and the thickness {delta}{sub C} of the fullerene shell. As was demonstrated recently, these assumptions allow us to represent the NG-C{sub n} photoionization cross section as a product of the NG cross section and two well-defined calculated factors.

  10. Noble gas trapping and fractionation during synthesis of carbonaceous matter. [in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of noble gas entrapment during synthesis of carbonaceous, macromolecular, and kerogen-like substances is presented. High molecular weight organic matter synthesized in aqueous condensation reactions contained little gas, and the composition was consistent with fractionation due to noble gas solubility in water; however, propane soot produced during a modified Miller-Urey experiment in an aritificial gas mixture contained high concentrations of trapped noble gases that displayed strong elemental fractionation from their reservoirs. It is concluded that theses experiemnts show that processes exist for synthesis of carbonaceous carriers that result in high noble gas concentrations and strong elemental fractionation at temperatures well above those required by absorption to achieve similar effects.

  11. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-21

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-I{sub h}, ice-I{sub c}, ice-II, and C{sub 0} interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C{sub 0} water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C{sub 0} hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  12. Noble Gas Measurement and Analysis Technique for Monitoring Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, William S

    1999-09-01

    An environmental monitoring technique using analysis of stable noble gas isotopic ratios on-stack at a reprocessing facility was developed. This technique integrates existing technologies to strengthen safeguards at reprocessing facilities. The isotopic ratios are measured using a mass spectrometry system and are compared to a database of calculated isotopic ratios using a Bayesian data analysis method to determine specific fuel parameters (e.g., burnup, fuel type, fuel age, etc.). These inferred parameters can be used by investigators to verify operator declarations. A user-friendly software application (named NOVA) was developed for the application of this technique. NOVA included a Visual Basic user interface coupling a Bayesian data analysis procedure to a reactor physics database (calculated using the Monteburns 3.01 code system). The integrated system (mass spectrometry, reactor modeling, and data analysis) was validated using on-stack measurements during the reprocessing of target fuel from a U.S. production reactor and gas samples from the processing of EBR-II fast breeder reactor driver fuel. These measurements led to an inferred burnup that matched the declared burnup with sufficient accuracy and consistency for most safeguards applications. The NOVA code was also tested using numerous light water reactor measurements from the literature. NOVA was capable of accurately determining spent fuel type, burnup, and fuel age for these experimental results. Work should continue to demonstrate the robustness of this system for production, power, and research reactor fuels.

  13. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure.

    PubMed

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-21

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-Ih, ice-Ic, ice-II, and C0 interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C0 water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C0 hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems. PMID:26493915

  14. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-Ih, ice-Ic, ice-II, and C0 interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C0 water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C0 hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  15. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S; Livingstone, David M; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry. PMID:24811123

  16. Determination of Natural In Vivo Noble-Gas Concentrations in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Livingstone, David M.; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry. PMID:24811123

  17. Neutron detection with noble gas scintillation: a review of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, C. M.; Coplan, Michael; Miller, Eric C.; Thompson, Alan K.; Kowler, Alex; Vest, Rob; Yue, Andrew; Koeth, Tim; Al-Sheikhly, Mohammad; Clark, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Thermal neutron detection is of vital importance to many disciplines, including neutron scattering, workplace monitoring, and homeland protection. We survey recent results from our collaboration which couple low-pressure noble gas scintillation with novel approaches to neutron absorbing materials and geometries to achieve potentially advantageous detector concepts. Noble gas scintillators were used for neutron detection as early as the late 1950's. Modern use of noble gas scintillation includes liquid and solid forms of argon and xenon in the dark matter and neutron physics experiments and commercially available high pressure applications have achieved high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. Little attention has been paid to the overlap between low pressure noble gas scintillation and thermal neutron detection, for which there are many potential benefits.

  18. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  19. The MSFC Noble Gas Research Laboratory (MNGRL): A NASA Investigator Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Noble-gas isotopes are a well-established technique for providing detailed temperature-time histories of rocks and meteorites. We have established the MSFC Noble Gas Research Laboratory (MNGRL) at Marshall Space Flight Center to serve as a NASA investigator facility in the wake of the closure of the JSC laboratory formerly run by Don Bogard. The MNGRL lab was constructed to be able to measure all the noble gases, particularly Ar-Ar and I-Xe radioactive dating to find the formation age of rocks and meteorites, and Ar/Kr/Ne cosmic-ray exposure ages to understand when the meteorites were launched from their parent planets.

  20. Polarized noble-gas atoms: A tool for fundamental physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1993-05-01

    Polarized noble gas atom samples suitable for a variety of experiments can be produced by spin exchange with laser optically pumped alkali-metal vapors. Most stable and even radioactive isotopes of He, Ne, Kr, Xe and Rn have been polarized, and the field has been paced, in part by laser developments and study of the atomic collision processes. I will focus on two kinds of application: (1) precision measurement of free precession frequencies to probe fundamental concepts such as CP violation, Local Lorentz Invariance and Linearity in Quantum Mechanics; (2) a polarized {sup 3}He target for electron scattering to extract information on the structure of the neutron. The precision measurement techniques take advantage of long coherence times (measured in hours for {sup 3}He and {sup 21}Ne) and large signal to noise ratios to measure frequency shifts with precision 10{sup -7} Hz in one hour. The polarized {sup 3}He target is used to measure asymmetries in deep inelastic electron scattering which are dominated by the neutron since the proton spins are approximately paired in the ground state of the nucleus. The spin dependent structure function of the neutron is an essential probe of the quark-parton structure of the nucleon. All of these investigations combine fundamental and particle physics motivation with atomic physics and precision measurement techniques in a way that spans many subfields of physics.

  1. External Photoevaporation of the Solar Nebula: Jupiter's Noble Gas Enrichments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Nikhil; Desch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We present a model explaining the elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne, and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments (~3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from H2. We argue that external photoevaporation by far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed H2, He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough (lsim 30 K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H, it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot & Hueso. We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production is also necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water vapor in regions <~ 30 K to trap gas-phase species in amorphous water ice in solar proportions. We find more efficient chemical fractionation in the outer disk: whereas the model of Guillot & Hueso predicts a factor of three enrichment when only <2% of the disk mass remains, we find the same enrichments when 30% of the disk mass remains. Finally, we predict the presence of ~0.1 M ⊕ of water vapor in the outer solar nebula and protoplanetary disks in H II regions.

  2. EXTERNAL PHOTOEVAPORATION OF THE SOLAR NEBULA: JUPITER's NOBLE GAS ENRICHMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Monga, Nikhil; Desch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We present a model explaining the elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne, and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments (∼3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from H{sub 2}. We argue that external photoevaporation by far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed H{sub 2}, He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough (≲ 30 K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H, it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot and Hueso. We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production is also necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water vapor in regions ≲ 30 K to trap gas-phase species in amorphous water ice in solar proportions. We find more efficient chemical fractionation in the outer disk: whereas the model of Guillot and Hueso predicts a factor of three enrichment when only <2% of the disk mass remains, we find the same enrichments when 30% of the disk mass remains. Finally, we predict the presence of ∼0.1 M {sub ⊕} of water vapor in the outer solar nebula and protoplanetary disks in H II regions.

  3. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  4. Experimental studies and model analysis of noble gas fractionation in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ding, Xin; Kennedy, B. Mack.; Evans, William C.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The noble gases, which are chemically inert under normal terrestrial conditions but vary systematically across a wide range of atomic mass and diffusivity, offer a multicomponent approach to investigating gas dynamics in unsaturated soil horizons, including transfer of gas between saturated zones, unsaturated zones, and the atmosphere. To evaluate the degree to which fractionation of noble gases in the presence of an advective–diffusive flux agrees with existing theory, a simple laboratory sand column experiment was conducted. Pure CO2 was injected at the base of the column, providing a series of constant CO2 fluxes through the column. At five fixed sampling depths within the system, samples were collected for CO2 and noble gas analyses, and ambient pressures were measured. Both the advection–diffusion and dusty gas models were used to simulate the behavior of CO2 and noble gases under the experimental conditions, and the simulations were compared with the measured depth-dependent concentration profiles of the gases. Given the relatively high permeability of the sand column (5 ´ 10−11 m2), Knudsen diffusion terms were small, and both the dusty gas model and the advection–diffusion model accurately predicted the concentration profiles of the CO2 and atmospheric noble gases across a range of CO2 flux from ?700 to 10,000 g m−2 d−1. The agreement between predicted and measured gas concentrations demonstrated that, when applied to natural systems, the multi-component capability provided by the noble gases can be exploited to constrain component and total gas fluxes of non-conserved (CO2) and conserved (noble gas) species or attributes of the soil column relevant to gas transport, such as porosity, tortuosity, and gas saturation.

  5. Correction for volatile fractionation in ascending magmas: noble gas abundances in primary mantle melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, Pete

    2001-09-01

    Accurate relative noble gas abundances of mantle-derived melts are required in order to further understand the distribution of noble gases in the mantle and fractionation of noble gases during the melting process. Noble gas relative abundances in the majority of oceanic basalts are highly fractionated, at least in part due to late stage, solubility controlled fractionation. Noble gas concentrations in the volatile phase (≡ noble gas:CO 2 ratio) will vary systematically during solubility controlled degassing of a magma. This contribution models the noble gas concentrations in the volatile phase during degassing at different pressures and vesicularities in order to develop a method for correcting fractionation resulting from magmatic degassing, and thereby estimate the "initial" (pre-degassing) noble gas compositions. Correcting for fractionation during magmatic degassing requires: a) a method for determining the volatile fractionation trajectory during degassing; and b) one well constrained mantle volatile composition with which to "fix" the extrapolation. The trajectory of volatile fractionation can be estimated by sequential crushing of basaltic glasses. Vesicles grow during ascent, therefore large vesicles trap early (less fractionated) volatiles while small vesicles trap late (fractionated) volatiles. Sequential crushing of basaltic glasses releases volatiles from progressively smaller vesicles, thereby allowing the fractionation trajectory resulting from degassing to be determined on individual samples. The production rate of both 21Ne and 4He in the mantle is a function of U concentration only, resulting in a constant 21Ne/ 4He production ratio in the mantle which can be used to "fix" the degassing fractionation trajectory determined by sequential crushing. This correction then allows fractionation of 4He from 40Ar prior to degassing to be assessed. This method is illustrated using multiple crushes of a single basaltic glass from the mid-Atlantic Ridge that

  6. Carbon and Noble Gas Isotope Banks in Two-Phase Flow: Changes in Gas Composition During Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In conjunction with the rise of unconventional oil and gas production, there has been a recent rise in interest in noble gas and carbon isotope changes that can occur during the migration of natural gas. Natural gas geochemistry studies use bulk hydrocarbon composition, carbon isotopes, and noble gas isotopes to determine the migration history of gases from source to reservoir, and to trace fugitive gas leaks from reservoirs to shallow groundwater. We present theoretical and experimental work, which helps to explain trends observed in gas composition in various migration scenarios. Noble gases are used as tracers for subsurface fluid flow due to distinct initial compositions in air-saturated water and natural gases. Numerous field studies have observed enrichments and depletions of noble gases after gas-water interaction. A theoretical two-phase gas displacement model shows that differences in noble gas solubility will cause volatile gas components will become enriched at the front of gas plumes, leaving the surrounding residual water stripped of dissolved gases. Changes in hydrocarbon gas composition are controlled by gas solubility in both formation water and residual oil. In addition to model results, we present results from a series of two-phase flow experiments. These results demonstrate the formation of a noble gas isotope banks ahead of a main CO2 gas plume. Additionally, we show that migrating hydrocarbon gas plumes can sweep biogenic methane from groundwater, significantly altering the isotope ratio of the gas itself. Results from multicomponent, two-phase flow experiments qualitatively agree with the theoretical model, and previous field studies. These experimentally verified models for gas composition changes can be used to aid source identification of subsurface gases.

  7. Laser-polarized xenon-129 magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The development of a method for in vivo perfusion measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Matthew Scot

    2001-07-01

    This thesis presents in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies with laser-polarized 129Xe delivered to living rats by inhalation and transported to tissue via blood flow. The results presented herein include the observation, assignment, and dynamic measurement of 129Xe resonances in the brain and body, the first one- and two-dimensional chemical-shift-resolved images of 129Xe in blood, tissue, and gas in the thorax, and the first images of 129Xe in brain tissue. These results establish that laser-polarized 129Xe can be used as a magnetic resonance tracer in vivo. NMR resonances at 0, 191, 198, and 209 ppm relative to the 129 Xe gas resonance are observed in the rat thorax and assigned to 129Xe in gas, fat, tissue, and blood respectively. Resonances at 189, 192, 195, 198, and 209 ppm are observed in the brain, and the 195 and 209 ppm resonances are assigned to 129Xe in grey matter, and blood, respectively. The design and construction of a laser-polarized 129Xe production and delivery system is described. This system produces liter-volumes of laser- polarized 129Xe by spin-exchange optical- pumping. It represented an order of magnitude increase over previously reported production volumes of polarized 129Xe. At approximately 3-7% polarization, 157 cc-atm of xenon is produced and stored as ice every 5 minutes. This reliable, effective, and simple production method for large volumes of 129Xe can be applied to other areas of research involving the use of laser-polarized noble gases. A model of the in vivo transport of laser polarized 129Xe to tissue under realistic experimental NMR conditions is described. Appropriate control of the NMR parameters is shown to allow tissue perfasion and 129Xe tissue T1 to be extracted from measurement of the steady-state 129Xe tissue signal. In vivo rodent 129Xe NMR results are used to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of this technique, and an inhaled 30% xenon/70% O2 mixture polarized to 5

  8. Helium Isotopes and Noble Gas Abundances of Cave Dripping Water in Three Caves in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. T.; Shen, C. C.; Tan, M.; Li, T.; Uemura, R.; Asami, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleo-temperature recorded in nature archives is a critical parameter to understand climate change in the past. With advantages of unique inert chemical characteristics and sensitive solubilities with temperature, dissolved noble gases in speleothem inclusion water were recently proposed to retrieve terrestrial temperature history. In order to accurately apply this newly-developed speleothem noble gas temperature (NGT) as a reliable proxy, a fundamental issue about behaviors of noble gases in the karst should be first clarified. In this study, we measured noble gas contents in air and dripping water to evaluate any ratio deviation between noble gases. Cave dripping water samples was collected from three selected caves, Shihua Cave in northern China, Furong Cave in southwestern, and Gyukusen Cave in an island located in the western Pacific. For these caves are characterized by a thorough mixing and long-term storage of waters in a karst aquifer by the absence of seasonal oxygen isotope shifts. Ratios of dripping water noble gases are statistically insignificant from air data. Helium isotopic ratios in the dripping water samples match air value. The results indicate that elemental and isotopic signatures of noble gases from air can be frankly preserved in the epikarst and support the fidelity of NGT techniques.

  9. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Atmospheric noble gas signatures in deep Michigan Basin brines as indicators of a past thermal event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Castro, Maria Clara; Hall, Chris M.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric noble gases (e.g., 22Ne, 36Ar, 84Kr, 130Xe) in crustal fluids are only sensitive to subsurface physical processes. In particular, depletion of atmospheric noble gases in groundwater due to boiling and steam separation is indicative of the occurrence of a thermal event and can thus be used to trace the thermal history of stable tectonic regions. We present noble gas concentrations of 38 deep brines (~ 0.5-3.6 km) from the Michigan Basin. The atmospheric noble gas component shows a strong depletion pattern with respect to air saturated water. Depletion of lighter gases ( 22Ne and 36Ar) is stronger compared to the heavier ones ( 84Kr and 130Xe). To understand the mechanisms responsible for this overall atmospheric noble gas depletion, phase interaction models were tested. We show that this atmospheric noble gas depletion pattern is best explained by a model involving subsurface boiling and steam separation, and thus, consistent with the occurrence of a past thermal event of mantle origin as previously indicated by both high 4He/heat flux ratios and the presence of primordial mantle He and Ne signatures in the basin. Such a conceptual model is also consistent with the presence of past elevated temperatures in the Michigan Basin (e.g., ~ 80-260 °C) at shallow depths as suggested by previous thermal studies in the basin. We suggest that recent reactivation of the ancient mid-continent rift system underneath the Michigan Basin is likely responsible for the release of both heat and mantle noble gases into the basin via deep-seated faults and fracture zones. Relative enrichment of atmospheric Kr and Xe with respect to Ar is also observed, and is interpreted as reflecting the addition of sedimentary Kr and Xe from associated hydrocarbons, following the hydrothermal event. This study pioneers the use of atmospheric noble gases in subsurface fluids to trace the thermal history of stable tectonic regions.

  11. Laser-Polarized Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K. L.; Fitzgerald, R. J.; Happer, W.

    1998-05-01

    Gaseous and solid laser-polarized ^129Xe have already been extensively studied. Now we extend the investigations to the liquid phase. We measured the relaxation rate of the ^129Xe polarization in liquid Xe as a function of magnetic field, temperature, and container surface. Lifetimes in excess of 30 minutes were observed. The relaxation rates displayed a mild dependence on temperature and surface environment, and a very mild dependence on field. Potential applications of laser-polarized liquid Xe include transportation of large quantities of hyperpolarized ^129Xe (as needed for medical imaging work) and cross-relaxation to other nuclear species dissolved in the liquid.

  12. Noble gases in gas shales : Implications for gas retention and circulating fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sudeshna; Jones, Adrian; Verchovsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Gas shales from three cores of Haynesville-Bossier formation have been analysed simultaneously for carbon, nitrogen and noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Xe) to constrain their source compositions and identify signatures associated with high gas retention. Ten samples from varying depths of 11785 to 12223 feet from each core, retrieved from their centres, have been combusted from 200-1200°C in incremental steps of 100°C, using 5 - 10 mg of each sample. Typically, Xe is released at 200°C and is largely adsorbed, observed in two of the three cores. The third core lacked any measureable Xe. High 40Ar/36Ar ratio up to 8000, is associated with peak release of nitrogen with distinctive isotopic signature, related to breakdown of clay minerals at 500°C. He and Ne are also mostly released at the same temperature step and predominantly hosted in the pore spaces of the organic matter associated with the clay. He may be produced from the uranium related to the organic matter. The enrichment factors of noble gases defined as (iX/36Ar)sample/(iX/36Ar)air where iX denotes any noble gas isotope, show Ne and Xe enrichment observed commonly in sedimentary rocks including shales (Podosek et al., 1980; Bernatowicz et al., 1984). This can be related to interaction of the shales with circulating fluids and diffusive separation of gases (Torgersen and Kennedy, 1999), implying the possibility of loss of gases from these shales. Interaction with circulating fluids (e.g. crustal fluids) have been further confirmed using 20Ne/N2, 36Ar/N2 and 4He/N2 ratios. Deviations of measured 4He/40Ar* (where 40Ar* represents radiogenic 40Ar after correcting for contribution from atmospheric Ar) from expected values has been used to monitor gas loss by degassing. Bernatowicz, T., Podosek, F.A., Honda, M., Kramer, F.E., 1984. The Atmospheric Inventory of Xenon and Noble Gases in Shales: The Plastic Bag Experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research 89, 4597-4611. Podosek, F.A., Honda, M., Ozima, M., 1980

  13. Solar Noble Gases in Polymict Ureilites and an Update on Ureilite Noble Gas Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Lohr, H. P.; Begemann, F.

    1993-07-01

    Ureilites are one of the least understood classes of meteorites; they show signs of being processed, but also appear to be primitive, with abundant carbon and trapped noble gases [1-6]. We have now begun to analyze a number of recently recovered specimens: one from the Saharan desert (Acfer 277) amd five from the Antarctic (LEW 85328, LEW 85440, EET 87720, FRO 90036, and FRO 90054). Analyses of Acfer 277, LEW 85328, and EET 87720 are complete (Table 1). Solar noble gases are present in polymict EET 87720, as shown by the three- isotope plot of Fig. 1. There, in contrast to the bulk data point for Acfer 277, data points for EET 87720 deviate from a mixing line between "typical" spallation Ne (as approximated here by the spallation-dominated 1800 degrees C step for EET 87720) and Ne-U [7] toward higher ^20Ne/^22Ne. A line fitted to the EET 87720 data points passes slightly below Ne-B [8]. The situation is similar for sample F1 from polymict EET 83309 [9], which is shown for comparison. Additional support for the presence of solar gases arises from the abundance of ^4He (~9 x 10^-5 cm^3 STP/g in EET 87720-F1, corrected for spallogenic contributions), which in both cases is far higher than in other ureilite bulk samples [6,10]. Also, in the ratio of spallation-corrected ^4He to trapped ^36Ar, these two polymict ureilites clearly stand out. Helium-4/argon-36 ratios in EET 87720-F1 and EET 83309-F1 are ~20 and ~28 respectively, at least 1 order of magnitude higher than in bulk monomict ureilites and 2 orders of magnitude higher than what appears typical of ureilite diamonds [6]. Nilpena, another polymict ureilite [11], also has a ^4He/^36Ar ratio (2.1 in Nilpena II-1 [7]) higher than all monomict ureilites but one (Dingo Pup Donga), indicating the presence of solar noble gases (in variable contents) as a possible general feature of polymict ureilites, similar to the presence in them of nitrogen with high delta(^15N/^14N) [12]. Monomict LEW 85328 has a very high (^22Ne

  14. Noble gas encapsulation into carbon nanotubes: Predictions from analytical model and DFT studies

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramani, Sree Ganesh; Singh, Devendra; Swathi, R. S.

    2014-11-14

    The energetics for the interaction of the noble gas atoms with the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated using an analytical model and density functional theory calculations. Encapsulation of the noble gas atoms, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe into CNTs of various chiralities is studied in detail using an analytical model, developed earlier by Hill and co-workers. The constrained motion of the noble gas atoms along the axes of the CNTs as well as the off-axis motion are discussed. Analyses of the forces, interaction energies, acceptance and suction energies for the encapsulation enable us to predict the optimal CNTs that can encapsulate each of the noble gas atoms. We find that CNTs of radii 2.98 − 4.20 Å (chiral indices, (5,4), (6,4), (9,1), (6,6), and (9,3)) can efficiently encapsulate the He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms, respectively. Endohedral adsorption of all the noble gas atoms is preferred over exohedral adsorption on various CNTs. The results obtained using the analytical model are subsequently compared with the calculations performed with the dispersion-including density functional theory at the M06 − 2X level using a triple-zeta basis set and good qualitative agreement is found. The analytical model is however found to be computationally cheap as the equations can be numerically programmed and the results obtained in comparatively very less time.

  15. Noble gas encapsulation into carbon nanotubes: Predictions from analytical model and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramani, Sree Ganesh; Singh, Devendra; Swathi, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    The energetics for the interaction of the noble gas atoms with the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated using an analytical model and density functional theory calculations. Encapsulation of the noble gas atoms, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe into CNTs of various chiralities is studied in detail using an analytical model, developed earlier by Hill and co-workers. The constrained motion of the noble gas atoms along the axes of the CNTs as well as the off-axis motion are discussed. Analyses of the forces, interaction energies, acceptance and suction energies for the encapsulation enable us to predict the optimal CNTs that can encapsulate each of the noble gas atoms. We find that CNTs of radii 2.98 - 4.20 Å (chiral indices, (5,4), (6,4), (9,1), (6,6), and (9,3)) can efficiently encapsulate the He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms, respectively. Endohedral adsorption of all the noble gas atoms is preferred over exohedral adsorption on various CNTs. The results obtained using the analytical model are subsequently compared with the calculations performed with the dispersion-including density functional theory at the M06 - 2X level using a triple-zeta basis set and good qualitative agreement is found. The analytical model is however found to be computationally cheap as the equations can be numerically programmed and the results obtained in comparatively very less time.

  16. Method and apparatus for noble gas atom detection with isotopic selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, G. Samuel; Payne, Marvin G.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Parks, James E.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus and methods of operation are described for determining, with isotopic selectivity, the number of noble gas atoms in a sample. The analysis is conducted within an evacuated chamber which can be isolated by a valve from a vacuum pumping system capable of producing a pressure of 10.sup.-8 Torr. Provision is made to pass pulses of laser beams through the chamber, these pulses having wavelengths appropriate for the resonance ionization of atoms of the noble gas under analysis. A mass filter within the chamber selects ions of a specific isotope of the noble gas, and means are provided to accelerate these selected ions sufficiently for implantation into a target. Specific types of targets are discussed. An electron measuring device produces a signal relatable to the number of ions implanted into the target and thus to the number of atoms of the selected isotope of the noble gas removed from the gas sample. The measurement can be continued until a substantial fraction, or all, of the atoms in the sample have been counted. Furthermore, additional embodiments of the apparatus are described for bunching the atoms of a noble gas for more rapid analysis, and for changing the target for repetitive cycling of the gas in the chamber. The number of repetitions of the cyclic steps depend upon the concentration of the isotope of interest, the separative efficiency of the mass filter, etc. The cycles are continued until a desired selectivity is achieved. Also described are components and a method of operation for a pre-enrichment operation for use when an introduction of a total sample would elevate the pressure within the chamber to levels in excess of those for operation of the mass filter, specifically a quadrupole mass filter. Specific examples of three noble gas isotope analyses are described.

  17. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (<0.05 °C) through the use of a heat exchanger. The temperature and total dissolved gas of the water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  18. Microdiamonds from Different Meteorite Types: N and Noble Gas Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, S. V. S.; Sahijpal, S.; Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. P.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.; Goswami, J. N.

    1993-07-01

    Microdiamonds isolated from CV3 and ordinary chondrites have been found to differ from those in CM2 meteorites in their N contents and low-temperature Xe-component (Xe-P3), even though the amounts of Xe-HL and the delta ^15N are similar [1,2]. We undertook a simultaneous study of N and noble gases in diamond-rich separates of Murchison (CM2), Efremovka (CV3), and Krymka (LL3.0) meteorites to identify the association of N and noble gas components in them and to characterize possible differences. Gases are extracted by combustion in 3 torr oxygen at low temperatures (up to 700 degrees C) and by pyrolysis at higher temperatures. Murchison: There are two peak releases. About 60-90% of all gases are released in the 550 degrees C step, which is characterized by the presence of Ne-A2, Xe-HL, and delta ^15N = -330 per mil. The second peak at 1200 degrees C gave delta ^15N = -567 per mil and showed a clear admixture of Ne-E and Xe-S (measured 20/22 = 4.2, 21/22 = 0.018, 130/132 = 0.309), indicating the presence of SiC. The low-temperature steps (400 degrees and 450 degrees C) gave Xe-P3 with an admixture of Xe-HL. These results are in agreement with our earlier analysis of another aliquot of Murchison C delta [3]. Efremovka (DE-4): There is a broad release in the 550 degrees C and 600 degrees C steps and a second peak at 1200 degrees C. We estimate that about 60% and 40% respectively of the sample are combusted at the two low- temperature steps. Although the 550 degrees C and 600 degrees C steps have similar gas amounts (except for Xe), other gases show significant differences in their isotopic compositions. The minimum delta ^15N of -290 per mil (600 degrees C) is much heavier than the typical C delta value of -330 per mil [1]. Xenon in both fractions is pure Xe-HL, while Kr is different [86/82 = 1.67 (550 degrees C) and 1.91 (600 degrees C)]. The 1200 degrees C fraction shows the presence of a small admixture of Ne-E, Xe-S, and Kr-S, but the delta ^15N (-127 per mil ) is

  19. An overview of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Xe) contents and isotope signals in terrestrial diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Jones, A. P.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Kelley, S. P.; Stuart, F. M.

    2013-11-01

    The noble gas geochemistry of different types of terrestrial diamond including coated stones, alluvial diamonds, framesites, carbonados and impact diamonds yields a wealth of information on the sources of volatiles responsible for diamond formation. We present an illustrated compilation of published analyses of noble gases in different types of natural diamond. Noble gases in diamond record primary signatures from the mantle indicative of their integrated sources, and, the contribution of different metasomatic agents including subducting fluids and kimberlitic melt sampled during diamond growth. In addition, they show evidence of secondary processes such as resorption. Most data are available for coated stones, which trap abundant volatile-rich microscopic inclusions in their rims. While the coated stones are dominated by Mid-Oceanic-Ridge-Basalt (MORB) type noble gas signatures, the other diamond types contain predominantly crustal and atmospheric components although some mantle gases may be present, the latter indicated in elevated 20Ne/22Ne and/or 129Xe/132Xe ratios relative to atmospheric values. Some alluvial diamonds have very high 3He/4He that may represent the presence of a solar component trapped during their formation, but are just as likely to be the result of cosmogenic 3He implantation during their prolonged residence at the Earth's surface. Oceanic-Island-Basalt (OIB) type noble gases occur in nanometer sized inclusions in metamorphic diamond from Kazakhstan, yet their significance as a fingerprint of mantle processes is not fully understood. Implanted noble gases occur near the outer surfaces of individual crystals, and are generally not a major hindrance for the study of mantle signatures, except for polycrystalline diamond like framesites with small grain size. Some diamonds including the polycrystalline carbonados, are dominated by crustal noble gases with no discernible mantle component evidenced by very low 3He/4He and 20Ne/22Ne ratios, and very

  20. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  1. Dissociation dynamics of noble-gas dimers in intense two-color IR laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, M.; Thumm, U.

    2013-07-01

    We numerically model the dissociation dynamics of the noble-gas dimer ions He2+, Ne2+, Ar2+, Kr2+, and Xe2+ in ultrashort pump and probe laser pulses of different wavelengths. Our calculations reveal a distinguished “gap” in the kinetic energy spectra, observed experimentally for the Ar2 dimer [J. Wu , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.110.033005 110, 033005 (2013)], for all noble-gas dimers for appropriate wavelength combinations. This striking phenomenon can be explained by the dissociation of dimer ions on dipole-coupled Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic potential curves. Comparing pump-probe-pulse-delay-dependent kinetic-energy-release spectra for different noble-gas dimer cations of increasing mass, we discuss increasingly prominent (i) fine-structure effects in and (ii) classical aspects of the nuclear vibrational motion.

  2. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M.L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed. PMID:23290627

  3. Photoionization of noble-gas atoms by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Astapenko, V. A. Svita, S. Yu.

    2014-11-15

    The photoionization of atoms of noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses of a corrected Gaussian shape is studied theoretically. Computations are performed in the context of perturbation theory using a simple expression for the total probability of photoionization of an atom by electromagnetic pulses. The features of this process are revealed and analyzed for various ranges of the parameters of the problem.

  4. Fragmentation dynamics of noble gas dimers in two-color intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, M.; Wu, J.; Doerner, R.; Thumm, U.

    2013-05-01

    We studied the dissociation dynamics of noble gas dimer ions in two-color infrared intense laser fields by analyzing their fragment-kinetic-energy-release spectra as a function of the pump-probe delay. Our calculations predict a striking ``delay gap'' in the kinetic-energy-spectra for all noble gas dimers that was so far only measured for the Ar2 dimer. We identify this phenomenon as a frustrated dissociation mechanism. This mechanism requests different pump- and probe-pulse wavelengths and involves the pump pulse to both, singly ionize the neutral dimers and dipole-couple adiabatic states in the dimer ion. Supported by the US NSF and DOE.

  5. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Isotopic and noble gas geochemistry in geothermal research

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M.; DePaolo, D.J.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this program is to provide, through isotopic analyses of fluids, fluid inclusions, and rocks and minerals coupled with improved methods for geochemical data analysis, needed information regarding sources of geothermal heat and fluids, the spatial distribution of fluid types, subsurface flow, water-rock reaction paths and rates, and the temporal evolution of geothermal systems. Isotopic studies of geothermal fluids have previously been limited to the light stable isotopes of H, C, and O. However, other isotopic systems such as the noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and reactive elements (e.g. B, N, S, Sr and Pb) are complementary and may even be more important in some geothermal systems. The chemistry and isotopic composition of a fluid moving through the crust will change in space and time in response to varying chemical and physical parameters or by mixing with additional fluids. The chemically inert noble gases often see through these variations, making them excellent tracers for heat and fluid sources. Whereas, the isotopic compositions of reactive elements are useful tools in characterizing water-rock interaction and modeling the movement of fluids through a geothermal reservoir.

  7. Experimental determination of noble gas, SF6 and CO2 flow profiles through a porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgallon, Rachel; Gilfillan, Stuart; Edlmann, Katriona; McDermott, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and SF6 have recently been used as artificial and inherent tracers of CO2 flow and migration from within[1,2] and from geological reservoirs[3]. However, outstanding questions remain, particularly regarding the flow behaviour of the noble gases compared to CO2. Here we present results from specially constructed experimental equipment, which has been used to determine the factors affecting transport of noble gases relative to CO2 in a porous sandstone. The experimental setup consists of a sample loop that can be loaded with a desired gas mixture. This sample can be released as a pulse into a feeder gas stream through a flow cell. The flow cell consists of a 3.6 cm diameter core, which can be of any length. The sample is surrounded by aluminium foil and treated with epoxy resin inside stainless steel tubing. The flow cell is encased by two purpose designed dispersion end plates. Real-time analysis of the arrival peaks of the gases downstream is recorded using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). For the experiments, a 0.96 m core of Fell Sandstone was selected to represent a porous media. Noble gases and SF6 pulses were flowed through a CO2 carrier gas at five different pressure gradients (10 - 50 kPa) with arrival profiles measured using the QMS. Surprisingly, peak arrival times of He were slower than the other noble gases at each pressure gradient. The differences in peak arrival times between He and other noble gases increased as pressure decreased and the curve profiles for each noble gas differ significantly. The heavier noble gases (Kr and Xe) along with SF6 show a steeper peak rise at initial appearance, but have a longer duration profile than the He curves. Interestingly, the breakthrough curve profiles for both Kr and Xe were similar to SF6 indicating that Kr and Xe could be substituted for SF6, which is a potent greenhouse gas, in tracing applications. In addition, CO2 pulses were passed through a N2 carrier gas. The

  8. Holocene noble gas paleothermometry from springs in the Olympic Mountains, Washington.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noble gas temperature proxies are examined from 52 springs in the Olympic Mountains, Washington. Groundwater flows from seeps to pooled springs at <0.1 L s-1 - 2.5 L s-1 in the Elwha watershed (≈692 km2). About 85% of sampled springs issue from confined fracture reservoirs preser...

  9. ULTRAHIGH SENSITIVITY HEAVY NOBLE GAS DETECTORS FOR LONG-TERM MONITORING AND MONITORING AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Georgia Institute of Technology/Argonne National Laboratory team will develop and demonstrate novel ultrahigh sensitivity heavy noble gas (krypton, xenon, and radon) detectors for long-term monitoring of spent fuel and TRU waste, as well as for distinguishing background radon a...

  10. Effect of noble gas ion pre-irradiation on deuterium retention in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Zhao, Z. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Yuan, Y.; Morgan, T. W.; Guo, L. P.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B. Y.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-02-01

    Impurity seeding of noble gases is an effective way of decreasing the heat loads onto the divertor targets in fusion devices. To investigate the effect of noble gases on deuterium retention, tungsten targets have been implanted by different noble gas ions and subsequently exposed to deuterium plasma. Irradiation induced defects and deuterium retention in tungsten targets have been characterized by positron annihilation Doppler broadening and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Similar defect distributions are observed in tungsten irradiated by neon and argon, while it is comparatively low in the case of helium. The influence of helium pre-irradiation on deuterium trapping is found to be small based on the desorption spectrum compared with that of the pristine one. Neon and argon pre-irradiation leads to an enhancement of deuterium trapping during plasma exposure. The influence on deuterium retention is found to be argon > neon > helium when comparing at a similar crystal damage level.

  11. Reactive Gas Environment Induced Structural Modification of Noble-Transition Metal Alloy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, V.; Yang, L.; Yin, J.; Loukrakpam, R.; Shan, S.; Wanjala, B.; Luo, J.; Chapman, K. W.; Zhong, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    Noble-transition metal (noble=Pt,Au; transition=Co,Ni,Cu) alloy particles with sizes of about 5 nm have been studied by in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction while subjected to oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) gas atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The different gas atmospheres do not affect substantially the random alloy, face-centered-cubic structure type of the particles but do affect the way the metal atoms pack together. In an O2 atmosphere, atoms get extra separated from each other, whereas, in an H2 atmosphere, they come closer together. The effect is substantial, amounting to 0.1 Å difference in the first neighbor atomic distances, and concurs with a dramatic change of the particle catalytic properties. It is argued that such reactive gas induced “expansion shrinking” is a common phenomenon that may be employed for the engineering of “smart” nanoparticles responding advantageously to envisaged gas environments.

  12. Computational investigation of noble gas adsorption and separation by nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sanders, Joseph C.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-10-01

    Molecular simulations are used to assess the ability of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials to store and separate noble gases. Specifically, grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation techniques are used to predict noble gas adsorption isotherms at room temperature. Experimental trends of noble gas inflation curves of a Zn-based material (IRMOF-1) are matched by the simulation results. The simulations also predict that IRMOF-1 selectively adsorbs Xe atoms in Xe/Kr and Xe/Ar mixtures at total feed gas pressures of 1 bar (14.7 psia) and 10 bar (147 psia). Finally, simulations of a copper-based MOF (Cu-BTC) predict this material's ability to selectively adsorb Xe and Kr atoms when present in trace amounts in atmospheric air samples. These preliminary results suggest that Cu-BTC may be an ideal candidate for the pre-concentration of noble gases from air samples. Additional simulations and experiments are needed to determine the saturation limit of Cu-BTC for xenon, and whether any krypton atoms would remain in the Cu-BTC pores upon saturation.

  13. New interatomic potentials for studying the behavior of noble gas atoms in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fen; Fang, Jingzhong; Deng, Huiqiu; Liu, Jianglong; Xiao, Shifang; Shu, Xiaolin; Gao, Fei; Hu, Wangyu

    2015-12-01

    To study the behavior of noble gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar) in bulk tungsten, new DFT-based potentials for W-He, W-Ne and W-Ar interactions were developed by fitting the results obtained from density functional theory calculations. The new potentials adopt the embedded atom method (EAM) formalism, and the "s-band model" is used to describe the many-body interactions between each of the noble gas atoms and its neighboring W atoms. These potentials reproduce the formation energies of point defects and the migration barriers of single noble gas atoms. The simulations using these potentials successfully predict that the tetrahedral interstitial site is more stable than the octahedral interstitial site for X (= He, Ne or Ar) interstitials. Based on these new potentials, the binding interactions of a single X atom with the Xn and Xn-Vacancy clusters and the diffusion properties of Xn clusters in bulk W were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The present results indicate that the binding energies obtained using the new potentials are good in agreement with the results of DFT calculations. The migration energies of the clusters increase with both the increase in the atomic radius of noble gases and the increase in the size of the clusters.

  14. Theoretical rovibrational analysis of the covalent noble gas compound ArNH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Carlie M.; Fortenberry, Ryan C.

    2016-04-01

    Noble gasses can make covalent bonds. This has been clearly shown for ArH+ as is evidenced by the observation of this molecule ubiquitously in the interstellar medium. In order to augment the list of potential noble gas molecules, highly-accurate quartic field methods are employed here to analyze the ArNH+ radical cation for the first time. This study is in line with previous examinations of ArOH+, ArH2+, and ArH3+. It is shown here that the Arsbnd N bond strength falls below the Arsbnd O bond energy in ArOH+ but in line with that from ArH2+ indicating that ArNH+ could certainly be synthesized in the lab or, potentially, in nature. In order to aid in the search for this noble gas molecular cation, spectroscopic constants, fundamental vibrational frequencies, absorption intensities, and the center-of-mass dipole moment are provided at high-level in order to augment our understanding of noble gas chemistry.

  15. Noble Metal Catalysts for Mercury Oxidation in Utility Flue Gas: Gold, Palladium and Platinum Formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J

    2008-07-01

    The use of noble metals as catalysts for mercury oxidation in flue gas remains an area of active study. To date, field studies have focused on gold and palladium catalysts installed at pilot scale. In this article, we introduce bench-scale experimental results for gold, palladium and platinum catalysts tested in realistic simulated flue gas. Our initial results reveal some intriguing characteristics of catalytic mercury oxidation and provide insight for future research into this potentially important process.

  16. A combined vacuum crushing and sieving (CVCS) system designed to determine noble gas paleotemperatures from stalagmite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Nadia; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Fleitmann, Dominik; Wieler, Rainer; Maden, Colin; Süsli, Andreas; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a novel extraction device for water and noble gases from speleothem samples for noble gas paleotemperature determination. The "combined vacuum crushing and sieving (CVCS) system" was designed to reduce the atmospheric noble gas contents from air inclusions in speleothem samples by up to 2 orders of magnitude without adsorbing atmospheric noble gases onto the freshly produced grain surfaces, a process that had often hampered noble gas temperature (NGT) determination in the past. We also present the results from first performance tests of the CVCS system processing stalagmite samples grown at a known temperature. This temperature is reliably reproduced by the NGTs derived from Ar, Kr, and Xe extracted from the samples. The CVCS system is, therefore, suitable for routine determinations of accurate NGTs. In combination with stalagmite dating, these NGTs will allow reconstructing past regional temperature evolutions, and also support the interpretation of the often complex stable isotope records preserved in the stalagmites' calcite.

  17. Noble Gas Isotopic Signatures and X-Ray and Electron Diffraction Characteristics of Tagish Lake Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Takaoka, N.

    2001-01-01

    Noble gas isotopic signatures and X-ray and electron diffraction characteristics of Tagish Lake indicate that it is a unique carbonaceous chondrite rich in saponite, Fe-Mg-Ca carbonate, primordial noble gases, and presolar grains. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Fluorinated noble-gas cyanides FKrCN, FXeCN, and FXeNC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Cheng; Räsänen, Markku; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2015-08-21

    We report on three new noble-gas molecules, FKrCN, FXeCN, and FXeNC, prepared in low-temperature Kr and Xe matrices. These molecules are made by UV photolysis of FCN in the matrices and subsequent thermal annealing. The FCN precursor is produced by deposition of the matrix gas containing (FCN){sub 3} through a microwave discharge. The new noble-gas molecules are assigned with the help of quantum chemical calculations at the MP2(full) and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Similar Ar compounds (FArCN and FArNC) as well as FKrNC are not found in these experiments, which is in agreement with the calculated energetics.

  19. Nonlinear optical response of multiply ionized noble-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar(1, 3), Maryam; Romanov(2, 3), Dmitri; Levis(1, 3), Robert

    2016-05-01

    Calculation of dynamic polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of ionized species using ab initio methods presents computational and conceptual difficulties, as these ionized species often have open-shell electronic system. We use multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) method with extended basis sets for calculating dynamic polarizability and second-order hyperpolarizabilities of atomic noble gases and their multiply charged cations in non-resonant regime. The calculations were performed at wavelengths ranging from about 100 nm to the red of the first multi-photon resonance all the way toward the static regime. The results were benchmarked to those of CCSD calculations for ions of even-number charge. The second-order hyperpolarizability coefficients were found to decrease when the electrons are progressively removed from the system. At higher ionization states, these coefficients become less dispersive as a function of wavelength. The values and even the signs of the γ (2) coefficients were found to depend on the spin of the ionic quantum state. Thus, for Ne+3 and Ne+4, in low-spin states (2 Pu, and 1 Sg, respectively) the sign of γ (2) is positive, whereas in high-spin states (4 Su, and 3 Pg) the sign is negative. The calculated hyperpolarizabilities of multiply ionized atoms relate to experiments on very bright high-order harmonic generation in multiply ionized plasmas.

  20. The Noble Gas Record of Gas-Water Phase Interaction in the Tight-Gas-Sand Reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballentine, C. J.; Zhou, Z.; Harris, N. B.

    2015-12-01

    The mass of hydrocarbons that have migrated through tight-gas-sandstone systems before the permeability reduces to trap the hydrocarbon gases provides critical information in the hydrocarbon potential analysis of a basin. The noble gas content (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) of the groundwater has a unique isotopic and elemental composition. As gas migrates through the water column, the groundwater-derived noble gases partition into the hydrocarbon phase. Determination of the noble gases in the produced hydrocarbon phase then provides a record of the type of interaction (simple phase equilibrium or open system Rayleigh fractionation). The tight-gas-sand reservoirs of the Rocky Mountains represent one of the most significant gas resources in the United States. The producing reservoirs are generally developed in low permeability (averaging <0.1mD) Upper Cretaceous fluvial to marginal marine sandstones and commonly form isolated overpressured reservoir bodies encased in even lower permeability muddy sediments. We present noble gas data from producing fields in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming; the the Piceance Basin, Colorado; and in the Uinta Basin, Utah. The data is consistent from all three basins. We show how in each basin the noble gases record open system gas migration through a water column at maximum basin burial. The data within an open system model indicates that the gas now in-place represents the last ~10% of hydrocarbon gas to have passed through the water column, most likely prior to permeability closedown.

  1. New noble gas data of primitive and differentiated achondrites including Northwest Africa 011 and Tafassasset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzer, A.; Schultz, L.; Franke, L.

    2003-10-01

    This work reports on the noble gas inventory of 3 new acapulcoites, 3 brachinites, 2 new eucrites from the Dar al Gani region in Libya, the unique achondrite Dar al Gani (DaG) 896 from the same locality, the new eucrite-like achondrite Northwest Africa (NWA) 011, and the controversial sample Tafassasset. We determined cosmic ray exposure and gas retention ages, evaluated shielding conditions, and discuss the trapped noble gas component of the specimens. All exposure ages are within the known range of stony meteorites and partly confirm previously established age clusters. Shielding conditions vary, suggesting substantial shielding for all 3 brachinites and Tafassasset. We cannot exclude, however, that the Mg-rich composition of brachinites simply simulates heavy shielding. Regarding the trapped component, we found Q-like compositions only for the acapulcoite Thiel Mountains (TIL) 99002. The brachinite Elephant Moraine (EET) 99402 yields a high, subsolar 36Ar/ 132Xe ratio of ~400 along with a slightly elevated 84Kr/132Xe ratio, indicating minor atmospheric contamination. All the other samples, particularly the eucrite DaG 983, are characterized by clearly elevated Ar/Kr/Xe ratios due to significant terrestrial alteration. Tafassasset exhibits noble gas parameters that are different from those of CR chondrites, including a relatively high cosmic ray exposure age, the absence of a solar component, low 132Xe concentrations, a low trapped 36Ar/132Xe ratio of ~30, and a noticeable amount of radiogenic 129Xe. Similar attributes have been observed for some primitive achondrites. These attributes are also consistent with the metamorphic character of the sample. We, therefore, consider Tafassasset's noble gas record to be inconclusive as to its classification (primitive achondrite versus metamorphosed CR chondrite).

  2. Temporal changes in noble gas compositions within the Aidlinsector ofThe Geysers geothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Kennedy, Mack; van Soest,Thijs; Lewicki, Jennifer

    2006-05-03

    The use of nonreactive isotopic tracers coupled to a full thermal-hydrological reservoir simulation allows for an improved method of investigating how reservoir fluids contained within matrix and fractures contribute over time to fluids produced from geothermal systems. A combined field and modeling study has been initiated to evaluate the effects of injection, production, and fracture-matrix interaction on produced noble gas contents and isotopic ratios. Gas samples collected periodically from the Aidlin steam field at The Geysers, California, between 1997 and 2006 have been analyzed for their noble gas compositions, and reveal systematic shifts in abundance and isotopic ratios over time. Because of the low concentrations of helium dissolved in the injection waters, the injectate itself has little impact on the helium isotopic composition of the reservoir fluids over time. However, the injection process may lead to fracturing of reservoir rocks and an increase in diffusion-controlled variations in noble gas compositions, related to gases derived from fluids within the rock matrix.

  3. Noble gas adsorption with and without mechanical stress: Not Martian signatures but fractionated air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Herrmann, Siegfried; Ott, Ulrich

    2012-06-01

    Sample preparation, involving physical and chemical methods, is an unavoidable step in geochemical analysis. From a noble gas perspective, the two important effects are loss of sample gas and/or incorporation of air, which are significant sources of analytical artifacts. This article reports on the effects of sample exposure to laboratory air without mechanical influence and during sample grinding. The experiments include pure adsorption on terrestrial analog materials (gibbsite and olivine) and grinding of Martian meteorites. A consistent observation is the presence of an elementally fractionated air component in the samples studied. This is a critical form of terrestrial contamination in meteorites as it often mimics the heavy noble gas signatures of known extra-terrestrial end-members that are the basis of important conclusions about the origin and evolution of a meteorite. Although the effects of such contamination can be minimized by avoiding elaborate sample preparation protocols, caution should be exercised in interpreting the elemental ratios (Ar/Xe, Kr/Xe), especially in the low-temperature step extractions. The experiments can also be transferred to the investigation of Martian meteorites with long terrestrial residence times, and to Mars, where the Mars Science Laboratory mission will be able to measure noble gas signatures in the current atmosphere and in rocks and soils collected on the surface in Gale crater.

  4. Quantum-chemical modeling of boron and noble gas dopants in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.

    1983-01-01

    The electron effects of the presence of boron and noble gas dopants in a model silicon lattice were investigated using a self-consistent charge extended Hueckel program. The extent of electronic interaction of the noble gas with the lattice is given by: Kr greater than Ar greater than Ne. Theoretically, boron diffusion in the presence of neon, argon or krypton was examined using a self-consistent charge extended Hueckel program. The net energy of interaction between boron and neon is strongly repulsive while argon-boron exhibits a region of relative stability; krypton exhibits behavior similar to argon though no region of stability was found for the range of separations used in the calculations. Finally, it is noted, from the relative energy of the topmost filled molecular orbital associated with boron (in an interstitial position), that activation of the boron does not require boron movement but can be accomplished by indirect transitions.

  5. Characterizing the Biological and Geochemical Architecture of Hydrothermally Derived Sedimentary Deposits: Coupling Micro Raman Spectroscopy with Noble Gas Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, D. M.; Conrad, P. G.; Steele, A.; Fries, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    The chemical species in cherts and glass fragments were analyzed using micro Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with measurements of heavy noble gas isotopes to characterize hydrothermally derived sedimentary environments.

  6. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection in Noble Gas Solids for Measurements of Rare Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep; Bailey, Kevin G.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Xu, Chen-Yu; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Optical detection of single atoms captured in solid noble gas matrices provides an alternative technique to study rare nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics. I will describe the prospects of applying this approach for cross section measurements of the ^22Ne,,),25Mg reaction, which is the crucial neutron source for the weak s process inside of massive stars. Noble gas solids are a promising medium for the capture, detection, and manipulation of atoms and nuclear spins. They provide stable and chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of guest species. Because noble gas solids are transparent at optical wavelengths, the guest atoms can be probed using lasers. We have observed that ytterbium in solid neon exhibits intersystem crossing (ISC) which results in a strong green fluorescence (546 nm) under excitation with blue light (389 nm). Several groups have observed ISC in many other guest-host pairs, notably magnesium in krypton. Because of the large wavelength separation of the excitation light and fluorescence light, optical detection of individual embedded guest atoms is feasible. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Prediction of a neutral noble gas compound in the triplet state.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debashree; Ghosh, Ayan; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2015-05-26

    Discovery of the HArF molecule associated with H-Ar covalent bonding [Nature, 2000, 406, 874-876] has revolutionized the field of noble gas chemistry. In general, this class of noble gas compound involving conventional chemical bonds exists as closed-shell species in a singlet electronic state. For the first time, in a bid to predict neutral noble gas chemical compounds in their triplet electronic state, we have carried out a systematic investigation of xenon inserted FN and FP species by using quantum chemical calculations with density functional theory and various post-Hartree-Fock-based correlated methods, including the multireference configuration interaction technique. The FXeP and FXeN species are predicted to be stable by all the computational methods employed in the present work, such as density functional theory (DFT), second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), coupled-cluster theory (CCSD(T)), and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). For the purpose of comparison we have also included the Kr-inserted compounds of FN and FP species. Geometrical parameters, dissociation energies, transition-state barrier heights, atomic charge distributions, vibrational frequency data, and atoms-in-molecules properties clearly indicate that it is possible to experimentally realize the most stable state of FXeP and FXeN molecules, which is triplet in nature, through the matrix isolation technique under cryogenic conditions. PMID:25891838

  8. A review of noble gas geochemistry in relation to early Earth history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most fundamental noble gas constraints on early Earth history is derived from isotopic differences in (129)Xe/(130)Xe between various terrestrial materials. The short half life (17 m.y.) of extinct (129I, parent of (129)Xe, means that these differences must have been produced within the first 100 m.y. after terrestrial accretion. The identification of large anomalies in (129)Xe/(130)Xe in mid ocean ridge basalts (MORB), with respect to atmospheric xenon, suggests that the atmosphere and upper mantle have remained separate since that time. This alone is a very strong argument for early catastrophic degassing, which would be consistent with an early fractionation resulting in core formation. However, noble gas isotopic systematics of oceanic basalts show that the mantle cannot necessarily be regarded as a homogeneous system, since there are significant variations in (3)He/(4)He, (40)Ar/(36)Ar, and (129)Xe/(130)Xe. Therefore, the early degassing cannot be considered to have acted on the whole mantle. The specific mechanisms of degassing, in particular the thickness and growth of the early crust, is an important variable in understanding present day noble gas inventories. Another constraint can be obtained from rocks that are thought to be derived from near the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary: ultramafic xenoliths.

  9. A new tool for palaeoclimate reconstruction: Noble gas temperatures from fluid inclusions in speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; Marx, T.; Scholz, D.; Niggemann, S.; Mangini, A.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.

    2008-05-01

    The aim of our research is to apply the absolute palaeothermometer provided by dissolved noble gases in water to the reliably dated high-resolution archive of speleothems. Here we report on methods used to extract and quantify water and noble gases from fluid inclusions in speleothems and the first successful derivation of noble gas temperatures (NGTs) from this archive. The water amount was determined manometrically, whereas the low noble gas amounts were measured by mass spectrometry, applying rigorous blank control. Gas was extracted by crushing either in a steel cylinder or in a copper tube with little heating, which both yielded acceptably low blanks. Extraction in the steel cylinder is more efficient as a finer grain size distribution can be achieved. A major problem is the often high contribution of noble gases from air inclusions, masking the temperature information present in the noble gases dissolved in water-filled inclusions. However, NGTs with an uncertainty in the range of 1 °C can be derived from suitable stalagmites with low air/water ratios in the inclusions. Such favourable conditions were found to be present in stalagmites of milky white appearance. Suitable samples were collected from the stalagmites BU-U, BU-1 and a soda straw from the Bunker Cave in North-West Germany. Inverse modeling of measured Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe concentrations leads to a mean temperature of (2.9 ± 0.7) °C for all BU-U sub-samples with an age between 10 800 and 11 700 years and of (7.1 ± 0.8) °C for a 1300 years old sample from BU-1. Compared to the modern mean annual air temperature at the investigated site of about 9.5 °C, the calculated temperatures appear rather low but not unreasonable, as the ages correspond to comparatively cool periods around the Younger Dryas/Preboreal transition and the Early Middle Ages, respectively. Moreover, the indicated temperature difference of about 4 °C between the early and late Holocene periods is in agreement with expectations.

  10. Issues Involving The OSI Concept of Operation For Noble Gas Radionuclide Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C R; Sun, Y

    2011-01-21

    The development of a technically sound protocol for detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is critical to the successful operation of an on site inspection (OSI) under the CTBT and has broad ramifications for all aspects of the OSI regime including the setting of specifications for both sampling and analysis equipment used during an OSI. With NA-24 support, we are investigating a variety of issues and concerns that have significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work at LLNL focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments - a lesson we learned previously from the LLNL Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE). Evaluation of a number of important noble gas detection issues, potentially affecting OSI policy, has awaited the US re-engagement with the OSI technical community. Thus, there have been numerous issues to address during the past 18 months. Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of LLNL computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied in the field making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated during the past year. We complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that is intended to be a practical solution to most if not all the challenges addressed here.

  11. Characterisation of Q-gases and other noble gas components in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieler, Rainer; Anders, Edward; Baur, Heinrich; Lewis, Roy S.; Signer, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Noble gases in several HF/HCl resistant residues of the CM2 chondrite Murchison were measured by closed-system stepped etching, in order to study the planetary gases in their major carrier 'Q'-an ill-defined minor phase, perhaps merely a set of adsorption sites. Neon, Ar, Kr, Xe, and probably also He in 'Q' of Murchison have the same isotopic and nearly the same elemental abundances as their counterparts in Allende (CV3). The isotopic composition of Ne-Q is consistent with mass-dependent fractionation of either solar wind Ne or Ne from solar energetic particles. Unlike Allende, Murchison during HNO3 attack release, besides Q-gases, large amounts of two other Ne-components, Ne-E and Ne-A3, a third subcomponent of Ne-A. This work confirms that Q-gases of well-defined composition were an important noble gas component in the early solar system an are now found in various classes of meteorites, such as carbonaceous chondrites, ureilites, and ordinary chondrites. Ne-Q may have played a role in the formation of noble gas reservoirs in terrestrial planets.

  12. ABOUT THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF HYDROCARBON LAKES IN THE ORIGIN OF TITAN'S NOBLE GAS ATMOSPHERIC DEPLETION

    SciTech Connect

    Cordier, D.; Mousis, O.; Lebonnois, S.; Lavvas, P.; Lobo, L. Q.; Ferreira, A. G. M.

    2010-10-01

    An unexpected feature of Titan's atmosphere is the strong depletion in primordial noble gases revealed by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe during its descent on 2005 January 14. Although several plausible explanations have already been formulated, no definitive response to this issue has yet been found. Here, we investigate the possible sequestration of these noble gases in the liquid contained in lakes and wet terrains on Titan and the consequences for their atmospheric abundances. Considering the atmosphere and the liquid existing on the soil as a whole system, we compute the abundance of each noble gas relative to nitrogen. To do so, we make the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium between the liquid and the atmosphere, the abundances of the different constituents being determined via regular solution theory. We find that xenon's atmospheric depletion can be explained by its dissolution at ambient temperature in the liquid presumably present on Titan's soil. In the cases of argon and krypton, we find that the fractions incorporated in the liquid are negligible, implying that an alternative mechanism must be invoked to explain their atmospheric depletion.

  13. About the Possible Role of Hydrocarbon Lakes in the Origin of Titan's Noble Gas Atmospheric Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.; Mousis, O.; Lunine, J. I.; Lebonnois, S.; Lavvas, P.; Lobo, L. Q.; Ferreira, A. G. M.

    2010-10-01

    An unexpected feature of Titan's atmosphere is the strong depletion in primordial noble gases revealed by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe during its descent on 2005 January 14. Although several plausible explanations have already been formulated, no definitive response to this issue has yet been found. Here, we investigate the possible sequestration of these noble gases in the liquid contained in lakes and wet terrains on Titan and the consequences for their atmospheric abundances. Considering the atmosphere and the liquid existing on the soil as a whole system, we compute the abundance of each noble gas relative to nitrogen. To do so, we make the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium between the liquid and the atmosphere, the abundances of the different constituents being determined via regular solution theory. We find that xenon's atmospheric depletion can be explained by its dissolution at ambient temperature in the liquid presumably present on Titan's soil. In the cases of argon and krypton, we find that the fractions incorporated in the liquid are negligible, implying that an alternative mechanism must be invoked to explain their atmospheric depletion.

  14. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  15. Noble gas measurements from tiny water amounts: fluid inclusions in carbonates of speleothemes and coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Laszlo; Palcsu, Laszlo; Major, Zoltan

    2010-05-01

    Based on the concentrations of dissolved noble gases in fluid inclusions in speleothems and corals, noble gas temperatures (NGT) might be derived, that would be important climate information [1]. In the case of terrestrial carbonates, it means that the temperature dependency of noble gases in the evolving fluid inclusions is suitable to determine the prevailing temperature. This recognition provides new opportunities for the research of paleoclimate. Additionally, the dissolved noble gases in the fluid inclusions represented in corals could be used to study past sea surface temperatures that are one of the most essential parameter of climate reconstructions. To measure dissolved noble gases in fluid inclusions of a few micro-litres, a noble gas mass spectrometer equipped with an ultra high vacuum preparation line is the most suitable way. The preparation of the carbonate samples is performed in a sample preparation system connected to a static mode VG 5400 noble gas mass spectrometer. As a first step of the sample preparation, one piece of a sample is put into a crusher of the preparation line and then evacuated and heated at night. The crushing of dripstone and coral samples is carried out in a stainless steel pipe with a ferro-magnetic ball at 150 °C temperature, in such a way that the ball is kept on elevating and falling down onto the carbonate sample one hundred times. The aim of the heating is to avoid the water released from the fluid inclusions not to be adsorbed on the surface of the freshly broken carbonate [2]. The water released from the fluid inclusions is frozen into a cold finger, being held at temperature of -70 °C for 15 minutes. In this case, the collection efficiency is better than 99.7 %. Then the cold finger is warmed to 27 °C, and the pressure of the water vapour expanded to the volume of the cold finger is determined by a pressure gauge, which accuracy is better than 0.2 % in the pressure range of 10-2 mbar to 11 mbar. The water vapour

  16. Noble gas tracers of ventilation during deep-water formation in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Khatiwala, S.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the dynamics and implications of incomplete air-sea equilibration during the formation of abyssal water masses, we simulated noble gases in the Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) global ocean state estimate. A novel computation approach utilizing a matrix-free Newton-Krylov (MFNK) scheme was applied to quickly compute the periodic seasonal solutions for noble gas tracers. MFNK allows for quick computation of a cyclo-stationary solution for tracers (i.e., a spun-up, repeating seasonal cycle), which would otherwise be computationally infeasible due to the long time scale of dynamic adjustment of the abyssal ocean (1000’s of years). A suite of experiments isolates individual processes, including atmospheric pressure effects, the solubility pump and air-sea bubble fluxes. In addition to these modeled processes, a volumetric contribution of 0.28 ± 0.07% of glacial melt water is required to reconcile deep-water observations in the Weddell Sea. Another primary finding of our work is that the saturation anomaly of heavy noble gases in model simulations is in excess of two-fold more negative than is suggested from Weddell Sea observations. This result suggests that model water masses are insufficiently ventilated prior to subduction and thus there is insufficient communication between atmosphere and ocean at high latitudes. The discrepancy between noble gas observations and ECCO simulations highlights that important inadequacies remain in how we model high-latitude ventilation with large implications for the oceanic uptake and storage of carbon.

  17. Noble gas and carbon isotopes in natural gas: a new methodology for oil and gas exploration/production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinzhofer, A.; Battani, A.

    2003-04-01

    Isotopic measurements of both stables isotopes and noble gases give important clues to reconstruct the geological history of hydrocarbons, from their generation to their accumulation. Recent analytical advances in carbon isotopes of natural gases (methane to butane and carbon dioxide) allowed to characterize some of the physico-chemical processes which affect natural gas, instead of using these signatures as simple fingerprinting of origins as it was the case some decades ago. These reconstructions provide important information on both the origins and the dynamic behavior of hydrocarbon fluids in sedimentary basins. Moreover, correlating this methodology with other natural tracers increases the knowledge of hydrocarbon history. Among them, noble gas isotopes may be the new frontier tool, as their chemical inertness allows to use them as precise tracers of sources and of associated physical processes (phases behavior, migration and leakage). Moreover, because some isotopes are produced by natural radioactivity, they act therefore as geological clocks, giving potentially a quantification of the residence times of hydrocarbons in a reservoir. The parameters one would hope to constrain, and which may be used as boundary conditions for basin modeling, are the age and the residence time of the fluids constituting a petroleum system, the quantitative estimate of the distance of migration of the hydrocarbons from the source rock to the reservoir and from the petroleum system to the atmosphere, and the proportion of hydrocarbons lost through leakage from the time of accumulation to the present. Other parameters associated with hydrocarbon accumulations, and more conventionally studied, include the relations between source rocks and accumulated fluids, the possible bacterial contribution through methanogenesis and/or biodegradation, the range of maturity of the fluids, the possible dysmigration of the gas from a liquid through evaporative fractionation, the characterization

  18. Noble gas incorporation in sputtered and ion beam assisted grown silicon films

    SciTech Connect

    van Veen, A. . Inter-Faculty Reactor Inst.); Greuter, M.J.W.; Niesen, L. . Dept. of Physics); Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Gas desorption measurements have been performed on sputter deposited silicon films. The sputter gas was argon or krypton. Parameters influencing the incorporation process e.g. bias voltage, substrate temperature and arrival rate ratio of silicon and noble gas atoms have been systematically varied. The films, a-Si and c-Si, have been characterised by various techniques for composition and defect analysis. A model has been applied to describe the composition of the growing silicon layer. Underlying mechanisms like gas-gas sputtering have been studied in separate ion implantation experiments. For a-Si concentrations as high as 6% Ar and Kr have been found. An important effect is the injection of self-interstitial atoms caused by the low energy heavy ion bombardment. It causes the layer to grow without large open volume defects.

  19. Noble gas incorporation in sputtered and ion beam assisted grown silicon films

    SciTech Connect

    van Veen, A.; Greuter, M.J.W.; Niesen, L.; Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.

    1991-12-31

    Gas desorption measurements have been performed on sputter deposited silicon films. The sputter gas was argon or krypton. Parameters influencing the incorporation process e.g. bias voltage, substrate temperature and arrival rate ratio of silicon and noble gas atoms have been systematically varied. The films, a-Si and c-Si, have been characterised by various techniques for composition and defect analysis. A model has been applied to describe the composition of the growing silicon layer. Underlying mechanisms like gas-gas sputtering have been studied in separate ion implantation experiments. For a-Si concentrations as high as 6% Ar and Kr have been found. An important effect is the injection of self-interstitial atoms caused by the low energy heavy ion bombardment. It causes the layer to grow without large open volume defects.

  20. Using noble gas ratios to determine the origin of ground ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utting, Nicholas; Lauriol, Bernard; Lacelle, Denis; Clark, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Argon, krypton and xenon have different solubilities in water, meaning their ratios in water are different from those in atmospheric air. This characteristic is used in a novel method to distinguish between ice bodies which originate from the compaction of snow (i.e. buried snow banks, glacial ice) vs. ice which forms from the freezing of groundwater (i.e. pingo ice). Ice which forms from the compaction of snow has gas ratios similar to atmospheric air, while ice which forms from the freezing of liquid water is expected to have gas ratios similar to air-equilibrated water. This analysis has been conducted using a spike dilution noble gas line with gas extraction conducted on-line. Samples were mixed with an aliquot of rare noble gases while being melted, then extracted gases are purified and cryogenically separated. Samples have been analysed from glacial ice, buried snow bank ice, intrusive ice, wedge ice, cave ice and two unknown ice bodies. Ice bodies which have formed from different processes have different gas ratios relative to their formation processes.

  1. Coupled noble gas-hydrocarbon evolution of the early Earth atmosphere upon solar UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard, E.; Marty, B.

    2014-01-01

    Using a new photochemical model of the Earth's early atmosphere, the relationship between noble gas photoionization and organic photochemistry has been investigated from the Archean eon to the present day. We have found that the enhanced UV emission of the young Sun triggered a peculiar atmospheric chemistry in a CH4-rich early atmosphere that resulted in the increased formation of an organic haze, similar to the preliminary results of a previous study (Ribas et al., 2010). We have investigated the interaction between this haze and noble gases photoionized by the UV light from the younger Sun. Laboratory experiments have shown indeed that ionized xenon trapping into organics (1) is more efficient that other ionized noble gases trapping and (2) results in a significant enrichment of heavy xenon isotopes relative to the light ones (e.g., Frick et al., 1979; Marrocchi et al., 2011). We find moreover preferential photoionization of xenon that peaks at an altitude range comparable to that of the organic haze formation, in contrast to other noble gases. Trapping and fractioning of ionized xenon in the organic haze could therefore have been far more efficient than for other noble gases, and could have been particularly effective throughout the Archean eon, since the UV irradiation flux from the young Sun was expected to be substantially higher than today (Ribas et al., 2010; Claire et al., 2012). Thus we suspect that the unique isotopic fractionation of atmospheric xenon and its elemental depletion in the atmosphere relative to other noble gases, compared to potential cosmochemical components, could have resulted from a preferential incorporation of the heaviest xenon isotopes into organics. A fraction of atmospheric xenon could have been continuously trapped in the forming haze and enriched in its heavy isotopes, while another fraction would have escaped from the atmosphere to space, with, or without isotope selection of the lightest isotopes. The combination of these

  2. Shock Compression of Cryogenic Noble Gas Mixtures: Xenon - Krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, Seth; Magyar, Rudolph; Lemke, Raymond; Mattsson, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    In past work, we have examined the multi-Mbar response of cryogenically cooled liquid xenon and liquid krypton measuring their Hugoniots to 8 Mbar. These results were utilized in the development of new EOS models for Xe and Kr to use in high energy density physics applications. The previous work demonstrated the usefulness of integrating high accuracy shock compression experiments with DFT to generate the basis for equation of state (EOS) models. In many physics applications, such as Z-pinch experiments, gas mixtures are used instead. However, we do not have reliable experimental data on these mixtures to provide informed decisions about the EOS models or mixture rules. To improve our understanding of mixtures at extreme conditions, we performed dynamic compression experiments using Sandia's Z - facility on a 70/30 molar ratio Kr/Xe cryogenically cooled liquid mixture. We measured the Hugoniot state and reshock state of the liquid mixture to several Mbar. The experimental data validated the DFT simulations for identical molar ratio mixtures. The combined experimental and DFT results are used to assess the EOS models and test the mixture rules. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Noble Gas Signatures in Antrim Shale Gas in the Michigan Basin - Assessing Compositional Variability and Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Ellis, B. R.; Hall, C. M.; Lohmann, K. C.; Bouvier, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies in the Michigan Basin looked at the atmospheric and terrigenic noble gas signatures of deep brines to place constraints on the past thermal history of the basin and to assess the extent of vertical transport processes within this sedimentary system. In this contribution, we present noble gas data of shale gas samples from the Antrim shale formation in the Michigan Basin. The Antrim shale was one of the first economic shale-gas plays in the U.S. and has been actively developed since the 1980's. This study pioneers the use of noble gases in subsurface shale gas in the Michigan Basin to clarify the nature of vertical transport processes within the sedimentary sequence and to assess potential variability of noble gas signatures in shales. Antrim Shale gas samples were analyzed for all stable noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) from samples collected at depths between 300 and 500m. Preliminary results show R/Ra values (where R and Ra are the measured and atmospheric 3He/4He ratios, respectively) varying from 0.022 to 0.21. Although most samples fall within typical crustal R/Ra range values (~0.02-0.05), a few samples point to the presence of a mantle He component with higher R/Ra ratios. Samples with higher R/Ra values also display higher 20Ne/22Ne ratios, up to 10.4, and further point to the presence of mantle 20Ne. The presence of crustally produced nucleogenic 21Ne and radiogenic 40Ar is also apparent with 21Ne/22Ne ratios up to 0.033 and 40Ar/36Ar ratios up to 312. The presence of crustally produced 4He, 21Ne and 40Ar is not spatially homogeneous within the Antrim shale. Areas of higher crustal 4He production appear distinct to those of crustally produced 21Ne and 40Ar and are possibly related the presence of different production levels within the shale with varying concentrations of parent elements.

  4. NMR of laser-polarized 129Xe in blood foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, C. H.; Peled, S.; Nascimben, L.; Oteiza, E.; Walsworth, R. L.; Jolesz, F. A.

    1997-01-01

    Laser-polarized 129Xe dissolved in a foam preparation of fresh human blood was investigated. The NMR signal of 129Xe dissolved in blood was enhanced by creating a foam in which the dissolved 129Xe exchanged with a large reservoir of gaseous laser-polarized 129Xe. The dissolved 129Xe T1 in this system was found to be significantly shorter in oxygenated blood than in deoxygenated blood. The T1 of 129Xe dissolved in oxygenated blood foam was found to be approximately 21 (+/-5) s, and in deoxygenated blood foam to be greater than 40 s. To understand the oxygenation trend, T1 measurements were also made on plasma and hemoglobin foam preparations. The measurement technique using a foam gas-liquid exchange interface may also be useful for studying foam coarsening and other liquid physical properties.

  5. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  6. Noble gas excimer scintillation following neutron capture in boron thin films

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, Jacob C.; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Coplan, Michael A.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2014-04-14

    Far-ultraviolet scintillation signals have been measured in heavy noble gases (argon, krypton, xenon) following boron-neutron capture ({sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li) in {sup 10}B thin films. The observed scintillation yields are comparable to the yields from some liquid and solid neutron scintillators. At noble gas pressures of 107 kPa, the number of photons produced per neutron absorbed following irradiation of a 1200 nm thick {sup 10}B film was 14 000 for xenon, 11 000 for krypton, and 6000 for argon. The absolute scintillation yields from the experimental configuration were calculated using data from (1) experimental irradiations, (2) thin-film characterizations, (3) photomultiplier tube calibrations, and (4) photon collection modeling. Both the boron films and the photomultiplier tube were characterized at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Monte Carlo modeling of the reaction cell provided estimates of the photon collection efficiency and the transport behavior of {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the thin films. Scintillation yields increased with gas pressure due to increased ionization and excitation densities of the gases from the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products, increased frequency of three-body, excimer-forming collisions, and reduced photon emission volumes (i.e., larger solid angle) at higher pressures. Yields decreased for thicker {sup 10}B thin films due to higher average energy loss of the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the films. The relative standard uncertainties in the measurements were determined to lie between 14% and 16%. The observed scintillation signal demonstrates that noble gas excimer scintillation is promising for use in practical neutron detectors.

  7. Noble gas isotopes and halogens in volatile-rich inclusions in diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Raymond; Turner, Grenville

    1994-01-01

    Application of the (40)Ar-(39)Ar method and noble gas studies to diamonds has increased our understanding of their age relationships to the host kimberlite or lamproite, and of the source and composition of volatile-rich fluids in the upper mantle. The properties of diamond (inert, high mechanical strength and low gas diffusivities) means they are especially useful samples for studying gases trapped deep within the earth (less than 150 km) as they are unlikely to have undergone loss or exchange of entrapped material since formation. Volatile-rich fluids (H2O-CO2) are important agents for metasomatic processes in the upper mantle, and the noble gases and halogens preferentially partition into this phase leading to a strong geochemical coherence between these groups of elements. The abundances of the halogens in the major reservoirs of the Earth shows a marked progression from chlorine, concentrated in the oceans, through to iodine which, through its affinity to organic material, is concentrated mainly in sediments. Abundances in the upper mantle are low. This is particularly true for iodine which is of special interest in view of its potential significance as an indicator of sediment recycling and by way of its link to (129)Xe amomalies in the mantle through the low extinct isotope (129)I. Extensions of the (40)Ar-(39)Ar technique enable measurements of halogens and other elements (K, Ca, Ba, U) by production of noble gas isotopes from these species during neutron irradiation. Samples analyzed in this way include 15 coated stones from an unknown source in Zaire, 3 boarts from the Jwaneng and 1 boart from the Orapa kimberlites, both in Botswana.

  8. Noble gas residence times of saline waters within crystalline bedrock, Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.; Niedermann, Samuel; Wiersberg, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Noble gas residence times of saline groundwaters from the 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, located within the Precambrian crystalline bedrock of the Fennoscandian Shield in Finland, are presented. The accumulation of radiogenic (4He, 40Ar) and nucleogenic (21Ne) noble gas isotopes in situ together with the effects of diffusion are considered. Fluid samples were collected from depths between 180 and 2480 m below surface, allowing us to compare the modelled values with the measured concentrations along a vertical depth profile. The results show that while the concentrations in the upper part are likely affected by diffusion, there is no indication of diffusive loss at or below 500 m depth. Furthermore, no mantle derived gases were found unequivocally. Previous studies have shown that distinct vertical variation occurs both in geochemistry and microbial community structuring along the drill hole, indicating stagnant waters with no significant exchange of fluids between different fracture systems or with surface waters. Therefore in situ accumulation is the most plausible model for the determination of noble gas residence times. The results show that the saline groundwaters in Outokumpu are remarkably old, with most of the samples indicating residence times between ∼20 and 50 Ma. Although being first order approximations, the ages of the fluids clearly indicate that their formation must predate more recent events, such as Quaternary glaciations. Isolation within the crust since the Eocene-Miocene epochs has also direct implications to the deep biosphere found at Outokumpu. These ecosystems must have been isolated for a long time and thus very likely rely on energy and carbon sources such as H2 and CO2 from groundwater and adjacent bedrock rather than from the ground surface.

  9. Noble gas excimer scintillation following neutron capture in boron thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, Jacob C.; Coplan, Michael A.; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2014-04-01

    Far-ultraviolet scintillation signals have been measured in heavy noble gases (argon, krypton, xenon) following boron-neutron capture (10B(n,α)7Li) in 10B thin films. The observed scintillation yields are comparable to the yields from some liquid and solid neutron scintillators. At noble gas pressures of 107 kPa, the number of photons produced per neutron absorbed following irradiation of a 1200 nm thick 10B film was 14 000 for xenon, 11 000 for krypton, and 6000 for argon. The absolute scintillation yields from the experimental configuration were calculated using data from (1) experimental irradiations, (2) thin-film characterizations, (3) photomultiplier tube calibrations, and (4) photon collection modeling. Both the boron films and the photomultiplier tube were characterized at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Monte Carlo modeling of the reaction cell provided estimates of the photon collection efficiency and the transport behavior of 10B(n,α)7Li reaction products escaping the thin films. Scintillation yields increased with gas pressure due to increased ionization and excitation densities of the gases from the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction products, increased frequency of three-body, excimer-forming collisions, and reduced photon emission volumes (i.e., larger solid angle) at higher pressures. Yields decreased for thicker 10B thin films due to higher average energy loss of the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction products escaping the films. The relative standard uncertainties in the measurements were determined to lie between 14% and 16%. The observed scintillation signal demonstrates that noble gas excimer scintillation is promising for use in practical neutron detectors.

  10. Study of Nanopore Sculpting with Noble Gas Ion Beams at Various Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledden, Bradley; Krueger, Eric; Li, Jiali

    2006-03-01

    We report on experiments using noble gas beams: Helium, Neon, Argon, Krypton, and Xenon, at energies of 1keV, 3keV, and 5keV to controllably fabricate nanopores in freestanding silicon nitride membranes. Utilizing computer simulations (SRIM and TRIM), and a surface adatom diffusion model to describe the phenomenon of nanopore formation, we evaluate the conditions, specifically the ion energy, responsible for highly controllable fabrication of solid state nanopores. Additionally, we present methods to determine the thickness of the grown film as well as the thickness profile of the nanopore.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of the noble gas transport and fate model: CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Barker, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    CASCADR9 is a desert alluvial soil site-specific noble gas transport and fate model. Input parameters for CASCADR9 are: man-made source term, background concentration of radionuclides, radon half-life, soil porosity, period of barometric pressure wave, amplitude of barometric pressure wave, and effective eddy diffusivity. Using average flux, total flow, and radon concentration at the 40 day mark as output parameters, a sensitivity analysis for CASCADR9 is carried out, under a variety of scenarios. For each scenario, the parameter to which output parameters are most sensitive are identified.

  12. An Alteration Scale for CM Chondrites and Implications for Planetary Noble Gas Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, L. B.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Zolensky, M.

    1993-07-01

    - temperature phases of CM chondrites, we observe decreasing noble gas abundances with increased volumes of low-temperature phases. This can be explained by a scenario similar to one proposed by Wood [7], in which all CM chondrites originally had high gas contents, and were subsequently degassed to varying degrees in response to aqueous alteration in a parent body setting. An alternate explanation is that the correlation between noble gas content and the degree of alteration is the fortuitous result of primary trapped gas abundances. If, however, degassing did occur in response to progressive alteration, then the sequence of alteration reactions in CM chondrites may provide additional constraints on the retention sites for trapped noble gases. References: [1] Bogard D. D. et al. (1971) JGR, 76, 4076-4083. [2] Bourcier W. L. et al. (1992) LPS XXIII, 143-144.[3] Browning L. B. et al. (1993) LPS XXIV. [4] Bunch T. E. and Chang S. (1980) GCA, 44, 1543-1577. [5] Mazor E. et al. (1970) GCA, 34, 781-824. [6] Schultz L. and Kruse H. (1989) Meteoritics, 24, 155-172. [6] Wood J. A. (1967) Icarus, 6, 1-49. Fig. 1, which appears here in the hard copy shows how averaged ^36Ar contents [6] for individual CM chondrites decrease with increasing alteration, as indicated by the mean composition of phyllosilicates.

  13. Constraints on light noble gas partitioning at the conditions of spinel-peridotite melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Colin R. M.; Parman, Stephen W.; Kelley, Simon P.; Cooper, Reid F.

    2013-12-01

    Helium partitioning between olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and spinel and basaltic melt has been experimentally determined under upper mantle melting conditions (up to 20 kbar and 1450 °C). Under the conditions explored, helium partition coefficients are similar in all minerals investigated (KdHe˜10-4), suggesting He is evenly distributed between the minerals of spinel peridotite. This is in contrast to most incompatible elements, which are concentrated in clinopyroxene in spinel peridotite. The studied minerals have different concentrations of point defects, but similar He solubility, providing no evidence for He partitioning onto specific defects sites (e.g. cation vacancies). Upper limits on the partition coefficients for Ne and Ar have also been determined, constraining these elements to be moderately to highly incompatible in olivine at the conditions of spinel peridotite melting (<10-2 and <10-3, respectively). Helium partitioning in peridotite minerals varies little within the range of temperatures, pressures, and mineral compositions explored in this study. Reported partition coefficients, in combination with previous work, suggest that moderate to high degree mantle melting is not an efficient mechanism for increasing (U+Th)/He, (U+Th)/Ne, or K/Ar of the depleted mantle (DMM) through time, and consequently, supports the argument that recycling of oceanic crust is largely responsible for the relatively strong radiogenic noble gas signatures in the depleted mantle. Mantle residues with lowered (U+Th)/He, (U+Th)/Ne, and K/Ar may be produced through large extents of melting, but concentrations of noble gases will be low, unless noble gas solubility in solids deviate from Henry's Law at high fugacity.

  14. Noble Gas Analysis for Mars Robotic Missions: Evaluating K-Ar Age Dating for Mars Rock Analogs and Martian Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Ming, D. W.; Garrison, D. H.; Jones, J. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Nagao, K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this noble gas investigation was to evaluate the possibility of measuring noble gases in martian rocks and air by future robotic missions such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission has, as part of its payload, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument, which consists of a pyrolysis oven integrated with a GCMS. The MSL SAM instrument has the capability to measure noble gas compositions of martian rocks and atmosphere. Here we suggest the possibility of K-Ar age dating based on noble gas release of martian rocks by conducting laboratory simulation experiments on terrestrial basalts and martian meteorites. We provide requirements for the SAM instrument to obtain adequate noble gas abundances and compositions within the current SAM instrumental operating conditions, especially, a power limit that prevents heating the furnace above approx.1100 C. In addition, Martian meteorite analyses from NASA-JSC will be used as ground truth to evaluate the feasibility of robotic experiments to constrain the ages of martian surface rocks.

  15. Light noble gas chemistry: Structures, stabilities, and bonding of helium, neon and argon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Frenking, G. ); Koch, W. ); Reichel, F. ); Cremer, D. )

    1990-05-23

    Theoretically determined geometries are reported for the light noble gas ions Ng{sub 2}C{sup 2+}, Ng{sub 2}N{sup 2+}, Ng{sub 2}O{sup 2+}, NgCCNg{sup 2+}, NgCCH{sup +}, NgCN{sup +}, and NgNC{sup +} (Ng = He, Ne, Ar) at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. In a few cases, optimizations were carried out at CASSCF/6-31G(d,p). The thermodynamic stability of the Ng compounds is investigated at MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(2df,2pd) for Ng = He, Ne and at MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(d,p) for Ng = Ar. The structures and stabilities of the molecules are discussed in terms of donor-acceptor interactions between Ng and the respective fragment cation, by using molecular orbital arguments and utilizing the analysis of the electron density distribution and its associated Laplace field. Generally, there is an increase in Ng,X binding interactions of a noble gas molecule NgX with increasing atomic size of Ng. In some cases the Ne,X stabilization energies are slightly smaller than the corresponding He,X values because of repulsive p-{pi} interactions in the neon compounds. The argon molecules are in all cases significantly stronger bound.

  16. Noble gas patterns in the atmospheres of Mars and Earth: A comparison via the SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O.; Becker, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Noble gas and nitrogen compositions in the glassy phase of the EETA 79001 shergottite correspond closely with Viking measurements. This direct evidence for the origin of the SNC meteorites on Mars, and for trapping of an unfractionated sample of Martian atmospheric gases in the 79001 glass, provides a reasonable basis for comparing the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres with more precision than that afforded by the Viking data set. Results are that, with one exception, elemental and isotopic compositions of nonradiogenic Martian noble gases are similar to those in the Earth's atmosphere; relatively small isotopic discrepancies in Kr and perhaps Xe may be attributable to different degrees of mass fractionation of a common parent reservoir. The anomaly is in Ar composition, where Martian Ar-36/AR-38 approx. 4 is strikingly lower than the values near 5.3 that characterize both the Earth and major meteoritic gas carriers. Although a primordial Martian ratio of 5.3 could in principle be altered by some planet specific process (e.g., cosmic ray spallation of surface materials) operating over geologic time, one has not been found that works.

  17. Development of an improved detector for krypton-81 and other noble-gas isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.

    1988-08-25

    Phase 1 studies focused on the annealing (transient melting) of silicon and germanium targets with a krypton-fluoride (KrF) excimer laser. A suitable target of a semiconducting material--as a means of storing noble gas atoms--is a key component of a device called the RISTRON for counting isotopes of a noble gas. A means for isotopic selective counting of atoms such as 39Ar for ocean water circulation studies and 81Kr for groundwater and ice-cap dating would be of considerable interest to earth scientists. In the RISTRON, ions are created by resonance ionization of neutral krypton atoms released from one of the targets by pulsed laser melting, and these ions are implanted in a second target after isotopic enrichment. The studies evaluated the space charge or plasma effects created as an undesirable by-product of the annealing of a semiconductor with a pulsed excimer laser. The studies showed that the space charge produced when either silicon or germanium is annealed with a KrF laser can be removed with modest electric fields in less than one microsecond.

  18. Migration of noble gas atoms in interaction with vacancies in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzagalli, L.; Charaf-Eddin, A.

    2015-08-01

    First principles calculations in combination with the nudged elastic band method have been performed in order to determine the mobility properties of various noble gas species (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) in silicon, a model semiconducting material. We focussed on single impurity, in interstitial configuration or forming a complex with a mono- or a di-vacancy, since the latter are known to be present and to play a key role in the formation of extended defects like bubbles or platelets. We determined several migration mechanisms and associated activation energies and have discussed these results in relation to available experiments. In particular, conflicting measured values of the migration energy of helium are explained by the present calculations. We also predict that helium diffuses solely as an interstitial, while an opposite behaviour is found for heavier species such as Ar, Kr, and Xe, with the prevailing role of complexes in that case. Finally, our calculations indicate that extended defects evolution by Ostwald ripening is possible for helium and maybe neon, but is rather unlikely for heavier noble gas species.

  19. Atmospheric noble gases as tracers of biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katherine L.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.; Kipfer, Rolf; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric noble gases (NGs) were used to investigate biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer impacted by a crude oil spill, near Bemidji, MN. Concentrations of 3,4He, 20,22Ne, 36,40Ar, Kr, and Xe were determined for gas- and aqueous-phase samples collected from the vadose and saturated zones, respectively. Systematic elemental fractionation of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe with respect to air was observed in both of these hydrogeologic zones. Within the vadose zone, relative ratios of Ne and Ar to Kr and Xe revealed distinct process-related trends when compared to corresponding ratios for air. The degree of NG deviation from atmospheric concentrations generally increased with greater atomic mass (i.e., ΔXe > ΔKr > ΔAr > ΔNe), indicating that Kr and Xe are the most sensitive NG tracers in the vadose zone. Reactive transport modeling of the gas data confirms that elemental fractionation can be explained by mass-dependent variations in diffusive fluxes of NGs opposite to a total pressure gradient established between different biogeochemical process zones. Depletion of atmospheric NGs was also observed within a methanogenic zone of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation located below the water table. Solubility normalized NG abundances followed the order Xe > Kr > Ar > Ne, which is indicative of dissolved NG partitioning into the gas phase in response to bubble formation and possibly ebullition. Observed elemental NG ratios of Ne/Kr, Ne/Xe, Ar/Xe, and Kr/Xe and a modeling analysis provide strong evidence that CH4 generation below the water table caused gas exsolution and possibly ebullition and carbon transfer from groundwater to the vadose zone. These results suggest that noble gases provide sensitive tracers in biologically active unconfined aquifers and can assist in identifying carbon cycling and transfer within the vadose zone, the capillary fringe, and below the water table.

  20. Noble gas composition of subcontinental lithospheric mantle: An extensively degassed reservoir beneath Southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalowitzki, Tiago; Sumino, Hirochika; Conceição, Rommulo V.; Orihashi, Yuji; Nagao, Keisuke; Bertotto, Gustavo W.; Balbinot, Eduardo; Schilling, Manuel E.; Gervasoni, Fernanda

    2016-09-01

    Patagonia, in the Southern Andes, is one of the few locations where interactions between the oceanic and continental lithosphere can be studied due to subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath the continent. In order to characterize the noble gas composition of Patagonian subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), we present the first noble gas data alongside new lithophile (Sr-Nd-Pb) isotopic data for mantle xenoliths from Pali-Aike Volcanic Field and Gobernador Gregores, Southern Patagonia. Based on noble gas isotopic compositions, Pali-Aike mantle xenoliths represent intrinsic SCLM with higher (U + Th + K)/(3He, 22Ne, 36Ar) ratios than the mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) source. This reservoir shows slightly radiogenic helium (3He/4He = 6.84-6.90 RA), coupled with a strongly nucleogenic neon signature (mantle source 21Ne/22Ne = 0.085-0.094). The 40Ar/36Ar ratios vary from a near-atmospheric ratio of 510 up to 17700, with mantle source 40Ar/36Ar between 31100-6800+9400 and 54000-9600+14200. In addition, the 3He/22Ne ratios for the local SCLM endmember, at 12.03 ± 0.15 to 13.66 ± 0.37, are higher than depleted MORBs, at 3He/22Ne = 8.31-9.75. Although asthenospheric mantle upwelling through the Patagonian slab window would result in a MORB-like metasomatism after collision of the South Chile Ridge with the Chile trench ca. 14 Ma, this mantle reservoir could have remained unhomogenized after rapid passage and northward migration of the Chile Triple Junction. The mantle endmember xenon isotopic ratios of Pali-Aike mantle xenoliths, which is first defined for any SCLM-derived samples, show values indistinguishable from the MORB source (129Xe/132Xe =1.0833-0.0053+0.0216 and 136Xe/132Xe =0.3761-0.0034+0.0246). The noble gas component observed in Gobernador Gregores mantle xenoliths is characterized by isotopic compositions in the MORB range in terms of helium (3He/4He = 7.17-7.37 RA), but with slightly nucleogenic neon (mantle source 21Ne/22Ne = 0.065-0.079). We

  1. Nitrogen and Carbon Isotopes in Presolar Diamond Samples with Known Noble Gas Isotope Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Huss, G. R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1994-07-01

    Since the first analyses of C and N isotopes in presolar diamonds with known noble gas isotope composition more than a decade ago [1,2] the investigation of these isotope systems in the diamonds were developed practicallly independently. During this time many interesting details in isotopic systematics of all the elements involved were found and reviewed [3-5]. The main conclusion now reached from a decade of investigation is that presolar diamonds from different meteorites are not identical but appear to consist of several populations [6-8]. Therefore a variety of circumstellar conditions may be involved through a type II supernova model is a good start point in trying to understand diamond synthesis [9]. The evidences from experimental data for all the isotope systems however are still not entirely consistent in the sense that we actually do not know how many carriers the diamonds represent and how the various noble gas carriers are related to those for nitrogen. The finding of a consensus between noble gas and light element analyses would seem to be a vital step so that more detailed nucleosynthesis models may be developed tor the diamond formation. A first point is to answer the question whether HL noble gases and light nitrogen must have been formed at the same astrophysical site. Another important achievement in terms of presolar diamond investigations during the last decade is the purity and number of samples now available. However a well known difficulty is that C, N, and noble gases are never measured all together on the same sample. The purpose of collaboration initiated in this paper is to exploit the availability of good quality samples and to go some way towards overcoming the difficulties of measurement technique incompatibility. We have analyzed three pure diamond samples separated at CalTech from Allende, Orgueil, (henceforth CT samples) and Leoville for N and C isotopic composition by stepped pyrolysis and combustion. The samples preparation and

  2. Infrared absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of vinyl radical in noble-gas matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Tanskanen, Hanna; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Raesaenen, Markku; Feldman, Vladimir I.; Sukhov, Fedor F.; Orlov, Aleksei Yu.; Tyurin, Daniil A.

    2005-08-08

    Vinyl radicals produced by annealing-induced reaction of mobilized hydrogen atoms with acetylene molecules in solid noble-gas matrices (Ar, Kr, and Xe) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. The hydrogen atoms were generated from acetylene by UV photolysis or fast electron irradiation. Two vibrational modes of the vinyl radical ({nu}{sub 7} and {nu}{sub 5}) were assigned in IR absorption studies. The assignment is based on data for various isotopic substitutions (D and {sup 13}C) and confirmed by comparison with the EPR measurements and density-functional theory calculations. The data on the {nu}{sub 7} mode is in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results whereas the {nu}{sub 5} frequency agrees well with the computational data but conflicts with the gas-phase IR emission results.

  3. Testing of a prototype of calibration facility for noble gas monitoring using 41Ar.

    PubMed

    Saibathulham, Holnisar; Wurdiyanto, Gatot; Marsum, Pujadi

    2012-09-01

    A prototype of a calibration facility for noble gas monitoring using (41)Ar in the PTKMR-BATAN has been tested. The facility was designed in such a way that the standard source of gas can be reused. The radioactive (41)Ar source was obtained by thermal neutron reaction of (40)Ar(n, γ)(41)Ar using a thermal neutron flux of 4.8×10(13) neutrons per cm(2) per second in two minutes on the multipurpose G.A. Siwabessy Reactor (Batan, Serpong, Indonesia). Gamma spectrometry was used to measure the radioactivity and purity of (41)Ar. The spectrum of the (41)Ar observed yields an energy of 1294 keV because of the highest intensity (99.2%). The activity of (41)Ar was 2821 kBq and 4% of the expanded uncertainty. The time required for (41)Ar to reach homogeneity was 7 min, and the effectiveness of resuse was 53%. PMID:22516716

  4. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  5. Demonstration of neutron detection utilizing open cell foam and noble gas scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, C. M. Miller, E. C.; Coplan, M.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Yue, A. T.; Kowler, A. L.; Koeth, T.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Clark, Charles W.

    2015-03-02

    We present results demonstrating neutron detection via a closely spaced converter structure coupled to low pressure noble gas scintillation instrumented by a single photo-multiplier tube (PMT). The converter is dispersed throughout the gas volume using a reticulated vitreous carbon foam coated with boron carbide (B{sub 4}C). A calibrated cold neutron beam is used to measure the neutron detection properties, using a thin film of enriched {sup 10}B as a reference standard. Monte Carlo computations of the ion energy deposition are discussed, including treatment of the foam random network. Results from this study indicate that the foam shadows a significant portion of the scintillation light from the PMT. The high scintillation yield of Xe appears to overcome the light loss, facilitating neutron detection and presenting interesting opportunities for neutron detector design.

  6. Fast Plasma Shutdowns By Massive Hydrogen, Noble and Mixed-Gas Injection in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, J. C.; van Zeeland, M. A.; Evans, T. E.; Humphreys, D. A.; Hyatt, A. W.; Parks, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Wu, W.; Hollmann, E. M.; Boedo, J. A.; Izzo, V. A.; James, A. N.; Moyer, R. A.; Rudakov, D. L.; Yu, J. H.; Jernigan, T. C.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Groth, M.

    2008-11-01

    Experiments conducted with hydrogenic, noble and mixed (H2 + Ar and D2 + Ne) gases injected into H-mode plasmas are described. Gas species, quantity, delivery rate and intrinsic and added impurities (mixtures) all affect the disruption mitigation attributes of the resulting fast plasma shutdowns. With sufficient quantity, effective mitigation is obtained for all species. Optimal results for disruption and runaway avalanche mitigation are with 3x10^22 He delivery in ˜2 ms. This yields a favorable combination of moderately-fast current quench, high free-electron densities, ˜2x10^21,m-3, gas assimilation fractions ˜0.3 and avalanche suppression ratios, ne/nRB˜0.1. Favorable scaling of assimilation with increasing quantity is seen for all low-Z gases. The experiments provide validation data for emerging MHD/radiation simulation models and insight about design of injection systems for disruption and avalanche mitigation in ITER.

  7. Pressure disequilibria induced by rapid valve closure in noble gas extraction lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Leah E.; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett

    2015-06-01

    Pressure disequilibria during rapid valve closures can affect calculated molar quantities for a range of gas abundance measurements (e.g., K-Ar geochronology, (U-Th)/He geochronology, noble gas cosmogenic chronology). Modeling indicates this effect in a system with a 10 L reservoir reaches a bias of 1% before 1000 pipette aliquants have been removed from the system, and a bias of 10% before 10,000 aliquants. Herein we explore the causes and effects of this problem, which is the result of volume changes during valve closure. We also present a solution in the form of an electropneumatic pressure regulator that can precisely control valve motion. This solution reduces the effect to ˜0.3% even after 10,000 aliquants have been removed from a 10 L reservoir.

  8. Conbined noble gas and stable isotope constraints on nitrogen gas sources within sedimentary basins. Final report for period 15 March 1996 - 14 March 1999 extended to 14 March 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ballentine, C.J.; Halliday, Alexander N.; Lollar, B. Sherwood

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen is one of the major non-hydrocarbon gases found in natural gas reservoirs. The objective of this work was to combine the information available from both noble gas and stable isotope systematics to understand the origin of nitrogen and related gas sources, transport behavior, and mass balance within natural gas reservoirs and sedimentary basin systems. The goals achieved are summarized under the following headings: Noble gas and stable isotopes in nitrogen-rich natural gases; Noble gases in groundwater; and Characterization of magmatic and crustal noble gas input into basin systems. Lists of publications and presentations are included.

  9. Noble gas-derived insights into carbon cycling into the deep biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood Lollar, B.; Ballentine, C. J.; Lippmann-Pipke, J.; Slater, G. F.; Onstott, T. C.; Lin, L.; Moran, J.; Tille, S.; Moser, D. P.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.

    2009-12-01

    Discovery of chemoautotrophic microbial communities at the mid-ocean ridges launched the exploration of the "deep hot biosphere". Recent advances have demonstrated however that chemoautotrophic communities are not restricted to high temperature hydrothermal settings. The discovery that the terrestrial subsurface too hosts chemoautotrophic ecosystems sustained by the products of water-rock reactions - albeit at lower temperatures and slower rates of reaction - has expanded our view of the extent of the planet that is habitable. Compelling questions remain. What are the ultimate limits to life in the Earth's deep subsurface? What are the underlying controls on microbial metabolic activity and biodiversity? The answers to these questions may provide insight into the evolutionary relationship of deep terrestrial microbial communities to marine sediment-hosted and vent-hosted communities, into the origin of life on Earth, and the potential for life on other planets and moons. At more than 2 km below surface, fracture waters accessed via mines in the tectonically quiescent Precambrian Shields of Canada and South Africa are dominated by radiogenic noble gases and crustal-derived carbon sources. Key uncertainties concerning the deep terrestrial biosphere in these settings include the rates and mechanisms of carbon cycling far from the photosphere, and hence the scale and significance of this remote and exotic reservoir of the global biogeochemical cycle. While carbon geochemistry and stable isotopes, as well as molecular microbiology, have facilitated major advances in identifying the geochemical and microbiological processes involved, this presentation will highlight how coupling these techniques with noble gases constrains the timescales for the deep carbon cycle. In particular, the coupling of noble gas tracers with carbon geochemistry provides the key to recognizing that hydrogeologically isolated fracture networks of geochemically distinct groundwaters exert a major

  10. The contribution of hydrothermally altered ocean crust to the mantle halogen and noble gas cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavrit, Déborah; Burgess, Ray; Sumino, Hirochika; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Droop, Giles; Shimizu, Aya; Ballentine, Chris J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that seawater-derived noble gases and halogens are recycled into the deep mantle by the subduction of oceanic crust. To understand the processes controlling the availability of halogens and noble gases for subduction, we determined the noble gas elemental and isotopic ratios and halogen (Cl, Br, I) concentrations in 28 igneous samples from the altered oceanic crust (AOC) from 5 ODP sites in the Eastern and Western Pacific Ocean. Crushing followed by heating experiments enabled determination of noble gases and halogens in fluid inclusions and mineral phases respectively. Except for He and Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopic ratios were all air-like suggesting that primary MORB signatures have been completely overprinted by air and/or seawater interaction. In contrast, 3He/4He ratios obtained by crushing indicate that a mantle helium component is still preserved, and 40Ar/36Ar values are affected by radiogenic decay in the mineral phases. The 130Xe/36Ar and 84Kr/36Ar ratios are respectively up to 15 times and 5 times higher than those of seawater and the highest ratios are found in samples affected by low temperature alteration (shallower than 800-900 m sub-basement). We consider three possible processes: (i) adsorption onto the clays present in the samples; (ii) fluid inclusions with a marine pore fluid composition; and (iii) fractionation of seawater through phase separation caused by boiling. Ninety percent of the Cl, Br and I were released during the heating experiments, showing that halogens are dominantly held in mineral phases prior to subduction. I/Cl ratios vary by 4 orders of magnitude, from 3 × 10-6 to 2 × 10-2. The mean Br/Cl ratio is 30% lower than in MORB and seawater. I/Cl ratios lower than MORB values are attributed to Cl-rich amphibole formation caused by hydrothermal alteration at depths greater than 800-900 m sub-basement together with different extents of I loss during low and high temperature alteration. At shallower depths, I

  11. Evaluating Gas-Phase Transport And Detection Of Noble Gas Signals From Underground Nuclear Explosions Using Chemical Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, C. R.; Hunter, S. L.; Sun, Y.; Wagoner, J. L.; Ruddle, D.; Anderson, G.; Felske, D.; Myers, K.; Zucca, J. J.; Emer, D. F.; Townsend, M.; Drellack, S.; Chipman, V.; Snelson, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) involved detonating 1 kiloton of chemical explosive in a subsurface cavity which also contained bottles of tracer gases (ref 1). That experiment provided an improved understanding of transport processes relevant to the detection of noble gas signals at the surface emanating from a clandestine underground nuclear explosion (UNE). As an alternative to performing large chemical detonations to simulate gas transport from UNEs, we have developed a test bed for subsurface gas transport, sampling and detection studies using a former UNE cavity. The test bed site allows for the opportunity to evaluate pathways to the surface created by the UNE as well as possible transport mechanisms including barometric pumping and cavity pressurization (ref 2). With the test bed we have monitored long-term chemical tracers as well as newly injected tracers. In order to perform high temporal resolution tracer gas monitoring, we have also developed a Subsurface Gas Smart Sampler (SGSS) which has application during an actual On Site Inspection (OSI) and is available for deployment in OSI field exercises planned for 2014. Deployment of five SGSS at the remote test bed has provided unparalleled detail concerning relationships involving tracer gas transport to the surface, barometric fluctuations and temporal variations in the natural radon concentration. We anticipate that the results of our tracer experiments will continue to support the development of improved noble gas detection technology for both OSI and International Monitoring System applications. 1. C.R. Carrigan et al., 1996, Nature, 382, p. 528. 2. Y. Sun and C.R. Carrigan, 2012, Pure Appl. Geophys., DOI 10.1007/s00024-012-0514-4.

  12. Hyperpolarized noble gas magnetic resonance imaging of the animal lung: Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santyr, Giles E.; Lam, Wilfred W.; Parra-Robles, Juan M.; Taves, Timothy M.; Ouriadov, Alexei V.

    2009-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas (HNG) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very promising noninvasive tool for the investigation of animal models of lung disease, particularly to follow longitudinal changes in lung function and anatomy without the accumulated radiation dose associated with x rays. The two most common noble gases for this purpose are H3e (helium 3) and X129e (xenon 129), the latter providing a cost-effective approach for clinical applications. Hyperpolarization is typically achieved using spin-exchange optical pumping techniques resulting in ˜10 000-fold improvement in available magnetization compared to conventional Boltzmann polarizations. This substantial increase in polarization allows high spatial resolution (<1 mm) single-slice images of the lung to be obtained with excellent temporal resolution (<1 s). Complete three-dimensional images of the lungs with 1 mm slice thickness can be obtained within reasonable breath-hold intervals (<20 s). This article provides an overview of the current methods used in HNG MR imaging with an emphasis on ventilation studies in animals. Special MR hardware and software considerations are described in order to use the strong but nonrecoverable magnetization as efficiently as possible and avoid depolarization primarily by molecular oxygen. Several applications of HNG MR imaging are presented, including measurement of gross lung anatomy (e.g., airway diameters), microscopic anatomy (e.g., apparent diffusion coefficient), and a variety of functional parameters including dynamic ventilation, alveolar oxygen partial pressure, and xenon diffusing capacity.

  13. Dating very old pore waters in impermeable rocks by noble gas isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Osenbrueck, K.; Lippmann, J.; Sonntag, C.

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 4}He, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 136}Xe content dissolved in the pore water of sedimentary rock samples was measured on samples from borehole cores near the repository for nuclear waste in Morsleben, Germany. Due to the very low permeabilities of the rock formations, conventional groundwater sampling was almost impossible. Hence, the authors developed a new sampling method for noble gases in the pore water of freshly drilled rock cores. This method provides vertical noble gas profiles in high depth resolution, even in impermeable rocks. By application of the new technique quantitative age information of groundwater and pore water have been derived. The authors find palaeowaters from the last glaciation depleted in {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O with a {sup 4}He age of about 55 kyr. The high saline pore solutions below are at least 6 Mio years old. This has been concluded from the profiles of radiogenic {sup 4}He and {sup 40}Ar close to diffusion in steady-state and from xenon isotopes produced by spontaneous fission of {sup 238}U in the rocks. A {sup 4}He flux of 2 {center_dot} 10{sup {minus}7} cc STP/cm{sup 2} yr is derived from the profile, which is due to local {sup 4}He production within the investigated sediments.

  14. Optimizing detection of noble gas emission at a former UNE site: sample strategy, collection, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkham, R.; Olsen, K.; Hayes, J. C.; Emer, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests may be first detected by seismic or air samplers operated by the CTBTO (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization). After initial detection of a suspicious event, member nations may call for an On-Site Inspection (OSI) that in part, will sample for localized releases of radioactive noble gases and particles. Although much of the commercially available equipment and methods used for surface and subsurface environmental sampling of gases can be used for an OSI scenario, on-site sampling conditions, required sampling volumes and establishment of background concentrations of noble gases require development of specialized methodologies. To facilitate development of sampling equipment and methodologies that address OSI sampling volume and detection objectives, and to collect information required for model development, a field test site was created at a former underground nuclear explosion site located in welded volcanic tuff. A mixture of SF-6, Xe127 and Ar37 was metered into 4400 m3 of air as it was injected into the top region of the UNE cavity. These tracers were expected to move towards the surface primarily in response to barometric pumping or through delayed cavity pressurization (accelerated transport to minimize source decay time). Sampling approaches compared during the field exercise included sampling at the soil surface, inside surface fractures, and at soil vapor extraction points at depths down to 2 m. Effectiveness of various sampling approaches and the results of tracer gas measurements will be presented.

  15. NG09 And CTBT On-Site Inspection Noble Gas Sampling and Analysis Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Tanaka, Junichi

    2010-05-01

    A provision of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) allows on-site inspections (OSIs) of suspect nuclear sites to determine if the occurrence of a detected event is nuclear in origin. For an underground nuclear explosion (UNE), the potential success of an OSI depends significantly on the containment scenario of the alleged event as well as the application of air and soil-gas radionuclide sampling techniques in a manner that takes into account both the suspect site geology and the gas transport physics. UNE scenarios may be broadly divided into categories involving the level of containment. The simplest to detect is a UNE that vents a significant portion of its radionuclide inventory and is readily detectable at distance by the International Monitoring System (IMS). The most well contained subsurface events will only be detectable during an OSI. In such cases, 37 Ar and radioactive xenon cavity gases may reach the surface through either "micro-seepage" or the barometric pumping process and only the careful siting of sampling locations, timing of sampling and application of the most site-appropriate atmospheric and soil-gas capturing methods will result in a confirmatory signal. The OSI noble gas field tests NG09 was recently held in Stupava, Slovakia to consider, in addition to other field sampling and analysis techniques, drilling and subsurface noble gas extraction methods that might be applied during an OSI. One of the experiments focused on challenges to soil-gas sampling near the soil-atmosphere interface. During withdrawal of soil gas from shallow, subsurface sample points, atmospheric dilution of the sample and the potential for introduction of unwanted atmospheric gases were considered. Tests were designed to evaluate surface infiltration and the ability of inflatable well-packers to seal out atmospheric gases during sample acquisition. We discuss these tests along with some model-based predictions regarding infiltration under different near

  16. Noble gas and hydrocarbon tracers in multiphase unconventional hydrocarbon systems: Toward integrated advanced reservoir simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T.; Moortgat, J.; Poreda, R. J.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional energy resources has increased dramatically in the last decade, total unconventional oil and gas recovery from black shales is still less than 25% and 9% of the totals in place, respectively. Further, the majority of increased hydrocarbon production results from increasing the lengths of laterals, the number of hydraulic fracturing stages, and the volume of consumptive water usage. These strategies all reduce the economic efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction. The poor recovery statistics result from an insufficient understanding of some of the key physical processes in complex, organic-rich, low porosity formations (e.g., phase behavior, fluid-rock interactions, and flow mechanisms at nano-scale confinement and the role of natural fractures and faults as conduits for flow). Noble gases and other hydrocarbon tracers are capably of recording subsurface fluid-rock interactions on a variety of geological scales (micro-, meso-, to macro-scale) and provide analogs for the movement of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. As such geochemical data enrich the input for the numerical modeling of multi-phase (e.g., oil, gas, and brine) fluid flow in highly heterogeneous, low permeability formations Herein we will present a combination of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe abundances and isotope ratios) and molecular and isotopic hydrocarbon data from a geographically and geologically diverse set of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs in North America. Specifically, we will include data from the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Eagle Ford, formations and the Illinois basin. Our presentation will include geochemical and geological interpretation and our perspective on the first steps toward building an advanced reservoir simulator for tracer transport in multicomponent multiphase compositional flow (presented separately, in Moortgat et al., 2015).

  17. Numerical models, geochemistry and the zero-paradox noble-gas mantle.

    PubMed

    Ballentine, Chris J; Van Keken, Peter E; Porcelli, Don; Hauri, Erik H

    2002-11-15

    Numerical models of whole-mantle convection demonstrate that degassing of the mantle is an inefficient process, resulting in ca. 50% of the (40)Ar being degassed from the mantle system. In this sense the numerical simulations are consistent with the (40)Ar mass balance between the atmosphere and mantle reservoir. These models, however, are unable to preserve the large-scale heterogeneity predicted by models invoking geochemical layering of the mantle system. We show that the three most important noble-gas constraints on the geochemically layered mantle are entirely dependent on the (3)He concentration of the convecting mantle derived from the (3)He flux into the oceans and the average ocean-crust generation rate. A factor of 3.5 increase in the convecting-mantle noble-gas concentration removes all requirements for: a (3)He flux into the upper mantle from a deeper high (3)He source; a boundary in the mantle capable of separating heat from helium; and a substantial deep-mantle reservoir to contain a hidden (40)Ar rich reservoir. We call this model concentration for the convecting mantle the 'zero-paradox' concentration. The time-integrated flux of (3)He into the oceans is a robust observation, but only representative of the ocean-floor activity over the last 1000 years. In contrast, ocean-floor generation occurs over tens of millions of years. We argue that combining these two observations to obtain the (3)He concentration of the mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is unsound. Other indicators of mantle (3)He concentration suggest that the real value may be at least a factor of two higher. As the zero-paradox concentration is approached, the noble-gas requirement for mantle layering is removed. We further consider the role that recycled material plays in ocean-island-basalt generation and show that a source with high (3)He and (3)He/(4)He must exist within the mantle. Nevertheless, only a small amount of this material is required to generate both the observed ocean

  18. Noble gas as tracers for CO2 deep input in petroleum reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Magali; Stuart, Finlay; Gilfillan, Stuart; Montel, François; Masini, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    The sub-salt hydrocarbon reservoirs in the deep offshore part of the Atlantic Ocean passive margins are a new key target for frontier oil and gas exploration. Type I source rocks locally rich in TOC (Total Organic Carbon) combined with an important secondary connected porosity of carbonate reservoirs overlain by an impermeable salt layer gives rise to reservoirs with high petroleum potential. However, some target structures have been found to be mainly filled with CO2 rich fluids. δ13C of the CO2 is generally between -9 and -4 permil, compatible with a deep source (metamorphic or mantle). Understanding the origin of the CO2 and the relative timing of its input into reservoir layers in regard to the geodynamic context appears to be a key issue for CO2 risk evaluation. The inertness and ubiquity of noble gases in crustal fluids make them powerful tools to trace the origin and migration of mixed fluids (Ballentine and Burnard 2002). The isotopic signature of He, Ne and Ar and the elemental pattern (He to Xe) of reservoir fluid from pressurized bottom hole samples provide an insight into fluid source influences at each reservoir depth. Three main end-members can be mixed into reservoir fluids (e.g. Gilfillan et al., 2008): atmospheric signature due to aquifer recharge, radiogenic component from organic fluid ± metamorphic influence, and mantle input. Their relative fractionation provides insights into the nature of fluid transport (Burnard et al., 2012)and its relative migration timing. In the studied offshore passive margin reservoirs, from both sides of South Atlantic margin, a strong MORB-like magmatic CO2 influence is clear. Hence, CO2 charge must have occurred during or after lithospheric break-up. CO2 charge(s) history appears to be complex, and in some cases requires several inputs to generate the observed noble gas pattern. Combining the knowledge obtained from noble gas (origin, relative timing, number of charges) with organic geochemical and thermodynamic

  19. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the

  20. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  1. Infrared and density functional theory studies of formic acid hydrate clusters in noble gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Fumiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of formic acid hydrate clusters (HCOOH)m(H2O)n have been measured in noble gas matrices (Ar and Kr). The concentration dependence of the spectra and the comparison with a previous experimental study on HCOOH(H2O) and HCOOH(H2O)2 [Geoge et al., Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 60 (2004) 3225] led to the identification of large clusters. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-DCP/6-31+G(2d,2p) level were carried out to determine the anharmonic vibrational properties of the clusters, enabling a consistent assignment of the observed vibrational peaks to specific clusters.

  2. Detection of a Noble Gas Molecular Ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Owen, P. J.; Cernicharo, J.; Gomez, H. L.; Ivison, R. J.; Krause, O.; Lim, T. L.; Matsuura, M.; Miller, S.; Olofsson, G.; Polehampton, E. T.

    2013-12-01

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of 36ArH+ at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed 36ArH+ emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  3. Detection of a noble gas molecular ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula.

    PubMed

    Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Owen, P J; Cernicharo, J; Gomez, H L; Ivison, R J; Krause, O; Lim, T L; Matsuura, M; Miller, S; Olofsson, G; Polehampton, E T

    2013-12-13

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of (36)ArH(+) at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed (36)ArH(+) emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed. PMID:24337290

  4. Fiber optic applications for laser polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, W.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1997-10-01

    For the past two years, the laser polarized target group at Argonne has been used multi-mode fiber optic patch cords for a variety of applications. In this paper, the authors describe the design for transporting high power laser beams with optical fibers currently in use at IUCF.

  5. Reservoir Characterization using geostatistical and numerical modeling in GIS with noble gas geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, D. A.; Swift, J. N.; Tan, S.; Darrah, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The integration of precise geochemical analyses with quantitative engineering modeling into an interactive GIS system allows for a sophisticated and efficient method of reservoir engineering and characterization. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is utilized as an advanced technique for oil field reservoir analysis by combining field engineering and geological/geochemical spatial datasets with the available systematic modeling and mapping methods to integrate the information into a spatially correlated first-hand approach in defining surface and subsurface characteristics. Three key methods of analysis include: 1) Geostatistical modeling to create a static and volumetric 3-dimensional representation of the geological body, 2) Numerical modeling to develop a dynamic and interactive 2-dimensional model of fluid flow across the reservoir and 3) Noble gas geochemistry to further define the physical conditions, components and history of the geologic system. Results thus far include using engineering algorithms for interpolating electrical well log properties across the field (spontaneous potential, resistivity) yielding a highly accurate and high-resolution 3D model of rock properties. Results so far also include using numerical finite difference methods (crank-nicholson) to solve for equations describing the distribution of pressure across field yielding a 2D simulation model of fluid flow across reservoir. Ongoing noble gas geochemistry results will also include determination of the source, thermal maturity and the extent/style of fluid migration (connectivity, continuity and directionality). Future work will include developing an inverse engineering algorithm to model for permeability, porosity and water saturation.This combination of new and efficient technological and analytical capabilities is geared to provide a better understanding of the field geology and hydrocarbon dynamics system with applications to determine the presence of hydrocarbon pay zones (or

  6. Assessing Compositional Variability and Migration of Natural Gas in the Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin Using Noble Gas Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Ellis, B. R.; Hall, C. M.; Lohmann, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Antrim Shale was one of the first economic shale gas plays in the U.S. and has been actively produced since the 1980's. While previous studies suggest co-produced water in the Antrim is a mixture of brine from deeper formations and freshwater recharge, the extent of water-gas interactions has yet to be determined. The extent and source of thermogenic methane in the Antrim Shale are also under debate. This study uses stable noble gases' (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) isotopic ratios and their volume fractions from the Antrim Shale gases to assess compositional variability and vertical fluid migration, in addition to distinguishing between the presence of thermogenic versus biogenic methane. R/Ra values of Antrim Shale gases (where R and Ra are the measured and atmospheric 3He/4He ratios, respectively) vary from 0.01 to 0.34 suggesting dominant crustal 4He in addition to minor mantle and atmospheric He. Elevated 20Ne/22Ne ratios (up to 10.4) point to mantle Ne. Similarly crustal 21Ne*, 40Ar* and 136Xe* are also suggested. High variability of noble gas signatures in the Antrim Shale are observed, which are mainly due to variable noble gas input from deep brines and, to a smaller extent, variable in-situ production in the Antrim Shale. Estimated 4He ages considering external 4He flux for Antrim water match well with timings of three major glaciation periods (Wisconsin, Illinoian and Kansan glaciations) in the Michigan Basin, suggesting that all our Antrim samples were more or less influenced by glaciation recharge. Consistency in measured and predicted 40Ar/36Ar assuming Ar release temperatures ≥ 250°C supports a thermogenic origin for the majority of the methane in our Antrim Shale gas samples. Thermogenic methane is likely to originate at greater depth, either from deeper portions of the Antrim Shale in the central Michigan Basin or from deeper formations underlying the Antrim Shale, as the thermal maturity of the Antrim Shale in our study area is low.

  7. Mineralogical and Noble Gas Evidence for an ET Impact at the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T. H.; Poreda, R. J.; Kennett, J. P.; Becker, L.; West, A.; Kennett, D. J.; Elrandson, J. M.

    2007-05-01

    We report mineralogical and noble gas evidence for an ET impact associated with the Younger Dryas (YD) event and the mass extinction of various megafauna throughout the Americas approximately 12,900 years ago. We examined numerous well established, 14C dated Clovis sites across the US including detailed sediment profile analyses at Daisy Cave, CA (DC), Murray Springs, AZ (MS), Topper, SC, and Blackwater Draw, NM (BWD). He, Ne, and Ar analysis of magnetic separates, bulk sediments, HF-acid treated residue, and fullerenes coupled with a detailed mineralogical and compositional analysis of magnetic separates by SEM suggest a marked increase in the accretion of extraterrestrial debris in sediments at the YD boundary layer. A preliminary characterization of the magnetic separates consistently observed across numerous sites indicates an extremely high abundance of relatively unoxidized, trace metal rich metallic grains with extremely unusual compositions (e.g. Pt (5-98%), Sn (25-28%) , Ni (1-11%), and Cu (12-90%). These compositions are not easily explained by ordinary terrestrial processes. A few examples include the YD layer at DC which contains numerous metallic grains including Fe-Ni, Cu-Ni, Fe-Sn-Ni, and Pt grains. Metallic iron grains are observed at BWD and Topper, while the Topper site also contains iron spherules, Fe-Ni metallic grains, and Fe-Ni oxides. At this point there is no evidence for a significant concentration of iron spherules, Fe-Ni oxides nor unusual metallic grains away from the proposed impact layer. The noble gas composition and isotopic ratios of fullerenes located at the YD layers contain trapped He with ET isotopic signatures (0.3-3.5 ncc/g 3He and 3He/4He 30- 220 Ra) while Argon ratios (40Ar/36Ar= 230-255) reflect a mixture of planetary and air components. Bulk sediments were treated with HF acid to remove silicates, leaving a carbonaceous residue. Acid treated residues from two boundary layers contained up to 5 ncc/g 3He and 3He/4He from 15

  8. Mineralogical and Noble Gas Evidence for an ET Impact at the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T. H.; Poreda, R. J.; Kennett, J. P.; Becker, L.; West, A.; Kennett, D. J.; Erlandson, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    We report mineralogical and noble gas evidence for an ET impact associated with the Younger Dryas (YD) event and the mass extinction of various megafauna throughout the Americas approximately 12,900 years ago. We examined numerous well established, 14C dated Clovis sites across the US including detailed sediment profile analyses at Daisy Cave, CA (DC), Murray Springs, AZ (MS), Topper, SC, and Blackwater Draw, NM (BWD). He, Ne, and Ar analysis of magnetic separates, bulk sediments, HF-acid treated residue, and fullerenes coupled with a detailed mineralogical and compositional analysis of magnetic separates by SEM suggest a marked increase in the accretion of extraterrestrial debris in sediments at the YD boundary layer. A preliminary characterization of the magnetic separates consistently observed across numerous sites indicates an extremely high abundance of relatively unoxidized, trace metal rich metallic grains with extremely unusual compositions (e.g. Pt (5-98%), Sn (25-28%) , Ni (1-11%), and Cu (12-90%). These compositions are not easily explained by ordinary terrestrial processes. A few examples include the YD layer at DC which contains numerous metallic grains including Fe-Ni, Cu-Ni, Fe-Sn-Ni, and Pt grains. Metallic iron grains are observed at BWD and Topper, while the Topper site also contains iron spherules, Fe-Ni metallic grains, and Fe-Ni oxides. At this point there is no evidence for a significant concentration of iron spherules, Fe-Ni oxides nor unusual metallic grains away from the proposed impact layer. The noble gas composition and isotopic ratios of fullerenes located at the YD layers contain trapped He with ET isotopic signatures (0.3-3.5 ncc/g 3He and 3He/4He 30- 220 Ra) while Argon ratios (40Ar/^{36}Ar= 230-255) reflect a mixture of planetary and air components. Bulk sediments were treated with HF acid to remove silicates, leaving a carbonaceous residue. Acid treated residues from two boundary layers contained up to 5 ncc/g 3He and 3He/4He from

  9. Methanesulfonyl Azide: Molecular Structure and Photolysis in Solid Noble Gas Matrices.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guohai; Li, Dingqing; Wu, Zhuang; Li, Hongmin; Bernhardt, Eduard; Zeng, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-21

    The parent sulfonyl azide CH3SO2N3 has been characterized in a neat form by IR (gas, matrix-isolation) and Raman (solid) spectroscopy, and its structure has been established by X-ray crystallography. In both gas phase and solid state, the azide exhibits single conformation with the azido ligand being synperiplanar to one of the two S═O groups. In the crystal molecules of CH3SO2N3 are interconnected through three-dimensional O···H-C-H···O hydrogen bonds. Upon an ArF laser (193 nm) photolysis, the azide in solid noble gas matrices splits off N2 and yields the sulfonyl nitrene CH3SO2N in the triplet ground state. Subsequent photolysis with UV light (266 nm) causes the transformation from the nitrene to the pseudo-Curtius rearrangement product CH3NSO2. The identification of the photolysis intermediates by matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy is supported by quantum chemical calculations with DFT methods. PMID:27383463

  10. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Thomas H; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Warner, Nathaniel R; Poreda, Robert J

    2014-09-30

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ(13)C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., (4)He, (20)Ne, (36)Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, (4)He) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the proportions of atmospheric gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, (36)Ar) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) relative to background groundwater. Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25225410

  11. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales

    PubMed Central

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ13C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., 4He, 20Ne, 36Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, 4He) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) and the proportions of atmospheric gases (air-saturated water; e.g., N2, 36Ar) were significantly lower (P < 0.01) relative to background groundwater. Noble gas isotope and hydrocarbon data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25225410

  12. A search for noble-gas evidence for presolar oxide grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Roy S.; Srinivasan, B.

    1993-01-01

    Early results from an ongoing search for isotopically distinctive noble gases as evidence for presolar oxide grains are presented. With some qualifications, we do not see such evidence in spinel rich acid residue fractions from the Allende meteorite. We remain hopeful that less abundant mineral separates may yet be fruitful. Presolar grains, micro-diamonds, silicon carbide, and graphite, were found in primitive meteorites. While the abundances of these three refractory C rich grains are low, a few hundred ppm, a few ppm, & less than 1 ppm, respectively in primitive meteorites, they are tagged with high concentrations of isotopically anomalous noble gas components, Xe-HL, KR & Xe-s and Ne-E(H), and Ne-E(L). These tags have served as tracers and allowed the development of techniques for their purification and eventual identification. One might expect similar amounts of refractory presolar oxides to have survived, but so far only three cases exist for their identification. The first two cases are individual corundum oxide grains. Huss et al. found one such grain from an Orgueil residue with an Al-26/Al-27 ratio of 8.9 x 10(exp -5), about 18 times higher than the canonical initial solar system value. The second corundum grain, from Murchison, was found by Nittler et al. to have unusual oxygen in addition to a similar Al-26/Al-27 ratio of 8.7 x 10(exp -4). The oxygen was depleted in O-18 by 22 percent and enriched in O-17 by a factor of 2. The third case is a measurement by Zinner et al. on an aggregate of fine grained spinels from a Murray residue with an O-17 enrichment and a possible O-18 depletion similar to the second grain, but much subdued. This is consistent with a few such presolar grains diluted by a much larger population of isotopically normal corundum grains and an even larger number of normal spinel grains.

  13. Mineralogy and noble gas isotopes of micrometeorites collected from Antarctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tsujimoto, Shin-ichi; Tobimatsu, Yu; Nakamura, Tomoki; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Itoh, Shoichi; Nagahara, Hiroko; Tachibana, Shogo; Terada, Kentaro; Yabuta, Hikaru

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated seven micrometeorites (MMs) from Antarctic snow collected in 2003 and 2010 by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation, and noble-gas isotope analysis. Isotopic ratios of He and Ne indicate that the noble gases in these MMs are mostly of solar wind (SW). Based on the release patterns of SW 4He, which should reflect the degree of heating during atmospheric entry, the seven MMs were classified into three types including two least heated, three moderately heated, and two severely heated MMs. The heating degrees are well correlated to their mineralogical features determined by TEM observation. One of the least heated MMs is composed of phyllosilicates, whereas the other consists of anhydrous minerals within which solar flare tracks were observed. The two severely heated MMs show clear evidence of atmospheric heating such as partial melt of the uppermost surface layer in one and abundant patches of dendritic magnetite and Si-rich glass within an olivine grain in the other. It is noteworthy that a moderately heated MM composed of a single crystal of olivine has a 3He/4He ratio of 8.44 × 10-4, which is higher than the SW value of 4.64 × 10-4, but does not show a cosmogenic 21Ne signature such as 20Ne/21Ne/22Ne = 12.83/0.0284/1. The isotopic compositions of He and Ne in this sample cannot be explained by mixing of a galactic cosmic ray (GCR)-produced component and SW gases. The high 3He/4He ratio without cosmogenic 21Ne signature likely indicates the presence of a 3He-enriched component derived from solar energetic particles.

  14. The role of soil air composition for noble gas tracer applications in tropical groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Simon; Jenner, Florian; Aeschbach, Werner; Weissbach, Therese; Peregovich, Bernhard; Machado, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved noble gases (NGs) in groundwater provide a well-established tool for paleo temperature reconstruction. However, reliable noble gas temperature (NGT) determination needs appropriate assumptions or rather an exact knowledge of soil air composition. Deviations of soil air NG partial pressures from atmospheric values have already been found in mid latitudes during summer time as a consequence of subsurface oxygen depletion. This effect depends on ambient temperature and humidity and is thus expected to be especially strong in humid tropical soils, which was not investigated so far. We therefore studied NGs in soil air and shallow groundwater near Santarém (Pará, Brazil) at the end of the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. Soil air data confirms a correlation between NG partial pressures, the sum value of O2+CO2 and soil moisture contents. During the rainy season, we find significant NG enhancements in soil air by up to 7% with respect to the atmosphere. This is twice as much as observed during the dry season. Groundwater samples show neon excess values between 15% and 120%. Nearly all wells show no seasonal variations of excess air, even though the local river level seasonally fluctuates by about 8 m. Assuming atmospheric NG contents in soil air, fitted NGTs underestimate the measured groundwater temperature by about 1-2° C. However, including enhanced soil air NG contents as observed during the rainy season, resulting NGTs are in good agreement with local groundwater temperatures. Our presented data allows for a better understanding of subsurface NG variations. This is essential with regard to NG tracer applications in humid tropical areas, for which reliable paleoclimate data is of major importance for modern climate research.

  15. U.S. Geological Survey Noble Gas Laboratory’s standard operating procedures for the measurement of dissolved gas in water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    This report addresses the standard operating procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Noble Gas Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, U.S.A., for the measurement of dissolved gases (methane, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide) and noble gas isotopes (helium-3, helium-4, neon-20, neon-21, neon-22, argon-36, argon-38, argon-40, kryton-84, krypton-86, xenon-103, and xenon-132) dissolved in water. A synopsis of the instrumentation used, procedures followed, calibration practices, standards used, and a quality assurance and quality control program is presented. The report outlines the day-to-day operation of the Residual Gas Analyzer Model 200, Mass Analyzer Products Model 215–50, and ultralow vacuum extraction line along with the sample handling procedures, noble gas extraction and purification, instrument measurement procedures, instrumental data acquisition, and calculations for the conversion of raw data from the mass spectrometer into noble gas concentrations per unit mass of water analyzed. Techniques for the preparation of artificial dissolved gas standards are detailed and coupled to a quality assurance and quality control program to present the accuracy of the procedures used in the laboratory.

  16. Structural Stability and Performance of Noble Metal-Free SnO2-Based Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tricoli, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The structural stability of pure SnO2 nanoparticles and highly sensitive SnO2-SiO2 nanocomposites (0–15 SiO2 wt%) has been investigated for conditions relevant to their utilization as chemoresistive gas sensors. Thermal stabilization by SiO2 co-synthesis has been investigated at up to 600 °C determining regimes of crystal size stability as a function of SiO2-content. For operation up to 400 °C, thermally stable crystal sizes of ca. 24 and 11 nm were identified for SnO2 nanoparticles and 1.4 wt% SnO2-SiO2 nanocomposites, respectively. The effect of crystal growth during operation (TO = 320 °C) on the sensor response to ethanol has been reported, revealing possible long-term destabilization mechanisms. In particular, crystal growth and sintering-neck formation were discussed with respect to their potential to change the sensor response and calibration. Furthermore, the effect of SiO2 cosynthesis on the cross-sensitivity to humidity of these noble metal-free SnO2-based gas sensors was assessed. PMID:25585712

  17. Cross-Calibration of Secondary Electron Multiplier in Noble Gas Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santato, Alessandro; Hamilton, Doug; Deerberg, Michael; Wijbrans, Jan; Kuiper, Klaudia; Bouman, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    The latest generation of multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometers has decisively improved the precision in isotopic ratio analysis [1, 2] and helped the scientific community to address new questions [3]. Measuring numerous isotopes simultaneously has two significant advantages: firstly, any fluctuations in signal intensity have no effect on the isotope ratio and secondly, the analysis time is reduced. This particular point becomes very important in static vacuum mass spectrometry where during the analysis, the signal intensity decays and at the same time the background increases. However, when multi-collector analysis is utilized, it is necessary to pay special attention to the cross calibration of the detectors. This is a key point in order to have accurate and reproducible isotopic ratios. In isotope ratio mass spectrometry, with regard to the type of detector (i.e. Faraday or Secondary Electron Multiplier, SEM), analytical technique (TIMS, MC-ICP-MS or IRMS) and isotope system of interest, several techniques are currently applied to cross-calibrate the detectors. Specifically, the gain of the Faraday cups is generally stable and only the associated amplifier must be calibrated. For example, on the Thermo Scientific instrument control systems, the 1011 and 1012 ohm amplifiers can easily be calibrated through a fully software controlled procedure by inputting a constant electric signal to each amplifier sequentially [4]. On the other hand, the yield of the SEMs can drift up to 0.2% / hour and other techniques such as peak hopping, standard-sample bracketing and multi-dynamic measurement must be used. Peak hopping allows the detectors to be calibrated by measuring an ion beam of constant intensity across the detectors whereas standard-sample bracketing corrects the drift of the detectors through the analysis of a reference standard of a known isotopic ratio. If at least one isotopic pair of the sample is known, multi-dynamic measurement can be used; in this

  18. Indigenous nitrogen in the Moon: Constraints from coupled nitrogen-noble gas analyses of mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füri, Evelyn; Barry, Peter H.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Marty, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen and noble gas (Ne-Ar) abundances and isotope ratios, determined by step-wise CO2 laser-extraction, static-mass spectrometry analysis, are reported for bulk fragments and mineral separates of ten lunar mare basalts (10020, 10057, 12008, 14053, 15555, 70255, 71557, 71576, 74255, 74275), one highland breccia (14321), and one ferroan anorthosite (15414). The mare basalt sub-samples 10057,183 and 71576,12 contain a large amount of solar noble gases, whereas neon and argon in all other samples are purely cosmogenic, as shown by their 21Ne/22Ne ratios of ≈0.85 and 36Ar/38Ar ratios of ≈0.65. The solar-gas-free basalts contain a two-component mixture of cosmogenic 15N and indigenous nitrogen (<0.5 ppm). Mare basalt 74255 and the olivine fraction of 15555,876 record the smallest proportion of 15Ncosm; therefore, their δ15 N values of -0.2 to + 26.7 ‰ (observed at the low-temperature steps) are thought to well represent the isotopic composition of indigenous lunar nitrogen. However, δ15 N values ≤ - 30 ‰ are found in several basalts, overlapping with the isotopic signature of Earth's primordial mantle or an enstatite chondrite-like impactor. While the lowest δ15 N values allow for nitrogen trapped in the Moon's interior to be inherited from the proto-Earth and/or the impactor, the more 15N-enriched compositions require that carbonaceous chondrites provided nitrogen to the lunar magma ocean prior to the solidification of the crust. Since nitrogen can efficiently be incorporated into mafic minerals (olivine, pyroxene) under oxygen fugacities close to or below the iron-wustite buffer (Li et al., 2013), the mare basalt source region is likely characterized by a high nitrogen storage capacity. In contrast, anorthosite 15414 shows no traces of indigenous nitrogen, suggesting that nitrogen was not efficiently incorporated into the lunar crust during magma ocean differentiation.

  19. Noble gas and carbon isotopic evidence for CO2-driven silicate dissolution in a recent natural CO2 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubacq, Benoît; Bickle, Mike J.; Wigley, Max; Kampman, Niko; Ballentine, Chris J.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    Secure storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological reservoirs requires predicting gas-water-rock interactions over millennial timescales. Noble gases and carbon isotope measurements can be used to shed light on the nature of competing dissolution-precipitation processes over different timescales, from the fast dissolution of gaseous CO2 in groundwater to more sluggish reactions involving dissolution and precipitation of newly formed minerals in the reservoir. Here we study a compilation of gas analyses including noble gases and δ13C of CO2 from nine different natural CO2 reservoirs. Amongst these reservoirs, the Bravo Dome CO2 field (New Mexico, USA) shows distinct geochemical trends which are explained by degassing of noble gases from groundwater altering the composition of the gas phase. This groundwater degassing is synchronous with the dissolution of CO2 in groundwater. Progressive creation of alkalinity via CO2-promoted mineral dissolution is required to explain the observed positive correlation between CO2/3He and δ13C of the gas phase, a unique feature of Bravo Dome. The differences between Bravo Dome and other natural CO2 reservoirs are likely explained by the more recent filling of Bravo Dome, reflecting CO2-water-rock interactions over thousands of years rather than over millions of years in older reservoirs.

  20. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  1. USGS-NoGaDat - A global dataset of noble gas concentrations and their isotopic ratios in volcanic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abedini, Atosa A.; Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.

    2006-01-01

    The database (Version 1.0) is a MS-Excel file that contains close to 5,000 entries of published information on noble gas concentrations and isotopic ratios from volcanic systems in Mid-Ocean ridges, ocean islands, seamounts, and oceanic and continental arcs (location map). Where they were available we also included the isotopic ratios of strontium, neodymium, and carbon. The database is sub-divided both into material sampled (e.g., volcanic glass, different minerals, fumarole, spring), and into different tectonic settings (MOR, ocean islands, volcanic arcs). Included is also a reference list in MS-Word and pdf from which the data was derived. The database extends previous compilations by Ozima (1994), Farley and Neroda (1998), and Graham (2002). The extended database allows scientists to test competing hypotheses, and it provides a framework for analysis of noble gas data during periods of volcanic unrest.

  2. The degassing history of the Earth: Noble gas studies of Archaean cherts and zero age glassy submarine basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, R.; Hogan, L.

    1985-01-01

    Recent noble gas studies suggests the Earth's atmosphere outgassed from the Earth's upper mantle synchronous with sea floor spreading, ocean ridge hydrothermal activity and the formation of continents by partial melting in subduction zones. The evidence for formation of the atmosphere by outgassing of the mantle is the presence of radionuclides H3.-4, Ar-040 and 136 Xe-136 in the atmosphere that were produced from K-40, U and Th in the mantle. How these radionuclides were formed is reviewed.

  3. Communication: Nuclear quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in noble gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio

    2013-11-14

    New, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic and imaging methods may be developed by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic effects. A first-principles electronic structure formulation of nuclear electric quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect (NQCME) is presented for closed-shell atoms. In NQCME, aligned quadrupole moments alter the index of refraction of the medium along with and perpendicular to the direction of nuclear alignment. The roles of basis-set convergence, electron correlation, and relativistic effects are investigated for three quadrupolar noble gas isotopes: {sup 21}Ne, {sup 83}Kr, and {sup 131}Xe. The magnitude of the resulting ellipticities is predicted to be 10{sup −4}–10{sup −6} rad/(M cm) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. These should be detectable in the Voigt setup. Particularly interesting is the case of {sup 131}Xe, in which a high degree of spin polarization can be achieved via spin-exchange optical hyperpolarization.

  4. Valence and diffuse-bound anions of noble-gas complexes with uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Lívia; Dolgounitcheva, O.; Zakrzewski, V. G.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2012-11-01

    Valence-bound (VB) and diffuse-bound (DB) anions of noble-gas (Ar, Kr, and Xe) complexes with uracil have been studied with ab initio methods. MP2 optimizations revealed minima corresponding to anions of both kinds in each case. Coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples, CCSD(T), and electron propagator single-point calculations were performed in order to assess vertical and adiabatic electron detachment energies of these complexes. Ab initio electron propagator calculations employed the outer valence Green's function and partial third-order approximations, and the algebraic diagrammatic construction in third order. Basis set effects have been systematically examined. DB anions of all three complexes were adiabatically bound, with calculated adiabatic electron attachment energies below 0.06 eV. Corresponding vertical electron detachment energies were below 0.1 eV. As to VB anions, only the Xe complex had a positive adiabatic electron detachment energy, of 0.01 eV, with a corresponding vertical electron detachment energy of 0.6 eV. These computational findings are consistent with the interpretation of results previously obtained experimentally by Hendricks et al.

  5. Noble-transition metal nanoparticle breathing in a reactive gas atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Valeri; Shan, Shiyao; Chupas, Peter; Yin, Jun; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-08-21

    In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis is used to obtain fundamental insight into the effect of the reactive gas environment on the atomic-scale structure of metallic particles less than 10 nm in size. To substantiate our recent discovery we investigate a wide range of noble-transition metal nanoparticles and confirm that they expand and contract radially when treated in oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) atmospheres, respectively. The results are confirmed by supplementary XAFS experiments. Using computer simulations guided by the experimental diffraction data we quantify the effect in terms of both relative lattice strain and absolute atomic displacements. In particular, we show that the effect leads to a small percent of extra surface strain corresponding to several tenths of Ångström displacements of the atoms at the outmost layer of the particles. The effect then gradually decays to zero within 4 atomic layers inside the particles. We also show that, reminiscent of a breathing type structural transformation, the effect is reproducible and reversible. We argue that because of its significance and widespread occurrence the effect should be taken into account in nanoparticle research. PMID:23828235

  6. Comparing Meteorite and Spacecraft Noble Gas Measurements to Trace Processes in the Martian Crust and Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    Our knowledge of the noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions in the Martian crust and atmosphere come from two sources, measurements of meteorites from Mars and in situ measurements by spacecraft. Measurements by the Viking landers had large uncertainties, but were precise enough to tie the meteorites to Mars. Hence most of the questions we have are currently defined by meteorite measurements. Curiosity's SAM has confirmed that the Ar isotopic composition of the atmosphere is highly fractionated, presumably representing atmospheric loss that can now be modeled with more confidence. What turns out to be a more difficult trait to explain is the fact that the ratio of Kr/Xe in nakhlites, chassignites and ALH84001 is distinct from the atmospheric ratio, as defined by measurements from shergottites. This discrepancy has been suggested to be a result of atmosphere/groundwater/rock interaction, polar clathrate formation, or perhaps local temperature conditions. More detailed atmospheric measurements, along with targeted simulation experiments, will be needed to make full use of this anomaly.

  7. A fence line noble gas monitoring system for nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Grasty, R L; Hovgaard, J; LaMarre, J R

    2001-01-01

    A noble gas monitoring system has been installed at Ontario Power Generation's Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) near Toronto, Canada. This monitoring system allows a direct measure of air kerma from external radiation instead of calculating this based on plant emission data and meteorological models. This has resulted in a reduction in the reported effective dose from external radiation by a factor of at least ten. The system consists of nine self-contained units, each with a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm (3 inch x 3 inch) NaI(TI) detector that is calibrated for air kerma. The 512-channel gamma ray spectral information is downloaded daily from each unit to a central computer where the data are stored and processed. A spectral stripping procedure is used to remove natural background variations from the spectral windows used to monitor xenon-133 (133Xe), xenon-135 (135Xe), argon-41 (41Ar), and skyshine radiation from the use of radiography sources. Typical monthly minimum detection limits in air kerma are 0.3 nGy for 133Xe, 0.7 nGy for 35Xe, 3 nGy for 41Ar and 2 nGy for skyshine radiation. Based on 9 months of continuous operation, the annualised air kerma due to 133Xe, 135Xe and 41Ar and skyshine radiation were 7 nGy, 8 nGy, 26 nGy and 107 nGy respectively. PMID:11605799

  8. Isotopic noble gas signatures released from medical isotope production facilities--simulations and measurements.

    PubMed

    Saey, Paul R J; Bowyer, Theodore W; Ringbom, Anders

    2010-09-01

    Radioxenon isotopes play a major role in confirming whether or not an underground explosion was nuclear in nature. It is then of key importance to understand the sources of environmental radioxenon to be able to distinguish civil sources from those of a nuclear explosion. Based on several years of measurements, combined with advanced atmospheric transport model results, it was recently shown that the main source of radioxenon observations are strong and regular batch releases from a very limited number of medical isotope production facilities. This paper reviews production processes in different medical isotope facilities during which radioxenon is produced. Radioxenon activity concentrations and isotopic compositions are calculated for six large facilities. The results are compared with calculated signals from nuclear explosions. Further, the outcome is compared and found to be consistent with radioxenon measurements recently performed in and around three of these facilities. Some anomalies in measurements in which (131m)Xe was detected were found and a possible explanation is proposed. It was also calculated that the dose rate of the releases is well below regulatory values. Based on these results, it should be possible to better understand, interpret and verify signals measured in the noble gas measurement systems in the International Monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. PMID:20447828

  9. Isotopic noble gas signatures released from medical isotope production facilities - Simulations and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Saey, Paul R.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Ringbom, Anders

    2010-09-09

    Journal article on the role that radioxenon isotopes play in confirming whether or not an underground explosion was nuclear in nature. Radioxenon isotopes play a major role in confirming whether or not an underground explosion was nuclear in nature. It is then of key importance to understand the sources of environmental radioxenon to be able to distinguish civil sources from those of a nuclear explosion. Based on several years of measurements, combined with advanced atmospheric transport model results, it was recently shown that the main source of radioxenon observations are strong and regular batch releases from a very limited number of medical isotope production facilities. This paper reviews production processes in different medical isotope facilities during which radioxenon is produced. Radioxenon activity concentrations and isotopic compositions are calculated for six large facilities. The results are compared with calculated signals from nuclear explosions. Further, the outcome is compared and found to be consistent with radioxenon measurements recently performed in and around three of these facilities. Some anomalies in measurements in which {sup 131m}Xe was detected were found and a possible explanation is proposed. It was also calculated that the dose rate of the releases is well below regulatory values. Based on these results, it should be possible to better understand, interpret and verify signals measured in the noble gas measurement systems in the International Monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

  10. Noble gas systematics for coexisting glass and olivine crystals in basalts and dunite xenoliths from Loihi Seamount

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaneoka, I.; Takaoka, N.; Clague, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Noble gas isotopes including 3He 4He, 40Ar 36Ar and Xe isotope ratios were determined for coexisting glass and olivine crystals in tholeiitic and alkalic basalts and dunite xenoliths from Loihi Seamount. Glass and coexisting olivine crystals have similar 3He 4He ratios (2.8-3.4) ?? 10-5, 20 to 24 times the atmospheric ratio (RA), but different 40Ar 36Ar ratios (400-1000). Based on the results of noble gas isotope ratios and microscopic observation, some olivine crystals are xenocrysts. We conclude that He is equilibrated between glass and olivine xenocrysts, but Ar is not. The apparent high 3He 4He ratio (3 ?? 10-5; = 21 RA) coupled with a relatively high 40Ar 36Ar ratio (4200) for dunite xenoliths (KK 17-5) may be explained by equilibration of He between MORB-type cumulates and the host magma. Except for the dunite xenoliths, noble gas data for these Loihi samples are compatible with a model in which samples from hot spot areas may be explained by mixing between P (plume)-type and M (MORB)-type components with the addition of A (atmosphere)-type component. Excess 129Xe has not been observed due to apparent large mass fractionation among Xe isotopes. ?? 1983.

  11. Optical-emission studies on the interaction between halogenated carbon species and noble gas during fluoropolymer sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Iwao; Miyake, Shojiro

    1989-06-01

    Using optical-emission spectroscopy, the interaction between metastable-excited noble gas and fluorocarbon species is investigated for poly-chloro-tri-fluoro-ethylene (PCTFE) sputtering under a mixture of noble gas and CF3Cl gas flow conditions. Among a variety of noble gases, He and Ne in an excited state were quenched through energy transfer which induced the ionization and self-decomposition of the halogenated carbon species. Such an inactivation was not observed in the Ar, Kr, and Xe cases, in accordance with the ionization energy in CF3Cl derived from photoelectron spectroscopy. Instability in a radio-frequency (rf) plasma was observed in the pure Xe case. However, the plasma was stabilized in the case of a mixture with CF3Cl. The CF2 band which is characteristic of PCTFE sputtering was not detected in the Xe case. In addition, it was confirmed that the oxygen introduced into the rf plasma was more likely to react with CF2(3B1) than with CF2(1B1) or CF3(1B1).

  12. Potential interstellar noble gas molecules: ArOH+ and NeOH+ rovibrational analysis from quantum chemical quartic force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Riley A.; Fortenberry, Ryan C.

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of ArH+ in the interstellar medium has shown that noble gas chemistry may be of more chemical significance than previously believed. The present work extends the known chemistry of small noble gas molecules to NeOH+ and ArOH+. Besides their respective neonium and argonium diatomic cation cousins, these hydroxyl cation molecules are the most stable small noble gas molecules analyzed of late. ArOH+ is once again more stable than the neon cation, but both are well-behaved enough for a complete quartic force field analysis of their rovibrational properties. The Ar-O bond in ArOH+ , for instance, is roughly three-quarters of the strength of the Ar-H bond in ArH+ highlighting the rigidity of this system. The rotational constants, geometries, and vibrational frequencies for both molecules and their various isotopologues are computed from ab initio quantum chemical theory at high-level, and it is shown that these cations may form in regions where peroxy or weakly-bound alcohols may be present. The resulting data should be of significant assistance for the laboratory or observational analysis of these potential interstellar molecules.

  13. CO2 Well Gas, Noble Gases and the Origin of Volatiles in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballentine, C. J.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Marty, B.; Cassidy, M.

    2003-12-01

    Neon isotopes provide a unique opportunity to distinguish between volatiles introduced into the mantle during the accretion of the Earth by equilibration between a magma ocean with a massive early atmosphere, or as a component trapped within accreting material. A massive early atmosphere would have a Solar Ne isotopic composition (20Ne/22Ne=13.8) while accreting material that has been irradiated by solar wind preserves a distinct composite mix, often called Ne-B (20Ne/22Ne=12.5). To date the highest reliable Ne isotopic values measured in mid ocean ridge basalt (MORB) samples reach a maximum at values of about 12.5. It is not possible to rule out using the MORB sample suite the possibility that ubiquitous air contamination (20Ne/22Ne=9.8) found in this sample type suppresses the maximum Ne value measured. We present noble gas data from 14 CO2 well gases collected from Harding County, New Mexico. With 3He/4He ranging from 0.76 to 3.7Ra (Ra= atmospheric ratio) and correlated 40Ar/36Ar ratios that vary from 4660 to 22600, these samples represent a mixture of crustal and mantle-derived noble gases with only a small groundwater-derived air component. The precision with which we can analyse these gases combined with a systematic and well-mixed crust/groundwater component allows us to resolve crustal, mantle and air components for He, Ne and Ar. The resolved elemental ratios of the mantle He/Ne and He/Ar components are similar to those resolved in volatile rich mid ocean ridge popping rocks. A near constant crust+air end-member component defines a Ne isotope mixing line that intersects with the MORB-air mixing line at 20Ne/22Ne=12.20 plus or minus 0.05. The small difference between the 20Ne/22Ne upper-limit resolved in the well gases compared to that observed in MORB can be accounted for by slightly different mantle He/Ne ratios. While this result provides the first unambiguous evidence for the upper mantle 20Ne/22Ne limit, sources other than Ne-B must also be considered

  14. Noble Gas Isotopic Evidence for Primordial Evolution of the Earth's Atmosphere in Three Distinct Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, C. L., Jr.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    1995-09-01

    The deep Earth is the key to understanding the primordial evolution of the Earth's atmosphere. However the atmosphere was not derived by degassing of the Earth, as widely held. Isotopic characterization of mantle noble gases and modeling based on this information [1] suggests the atmosphere experienced a 3-stage early history. This follows from 5 basic observations: (i) Ne in the mantle is solar-like, with light (high) 20Ne/22Ne relative to the atmosphere [2]; (ii) mantle Xe has higher 128Xe/130Xe than the atmosphere [3], which carries an extreme heavy isotope enriched mass fractionation signature of >3%/amu (iii) most of the radiogenic Xe from l29I and 244Pu decay in the Earth is not present either in the mantle or in the atmosphere; (iv) the inferred abundances of noble gases in the deep Earth "plume source" are insufficient to generate the present atmospheric abundances, even for whole mantle degassing; and (v) mantle noble gases indicate a 2 component structure, with solar light gases (He and Ne) and planetary heavy gases [4]. The present day noble gas budgets (and likely also N2) must derive from late accretion of a volatile-rich "veneer." This is stage III. Stage II is a naked (no atmosphere) epoch indicated by evidence for Hadean degassing of 244Pu (T1/2 = 80 Ma) fission Xe from the whole mantle, which was not retained in the present atmosphere. The naked stage must have lasted for more than ~200 Ma, and was supported by the early intense solar EUV luminosity. Stage I, a massive solar-composition protoatmosphere, occurred during the Earth's early accretion phase. Its existence is indicated by the presence of the solar gas component in the Earth. This is not attributable to subduction of solar wind rich cosmic dust, or solar wind irradiation of coagulating objects. It is best explained by accretion of a solar composition atmosphere from the nebula. This provided a thermal blanket supporting a magma ocean in which solar gases dissolved. Under these conditions

  15. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry provides new constraints on LGM temperature estimates inferred from glacier extents in the Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, M. M.; Baden, C. W.; Balco, G.; Shuster, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical models successfully simulate LGM glacier extents in the Sierra Nevada, California, over a large range of precipitation and temperature combinations (Kessler et al. 2006, J. Geophys. Res., 111, F02002, doi:10.1029/2005JF000365). We use cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry on samples from summit flats in the Sierra Nevada to estimate temperatures during the last glacial period in this region and further constrain the climatological predictions of these models. Cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry utilizes the open-system behavior of cosmogenic noble gases at surface temperatures in common minerals like quartz to quantify the thermal histories of rocks during exposure to cosmic ray particles at the Earth's surface. We sampled boulders and bedrock tors atop summit flats inferred to be exposed throughout the last glacial period and measured cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne concentrations in quartz from these samples. We use cosmogenic 21Ne, which is quantitatively retained at Earth surface temperatures in quartz, to constrain exposure durations and erosion rates, and cosmogenic 3He, which exhibits open-system behavior in quartz, to quantify time-integrated temperatures during surface exposure. Data from samples collected at the summit of Mt. Langley in the southern Sierra Nevada indicate that 30-45% of the cosmogenic 3He produced in quartz has been retained at surface exposure temperatures; the rest has been diffusively lost. Preliminary models using these data and published diffusion kinetics indicate that the difference between modern and LGM summit temperatures may be significantly greater than the 5.6°C difference predicted by Kessler et al. (2006). We would expect significantly less 3He to be retained if average temperatures were 5.6°C lower at the LGM. Additional cosmogenic noble gas measurements on samples from this site and other sites in the Sierra Nevada and White Mountains as well as sample-specific diffusion kinetics will enable us to quantify this

  16. Noble Gas Proxy Evidence Of Holocene Climate Fluctuations In The Elwha Watershed, Olympic Mountains, Washington

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paleotempertures retrieved from the groundwater archives in the largest watershed (≈800 km2) in the Olympic Mountains suggest asynchronous Olympic Peninsula climate responses during the Everson interstade period after the last continental glacial maximum. Dissolved noble gases fr...

  17. Laser microprobe analyses of noble gas isotopes and halogens in fluid inclusions: Analyses of microstandards and synthetic inclusions in quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Irwin, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Ar, Kr, Xe, Cl, Br, I, and K abundances and isotopic compositions have been measured in microscopic fluid inclusions in minerals by noble gas mass spectrometry following neutron irradiation and laser extraction. The laser microprobe noble gas mass spectrometric (LMNGMS) technique was quantified by use of microstandards, including air-filled capillary tubes, synthetic basalt glass grains, standard hornblende grains, and synthetic fluid inclusions in quartz. Common natural concentrations of halogens (Cl, Br, and I) and noble gases (Ar and Kr) in trapped groundwaters and hydrothermal fluids can be analyzed simultaneously by LMNGMS in as little as 10-11 L of inclusion fluid, with accuracy and precision to within 5-10% for element and isotope ratios. Multicomponent element and isotope correlations indicate contaminants or persistent reservoirs of excess Xe and/or unfractionated air in some synthetic and natural fluid inclusion samples. LMNGMS analyses of natural fluid inclusions using the methods and calibrations reported here may be used to obtain unique information on sources of fluids, sources of fluid salinity, mixing, boiling (or unmixing), and water-rock interactions in ancient fluid flow systems. ?? 1992.

  18. Detection of Noble Gas Radionuclides from an Underground Nuclear Explosion During a CTBT On-Site Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Sun, Yunwei

    2014-03-01

    The development of a technically sound approach to detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is a critical component of the on-site inspection (OSI) protocol under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. In this context, we are investigating a variety of technical challenges that have a significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments—a lesson we learned previously from the non-proliferation experiment (NPE). Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied by field experiments, making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated and complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that addresses some of the sampling challenges discussed here.

  19. Downhole fluid sampling and noble gas analysis of saline waters from the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, Thomas; Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Niedermann, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    The 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole is situated at the NW-SE trending boundary between the Archaean and Proterozoic domains of the eastern Fennoscandian Shield (Finland). In August 2011, eight fluid samples were collected with a Leutert positive displacement sampler (PDS) from 500 m to 2480 m depth in the open bore hole. The PDS allows sampling at in situ pressures, thus minimising fractionation from degassing during sampling. At the surface, the samples were transferred into an evacuated sampling line connected with a Cu-tube and a glass bulb for gas sampling, a pressure gauge, and a thermometer. Gas was liberated with a heated ultrasonic bath and then admitted to the sampling devices. Gas/water ratios were already determined in the field during gas extraction. Saline groundwaters rich in methane, nitrogen, hydrogen and helium and with water stable isotope composition distinctive from meteoric and sea water have been found to host isolated ecosystems within the Precambrian crystalline bedrock of Outokumpu (Kietäväinen et al., 2013). In order to characterise the geochemical and microbiological evolution of the deep subsurface of the area, noble gas residence times have been calculated based on radiogenic (4He, 40Ar), nucleogenic (21Ne) and fissiogenic (134Xe, 136Xe) noble gas nuclides. Geochemical and microbiological variations together with hydrogeological and geophysical data indicate negligible vertical fluid flow in the bedrock. Moreover, noble gas diffusion models show that diffusion is not likely to affect noble gas concentrations of groundwater at or below 500 m depth in Outokumpu. Therefore in situ accumulation was assumed as a basis for the age determination. In general, residence times between 10 and 50 Ma were indicated by 4He and21Ne, while somewhat younger ages were obtained by 40Ar, using average values for porosity, density and concentration of radioactive elements in the bedrock of Outokumpu. Kietäväinen R., Ahonen L., Kukkonen I

  20. Repulsive interatomic potentials for noble gas bombardment of Cu and Ni targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Interatomic potentials that are relevant for noble gas bombardment of Cu and Ni targets have been calculated in the energy region below 10 keV. Potentials are calculated for the diatomic species: NeCu, ArCu, KrCu, Cu2, ArNi, Ni2 and NiCu. The calculations primarily employ density functional theory (with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional). Potential curves derived from Hartree-Fock theory calculations are also discussed. Scalar relativistic effects have been included via the second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) method. On the basis of a variational argument, it can be shown that the predicted potential curves represent an upper limit to the true potential curves. The potentials provide a basis for assessing corrections required to the ZBL and Molière screened Coulombic potentials, which are typically found to be too repulsive below 1-2 keV. These corrections significantly improve the accuracy of the sputter yield predicted by molecular dynamics for Ni(1 0 0), whereas the sputter yield predicted for Cu(1 0 0) is negligibly affected. The validity of the pair potential approximation in the repulsive region of the potential is tested by direct calculation of the potentials arising from the interaction of either an Ar or Cu atom with a Cu3 cluster. The pairwise approximation represents the Ar-Cu3 potential energy function with an error <3 eV at all Ar-Cu3 separations. For Cu-Cu3, the pairwise approximation underestimates the potential by ca. 10 eV when the interstitial atom is located near the centre of the cluster.

  1. NOBLE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Noble Gases symposium, on which this report is based, provided comprehensive coverage of the noble gases. The coverage included, but was not limited to, the properties, biokinetics, bioeffects, production and release to the environment, detection techniques, standards, and ap...

  2. Noble Gas and Mineralogical Tracers of Interplanetary Dust Particles and Impact Debris in a Central Pacific Sediment Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T. H.; Poreda, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    Thirty-five deep ocean sediment samples from the Central Pacific sediment core LL-44 GPC-3 were examined for their noble gas composition and mineralogy. The samples spanned from 30 to 71 Ma in age, including the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T), Paleocene/Eocene (P/E), and Eocene/Oligocene (E/O) boundaries. From each bulk sediment sample, magnetic grains (5-200 μg/g; 1-20 μm diameter) were isolated and analyzed. Noble gas measurements determined the helium and neon isotopic compositions and the abundance of extra-terrestrial (ET) noble gases for the bulk and magnetic fractions. 3He/4He ratios of 3.1x10-4 and 20Ne/22Ne ratios of 9.96-12.62 are consistent with the SEP (solar energetic particle) signature seen in both zero-age magnetic grains (Z-MAG) from the central Pacific sediments and stratospheric interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). The isolated magnetic fraction typically consisted of less than 1% of the bulk sample while accounting for 3 to 10% of the bulk sediment 3He with a maximum of 40% at K/T boundary. The magnetic isolates revealed no significant differences of 3He/4He, 20Ne/22Ne, or (3He/20Ne)solar from the bulk GPC-3 sediments or Z-MAG grains. No temporal variation in He or Ne or anomalous gas signatures associated with the boundaries present within this time interval was observed. Scanning electron microscope analysis was utilized to determine the mineralogy of the magnetic isolates in an effort to distinguish between the continuous flux of interplanetary dust particles and the flux associated with major impact events. This information may also assist in determining the carrier phase of ET noble gases. Anomalously high Ni, Mg, Al, and Cr compositions combined with low or nonexistent abundances of titanium can distinguish extraterrestrial spinel grains from terrestrial spinel. The SEM analysis revealed stark contrasts in composition and morphology in the samples associated with the boundaries included in this study. A survey of ``background'' samples

  3. A preliminary report on noble gas isotope analyses using the Helix-MC multi-collector mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Zhang, X.; Phillips, D.; Szczepanski, S.; Deerberg, M.; Hamilton, D.; Krummen, M.; Schwieters, J.

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of noble gas isotopes by multi-collector mass spectrometry substantially improve measurement precision and accuracy, with the potential to revolutionise applications to cosmo-geo-sciences. The Helix-MC noble gas mass spectrometer manufactured by Thermo-Fisher is a 350mm, 120 degree extended geometry, high resolution, multi-collector mass spectrometer for the simultaneous analysis of noble gas isotopes. The detector array includes a fixed axial (Ax) detector, 2 adjustable high mass (H1 and H2) detectors and 2 adjustable low mass (L1 and L2) detectors. Each detector is equipped with a Faraday/ion counting multiplier CFM (Combined Faraday and CDD Multiplier) detector. Mass resolution and mass resolving power on the H2, Ax and L2 detectors of the Helix-MC installed at the Australian National University (ANU) are approximately 1,800 and 8,000, respectively. The noble gas handling system on-line to the Helix-MC consists of: (1) a resistively-heated, double-vacuum, tantalum furnace system, (2) air actuated vacuum crusher, (3) Photon-Machines diode laser heating system, (4) Janis He cryogenic trap assembly, (5) gas purification system and (6) standard gas pipette tanks, which are totally automated and controlled by the Qtegra software platform developed by Thermo-Fisher. Eleven repeat measurements of atmospheric Ar using the H2 Faraday (1E11 ohm resistor) and L2 CDD collectors on the Helix-MC, yield a mean 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 322.09 +- 0.28 (0.089%) with a 4,700 fA 40Ar beam current. This result compares favourably with the precision achieved by the Argus VI at the University of Melbourne (318.12 +- 0.17; 0.052%; n = 10) with a similar beam size of 4,200 fA. The high mass resolution of the L2 collector permits complete separation of the 36Ar and interfering 3 x 12C (required mass resolution (MR) of 1,100) and partial separation of H35Cl (MR = 3,900). This capability enables evaluation of the significance of Ar isotopic interferences related to the correction of

  4. Identifying the Sources of Methane in Shallow Groundwaters in Parker and Hood Counties, Texas through Noble Gas Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Nicot, J. P.; Hall, C. M.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    With rising demands for cleaner domestic energy resources, horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques in unconventional hydrocarbon exploration have been extensively developed. However, the observation that some water wells have showed elevated concentrations of dissolved methane and other light hydrocarbons has caused public concern regarding unconventional energy extraction. In this contribution, we present noble gas data of production shale gases from the Barnett and Strawn Formations, as well as nearby groundwater samples in south-central Texas. The Barnett Shale located in the Fort Worth Basin at an average depth of ~2300 m is one of the most prominent shale gas plays in the U.S. This DOE-sponsored study explores the potential of noble gases for fingerprinting shale gas and thus, for identifying the sources of gas in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale, due either to natural hydrocarbon occurrences or potentially related to gas production from unconventional energy resources. A total of 35 groundwater samples were collected in Parker and Hood counties in areas where high amounts of methane (>10 mg/L) were detected in shallow groundwater. Two gas samples were also collected directly from groundwater wells where bubbling methane was present. Preliminary results show that He concentrations in water samples, in excess of up to three orders of magnitude higher than expected atmospheric values are directly correlated with methane concentrations. 3He/4He ratio values vary from 0.030 to 0.889 times the atmospheric ratio with the lowest, more pure radiogenic contributions being associated with highest methane levels. The presence of crustally-produced radiogenic 40Ar is also apparent in groundwater samples with 40Ar/36Ar ratios up to 316. A combined analysis of 40Ar/36Ar ratios from groundwater wells bubbling gas and that of shale gas suggests that the source of this methane is not the heavily exploited Barnett Shale, but rather, the Strawn Formation.

  5. Estimates of the relative magnitudes of the isotropic and anisotropic magnetic-dipole hyperfine interactions in alkali-metal-noble-gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, D. K.; Happer, W.; Walker, T. G.

    1998-11-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the noble-gas nuclear-spin relaxation due to the anisotropic magnetic-dipole hyperfine interaction between the noble-gas nucleus and alkali-metal valence electron vis à vis the already well-understood (spin-conserving) isotropic magnetic-dipole hyperfine interaction in alkali-metal-noble-gas systems. We find that, for all pairs in which the noble gas is not helium, the predicted spin-relaxation rate from the anisotropic interaction does not exceed 2.5% of the rate from the isotropic interaction, thereby not appreciably limiting the maximum noble-gas nuclear polarization attainable via spin-exchange collisions with polarized alkali-metal atoms. For alkali-metal-helium pairs, we predict that the anisotropic interaction has a slightly larger relative effect, perhaps limiting the nuclear polarization to ~95% of the electronic polarization in the Rb-3He system; however, our confidence in the helium results is limited by a lack of knowledge of the interatomic potentials necessary for the calculation.

  6. Noble gas isotope signals of mid-ocean ridge basalts and their implication for upper mantle structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroncik, Nicole A.; Niedermann, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    The geochemical structure of the upper mantle in general and its noble gas isotopic structure in particular have been the subject of countless studies, as both provide important insights into mantle dynamic processes and are essential for the formulation of mantle geodynamic models. This contribution presents a noble gas study of basaltic glasses derived from the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge (MAR) between 4 and 12° S, an area well known for its high degree of lithophile isotope heterogeneity and exhibiting anomalous crustal thickness. The Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf isotopies along this segment of the MAR range from ultra-depleted (more than NMORB) to highly enriched, and different concepts have been proposed to explain the observed isotopic signatures. Here we show that the high degree of heterogeneity is not confined to the isotopes of the lithophile elements, but is also shown by the noble gas isotopes and noble gas interelement ratios, such as e.g. 3He/22NeM or 4He/40Ar*. 3He/4He, 21Ne/22Neextra and 40Ar/36Ar range from 7.3 to 9.3 RA, from 0.05 to 0.08, and from 346 to 37,400, respectively. Nevertheless, the majority of the Ne isotope data are clearly aligned along a single mixing line in the Ne-three-isotope diagram, represented by the equation 20Ne/22Ne=70.5 x 21Ne/22Ne + 7.782, with a slope distinctly different from that of the MORB line, indicating that the ultra-depleted material is characterised by a significantly more nucleogenic 21Ne/22Ne isotopy than the normal depleted mantle. We show, based on covariations between 3He/4He and 21Ne/22Neextra with 206Pb/204Pb and 178Hf/177Hf, that the ultra-depleted material erupted at this MAR segment was most likely produced by an ancient, deep melting event. This implies that isotopic heterogeneities in the upper mantle are not solely caused by the injection of enriched materials from deep-seated mantle plumes or by crustal recycling but may also be due to differences in the depth and degree of melting of upper mantle material within

  7. Noble gas-sulfur anions: A theoretical investigation of FNgS - (Ng = He, Ar, Kr, Xe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borocci, Stefano; Bronzolino, Nicoletta; Grandinetti, Felice

    2008-06-01

    MP2, coupled-cluster, and multireference-CI calculations were performed to investigate the structure, stability, and properties of the noble gas anions FNgS- (Ng = He, Ar, Kr, Xe). Similar to the recently investigated FNgO- and FNgBN-, these species reside into deep wells on the singlet surface, protected by sizable barriers with respect to FS- + Ng and F- + Ng + S(3P). Their stability arises from the strong F--stabilization of the elusive NgS. The lightest FHeS- and FArS- are also first predicted examples of helium-sulfur and argon-sulfur molecular species.

  8. Effect of heavy noble gas ion irradiation on terahertz emission efficiency of InP (100) and (111) crystal planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhanpura, K.; Lewis, R. A.; Sirbu, L.; Enachi, M.; Tiginyanu, I. M.; Skuratov, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    Emission of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation from heavily-doped (5 × 1018 cm-3) (100) and (111) InP bulk materials and nanoporous honeycomb membranes, irradiated with heavy noble gas (Kr and Xe) ions, is presented. Irradiating samples with Kr or Xe improves THz emission efficiency. For (111) samples, as for unirradiated samples, the irradiated porous structures generate more THz radiation than their bulk counterparts. On the other hand, in contrast to unirradiated (100) samples, the irradiated (100) samples show a decrease in THz emission with porosity. We attribute this behaviour to changes in the local electric field due to the combined effect of the irradiation and nanoporosity.

  9. Magma feeding 2011 unrest at Turrialba volcano: insights from noble gas geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Piazza, A.; Barberi, F.; Carapezza, M.; Rizzo, A.; Romano, C.; De Astis, G.

    2013-12-01

    After almost 150 years of quiescence accompanied by weak fumarolic activity, Turrialba volcano (Costa Rica Central Cordillera) is showing signals of potential reawakening. Since 1996, the degassing has become more intense with the extension of the fumarolic field, the opening of new fractures and the occurrence of phreatic explosions (2010-2013). Here, we present a noble gas isotope investigation of crater fumaroles and of fluid inclusions hosted in olivines and pyroxenes from lavas and scoria erupted in the last 10 ka. The 3He/4He ratio of fluid inclusions from the most mafic eruptive products (SiO2=52.5wt% and MgO=6wt%) varies from 7.86 to 8.07 Ra, while that from andesite lavas varies from 7.03 to 7.18 Ra. The most evolved products (SiO2=63wt% and MgO=3wt%) display the lowest 3He/4He ratio (Rc/Ra=6.5). The He isotope values of the most mafic products are in the range of typical arc volcanoes (7-8 Ra), suggesting that contamination of the mantle wedge below the volcano by crustal He is negligible. On the other hand, the lowest values of 3He/4He ratio measured in the most silicic rocks of the series (dacitic) could be representative of a crustal contamination undergone by magma in the plumbing system of Turrialba. The fumaroles collected in 2007-2011 show an helium isotope composition of 7.50-7.96 Ra, which is well in the range of that measured in fluid inclusions from more mafic and recently erupted rocks. This implies that magma involved in the ongoing unrest phase and feeding the crater fumarolic field has petrological and geochemical features comparable to the basaltic-andesitic rocks analyzed in this study. In addition, long-term monitoring of He isotope composition carried out in the last years at Turrialba displays a progressive increase of 3He/4He ratios, which could be related to the simultaneous unrest testified by the increased seismic activity. We infer that this variation could be related to a refill of the plumbing system by 3He-rich magmas, which

  10. Noble gas isotopic signatures in thermal waters of the Dead Sea Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsur, Neta; Kaudse, Tillmann; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    2014-05-01

    Noble gas isotope composition in thermal groundwater provides information about crust-mantle interactions, in form of geotectonic activity, volcanism and advective heat transfer. The knowledge of the geothermal state of the crust is useful for the indication of thermal energy resources, which are of significant environmental and economic importance. In this study, groundwater samples were collected in Israel and Jordan in 2012, along the east and west sides of the central Dead Sea Transform. The helium isotope ratio, 3He/4He, is a well-established marker to discriminate three different geochemical reservoirs: Atmosphere, crust and mantle. The distinct isotope ratios in each reservoir make it possible to separate the total helium concentration in groundwater into mantle, crustal (radiogenic) and atmospheric components. The 3He/4He ratios of all sampled waters exceed the typical crustal ratio, indicating contributions of mantle-derived helium to the total helium concentration. Most of the samples contain less than 3% atmospheric helium, whereas the mantle-derived helium component ranges from 1% to 61%. In Israel, a clear trend is observed. Samples from the northern parts of the sampling area show higher 3He/4He ratios than samples from southern parts. These findings confirm Torfstein et al. [1], who analyzed thermal groundwaters from Israel. In our data from Jordan, however, no north-south trend is seen, but a local anomaly is observed in the area between the Dead Sea and the Sea of Galilee, with a 3He/4He ratio that is 5 times higher than the atmospheric 3He/4He ratio. Moreover, some samples from North Jordan exhibit only minor mantle contributions, compared to the samples from the north of Israel. Our results emphasize the importance of local faulting patterns, which enable a better transfer of mantle derived helium into the shallow crust. In addition to helium, the origin of CO2 in the water was examined. Measurements of δ13C suggest that CO2 originates from

  11. Geostatistical Analysis of Tritium, 3H/3He Age and Noble Gas Derived Parameters in California Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Moran, J. E.; Fram, M. S.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Esser, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Key characteristics of California groundwater systems related to aquifer vulnerability, sustainability, recharge locations and mechanisms, and anthropogenic impact on recharge, are revealed in a spatial geostatistical analysis of the data set of tritium, dissolved noble gas and helium isotope analyses collected for the California State Water Resources Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) and California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) programs. Over 4,000 tritium and noble gas analyses are available from wells across California. 25% of the analyzed samples contained less than 1 pCi/L indicating recharge occurred before 1950. The correlation length of tritium concentration is 120 km. Nearly 50% of the wells show a significant component of terrigenic helium. Over 50% of these samples show a terrigenic helium isotope ratio (Rter) that is significantly higher than the radiogenic helium isotope ratio (Rrad = 2×10-8). Rter values of more than three times the atmospheric isotope ratio (Ra = 1.384×10-6) are associated with known faults and volcanic provinces in Northern California. In the Central Valley, Rter varies from radiogenic to 2.25 Ra, complicating 3H/3He dating. The Rter was mapped by kriging, showing a correlation length of less than 50 km. The local predicted Rter was used to separate tritiogenic from atmospheric and terrigenic 3He. Regional groundwater recharge areas, indicated by young groundwater ages, are located in the southern Santa Clara Basin and in the upper LA basin and in the eastern San Joaquin Valley and along unlined canals carrying Colorado River water. Recharge in California is dominated by agricultural return flows, river recharge and managed aquifer recharge rather than precipitation excess. Combined application of noble gases and other groundwater tracers reveal the impact of engineered groundwater recharge and prove invaluable for the study of complex groundwater systems. This work was performed under the

  12. Theoretical prediction of noble gas inserted thioformyl cations: HNgCS⁺ (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayan; Manna, Debashree; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2015-03-19

    The existence of new interesting insertion compounds, HNgCS(+) (Ng = He-Xe), have been predicted theoretically through insertion of a noble gas atom into the thioformyl cation, HCS(+). Second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), density functional theory (DFT), and coupled-cluster theory (CCSD(T)) based techniques have been used to explore the structure, energetics, charge distribution, and harmonic vibrational frequencies of these compounds. These predicted ions are found to be energetically stable with respect to all the possible 2-body and 3-body dissociation pathways, except the 2-body channel leading to the global minimum products (HCS(+) + Ng). Nevertheless, all these ions are found to be kinetically stable with a finite barrier height corresponding to their transition states, which are connected to their respective global minima products. The results obtained from charge distribution as well as atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis suggest that these ions can be best described as [HNg](+)CS. Strong covalent character in the H-Ng bond is supported by the high positive energy value corresponding to the 3-body dissociation pathways. Thus, it might be possible to prepare the HNgCS(+) ions in a glow discharge containing H2S, CO, and noble gas under cryogenic conditions through matrix isolation technique. PMID:24960593

  13. Groundwater noble gas, age, and temperature signatures in an Alpine watershed: Valuable tools in conceptual model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Andrew H.; Caine, Jonathan Saul

    2007-04-01

    Bedrock groundwater in alpine watersheds is poorly understood, mainly because of a scarcity of wells in alpine settings. Groundwater noble gas, age, and temperature data were collected from springs and wells with depths of 3-342 m in Handcart Gulch, an alpine watershed in Colorado. Temperature profiles indicate active groundwater circulation to a maximum depth (aquifer thickness) of about 200 m, or about 150 m below the water table. Dissolved noble gas data show unusually high excess air concentrations (>0.02 cm3 STP/g, ΔNe > 170%) in the bedrock, consistent with unusually large seasonal water table fluctuations (up to 50 m) observed in the upper part of the watershed. Apparent 3H/3He ages are positively correlated with sample depth and excess air concentrations. Integrated samples were collected from artesian bedrock wells near the trunk stream and are assumed to approximate flow-weighted samples reflecting bedrock aquifer mean residence times. Exponential mean ages for these integrated samples are remarkably consistent along the stream, four of five being from 8 to 11 years. The tracer data in combination with other hydrologic and geologic data support a relatively simple conceptual model of groundwater flow in the watershed in which (1) permeability is primarily a function of depth; (2) water table fluctuations increase with distance from the stream; and (3) recharge, aquifer thickness, and porosity are relatively uniform throughout the watershed in spite of the geological complexity of the Proterozoic crystalline rocks that underlie it.

  14. Groundwater noble gas, age, and temperature signatures in an Alpine watershed: Valuable tools in conceptual model development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, A.H.; Caine, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    [1] Bedrock groundwater in alpine watersheds is poorly understood, mainly because of a scarcity of wells in alpine settings. Groundwater noble gas, age, and temperature data were collected from springs and wells with depths of 3-342 m in Handcart Gulch, an alpine watershed in Colorado. Temperature profiles indicate active groundwater circulation to a maximum depth (aquifer thickness) of about 200 m, or about 150 m below the water table. Dissolved noble gas data show unusually high excess air concentrations (>0.02 cm3 STP/g, ??Ne > 170%) in the bedrock, consistent with unusually large seasonal water table fluctuations (up to 50 m) observed in the upper part of the watershed. Apparent 3H/3He ages are positively correlated with sample depth and excess air concentrations. Integrated samples were collected from artesian bedrock wells near the trunk stream and are assumed to approximate flow-weighted samples reflecting bedrock aquifer mean residence times. Exponential mean ages for these integrated samples are remarkably consistent along the stream, four of five being from 8 to 11 years. The tracer data in combination with other hydrologic and geologic data support a relatively simple conceptual model of groundwater flow in the watershed in which (1) permeability is primarily a function of depth; (2) water table fluctuations increase with distance from the stream; and (3) recharge, aquifer thickness, and porosity are relatively uniform throughout the watershed in spite of the geological complexity of the Proterozoic crystalline rocks that underlie it. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Noble Gas Inventory of Micrometeorites Collected at the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and Indications for Their Provenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Baecker, B.; Folco, L.; Cordier, C.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of processes have been considered possibly contributing the volatiles including noble gases to the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets (e.g., [1-3]). Special consideration has been given to the concept of accretion of volatile-rich materials by the forming planets. This might include infalling planetesimals and dust, and could include material from the outer asteroid belt, as well as cometary material from the outer solar system. Currently, the dominant source of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth is represented by micrometeorites (MMs) with sizes mostly in the 100-300 micron range [3, 4]). Their role has been assessed by [3], who conclude that accretion of early micrometeorites played a major role in the formation of the terrestrial atmosphere and oceans. We have therefore set out to investigate in more detail the inventory of noble gases in MMs. Here we summarize some of our results obtained on MMs collected in micrometeorite traps of the Transantarctic Mountains [5].

  16. Noble gas paleotemperatures and water contents of stalagmites - a new extraction tool and a new paleoclimate proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Scheidegger, Y.; Brennwald, M. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Figura, S.; Wieler, R.; Kipfer, R.

    2012-04-01

    Stalagmites represent excellent multi-proxy paleoclimate archives as they cover long timescales and can be dated with high precision [e.g., 1]. The absolute temperature at which a stalagmite grew, can be deduced from the amounts of atmospheric noble gases dissolved in the stalagmite's fluid inclusion water (= noble gas temperature, NGT) [2-4]. We present technical advances towards more robust NGT determinations and also propose a new paleoclimate proxy, namely the stalagmite's water content, which is a "by-product" of NGT determination. Water contents and oxygen isotope records of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island (Yemen) were found to vary systematically: progressively lighter oxygen is accompanied by decreasing water contents and vice versa. Via the oxygen isotope records [5] the stalagmites' water contents are linked to the amounts of precipitation on Socotra Island. High precipitation, i.e., high drip rates lead to homogeneous calcite growth with low porosity and therefore a small number of water-filled inclusions, i.e. low water contents. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular crystal growth with higher porosity, leading to higher water contents of the calcite (see also [6]). Therefore the stalagmites' water contents seem to record changes in drip water supply and, under favourable conditions, changes in regional precipitation. The current method to extract water and noble gases from stalagmite samples is experimentally challenging and subject to certain limitations (e.g., time-consuming sample preparation in a glove box, temperature restrictions for water extraction, and the often inadequate correction for air from residual air-filled inclusions [3, 4]). To overcome these limitations we have developed a new type of crusher directly attached to our noble gas line. It not only allows crushing and separating the samples into different grain size fractions in vacuo, but the separates can be individually heated to significantly higher

  17. Energy loss and electron emission during grazing scattering of fast noble gas atoms from an Al(1 1 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, S.; Winter, H.; Winter, HP.

    2007-05-01

    Electron loss and electron emission for grazing impact of noble gas atoms with energies in the keV domain are investigated via time-of-flight spectra recorded in coincidence with the number of emitted electrons. The data is analyzed in terms of computer simulations concerning the interaction of the fast atoms with the electron gas in the selvedge of the Al(1 1 1) surface. The interaction is approximated by binary collisions of the fast atoms with Fermi electrons of the conduction band and differential cross sections obtained for electron scattering from free atoms. For an effective number of collisions of about 50 the energy loss spectra are fairly well reproduced by our calculations. We show that for our conditions the shift of the energy spectra for the emission of an additional electron from the surface is close to the work function of the target.

  18. Gas transport below artificial recharge ponds: insights from dissolved noble gases and a dual gas (SF6 and 3He) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jordan F; Hudson, G Bryant; Avisar, Dror

    2005-06-01

    A dual gas tracer experiment using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and an isotope of helium (3He) and measurements of dissolved noble gases was performed at the El Rio spreading grounds to examine gas transport and trapped air below an artificial recharge pond with a very high recharge rate (approximately 4 m day(-1)). Noble gas concentrations in the groundwater were greater than in surface water due to excess air formation showing that trapped air exists below the pond. Breakthrough curves of SF6 and 3He at two nearby production wells were very similar and suggest that nonequilibrium gas transfer was occurring between the percolating water and the trapped air. At one well screened between 50 and 90 m below ground, both tracers were detected after 5 days and reached a maximum at approximately 24 days. Despite the potential dilution caused by mixing within the production well, the maximum concentration was approximately 25% of the mean pond concentration. More than 50% of the SF6 recharged was recovered by the production wells during the 18 month long experiment. Our results demonstrate that at artificial recharge sites with high infiltration rates and moderately deep water tables, transport times between recharge locations and wells determined with gas tracer experiments are reliable. PMID:15984768

  19. Nanoscale lead and noble gas inclusions in aluminum: structures and properties.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erik; Andersen, Hans Henrik; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used for structural and physical characterization of nanoscale inclusions of lead and noble gases in aluminum. When the inclusion sizes approach nanoscale dimensions, many of their properties are seen to deviate from similar properties in bulk and in most cases the deviations will increase as the inclusion sizes decrease. Binary alloys of lead and noble gases with aluminum are characterized by extremely low mutual solubilities and inclusions will, therefore, exist as practically pure components embedded in the aluminum matrix. Furthermore, the thermal vacancy mobility in aluminum at and above room temperature is sufficiently high to accommodate volume strains associated with the inclusions thus leading to virtually strain free crystals. The inclusions grow in parallel cube alignment with the aluminum matrix and have a cuboctahedral shape, which reflects directly the anisotropy of the interfacial energies. Inclusions in grain boundaries can have single crystalline or bicrystalline morphology that can be explained from a generalized Wulff analysis such as the xi-vector construction. The inclusions have been found to display a variety of nanoscale features such as high Laplace pressure, size-dependent superheating during melting, deviations from the Wulff shape displaying magic size effects, a shape dependence of edge energy, and so on. All these effects have been observed and monitored by TEM using conventional imaging conditions and high-resolution conditions in combination with in-situ analysis at elevated temperatures. PMID:15549703

  20. Ultrahigh sensitivity heavy noble gas detectors for long-term monitoring and for monitoring air. Technical status report

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, J.D.

    1999-01-31

    The primary objective of this research project is to develop heavy noble gas (krypton, xenon, and radon) detectors for (1) long-term monitoring of transuranic waste, spent fuel, and other uranium and thorium bearing wastes and (2) alpha particle air monitors that discriminate between radon emissions and other alpha emitters. A University of Cincinnati/Argonne National Laboratory (UC/ANL) Team was assembled to complete this detector development project. DOE needs that are addressed by this project include improved long-term monitoring capability and improved air monitoring capability during remedial activities. Successful development and implementation of the proposed detection systems could significantly improve current capabilities with relatively simple and inexpensive equipment.

  1. Pump-probe studies of EUV and X-ray emission dynamics of laser-irradiated noble gas droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, E.; McNaught, S. J.; Fan, J.; Milchberg, H. M.

    The interaction of high intensity 100-ps laser pulses with micron-sized noble gas (argon and krypton) droplets is experimentally investigated via a series of pump-probe experiments monitoring the delay-dependent X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission, and by imaging frequency-doubled probe light scattered from the interaction region. An understanding of the time scales for this interaction is important for optimization of EUV sources for next-generation lithography that utilizes laser-produced plasmas (LPP). Depending on the spectral region of interest, the type of emission, and the droplet characteristics, the effective emission lifetime was found to extend from a few hundred picoseconds to as long as several nanoseconds, in agreement with the expected plasma expansion, EUV excitation, and recombination emission time scales.

  2. Magnetic-field-induced quadrupole coupling in the nuclear magnetic resonance of noble-gas atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, Pekka; Vaara, Juha; Pyykkoe, Pekka

    2004-10-01

    An analytic response theory formulation for the leading-order magnetic field-induced and field-dependent quadrupole splitting in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra is presented and demonstrated with first-principles calculations for {sup 21}Ne, {sup 36}Ar, and {sup 83}Kr in noble gas atoms. The case of molecules was studied for {sup 33}S in the sulphur hexafluoride molecule, as well as for {sup 47/49}Ti, {sup 91}Zr, and {sup 177,179}Hf in group(IV) tetrahalides. According to our calculations, the hitherto experimentally unknown field-induced quadrupole splitting in molecules rises to 10{sup 2} Hz for {sup 177,179}Hf nuclei in HfF{sub 4} and 10{sup 1} Hz for {sup 47/49}Ti in TiCl{sub 4}, and is hence of observable magnitude.

  3. Noble gas and halogen evidence for the origin of Scandinavian sandstone-hosted Pb-Zn deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, M. A.; Burgess, R.; Harrison, D.; Bjørlykke, A.

    2005-01-01

    Fluid origins in the sandstone-hosted Pb-Zn class of ore deposit have been investigated in three deposits from Scandinavia; Laisvall, Vassbo and Osen. The deposits studied are hosted by autochthonous Cambrian sandstones that preserve a near original structural relationship to the underlying Precambrian basement, enabling the role of basement interaction to be assessed. Mineral samples have been collected from across the paragenetic sequence: sphalerite, galena, pyrite, fluorite and barite, of impregnation and related joint-hosted mineralization. Fluid-inclusion halogen (Cl, Br and I) and noble gas isotope ( 40Ar, 36Ar, 84Kr) compositions were determined simultaneously by noble gas mass spectrometry of irradiated sample splits. Complementary He isotope analyses are obtained from nonirradiated splits of the same samples. 3He/ 4He values at Laisvall and Osen are highly radiogenic, 0.02 Ra, and the 4He/ 40Ar* ratio extends to values greater than the crustal production value of 5, characteristic of low-temperature crustal fluids. At Vassbo, a slightly elevated 3He/ 4He ratio of 0.1-0.3 Ra is compatible with a very minor mantle component (1%-4%) suggesting a distal source for the basinal brine-dominated fluid. Br/Cl molar ratios 3.2-8.2 × 10 -3 are greater than the present seawater value of 1.54 × 10 -3 and correspond with I/Cl molar ratios in the range 64-1600 × 10 -6. The upper limits of both the I/Cl and Br/Cl values are amongst the highest measured in crustal fluids. Together, the data indicate acquisition of salinity by the evaporation of seawater beyond the point of halite saturation and subsequent fluid interaction with I-rich organic matter in the subsurface. The data are compatible with the independent transport of sulfate and sulfide and indicate that fluids responsible for joint-hosted mineralization were distinct to those responsible for impregnation mineralization. All three deposits preserve fluids with 40Ar/ 36Ar in the range of 6,000-10,000 and fluid

  4. Ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray source: saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Charles K.; Boyer, Keith

    2004-02-17

    An apparatus and method for the generation of ultrabright multikilovolt x-rays from saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states is described. Conditions for x-ray amplification in this spectral region combine the production of cold, high-Z matter, with the direct, selective multiphoton excitation of hollow atoms from clusters using ultraviolet radiation and a nonlinear mode of confined, self-channeled propagation in plasmas. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of saturated amplification on several transition arrays of the hollow atom Xe(L) spectrum (.lambda..about.2.9 .ANG.). An estimate of the peak brightness achieved is .about.10.sup.29 .gamma..multidot.s.sup.-1.multidot.mm.sup.-2.multidot.mr.sup.-2 (0.1% Bandwidth).sup.-1, that is .about.10.sup.5 -fold higher than presently available synchotron technology.

  5. Plasma and laser kinetics and field emission from carbon nanotube fibers for an Advanced Noble Gas Laser (ANGL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Paul J.; Lockwood, Nathaniel P.; Lange, Matthew A.; Hostutler, David A.; Guild, Eric M.; Guy, Matthew R.; McCord, John E.; Pitz, Greg A.

    2016-03-01

    A metastable argon laser operating at 912 nm has been demonstrated by optically pumping with a pulsed titanium sapphire laser to investigate the temporal dynamics of an Advanced Noble Gas Laser (ANGL). Metastable argon concentrations on the order of 1011 cm-3 were maintained with the use of a radio frequency (RF) capacitively coupled discharge. The end-pumped laser produced output powers under 2 mW of average power with pulse lengths on the order of 100 ns. A comparison between empirical results and a four level laser model using longitudinally average pump and inter-cavity intensities is made. An alternative, highly-efficient method of argon metastable production for ANGL was explored using carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers.

  6. Determining CO2 storage potential during miscible CO2 enhanced oil recovery: noble gas and stable isotope tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hunt, Andrew; Beebe, Thomas L; Parker, Andrew D; Warwick, Peter; Drake, Ronald; John E. McCray

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are fueling anthropogenic climate change. Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is one option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere while enhancing oil recovery. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites in the United States for permanent CO2 storage, an active multi-stage miscible CO2 flooding project in the Permian Basin (North Ward Estes Field, near Wickett, Texas) was investigated. In addition, two major natural CO2 reservoirs in the southeastern Paradox Basin (McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon) were also investigated as they provide CO2 for EOR operations in the Permian Basin. Produced gas and water were collected from three different CO2 flooding phases (with different start dates) within the North Ward Estes Field to evaluate possible CO2 storage mechanisms and amounts of total CO2 retention. McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon were sampled for produced gas to determine the noble gas and stable isotope signature of the original injected EOR gas and to confirm the source of this naturally-occurring CO2. As expected, the natural CO2 produced from McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon is a mix of mantle and crustal sources. When comparing CO2 injection and production rates for the CO2 floods in the North Ward Estes Field, it appears that CO2 retention in the reservoir decreased over the course of the three injections, retaining 39%, 49% and 61% of the injected CO2 for the 2008, 2010, and 2013 projects, respectively, characteristic of maturing CO2 miscible flood projects. Noble gas isotopic composition of the injected and produced gas for the flood projects suggest no active fractionation, while δ13CCO2 values suggest no active CO2 dissolution into formation water, or mineralization. CO2 volumes capable of dissolving in residual formation fluids were also estimated along with the potential to store pure-phase supercritical CO2. Using a combination of

  7. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, C. A.; Blanchard, W. R.; Kozub, T. A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-14

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  8. Noble-Gas-Inserted Fluoro(sulphido)boron (FNgBS, Ng = Ar, Kr, and Xe): A Theoretical Prediction.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayan; Dey, Sourav; Manna, Debashree; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of the existence of a new series of neutral noble gas compound, FNgBS (where Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe), is explored theoretically through the insertion of a Ng atom into the fluoroborosulfide molecule (FBS). Second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, density functional theory, and coupled cluster theory based methods have been employed to predict the structure, stability, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and charge distribution of FNgBS molecules. Through energetics study, it has been found that the molecules could dissociate into global minima products (Ng + FBS) on the respective singlet potential energy surface via a unimolecular dissociation channel; however, the sufficiently large activation energy barriers provide enough kinetic stability to the predicted molecules, which, in turn, prevent them from dissociating into the global minima products. Moreover, the FNgBS species are thermodynamically stable, owing to very high positive energies with respect to other two two-body dissociation channels, leading to FNg + BS and F(-) + NgBS(+), and two three-body dissociation channels, corresponding to the dissociation into F + Ng + BS and F(-) + Ng + BS(+). Furthermore, the Mulliken and NBO charge analysis together with the AIM results reveal that the Ng-B bond is more of covalent in nature, whereas the F-Ng bond is predominantly ionic in character. Thus, these compounds can be better represented as F(-)[NgBS](+). This fact is also supported by the detail analysis of bond length, bond dissociation energy, and stretching force constant values. All of the calculated results reported in this work clearly indicate that it might be possible to prepare and characterize the FNgBS molecules in cryogenic environment through matrix isolation technique by using a mixture of OCS/BF3 in the presence of large quantity of noble gas under suitable experimental conditions. PMID:25928588

  9. Noble Gas Inserted Protonated Silicon Monoxide Cations: HNgOSi(+) (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe).

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Pooja; Ghosh, Ayan; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2015-11-25

    The existence of noble gas containing protonated silicon monoxide complexes have been predicted theoretically through ab initio quantum chemical methods. The predicted HNgOSi(+) ions are obtained by insertion of a noble gas atom (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) between the H and O atoms in SiOH(+) ion. The structural parameters, energetics, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and charge distributions have been analyzed by optimizing the minima and the transition state structures using second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), density functional theory (DFT), and coupled-cluster theory (CCSD(T)) based techniques. The predicted HNgOSi(+) ions are found to be stable with respect to all possible 2-body and 3-body dissociation channels, except the dissociation path leading to the respective global minimum products. However, these ions are found to be kinetically stable with respect to the global minimum dissociation process as revealed from the finite barrier heights, which in turn can prevent the transformation of these metastable species to the global minimum products. Furthermore, the computed bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, and force constant values suggest that a strong covalent bond exists between the H and Ng atoms in HNgOSi(+) ions while the Ng and O atoms share a strong van der Waals kind of interaction. Charge distributions and bonding analysis indicate that HNgOSi(+) ions can be best represented as strong complexes between the [HNg](+) ions and OSi molecule. All the computational results suggest that the predicted species, HNgOSi(+), may be prepared and characterized by suitable experimental technique at cryogenic temperature. PMID:26501440

  10. History of the paired lunar meteorites MAC88104 and MAC88105 derived from noble gas isotopes, radionuclides, and some chemical abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Eugster, O.; Burger, M.; Kraehenbuehl, U.; Michel, T. ); Beer, J. ); Finkel, R.C. ); Hofmann, H.J.; Synal, H.A.; Woelfli, W. )

    1991-11-01

    Noble gas isotopes, radionuclides, and chemical abundances were studied in the lunar meteorites MAC88104 and MAC88105 collected in the MacAlpine Hills area of Antarctica. The concentrations of the noble gas isotopes and the radionuclide activities in the two meteorites are essentially identical, proving that the two meteorites are paired. From {sup 40}K-{sup 40}Ar dating the authors obtain a gas retention age of 3,550 {plus minus} 400 Ma, typical for lunar surface material. Probably before breccia compaction the MAC88104/5 material resided for 630 {plus minus} 200 Ma at an average shielding depth of 85 g/cm{sup 2}, that is, about 50 cm below the lunar surface in the lunar regolith, as judged from the concentration of cosmic-ray produced Kr and Xe isotopes. Although this duration of lunar regolith residence is relatively long, MAC88104/5 represent immature regolith material: the concentration of solar wind implanted noble gases are two orders of magnitude lower than those in mature lunar soil. The {sup 40}Ar/{sup 36}Ar ratio of the trapped component is 5.7 {plus minus} 1.0, indicating an intermediate antiquity of the material; the authors estimate that the solar wind and lunar atmospheric particles were implanted about 2,000 Ma ago. The radionuclide activities allow a determination of the exposure history of the MAC88104/5 material. The duration of the Moon-Earth transfer was {much lt} 0.24 Ma. The exposure histories of the lunar meteorites discussed in this work indicate that at least two impact events are required for their ejection from the Moon. The authors first noble gas results for lunar meteorite Yamato-793274 show that it represents mature lunar regolith material with relatively high concentrations of solar wind implanted noble gas and a duration of several hundred million years of exposure to cosmic rays.