Science.gov

Sample records for laser-supported detonation waves

  1. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J. )

    1990-07-30

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition of the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the Program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research question still outstanding in this area.

  2. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition if the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research questions still outstanding in this area. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Numerical Analysis on Non-Equilibrium Mechanism of Laser-Supported Detonation Wave Using Multiply-Charged Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2006-05-02

    Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), one type of Laser-Supported Plasma (LSP), is considered as the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for laser absorption. In this study, I have numerically simulated the 1-D LSD waves propagating through a helium gas, in which Multiply-charged ionization model is considered for describing an accurate ionization process.

  4. A computational study of laser-supported detonation waves propagating up an oblique incident beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, C. L.; Crawford, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    A series of numerical experiments was conducted to study the propagation of laser-supported detonation waves (LSDWs) in the case that a CO2 laser beam strikes an aluminum surface obliquely in air. A reflected shock formed at the aluminum surface was more prominent at higher angles of incidence theta of the beam, but otherwise the hydrodynamics of the plasma and the LSDW were insensitive to theta. Furthermore, the total impulse delivered to the aluminum varied approximately as 1/cos theta, a result that can be modeled with elementary blast-wave theory.

  5. Fundamental Properties of Non-equilibrium Laser-Supported Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2004-03-30

    For developing laser propulsion, it is very important to analyze the mechanism of Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), because it can generate high pressure and high temperature to be used by laser propulsion can be categorized as one type of hypersonic reacting flows, where exothermicity is supplied not by chemical reaction but by radiation absorption. I have numerically simulated the 1-D and Quasi-1-D LSD waves propagating through an inert gas, which absorbs CO2 gasdynamic laser, using a 2-temperature model. Calculated results show the fundamental properties of the non-equilibrium LSD Waves.

  6. Laser supported detonation wave source of atomic oxygen for aerospace material testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A pulsed high-flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen was developed to perform accelerated erosion testing of spacecraft materials in a simulated low-earth orbit (LEO) environment. Molecular oxygen is introduced into an evacuated conical expansion nozzle at several atmospheres pressure through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A laser-induced breakdown is generated in the nozzle throat by a pulsed CO2 TEA laser. The resulting plasma is heated by the ensuing laser-supported detonation wave, and then it rapidly expands and cools. An atomic oxygen beam is generated with fluxes above 10 to the 18th atoms per pulse at 8 + or - 1.6 km/s with an ion content below 1 percent for LEO testing. Materials testing yielded the same surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples as observed on the STS mission, and scanning electron micrographs of the irradiated polymer surfaces showed an erosion morphology similar to that obtained on low earth orbit.

  7. Internal structure of laser supported detonation waves by two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamura, Kohei; Kawamura, Koichi; Fukuda, Akio; Wang Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Hatai, Keigo; Fukui, Akihiro; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-04-15

    Characteristics of the internal structure of the laser supported detonation (LSD) waves, such as the electron density n{sub e} and the electron temperature T{sub e} profiles behind the shock wave were measured using a two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer along with emission spectroscopy. A TEA CO{sub 2} laser with energy of 10 J/pulse produced explosive laser heating in atmospheric air. Results show that the peak values of n{sub e} and T{sub e} were, respectively, about 2 x 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and 30 000 K, during the LSD regime. The temporal variation of the laser absorption coefficient profile estimated from the measured properties reveals that the laser energy was absorbed perfectly in a thin layer behind the shock wave during the LSD regime, as predicted by Raizer's LSD model. However, the absorption layer was much thinner than a plasma layer, the situation of which was not considered in Raizer's model. The measured n{sub e} at the shock front was not zero while the LSD was supported, which implies that the precursor electrons exist ahead of the shock wave.

  8. Numerical Analysis on Thermal Non-Equilibrium Process of Laser-Supported Detonation Wave in Axisymmetric Nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2008-04-28

    Numerical Analyses on Laser-Supported Plasma (LSP) have been performed for researching the mechanism of laser absorption occurring in the laser propulsion system. Above all, Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), categorized as one type of LSP, is considered as one of the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for performing highly effective propulsion. For simulating generation and propagation of LSD wave, I have performed thermal non-equilibrium analyses by Navier-stokes equations, using a CO{sub 2} gasdynamic laser into an inert gas, where the most important laser absorption mechanism for LSD propagation is Inverse Bremsstrahlung. As a numerical method, TVD scheme taken into account of real gas effects and thermal non-equilibrium effects by using a 2-temperature model, is applied. In this study, I analyze a LSD wave propagating through a conical nozzle, where an inner space of an actual laser propulsion system is simplified.

  9. Laser-Supported Detonation Concept as a Space Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Toshi; Miyasaka, Takeshi

    2004-03-30

    Similar to the concept of pulse detonation engine (PDE), a detonation generated in the 'combustion chamber' due to incoming laser absorption can produce the thrust basically much higher than the one that a laser-supported deflagration wave can provide. Such a laser-supported detonation wave concept has been theoretically studied by the first author for about 20 years in view of its application to space propulsion. The entire work is reviewed in the present paper. The initial condition for laser absorption can be provided by increasing the electron density using electric discharge. Thereafter, once a standing/running detonation wave is formed, the laser absorption can continuously be performed by the classical absorption mechanism called Inverse Bremsstrahlung behind a strong shock wave.

  10. Calculation of laser induced impulse based on the laser supported detonation wave model with dissociation, ionization and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2014-03-01

    In the laser intensity range that the laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can be maintained, dissociation, ionization and radiation take a substantial part of the incidence laser energy. There is little treatment on the phenomenon in the existing models, which brings obvious discrepancies between their predictions and the experiment results. Taking into account the impact of dissociation, ionization and radiation in the conservations of mass, momentum and energy, a modified LSD wave model is developed which fits the experimental data more effectively rather than the existing models. Taking into consideration the pressure decay of the normal and the radial rarefaction, the laser induced impulse that is delivered to the target surface is calculated in the air; and the dependencies of impulse performance on laser intensity, pulse width, ambient pressure and spot size are indicated. The results confirm that the dissociation is the pivotal factor of the appearance of the momentum coupling coefficient extremum. This study focuses on a more thorough understanding of LSD and the interaction between laser and matter.

  11. Calculation of laser induced impulse based on the laser supported detonation wave model with dissociation, ionization and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Li Mousen, Cheng; Xiaokang, Li

    2014-03-15

    In the laser intensity range that the laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can be maintained, dissociation, ionization and radiation take a substantial part of the incidence laser energy. There is little treatment on the phenomenon in the existing models, which brings obvious discrepancies between their predictions and the experiment results. Taking into account the impact of dissociation, ionization and radiation in the conservations of mass, momentum and energy, a modified LSD wave model is developed which fits the experimental data more effectively rather than the existing models. Taking into consideration the pressure decay of the normal and the radial rarefaction, the laser induced impulse that is delivered to the target surface is calculated in the air; and the dependencies of impulse performance on laser intensity, pulse width, ambient pressure and spot size are indicated. The results confirm that the dissociation is the pivotal factor of the appearance of the momentum coupling coefficient extremum. This study focuses on a more thorough understanding of LSD and the interaction between laser and matter.

  12. Influence of the gaseous form on the precursor heating layer of a laser-supported detonation wave using half self-emission half shadowgraph visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Kohei; Michigami, Keisuke; Ofoso, Joseph; Komursaki, Kimiya

    2012-10-01

    After breakdown one of the possible mechanisms of occurrence of laser-produced plasma is noted as laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave. This wave consisting of the shock wave and the beam absorbing plasma travels at 1-10 km/s along the beam channel in the direction opposite to the laser incidence. The laser heating structure is recognized as the ZND model of chemical detonation. However, Shimamura et. al, showed that the plasma proceeds the shock wave during LSD regime. The role of shock compression is relatively smaller than preheating by laser. The conventional model is inconsistent with our paper. To investigate the heating structure of a LSD wave, half self-emission half shadowgraph (HSHS) methods provides the self-emission image from the plasma on the top half and the shadowgraph image of the induced shock wave on the bottom half simultaneously. A TEA CO2 laser was used at 10 J incident energy. The locations of both wave fronts were detected from the brightness distribution of the HSHS images. As a result, the propagation of ionization front precedes that of shock wave front by the order of 10-4 m in air and N2. Preheating layer of N2 is shorter than that of air because O2 in air has the lowest ionization energy. Thus, a characteristic of preionization layer depends on the ionization properties because photoionization by the UV radiation generate the seed electrons ahead of shock wave.

  13. Predicting propagation limits of laser-supported detonation by Hugoniot analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Kohei; Ofosu, Joseph A.; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Koizumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Termination conditions of a laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave were investigated using control volume analysis with a Shimada-Hugoniot curve and a Rayleigh line. Because the geometric configurations strongly affect the termination condition, a rectangular tube was used to create the quasi-one-dimensional configuration. The LSD wave propagation velocity and the pressure behind LSD were measured. Results reveal that the detonation states during detonation and at the propagation limit are overdriven detonation and Chapman-Jouguet detonation, respectively. The termination condition is the minimum velocity criterion for the possible detonation solution. Results were verified using pressure measurements of the stagnation pressure behind the LSD wave.

  14. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, ?). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt ? = R(V, e, ?). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  15. Oblique detonation wave ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    Two conceptual designs of the oblique detonation wave ramjet are presented. The performance is evaluated for stoichiometric hydrogen-air equivalence ratios of phi = 1/3, 2/3 and 1 for a range of flight Mach numbers from 6 to 10.

  16. Understanding curved detonation waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bukiet, B.G.; Lackner, K.S.; Menikoff, R.

    1993-06-01

    The reaction zone of a detonation wave is very small compared to the dynamic length scale for a typical application. Consequently, it is impractical for numerical calculations to fully resolve the reaction zone. A non-zero reaction zone width is critical to describe curved detonation waves because it affects the wave speed. The curvature effect is the result of an the interaction between the rate of energy release and geometric source terms within the reaction zone. When the reaction zone width is determined by the computational cell size rather than the physical scale, the numerics introduces an artificial curvature effect which frequently dominates the physical effect and leads to mesh dependence of simulations. Modified Hugoniot jump conditions are derived which characterize the curvature effect. They express the conservation laws and are not sensitive to the detailed reaction dynamics but instead depend only on the reaction zone width, and averages of pressure and of mass, momentum and energy densities.

  17. Photoionization in the Precursor of Laser Supported Detonation by Ultraviolet Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamura, Kohei; Michigami, Keisuke; Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-11-10

    The propagation mechanism of laser-supported detonation (LSD) is important for designing laser propulsion for a detonation type thruster. The purpose of this work to was to confirm that photo-ionization in precursor is the predominant LSD sustainment mechanism. First of all, we tried to investigate the dependency of LSD duration on ambient gas species, air and argon. We took a series of high-speed images using the laser shadow-graphy. Besides, to estimate the UV photons emitted from the plasma, we used plasma emission spectroscopy and determined the electron temperature and density. As a result, the LSD duration of argon plasma and air plasma are 0.7 {mu}s and 0.3 {mu}s, resp. Besides, argon plasma emitted 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 14} photons/seconds, which was higher than air plasma. These results reveal that LSD propagation depends on the photon-contributing photoionization. The threshold photon-emission rate of LSD termination gives the elucidation of the LSD termination condition.

  18. Evaluation of the oblique detonation wave ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    The potential performance of oblique detonation wave ramjets is analyzed in terms of multishock diffusion, oblique detonation waves, and heat release. Results are presented in terms of thrust coefficients and specific impulses for a range of flight Mach numbers of 6 to 16.

  19. Damage of silica-based optical fibers in laser supported detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, V. P.; Fortov, V. E.; Frolov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    The study of detonation-like mode of laser induced damage propagation is presented. This mode is new investigation object of laser destruction of silica-based optical fibers. The fiber destruction images were obtained in evolution and in static (on saved samples).

  20. Detonation Wave Propagation in an Ejector-Augmented Pulse Detonation Rocket

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Detonation Wave Propagation in an Ejector-Augmented Pulse Detonation Rocket Tae-Hyeong Yi , Donald, TX 76019, USA The propagation of a detonation wave in an ejector-augmented pulse detonation rocket fueled with a hydrogen-oxygen mixture is studied for a novel concept of a propulsion system. An one

  1. Detonation wave augmentation of gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study that examined the effects of using detonation waves to augment the performance of gas turbines are reported. The central ideas were to reduce compressor requirements and to maintain high performance in jet engines. Gasdynamic equations were used to model the flows associated with shock waves generated by the detonation of fuel in detonator tubes. Shock wave attenuation to the level of Mach waves was found possible, thus eliminating interference with the compressor and the necessity of valves and seals. A preliminary parametric study of the performance of a compressor working at a 4:1 ratio in a conceptual design of a detonation wave augmented jet engine in subsonic flight indicated a clear superiority over conventional designs in terms of fuel efficiency and thrust.

  2. Detonation wave compression in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, A.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of the concept of augmenting the performance of low pressure ratio gas turbines by detonation wave compression of part of the flow. The concept exploits the constant volume heat release of detonation waves to increase the efficiency of the Brayton cycle. In the models studied, a fraction of the compressor output was channeled into detonation ducts where it was processed by transient transverse detonation waves. Gas dynamic studies determined the maximum cycling frequency of detonation ducts, proved that upstream propagation of pressure pulses represented no problems and determined the variations of detonation duct output with time. Mixing and wave compression were used to recombine the combustor and detonation duct flows and a concept for a spiral collector to further smooth the pressure and temperature pulses was presented as an optional component. The best performance was obtained with a single firing of the ducts so that the flow could be re-established before the next detonation was initiated. At the optimum conditions of maximum frequency of the detonation ducts, the gas turbine efficiency was found to be 45 percent while that of a corresponding pressure ratio 5 conventional gas turbine was only 26%. Comparable improvements in specific fuel consumption data were found for gas turbines operating as jet engines, turbofans, and shaft output machines. Direct use of the detonation duct output for jet propulsion proved unsatisfactory. Careful analysis of the models of the fluid flow phenomena led to the conclusion that even more elaborate calculations would not diminish the uncertainties in the analysis of the system. Feasibility of the concept to work as an engine now requires validation in an engineering laboratory experiment.

  3. High order hybrid numerical simulations of two dimensional detonation waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In order to study multi-dimensional unstable detonation waves, a high order numerical scheme suitable for calculating the detailed transverse wave structures of multidimensional detonation waves was developed. The numerical algorithm uses a multi-domain approach so different numerical techniques can be applied for different components of detonation waves. The detonation waves are assumed to undergo an irreversible, unimolecular reaction A yields B. Several cases of unstable two dimensional detonation waves are simulated and detailed transverse wave interactions are documented. The numerical results show the importance of resolving the detonation front without excessive numerical viscosity in order to obtain the correct cellular patterns.

  4. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8?m), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  5. Rotating Detonation Wave Propulsion: Experimental Challenges, Modeling, and Engine Concepts (Invited)

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    attention paid to detonation initiation and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT). As farRotating Detonation Wave Propulsion: Experimental Challenges, Modeling, and Engine Concepts, Arlington, Texas, 76019 Rotating detonation engines (RDEs), also known as continuous detonation engines

  6. Analytical study of laser supported combustion waves in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, N. H.; Root, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    A one-dimensional energy equation, with constant pressure and area, was used to model the LSC wave. This equation balances convection, conduction, laser energy absorption, radiation energy loss and radiation energy transport. Solutions of this energy equation were obtained to give profiles of temperature and other properties, as well as the relation between laser intensity and mass flux through the wave. The flow through the LSC wave was then conducted through a variable pressure, variable area streamtube to accelerate it to high speed, with the propulsion application in mind. A numerical method for coupling the LSC wave model to the streamtube flow was developed, and a sample calculation was performed. The result shows that 42% of the laser power has been radiated away by the time the gas reaches the throat. It was concluded that in the radially confined flows of interest for propulsion applications, transverse velocities would be less important than in the unconfined flows where air experiments have been conducted.

  7. Testing of a Continuous Detonation Wave Engine with Swirled Injection

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    engine but occurred separately in the second. Deflagration-to-detonation transition could be observedTesting of a Continuous Detonation Wave Engine with Swirled Injection Eric M. Braun Nathan L. Dunn detonation wave engines with swirl to improve mixing were developed. The reactants were ignited

  8. Laser-supported ionization wave in under-dense gases and foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Limpouch, J.; Nicolaie, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2011-10-15

    Propagation of laser-supported ionization wave in homogeneous and porous materials with a mean density less than the critical plasma density is studied theoretically in the one-dimensional geometry. It is shown that the velocity of the ionization wave in a foam is significantly decreased in comparison with the similar wave in a homogeneous fully ionized plasma of the same density. That difference is attributed to the ionization and hydro-homogenization processes forming an under-critical density environment in the front of ionization wave. The rate of energy transfer from laser to plasma is found to be in a good agreement with available experimental data.

  9. Detonation wave velocity and curvature of brass encased PBXN-111

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J.W.; Lemar, E.R.

    1996-05-01

    Detonation velocities and wave front curvatures were measured for PBXN-111 charges encased in 5 mm thick brass tubes. In all the experiments (charge diameters from 19 to 47 mm) the brass case affected the detonation properties of PBXN-111. Steady detonation waves propagated in brass encased charges with diameters as small as 19 mm, which is about half of the unconfined failure diameter. The radii of curvature of the detonation waves at the center of the wave fronts ranged from 52 to 141 mm for charge diameters of 25 to 47 mm. The angles between the detonation wave fronts and the brass/charge interfaces were between 72 and 74 degrees. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. DDT and detonation waves in dust-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Grönig, H.; van de Ven, A.

    This paper summarizes the studies of DDT and stable detonation waves in dust-air mixtures at the Stosswellenlabor of RWTH Aachen. The DDT process and propagation mechanism for stable heterogeneous dust detonations in air are essentially the same as in the oxygen environment studied previously. The dust DDT process in tubes is composed of a reaction compression stage followed by a reaction shock stage as the pre-detonation process. The transverse waves that couple the shock wave and the chemical energy release are responsible for the propagation of a stable dust-air detonation. However, the transverse wave spacing of dust-air mixtures is much larger. Therefore, DDT and propagation of a stable detonation in most industrial and agricultural, combustible dust-air mixtures require a tube that has a large diameter between 0.1 m and 1 m and a sufficient length-diameter ratio beyond 100, when an appropriately strong initiation energy is used. Two dust detonation tubes, 0.14 m and 0.3 m in diameter, were used for observation of the above-mentioned results in cornstarch, anthraquinone and aluminum dust suspended in air. Smoked-foil technique was also used to measure the cellular structure of dust detonations in the 0.3 m detonation tube.

  11. Numerical Simulations of Detonation Wave - Magnetic Field Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Lord; Karagozian, Ann

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations of one- and two-dimensional detonation waves subjected to an applied magnetic field are performed, with applications to flow control and MHD thrust augmentation in Pulse Detonation Engines and their design variations. The evolution of the ionization processes and the diffusive and convective transport of the magnetic field are examined in the context of their effect on detonation dynamics. As with prior studies on hydrogen-air detonation dynamics, the present studies explore hydrogen-air-cesium detonations via high order shock capturing schemes and complex reaction kinetics, in addition to a two-temperature relaxation model for the plasma. One-dimensional simulations examining the non-coupled effect of the magnetic field on the unsteady detonation indicate that the stabilizing effect of the dilluent, cesium, becomes less effective when it becomes an active participant under the influence of strong magnetic fields. Two-dimensional dynamics allow a more complete coupling between the magnetic field and the detonation kinetics to be represented, with implications for an alteration in stability characteristics. Supported by the US Air Force/ERC, Inc. under subcontract RS100226.

  12. Weakly nonlinear dynamics of near-CJ detonation waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, J.B.; Klein, R.

    1993-02-01

    The renewed interest in safety issues for large scale industrial devices and in high speed combustion has driven recent intense efforts to gain a deeper theoretical understanding of detonation wave dynamics. Linear stability analyses, weakly nonlinear bifurcation calculations as well as full scale multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations have been pursued for a standard model problem based on the reactive Euler equations for an ideal gas with constant specific heat capacities and simplified chemical reaction models. Most of these studies are concerned with overdriven detonations. This is true despite the fact that the majority of all detonations observed in nature are running at speeds close to the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) limit value. By focusing on overdriven waves one removes an array of difficulties from the analysis that is associated with the sonic flow conditions in the wake of a CJ-detonation. In particular, the proper formulation of downstream boundary conditions in the CJ-case is a yet unsolved analytical problem. A proper treatment of perturbations in the back of a Chapman-Jouguet detonation has to account for two distinct weakly nonlinear effects in the forward acoustic wave component. The first is a nonlinear interactionof highly temperature sensitive chemistry with the forward acoustic wave component in a transonic boundary layer near the end of the reaction zone. The second is a cumulative three-wave-resonance in the sense of Majda et al. which is active in the near-sonic burnt gas flow and which is essentially independent of the details of the chemical model. In this work, we consider detonations in mixtures with moderate state sensitivity of the chemical reactions. Then, the acoustic perturbations do not influence the chemistry at the order considered and we may concentrate on the second effect; the three-wave resonance.

  13. Weakly nonlinear dynamics of near-CJ detonation waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, J.B. ); Klein, R. . Inst. fuer Technische Mechanik)

    1993-01-01

    The renewed interest in safety issues for large scale industrial devices and in high speed combustion has driven recent intense efforts to gain a deeper theoretical understanding of detonation wave dynamics. Linear stability analyses, weakly nonlinear bifurcation calculations as well as full scale multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations have been pursued for a standard model problem based on the reactive Euler equations for an ideal gas with constant specific heat capacities and simplified chemical reaction models. Most of these studies are concerned with overdriven detonations. This is true despite the fact that the majority of all detonations observed in nature are running at speeds close to the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) limit value. By focusing on overdriven waves one removes an array of difficulties from the analysis that is associated with the sonic flow conditions in the wake of a CJ-detonation. In particular, the proper formulation of downstream boundary conditions in the CJ-case is a yet unsolved analytical problem. A proper treatment of perturbations in the back of a Chapman-Jouguet detonation has to account for two distinct weakly nonlinear effects in the forward acoustic wave component. The first is a nonlinear interactionof highly temperature sensitive chemistry with the forward acoustic wave component in a transonic boundary layer near the end of the reaction zone. The second is a cumulative three-wave-resonance in the sense of Majda et al. which is active in the near-sonic burnt gas flow and which is essentially independent of the details of the chemical model. In this work, we consider detonations in mixtures with moderate state sensitivity of the chemical reactions. Then, the acoustic perturbations do not influence the chemistry at the order considered and we may concentrate on the second effect; the three-wave resonance.

  14. Airbreathing Rotating Detonation Wave Engine Cycle Analysis

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Fellow AIAA. 1 of 13 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 46th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint ratio Specific heat ratio c Compression efficiency e Nozzle efficiency Detonation cell size max is in the range of 1­10 kHz. Cycle analysis may thus be simplified with a steady flow inlet and nozzle model

  15. On the influence of low initial pressure and detonation stochastic nature on Mach reflection of gaseous detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. J.; Guo, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    The two-dimensional, time-dependent and reactive Navier-Stokes equations were solved to obtain an insight into Mach reflection of gaseous detonation in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture diluted by 25 % argon. This mixture generates a mode-7 detonation wave under an initial pressure of 8.00 kPa. Chemical kinetics was simulated by an eight-species, forty-eight-reaction mechanism. It was found that a Mach reflection mode always occurs for a planar detonation wave or planar air shock wave sweeping over wedges with apex angles ranging from to . However, for cellular detonation waves, regular reflection always occurs first, which then transforms into Mach reflection. This phenomenon is more evident for detonations ignited under low initial pressure. Low initial pressure may lead to a curved wave front, that determines the reflection mode. The stochastic nature of boundary shape and transition distance, during deflagration-to-detonation transition, leads to relative disorder of detonation cell location and cell shape. Consequently, when a detonation wave hits the wedge apex, there appears a stochastic variation of triple point origin and variation of the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface. As the wedge apex angle increases, the distance between the triple point trajectory origin and the wedge apex increases, and the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface decreases exponentially.

  16. A Fully Conservative Ghost Fluid Method & Stiff Detonation Waves Computer Science Department

    E-print Network

    Thrun, Sebastian

    applicable for tracking material interfaces, inert shocks, and both deflagration and detonation wavesA Fully Conservative Ghost Fluid Method & Stiff Detonation Waves Duc Nguyen Computer Science tracking inert shocks and detonation waves, so that is the focus of this paper. In particular, we address

  17. Experimental Study on Transmission of an Overdriven Detonation Wave Across a Mixture

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Experimental Study on Transmission of an Overdriven Detonation Wave Across a Mixture J. Li1 , K a strong overdriven state in a weaker mixture by propagating an overdriven detonation wave via/oxygen mixture were used to evaluate the attenuation of the overdriven detonation wave in the DDT process. Next

  18. Mechanism of Detonation Wave propagation in PBX with Energetic Binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, I.; Campos, J.; Mendes, R.; Ribeiro, J.; Gois, J.

    2000-04-01

    The complex phenomena of Detonation Wave (DW) propagation in PBX of 82% of HMX, with successively HTPB, as inert binder, and GAP as Energetic Binder (EB), with an initial density 99.5% TMD was studied. A thin optical multifibre strip (250 ?m each fibre), connected to a fast electronic streak camera, allows the nanosecond temporal resolution not only of the behavior of coarse HMX particles, surrounded by binder, but also the fine geometrical structure of detonation and its subsequent shock waves. The results obtained with micro gap and corner turning tests, prove the influence of EB in the mechanisms of DW formation in PBX, especially in the interaction zone between binder and particles. Detonation in PBX with GAP binder shows the shock front interacting earlier in the EB space, between the coarse particles, and DW oscillations with a mean period of 23±5 ns, 1.5 times less than those observed in PBX with HTPB.

  19. Impact waves and detonation. Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R

    1929-01-01

    Among the numerous thermodynamic and kinetic problems that have arisen in the application of the gaseous explosive reaction as a source of power in the internal combustion engine, the problem of the mode or way by which the transformation proceeds and the rate at which the heat energy is delivered to the working fluid became very early in the engine's development a problem of prime importance. The work of Becker here given is a notable extension of earlier investigations, because it covers the entire range of the explosive reaction in gases - normal detonation and burning.

  20. The chemical-gas dynamic mechanisms of pulsating detonation wave instability

    E-print Network

    Kapila, Ashwani K.

    . This internal detonation wave overtakes the lead detonation shock, generating a new high-pressure detonation layer once again decou- ple and the instability cycle is repeated. For failure scenarios, the shock, whereby a wave of compression overtakes the shock front generating a contact discontinuity in the process

  1. Facility for Shock and Detonation Wave Interaction with a Reactive Turbulent Field

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    as in scramjet combustors30 and as a mechanism for deflagration-to-detonation transition.31 The interactionFacility for Shock and Detonation Wave Interaction with a Reactive Turbulent Field Frank K. Lu with a shock or a detonation wave. This shock tube is different from existing approaches due to the need

  2. Structure of an oblique detonation wave induced by a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.-S.; Wu, D.; Wang, J.-P.

    2015-10-01

    The structure of an oblique detonation wave (ODW) induced by a wedge is investigated via numerical simulations and Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. The two-dimensional Euler equations coupled with a two-step chemical reaction model are solved. In the numerical results, four configurations of the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) ODW reflection (overall Mach reflection, Mach reflection, regular reflection, and non-reflection) are observed to take place sequentially as the inflow Mach number increases. According to the numerical and analytical results, the change of the CJ ODW reflection configuration results from the interaction among the ODW, the CJ ODW, and the centered expansion wave.

  3. Experimental study on transmission of an overdriven detonation wave from propane/oxygen to propane/air

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Lai, W.H.; Chung, K.; Lu, F.K.

    2008-08-15

    Two sets of experiments were performed to achieve a strong overdriven state in a weaker mixture by propagating an overdriven detonation wave via a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) process. First, preliminary experiments with a propane/oxygen mixture were used to evaluate the attenuation of the overdriven detonation wave in the DDT process. Next, experiments were performed wherein a propane/oxygen mixture was separated from a propane/air mixture by a thin diaphragm to observe the transmission of an overdriven detonation wave. Based on the characteristic relations, a simple wave intersection model was used to calculate the state of the transmitted detonation wave. The results showed that a rarefaction effect must be included to ensure that there is no overestimate of the post-transmission wave properties when the incident detonation wave is overdriven. The strength of the incident overdriven detonation wave plays an important role in the wave transmission process. The experimental results showed that a transmitted overdriven detonation wave occurs instantaneously with a strong incident overdriven detonation wave. The near-CJ state of the incident wave leads to a transmitted shock wave, and then the transition to the overdriven detonation wave occurs downstream. The attenuation process for the overdriven detonation wave decaying to a near-CJ state occurs in all tests. After the attenuation process, an unstable detonation wave was observed in most tests. This may be attributed to the increase in the cell width in the attenuation process that exceeds the detonability cell width limit. (author)

  4. The ignition of carbon detonations via converging shock waves in white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Ken J.; Bildsten, Lars E-mail: bildsten@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2014-04-10

    The progenitor channel responsible for the majority of Type Ia supernovae is still uncertain. One emergent scenario involves the detonation of a He-rich layer surrounding a C/O white dwarf, which sends a shock wave into the core. The quasi-spherical shock wave converges and strengthens at an off-center location, forming a second, C-burning, detonation that disrupts the whole star. In this paper, we examine this second detonation of the double detonation scenario using a combination of analytic and numeric techniques. We perform a spatially resolved study of the imploding shock wave and outgoing detonation and calculate the critical imploding shock strengths needed to achieve a core C detonation. We find that He detonations in recent two-dimensional simulations yield converging shock waves that are strong enough to ignite C detonations in high-mass C/O cores, with the caveat that a truly robust answer requires multi-dimensional detonation initiation calculations. We also find that convergence-driven detonations in low-mass C/O cores and in O/Ne cores are harder to achieve and are perhaps unrealized in standard binary evolution.

  5. Unsteady self-sustained detonation waves in flake aluminum dust/air mixtures

    E-print Network

    Liu, Qingming; Zhang, Yunming; Li, Shuzhuan

    2015-01-01

    Self-sustained detonation waves in flake aluminum dust/air mixtures have been studied in a tube of diameter 199 mm and length 32.4 m. A pressure sensor array of 32 sensors mounted around certain circumferences of the tube was used to measure the shape of the detonation front in the circumferential direction and pressure histories of the detonation wave. A two-head spin detonation wave front was observed for the aluminum dust/air mixtures, and the cellular structure resulting from the spinning movement of the triple point was analyzed. The variations in velocity and overpressure of the detonation wave with propagation distance in a cell were studied. The interactions of waves in triple-point configurations were analyzed and the flow-field parameters were calculated. Three types of triple-point configuration exist in the wave front of the detonation wave of an aluminum dust/air mixture. Both strong and weak transverse waves exist in the unstable self-sustained detonation wave.

  6. Precursor detonation wave development in ANFO due to aluminum confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Klyanda, Charles B; Short, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Detonations in explosive mixtures of ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum allow for transport of detonation energy ahead of the detonation front due to the aluminum sound speed exceeding the detonation velocity. The net effect of this energy transport on the detonation is unclear. It could enhance the detonation by precompressing the explosive near the wall. Alternatively, it could decrease the explosive performance by crushing porosity required for initiation by shock compression or destroying confinement ahead of the detonation. At present, these phenomena are not well understood. But with slowly detonating, non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) systems becoming increasing prevalent, proper understanding and prediction of the performance of these metal-confined NIHE systems is desirable. Experiments are discussed that measured the effect of this ANFO detonation energy transported upstream of the front by a 76-mm-inner-diameter aluminum confining tube. Detonation velocity, detonation-front shape, and aluminum response are recorded as a function of confiner wall thickness and length. Detonation shape profiles display little curvature near the confining surface, which is attributed to energy transported upstream modifying the flow. Average detonation velocities were seen to increase with increasing confiner thickness, while wavefront curvature decreased due to the stiffer, subsonic confinement. Significant radial sidewall tube motion was observed immediately ahead of the detonation. Axial motion was also detected, which interfered with the front shape measurements in some cases. It was concluded that the confiner was able to transport energy ahead of the detonation and that this transport has a definite effect on the detonation by modifying its characteristic shape.

  7. Simulations of detonation wave propagation in rectangular ducts using a three-dimensional WENO scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Tsai, Her Mann; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Qiu, Jianxian

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports high resolution simulations using a fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme with a third-order TVD Runge-Kutta time stepping method to examine the features of detonation front and physics in square ducts. The simulations suggest that two and three-dimensional detonation wave front formations are greatly enhanced by the presence of transverse waves. The motion of transverse waves generates triple points (zones of high pressure and large velocity coupled together), which cause the detonation front to become locally overdriven and thus form ''hot spots.'' The transversal motion of these hot spots maintains the detonation to continuously occur along the whole front in two and three dimensions. The present simulations indicate that the influence of the transverse waves on detonation is more profound in three dimensions and the pattern of quasi-steady detonation fronts also depends on the duct size. For a ''narrow'' duct (4L x 4L where L is the half-reaction length), the detonation front displays a distinctive ''spinning'' motion about the axial direction with a well-defined period. For a wider duct (20L x 20L), the detonation front exhibits a ''rectangular mode'' periodically, with the front displaying ''convex'' and ''concave'' shapes one following the other and the transverse waves on the four walls being partly out-of-phase with each other. (author)

  8. Exploratory Study of Conductivity in Detonation Waves D. R. Wilson,

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    of the plasma of detonation products for potential applications in hybrid pulse detonation engines. Detonations In the reported experiments, the driver tube was filled with combinations of gaseous fuel, such as hydrogen of hydrogen/oxygen, hydrogen/air and propane/oxygen established Chapman-Jouguet shocks. The experiments

  9. Dynamic compaction of powders by an oblique detonation wave in the cylindrical configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, E. P.; Verbeek, H. J.; Stuivinga, M.; Schoonman, J.

    1997-04-01

    A new method has been applied to dynamically compact ceramic powders in the cylindrical configuration. In this method, a converging oblique detonation is used instead of the sliding detonation used in the standard method. The oblique detonation is generated by a configuration using two explosive layers. X-ray flash photographs have been made that show the detonation and shock fronts in both the standard and new configuration. In the present article, the shock wave and particle velocities in the B4C powder have been calculated using the shock and detonation angles obtained from the photographs in combination with the measured detonation velocity. In the two-layer configuration, the pressure applied to the powder was increased by a factor of 3.5 compared to the one-layer configuration, in agreement with calculations. The working principle of the two-layer configuration is discussed and compared with a computer simulation of the process.

  10. Numerical simulation of laser-supported combustion wave induced by millisecond-pulsed laser on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Wei, Z.; Wang, Y. B.; Jin, G. Y.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the energy transmission of a laser-supported combustion wave (LSCW) is numerically studied, which includes inverse bremsstrahlung, thermal conduction and convection. A physical model is established to simulate an LSCW induced by millisecond-pulsed laser on aluminum alloy. This physical model is a 2D axis-symmetric numerical model of radiation gas dynamics. Moreover, the simulation focuses on the interaction process in different laser conditions such as various pulse widths and peak energies. As a result, the speed of the LSCW increases by increasing the laser energy while keeping the laser pulse constant, whereas the speed is reduced by increasing the laser pulse width while keeping the laser energy constant. After a comparison of the theoretical, numerical and experimental results, analyses are performed while the experimental results are explained reasonably. Furthermore, the consistency between the numerical and experimental results implies that the numerical calculation model used in this paper can describe the motion of the LSCW of the millisecond-pulsed laser on aluminum alloy very well.

  11. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huifeng; Yuan, Hong; Tang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  12. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong; Tang Zhiping

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  13. Simulations of Detonation Wave Propagation in Rectangular Ducts Using a Three-Dimensional WENO Scheme

    E-print Network

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Qiu, Jianxian

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports high resolution simulations using a fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme with a third order TVD Runge-Kutta time stepping method to examine the features of detonation front and physics in square ducts. The simulations suggest that two and three-dimensional detonation wave front formations are greatly enhanced by the presence of transverse waves. The motion of transverse waves generates triple points (zones of high pressure and large velocity coupled together), which cause the detonation front to become locally overdriven and thus form "hot spots". The transversal motion of these hot spots maintains the detonation to continuously occur along the whole front in two and three-dimensions. The present simulations indicate that the influence of the transverse waves on detonation is more profound in three dimensions and the pattern of quasi-steady detonation fronts also depends on the duct size. For a narrow duct (4LX4L where L is the half reaction length), the detonation...

  14. A Reaction Zone Enthalpy Balance Model to Simulate Shock-to-Detonation Transition and Unsteady Detonation Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froger, A.

    2004-07-01

    The standard models in use to simulate the reactive detonation wave propagation are not accurate in computing the transient evolutions because they focus on the shock front, not on the reaction zone where the coupling of thermodynamic and mechanic effects occurs. The model we propose is based on a new thermodynamic description of the constituents in the reaction zone, and on the use of the enthalpy balance of the chemical reaction as the energetic parameter instead of the heat of reaction. The enthalpy balance of the reaction results from the enthalpies of formation of all the chemical species involved in the reaction and is, therefore, a physical constant. The model is based on four basic assumptions: -1) the reaction zone is anevolving intimate mixture of non-reacted material and detonation products, -2) the energy released by thereaction is inherent to the detonation products alone, -3) the two constituents have the same pressure but different temperatures, -4) the specific energy released is not a constant but is related to the enthalpy balance and depends on the thermodynamic state. The model only needs the physical properties of the materials (equations of state of the constituents, chemical reaction and initiation delay), not the CJ state nor any other sub-model. When coupled with the Euler equations this thermodynamic description of the reaction zone permits us to simulate the transient evolution of an emerging detonation for any geometry (2D or 3D) or confinement structure.

  15. Microscopic simulations of supersonic and subsonic exothermic chemical wave fronts and transition to detonation.

    PubMed

    Lemarchand, A; Nowakowski, B; Dumazer, G; Antoine, C

    2011-01-21

    We perform microscopic simulations using the direct simulation Monte Carlo approach to an exothermic chemical wave front of Fisher-Kolmogorov, Petrovsky, Piskunov-type in a one-dimensional gaseous medium. The results confirm the existence of a transition from a weak detonation or deflagration to a Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave, that we already investigated at the macroscopic scale [G. Dumazer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 016309 (2008)]. In the domain of weak detonation or deflagration, the discrepancy between the propagation speeds deduced from the simulations and the macroscopic balance equations of hydrodynamics is explained by two microscopic effects, the discretization of the variables, known as cutoff effect, and the departure from local equilibrium. Remarkably, the propagation speed of a Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave is not sensitive to these perturbations of microscopic origin. PMID:21261344

  16. Deflagration to detonation transition by amplification of acoustic waves in type Ia supernovae

    E-print Network

    Charignon, Camille

    2013-01-01

    We study a new mechanism for deflagration to detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae (SNe Ia), based on the formation of shocks by amplification of sound waves in the steep density gradients of white dwarfs envelopes. Given a large enough jump in density a small pressure and velocity perturbation, produced by the turbulent deflagration, turns into a shock down of the gradient, where it will dissipate and heat up the media. With the right frequency and amplitude the heating can be enough to initiate a detonation, which can propagate backward and up the density gradient. We studied planar and spherical geometry. In the planar case we made a parametric study of the frequency and amplitude. We found it possible to obtain a detonation for perturbations down to Mach number M=0.003. In the spherical case, geometrical damping makes it harder to initiate a detonation, but considering a small He atmosphere (detonation down to small perturbation (M=0.002). In ...

  17. The stabilization of unstable detonation waves for the mixture of nitromethane/methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, A. V.; Koldunov, S. A.; Mochalova, V. M.; Torunov, S. I.; Lapin, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    Using a laser interferometer VISAR the measurements of the particle velocity profiles in detonation waves for nitromethane/methanol mixtures with additions of a sensitizer diethylenetriamine were conducted. It is shown that the detonation front in a mixture of nitromethane/methanol is unstable and sensitizer is an effective method for the flow stabilization. If the diluent concentration is less than 10%, the detonation front is stabilized by adding of 1% diethylenetriamine. At higher concentrations of methanol, the sensitizer does not reject instability, but the amplitude of oscillations decreases in several times. An increase of the limit concentration of methanol at the addition of diethylenetriamine to the mixture was found.

  18. Reactive Flow Modeling of the Interaction of TATB Detonation Waves with Inert Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M; McGuire, E M

    2002-07-01

    The Ignition & Growth model for the shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives is applied to calculating the main features of detonation waves in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based high explosives LX-17, PBX 9502 and EDC-35. Under detonation conditions, TATB based explosives exhibit reaction zone lengths of 2 to 3 mm depending on the interactions between the detonation wave and the surrounding inert materials. This paper describes comparisons of Ignition & Growth calculations with data from several two- and three-dimensional experiments in which various materials are used to confine the TATB based explosives. The calculated unconfined failure diameters of PBX 9502 are normalized to the measured values at five initial temperatures. Failure diameters for LX-17 are then estimated by changing only the fraction ignited near the shock front. Fabry-Perot data on spherically divergent LX-17 snowball experiments is also compared to calculations. Calculated detonation velocities, wave front curvatures, and metal acceleration velocities are compared to experimental detonation data for TATB-based high explosives in tantalum, copper, PMMA, brass, and beryllium confinement. Three-dimensional prism failure test results on PBX 9502 are also stimulated using the ALE3D code.

  19. 1899-1909: the Key Years of the Understanding of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuzé, Olivier

    2009-12-01

    One century ago, in 1909, finished one of the most creative decade for the progress of shock wave and detonation understanding. In 1899, Chapman provided the basis of what is called now the Chapman-Jouguet theory. During the following years, several authors (Jouguet, Hadamard, Crussard, Duhem, Dixon and the Hungarian Zemplen…) yielded important contributions to the understanding of shock wave and detonation propagation: sonicity properties, possibility of the rarefaction shock, real waves with finite thickness, real geometries and real materials, thermodynamic properties, etc… These years finished in 1909 with Duhem's paper which gathered some properties concerning real materials.

  20. AIAA 95-2197 Experimental Investigation of Pulse Detonation Wave

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    is in rocket propulsion. Again there are several advantages that a Pulse Detonation Engine would have over obvious application is for aerospace propulsion systems. An engine of this type would offer several conventional rocket motors.' This technology may also be used to clean slag offof coal furnaces which would

  1. Equilibrium and stability properties of detonation waves in the hydrodynamic limit of a kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Wilson, Jr.; Jacinta Soares, Ana; Pandolfi Bianchi, Miriam; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2015-06-01

    A shock wave structure problem, like the one which can be formulated for the planar detonation wave, is analyzed here for a binary mixture of ideal gases undergoing the symmetric reaction {{A}1}+{{A}1}\\rightleftharpoons {{A}2}+{{A}2}. The problem is studied at the hydrodynamic Euler limit of a kinetic model of the reactive Boltzmann equation. The chemical rate law is deduced in this frame with a second-order reaction rate, in a chemical regime such that the gas flow is not far away from the chemical equilibrium. The caloric and the thermal equations of state for the specific internal energy and temperature are employed to close the system of balance laws. With respect to other approaches known in the kinetic literature for detonation problems with a reversible reaction, this paper aims to improve some aspects of the wave solution. Within the mathematical analysis of the detonation model, the equation of the equilibrium Hugoniot curve of the final states is explicitly derived for the first time and used to define the correct location of the equilibrium Chapman-Jouguet point in the Hugoniot diagram. The parametric space is widened to investigate the response of the detonation solution to the activation energy of the chemical reaction. Finally, the mathematical formulation of the linear stability problem is given for the wave detonation structure via a normal-mode approach, when bidimensional disturbances perturb the steady solution. The stability equations with their boundary conditions and the radiation condition of the considered model are explicitly derived for small transversal deviations of the shock wave location. The paper shows how a second-order chemical kinetics description, derived at the microscopic level, and an analytic deduction of the equilibrium Hugoniot curve, lead to an accurate picture of the steady detonation with reversible reaction, as well as to a proper bidimensional linear stability analysis.

  2. Numerical study of oblique detonation wave initiation in a stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Yining; Teng, Honghui; Jiang, Zonglin; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional, oblique detonations induced by a wedge are simulated using the reactive Euler equations with a detailed chemical reaction model. The focus of this study is on the oblique shock-to-detonation transition in a stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture. A combustible, gas mixture at low pressure and high temperature, corresponding to the realistic, inflow conditions applied in oblique detonation wave engines, is presented in this study. At practical flight conditions, the present numerical results illustrate that oblique detonation initiation is achieved through a smooth transition from a curved shock, which differs from the abrupt transition depicted in the previous studies. The formation mechanism of this smooth transition is discussed and a quantitative analysis is carried out by defining a characteristic length for the initiation process. The dependence of the initiation length on different parameters including the wedge angle, flight Mach number, and inflow Mach number is discussed. Despite the hypothetical nature of the simulation configuration, the present numerical study uses parameters we deem relevant to practical conditions and provides important observations for which future investigations can benefit from in reaching toward a rigorous theory of the formation and self-sustenance of oblique detonation waves.

  3. THE PROTOTYPE OF RECORDING SYSTEM FOR SHOCK AND DETONATION WAVE INVESTIGATION WITH APPLICATION OF

    E-print Network

    Fedotov, Mikhail G.

    THE PROTOTYPE OF RECORDING SYSTEM FOR SHOCK AND DETONATION WAVE INVESTIGATION WITH APPLICATION of SB RAS, b Novosibirsk State University c Institute of Solid-State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry of SB RAS BINP, 630090, Novosibirsk Russia fedotov@inp.nsk.su, kolmakov@mail.ru ABSTRACT A new version

  4. The propagation of detonation waves in non-ideal condensed-phase explosives confined by high sound-speed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikolaos; Lee, Bok Jik

    2013-08-01

    Highly non-ideal condensed-phase explosives used by the mining industry have a strong detonation velocity dependence on the charge dimension. Detonation velocities can be as low as one third of the theoretically calculated ideal detonation velocity in charge radii close to the failure radius. Under these detonation conditions the flow in the confiner can become subsonic, a flow condition under which classical shock-polar analysis is not applicable. This restriction prohibits the use of popular engineering models like detonation shock dynamics and Wood-Kirkwood type models under these confinement conditions. In addition, it has been found in the literature that subsonic flow in the confiner will increase the influence of the confining material on the detonation performance. In this work, we use a multi-phase model coupled to an elastic-plastic model (for the representation of a confiner) to explore the interaction of detonations under these confiner conditions. An ammonium nitrate based mining emulsion is investigated in aluminium and steel confinement of finite and infinite thickness representing the confiner as either a fluid or an elastic-plastic material. It is found that the presence of elastic waves is negligible close to ideal detonation conditions, but is important close to the failure radius and in detonation conditions with subsonic flow in the confiner. High sound-speed confiners support the detonation through energy transport ahead of the detonation front if desensitisation effects are negligible. The detonation front profiles are found to remain convex even in the most non-ideal detonation conditions, and the detonation front curvature only becomes concave in a localised region close to the confiner edge.

  5. Critical deflagration waves leading to detonation onset under different boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Zhou, Jin; Fan, Xiao-Hua; Lin, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    High-speed turbulent critical deflagration waves before detonation onset in H2-air mixture propagated into a square cross section channel, which was assembled of optional rigid rough, rigid smooth, or flexible walls. The corresponding propagation characteristic and the influence of the wall boundaries on the propagation were investigated via high-speed shadowgraph and a high-frequency pressure sampling system. As a comprehensive supplement to the different walls effect investigation, the effect of porous absorbing walls on the detonation propagation was also investigated via smoke foils and the high-frequency pressure sampling system. Results are as follows. In the critical deflagration stage, the leading shock and the closely following turbulent flame front travel at a speed of nearly half the CJ detonation velocity. In the preheated zone, a zonary flame arises from the overlapping part of the boundary layer and the pressure waves, and then merges into the mainstream flame. Among these wall boundary conditions, the rigid rough wall plays a most positive role in the formation of the zonary flame and thus accelerates the transition of the deflagration to detonation (DDT), which is due to the boost of the boundary layer growth and the pressure wave reflection. Even though the flexible wall is not conducive to the pressure wave reflection, it brings out a faster boundary layer growth, which plays a more significant role in the zonary flame formation. Additionally, the porous absorbing wall absorbs the transverse wave and yields detonation decay and velocity deficit. After the absorbing wall, below some low initial pressure conditions, no re-initiation occurs and the deflagration propagates in critical deflagration for a relatively long distance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51206182).

  6. Oblique shock wave calculations for detonation waves in brass confined and bare PBXN-111 cylindrical charges

    SciTech Connect

    Lemar, E.R.; Forbes, J.W.; Cowperthwaite, M.

    1998-07-01

    Shock polar theory is used to calculate the angles detonation fronts make with the cylinder wall for brass cased and bare PBXN-111 cylinders. Two extrapolated unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniot curves are used to calculate these angles. Measured and calculated angles for bare PBXN-111 cylinders are in good agreement for one of the unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniots. Except for the 100 mm diameter charge, the differences between calculated and measured angles for brass cased charges are beyond experimental error. Limited data suggests that the wave front curvature exhibits a large change right at the brass wall and the resolution in the experiments may not be fine enough to show it clearly. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Numerical investigation of shock wave reflections near the head ends of rotating detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, R.; Wang, J.-P.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of various chamber geometries on shock wave reflections near the head end of rotating detonation engines was investigated. A hydrogen/air one-step chemical reaction model was used. The results demonstrated that the variation in flow field along the radial direction was not obvious when the chamber width was small, but became progressively more obvious as the chamber width increased. The thrust increased linearly, and the detonation height and the fuel-based gross specific impulse were almost constant as the chamber width increased. Near the head end, shock waves reflected repeatedly between the inner and outer walls. Both regular and Mach reflections were found near the head end. The length of the Mach stem increased as the chamber length increased. When the chamber width, chamber length and injection parameters were the same, the larger inner radius resulted in more shock wave reflections between the inner and outer walls. The greater the ratio of the chamber width to the inner radius, the weaker the shock wave reflection near the head end. The detonation height on the outer wall and the thrust, both increased correspondingly, while the specific impulse was almost constant as the inner radius of the chamber increased. The numerical shock wave reflection phenomena coincided qualitatively with the experimental results.

  8. Experimental measurements of the detonation wave profile in a TATB based explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyer, V.; Doucet, M.; Decaris, L.

    We report results of the experimental measurements of the detonation wave profile of the TATB based plastic bonded explosive T2 (97 w. % of TATB) using VISAR and Heterodyne Velocimetry (HV - same as Photon Doppler Velocimetry). The experiment consists in initiating a detonation wave in a 15 mm diameter cylinder of explosive using an explosive wire detonator and an explosive booster. In order to obtain the particle velocity history in the reaction zone, we measure particle velocity at the interaction of the detonation front with an aluminized window or the free surface velocity of a metallic foil. Lithium Fluoride (LIF), PMMA and steel have been tested. Several shots have been performed for different lengths of explosive. We compare the VISAR and HV measurements. With LIF and steel, VISAR and HV diagnostics give very similar profiles. The ZND profile obtained on LIF is resolved with both techniques. With PMMA, HV gives a more accurate profile than VISAR in the reaction zone. There is no evidence of the influence of the explosive cylinder length.

  9. Deflagration-to-detonation transition by amplification of acoustic waves in type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charignon, C.; Chièze, J.-P.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: We study a new mechanism for deflagration-to-detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae (SNe Ia), based on the formation of shocks by amplification of sound waves in the steep density gradients of white dwarfs envelopes. We characterise, in terms of wavelength and amplitude, the perturbations which will ignite a detonation after their amplification. Methods: This study was performed using the well tested HERACLES code, a conservative hydrodynamical code, validated in the present specific application by an analytical description of the propagation of sound waves in white dwarfs. Thermonuclear combustion of the carbon oxygen fuel was treated with the ?-chain nuclear reactions network. Results: In planar geometry we found the critical parameter to be the height of shock formation. When it occurs in the inner dense regions (? > 106 g cm-3) detonation is inevitable but can take an arbitrarily long time. We found that ignition can be achieved for perturbation as low as Mach number: M ~ 0.005, with heating times compatible with typical explosion time scale (a few seconds). On the opposite no ignition occurs when shocks initiated by small amplitude or large wavelength form further away in less dense regions. We show finally that ignition is also achieved in a spherical self-gravitating spherical model of cold C+O white dwarf of 1.430 M?, but due to the spherical damping of sound waves it necessitates stronger perturbation (M ~ 0.02). Small perturbations (M ~ 0.003) could still trigger detonation if a small helium layer is considered. In the context of SNe Ia, one has to consider further the initial expansion of the white dwarf, triggered by the deflagration, prior to the transition to detonation. As the star expands, gradients get flatter and ignition requires increasingly strong perturbations.

  10. Scale effect of spherical projectiles for stabilization of oblique detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, S.; Sumiya, S.; Kasahara, J.; Matsuo, A.

    2015-03-01

    Oblique detonation waves (ODWs) were stabilized by launching a spherical projectile with 1.2-1.4 times the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) velocity into detonable mixtures at rest. We used smaller projectiles (3.18 mm diameter) than those (4.76 mm diameter) in our previous studies and investigated the effect of the projectile scale on the stabilization of ODWs. We carried out high time resolution schlieren visualization using a high-speed camera. The detonable mixtures used were stoichiometric oxygen mixtures with acetylene, ethylene or hydrogen. They were diluted with argon with a 50 % volumetric fraction, and a dilute mixture containing 75 % argon was also tested for the acetylene/oxygen mixture. Here, we discuss the detonation stability in terms of the curvature effect arising from the three-dimensional nature of a stabilized ODW around a projectile. The curvature effect attenuated the detonation wave to below its C-J velocity in the vicinity of the projectile before the wave velocity asymptotically reached the C-J velocity in the far field. Our previous study showed that the propagation limit of the curvature effect is responsible for the stabilizing criticality of detonation waves. By obtaining detailed distributions of the wave propagation velocity and radius of curvature at the stabilizing criticality, we showed that the radius of curvature at the local minimum point of the wave propagation velocity represents the critical radius of curvature required for curved self-sustained detonation. In this study, we focused on this critical mode of the stabilized ODW for a small projectile (3.18 mm diameter). Distributions of the wave velocity and radius of curvature were obtained in the critical mode of the stabilized ODW. We compare these distributions with those for a larger projectile (4.76 mm diameter) and discuss the stabilizing criticality. For the small projectile, the observed combustion regimes had qualitatively the same trend for the initial pressure of the mixture as that observed for the large projectile. However, the initial pressure for each combustion regime was quantitatively different for the different projectile scales. The small projectile required a higher initial pressure to stabilize the ODW than the large projectile. For the critical mode of the stabilized ODW, the wave velocity distribution had a local minimum value (0.8-0.9 times the C-J velocity) due to the curvature effect. The radius of curvature at this characteristic point was about five times the projectile radius, regardless of the mixture composition. The radius of curvature normalized by the cell size was about 8-10 and 15 for mixtures diluted with 50 and 75 % argon, respectively, regardless of the projectile diameter. These results mean that the projectile radius (diameter) proportionally affects the geometrical scale of the wave around the projectile, and the fraction of the gas used for dilution affects the cell size required to sustain a curved detonation wave. The stabilizing criticality, expressed as the dimensionless projectile diameter (projectile diameter normalized by cell size), was about 3.5 and 5.5 for mixtures diluted with 50 and 75 % argon, respectively. These criticalities agreed with those of the large projectile of the previous study. This indicates that the dimensionless projectile diameter is a unique parameter for the stabilizing criticality regardless of the projectile diameter.

  11. Neutrino and gravitational wave signal of a delayed-detonation model of Type Ia supernovae

    E-print Network

    Ivo R. Seitenzahl; Matthias Herzog; Ashley J. Ruiter; Kai Marquardt; Sebastian T. Ohlmann; Friedrich K. Roepke

    2015-11-08

    The progenitor system(s) and the explosion mechanism(s) of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Non-electromagnetic observables, in particular gravitational waves and neutrino emission, of thermoclear supernovae are a complementary window to light curves and spectra for studying these enigmatic objects. A leading model for SNe Ia is the thermonuclear incineration of a near-Chandrasekhar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf star in a "delayed-detonation". We calculate a three-dimensional hydrodynamic explosion for the N100 delayed-detonation model extensively discussed in the literature, taking the dynamical effects of neutrino emission from all important contributing source terms into account. Although neutrinos carry away $2 \\times 10^{49}$ erg of energy, we confirm the common view that neutrino energy losses are dynamically not very important, resulting in only a modest reduction of the final kinetic energy by two per cent. We then calculate the gravitational wave signal from the time evolution of the quadrupole moment. Our model radiates $7 \\times 10^{39}$ erg in gravitational waves and the spectrum has a pronounced peak around 0.4 Hz. Depending on viewing angle and polarization, we find that the future space-based gravitational wave missions DECIGO and BBO would be able to detect our source to a distance of 1.3 Mpc. We predict a clear signature of the deflagration-to-detonation transition in the neutrino and the gravitational wave signals. If observed, such a feature would be a strong indicator of the realization of delayed-detonations in near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs.

  12. Neutrino and gravitational wave signal of a delayed-detonation model of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Herzog, Matthias; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Marquardt, Kai; Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.

    2015-12-01

    The progenitor system(s) and the explosion mechanism(s) of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Nonelectromagnetic observables, in particular, gravitational waves and neutrino emission, of thermoclear supernovae are a complementary window to light curves and spectra for studying these enigmatic objects. A leading model for SNe Ia is the thermonuclear incineration of a near-Chandrasekhar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf star in a "delayed detonation." We calculate a three-dimensional hydrodynamic explosion for the N100 delayed-detonation model extensively discussed in the literature, taking the dynamical effects of neutrino emission from all important contributing source terms into account. Although neutrinos carry away 2 ×1049 erg of energy, we confirm the common view that neutrino energy losses are dynamically not very important, resulting in only a modest reduction of final kinetic energy by 2%. We then calculate the gravitational wave signal from the time evolution of the quadrupole moment. Our model radiates 7 ×1039 erg in gravitational waves and the spectrum has a pronounced peak around 0.4 Hz. Depending on viewing angle and polarization, we find that the future space-based gravitational wave missions DECIGO and BBO would be able to detect our source to a distance of ˜1.3 Mpc . We predict a clear signature of the deflagration-to-detonation transition in the neutrino and the gravitational wave signals. If observed, such a feature would be a strong indicator of the realization of delayed detonations in near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs.

  13. Relation Between Spark-Ignition Engine Knock, Detonation Waves, and Autoignition as Shown by High-Speed Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Cearcy D

    1946-01-01

    A critical review of literature bearing on the autoignition and detonation-wave theories of spark-ignition engine knock and on the nature of gas vibrations associated with combustion and knock results in the conclusion that neither the autoignition theory nor the detonation-wave theory is an adequate explanation of spark-ignition engine knock. A knock theory is proposed, combining the autoignition and detonation-wave theories, which introduces the idea that the detonation wave develops in autoignited or after-burning gases, and ascribes comparatively low-pitched heavy knocks to autoignition but high-pitched pinging knocks to detonation waves with the possibility of combinations of the two types of knocks. Analysis of five shots of knocking combustion, taken with the NACA high-speed motion-picture camera at the rate of 40,000 photographs per second reveals propagation speeds ranging from 3250 to more than 5500 feet per second. The range of propagation speeds from 3250 to more than 5500 feet per second is held to be considered with the proposed combined theory but not with either the simple autoignition theory or the simple detonation-wave theory.

  14. Portable fiber optic coupled Doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock wave diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    Testing and analysis of shock wave characteristics such as detonators and ground shock propagation frequently require a method of measuring velocity and displacement of the surface of interest. One method of measurement is Doppler interferometry. The VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) uses Doppler interferometry and has gained wide acceptance as the preferred tool for shock measurement. An important asset of VISAR is that it measures velocity and displacement nonintrusively.

  15. The Attenuation of a Detonation Wave by an Aircraft Engine Axial Turbine Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane; Turner, Mark G.

    2007-01-01

    A Constant Volume Combustion Cycle Engine concept consisting of a Pulse Detonation Combustor (PDC) followed by a conventional axial turbine was simulated numerically to determine the attenuation and reflection of a notional PDC pulse by the turbine. The multi-stage, time-accurate, turbomachinery solver TURBO was used to perform the calculation. The solution domain consisted of one notional detonation tube coupled to 5 vane passages and 8 rotor passages representing 1/8th of the annulus. The detonation tube was implemented as an initial value problem with the thermodynamic state of the tube contents, when the detonation wave is about to exit, provided by a 1D code. Pressure time history data from the numerical simulation was compared to experimental data from a similar configuration to verify that the simulation is giving reasonable results. Analysis of the pressure data showed a spectrally averaged attenuation of about 15 dB across the turbine stage. An evaluation of turbine performance is also presented.

  16. Sunflower detonation

    E-print Network

    Kasimov, A

    2012-01-01

    At this fluid dynamic video we present the instability formation of converging two-dimensional detonation in a radially expanding flow of ideal gas. This unstable pattern expands in space and goes out of the calculation domain. To keep this pattern inside bounded region, we surrounded it by obstacles. The pattern and shock waves reflected from the obstacles forms the structure which we call "sunflower detonation".

  17. Detonation wave profiles measured in plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm photon doppler velocimetry (PDV)

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, Richard L; Bartram, Brian D; Sanchez, Nathaniel J

    2009-01-01

    We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was varied to produce varied distance to detonation, and therefore varied support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of {approx} 3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of {approx} 6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55 C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25 {+-} 0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4 {+-} 0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (> 2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (<< 50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

  18. Analytical and experimental investigations of the oblique detonation wave engine concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Adelman, Henry G.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1990-01-01

    Wave combustors, which include the oblique detonation wave engine (ODWE), are attractive propulsion concepts for hypersonic flight. These engines utilize oblique shock or detonation waves to rapidly mix, ignite, and combust the air-fuel mixture in thin zones in the combustion chamber. Benefits of these combustion systems include shorter and lighter engines which require less cooling and can provide thrust at higher Mach numbers than conventional scramjets. The wave combustor's ability to operate at lower combustor inlet pressures may allow the vehicle to operate at lower dynamic pressures which could lessen the heating loads on the airframe. The research program at NASA-Ames includes analytical studies of the ODWE combustor using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes which fully couple finite rate chemistry with fluid dynamics. In addition, experimental proof-of-concept studies are being performed in an arc heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Several fuel injection design were studied analytically and experimentally. In-stream strut fuel injectors were chosen to provide good mixing with minimal stagnation pressure losses. Measurements of flow field properties behind the oblique wave are compared to analytical predictions.

  19. Analytical and experimental investigations of the oblique detonation wave engine concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Adelman, Henry G.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    Wave combustors, which include the Oblique Detonation Wave Engine (ODWE), are attractive propulsion concepts for hypersonic flight. These engines utilize oblique shock or detonation waves to rapidly mix, ignite, and combust the air-fuel mixture in thin zones in the combustion chamber. Benefits of these combustion systems include shorter and lighter engines which will require less cooling and can provide thrust at higher Mach numbers than conventional scramjets. The wave combustor's ability to operate at lower combustor inlet pressures may allow the vehicle to operate at lower dynamic pressures which could lessen the heating loads on the airframe. The research program at NASA-Ames includes analytical studies of the ODWE combustor using CFD codes which fully couple finite rate chemistry with fluid dynamics. In addition, experimental proof-of-concept studies are being carried out in an arc heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Several fuel injection designs were studied analytically and experimentally. In-stream strut fuel injectors were chosen to provide good mixing with minimal stagnation pressure losses. Measurements of flow field properties behind the oblique wave are compared to analytical predictions.

  20. The formation of an overdriven detonation wave in the flow of methane-oxygen mixtures in a channel of variable cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    Formation of an overdriven detonation wave in methane-oxygen mixtures in a channel was investigated experimentally The gas mixture was ignited by a spark gap, located at the closed end of the combustion chamber. To create the overdriven detonation wave, a decay of the stationary detonation wave in the transition to a channel with a larger cross-section was carried out. Then, a complex of a shock wave and flame front moved into the channel with converging section. Formation of the overdriven detonation wave with parameters several times greater than those of the Chapman-Jouguet detonation was recorded at the outlet of the conical section. The velocities of the detonation front depend upon the composition of the mixture.

  1. Geometric scaling for a detonation wave governed by a pressure-dependent reaction rate and yielding confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Mi, X.; Higgins, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    The propagation of detonation waves in reactive media bounded by an inert, compressible layer is examined via computational simulations in two different geometries, axisymmetric cylinders, and two dimensional, planar slabs. For simplicity, an ideal gas equation of state is used with a pressure-dependent reaction rate that results in a detonation wave structure that does not exhibit cellular instability. The detonation is initiated as an ideal Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation with a one-dimensional structure, and then allowed to propagate into a finite diameter or thickness layer of explosive surrounded by an inert layer. The yielding confinement of the inert layer results in the detonation wave decaying to a sub-CJ steady state velocity or failing entirely. Simulations are performed with different values of the reaction rate pressure exponent (n = 2 and 3) and different impedance confinement (greater than, less than, and equal to that of the explosive). The velocity decrement and critical dimension (critical diameter or thickness) are determined, and a 2:1 scaling between the cylinder diameter and slab thickness results is confirmed, in good agreement with curvature-based models of detonation propagation. The measured shock front curvature and detonation velocity relation (DN-?) agrees with the classic model of Wood and Kirkwood. The computational simulations are compared to a simple, analytic model that treats the interaction of the confinement with the detonation products via Newtonian theory and a model that assumes a continuous variation in shock front curvature with the shock angle at the interface with the confinement matching the angle determined by shock polar analysis. The Newtonian model works very well for the case of high impedance confinement, while the shock front curvature model agrees with the simulations for the case of low impedance confinement.

  2. Neutrino and gravitational wave signal of a delayed-detonation model of Type Ia supernovae

    E-print Network

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R; Ruiter, Ashley J; Marquardt, Kai; Ohlmann, Sebastian T; Roepke, Friedrich K

    2015-01-01

    The progenitor system(s) and the explosion mechanism(s) of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Non-electromagnetic observables, in particular gravitational waves and neutrino emission, of thermoclear supernovae are a complementary window to light curves and spectra for studying these enigmatic objects. A leading model for SNe Ia is the thermonuclear incineration of a near-Chandrasekhar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf star in a "delayed-detonation". We calculate a three-dimensional hydrodynamic explosion for the N100 delayed-detonation model extensively discussed in the literature, taking the dynamical effects of neutrino emission from all important contributing source terms into account. Although neutrinos carry away $2 \\times 10^{49}$ erg of energy, we confirm the common view that neutrino energy losses are dynamically not very important, resulting in only a modest reduction of the final kinetic energy by two per cent. We then calculate the gravitational wave signal from the time evolution of ...

  3. Collision of plane thermonuclear detonation waves in a preliminarily compressed DT mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Charakhch'yan, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    The paper deals with a one-dimensional problem on symmetric irradiation of a plane DT fuel layer with a thickness 2 H and density ?0 ? 100? s (where ? s is the density of the DT fuel in the solid state at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 4 K) by two identical monoenergetic proton beams with a kinetic energy of 1 MeV, an intensity of 1019 W/cm2, and a duration of 50 ps. The problem is solved in the framework of one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic model that takes into account the equation of state for hydrogen, electron and ion heat conductivities, kinetics of the DT reaction, plasma self-radiation, and plasma heating by ?-particles. The irradiation of the fuel results in the appearance of two counterpropagating detonation waves to the fronts of which rarefaction waves are adjacent. The efficiency of the DT reaction after the collision (reflection from the plane of symmetry) of the detonation waves depends on the spatial homogeneity of thermodynamic functions between the fronts of the reflected detonation waves. At H?0 ? 1 g/cm2, the gain factor is G ? 200, whereas at H?0 ? 5 g/cm2, it is G > 2000. As applied to a cylindrical target that is ignited from ends and in which the cylinder with the fuel is surrounded by a heavy magnetized shell, the obtained values of the burn-up and gain factors are maximum possible. To estimate the ignition energy E ig of a cylindrical target by using solutions to the one-dimensional problem, a quasi-one-dimensional model is developed. The model assumes that the main mechanism of target ignition is fuel heating by ?-particles. The trajectories of ?-particles are limited by a cylindrical surface with a given radius, which is a parameter of the model and is identified with the fuel radius in the target and the radii of the irradiating proton beams. This model reproduces the well-known theoretical dependence E ig ˜ ?{0/-2} and yields E ig = 160 kJ as a lower estimate of the ignition energy for ?0 = 100? s ? 22 g/cm3.

  4. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    E-print Network

    Cole, Lord Kahil

    2012-01-01

    Shock Cou- pling in Detonation Waves: 1D Dynamics,” Combustion Science &shock coupling in detonation waves: 1D dynamics. Combustion Scienceshock coupling in detonation waves: 1D dynamics”, published in the journal Com- bustion Science

  5. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard Iii, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation. PMID:26688211

  6. Portable fiber optic coupled doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock wave diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.J.

    1993-03-01

    Testing and analysis of shock wave characteristics such as produced by detonators and ground shock propagation frequently require a method of measuring velocity and displacement of the surface of interest. One method of measurement is doppler interferometry. The VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) uses doppler interferometry and has pined wide acceptance as the preferred tool for shock measurement. An important asset of VISAR is that it measures velocity and displacement non intrusively. The conventional VISAR is not well suited for portability because of its sensitive components, large power and cooling requirements, and hazardous laser beam. A new VISAR using the latest technology in solid state lasers and detectors has been developed and tested. To further enhance this system`s versatility, the unit is fiber optic coupled which allows remote testing, permitting the VISAR to be placed over a kilometer away from the target being measured. Because the laser light is contained in the fiber optic, operation of the system around personnel is far less hazardous. A software package for data reduction has also been developed for use with a personal computer. These new advances have produced a very versatile system with full portability which can be totally powered by batteries or a small generator. This paper describes the solid state VISAR and its peripheral components, fiber optic coupling methods and the fiber optic coupled sensors used for sending and receiving laser radiation.

  7. Numerical Optimisation in Non Reacting Conditions of the Injector Geometry for a Continuous Detonation Wave Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, T.; Davidenko, D.; Dupoirieux, F.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the methodology and the results of a numerical study, which is aimed at the investigation and optimisation of different means of fuel and oxidizer injection adapted to rocket engines operating in the rotating detonation mode. As the simulations are achieved at the local scale of a single injection element, only one periodic pattern of the whole geometry can be calculated so that the travelling detonation waves and the associated chemical reactions can not be taken into account. Here, separate injection of fuel and oxidizer is considered because premixed injection is handicapped by the risk of upstream propagation of the detonation wave. Different associations of geometrical periodicity and symmetry are investigated for the injection elements distributed over the injector head. To analyse the injection and mixing processes, a nonreacting 3D flow is simulated using the LES approach. Performance of the studied configurations is analysed using the results on instantaneous and mean flowfields as well as by comparing the mixing efficiency and the total pressure recovery evaluated for different configurations.

  8. Detonation wave velocity and curvature of a plastic-bonded, nonideal explosive PBXN-111 as a function of diameter and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, J. W.; Lemar, E. R.

    1998-12-01

    Detonation velocities and wave front curvatures are measured on various diameter cylinders of PBXN-111 (RDX/AP/Al/HTPB binder with 20/43/25/12 weight percent). The cylinders are either unconfined or encased in 5-mm-thick brass tubes. In all experiments with brass tubes (diameters from 19 to 100 mm) the detonation velocity of PBXN-111 was affected by the confinement. Steady detonation waves propagated in brass encased charges with diameters as small as 19 mm, which is about half of the 37.1 mm failure diameter for unconfined PBXN-111. The radii of curvature at the center of the detonation wave fronts ranged from 52 to 480 mm for charge diameters from 25 to 100 mm, respectively. Detonation velocity as a function of radius of curvature at the wave's center is represented by a single curve for both cased and uncased cylindrical charges. The difference in the axial position of the detonation wave at the center of the charge and at the edge of the charge (i.e., lag distance) are between 1.6 and 6.7 mm. The angles between the detonation wave fronts and the brass/charge interfaces are between 73° and 82° while the angles at the cylindrical free surface for the uncased charges are between 61° and 64°. Calculation of this angle for brass encased charges using oblique shock equations and assuming no reaction in the shock front resulted in angles 8° higher than measured except for the 100-mm-diam charge which was in agreement. The calculated angles for the uncased charge are in agreement with the measured values.

  9. Md and HD Simulations of Detonation Wave Refraction at the Border of Tatb-Like he and BE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, I. V.; Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Karavaev, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. A.; Khardina, L. V.; Sokolova, N. D.; Soulard, L.

    2009-12-01

    Here we present results of Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Hydro Dynamics (HD) investigations into the process of detonation wave refraction on the border with the inert material. The effects of broad reaction zone in TATB-like HE and high sound speed in inert material (Be) were of particular interest. To make possible direct comparison of MD and HD approaches the parameters of the models used in HD were determined from MD simulations, i.e. we used MD results to choose parameters for Be and HE equations of state and to evaluate parameters of elastic-plastic transition models for these materials. HD and MD results have been compared and analyzed.

  10. Shock wave physics and detonation physics — a stimulus for the emergence of numerous new branches in science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehl, Peter O. K.

    2011-07-01

    In the period of the Cold War (1945-1991), Shock Wave Physics and Detonation Physics (SWP&DP) — until the beginning of WWII mostly confined to gas dynamics, high-speed aerodynamics, and military technology (such as aero- and terminal ballistics, armor construction, chemical explosions, supersonic gun, and other firearms developments) — quickly developed into a large interdisciplinary field by its own. This rapid expansion was driven by an enormous financial support and two efficient feedbacks: the Terminal Ballistic Cycleand the Research& Development Cycle. Basic knowledge in SWP&DP, initially gained in the Classic Period(from 1808) and further extended in the Post-Classic Period(from the 1930s to present), is now increasingly used also in other branches of Science and Engineering (S&E). However, also independent S&E branches developed, based upon the fundamentals of SWP&DP, many of those developments will be addressed (see Tab. 2). Thus, shock wave and detonation phenomena are now studied within an enormous range of dimensions, covering microscopic, macroscopic, and cosmic dimensions as well as enormous time spans ranging from nano-/picosecond shock durations (such as produced by ultra-short laser pulses) to shock durations that continue for centuries (such as blast waves emitted from ancient supernova explosions). This paper reviews these developments from a historical perspective.

  11. Optically detonated explosive device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.; Menichelli, V. J. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    A technique and apparatus for optically detonating insensitive high explosives, is disclosed. An explosive device is formed by containing high explosive material in a house having a transparent window. A thin metallic film is provided on the interior surface of the window and maintained in contact with the high explosive. A laser pulse provided by a Q-switched laser is focussed on the window to vaporize the metallic film and thereby create a shock wave which detonates the high explosive. Explosive devices may be concurrently or sequentially detonated by employing a fiber optic bundle to transmit the laser pulse to each of the several individual explosive devices.

  12. A Virtual Test Facility for the Efficient Simulation of Solid Material Response under Strong Shock and Detonation Wave Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    A Virtual Test Facility (VTF) for studying the three-dimensional dynamic response of solid materials subject to strong shock and detonation waves has been constructed as part of the research program of the Center for Simulating the Dynamic Response of Materials at the California Institute of Technology. The compressible fluid flow is simulated with a Cartesian finite volume method and treating the solid as an embedded moving body, while a Lagrangian finite element scheme is employed to describe the structural response to the hydrodynamic pressure loading. A temporal splitting method is applied to update the position and velocity of the boundary between time steps. The boundary is represented implicitly in the fluid solver with a level set function that is constructed on-the-fly from the unstructured solid surface mesh. Block-structured mesh adaptation with time step refinement in the fluid allows for the efficient consideration of disparate fluid and solid time scales. We detail the design of the employed object-oriented mesh refinement framework AMROC and outline its effective extension for fluid-structure interaction problems. Further, we describe the parallelization of the most important algorithmic components for distributed memory machines and discuss the applied partitioning strategies. As computational examples for typical VTF applications, we present the dynamic deformation of a tantalum cylinder due to the detonation of an interior solid explosive and the impact of an explosion-induced shock wave on a multi-material soft tissue body.

  13. On the possibility of the realization of combustion and detonation waves in a system of nuclear isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Akhrameev, E. V.; Bolshov, L. A.; Kondratenko, P. S.; Tkalya, E. V.

    2014-02-01

    The possible regimes of the propagation of a self-sustained fluorescence wave of long-lived nuclear isomers, which is initiated by transitions to the nearest short-lived level owing to the absorption of X-ray photons and inelastic collisions of electrons in a plasma, have been analyzed. It has been found that, when the energy exchange between the nuclear subsystem and plasma is due to absorption and emission of photons, the fluorescence wave can propagate in the fast (with a near-light velocity) deflagration regime induced by the radiative heat transfer mechanism. When the energy exchange between the subsystems is nonradiative, the (slower) detonation regime becomes significant. The implementation of each of the two regimes requires certain conditions on the characteristics of the system.

  14. Molecular Dynamics and Hydrodynamics Simulations of Detonation Wave Refraction at the Boundary of TATB-like HE and Beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ilya; Dremov, Vladimir; Karavaev, Alexey; Sapozhnikov, Filipp; Soulard, Laurent

    2009-06-01

    Here we present results of investigations of the process of detonation wave refraction on the border with inert material. The effects of broad reaction zone in TATB-like HE and high sound speed in Be were of particular interest. Molecular Dynamics (MD) was chosen as an instrument of the investigation. An atomistic approach to the contrast of HydroDynamics (HD) does not use any phenomenological models for physical processes but intreatomic potentials. Therefore MD allows for the direct and explicit simulation of such phenomena as detonation kinetics, elastic-plastic transition mechanism and shear stress relaxation kinetics from the microscopic point of view. Nevertheless it was very interesting and important to compare results of MD and HD approaches to the same problem. To make possible hydrodynamics modeling the parameters of the models used in HD were determined from MD simulations. In the course, we used MD results to choose parameters for Be and TATB-like HE equations of state and to evaluate parameters of elastic- plastic transition models for these materials. HD and MD results have been compared and analyzed.

  15. Theory of gaseous detonations.

    PubMed

    Clavin, Paul

    2004-09-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review some developments that have occurred in detonation theory over the last ten years. They concern nonlinear dynamics of detonation fronts, namely patterns of pulsating and/or cellular fronts, selection of the cell size, dynamical self-quenching, direct (blast) or spontaneous initiation, and transition from deflagration to detonation. These phenomena are all well documented by experiments since the sixties but remained unexplained until recently. In the first part of the paper, the patterns of cellular detonations are described by an asymptotic solution to nonlinear hyperbolic equations (reactive Euler equations) in the form of unsteady (sometime chaotic) and multidimensional traveling-waves. In the second part, turning points of quasi-steady solutions are shown to correspond to critical conditions of fully unsteady problems, either for (direct or spontaneous) initiation or for spontaneous failure (self-quenching). Physical insights are tentatively presented rather than technical aspects. The challenge is to identify the physical mechanisms with their relevant parameters, and more specifically to explain how the length-scales involved in detonation dynamics are larger by two order of magnitude (at least) than the length-scale involved in the steady planar traveling-wave solution (detonation thickness). PMID:15446993

  16. A summary of hydrogen-air detonation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Guirao, C.M.; Knystautas, R.; Lee, J.H.

    1989-05-01

    Dynamic detonation parameters are reviewed for hydrogen-air-diluent detonations and deflagration-to-detonation transitions (DDT). These parameters include the characteristic chemical length scale, such as the detonation cell width, associated with the three-dimensional cellular structure of detonation waves, critical transmission conditions of confined detonations into unconfined environments, critical initiation energy for unconfined detonations, detonability limits, and critical conditions for DDT. The detonation cell width, which depends on hydrogen and diluent concentrations, pressure, and temperature, is an important parameter in the prediction of critical geometry-dependent conditions for the transmission of confined detonations into unconfined environments and the critical energies for the direct initiation of unconfined detonations. Detonability limits depend on both initial and boundary conditions and the limit has been defined as the onset of single head spin. Four flame propagation regimes have been identified and the criterion for DDT in a smooth tube is discussed. 108 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Two phase detonation studies conducted in 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A report is presented describing the research conducted on five phases: (1) ignition of fuel drops by a shock wave and passage of a shock wave over a burning drop, (2) the energy release pattern of a two-phase detonation with controlled drop sizes, (3) the attenuation of shock and detonation waves passing over an acoustic liner, (4) experimental and theoretical studies of film detonations, and (5) a simplified analytical model of a rotating two-phase detonation wave in a rocket motor.

  18. Planar Reflection of Gaseous Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damazo, Jason Scott

    Pipes containing flammable gaseous mixtures may be subjected to internal detonation. When the detonation normally impinges on a closed end, a reflected shock wave is created to bring the flow back to rest. This study built on the work of Karnesky (2010) and examined deformation of thin-walled stainless steel tubes subjected to internal reflected gaseous detonations. A ripple pattern was observed in the tube wall for certain fill pressures, and a criterion was developed that predicted when the ripple pattern would form. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook material properties; the pressure loading created by reflected gaseous detonations was accounted for with a previously developed pressure model. The residual plastic strain between experiments and computations was in good agreement. During the examination of detonation-driven deformation, discrepancies were discovered in our understanding of reflected gaseous detonation behavior. Previous models did not accurately describe the nature of the reflected shock wave, which motivated further experiments in a detonation tube with optical access. Pressure sensors and schlieren images were used to examine reflected shock behavior, and it was determined that the discrepancies were related to the reaction zone thickness extant behind the detonation front. During these experiments reflected shock bifurcation did not appear to occur, but the unfocused visualization system made certainty impossible. This prompted construction of a focused schlieren system that investigated possible shock wave-boundary layer interaction, and heat-flux gauges analyzed the boundary layer behind the detonation front. Using these data with an analytical boundary layer solution, it was determined that the strong thermal boundary layer present behind the detonation front inhibits the development of reflected shock wave bifurcation.

  19. The role of compression waves in flame acceleration and transition to detonation inside confined volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Yakovenko, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    Features of the unsteady flames propagating in channels filled with gaseous combustible mixtures are studied numerically. The analysis is based on the model treating the flame as a moving energy source. It is shown that the crucial role in flame dynamics and its structure evolution belongs to the compression waves emitted by non-steady flame itself. The compression waves establish flow pattern, temperature and pressure fields near the flame front, which in turn determine the features of flame evolution on the different stages of its propagation.

  20. PRELUDE TO A DOUBLE DEGENERATE MERGER: THE ONSET OF MASS TRANSFER AND ITS IMPACT ON GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND SURFACE DETONATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Marius; Rosswog, Stephan; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico E-mail: rosswog@jacobs-university.de E-mail: enrico@ucolick.org

    2011-08-20

    We present the results of a systematic numerical study of the onset of mass transfer in double degenerate binary systems and its impact on the subsequent evolution. All investigated systems belong to the regime of direct impact, unstable mass transfer. In all of the investigated cases, even those considered unstable by conventional stability analysis, we find a long-lived mass transfer phase continuing for as many as several dozen orbital periods. This settles a recent debate sparked by a discrepancy between earlier smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) calculations that showed disruptions after a few orbital periods and newer grid-based studies in which mass transfer continued for tens of orbits. The number of orbits a binary survives sensitively depends on the exact initial conditions. We find that the approximate initial conditions that have been used in most previous SPH calculations have a serious impact on all stages of the evolution from the onset of mass transfer up to the final structure of the remnant. We compare 'approximate' initial conditions where spherical stars are placed at an initial separation obtained from an estimate of the Roche lobe size with 'accurate' initial conditions that were constructed by carefully driving the binary system to equilibrium by a relaxation scheme. Simulations that use the approximate initial conditions underestimate the initial separation when mass transfer sets in, which yields a binary that only survives for only a few orbits and thus a rapidly fading gravitational wave signal. Conversely, the accurate initial conditions produce a binary system in which the mass transfer phase is extended by almost two orders of magnitude in time, resulting in a gravitational wave signal with amplitude and frequency that remain essentially constant up until merger. As we show that these binaries can survive at small separation for hundreds of orbital periods, their associated gravitational wave signal should be included when calculating the gravitational wave foreground (although expected to be below Laser Interferometer Space Antenna's sensitivity at these high frequencies). We also show that the inclusion of the entropy increase associated with shock heating of the accreted material reduces the number of orbits a binary survives given the same initial conditions, although the effect is not as pronounced when using the appropriate initial conditions. The use of accurate initial conditions and a correct treatment of shock heating allows for a reliable time evolution of the temperature, density, and angular momentum, which are important when considering thermonuclear events that may occur during the mass transfer phase and/or after merger. Our treatment allows us to accurately identify when surface detonations may occur in the lead-up to the merger, as well as the properties of final merger products.

  1. Deflagration to detonation transition in combustible gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, N.N.; Panfilov, I.I.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a computational investigation of the process of deflagration to detonation transition in a combustible gas mixture. The type of combustion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) supported by a two-step reaction scheme is studied as a function of the activation energies. It is shown that both a deflagration to detonation transition and a deflagration wave that lags behind a leading shock are possible. Two types of deflagration to detonation transitions are found theoretically: initiation of detonation from the flame zone and initiation of detonation along a contact discontinuity in the compressed gas near the primary shock wave.

  2. Ralf Deiterding H2-O2 detonation structures in smooth pipe bends Numerical Simulation of Transient Detonation

    E-print Network

    Deiterding, Ralf

    generator on top of the Chemkin-II library in advance. Since detonations involve shock waves, we use.O. Box 2008 MS6367, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA 1 Introduction Accidental internal detonation waves to quantify the failure potential of piping structures, es- pecially at bends, accurate detonation pressure

  3. Influence of sweeping detonation-wave loading on damage evolution during spallation loading of tantalum in both a planar and curved geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George Thompson III; Hull, Lawrence Mark; Livescu, Veronica; Faulkner, James; Briggs, Matthew E.; Meyer, Ross Keith; Andrews, Heather Lynn; Hare, Steven John; Jakulewicz, Micah Shawn; Shinas, Michael A.

    2015-03-30

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning the shock hardening, damage evolution, and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. However, fewer quantitative studies have been conducted on the effect of direct, in-contact, high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave (unsupported shocks) loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Systematic studies quantifying the effect of sweeping-detonation wave loading are yet sparser. In this study, the damage evolution and spallation response of Ta is shown to be critically dependent on the peak shock stress, the geometry of the sample (flat or curved plate geometry), and the shock obliquity during sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading. Sweepingwave loading in the flat-plate geometry is observed to: a) yield a lower spall strength than previously documented for 1-D supported-shock-wave loading, b) exhibit increased shock hardening as a function of increasing obliquity, and c) lead to an increased incidence of deformation twin formation with increasing shock obliquity. Sweeping-wave loading of a 10 cm radius curved Ta plate is observed to: a) lead to an increase in the shear stress as a function of increasing obliquity, b) display a more developed level of damage evolution, extensive voids and coalescence, and lower spall strength with obliquity in the curved plate than seen in the flat-plate sweeping-detonation wave loading for an equivalent HE loading, and c) no increased propensity for deformation twin formation with increasing obliquity as seen in the flat-plate geometry. The overall observations comparing and contrasting the flat versus curved sweeping-wave spall experiments with 1D loaded spallation behavior suggests a coupled influence of obliquity and geometry on dynamic shock-induced damage evolution and spall strength. Coupled experimental and modeling research to quantify the combined effects of sweeping-wave loading with increasingly complex sample geometries on the shockwave response of materials is clearly crucial to providing the basis for developing and thereafter validation of predictive modeling capability.

  4. Analysis of Laser-Generated Impulse In An Airbreathing Pulsed Detonation Engine: Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Jacques C.; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2005-04-01

    An investigation is performed on an airbreathing laser propulsion (LP) system designed to propel a 1.4 m diameter, 120-kg (dry mass) vehicle called the Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator (LTD) into low Earth orbit, along with its opto-electronics payload. The LTD concept led directly to the model ?200 lightcraft — recently demonstrated in laboratory and flight experiments at White Sands Missile Range, NM at the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF), using the 10-kW PLVTS CO2 laser. The pulsed detonation wave engine (PDE) employs repetitively ignited, laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves to develop thrust by expanding high pressure blast waves over an annular, interior shroud surface. Numerical simulation of thruster impulse is accomplished with a 1-D cylindrical model of blast waves propagating radially outward from a laser-generated `line-source' of high temperature, high pressure air. External airflow over the LTD structure is also analyzed to predict basic engine/vehicle drag characteristics, including inlet total pressure recovery, and captured air mass flow rate — all projected vs. flight Mach number and altitude.

  5. Detonation transformations in an aerated liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrikov, B.N.; Kozak, G.D.; Oblomskii, V.B.; Savkin, A.V.

    1987-09-01

    The propagation of detonation waves (DW) in aerated fluid systems, capable of exothermal chemical reaction, is of great interest both from the theoretical standpoint and for providing safe conditions in chemical production. In this work the conditions for detonation transformations in liquid organic nitrogen derivatives - diethylene glycol dinitrate (DEGDN) and nitromethane - are studied. Initiation of detonation in porous nitromethane is described. The porosity was created by continuously passing air bubbles through the liquid.

  6. Detonation shock dynamics and comparisons with direct numerical simulation

    E-print Network

    Aslam, Tariq

    observed to change by as much as 40% due to multi-dimensional effects [3]. Failure of detonation waves hasDetonation shock dynamics and comparisons with direct numerical simulation Tariq D. Aslam , and D- nation and detonation shock dynamics (DSD) is made. The theory of DSD defines the motion

  7. Detonation shock dynamics and comparisons with direct numerical simulation

    E-print Network

    Aslam, Tariq

    ]. Failure of detonation waves has also been observed experimentally. Other dynamics, such as pulsatingDetonation shock dynamics and comparisons with direct numerical simulation Tariq D. Aslam # , and D­ nation and detonation shock dynamics (DSD) is made. The theory of DSD defines the motion

  8. Autoignitions and detonations in engines and ducts.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Derek

    2012-02-13

    The origins of autoignition at hot spots are analysed and the pressure pulses that arise from them are related to knock in gasoline engines and to developing detonations in ducts. In controlled autoignition engines, autoignition is benign with little knock. There are several modes of autoignition and the existence of an operational peninsula, within which detonations can develop at a hot spot, helps to explain the performance of various engines. Earlier studies by Urtiew and Oppenheim of the development of autoignitions and detonations ahead of a deflagration in ducts are interpreted further, using a simple one-dimensional theory of the generation of shock waves ahead of a turbulent flame. The theory is able to indicate entry into the domain of autoignition in an 'explosion in the explosion'. Importantly, it shows the influence of the turbulent burning velocity, and particularly its maximum attainable value, upon autoignition. This value is governed by localized flame extinctions for both turbulent and laminar flames. The theory cannot show any details of the transition to a detonation, but regimes of eventually stable or unstable detonations can be identified on the operational peninsula. Both regimes exhibit transverse waves, triple points and a cellular structure. In the case of unstable detonations, transverse waves are essential to the continuing propagation. For hazard assessment, more needs to be known about the survival, or otherwise, of detonations that emerge from a duct into the same mixture at atmospheric pressure. PMID:22213665

  9. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  10. AlAA 95-2580 Experimental Investigation of Pulse Detonation

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    combustion instead of deflagration or subsonic combustion which conventional engines use. Detonation enginesAlAA 95-2580 Experimental Investigation of Pulse Detonation Wave Phenomenon as Related DETONATION WAVE PHENOMENON AS RELATED TO PROPULSION APPLICATION* Steven B. Stanley?, Karl R. Burgef

  11. Study of a Model Equation in Detonation Theory

    E-print Network

    Faria, Luiz M.

    Here we analyze properties of an equation that we previously proposed to model the dynamics of unstable detonation waves [A. R. Kasimov, L. M. Faria, and R. R. Rosales, Model for shock wave chaos, Phys. Rev. Lett., 110 ...

  12. Gravity Waves Gravity Waves

    E-print Network

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    flythrough #12;07/04/2015 26 Theory of Supernova Blast Waves Supernovae: Type Ia Subsonic deflagration wave turning into a supersonic detonation wave in outer layers. Mechanism: explosive carbon burning in a mass

  13. Detonation Phenomena of PBX Microsamples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Igor; Campos, Jose; Ribeiro, Jose; Mendes, Ricardo

    2001-06-01

    Detonation study of PBX micro-samples, based on HMX with an inert (HTPB, epoxy) or energetic (GAP) binder was developed on the mesoscale level, using the multifiber optical probes, of 50 ?m resolution, connected directly to a fast electronic streak camera with 0.5 ns of temporal resolution. This record system allows the 2D direct observation of particle-to-particle successive transition of ?-waves through the interparticle binder space. The obtained results show, when the individual coarse HMX particles are subjected to a strong shock wave (30 GPa), the pulsed, double phase, process of energy release (a fast initial phase followed by relatively slow second phase). Also it can be observed the cooperative formation of a multi-head detonation front (DF) in collections of particles surrounded by the binder and the synergetic effect, behind the DF, by the appearing of spatial-temporal dissipative structures, followed by the self-organization of DF oscillations.

  14. Demonstration of a multi-channel, low-profile wire gauge for tracing wave development and detonation turning in explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, Bradley E; Novak, Alan M; Zucker, Jonathan M; Parker, Jr, Gary R; Dickson, Peter; Foley, Timothy J; Trebs, Adam A

    2010-01-01

    The multi-channel low-profile wire gauge is a device which measures high pressure wave position via the continuous variation in length of a conductor in conjunction with a fiducial, allowing in situ measurement of wave front curvature during wave development. The gauge's low profile ({approx}250 {micro}m) and high resolution measurements (up to 0.5 nanoseconds) make it minimally intrusive and highly responsive, with a typically wave position accuracy of {+-}1 mm. Gauge construction and data analysis methods are described and waveforms are presented for Detasheet and N-9 explosives.

  15. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H2–O2–Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmore »in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.« less

  16. Methods for proving the equivalency of detonator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, Alan C; Akinci, Adrian A; Thomas, Keith A; Clarke, Steve A; Martin, Eric S; Murphy, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges facing engineers is developing newer, safer detonators that are equivalent to devices currently in use. There is no clear consensus on an exact method for drawing equivalence of detonators. This paper summarizes our current efforts to develop diagnostics addressing various aspects of detonator design to better quantify and prove equivalency. We consider various optical techniques to quantify the output pressure and output wave shape. The development of a unique interpretation of streak camera breakouts, known as the apparent center of initiation, will be discussed as a metric for detonation wave shape. Specific examples apply these techniques to the comparison of a new laser-driven detonator with an existing exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonator. Successes and short-comings of the techniques will be discussed.

  17. Excitation and quenching of detonation in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V. A.; Manuilovich, I. S.; Markov, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    The results of investigations on the problems of initiation, propagation, and stabilization of detonation waves and flowing combustible gaseous mixtures are presented. To describe the flows, we used ideal perfect gas equations and two models of the detonation wave: the classical infinitely thin model and a model in which behind the shock wave chemical reactions described by the single-stage kinetics for propane- and methane-air combustible mixtures proceed. Investigations were carried out by both analytical and numerical methods based on the S. K. Godunov scheme on stationary and movable computational meshes with explicit resolution of the bow shock and the surfaces separating gases with different properties.

  18. High temperature detonator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O. (Los Alamos, NM); Dinegar, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  19. Detonation diffraction in combustible high-speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Mingyue; Fan, Baochun; Li, Baoming

    2015-10-01

    Detonation propagating in a T-shaped tube with quiescent and moving hydrogen/oxygen/argon mixtures is numerically examined based on the Euler equations with detailed finite-rate chemistry using the fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme. When diffracted in a quiescent combustible mixture, the detonation wave propagating from the bottom of the T-shaped tube is influenced by the corner rarefaction waves and decays into a non-reacting shock. Subsequently, the decoupled shock reflects irregularly from the top wall. Through several reflections back and forth between the top and bottom walls, a planar detonation is finally re-established. When the combustible mixture in the horizontal part flows from the left to the right, the detonation products ejected from the vertical tube will retard the flow, generating a compression flow upstream and a rarefaction flow downstream. The disturbed detonation on the left side is stronger than that on the right side. The final planar detonation in the upstream direction propagates faster than the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation with compressed, fine cellular structures, whereas the detonation in the downstream direction propagates more slowly than the CJ detonation with elongated, coarse cellular structures. The details of the transient behavior of diffracting detonation in high-speed flows are discussed.

  20. The Physical Effects of Detonation in a Closed Cylindrical Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, C S

    1935-01-01

    Detonation in the internal-combustion engine is studied as a physical process. It is shown that detonation is accompanied by pressure waves within the cylinder charge. Sound theory is applied to the calculation of resonant pressure-wave frequencies. Apparatus is described for direct measurement of pressure-wave frequencies. Frequencies determined from two engines of different cylinder sizes are shown to agree with the values calculated from sound theory. An outline of the theoretically possible modes of vibration in a right circular cylinder with flat ends is included. An appendix by John P. Elting gives a method of calculating pressure in the sound wave following detonation.

  1. Electromagnetic Properties of Detonating Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Paul G.; Lee, Richard J.; Oxby, Troy; Perger, Warren; Kunz, Barry

    2001-06-01

    Current theories of reaction processes suggest that changes in electronic band structure and radiation producing dipole oscillations occur during shock loading of an energetic crystal prior to detonation. To test these theories, a broadband antenna, capable of measuring polarization, was employed to observe shock-induced electromagnetic radiation from a crystalline explosive, RDX. The frequency spectra from these experiments were analyzed using time/frequency Fourier methods. Changes in conductivity resulting from this shock loading were also measured at the opposite end of the crystal from the shock source. A four-point-probe arrangement was used to eliminate errors involving lead resistance. This arrangement uses two leads and a fast discharge circuit to pass current through the crystal interface at the time conductivity begins to change in conjunction with the arrival of the shock wave. Two separate leads are used to simultaneously measure the voltage. Voltage and current data are used to construct conductance versus time profiles preceding and during the detonation process. Also reported are corresponding light (observed with a high-speed electronic camera) and microwave emission observed during the passing of the shock wave in the RDX crystal prior to detonation.

  2. Computation of a diverging Comp-B detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Bukiet, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    The expansion which occurs in diverging detonations weakens the wave and yields pressures and densities below those occurring in planar geometry. We study the problem of a spherically expanding detonation of Comp-B. The effect of varying the order of reaction as well as the rate law parameters (using an Arrhenius burn model) is studied. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Detonation Phenomena of PBX Microsamples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, I.; Campos, J.; Ribeiro, J.; Mendes, R.

    2002-07-01

    Detonation study of PBX micro-samples, based in HMX with an inert (HTPB, epoxy) or energetic (GAP) binder was performed on the meso-scale level, using the multifiber optical probes of 50 mum of maximum resolution, connected directly to a fast electronic streak camera with 0.6 ns resolution. The direct 2D observation of particle to particle successive transition of transmitted shock wave, through the binder, allows to analyse and to discuss, not only the cooperative formation of a multihead detonation front (DF), in the collection of particles surrounded by binder, but also the synenergetic effect, behind the DF, by the appearing of dissipative structures drawing spatial and temporal DF oscillations.

  4. Detonation duct gas generator demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, Andrew; Brinlee, Gayl A.; Othmer, Peter; Whelan, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of the generation of detonation waves moving periodically across high speed channel flow is experimentally demonstrated. Such waves are essential to the concept of compressing requirements and increasing the engine pressure compressor with the objective of reducing conventional compressor requirements and increasing the engine thermodynamic efficiency through isochoric energy addition. By generating transient transverse waves, rather than standing waves, shock wave losses are reduced by an order of magnitude. The ultimate objective is to use such detonation ducts downstream of a low pressure gas turbine compressor to produce a high overall pressure ratio thermodynamic cycle. A 4 foot long, 1 inch x 12 inch cross-section, detonation duct was operated in a blow-down mode using compressed air reservoirs. Liquid or vapor propane was injected through injectors or solenoid valves located in the plenum or the duct itself. Detonation waves were generated when the mixture was ignited by a row of spark plugs in the duct wall. Problems with fuel injection and mixing limited the air speeds to about Mach 0.5, frequencies to below 10 Hz, and measured pressure ratios of about 5 to 6. The feasibility of the gas dynamic compression was demonstrated and the critical problem areas were identified.

  5. The role of diffusion at shear layers in irregular detonations Marco Arienti1

    E-print Network

    and thermal transport effects can be neglected in one-dimensional detonation waves. In reality, detonation, it is possible that diffusion can compete with convection as a transport mechanism and augment ignition transport of radicals and energy could play a significant role in the combustion mechanism of detonations

  6. Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame S. E of these regions can be supersonic and could initiate a detonation. Subject headings: supernovae: general a late time transition of the thermonuclear burning to a detonation wave (e.g., Hoflich et al. 1995

  7. Detonation command and control

    DOEpatents

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2015-11-10

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link therebetween. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  8. Hydrazine vapor detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedley, M. D.; Bishop, C. V.; Benz, F. J.; Bennett, C. A.; Mcclenagan, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    The detonation velocity and cell widths for hydrazine decomposition were measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. The detonation velocity in pure hydrazine was within 5 percent of the calculated C-J velocity. The detonation cell width measurements were interpreted using the Zeldovich-Doering-von Neumann model with a detailed reaction mechanism for hydrazine decomposition. Excellent agreement with experimental data for pure hydrazine was obtained using the empirical relation that detonation cell width was equal to 29 times the kinetically calculated reaction zone length.

  9. Explosives malfunction from sympathetic detonation to shock desensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Katsabanis, P.D.; Yeung, C.; Fitz, G.; Heater, R.

    1994-12-31

    Explosives malfunction due to shock waves is a serious concern for successful blasting results. Malfunction can range from sympathetic detonation to desensitization and modification of firing times of conventional pyrotechnic detonators. Decked charges consisting of commercial emulsion explosives having a detonator and a primer were placed in 10cm diameter blastholes and their performance was recorded. Due to the limited length of the holes the events were mainly sympathetic detonations although desensitization was also recorded. Pressure measurements along the stemming column showed that shock waves produced by an explosive have a significant amplitude even at relatively large distances away from the detonating explosive. It was found that 2m away from a detonating charge the pressures in the stemming material were above 0.1 GPa indicating that there is potential for primers and detonators to malfunction. Parallel charges consisting of a commercial emulsion explosive with a diameter of 32mm were confined in 2mm thick steel tubes and initiation was attempted using detonators having a delay interval of 25ms. The charges were placed in sand and the velocity of detonation of the acceptor charge was recorded using a continuous resistance probe system. Carbon resistors were also placed in the same position as the acceptor charge to examine the dynamic pressures that were applied to the charge. Sympathetic detonation, complete desensitization, partial desensitization and properly sequenced detonations were observed as the distance between charges was increased from 76 mm to 305 mm. Delay detonators were also tested in a similar to the last configuration. Modification of firing times was observed at distances between 150 and 360 mm.

  10. Explosive Products EOS: Adjustment for detonation speed and energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-05

    Propagating detonation waves exhibit a curvature effect in which the detonation speed decreases with increasing front curvature. The curvature effect is due to the width of the wave profile. Numerically, the wave profile depends on resolution. With coarse resolution, the wave width is too large and results in a curvature effect that is too large. Consequently, the detonation speed decreases as the cell size is increased. We propose a modification to the products equation of state (EOS) to compensate for the effect of numerical resolution; i.e., to increase the CJ pressure in order that a simulation propagates a detonation wave with a speed that is on average correct. The EOS modification also adjusts the release isentrope to correct the energy release.

  11. Prechamber initiation of detonation in gaseous mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    A process of deflagration-to-detonation transition in propane-butane-oxygen and acetylene-oxygen mixtures, in an open channel with a circular cross section with a diameter of 3 mm, was investigated experimentally. Detonation initiation was carried out by burning the mixture in the prechamber connected to the channel. The prechamber was considered as an extended source for the initiation of the detonation of a finite volume. To measure the velocity of a flame front, photodiodes, installed along the axis of the channel, were used. To determine the boundary conditions at the entrance to the channel, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used. The influence of the dimensions of the prechamber, equivalence ratio and fuel on the pressure profile, and evolution of the flame front along the axis of the channel are presented. It was shown that, the dynamics of the flame front and shock waves in the channel can occur in different scenarios depending on the geometry of the prechamber and equivalence ratio. Two limit effects of the prechamber detonation initiation in the channel have been analyzed. The pre-detonation distances and the minimal energy of direct initiation of the detonation were determined.

  12. Annihilation explosions in macroscopic polyelectrons. Photon detonation

    E-print Network

    Alexei M. Frolov

    2009-09-03

    Annihilation of the electron-positron pairs in macroscopic polyelectrons is considered. It is shown that very fast collapse of the spatial area occupied by macroscopic polyelectron (or dense electron-positron plasma) produces an instant annihilation of a very large number of electron-positron pairs. This phenomenon corresponds to the so-called annihilation explosion. Annihilation of each electron-positron pair is a highly exothermic process. Therefore, in dense electron-positron plasma one can observe a very interesting phenomenon of photon detonation, i.e. a self-organized formation and propagation of the detonation wave which coincides with the annihilation wave. The photon detonation can be used in many applications, including many military and astrophysical problems.

  13. Simplified modeling of transition to detonation in porous energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S. ); Asay, B.W. ); Prasad, K. )

    1994-07-01

    A simplified model that can predict the transitions from compaction to detonation and shock to detonation is given with the aim of describing experiments in beds of porous HMX. In the case of compaction to detonation, the energy of early impact generates a slowly moving, convective-reactive deflagration that expands near the piston face and evolves in a manner that is characteristic of confined deflagration to detonation transition. A single-phase state variable theory is adopted in contrast to a two-phase axiomatic mixture theory. The ability of the porous material to compact is treated as an endothermic process. Reaction is treated as an exothermic process. The algebraic (Rankine--Hugoniot) steady wave analysis is given for inert compaction waves and steady detonation waves in a piston supported configuration, typical of the experiments carried out in porous HMX. A structure analysis of the steady compaction wave is given. Numerical simulations of deflagration to detonation are carried out for parameters that describe an HMX-like material and compared with the experiments. The simple model predicts the high density plug that is observed in the experiments and suggests that the leading front of the plug is a secondary compaction wave. A shock to detonation transition is also numerically simulated.

  14. Atomistic simulation of detonation initiation by ultra-short impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzov, S. A.; Zhakhovsky, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of the classical molecular dynamics simulation of detonation initiation in simple AB model of a high explosive compressed by ultra-short shock wave (SW). The simplified reactive empirical bond order potential (REBO) defines interatomic forces in the AB model explosive made up of diatomic AB molecules. Simulation of ultra-short piston-driven compression of AB explosive with duration of picoseconds represents an indirect initiation via a thin metal foil irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse. We studied transition of SW to a detonation wave (DW), including evolution of calculated pressure profile in a sample. A run distance to detonation of such AB explosive film, which is required for detonation initiation, was obtained. Variation of loading time and piston velocity gives a 2D region of transition from SW to DW. The influence of pores on detonation initiation threshold is discussed.

  15. Exploding bridgewire detonator simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. R.; Tarley, R. C.; Tarpley, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Tests indicate that electric detonator simulators of the exploding bridgewire type will not fire as a result of the application of a direct current power of one watt for 5 minutes. The detonator also will not fire if the protective gap fails and the firing stimulus is inadvertently applied.

  16. Bidirectional slapper detonator

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, Robert N. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Melissa D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a bidirectional slapper detonator. One embodiment utilizes a single bridge circuit to detonate a pair of opposing initiating pellets. A line generator embodiment uses a plurality of bridges in electrical series to generate opposing cylindrical wavefronts.

  17. Reaction zone structure for strong, weak overdriven, and weak underdriven oblique detonations

    E-print Network

    solutions for a continuum of shock wave angles for two classes of solutions identified by a Rankine-Hugoniot detonations. Steady oblique detonations consisting of a straight lead shock attached to a solid wedge followed shock-wave angles. Chapman-Jouguet waves, however, are not admitted. These results contrast those

  18. Pulse Detonation Engine Test Bed Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    A detonation is a supersonic combustion wave. A Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) repetitively creates a series of detonation waves to take advantage of rapid burning and high peak pressures to efficiently produce thrust. NASA Glenn Research Center's Combustion Branch has developed a PDE test bed that can reproduce the operating conditions that might be encountered in an actual engine. It allows the rapid and cost-efficient evaluation of the technical issues and technologies associated with these engines. The test bed is modular in design. It consists of various length sections of both 2- and 2.6- in. internal-diameter combustor tubes. These tubes can be bolted together to create a variety of combustor configurations. A series of bosses allow instrumentation to be inserted on the tubes. Dynamic pressure sensors and heat flux gauges have been used to characterize the performance of the test bed. The PDE test bed is designed to utilize an existing calorimeter (for heat load measurement) and windowed (for optical access) combustor sections. It uses hydrogen as the fuel, and oxygen and nitrogen are mixed to simulate air. An electronic controller is used to open the hydrogen and air valves (or a continuous flow of air is used) and to fire the spark at the appropriate times. Scheduled tests on the test bed include an evaluation of the pumping ability of the train of detonation waves for use in an ejector and an evaluation of the pollutants formed in a PDE combustor. Glenn's Combustion Branch uses the National Combustor Code (NCC) to perform numerical analyses of PDE's as well as to evaluate alternative detonative combustion devices. Pulse Detonation Engine testbed.

  19. Experimental investigation of deflagration to detonation transition in hydrocarbon-air gaseous mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, N.N.; Tyurnikov, M.V.

    1995-03-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of deflagration to detonation transition in gas mixtures with exothermic chemical reaction using the experimental method of nonintrusive diagnostics of the process. Schlieren photochronography in the optical sections in different places of the tube is performed using the laser as a source of light. Experimental results of visualization of the transition process in hydrocarbon-air gas mixtures show several different flow patterns: (1) The detonation wave originates in the flame zone. (2) The detonation wave originates between the flame zone and primary shock wave. (3) The secondary combustion zone originates between primary shock and the flame and causes the detonation. (4) Spontaneous flame occurs that leads to the combustion to detonation transition. The influence of the flame zone on the originating strong detonation wave is noticed.

  20. Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Modeling of Recent HMX/TATB Detonation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig

    2015-06-01

    Ignition and Growth model parameters for detonating PBX 9501 (95%HMX, 2.5 %Estane, 2.5%BDNPAF) and PBX 9502 (95%TATB, 5%Kel-F800) are used to simulate two experiments in which detonating HMX-based PBX's accelerate slower detonating TATB PBX's. The measured HMX and TATB detonation velocities, the angles produced in the detonating TATB charges by the leading HMX detonation waves, the arrival times of the complex detonation wave front, and the PDV records measured at several positions along the interfaces between the two explosives and LiF windows are accurately calculated. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Modified Multiprocess Model of Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, Vladimir

    2001-06-01

    New powerful teraflops computers require hydrocodes of new generation with material models of new generation, i.e., high precision models based on perfect physical description of shock wave processes. Presented here Modified Multiprocess model of detonation (MMP model) is certain step in this strategical project. It is model for classical explosive compositions of PBX type. The MMP model describes process of explosive decomposition as a sum of two parallel processes, namely, heterogeneous and homogeneous decompositions. The heterogeneous process, i.e., hot spot process (which dominates at low pressure P<200 kbar) is described by two-modes mechanism. It is a new developed mechanism. It consists from the low pressure mode (when switching from outward to inward birn topology occurs at decomposition fraction equals about 0.76) and from high pressure mode (when switching occurs at decomposition fraction equals about 0.1). The homogeneous process (which dominates at high pressure P>200 kbar) is described by the so-called frontal mechanism. This mechanism consists from two stages: (1) intra-frontal stage and (2) post-frontal stage. The first stage describes process of electron excitation of explosive molecules (i.e., HMX, RDX, TNT molecules) in shock wave front and fast break-up of excited molecules with creation of primary radicals. The MMP model takes into account effect of decreasing excitation energy under compression. At the second stage these radicals generate some set of consecutive-parallel reactions which produce final products. The developed MMP model was incorporated into the DYNA3D hydrocode and demonstrates high accuracy in simulation of detonation processes. In particular, it reproduces extraordinarily well experimental profiles of particle velocity for shock to detonation transition process. It is consequence of high physical level of the MMP model.

  2. Detonation propagation in a high loss configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Shepherd, Joseph E

    2009-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study of detonation wave propagation in tubes with inner diameters (ID) comparable to the mixture cell size. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in two test section tubes with inner diameters of 1.27 mm and 6.35 mm. For both test sections, the initial pressure of stoichiometric mixtures was varied to determine the effect on detonation propagation. For the 6.35 mm tube, the equivalence ratio {phi} (where the mixture was {phi} C{sub 3}H{sub 8} + 50{sub 2}) was also varied. Detonations were found to propagate in mixtures with cell sizes as large as five times the diameter of the tube. However, under these conditions, significant losses were observed, resulting in wave propagation velocities as slow as 40% of the CJ velocity U{sub CJ}. A review of relevant literature is presented, followed by experimental details and data. Observed velocity deficits are predicted using models that account for boundary layer growth inside detonation waves.

  3. High Resolution Numerical Simulation of Detonation Diffraction of Condensed Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, A high resolution large scale parallel computation software is developed based on positivity preserving for finite difference WENO method, high order boundary treatment method, multi-medium interface treatment. A new method for deriving the partial derivative of pressure in respect of every conserved quantity is proposed. The software can simulate detonation diffraction problems for two-dimensional condensed explosives. The numerical simulation results revealed the forming reasons of the low-pressure region, the low-density region, the ``vortex'' region and the ``dead zone'' in the vicinity of the corner. Furthermore, it demonstrated that the retonation will generate along the inner wall, and it plays an important role in the process of detonation diffraction. Finally, we obtain that the propagating state of detonation wave around the corner is generally determined by two factors: the transverse shock wave along the inner wall downwards and the extending curved detonation wave.

  4. Modeling Hemispheric Detonation Experiments in 2-Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Fried, L E; Vitello, P A; Druce, R L; Phillips, D; Lee, R; Mudge, S; Roeske, F

    2006-06-22

    Experiments have been performed with LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder) to study scaling of detonation waves using a dimensional scaling in a hemispherical divergent geometry. We model these experiments using an arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE3D) hydrodynamics code, with reactive flow models based on the thermo-chemical code, Cheetah. The thermo-chemical code Cheetah provides a pressure-dependent kinetic rate law, along with an equation of state based on exponential-6 fluid potentials for individual detonation product species, calibrated to high pressures ({approx} few Mbars) and high temperatures (20000K). The parameters for these potentials are fit to a wide variety of experimental data, including shock, compression and sound speed data. For the un-reacted high explosive equation of state we use a modified Murnaghan form. We model the detonator (including the flyer plate) and initiation system in detail. The detonator is composed of LX-16, for which we use a program burn model. Steinberg-Guinan models5 are used for the metal components of the detonator. The booster and high explosive are LX-10 and LX-17, respectively. For both the LX-10 and LX-17, we use a pressure dependent rate law, coupled with a chemical equilibrium equation of state based on Cheetah. For LX-17, the kinetic model includes carbon clustering on the nanometer size scale.

  5. Equations of state for explosive detonation products: The PANDA model

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, G.I.

    1994-05-01

    This paper discusses a thermochemical model for calculating equations of state (EOS) for the detonation products of explosives. This model, which was first presented at the Eighth Detonation Symposium, is available in the PANDA code and is referred to here as ``the Panda model``. The basic features of the PANDA model are as follows. (1) Statistical-mechanical theories are used to construct EOS tables for each of the chemical species that are to be allowed in the detonation products. (2) The ideal mixing model is used to compute the thermodynamic functions for a mixture of these species, and the composition of the system is determined from assumption of chemical equilibrium. (3) For hydrocode calculations, the detonation product EOS are used in tabular form, together with a reactive burn model that allows description of shock-induced initiation and growth or failure as well as ideal detonation wave propagation. This model has been implemented in the three-dimensional Eulerian code, CTH.

  6. Measuring In-Situ Mdf Velocity Of Detonation

    DOEpatents

    Horine, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); James, Jr., Forrest B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-10-25

    A system for determining the velocity of detonation of a mild detonation fuse mounted on the surface of a device includes placing the device in a predetermined position with respect to an apparatus that carries a couple of sensors that sense the passage of a detonation wave at first and second spaced locations along the fuse. The sensors operate a timer and the time and distance between the locations is used to determine the velocity of detonation. The sensors are preferably electrical contacts that are held spaced from but close to the fuse such that expansion of the fuse caused by detonation causes the fuse to touch the contact, causing an electrical signal to actuate the timer.

  7. Indirect detonation initiation using acoustic timescale thermal power J. D. Regele, D. R. Kassoy, A. Vezolainen, and O. V. Vasilyev

    E-print Network

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) from a laminar flame or through direct initiation from a blast waveIndirect detonation initiation using acoustic timescale thermal power deposition J. D. Regele, D. R the multidimensional indirect detonation formation process for times 2 t 24 (enhanced online) [URL: http

  8. Detonation Diffraction into a Confined Volume 

    E-print Network

    Polley, Nolan Lee

    2012-02-14

    Detonation diffraction has been, and remains, an active area of research. However, detonation diffraction into a confined volume, and specifically the transformation of a planar detonation into a cylindrical detonation, ...

  9. Detonation structures generated by multiple shocks on ram-accelerator projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Kailasanath, K.; Oran, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    The detailed detonation structure generated by multiple shocks on ram-accelerator projectiles is studied using highly resolved numerical simulations. The simulations show that the detonation structure on the projectile consists of the following basic elements: nonreactive shocks, induction regions, deflagration waves, and detonation waves. The shape and location of these basic elements strongly depends on the projectile Mach number. In some cases, the induction region and the related detonation wave are primarily associated with one single shock. In other cases, the induction region extends across several shocks and the detonation structure is much more complex. These simulations also confirm that the detonations on the projectile are stable in a wide range of flow conditions and, therefore, can be used to generate the high pressure needed for projectile propulsion.

  10. A Virtual Test Facility for Simulating Detonation-induced Fracture of

    E-print Network

    Cirak, Fehmi

    -79, Pasadena CA 91125, USA {ralf,cirak,sean,dim}@cacr.caltech.edu WWW home page: http to the passage of an ethylene-oxygen detonation wave is presented. 1 Introduction The Center for Simulation tube due to an internal detonation wave in ethylene-oxygen. Simulations of this type will be compared

  11. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in paragraph 11.1.7. 4.2Deflagration—A combustion wave that propagates subsonically (as measured at... to the unburned gas ahead of the flame front. 4.3Detonation—A reaction in a combustion wave.... A detonation is stable when it has a velocity equal to the speed of sound in the burnt gas or may...

  12. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in paragraph 11.1.7. 4.2Deflagration—A combustion wave that propagates subsonically (as measured at... to the unburned gas ahead of the flame front. 4.3Detonation—A reaction in a combustion wave.... A detonation is stable when it has a velocity equal to the speed of sound in the burnt gas or may...

  13. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in paragraph 11.1.7. 4.2Deflagration—A combustion wave that propagates subsonically (as measured at... to the unburned gas ahead of the flame front. 4.3Detonation—A reaction in a combustion wave.... A detonation is stable when it has a velocity equal to the speed of sound in the burnt gas or may...

  14. Evaluating detonation possibilities in a Hanford radioactive waste tank

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, J.R.; Fujita, R.K.; Ross, M.C.; Edwards, J.N.; Shepherd, J.E.

    1994-07-01

    Since the early 1940s, radioactive wastes generated from the defense operations at the Hanford Site have been stored in underground waste storage tanks. During the intervening years, the waste products in some of these tanks have transformed into a potentially hazardous mixture of gases and solids as a result of radiolytic and thermal chemical reactions. One tank in particular, Tank 101-SY, has been periodically releasing high concentrations of a hydrogen/nitrous oxide/nitrogen/ ammonia gas mixture into the tank dome vapor space. There are concerns that under certain conditions a detonation of the flammable gas mixture may occur. There are two ways that a detonation can occur during a release of waste gases into the dome vapor splice: (1) direct initiation of detonation by a powerful ignition source, and (2) deflagration to detonation transition (DDT). The first case involves a strong ignition source of high energy, high power, or of large size (roughly 1 g of high explosive (4.6 kj) for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture{sup 1}) to directly initiate a detonation by ``shock`` initiation. This strong ignition is thought to be incredible for in-tank ignition sources. The second process involves igniting the released waste gases, which results in a subsonic flame (deflagration) propagating into the unburned combustible gas. The flame accelerates to velocities that cause compression waves to form in front of the deflagration combustion wave. Shock waves may form, and the combustion process may transition to a detonation wave.

  15. Multiple-cycle Simulation of a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, S.; Perkins, H. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study involving single and multiple-cycle numerical simulations of various PDE-ejector configurations utilizing hydrogen-oxygen mixtures. The objective was to investigate the thrust, impulse and mass flow rate characteristics of these devices. The results indicate that ejector systems can utilize the energy stored in the strong shock wave exiting the detonation tube to augment the impulse obtained from the detonation tube alone. Impulse augmentation ratios of up to 1.9 were achieved. The axial location of the converging-diverging ejectors relative to the end of the detonation tube were shown to affect the performance of the system.

  16. Metalized heterogeneous detonation and dense reactive particle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan

    2012-03-01

    Metalized heterogeneous detonation and subsequent dense reactive particle flow have become a rapidly growing research area. Selected recent developments are reviewed with an emphasis on particle aspects in three parts: detonation-particle interactions, particle reaction and instability of particle dynamics. This includes the breakdown of the CJ detonation, detonation shock interaction effects on wave velocity, critical failure diameter, post-combustion and particle morphology, shocked particle reaction mechanism, critical charge diameter for particle reaction, multiple heat release laws, aerodynamic fragmentation combustion, particle dynamic instability, which leads to clustering, agglomeration and coherent jet structure, and its mechanisms through the role of stochastic particle interactions with shock waves and fluid vorticity and turbulence. These advances have laid down the fundamentals for the next stage of developments.

  17. Attenuation of a hydrogen-air detonation by acoustic absorbing covering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.; Ivanov, K. V.; Korobov, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    Using of sound-absorbing surfaces to weaken and decay of a detonation wave in hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated experimentally. Experiments were carried out in a cylindrical detonation tube open at one end. Initiation of the explosive mixture was carried out by a spark discharge, which is located at the closed end of the detonation tube. Acoustical sound absorbing foam element of a specific weight of 0.035 g/cm3 with open pores of 0.5 mm was used. The degree of attenuation of the intensity of the detonation wave front was determined.

  18. Deflagration to Detonation

    E-print Network

    A. M. Khokhlov

    1999-10-25

    Thermonuclear explosions of Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) involve turbulent deflagrations, detonations, and possibly a deflagration-to-detonation transition. A phenomenological delayed detonation model of SNIa successfully explains many observational properties of SNIa including monochromatic light curves, spectra, brightness - decline and color - decline relations. Observed variations among SNia are explained as a result of varying nickel mass synthesised in an explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass C/O white dwarf. Based on theoretical models of SNIa, the value of the Hubble constant H_o \\simeq 67km/s/Mpc was determined without the use of secondary distance indicators. The cause for the nickel mass variations in SNIa is still debated. It may be a variation of the initial C/O ratio in a supernova progenitor, rotation, or other effects.

  19. Reverse slapper detonator

    DOEpatents

    Weingart, Richard C. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  20. Synchro-ballistic recording of detonation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Critchfield, R.R.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.; Davis, W.C.; Ferm, E.N.; Idar, D.J.

    1997-09-01

    Synchro-ballistic use of rotating-mirror streak cameras allows for detailed recording of high-speed events of known velocity and direction. After an introduction to the synchro-ballistic technique, this paper details two diverse applications of the technique as applied in the field of high-explosives research. In the first series of experiments detonation-front shape is recorded as the arriving detonation shock wave tilts an obliquely mounted mirror, causing reflected light to be deflected from the imaging lens. These tests were conducted for the purpose of calibrating and confirming the asymptotic Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) theory of Bdzil and Stewart. The phase velocities of the events range from ten to thirty millimeters per microsecond. Optical magnification is set for optimal use of the film`s spatial dimension and the phase velocity is adjusted to provide synchronization at the camera`s maximum writing speed. Initial calibration of the technique is undertaken using a cylindrical HE geometry over a range of charge diameters and of sufficient length-to-diameter ratio to insure a stable detonation wave. The final experiment utilizes an arc-shaped explosive charge, resulting in an asymmetric detonation-front record. The second series of experiments consists of photographing a shaped-charge jet having a velocity range of two to nine millimeters per microsecond. To accommodate the range of velocities it is necessary to fire several tests, each synchronized to a different section of the jet. The experimental apparatus consists of a vacuum chamber to preclude atmospheric ablation of the jet tip with shocked-argon back lighting to produce a shadow-graph image.

  1. Delayed detonations in full-star models of Type Ia supernova explosions

    E-print Network

    Roepke, F K

    2007-01-01

    Aims: We present the first full-star three-dimensional explosion simulations of thermonuclear supernovae including parameterized deflagration-to-detonation transitions that occur once the flame enters the distributed burning regime. Methods: Treating the propagation of both the deflagration and the detonation waves in a common front-tracking approach, the detonation is prevented from crossing ash regions. Results: Our criterion triggers the detonation wave at the outer edge of the deflagration flame and consequently it has to sweep around the complex structure and to compete with expansion. Despite the impeded detonation propagation, the obtained explosions show reasonable agreement with global quantities of observed type Ia supernovae. By igniting the flame in different numbers of kernels around the center of the exploding white dwarf, we set up three different models shifting the emphasis from the deflagration phase to the detonation phase. The resulting explosion energies and iron group element productions...

  2. In-Situ Continuous Detonation Velocity Measurements Using Fiber-optic Bragg Grating Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Udd, E; Wilkins, P; Roeske, F; Roos, E; Jackson, D

    2007-07-25

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation and detonation research requires continuous measurement of low order detonation velocities as the detonation runs up to full order detonation for a given density and initiation pressure pulse. A novel detector of detonation velocity is presented using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber with an integral chirped fiber Bragg grating as an intrinsic sensor. This fiber is embedded in the explosive under study and interrogated during detonation as the fiber Bragg grating scatters light back along the fiber to a photodiode, producing a return signal dependant on the convolution integral of the grating reflection bandpass, the ASE intensity profile and the photodetector response curve. Detonation velocity is measured as the decrease in reflected light exiting the fiber as the grating is consumed when the detonation reaction zone proceeds along the fiber sensor axis. This small fiber probe causes minimal perturbation to the detonation wave and can measure detonation velocities along path lengths tens of millimeters long. Experimental details of the associated equipment and preliminary data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within nitromethane and PBX-9502 are presented.

  3. Type Ia Supernova Explosion: Gravitationally Confined Detonation

    E-print Network

    Tomasz Plewa; Alan Calder; Don Lamb

    2004-05-08

    We present a new mechanism for Type Ia supernova explosions in massive white dwarfs. The proposed scenario follows from relaxing the assumption of symmetry in the model and involves a detonation created in an unconfined environment. The explosion begins with an essentially central ignition of stellar material initiating a deflagration. This deflagration results in the formation of a buoyantly-driven bubble of hot material that reaches the stellar surface at supersonic speeds. The bubble breakout forms a strong pressure wave that laterally accelerates fuel-rich outer stellar layers. This material, confined by gravity to the white dwarf, races along the stellar surface and is focused at the location opposite to the point of the bubble breakout. These streams of nuclear fuel carry enough mass and energy to trigger a detonation just above the stellar surface. The flow conditions at that moment support a detonation that will incinerate the white dwarf and result in an energetic explosion. The stellar expansion following the deflagration redistributes stellar mass in a way that ensures production of intermediate mass and iron group elements consistent with observations. The ejecta will have a strongly layered structure with a mild amount of asymmetry following from the early deflagration phase. This asymmetry, combined with the amount of stellar expansion determined by details of the evolution (principally the energetics of deflagration, timing of detonation, and structure of the progenitor), can be expected to create a family of mildly diverse Type Ia supernova explosions.

  4. Detonation and deflagration properties of pyrotechnic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Katsumi

    1996-07-01

    Theoretical calculation of detonation and deflagration properties of pyrotechnic mixtures have been performed including report charges and display charges. Calculation were performed with the KHT (Kihara-Hikta-Tanaka) code. KHT results are compared with a modified version of the TIGER code which allows calculation with 900 gaseous and 600 condensed product species at high pressure. Detonation properties computed by KHT and BKWS (Becker-Kistiakowskii-Wilson) give favorable agreement with experimental results of detonation velocity measurements. Hydrodynamic computation by one dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code using the isentrope given by KHT constant volume explosion, indicated that experimental results for blast wave measurement for 30kg and 50kg of report charge were an incomplete reaction. Underwater detonation experiments with explosive charge of 25g, however, indicates a more energetic nature than the KHT prediction. This scale effect indicates complicated slow reactions and a number of condensed phase deflagration products of powder mixtures such as aluminum or titanium with oxidizers such as potassium perchlorate or nitrate salts as suggested by Hobbs et al.

  5. On the theory of the propagation of detonation in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldovich, Y B

    1950-01-01

    The existing theory of detonation is critically examined. It is shown that the considerations with which the steady value of the velocity of detonation is chosen are not convincing. In connection with the problem of the process of the chemical reaction in a detonation wave, the objections raised against the conceptions of Le Chatelier and Vieille of the 19th century with regard to the ignition of the gas by the shock wave are refuted. On the basis of this concept, it is possible to give a rigorous foundation for the existing method of computing the detonation velocity. The distributions of the temperature, the pressure, and the velocity in the detonation wave front as the chemical reaction proceeds, are considered. On the assumption of the absence of losses, the pure compression of the gas in the shock wave at the start of the chemical reaction develops a temperature that is near the temperature of combustion of the given mixture at constant pressure.

  6. Printable sensors for explosive detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Matthew J. Cooling, Nathan A.; Elkington, Daniel C.; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C.; Muller, Elmar

    2014-10-06

    Here, we report the development of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based on printable solution processed polymers and employing a quantum tunnelling composite material as a sensor to convert the pressure wave output from detonation transmission tubing (shock tube) into an inherently amplified electronic signal for explosives initiation. The organic electronic detector allows detection of the signal in a low voltage operating range, an essential feature for sites employing live ordinances that is not provided by conventional electronic devices. We show that a 30-fold change in detector response is possible using the presented detector assembly. Degradation of the OTFT response with both time and repeated voltage scans was characterised, and device lifetime is shown to be consistent with the requirements for on-site printing and usage. The integration of a low cost organic electronic detector with inexpensive shock tube transmission fuse presents attractive avenues for the development of cheap and simple assemblies for precisely timed initiation of explosive chains.

  7. RESPONSE OF ALUMINUM SPHERES IN SITU TO DETONATION

    SciTech Connect

    Molitoris, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Batteux, J D; Wong, B M; Villafana, R J; Cracchiola, B A; Forbes, J W

    2010-03-26

    Time sequence x-ray imaging was utilized to determine the response of aluminum spheres embedded in a detonating high-explosive cylinder. The size of these spheres ranged from 3/8-inch to 1/32-inch in diameter. These experiments directly observed the response of the spheres as a function of time after interaction with the detonation wave. As the spheres are entrained in the post-detonation flow field, they are accelerating and their velocity profile is complicated, but can be determined from the radiography. Using the aluminum spheres as tracers, radial velocities of order 1.6 mm/us and horizontal velocities of order 0.08 mm/us were measured at early times post detonation. In terms of response, these data show that the largest sphere deforms and fractures post detonation. The intermediate size spheres suffer negligible deformation, but appear to ablate post detonation. Post detonation, the smallest spheres either react, mechanically disintegrate, atomize as a liquid or some combination of these.

  8. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A

    2005-12-21

    Many energetic systems can be activated via mechanical means. Percussion primers in small caliber ammunition and stab detonators used in medium caliber ammunition are just two examples. Current medium caliber (20-60mm) munitions are detonated through the use of impact sensitive stab detonators. Stab detonators are very sensitive and must be small, as to meet weight and size limitations. A mix of energetic powders, sensitive to mechanical stimulus, is typically used to ignite such devices. Stab detonators are mechanically activated by forcing a firing pin through the closure disc of the device and into the stab initiating mix. Rapid heating caused by mechanically driven compression and friction of the mixture results in its ignition. The rapid decomposition of these materials generates a pressure/temperature pulse that is sufficient to initiate a transfer charge, which has enough output energy to detonate the main charge. This general type of ignition mix is used in a large variety of primers, igniters, and detonators.[1] Common primer mixes, such as NOL-130, are made up of lead styphnate (basic) 40%, lead azide (dextrinated) 20%, barium nitrate 20%, antimony sulfide 15%, and tetrazene 5%.[1] These materials pose acute and chronic toxicity hazards during mixing of the composition and later in the item life cycle after the item has been field functioned. There is an established need to replace these mixes on toxicity, health, and environmental hazard grounds. This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic solgel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs), which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash metal multilayer and sol-gel to be generic technologies applicable to a wide range of devices, especially in small caliber ammunition and sub-munitions. We will replace the NOL-130 mixture with a nanocomposite that consists of a mechanically robust energetic multilayer foil that has been coated with a sol-gel energetic material. The exothermic reactions are activated in this nanocomposite are the transformation of the multilayer material to its respective intermetallic alloy and the thermite reaction, which is characterized by very high temperatures, a small pressure pulse, and hot particle ejection. The proposed materials and their reaction products consist of, but are not limited to aluminum, nickel, iron, aluminum oxide, titanium, iron oxide and boron. These materials have much more desirable environmental and health characteristics than the NOL-130 composition.

  9. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Lord Kahil

    A number of promising alternative rocket propulsion concepts have been developed over the past two decades that take advantage of unsteady combustion waves in order to produce thrust. These concepts include the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE), in which repetitive ignition, propagation, and reflection of detonations and shocks can create a high pressure chamber from which gases may be exhausted in a controlled manner. The Pulse Detonation Rocket Induced Magnetohydrodynamic Ejector (PDRIME) is a modification of the basic PDRE concept, developed by Cambier (1998), which has the potential for performance improvements based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thrust augmentation. The PDRIME has the advantage of both low combustion chamber seeding pressure, per the PDRE concept, and efficient energy distribution in the system, per the rocket-induced MHD ejector (RIME) concept of Cole, et al. (1995). In the initial part of this thesis, we explore flow and performance characteristics of different configurations of the PDRIME, assuming quasi-one-dimensional transient flow and global representations of the effects of MHD phenomena on the gas dynamics. By utilizing high-order accurate solvers, we thus are able to investigate the fundamental physical processes associated with the PDRIME and PDRE concepts and identify potentially promising operating regimes. In the second part of this investigation, the detailed coupling of detonations and electric and magnetic fields are explored. First, a one-dimensional spark-ignited detonation with complex reaction kinetics is fully evaluated and the mechanisms for the different instabilities are analyzed. It is found that complex kinetics in addition to sufficient spatial resolution are required to be able to quantify high frequency as well as low frequency detonation instability modes. Armed with this quantitative understanding, we then examine the interaction of a propagating detonation and the applied MHD, both in one-dimensional and two-dimensional transient simulations. The dynamics of the detonation are found to be affected by the application of magnetic and electric fields. We find that the regularity of one-dimensional cesium-seeded detonations can be significantly altered by reasonable applied magnetic fields (Bz ? 8T), but that it takes a stronger applied field (Bz > 16T) to significantly alter the cellular structure and detonation velocity of a two-dimensional detonation in the time in which these phenomena were observed. This observation is likely attributed to the additional coupling of the two-dimensional detonation with the transverse waves, which are not captured in the one-dimensional simulations. Future studies involving full ionization kinetics including collisional-radiative processes, will be used to examine these processes in further detail.

  10. Influence of discrete sources on detonation propagation in a Burgers equation analog system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, XiaoCheng; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2015-05-01

    An analog to the equations of compressible flow that is based on the inviscid Burgers equation is utilized to investigate the effect of spatial discreteness of energy release on the propagation of a detonation wave. While the traditional Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) treatment of a detonation wave assumes that the energy release of the medium is homogeneous through space, the system examined here consists of sources represented by ? functions embedded in an otherwise inert medium. The sources are triggered by the passage of the leading shock wave following a delay that is either of fixed period or randomly generated. The solution for wave propagation through a large array (103-104) of sources in one dimension can be constructed without the use of a finite difference approximation by tracking the interaction of sawtooth-profiled waves for which an analytic solution is available. A detonation-like wave results from the interaction of the shock and rarefaction waves generated by the sources. The measurement of the average velocity of the leading shock front for systems of both regular, fixed-period and randomized sources is found to be in close agreement with the velocity of the equivalent CJ detonation in a uniform medium, wherein the sources have been spatially homogenized. This result may have implications for the applicability of the CJ criterion to detonations in highly heterogeneous media (e.g., polycrystalline, solid explosives) and unstable detonations with a transient and multidimensional structure (e.g., gaseous detonation waves).

  11. Influence of discrete sources on detonation propagation in a Burgers equation analog system.

    PubMed

    Mi, XiaoCheng; Higgins, Andrew J

    2015-05-01

    An analog to the equations of compressible flow that is based on the inviscid Burgers equation is utilized to investigate the effect of spatial discreteness of energy release on the propagation of a detonation wave. While the traditional Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) treatment of a detonation wave assumes that the energy release of the medium is homogeneous through space, the system examined here consists of sources represented by ? functions embedded in an otherwise inert medium. The sources are triggered by the passage of the leading shock wave following a delay that is either of fixed period or randomly generated. The solution for wave propagation through a large array (10^{3}-10^{4}) of sources in one dimension can be constructed without the use of a finite difference approximation by tracking the interaction of sawtooth-profiled waves for which an analytic solution is available. A detonation-like wave results from the interaction of the shock and rarefaction waves generated by the sources. The measurement of the average velocity of the leading shock front for systems of both regular, fixed-period and randomized sources is found to be in close agreement with the velocity of the equivalent CJ detonation in a uniform medium, wherein the sources have been spatially homogenized. This result may have implications for the applicability of the CJ criterion to detonations in highly heterogeneous media (e.g., polycrystalline, solid explosives) and unstable detonations with a transient and multidimensional structure (e.g., gaseous detonation waves). PMID:26066256

  12. New detonation concepts for propulsion and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Eric M.

    A series of related analytical and experimental studies are focused on utilizing detonations for emerging propulsion and power generation devices. An understanding of the physical and thermodynamic processes for this unsteady thermodynamic cycle has taken over 100 years to develop. An overview of the thermodynamic processes and development history is provided. Thermodynamic cycle analysis of detonation-based systems has often been studied using surrogate models. A real gas model is used for a thermal efficiency prediction of a detonation wave based on the work and heat specified by process path diagrams and a control volume analysis. A combined first and second law analysis aids in understanding performance trends for different initial conditions. A cycle analysis model for an airbreathing, rotating detonation wave engine (RDE) is presented. The engine consists of a steady inlet system with an isolator which delivers air into an annular combustor. A detonation wave continuously rotates around the combustor with side relief as the flow expands towards the nozzle. Air and fuel enter the combustor when the rarefaction wave pressure behind the detonation front drops to the inlet supply pressure. To create a stable RDE, the inlet pressure is matched in a convergence process with the average combustor pressure by increasing the annulus channel width with respect to the isolator channel. Performance of this engine is considered using several parametric studies. RDEs require a fuel injection system that can cycle beyond the limits of mechanical valves. Fuel injectors composed of an orifice connected to a small plenum cavity were mounted on a detonation tube. These fuel injectors, termed fluidic valves, utilize their geometry and a supply pressure to deliver fuel and contain no moving parts. Their behavior is characterized in order to determine their feasibility for integration with high-frequency RDEs. Parametric studies have been conducted with the type of fuel injected, the orifice diameter, and the plenum cavity pressure. Results indicate that the detonation wave pressure temporarily interrupts the fluidic valve supply, but the wave products can be quickly expelled by the fresh fuel supply to allow for refueling. The interruption time of the valve scales with injection and detonation wave pressure ratios as well as a characteristic time. The feasibility of using a detonation wave as a source for producing power in conjunction with a linear generator is considered. Such a facility can be constructed by placing a piston--spring system at the end of a pulsed detonation engine (PDE). Once the detonation wave reflects off the piston, oscillations of the system drive the linear generator. An experimental facility was developed to explore the interaction of a gaseous detonation wave with the piston. Experimental results were then used to develop a model for the interaction. Governing equations for two engine designs are developed and trends are established to indicate a feasible design space for future development.

  13. Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations and their transition to detonation

    E-print Network

    Saif, Mohamed; Pekalski, Andrzej; Levin, Marc; Radulescu, Matei I

    2015-01-01

    We study experimentally fast flames and their transition to detonation in mixtures of methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, and propane mixtures with oxygen. Following the interaction of a detonation wave with a column of cylinders of varying blockage ratio, the experiments demonstrate that the fast flames established are Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations, in excellent agreement with the self-similar model of Radulescu et al. (2015). The experiments indicate that these Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations dynamically restructure and amplify into fewer stronger modes until the eventual transition to detonation. The transition length to a self-sustained detonation was found to correlate very well with the mixtures' sensitivity to temperature fluctuations, reflected by the $\\chi$ parameter introduced by Radulescu, which is the product of the non-dimensional activation energy $E_a/RT$ and the ratio of chemical induction to reaction time $t_i/t_r$. Correlation of the measured DDT lengths determined that the relevant characte...

  14. Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Kopczewski, M.R.; Schwarz, A.C.

    1985-01-04

    The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives. 3 figs.

  15. Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Kopczewski, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Schwarz, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives.

  16. Material properties effects on the detonation spreading and propagation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Elizabeth Green; Morris, John S; Novak, Alan M; Kennedy, James E

    2010-01-01

    Recent dynamic testing of Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) has focused on understanding the material properties affecting the detonation propagation, spreading, behavior and symmetry. Small scale gap testing and wedge testing focus on the sensitivity to shock with the gap test including the effects of particle size and density. Floret testing investigates the detonation spreading as it is affected by particle size, density, and binder content. The polyrho testing illustrates the effects of density and binder content on the detonation velocity. Finally the detonation spreading effect can be most dramatically seen in the Mushroom and Onionskin tests where the variations due to density gradients, pressing methods and geometry can be seen on the wave breakout behavior.

  17. Application of a Schlieren diagnostic to the behavior of exploding bridge wire and laser detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael J; Clarke, Steven A; Munger, Alan C; Thomas, Keith A

    2009-01-01

    Even though the exploding bridge wire (EBW) detonator has been in use for over 60 years, there are still discussions about the mechanism for achieving detonation. Los Alamos has been developing a high-power laser detonator to function in a manner similar to an EBW. Schlieren imaging techniques are applied to laser-driven detonator output in polydimethylsiloxane (POMS) samples to investigate the time-dependent geometry of the shock wave and to obtain instantaneous measurements of shock-front velocity. Velocity Hugoniot data are used to convert measured shock velocities to corresponding particle velocities, allowing instantaneous shock pressures to be obtained via Rankine-Hugoniot relations across the shock.

  18. Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    -exponential factor for Arrhenius law E Specific total energy Ej r , Ej f Activation energy fn Flux function F n,±1 Ns Number of species p Pressure of mixture R Universal gas constant W Molecular weight of mixture our understanding of the physics of detonations. I.A. Detonation Wave Composition Figure 1. Schlieren

  19. From combustion and detonation to nitrogen oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Klumov, B. A.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper looks at Ya B Zeldovich's ideas on the combustion and detonation physics of gaseous mixtures and how they evolved as work in this field progressed. The paper demonstrates the fundamental role of Zeldovich's concept of spontaneous combustion waves in studying transient initiation processes for various combustion regimes and in determining the energy and concentration inflammation limits for combustible gaseous mixtures. It shows how his notion that flame front stretching crucially influences flame acceleration in channels explains in a new way the deflagration-to-detonation transition in highly reactive gaseous mixtures. Most of the presented results were obtained by simulations, allowing Zeldovich's ideas to be extended to the combustion of real gaseous mixtures, where chemical reactions and gasdynamical flows add hugely to the complexity of the problem. The paper concludes by using Zeldovich's mechanism to assess the amount of nitrogen oxide produced by a lightning discharge.

  20. Precursors in detonations in porous explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Spaulding, R.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Photographs of detonation waves in low-density HMX and PETN, made with an image-intensifier camera, show a brilliant band of light in front of the pressure jump. The radiation temperature is estimated to be 12,000 to 14,000/sup 0/K. The spectrum of this light is continuous. A quartz gauge shows a gradual buildup of pressure from the material producing the light. The material has little effect on the propagation of detonation. Further observations, using pellets of plastic-bonded HMX and single crystals of PETN, show that the material thrown off the free surface is transparent, with a leading edge moving at approximately 20 mm/..mu..s. Collision of this material with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) produces a brilliant light with a spectrum that is initially a narrow H/sub ..cap alpha../ line. Quartz gauges measure the rate of pessure buildup of this material.

  1. Recent work on gaseous detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, M. A.

    The paper reviews recent progress in the field of gaseous detonations, with sections on shock diffraction and reflection, the transition to detonation, hybrid, spherically-imploding, and galloping and stuttering fronts, their structure, their transmission and quenching by additives, the critical energy for initiation and detonation of more unusual fuels. The final section points out areas where our understanding is still far from being complete and contains some suggestions of ways in which progress might be made.

  2. Experimental Study on DDT Characteristics in Spiral Configuration Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Qiu, Hua; Fan, Wei; Xiong, Cha

    2013-09-01

    This work investigated features of the deflagration to detonation transition in a curved tube. A number of experiments were performed to acquire the transition rule of DDT, which would provide the design data and theoretical basis for the curved detonation chamber. The content of research is as follows: (1) Flow resistance experiments of nine detonation chambers have been explored. The results show that the spiral configuration can reduce the axial length of DC, and the total pressure recovery coefficient increases with the spiral pitch. (2) Single-cycle detonation experiments have been conducted using the 9 tubes in the resistance experiments. Liquid-gasoline/air is used as the detonative mixture in all the experiments. The detonation experimental results indicate that there is no detonation wave formed in the straight tube, but in all the selected spiral tubes fully-developed detonation waves have been obtained; compared to the straight tube case, the DDT time decrease with the decreasing of the radius of curvature (RC) by 6.2%˜19.8% in the spiral detonation tubes.

  3. Detonation Shock Dynamics for Porous Explosives and Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Juan A.; Stewart, D. Scott

    2009-12-01

    An explosive powder subjected to mechanical or thermal loading undergoes micro structural changes that cause the density to increase and the material to be compacted. The energy that drives compaction is absorbed by the material as the microstructure changes and the specific internal energy of the solid-void mixture increases due to the increase in density as voids become occupied by solids. These changes affect the reactive properties of the material and the mechanics and dynamics of detonation waves in explosive powders. The effects of explosive powder compaction on detonation wave dynamics have not been well characterized. Here we use the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) to analyze the effects of compaction on the dynamics and geometry of detonation waves in explosive powders. We apply DSD theory using a simplified equation of state (EOS) that has been shown to represent the effects of compaction that lead to deflagration to detonation transition in explosive powders. We will show results from the numerical solution of the DSD theory equations as well as from asymptotic DSD theory.

  4. Detonation Shock Dynamics for Porous Explosives and Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Juan; Stewart, D. Scott

    2009-06-01

    An explosive powder subjected to mechanical or thermal loading undergoes microstructural changes that cause the density to increase and the material to be compacted. The energy that drives compaction is absorbed by the material as the microstructure changes and the specific internal energy of the solid-void mixture increases due to the increase in density as voids become occupied by solids. These changes affect the reactive properties of the material and the mechanics and dynamics of detonation waves in explosive powders. The effects of explosive powder compaction on detonation wave dynamics have not been well characterized. Here we use the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) to analyze the effects of compaction on the dynamics and geometry of detonation waves in explosive powders. We apply DSD theory using a simplified equation of state (EOS) that has been shown to represent the effects of compaction that lead to deflagration to detonation transition in explosive powders. We will show results from the numerical solution of the DSD theory equations as well as from asymptotic DSD theory.

  5. Low voltage nonprimary explosive detonator

    DOEpatents

    Dinegar, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Kirkham, John (Newbury, GB2)

    1982-01-01

    A low voltage, electrically actuated, nonprimary explosive detonator is disclosed wherein said detonation is achieved by means of an explosive train in which a deflagration-to-detonation transition is made to occur. The explosive train is confined within a cylindrical body and positioned adjacent to low voltage ignition means have electrical leads extending outwardly from the cylindrical confining body. Application of a low voltage current to the electrical leads ignites a self-sustained deflagration in a donor portion of the explosive train which then is made to undergo a transition to detonation further down the train.

  6. The Effect of the Pre-detonation Stellar Internal Velocity Profile on the Nucleosynthetic Yields in Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C., IV; Graziani, Carlo; Meyer, B. S.; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W.

    2013-07-01

    A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of ?-particle nuclei, including 56Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to 56Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the ?-particle nuclei, including 56Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter ?up/v down, where ?up is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v down is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v down depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

  7. Suppression of gas detonation by a dust cloud at reduced mixture pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaev, A. V.; Vasil'ev, A. A.; Pinaev, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    The decay of a detonation wave in a mixture propagating through a dust cloud is experimentally studied for three types of silica sand with particle sizes 250-600, 120-250, and 90-120 , mean volume densities 2.2-3.5 g/l, and initial pressure 0.1-0.01 MPa. A non-monotonic character of reduction of wave velocity in the dust cloud is observed, where a secondary detonation can arise behind the leading front of the wave in the course of its attenuation. This situation is induced by the dual role of sand particles in decelerating the flow and simultaneously generating hot spots that promote reaction excitation. As a result, the mechanism of ignition in the decaying detonation wave becomes different. Critical parameters of the dust cloud providing complete suppression of the detonation wave and the flame propagating behind the latter at a reduced initial pressure of the gas mixture are determined.

  8. Detonation failure characterization of non-ideal explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesheski, Robert S.; Groven, Lori J.; Son, Steven

    2012-03-01

    Non-ideal explosives are currently poorly characterized, hence limiting the modeling of them. Current characterization requires large-scale testing to obtain steady detonation wave characterization for analysis due to the relatively thick reaction zones. Use of a microwave interferometer applied to small-scale confined transient experiments is being implemented to allow for time resolved characterization of a failing detonation. The microwave interferometer measures the position of a failing detonation wave in a tube that is initiated with a booster charge. Experiments have been performed with ammonium nitrate and various fuel compositions (diesel fuel and mineral oil). It was observed that the failure dynamics are influenced by factors such as chemical composition and confiner thickness. Future work is planned to calibrate models to these small-scale experiments and eventually validate the models with available large scale experiments. This experiment is shown to be repeatable, shows dependence on reactive properties, and can be performed with little required material.

  9. Structure and Stability of One-Dimensional Detonations in Ethylene-Air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, S.; Radhakrishnan, K.; Perkins, High D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of one-dimensional detonations in ethylene-air mixtures is investigated numerically by solving the one-dimensional Euler equations with detailed finite-rate chemistry. The numerical method is based on a second-order spatially accurate total-variation-diminishing scheme and a point implicit, first-order-accurate, time marching algorithm. The ethylene-air combustion is modeled with a 20-species, 36-step reaction mechanism. A multi-level, dynamically adaptive grid is utilized, in order to resolve the structure of the detonation. Parametric studies over an equivalence ratio range of 0.5 less than phi less than 3 for different initial pressures and degrees of detonation overdrive demonstrate that the detonation is unstable for low degrees of overdrive, but the dynamics of wave propagation varies with fuel-air equivalence ratio. For equivalence ratios less than approximately 1.2 the detonation exhibits a short-period oscillatory mode, characterized by high-frequency, low-amplitude waves. Richer mixtures (phi greater than 1.2) exhibit a low-frequency mode that includes large fluctuations in the detonation wave speed; that is, a galloping propagation mode is established. At high degrees of overdrive, stable detonation wave propagation is obtained. A modified McVey-Toong short-period wave-interaction theory is in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations.

  10. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p(sub 2)/p(sub 1) approx. 34 and D approx. 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (=6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front. In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T. and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Ohm. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the MHD interaction exerted a negligible influence on system thrust and that the measured I(sub sp) of the system (200 sec) exceeded that computed for an equivalent nozzleless rocket (120 sec).

  11. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p2/p1 approximately 34 and D approximately 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (approximately = 6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front, In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T, and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Omega. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the NM interaction exerted a negligible influence on system thrust and that the measured I(sub sp) of the system (200 see) exceeded that computed for an equivalent nozzleless rocket (120 see).

  12. Effect of slow energy releasing on divergent detonation of Insensitive High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaomian; Pan, Hao; Huang, Yong; Wu, Zihui

    2014-03-01

    There exists a slow energy releasing (SER) process in the slow reaction zone located behind the detonation wave due to the carbon cluster in the detonation products of Insensitive High Explosives (IHEs), and the process will affect the divergent detonation wave's propagation and the driving process of the explosives. To study the potential effect, a new artificial burn model including the SER process based on the programmed burn model is proposed in the paper. Quasi-steady analysis of the new model indicates that the nonlinearity of the detonation speed as a function of front curvature owes to the significant change of the reaction rate and the reaction zone length at the sonic state. What's more, in simulating the detonation of IHE JB-9014, the new model including the slow reaction can predict a slower jump-off velocity, in good agreement with the result of the test.

  13. Evaluating detonation possibilities in a Hanford radioactive waste tank

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, J.R.; Fujita, R.K.; Ross, M.C.; Edwards, J.N.; Shepherd, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    Since the early 1940s, radioactive wastes generated from the defense operations at the Hanford site have been stored in underground waste storage tanks. During the intervening years, the waste products in some of these tanks have transformed into a potentially hazardous mixture of gases and solids as a result of radiolytic and thermal chemical reactions. One tank in particular, tank 241-SY-101, has been periodically releasing high concentrations of a hydrogen/nitrous oxide/nitrogen/ammonia gas mixture into the tank dome vapor space. The purpose of this study is to determine the conditions under which a detonation of the flammable gas mixture may occur and damage the tank system. There are two ways that a detonation can occur during a release of waste gases into the dome vapor space: direct initiation of detonation by a powerful ignition source and deflagration to detonation transition (DDT). The first case involves a strong ignition source of high energy, high power, or of large size [{approximately}1 g of high explosive (4.6 kJ) for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture] to directly initiate a detonation by {open_quotes}shock{close_quotes} initiation. This strong ignition is thought to be incredible for in-tank ignition sources. The second process involves igniting the released waste gases, which results in a subsonic flame (deflagration) propagating into the unburned combustible gas. The flame accelerates to velocities that cause compression waves to form in front of the deflagration combustion wave. Shock waves may form and the combustion process may be transformed to a detonation wave.

  14. Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael John; Adrian, Ronald J

    2009-01-01

    A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

  15. Smooth blasting with the electronic delay detonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Ichijo, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Yoshiharu

    1995-12-31

    The authors utilized electronic detonators (EDs) to investigate the effect of high detonator delay accuracy on overbreak, remaining rock damage, and surface smoothness, in comparison with that of long-period delay detonators (0.25 sec interval) PDs. The experiments were conducted in a deep mine, in a test site region composed of very hard granodiorite with a seismic wave velocity of about 6.0 km/sec and a uniaxial compressive strength, uniaxial tensile strength, and Young`s modulus of 300 MPa, 12 MPa, and 73 GPa, respectively. The blasting design was for a test tunnel excavation of 8 m{sup 2} in cross section, with an advance per round of 2.5 m. Five rounds were performed, each with a large-hole cut and perimeter holes in a 0.4-m spacing charged with 20-mm-diameter water gel explosive to obtain low charge concentration. EDs were used in the holes on the perimeter of the right half, and PDs were used in all other holes. Following each shot, the cross section was measured by laser to determine amount of overbreak and surface smoothness. In situ seismic prospecting was used to estimate the depth of damage in the remaining rock, and the damage was further investigated by boring into both side walls.

  16. Reaction zone measurements in detonating aluminized explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Lubyatinsky, S.N.; Loboiko, B.G.

    1996-05-01

    Detonation reaction zone measurements have been made on five RDX-based explosives (60 {mu}m average particle size RDX), containing 6{percent} polymer binder and from 0 to 19{percent} aluminum of different particle size (from 2 {mu}m to 20 {mu}m). A photoelectric technique was employed to record the radiation intensity history of the shock front propagating through chloroform in contact with the charge face. The record was then translated into the explosive/chloroform interface velocity history. In all cases, the Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering detonation wave structure was observed. Aluminum particle size was found to have no appreciable effect on the reaction zone length, which increases from 0.34 mm to 0.58 mm as aluminum content increases from 0 to 19{percent}. Nevertheless, the reaction zone lengths of the studied explosives are less than that of RDX/TNT 50/50 (0.59 mm), which implies relatively high rate of the reaction between aluminum and RDX detonation products. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

    1983-08-16

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

  18. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, Roy A. (Livermore, CA); von Holle, William G. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

  19. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Grubelich, Mark C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length.

  20. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1999-01-19

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length. 3 figs.

  1. Detonation Failure Characterization of Non-Ideal Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesheski, Robert; Son, Steven; Groven, Lori

    2011-06-01

    Non-ideal explosives are currently poorly characterized, which limits the modeling of them. Current characterization requires large-scale testing to obtain detonation wave characterization for analysis due to the relatively thick reaction zones. Use of a microwave interferometer applied to small-scale confined experiments is being implemented to allow for time resolved characterization of a failing detonation. The microwave interferometer measures the failing detonation wave in a tube, and this experiment only requires small amounts of non-ideal explosives. A non-ideal explosive is initiated with a booster charge and a measurement of the failure distance and a continuous position-time trace of the detonation front location can be obtained. Initial tests have been performed that show this method is feasible using an ammonium perchlorate (AP) composite propellant as a model non-ideal explosive. Future work will apply this approach to non-ideal explosives. Successful results of this method would allow for the calibration of detonation models for many different non-ideal explosives. This project was funded by the Department of Homeland Security through the Center of Excellence for Explosive Detection, Mitigation, and Response under award number 080409/0002251.

  2. Pulse Detonation Rocket Magnetohydrodynamic Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Jones, J. E.; Dobson, C. C.; Cole, J. W.; Thompson, B. R.; Plemmons, D. H.; Turner, M. W.

    2003-01-01

    The production of onboard electrical power by pulse detonation engines is problematic in that they generate no shaft power; however, pulse detonation driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation represents one intriguing possibility for attaining self-sustained engine operation and generating large quantities of burst power for onboard electrical systems. To examine this possibility further, a simple heat-sink apparatus was developed for experimentally investigating pulse detonation driven MHD generator concepts. The hydrogen oxygen fired driver was a 90 cm long stainless steel tube having a 4.5 cm square internal cross section and a short Schelkin spiral near the head end to promote rapid formation of a detonation wave. The tube was intermittently filled to atmospheric pressure and seeded with a CsOH/methanol prior to ignition by electrical spark. The driver exhausted through an aluminum nozzle having an area contraction ratio of A*/A(sub zeta) = 1/10 and an area expansion ratio of A(sub zeta)/A* = 3.2 (as limited by available magnet bore size). The nozzle exhausted through a 24-electrode segmented Faraday channel (30.5 cm active length), which was inserted into a 0.6 T permanent magnet assembly. Initial experiments verified proper drive operation with and without the nozzle attachment, and head end pressure and time resolved thrust measurements were acquired. The exhaust jet from the nozzle was interrogated using a polychromatic microwave interferometer yielding an electron number density on the order of 10(exp 12)/cm at the generator entrance. In this case, MHD power generation experiments suffered from severe near-electrode voltage drops and low MHD interaction; i.e., low flow velocity, due to an inherent physical constraint on expansion with the available magnet. Increased scaling, improved seeding techniques, higher magnetic fields, and higher expansion ratios are expected to greatly improve performance.

  3. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics A Pulsed Detonation Based Multimode Engine

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    -Jouguet Mach number, (3) An oblique detonation wave mode of operation for Mach numbers in the airbreathing to be comparable or superior to existing RBCC designs. Present research is a collaborative work of HyPerComp, Inc

  4. Preliminary Design of a Pulsed Detonation Based Combined Cycle Engine Ramakanth Munipalli*

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    at combustion chamber Mach numbers less than the Chapman-Jouguet Mach number, (3) An oblique detonation wave. Resulting thrust and specific impulse values have been found to be comparable or superior to existing RBCC

  5. Direct Observations of Reaction Zone Structure in Propagating Detonations

    E-print Network

    Barr, Al

    of self-sustaining, cellular detonations propagating near the Chapman-Jouguet state in hydrogen- oxygen-argon/nitrogen of keystone-shaped regions of low reactivity behind the incident shock near the end of the oscillation cycle the transverse waves were orthogonal with respect to the side walls and the optical path. In nitrogen

  6. The dynamics of unsteady detonation in ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq D; Powers, Joseph M

    2008-01-01

    An ultra-fine, sub-micron discrete grid is used to capture the unsteady dynamics of a one-dimensional detonation in an inviscid O - O{sub 2} - O{sub 3} mixture. The ultra-fine grid is necessary to capture the length scales revealed by a complementary analysis of the steady detonation wave structure. For the unsteady calculations, shock-fitting coupled with a high order spatio-temporal discretization scheme combine to render numerical corruption negligible. As a result, mathematically verified solutions for a mixture initially of all O{sub 3} at one atmosphere and 298.15 K have been obtained; the solutions are converging at a rate much faster than the sub-first order convergence rate of all shock-capturing schemes. Additionally, the model has been validated against limited experimental data. Transient calculations show that strongly overdriven waves are stable and moderately overdriven waves unstable. New limit cycle behavior is revealed, and the first high resolution bifurcation diagram for etonation with detailed kinetics is found.

  7. The role of cellular structure on increasing the detonability limits of three-step chain-branching detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Kiyanda, Charles B; Quirk, James J; Sharpe, Gary J

    2011-01-27

    In [1], the dynamics of a pulsating three-step chain-branching detonation were studied. The reaction model consists of, sequentially, chain-initiation, chain-branching and chain-termination steps. The chain-initiation and chain-branching steps are taken to be thermally neutral, with chemical energy release occuring in the chain-termination stage. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether cellular detonation structure can increase the value of the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b} at which fully coupled detonation solutions are observed over those in 1 D. The basic concept is straightforward and has been discussed in [1] and [3]; if T{sub s} drops below T{sub b} at the lead shock, the passage of a transverse shock can increase both the lead shock temperature and the temperature behind the transverse wave back above T{sub b}, thus sustaining an unstable cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} for which a one-dimensional pulsating detonation will fail. Experiments potentially supporting this hypothesis with irregular detonations have been shown in [3] in a shock tube with acoustically absorbing walls. Removal of the transverse waves results in detonation failure, giving way to a decoupled shock-flame complex. A number of questions remain to be addressed regarding the possibility of such a mechanism, and, if so, about the precise mechanisms driving the cellular structure for large T{sub b}. For instance, one might ask what sets the cell size in a chain-branching detonation, particularly could the characteristic cell size be set by the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b}: after a transverse wave shock collision, the strength of the transverse wave weakens as it propagates along the front. If the spacing between shock collisions is too large (cell size), then the transverse shocks may weaken to the extent that the lead shock temperature or that behind the transverse waves is not raised above T{sub b}, losing chemical energy to drive the front in those regions. Failure may result if less than sufficient of the lead shock be driven above n to sustain reaction. Our starting point for generating cellular solutions is as in [I], consisting of an initial ZND wave in the channel, but perturbed here by a density non-uniformity to generate a cellular structure. Exactly how far the detonability limits (value of T{sub b}) can be extended is not addressed here, as such issues relate in part to the way the cellular structure is generated [6]. Our concern here is to investigate the mechanisms of self-sustained cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} above those that lead to 1D pulsating wave failure that can be generated from the initial ZND wave. Finally, we do not consider cellular propagation driven by a process of apparent thermal ignition of hot-spots downstream that tends to appear close to the 20 detonability limit. Such events are subject to the lack of correct thermal diffusive physics in the model and thus to the form of numerical dissipation in the underlying flow algorithm.

  8. The influence of structural response on sympathetic detonation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The role that a munition's structural response plays in the ignition process and the development of violent reactions and detonations is explored. The munition's structural response is identified as one of the factors that influences reaction violence. If the structural response of a round is known, this knowledge can be used to redstruce the probability that a large explosion would result from the sequential detonation of individual rounds within a large storage array. The response of an acceptor round was studied. The castings fail in the same manner regardless of whether or not there is a fill material present in the round. These failures are caused by stress waves which are transformed from compressive waves to tensile waves by reflection as the impact energy moves around the casting. Since these waves move in opposite directions around the projectile circumference and collide opposite the point of impact, very high tensile forces are developed which can crack the casing.

  9. Preparation of C60 by Detonation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xianfeng; Han, Yong; Long, Xinping

    2012-11-01

    A mixture of TNT (Trinitrotoluene) and natural graphite was detonated in a vacuum container which was immersed into cooling water; detonation products were collected for detecting. The results of mass spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography showed significant signals of C60, which proved that C60 could be synthesized by detonating the mixture of TNT/graphite and the detonation pressure was around 12.3 GPa and the detonation temperature was around 1985 K.

  10. New generation detonics

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.

    1996-12-15

    Modern theory is being used to accelerate the development of new high performance explosive molecules. Combining quantum chemistry calculations with synthesis of promising candidate molecules may enable the advance of the state of the art in this field by more than 50 years. We have established a high explosive performance prediction code by linking the thermochemical code CHEETAH with the ab initio electronic structure code GAUSSIAN and the molecular packing code MOLPAK. GAUSSIAN is first used to determine the shape of the molecule and its binding energy; the molecules are then packed together into a low energy configuration by MOLPAK. Finally, CHEETAH is used to transform the crystal energy and density into explosive performance measures such as detonation velocity, pressure, and energy. Over 70 target molecules have been created, and several of these show promise in combining performance, chemical stability, and ease of synthesis.

  11. Vortex formation in a proposed detonation internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loth, Eric

    1995-05-01

    A possible configuration for taking advantage of detonation combustion in an internal combustion engine is described, which uses a separate detonation combustion chamber that discharges tangentially into a vortex chamber formed by the piston and cylinder at top dead center. The vortex chamber is designed to efficiently store a portion of the kinetic energy produced by the detonation wave in the form of a vortex, which would subsequently be converted into static pressure. By placing this chamber above the piston surface, the detonation and primary shock waves are directed parallel to the piston surface, thus avoiding potentially destructive loads to the piston. The rapid burning followed by mixing with air in the vortex chamber may reduce the formation of NOx and unburned hydrocarbons as compared to conventional combustion. Such a configuration may efficiently take advantage of clean-burning slow-deflagrating fuels such as natural gas to yield constant volume-type efficiencies. Shock wave propagation through the vortex chamber was simulated to qualitatively observe the vortex storage and rapid mixing characteristics.

  12. Development of an Actuator for Flow Control Utilizing Detonation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonneman, Patrick J.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2004-01-01

    Active flow control devices including mass injection systems and zero-net-mass flux actuators (synthetic jets) have been employed to delay flow separation. These devices are capable of interacting with low-speed, subsonic flows, but situations exist where a stronger crossflow interaction is needed. Small actuators that utilize detonation of premixed fuel and oxidizer should be capable of producing supersonic exit jet velocities. An actuator producing exit velocities of this magnitude should provide a more significant interaction with transonic and supersonic crossflows. This concept would be applicable to airfoils on high-speed aircraft as well as inlet and diffuser flow control. The present work consists of the development of a detonation actuator capable of producing a detonation in a single shot (one cycle). Multiple actuator configurations, initial fill pressures, oxidizers, equivalence ratios, ignition energies, and the addition of a turbulence generating device were considered experimentally and computationally. It was found that increased initial fill pressures and the addition of a turbulence generator aided in the detonation process. The actuators successfully produced Chapman-Jouguet detonations and wave speeds on the order of 3000 m/s.

  13. Detonation tube impulse in sub-atmospheric environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Marcia A.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2005-04-01

    The thrust from a multi-cycle, pulse detonation engine operating at practical flight altitudes will vary with the surrounding environment pressure. We have carried out the first experimental study using a detonation tube hung in a ballistic pendulum arrangement within a large pressure vessel in order to determine the effect that the environment has on the single-cycle impulse. The air pressure inside the vessel surrounding the detonation tube varied between 100 and 1.4 kPa while the initial pressure of the stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen mixture inside the tube varied between 100 and 30 kPa. The original impulse model (Wintenberger et al., Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2002) was modified to predict the observed increase in impulse and blow down time as the environment pressure decreased below one atmosphere. Comparisons between the impulse from detonation tubes and ideal, steady flow rockets indicate incomplete expansion of the detonation tube exhaust, resulting in a 37% difference in impulse at a pressure ratio (ratio of pressure behind the Taylor wave to the environment pressure) of 100.

  14. Detonation propagation in hydrogen-air mixtures with transverse concentration gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeck, L. R.; Berger, F. M.; Hasslberger, J.; Sattelmayer, T.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of transverse concentration gradients on detonation propagation in {H}_2 -air mixtures is investigated experimentally in a wide parameter range. Detonation fronts are characterized by means of high-speed shadowgraphy, OH* imaging, pressure measurements, and soot foils. Steep concentration gradients at low average {H}_2 concentrations lead to single-headed detonations. A maximum velocity deficit compared to the Chapman-Jouguet velocity of 9 % is observed. Significant amounts of mixture seem to be consumed by turbulent deflagration behind the leading detonation. Wall pressure measurements show high local pressure peaks due to strong transverse waves caused by the concentration gradients. Higher average {H}_2 concentrations or weaker gradients allow for multi-headed detonation propagation.

  15. Metalized Heterogeneous Detonation and Dense Reactive Particle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan

    2011-06-01

    A metalized explosive system comprises a condensed-phase explosive and a large quantity of reactive metal particles, in an attempt to exploit the high energy content of the particles through their rapid combustion. Detonation in such heterogeneous matter and subsequent reaction of the metal particles under strong shock conditions constitute a new area in the dynamics and combustion of dense particle flow, which is characterized by a large number of particle interactions through shocked interstitial fluid or direct inelastic collisions. Progress in the fundamentals of this field is reviewed with an emphasis on particle aspects in three parts: detonation-particle interactions, particle ignition and reaction, and dynamic instabilities of particles. The paper begins with the unique characteristics of the subject heterogeneous detonation including the breakdown of the CJ detonation and detonation shock interaction effects on wave velocity, critical failure diameter, momentum transfer and morphology of particles. Secondly, the concept of a critical diameter for particle ignition, shocked particle reaction mechanism, multiple heat release history and aerodynamic secondary fragmentation combustion are described. Thirdly, particle dynamic instabilities lead to clustering, collisions and coherent jet structure and influence not only the aerodynamic trajectories but also the particle-gas mixing and subsequent energy release. Their mechanisms are revealed through the role of stochastic particle interactions with shock waves and fluid vorticity and turbulence on the formation of the trajectory instabilities of the particles. A hybrid detonation mode is finally invoked to exploit the energy release limit of metal particles. The paper is portrayed in a large number of experiments combined with meso-scale modeling and theoretical explanation.

  16. Electromagnetic Properties of Pre-detonating Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, G. P.; Lee, R. J.; Oxby, T. J.; Perger, W. F.

    2002-07-01

    Current theories of reaction processes suggest that changes in electronic band structure and radiation producing dipole oscillations occur during shock loading of an energetic crystal prior to detonation. To test these theories, a broadband antenna, capable of measuring polarization, was employed to observe shock-induced electromagnetic radiation from a crystalline explosive, RDX. The frequency spectra from these experiments were analyzed using time/frequency Fourier methods. Changes in conductivity resulting from this shock loading were also measured at the opposite end of the crystal from the shock source. A four-point-probe arrangement was used to eliminate errors involving lead resistance. This arrangement uses two leads and a fast discharge circuit to pass current through the crystal interface at the time conductivity begins to change in conjunction with the arrival of the shock wave. Also reported are corresponding light (observed with a high-speed electronic camera) and sub-microwave emission observed during the passing of the shock wave in the RDX crystal prior to detonation.

  17. 75 FR 3160 - Commerce in Explosives-Storage of Shock Tube With Detonators (2005R-3P)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ...detonators because these materials when stored together do not pose a mass detonation hazard. Shock tube is a small diameter plastic laminate tube coated with a very thin layer of explosive material. When initiated, it transmits a low energy wave from...

  18. The Los Alamos detonating pellet test (DPT): PBX 9501 evaluation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, D. N.; Hill, L. G.; Tappan, B. C.

    2014-05-01

    High explosive (HE) Velocity of Detonation (VOD) measurements are usually conducted using rate-stick-type tests. This method is highly accurate if carefully implemented, but is relatively costly and may require kilograms or more of HE depending on its sensitivity. We present a novel technique for inferring VOD using a single HE pellet, which for Conventional High Explosives (CHEs) can use 10 gm of HE or even less. This attribute makes the Detonating Pellet Test (DPT) ideal for the preliminary performance characterization of newly synthesized HE materials. On the other end of the size spectrum, the DPT can be scaled to very large dimensions so as to minimize the HE load necessary to characterize highly insensitive HEs such as ANFO. The DPT exploits the fact that the detonation emerging from the pellet face can be made highly spherical over some central region. Spherical detonation breakout on the Sample Pellet (SP) face is described by a simple analytic equation, which depends on the VOD and the Center Of Initiation (COI). The latter is determined by separate characterization of the detonator, with a wave refraction correction at the detonator/SP interface. The SP VOD is then determined by fitting the ideal breakout equation, with specified detonator COI, to detonation breakout data obtained via streak camera. We develop the DPT method and appraise it using sample PBX 9501 data in particular, while discussing its benefits and limitations in general.

  19. Optimization of detonation velocity measurements using a chirped fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarin, Y.; Lefrançois, A.; Zaniolo, G.; Chuzeville, V.; Jacquet, L.; Magne, S.; Luc, J.; Osmont, A.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic measurements of detonation velocity profiles are performed using long Chirped Fiber Bragg Gratings (CFBGs). Such thin probes, with a diameter of typically 150 ?m, are inserted directly into a high explosive sample or simply positioned laterally. During the detonation, the width of the reflected optical spectrum is continuously reduced by the propagation of the wave-front, which physically shortens the CFBG. The reflected optical intensity delivers a ramp down signal type, which is directly related to the detonation velocity profile. Experimental detonation velocity measurements were performed on the side of three different high explosives (TNT, B2238 and V401) in a bare cylindrical stick configuration (diameter: 2 inches, height: 10 inches). The detonation velocity range covered was 6800 to 9000 m/s. The extraction of the detonation velocity profiles requires a careful calibration of the system and of the CFBG used. A calibration procedure was developed, with the support of optical simulations, to cancel out the optical spectrum distortions from the different optical components and to determine the wavelength-position transfer function of the CFBG in a reproducible way. The 40-mm long CFBGs were positioned within the second half of the three high explosive cylinders. The excellent linearity of the computed position-time diagram confirms that the detonation was established for the three high explosives. The fitted slopes of the position-time diagram give detonation velocity values which are in very good agreement with the classical measurements obtained from discrete electrical shorting pins.

  20. Towards Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and MHD Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Thompson, Bryan R.; Lineberry, John T.

    1999-01-01

    The interest in pulse detonation engines (PDE) arises primarily from the advantages that accrue from the significant combustion pressure rise that is developed in the detonation process. Conventional rocket engines, for example, must obtain all of their compression from the turbopumps, while the PDE provides additional compression in the combustor. Thus PDE's are expected to achieve higher I(sub sp) than conventional rocket engines and to require smaller turbopumps. The increase in I(sub sp) and the decrease in turbopump capacity must be traded off against each other. Additional advantages include the ability to vary thrust level by adjusting the firing rate rather than throttling the flow through injector elements. The common conclusion derived from these aggregated performance attributes is that PDEs should result in engines which are smaller, lower in cost, and lighter in weight than conventional engines. Unfortunately, the analysis of PDEs is highly complex due to their unsteady operation and non-ideal processes. Although the feasibility of the basic PDE concept has been proven in several experimental and theoretical efforts, the implied performance improvements have yet to be convincingly demonstrated. Also, there are certain developmental issues affecting the practical application of pulse detonation propulsion systems which are yet to be fully resolved. Practical detonation combustion engines, for example, require a repetitive cycle of charge induction, mixing, initiation/propagation of the detonation wave, and expulsion/scavenging of the combustion product gases. Clearly, the performance and power density of such a device depends upon the maximum rate at which this cycle can be successfully implemented. In addition, the electrical energy required for direct detonation initiation can be significant, and a means for direct electrical power production is needed to achieve self-sustained engine operation. This work addresses the technological issues associated with PDEs for integrated aerospace propulsion and MHD power. An effort is made to estimate the energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of potential fuel/oxidizer mixtures and to determine the electrical power requirements. This requirement is evaluated in terms of the possibility for MHD power generation using the combustion detonation wave. Small scale laboratory experiments were conducted using stoichiometric mixtures of acetylene and oxygen with an atomized spray of cesium hydroxide dissolved in alcohol as an ionization seed in the active MHD region. Time resolved thrust and MHD power generation measurements were performed. These results show that PDEs yield higher I(sub sp) levels than a comparable rocket engine and that MHD power generation is viable candidate for achieving self-excited engine operation.

  1. Development and qualification testing of a laser-ignited, all-secondary (DDT) detonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blachowski, Thomas J.; Krivitsky, Darrin Z.; Tipton, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    The Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHDIV, NSWC) is conducting a qualification program for a laser-ignited, all-secondary (DDT) explosive detonator. This detonator was developed jointly by IHDIV, NSWC and the Department of Energy's EG&G Mound Applied Technologies facility in Miamisburg, Ohio to accept a laser initiation signal and produce a fully developed shock wave output. The detonator performance requirements were established by the on-going IHDIV, NSWC Laser Initiated Transfer Energy Subsystem (LITES) advanced development program. Qualification of the detonator as a component utilizing existing military specifications is the selected approach for this program. The detonator is a deflagration-to-detonator transfer (DDT) device using a secondary explosive, HMX, to generate the required shock wave output. The prototype development and initial system integration tests for the LITES and for the detonator were reported at the 1992 International Pyrotechnics Society Symposium and at the 1992 Survival and Flight Equipment National Symposium. Recent results are presented for the all-fire sensitivity and qualification tests conducted at two different laser initiation pulses.

  2. Delayed detonations in full-star models of Type Ia supernova explosions

    E-print Network

    F. K. Roepke; J. C. Niemeyer

    2007-03-14

    Aims: We present the first full-star three-dimensional explosion simulations of thermonuclear supernovae including parameterized deflagration-to-detonation transitions that occur once the flame enters the distributed burning regime. Methods: Treating the propagation of both the deflagration and the detonation waves in a common front-tracking approach, the detonation is prevented from crossing ash regions. Results: Our criterion triggers the detonation wave at the outer edge of the deflagration flame and consequently it has to sweep around the complex structure and to compete with expansion. Despite the impeded detonation propagation, the obtained explosions show reasonable agreement with global quantities of observed type Ia supernovae. By igniting the flame in different numbers of kernels around the center of the exploding white dwarf, we set up three different models shifting the emphasis from the deflagration phase to the detonation phase. The resulting explosion energies and iron group element productions cover a large part of the diversity of type Ia supernovae. Conclusions: Flame-driven deflagration-to-detonation transitions, if hypothetical, remain a possibility deserving further investigation.

  3. On the neutralization of bacterial spores in post-detonation flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottiparthi, K. C.; Schulz, J. C.; Menon, S.

    2014-09-01

    In multiple operational scenarios, explosive charges are used to neutralize confined or unconfined stores of bacterial spores. The spore destruction is achieved by post-detonation combustion and mixing of hot detonation product gases with the ambient flow and spore clouds. In this work, blast wave interaction with bacterial spore clouds and the effect of post-detonation combustion on spore neutralization are investigated using numerical simulations. Spherical explosive charges (radius, = 5.9 cm) comprising of nitromethane are modeled in the vicinity of a spore cloud, and the spore kill in the post-detonation flow is quantified. The effect of the mass of the spores and the initial distance, , of the spore cloud from the explosive charge on the percentage of spores neutralized is investigated. When the spores are initially placed within a distance of 3.0, within 0.1 ms after detonation of the charge, all the spores are neutralized by the blast wave and the hot detonation product gases. In contrast, almost all the spores survived the explosion when is greater than 8.0. The percentage of intact spores varied from 0 to 100 for 3.0 8.0 with spore neutralization dependent on time spent by the spores in the post-detonation mixing/combustion zone.

  4. POINTWISE GREEN FUNCTION BOUNDS AND STABILITY OF COMBUSTION WAVES

    E-print Network

    Texier, Benjamin - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    or strong detonation, weak of strong deflagration. The results described in this paper, Theorems D 1-wave) approximation. Notably, our results apply to combustion waves of any type: weak or strong, detonations or defla-amplitude strong detonations in the small heat-release (i.e., fluid-dynamical) limit, simplifying and greatly

  5. Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition Induced by Hot Jets in a Supersonic Premixed Airstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Zhou, Jin; Lin, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Yu

    2013-05-01

    Detonation is initiated through a hot jet in a supersonic premixed mixture of H2 and air, which is produced by using a air heater. The results show that initiation fails in the low-equivalence-ratio premixed gas. With the increase of equivalence ratio, the hot jet can induce deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) in the premixed mixture, which an indirect initiation of detonation. Further studies show that the DDT process is due to the combined effect of a local hemispherical explosion shock wave, the bow shock, and the flame produced by the hot jet.

  6. Deflagration-to-detonation transition in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, P; Chaland, F; Masse, L

    2004-11-01

    By means of highly resolved one-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations, we provide an understanding of the burn process in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets. The cornerstone of the phenomenology of propagating burn in such laser-driven capsules is shown to be the transition from a slow unsteady reaction-diffusion regime of thermonuclear combustion (some sort of deflagration) to a fast detonative one. Remarkably, detonation initiation follows the slowing down of a shockless supersonic reaction wave driven by energy redeposition from the fusion products themselves. Such a route to detonation is specific to fusion plasmas. PMID:15600681

  7. Deflagration-to-detonation transition in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, P.; Chaland, F.; Masse, L.

    2004-11-01

    By means of highly resolved one-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations, we provide an understanding of the burn process in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets. The cornerstone of the phenomenology of propagating burn in such laser-driven capsules is shown to be the transition from a slow unsteady reaction-diffusion regime of thermonuclear combustion (some sort of deflagration) to a fast detonative one. Remarkably, detonation initiation follows the slowing down of a shockless supersonic reaction wave driven by energy redeposition from the fusion products themselves. Such a route to detonation is specific to fusion plasmas.

  8. Detonation of insensitive high explosives by a Q-switched ruby laser.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.; Menichelli, V. J.

    1971-01-01

    Immediate longitudinal detonations have been observed in confined small-diameter columns of PETN, RDX, and tetryl by using a focused Q-switched ruby laser. The energy ranged from 0.8 to 4.0 J in a pulse width of 25 nsec. A 1000-A-thick aluminum film deposited on a glass window was used to generate a shock wave at the window-explosive interface when irradiated by the laser. In some cases, steady-state detonations were reached in less than .5 microsec with less than 10% variation in the detonation velocity.

  9. Effect of surface roughness of charge hole on detonation propagation of emulsion explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Sumiya, Fumihiko; Hirosaki, Yoshikazu; Katoh, Yukio; Wada, Yuji; Ogata, Yuji; Katsuyama, Kunihisa

    1996-12-01

    In the present study, some experimental work was performed to investigate the effects of surface roughness of the charge hole on the velocity of the precursor air shock wave. Photographic observation was performed using rectangular PMMA tubes with sandpaper on inner wall to simulate surface roughness for various decoupling coefficients. The experimental results indicate that the increase of surface roughness of the tube wall reduces the precursor air shock wave velocity and prevents detonation failure. It is shown that detonation failure occurs when the ratio of the precursor air shock wave velocity to detonation velocity becomes greater than 1.21 in the case of a rectangular PMMA tube. Precursor air shock wave velocity and detonation velocity were measured using PVC pipes of various inner diameters with sandpaper on the inner wall to simulate actual charge hole roughness. Sample explosive confined in polyethylene tubes of 20 mm in diameter was placed on the inner wall of the PVC pipe. The experimental results show that the increase of surface roughness of the PVC pipe decreases the velocity of the precursor air shock wave and improves the detonation propagation of explosive in the PVC pipe. It is shown that detonation failure occurs when the ratio of the precursor air shock wave velocity to detonation velocity exceeds 1.1 times in the case of the PVC pipe. The difference observed between the experiments with a rectangular PMMA tube and those with a circular PVC pipe is due to the difference of precompression mode of unreacted explosive by precursor air shock waves.

  10. Detonation propagation and Mach stem formation in PBXN-9

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, L.M.

    1997-09-01

    PBXN-9 is an explosive that is less sensitive to certain insults, yet retains a high level of performance. As a result, PBXN-9 has been considered as an interim insensitive high explosive for conventional munitions systems. Certain of these systems incorporate wave control methodologies that require some form of reactive flow representation to achieve accurate predictions of the wave propagation. The authors have continued the use of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) as a means to approximately account for reactive flow effects, yet retain the efficiency necessary for the munitions design process. To use DSD, they have taken the approach to calibrate explosives by measuring the detonation velocity as a function of local wave curvature. The DSD calibration, including the appropriate boundary conditions, can then be used to predict wave propagation in complex situations such as around obstacles, following wave-wave collisions, and so on. This paper describes the DSD calibration for PBXN-9, along with the methodologies used to obtain it, for both convergent and divergent flow (positive and negative wave curvatures). During the course of the calibration for convergent flow, Mach stem formation is observed in wave reflection experiments. The characteristics of the Mach stem formation and the subsequent growth are analyzed, presented and compared to similar measurements on other explosives. Illustrative examples of the use of DSD to predict wave propagation are provided.

  11. Stability of cosmological detonation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín

    2014-05-01

    The steady-state propagation of a phase-transition front is classified, according to hydrodynamics, as a deflagration or a detonation, depending on its velocity with respect to the fluid. These propagation modes are further divided into three types, namely, weak, Jouguet, and strong solutions, according to their disturbance of the fluid. However, some of these hydrodynamic modes will not be realized in a phase transition. One particular cause is the presence of instabilities. In this work we study the linear stability of weak detonations, which are generally believed to be stable. After discussing in detail the weak detonation solution, we consider small perturbations of the interface and the fluid configuration. When the balance between the driving and friction forces is taken into account, it turns out that there are actually two different kinds of weak detonations, which behave very differently as functions of the parameters. We show that the branch of stronger weak detonations are unstable, except very close to the Jouguet point, where our approach breaks down.

  12. Infrared signatures from bomb detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orson, Jay A.; Bagby, William F.; Perram, Glen P.

    2003-04-01

    Remote observations of the temporal and spectral characteristics of the infrared emissions from bomb detonations have been correlated with explosion conditions. A Fourier transform interferometer was used to record spectra in the 1.6-20 ?m range at spectral resolutions of 4-16 cm -1 and temporal resolutions of 0.047-0.123 s. Field observations of 56 detonation events included a set of aircraft delivered ordinance and a series of static ground detonations for a variety of bomb sizes, types and environmental conditions. The emission is well represented by a gray body with continuously decreasing temperature and characteristic decay times of 1-4 s, providing only limited variability with detonation conditions. However, the fireball size times the emissivity as a function of time can be determined from the spectra without imaging and provides a more sensitive signature. The degree of temporal overlap as a function of frequency for a pair of detonation events provides a very sensitive discriminator for explosion conditions. The temporal overlap decreases with increasing emission frequency for all the observed events, indicating more information content at higher frequencies.

  13. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent magnet assembly were then installed on Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) rectangular channel pulse detonation research engine. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power extraction experiments were carried out for a range of load impedances in which cesium hydroxide seed (dissolved in methanol) was sprayed into the gaseous oxygen/hydrogen propellants. Positive power extraction was obtained, but preliminary analysis of the data indicated that the plasma electrical conductivity is lower than anticipated and the near-electrode voltage drop is not negligible. It is believed that the electrical conductivity is reduced due to a large population of negative OH ions. This occurs because OH has a strong affinity for capturing free electrons. The effect of near-electrode voltage drop is associated with the high surface-to-volume ratio of the channel (1-inch by 1-inch cross-section) where surface effects play a dominant role. As usual for MHD devices, higher performance will require larger scale devices. Overall, the gathered data is extremely valuable from the standpoint of understanding plasma behavior and for developing empirical scaling laws.

  14. Numerical simulations of forward detonation drivers for high-enthalpy shock tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. L.; Hu, Z. M.; Zhang, D. L.; Jiang, Z.

    In this paper, detonation propagation in a forward detonation driver is simulated by solving axis-symmetric Euler equations to examine its performances. The Dispersion Controlled Dissipation (DCD) scheme is adopted in the simulations and the two-step chemical reaction model modified by M. Sichel et al. are accepted for a H 2 - O 2 mixture. The flowfield near the cavity ring is treated as a two-dimensional case and other sections are one-dimensional. The propagation, reflection and focusing of the detonation are captured in detail and numerical results show the ratio of the cavity radius to that of the detonation tube plays an important role in wave interaction. It is observable that a strong up-stream travelling shock wave is generated from detonation wave reflections and shock wave focusing, which can elevate the flow pressure that has decreased because of Taylor expansions waves. In the driven section, the contact interface almost staying near the end of the driven section after the shock wave reflection affects long-drawn usable test gas flow more or less.

  15. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The implementation of energetic sol-gel coated metallic multilayers, as new small IIDs will result in dramatically reduced environmental risks and improved worker and user safety risks without any sacrifice in the performance of the device. The proposed effort is designed to field an IID that is free of toxic (e.g., tetrazene) and heavy metal constituents (e.g., lead styphnate, lead azide, barium nitrate, and antimony sulfides) present in the NOL-130 initiating mixture and in the lead azide transfer charge of current stab detonators. The preferred materials for this project are nanocomposites consisting of thin foils of metallic multilayers, composed of nanometer thick regions of different metals, coated with a sol-gel derived energetic material. The favored metals for the multilayers will be main-group and early transition metals such as, but not limited to, boron, aluminum, silicon, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. Candidate sol-gel energetic materials include iron (III) oxide/aluminum nanocomposites. It should be noted that more traditional materials than sol-gel might also be used with the flash metals. The metallic multilayers undergo an exothermic transition to a more stable intermetallic alloy with the appropriate mechanical or thermal stimulus. This exothermic transition has sufficient output energy to initiate the more energy dense sol-gel energetic material, or other candidate materials. All of the proposed initiation mix materials and their reaction by products have low toxicity, are safe to handle and dispose of, and provide much less environmental and health concerns than the current composition. We anticipate that the technology and materials proposed here will be produced successfully in production scale with very competitive costs with existing IIDs, when amortized over the production lifetime. The sol-gel process is well known and used extensively in industry for coatings applications. All of the proposed feedstock components are mass-produced and have relatively low costs. The multilayer deposition equipment is commercially available and the technology is wide

  16. Surface detonation in type Ia supernova explosions?

    E-print Network

    F. K. Roepke; S. E. Woosley

    2006-09-25

    We explore the evolution of thermonuclear supernova explosions when the progenitor white dwarf star ignites asymmetrically off-center. Several numerical simulations are carried out in two and three dimensions to test the consequences of different initial flame configurations such as spherical bubbles displaced from the center, more complex deformed configurations, and teardrop-shaped ignitions. The burning bubbles float towards the surface while releasing energy due to the nuclear reactions. If the energy release is too small to gravitationally unbind the star, the ash sweeps around it, once the burning bubble approaches the surface. Collisions in the fuel on the opposite side increase its temperature and density and may -- in some cases -- initiate a detonation wave which will then propagate inward burning the core of the star and leading to a strong explosion. However, for initial setups in two dimensions that seem realistic from pre-ignition evolution, as well as for all three-dimensional simulations the collimation of the surface material is found to be too weak to trigger a detonation.

  17. A three-dimensional picture of the delayed-detonation model of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, E.; García-Senz, D.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:Deflagration models poorly explain the observed diversity of SNIa. Current multidimensional simulations of SNIa predict a significant amount of, so far unobserved, carbon and oxygen moving at low velocities. It has been proposed that these drawbacks can be resolved if there is a sudden jump to a detonation (delayed detonation), but these kinds of models have been explored mainly in one dimension. Here we present new three-dimensional delayed detonation models in which the deflagraton-to-detonation transition (DDT) takes place in conditions like those favored by one-dimensional models. Methods: We have used a smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics code adapted to follow all the dynamical phases of the explosion, with algorithms devised to handle subsonic as well as supersonic combustion fronts. The starting point was a centrally ignited C-O white dwarf of 1.38 {M}?. When the average density on the flame surface reached 2-3×107 g cm-3 a detonation was launched. Results: The detonation wave processed more than 0.3 M? of carbon and oxygen, emptying the central regions of the ejecta of unburned fuel and raising its kinetic energy close to the fiducial 1051 erg expected from a healthy type Ia supernova. The final amount of 56Ni synthesized also was in the correct range. However, the mass of carbon and oxygen ejected is still too high. Conclusions: The three-dimensional delayed detonation models explored here show an improvement over pure deflagration models, but they still fail to coincide with basic observational constraints. However, there are many aspects of the model that are still poorly known (geometry of flame ignition, mechanism of DDT, properties of detonation waves traversing a mixture of fuel and ashes). Therefore, it will be worth pursuing its exploration to see if a good SNIa model based on the three-dimensional delayed detonation scenario can be obtained.

  18. A Three-Dimensional Picture of the Delayed-Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-print Network

    Eduardo Bravo; Domingo Garcia-Senz

    2007-12-04

    Deflagration models poorly explain the observed diversity of SNIa. Current multidimensional simulations of SNIa predict a significant amount of, so far unobserved, carbon and oxygen moving at low velocities. It has been proposed that these drawbacks can be resolved if there is a sudden jump to a detonation (delayed detonation), but this kind of models has been explored mainly in one dimension. Here we present new three-dimensional delayed detonation models in which the deflagraton-to-detonation transition (DDT) takes place in conditions like those favored by one-dimensional models. We have used a SPH code adapted to SNIa with algorithms devised to handle subsonic as well as supersonic combustion fronts. The starting point was a C-O white dwarf of 1.38 solar masses. When the average density on the flame surface reached 2-3x10^7 g/cm^3 a detonation was launched. The detonation wave processed more than 0.3 solar masses of carbon and oxygen, emptying the central regions of the ejecta of unburned fuel and raising its kinetic energy close to the fiducial 10^51 ergs expected from a healthy Type Ia supernova. The final amount of 56Ni synthesized also was in the correct range. However, the mass of carbon and oxygen ejected is still too high. The three-dimensional delayed detonation models explored here show an improvement over pure deflagration models, but they still fail to coincide with basic observational constraints. However, there are many aspects of the model that are still poorly known (geometry of flame ignition, mechanism of DDT, properties of detonation waves traversing a mixture of fuel and ashes). Therefore, it will be worth pursuing its exploration to see if a good SNIa model based on the three-dimensional delayed detonation scenario can be obtained.

  19. 14 CFR 33.47 - Detonation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.47 Detonation test. Each engine must be tested to establish that the engine can function without detonation throughout its range of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detonation test. 33.47 Section...

  20. Fiber Bragg grating sensing of detonation and shock experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Jackson, S. I.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Vincent, S. W.; McCulloch, Q.; Martinez, R. M.; Gilbertson, S. M.; Udd, E.

    2013-05-01

    An all optical-fiber-based approach to measuring high explosive detonation front position and velocity is described. By measuring total light return using an incoherent light source reflected from a fiber Bragg grating sensor in contact with the explosive, dynamic mapping of the detonation front position and velocity versus time is obtained. We demonstrate two calibration procedures and provide several examples of detonation front measurements: PBX 9502 cylindrical rate stick, radial detonation front in PBX 9501, and PBX 9501 detonation along a curved meridian line. In the cylindrical rate stick measurement, excellent agreement with complementary diagnostics (electrical pins and streak camera imaging) is achieved, demonstrating accuracy in the detonation front velocity to below the 0.3% level when compared to the results from the pin data. In a similar approach, we use embedded fiber grating sensors for dynamic pressure measurements to test the feasibility of these sensors for high pressure shock wave research in gas gun driven flyer plate impact experiments. By applying well-controlled steady shock wave pressure profiles to soft materials such as PMMA, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave. Comparison of the fiber sensor results is then made with traditional methods (velocimetry and electro-magnetic particle velocity gauges) to gauge the accuracy of the approach.

  1. Investigation of organic dust detonation in the presence of chemically inert particles

    SciTech Connect

    Klemens, R.; Kapuscinski, M.; Wolinski, M.; Wolanski, P. . Instytut Techniki Cieplnej); Sichel, M. . Dept. of Aerospace Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    The results of experimental studies of organic dust detonation in the presence of chemically inert particles are presented. Tests were carried out using a vertical detonation tube, and direct streak pictures showing the flame acceleration and pressure and temperature records were obtained. Flax dust, dispersed in an oxygen atmosphere, was used as the fuel, and two kinds of quartz sand were introduced as nonreacting particles. It was found that addition of inert particles caused a linear decrease of the detonation wave velocity but had no special influence on the transition distance. Calculations using the Gordon McBride Code showed that propagation of the detonation wave in a dust-oxygen mixture requires that the dust particles burnout at a level of about 70% but addition of inert particles increased the necessary burnout level to over 80% (with a significant decrease of the detonation wave velocity). The aim of this work was to investigate the processes of flame self acceleration and transition to detonation in mixtures of organic dust with oxygen and to investigate the influence of chemically neutral particles (used as a flame inhibiting agent) on these processes.

  2. Rotating Detonation Combustion: A Computational Study for Stationary Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Sergio

    The increased availability of gaseous fossil fuels in The US has led to the substantial growth of stationary Gas Turbine (GT) usage for electrical power generation. In fact, from 2013 to 2104, out of the 11 Tera Watts-hour per day produced from fossil fuels, approximately 27% was generated through the combustion of natural gas in stationary GT. The thermodynamic efficiency for simple-cycle GT has increased from 20% to 40% during the last six decades, mainly due to research and development in the fields of combustion science, material science and machine design. However, additional improvements have become more costly and more difficult to obtain as technology is further refined. An alternative to improve GT thermal efficiency is the implementation of a combustion regime leading to pressure-gain; rather than pressure loss across the combustor. One concept being considered for such purpose is Rotating Detonation Combustion (RDC). RDC refers to a combustion regime in which a detonation wave propagates continuously in the azimuthal direction of a cylindrical annular chamber. In RDC, the fuel and oxidizer, injected from separated streams, are mixed near the injection plane and are then consumed by the detonation front traveling inside the annular gap of the combustion chamber. The detonation products then expand in the azimuthal and axial direction away from the detonation front and exit through the combustion chamber outlet. In the present study Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used to predict the performance of Rotating Detonation Combustion (RDC) at operating conditions relevant to GT applications. As part of this study, a modeling strategy for RDC simulations was developed. The validation of the model was performed using benchmark cases with different levels of complexity. First, 2D simulations of non-reactive shock tube and detonation tubes were performed. The numerical predictions that were obtained using different modeling parameters were compared with analytical solutions in order to quantify the numerical error in the simulations. Additionally, experimental data from laboratory scale combustors was used to validate 2D and 3D numerical simulations. The effects of different modeling parameters on RDC predictions was also studied. The validated simulation strategy was then used to assess the performance of RDC for different combustion chamber geometries and operating conditions relevant to GT applications. As a result, the limiting conditions for which continuous detonation and pressure gain combustion can be achieved were predicted and the effect of operating conditions on flow structures and RDC performance was assessed. The modeling strategy and the results from this study could be further used to design more efficient and more stable RDC systems.

  3. The mechanism of small-gas detonation in mechanically activated low-density powder mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkovskii, S. A.; Dolgoborodov, A. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    A mechanism of supersonic propagation of the energy-release wave in mechanically activated small-gas explosive powder mixtures is proposed. It is shown that, under certain conditions, this process exhibits all the signs of detonation and should be recognized as a kind of thereof. On the other hand, this kind of detonation is fundamentally different from classical detonation, e.g., in gases. Instead of a shock wave, the powder mixture features propagation of a compression wave, in which the powder exhibits densification due to the mutual displacement of particles rather than contraction of the particle material. A chemical reaction is initiated by the mutual friction of particles in the compression wave.

  4. The Effect of the Pre-Detonation Stellar Internal Velocity Profile on the Nucleosynthetic Yields in Type Ia Supernova

    E-print Network

    Kim, Yeunjin; Graziani, Carlo; Meyer, B S; Lamb, D Q; Truran, J W

    2013-01-01

    A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of alpha-particle nuclei, including Ni56, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Al...

  5. Thrust Augmentation Measurements Using a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE)/ejector setup that was specifically designed for the study and operated at frequencies up to 50 Hz. The results of various experiments designed to probe different aspects of the PDE/ejector setup are reported. The baseline PDE was operated using ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel and an oxygen/nitrogen O2 + N2) mixture at an equivalence ratio of one. The PDE only experiments included propellant mixture characterization using a laser absorption technique, high fidelity thrust measurements using an integrated spring-damper system, and shadowgraph imaging of the detonation/shock wave structure emanating from the tube. The baseline PDE thrust measurement results at each desired frequency agree with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature. These PDE setup results were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups with constant diameter ejector tubes and various ejector lengths, the radius of curvature for the ejector inlets and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. For the studied experimental matrix, the results showed a maximum thrust augmentation of 106% at an operational frequency of 30 Hz. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  6. Deflagration to detonation transition fueled by dust layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.-C.; Harbaugh, A. S.; Alexander, C. G.; Kauffman, C. W.; Sichel, M.

    1995-12-01

    The roles which dust layers play in severe dust explosions were investigated in a 70 m long and 30 cm inside diameter horizontal Flame Acceleration Tube (FAT) with one end closed and the other end open to the atmosphere. A variety of dusts such as corn dust, cornstarch, Mira Gel starch, wheat dust, and wood flour were layered on the bottom half of the FAT. To initiate the combustion process, a detonation tube filled with a stoichiometric H2/O2 mixture at room temperature and 1 atm pressure was used to ignite a short presuspended dust cloud with a dust concentration of 500 600 g/m3. Combustion waves generated by this dust cloud travel toward the open end of the FAT and are continuously fueled by the dust/air mixtures. Flame propagation processes in the FAT were closely monitored by a variety of measuring instruments at different locations. The study demonstrates that stable quasi-detonation were reached in some runs, but self-sustained Chapman-Jouguet detonations were not observed possibly due to the limitation of the tube length. Attempts were made to determine the structure of dust detonations fueled by a dust layer. Preliminary evidence indicates that for Mira Gel starch the leading shock is essentially a triple shock configuration which involves a Mach stem and for wheat and wood dusts there possibly exists a multi-headed spin structure.

  7. ASYMMETRY AND THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC SIGNATURE OF NEARLY EDGE-LIT DETONATION IN WHITE DWARF CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Chamulak, David A.; Truran, James W.; Meakin, Casey A.; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the leading explosion scenarios for Type Ia supernovae involve the nuclear incineration of a white dwarf star through a detonation wave. Several scenarios have been proposed as to how this detonation may actually occur, but the exact mechanism and environment in which it takes place remain unknown. We explore the effects of an off-center initiated detonation on the spatial distribution of the nucleosynthetic yield products in a toy model-a pre-expanded near Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf. We find that a single-point near edge-lit detonation results in asymmetries in the density and thermal profiles, notably the expansion timescale, throughout the supernova ejecta. We demonstrate that this asymmetry of the thermodynamic trajectories should be common to off-center detonations where a small amount of the star is burned prior to detonation. The sensitivity of the yields on the expansion timescale results in an asymmetric distribution of the elements synthesized as reaction products. We tabulate the shift in the center of mass of the various elements produced in our model supernova and find an odd-even pattern for elements past silicon. Our calculations show that off-center single-point detonations in carbon-oxygen white dwarfs are marked by significant composition asymmetries in their remnants which bear potentially observable signatures in both velocity and coordinate space, including an elemental nickel mass fraction that varies by a factor of 2-3 from one side of the remnant to the other.

  8. Sensitized Liquid Hydrazine Detonation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathgeber, K. A.; Keddy, C. P.; Bunker, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-phase hydrazine (N2H4) is known to be very sensitive to detonation while liquid hydrazine is very insensitive to detonation, theoretically requiring extremely high pressures to induce initiation. A review of literature on solid and liquid explosives shows that when pure explosive substances are infiltrated with gas cavities, voids, and/or different phase contaminants, the energy or shock pressure necessary to induce detonation can decrease by an order of magnitude. Tests were conducted with liquid hydrazine in a modified card-gap configuration. Sensitization was attempted by bubbling helium gas through and/or suspending ceramic microspheres in the liquid. The hydrazine was subjected to the shock pressure from a 2 lb (0.9 kg) Composition C-4 explosive charge. The hydrazine was contained in a 4 in. (10.2 cm) diameter stainless steel cylinder with a 122 in(sup 3) (2 L) volume and sealed with a polyethylene cap. Blast pressures from the events were recorded by 63 high speed pressure transducers located on three radial legs extending from 4 to 115 ft (1.2 to 35.1 in) from ground zero. Comparison of the neat hydrazine and water baseline tests with the "sensitized" hydrazine tests indicates the liquid hydrazine did not detonate under these conditions.

  9. Pulse detonation engines and components thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tangirala, Venkat Eswarlu (Inventor); Rasheed, Adam (Inventor); Vandervort, Christian Lee (Inventor); Dean, Anthony John (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A pulse detonation engine comprises a primary air inlet; a primary air plenum located in fluid communication with the primary air inlet; a secondary air inlet; a secondary air plenum located in fluid communication with the secondary air inlet, wherein the secondary air plenum is substantially isolated from the primary air plenum; a pulse detonation combustor comprising a pulse detonation chamber, wherein the pulse detonation chamber is located downstream of and in fluid communication with the primary air plenum; a coaxial liner surrounding the pulse detonation combustor defining a cooling plenum, wherein the cooling plenum is in fluid communication with the secondary air plenum; an axial turbine assembly located downstream of and in fluid communication with the pulse detonation combustor and the cooling plenum; and a housing encasing the primary air plenum, the secondary air plenum, the pulse detonation combustor, the coaxial liner, and the axial turbine assembly.

  10. Development of a Gas-Fed Pulse Detonation Research Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Hutt, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In response to the growing need for empirical data on pulse detonation engine performance and operation, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and placed into operation a low-cost gas-fed pulse detonation research engine. The guiding design strategy was to achieve a simple and flexible research apparatus, which was inexpensive to build and operate. As such, the engine was designed to operate as a heat sink device, and testing was limited to burst-mode operation with run durations of a few seconds. Wherever possible, maximum use was made of standard off-the-shelf industrial or automotive components. The 5-cm diameter primary tube is about 90-cm long and has been outfitted with a multitude of sensor and optical ports. The primary tube is fed by a coaxial injector through an initiator tube, which is inserted directly into the injector head face. Four auxiliary coaxial injectors are also integrated into the injector head assembly. All propellant flow is controlled with industrial solenoid valves. An automotive electronic ignition system was adapted for use, and spark plugs are mounted in both tubes so that a variety of ignition schemes can be examined. A microprocessor-based fiber-optic engine control system was developed to provide precise control over valve and ignition timing. Initial shakedown testing with hydrogen/oxygen mixtures verified the need for Schelkin spirals in both the initiator and primary tubes to ensure rapid development of the detonation wave. Measured pressure wave time-of-flight indicated detonation velocities of 2.4 km/sec and 2.2 km/sec in the initiator and primary tubes, respectively. These values implied a fuel-lean mixture corresponding to an H2 volume fraction near 0.5. The axial distribution for the detonation velocity was found to be essentially constant along the primary tube. Time-resolved thrust profiles were also acquired for both underfilled and overfilled tube conditions. These profiles are consistent with previous time-resolved measurements on single-cycle tubes where the thrust is found to peak as the detonation wave exits the tube, and decay as the tube blows down.

  11. MULTI-DIMENSIONAL MODELS FOR DOUBLE DETONATION IN SUB-CHANDRASEKHAR MASS WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, R.; Woosley, S. E.

    2013-09-10

    Using two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations, we study the ''robustness'' of the double detonation scenario for Type Ia supernovae, in which a detonation in the helium shell of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf induces a secondary detonation in the underlying core. We find that a helium detonation cannot easily descend into the core unless it commences (artificially) well above the hottest layer calculated for the helium shell in current presupernova models. Compressional waves induced by the sliding helium detonation, however, robustly generate hot spots which trigger a detonation in the core. Our simulations show that this is true even for non-axisymmetric initial conditions. If the helium is ignited at multiple points, then the internal waves can pass through one another or be reflected, but this added complexity does not defeat the generation of the hot spot. The ignition of very low-mass helium shells depends on whether a thermonuclear runaway can simultaneously commence in a sufficiently large region.

  12. Effect of electric fields on the reaction rates in shock initiating and detonating solid explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.

    2012-03-01

    The presence of a strong electric field has been demonstrated to effect the shock initiation and detonation wave propagation of solid high explosives. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed increased shock sensitivity, increased detonation velocity, and decreased failure diameter of certain explosives. The most likely chemical mechanism is postulated to be the excitation of some of the explosive molecules and/or intermediate reaction products to higher energy electronic states, which rapidly transition nonradiatively to the ground electronic state with excited vibrational states. This vibrational excitation increases the reaction rates of the explosive decomposition chain reactions. The resulting shorter duration reaction zone causes faster shock to detonation transition, decreased failure thickness, and increased detonation velocity for a specific charge diameter.

  13. Effects of Electric Fields on the Chemical Reaction Rates of Detonating Solid Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig

    2011-06-01

    The presence of a strong electric field has been demonstrated to effect the shock initiation and detonation wave propagation of solid high explosives. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed increased shock sensitivity, increased detonation velocity, and decreased failure diameter of certain explosives. One chemical mechanism is thought to be the excitation of some of the explosive molecules to higher energy electronic states, which rapidly decay to the ground electronic state while vibrationally exciting the molecules. This process increases the overall reaction rate of the explosive and produces a shorter duration reaction zone. The shorter reaction time results in a more rapid transition to detonation, a decreased failure diameter, and an increased detonation velocity for a specific charge diameter. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Nucleosynthesis in Two-Dimensional Delayed Detonation Models of Type Ia Supernova Explosions

    E-print Network

    Maeda, K; Fink, M; Hillebrandt, W; Travaglio, C; Thielemann, F -K

    2010-01-01

    The nucleosynthetic characteristics of various explosion mechanisms of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is explored based on three two-dimensional explosion simulations representing extreme cases: a pure turbulent deflagration, a delayed detonation following an approximately spherical ignition of the initial deflagration, and a delayed detonation arising from a highly asymmetric deflagration ignition. Apart from this initial condition, the deflagration stage is treated in a parameter-free approach. The detonation is initiated when the turbulent burning enters the distributed burning regime. This occurs at densities around $10^{7}$ g cm$^{-3}$ -- relatively low as compared to existing nucleosynthesis studies for one-dimensional spherically symmetric models. The burning in these multidimensional models is different from that in one-dimensional simulations as the detonation wave propagates both into unburned material in the high density region near the center of a white dwarf and into the low density region near the ...

  15. THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W.; Meyer, B. S.

    2013-07-01

    A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

  16. Cellular pattern evolution in gaseous detonation diffraction in a 90-degree-branched channel

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Changming; Wang, Changjian; Xu, Shengli; Zhang, Hanhong

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents recent results of an experimental investigation on gaseous detonation diffraction in a 90-degree-branched channel. The entire process of diffraction is demonstrated by cellular patterns and the analysis is mainly based on their evolution. Detonation pressure history and velocity are measured and the corresponding cellular patterns are recorded on soot foils around the branched segment. Results show that detonation propagation is notably disturbed by the branched wall geometry and that a complex wave configuration appears in both channels. Cellular patterns show that an expansion fan appears at the T-junction area with a Mach reflection taking place in the horizontal channel, while regular reflection takes place in the vertical channel. Subsequently, it appears that there is a transition from a regular reflection to a Mach reflection in the vertical channel. Details of the cellular pattern indicate that from the early stage to the end of diffraction, the detonation wave sequentially experiences attenuation, front decoupling, and degradation into deflagration, reinitiation, and recuperation. According to cellular pattern evolution and velocity measurement, a recuperated detonation with nearly the same velocity as the undisturbed incoming wave finally develops downstream in both channels, at a distance of about four times the channel height (160 mm). The mechanism of diffraction is explored based on the ZND (Zel'dovich-von Neumann-Doering) model, and the soot foils in both channels show a pattern consistent with air shock-wave diffraction in a 90-degree-branched channel. (author)

  17. Slang characterization and removal using pulse detonation technology during coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, Z.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.; Zhou, J.

    1997-03-25

    Boiler slagging and fouling as a result of inorganic impurities in combustion gases being deposited on heat transfer tubes have caused severe problems in coal-fired power plant operation. These problems are fuel, system design, and operating condition dependent. Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. The detonation wave technique based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. These detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. The experimental results show that the single shot detonation wave is capable of removing the entire slag (types of slag deposited on economizer) even at a distance of 8 in. from the exit of a detonation engine tube. Wave strength and slag orientation also have different effects on the chipping off of the slag. This paper discusses about the results obtained in effectively removing the economizer slag.

  18. Effect of Velocity of Detonation of Explosives on Seismic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroujkova, A. F.; Leidig, M.; Bonner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We studied seismic body wave generation from four fully contained explosions of approximately the same yields (68 kg of TNT equivalent) conducted in anisotropic granite in Barre, VT. The explosions were detonated using three types of explosives with different velocities of detonation (VOD): Black Powder (BP), Ammonium Nitrate Fuel Oil/Emulsion (ANFO), and Composition B (COMP B). The main objective of the experiment was to study differences in seismic wave generation among different types of explosives, and to determine the mechanism responsible for these differences. The explosives with slow burn rate (BP) produced lower P-wave amplitude and lower corner frequency, which resulted in lower seismic efficiency (0.35%) in comparison with high burn rate explosives (2.2% for ANFO and 3% for COMP B). The seismic efficiency estimates for ANFO and COMP B agree with previous studies for nuclear explosions in granite. The body wave radiation pattern is consistent with an isotropic explosion with an added azimuthal component caused by vertical tensile fractures oriented along pre-existing micro-fracturing in the granite, although the complexities in the P- and S-wave radiation patterns suggest that more than one fracture orientation could be responsible for their generation. High S/P amplitude ratios and low P-wave amplitudes suggest that a significant fraction of the BP source mechanism can be explained by opening of the tensile fractures as a result of the slow energy release.

  19. Numerical simulation of detonation reignition in H 2-O 2 mixtures in area expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. A.; Kemister, G.; Tonello, N. A.; Oran, E. S.; Sichel, M.

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional, numerical simulations of a transmitted detonation show reignition occuring by one of two mechanisms. The first mechanism involves the collision of triple points as they expand along a decaying shock front. In the second mechanism ignition results from the coalescence of a number of small, relatively high pressure regions left over from the decay of weakened transverse waves. The simulations were performed using an improved chemical kinetic model for stoichiometric H 2-O 2 mixtures. The initial conditions were a propagating, two-dimensional detonation resolved enough to show transverse wave structure. The calculations provide clarification of the reignition mechanism seen in previous H 2-O 2-Ar simulations, and again demonstrate that the transverse wave structure of the detonation front is critical to the reignition process.

  20. Two-PHASE STEADY DETONATION ANALYSIS with applicationsfor

    E-print Network

    f '1 Two-PHASE STEADY DETONATION ANALYSIS with applicationsfor DEFLAGRATION-TO-DETONATION #12;Review of Two-Phase Unsteady Detonation Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) Bernecker in Progress Powers, J.M., Stewart, D.S., and Krier, H., "Two-Phase Steady Detonation Analysis," presented

  1. Simulation of multidimensional gaseous detonations with a parallel adaptive method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2008-11-01

    A detonation wave is a self-sustained, violent form of shock-induced combustion that is characterized by a subtle energetic interplay between leading hydrodynamic shock wave and following chemical reaction. Multidimensional gaseous detonations never remain planar and instead exhibit transverse shocks that form triple points with transient Mach reflection patterns. Their accurate numerical simulation requires a very high resolution around shock and reaction zone. A parallel adaptive finite volume method for the chemically reactive Euler equations for mixtures of thermally perfect gases has been developed for this purpose. Its key components are a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme of Roe-type, block-structured Cartesian mesh adaptation, and operator splitting to handle stiff, detailed kinetics. Beside simple verification examples to quantify the savings in wall time from mesh adaptation and parallelization, large-scale computations of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures will be discussed. These computations allowed the detailed analysis of triple point structures under transient conditions and a comparison between two and three space dimensions.

  2. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1994-11-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  3. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  4. a New Approach of the Deflagration to Detonation Transition in SNIa Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chièze, Jean Pierre; Charignon, Camille

    2015-03-01

    A wide class of type Ia thermonuclear supernovae models relies on the transition from the subsonic deflagration combustion regime to the supersonic detonation regime of the carbon and oxygen mixture of an accreting white dwarf, near the Chandrasekhar mass. We show that this can actually be achieved in a cold C+O white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass, with seed sound waves of relatively low Mach number M ˜ 0.02. Moreover, even weaker perturbations, with velocity perturbations as low as M ˜ 0.003 can trigger a detonation wave in SNIa progenitors models wich include the presence of a thin helium surface layer.

  5. Improved detonation modeling with CHEETAH

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, A.

    1997-11-01

    A Livermore software program called CHEETAH, an important, even indispensable tool for energetic materials researchers worldwide, was made more powerful in the summer of 1997 with the release of CHEETAH 2.0, an advanced version that simulates a wider variety of detonations. Derived from more than 40 years of experiments on high explosives at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos national laboratories, CHEETAH predicts the results from detonating a mixture of specified reactants. It operates by solving thermodynamic equations to predict detonation products and such properties as temperature, pressure, volume, and total energy released. The code is prized by synthesis chemists and other researchers because it allows them to vary the starting molecules and conditions to optimize the desired performance properties. One of the Laboratory`s most popular computer codes, CHEETAH is used at more than 200 sites worldwide, including ones in England, Canada, Sweden, Switzerland, and France. Most sites are defense-related, although a few users, such as Japanese fireworks researchers, are in the civilian sector.

  6. Optically triggered fire set/detonator system

    DOEpatents

    Chase, Jay B.; Pincosy, Philip A.; Chato, Donna M.; Kirbie, Hugh; James, Glen F.

    2007-03-20

    The present invention is directed to a system having a plurality of capacitor discharge units (CDUs) that includes electrical bridge type detonators operatively coupled to respective explosives. A pulse charging circuit is adapted to provide a voltage for each respective capacitor in each CDU. Such capacitors are discharged through the electrical bridge type detonators upon receiving an optical signal to detonate respective operatively coupled explosives at substantially the same time.

  7. Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives#

    E-print Network

    Aslam, Tariq

    Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives ###. At the edges of the explosive# D n ### is supplemented with boundary conditons. By direct numerical simulation for simulating complex explosive#containing systems. Key words# Detonation# Curvature e#ect# Edge interactions

  8. Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives

    E-print Network

    Aslam, Tariq

    Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives(). At the edges of the explosive, Dn() is supplemented with boundary conditons. By direct numerical simulation for simulating complex explosive-containing systems. Key words: Detonation, Curvature eect, Edge interactions

  9. Laser diode initiated detonators for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewick, David W.; Graham, J. A.; Hawley, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ensign Bickford Aerospace Company (EBAC) has over ten years of experience in the design and development of laser ordnance systems. Recent efforts have focused on the development of laser diode ordnance systems for space applications. Because the laser initiated detonators contain only insensitive secondary explosives, a high degree of system safety is achieved. Typical performance characteristics of a laser diode initiated detonator are described in this paper, including all-fire level, function time, and output. A finite difference model used at EBAC to predict detonator performance, is described and calculated results are compared to experimental data. Finally, the use of statistically designed experiments to evaluate performance of laser initiated detonators is discussed.

  10. Deflagrations and detonations in thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S

    2004-05-28

    We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast with the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae. PMID:15245271

  11. Deflagrations and Detonations in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-print Network

    Vadim N. Gamezo; Alexei M. Khokhlov; Elaine S. Oran

    2004-06-03

    We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast to the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae.

  12. Detonability of hydrocarbon fuels in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, H. D.; Mcclenagan, R. D.; Bishop, C. V.; Benz, F. J.; Pitz, W. J.; Westbrook, C. K.; Lee, J. H. S.

    1991-01-01

    Studies were conducted of the detonation of gas-phase mixtures of n-hexane and JP-4, with oxidizers as varied as air and pure oxygen, measuring detonation velocities and cell sizes as a function of stoichiometry and diluent concentration. The induction length of a one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering detonation was calculated on the basis of a theoretical model that employed the reaction kinetics of the hydrocarbon fuels used. Critical energy and critical tube diameter are compared for a relative measure of the heavy hydrocarbon fuels studied; detonation sensitivity appears to increase slightly with increasing carbon number.

  13. Detonation Initiation by a Temperature Gradient for a Detailed Chemical Reaction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, Michael; Kiverin, Alexey; Chukalovsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Mikhail

    2011-04-01

    The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation is investigated using high resolution numerical simulations for combustion mixture whose chemistry is governed by a detailed chemical kinetics. We employ a model representing an initial linear temperature gradient in the fuel. Emphasis is on comparing the results with previous studies that used simple one-step kinetics. It is shown that the evolution to detonation from temperature nonuniformities is considerably different for one-step kinetics models than for chain-branching kinetic models and it is different in different fuels for the same initial conditions. A detailed chemical model has a profound effect on the validity of Zel'dovich's spontaneous wave concept for detonation initiation by a gradient of reactivity. The evolution to detonation from a temperature gradient is considered for hydrogen-air and methane-air mixtures at different initial pressures. The analysis shows that for a detailed chemical kinetics the temperature gradients, which was thought to appear in the form of hot spots and the like, are not satisfy the criteria to initiate detonation, and the gradient mechanism can not be origin of the deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  14. A Three-Dimensional Picture of the Delayed-Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-print Network

    Bravo, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Deflagration models poorly explain the observed diversity of SNIa. Current multidimensional simulations of SNIa predict a significant amount of, so far unobserved, carbon and oxygen moving at low velocities. It has been proposed that these drawbacks can be resolved if there is a sudden jump to a detonation (delayed detonation), but this kind of models has been explored mainly in one dimension. Here we present new three-dimensional delayed detonation models in which the deflagraton-to-detonation transition (DDT) takes place in conditions like those favored by one-dimensional models. We have used a SPH code adapted to SNIa with algorithms devised to handle subsonic as well as supersonic combustion fronts. The starting point was a C-O white dwarf of 1.38 solar masses. When the average density on the flame surface reached 2-3x10^7 g/cm^3 a detonation was launched. The detonation wave processed more than 0.3 solar masses of carbon and oxygen, emptying the central regions of the ejecta of unburned fuel and raising ...

  15. Unsteady features on one-dimensional hydrogen-air detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daimon, Yu; Matsuo, Akiko

    2007-11-01

    The features of one-dimensional unsteady detonations are studied numerically using a hydrogen-air detailed chemical reaction model. A series of simulations are carried out while degree of overdrive, initial pressure, initial temperature, and equivalence ratio are varied. The oscillation modes and mechanisms of the one-dimensional detonations are discussed with reference to shock pressure histories and x-t diagrams of density distributions. As the degree of overdrive is reduced with a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen-air at P0=0.421atm and T0=293K, a steady state appears, along with a high-frequency mode and a low-frequency mode. The oscillation mechanism of the high-frequency mode is the same as that of the regular regime of unsteady shock-induced combustion observed around a spherical projectile flying at hypersonic velocity in detonable gases. The degree of overdrive threshold between the steady and unsteady region increases monotonically with initial pressure and decreases monotonically with initial temperature. When the equivalence ratio is changed, the threshold has a minimum value around ? =1. We focus attention on a nondimensional effective activation energy, which is generally used for linear stability analysis. The oscillation mode depends highly on the nondimensional effective activation energy. The oscillation of the detonation front appears as the nondimensional effective activation energy goes past a threshold value of 5.2. Furthermore, we investigate the failed regime and possible reignition in this regime. In the failed regime, a detonation wave breaks up into a leading shock, a contact discontinuity, and a rarefaction wave. When the shock is weak, reignition time becomes very long. Therefore, the reignition after the failed regime is difficult to reproduce in the restricted computational domain. The reignition process in the failed regime is investigated by means of analysis consisting of integration along the point of intersection between a Rayleigh line for weak leading shock and a partially burnt Hugoniot curve. The reignition time increases dramatically with decreasing temperature behind the shock wave, when the gas condition goes past the second explosion limit. The second explosion limit is one of the characteristics of the hydrogen-air detailed chemical reaction model and does not exist in the one-step chemical reaction model. Lastly, the reignition time obtained by the analysis is compared with that obtained by the simulation results. The simulation results agree well with the analytical results.

  16. Shock-to-detonation transition of RDX and NTO based composite high explosives: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Gerard; Roudot, Marie; Genetier, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Composite HMX and NTO based high explosives (HE) are widely used in ammunitions. Designing modern warheads needs robust and reliable models to compute shock ignition and detonation propagation inside HE. Comparing to a pressed HE, a composite HE is not porous and the hot-spots are mainly located at the grain - binder interface leading to a different behavior during shock-to-detonation transition. An investigation of how shock-to-detonation transition occurs inside composite HE containing RDX and NTO is proposed in this lecture. Two composite HE have been studied. The first one is HMX - HTPB 82:18. The second one is HMX - NTO - HTPB 12:72:16. These HE have been submitted to plane sustained shock waves at different pressure levels using a laboratory powder gun. Pressure signals are measured using manganin gauges inserted at several distances inside HE. The corresponding run-distances to detonation are determined using wedge test experiments where the plate impact is performed using a powder gun. Both HE exhibit a single detonation buildup curve in the distance - time diagram of shock-to-detonation transition. This feature seems a common shock-to-detonation behavior for composite HE without porosity. This behavior is also confirmed for a RDX - HTPB 85:15 based composite HE. Such a behavior is exploited to determine the heterogeneous reaction rate versus the shock pressure using a method based on the Cauchy-Riemann problem inversion. The reaction rate laws obtained allow to compute both run-distance to detonation and pressure signals.

  17. A thermochemical model for shock-induced reactions (heat detonations) in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B. )

    1990-02-01

    Recent advances in studies of shock-induced chemistry in reactive solids have led to the recognition of a new class of energetic materials which are unique in their response to shock waves. Experimental work has shown that chemical energy can be released on a time scale shorter than shock-transit times in laboratory samples. However, for many compositions, the reaction products remain in the condensed state upon release from high pressure, and no sudden expansion takes place. Nevertheless, if such a reaction is sufficiently rapid, it can be modeled as a type of detonation, termed heat detonation'' in the present paper. It is shown that unlike an explosive detonation, an unsupported heat detonation will decay to zero unless certain conditions are met. An example of such a reaction is Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} +2Al+shock{r arrow}Al{sub 2} O{sub 3} +2Fe (the standard thermite reaction). A shock-wave equation of state is determined from a mixture theory for reacted and unreacted porous thermite. The calculated shock temperatures are compared to experimentally measured shock temperatures, demonstrating that a shock-induced reaction takes place. Interpretation of the measured temperature history in the context of the thermochemical model implies that the principal rate-controlling kinetic mechanism is dynamic mixing at the shock front. Despite the similarity in thermochemical modeling of heat detonations to explosive detonations, the two processes are qualitatively very different in reaction mechanism as well as in the form the energy takes upon release, with explosives producing mostly work and heat detonations producing mostly heat.

  18. Equations of state of detonation products: ammonia and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, John; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Garcia, Daniel; Coe, Joshua; Leiding, Jeffery; Gibson, Lloyd; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) are two principal product gases resulting from explosives detonation, and the decomposition of other organic materials under shockwave loading (such as foams). Accurate thermodynamic descriptions of these gases are important for understanding the detonation performance of high explosives. However, shock compression data often do not exist for molecular species in the dense gas phase, and are limited in the fluid phase. Here, we present equation of state measurements of elevated initial density ammonia and methane gases dynamically compressed in gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. Pressure and density of the shocked gases on the principal Hugoniot were determined from direct particle velocity and shock wave velocity measurements recorded using optical velocimetry (Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector)). Streak spectroscopy and 5-color pyrometry were further used to measure the emission from the shocked gases, from which the temperatures of the shocked gases were estimated. Up to 0.07 GPa, ammonia was not observed to ionize, with temperature remaining below 7000 K. These results provide quantitative measurements of the Hugoniot locus for improving equations of state models of detonation products.

  19. Detonation transfer understanding applied to aerospace problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmel, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Summary of the findings obtained from a two-year investigation aimed at a quantitative understanding of explosive stimulus transfer. It is felt that the improved understanding achieved on detonation transfer mechanisms will make possible better output tests and specifications, and should result in improved detonators and initiation methods.

  20. 14 CFR 33.47 - Detonation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detonation test. 33.47 Section 33.47 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.47 Detonation test. Each...

  1. 14 CFR 33.47 - Detonation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Detonation test. 33.47 Section 33.47 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.47 Detonation test. Each...

  2. Tritium labeling of detonation nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Girard, Hugues A; El-Kharbachi, Abdelouahab; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Petit, Tristan; Bergonzo, Philippe; Rousseau, Bernard; Arnault, Jean-Charles

    2014-03-18

    For the first time, the radioactive labeling of detonation nanodiamonds was efficiently achieved using a tritium microwave plasma. According to our measurements, the total radioactivity reaches 9120 ± 120 ?Ci mg(-1), with 93% of (3)H atoms tightly bonded to the surface and up to 7% embedded into the diamond core. Such (3)H doping will ensure highly stable radiolabeled nanodiamonds, on which surface functionalization is still allowed. This breakthrough opens the way to biodistribution and pharmacokinetics studies of nanodiamonds, while this approach can be scalable to easily treat bulk quantities of nanodiamonds at low cost. PMID:24492594

  3. Performance characterization of the NASA standard detonator

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbell, W.W.; Burke, T.L.; Solomon, S.E.

    1995-05-01

    The NASA Standard Detonator (NSD) is employed in support of a number of current applications, including the Space Shuttle. This effort was directed towards providing test results to characterize the output of this device for its use in a safe and arm device. As part of the investigation, flash X-ray was used to provide stop-motion photographs of the flying metal plate that is created by initiation of the detonator. This provided researchers with a better understanding of the shape and character of the high-velocity disk as it propagated across the gap between the detonator and next assembly. The second portion of the study used a velocity interferometer to evaluate the acceleration and velocity histories of the flying plate, providing a quantified assessment of the detonator`s ability to initiate the explosive in the next explosive.

  4. Pulse detonation assembly and hybrid engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasheed, Adam (Inventor); Dean, Anthony John (Inventor); Vandervort, Christian Lee (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A pulse detonation (PD) assembly includes a number of PD chambers adapted to expel respective detonation product streams and a number of barriers disposed between respective pairs of PD chambers. The barriers define, at least in part, a number of sectors that contain at least one PD chamber. A hybrid engine includes a number of PD chambers and barriers. The hybrid engine further includes a turbine assembly having at least one turbine stage, being in flow communication with the PD chambers and being configured to be at least partially driven by the detonation product streams. A segmented hybrid engine includes a number of PD chambers and segments configured to receive and direct the detonation product streams from respective PD chambers. The segmented hybrid engine further includes a turbine assembly configured to be at least partially driven by the detonation product streams.

  5. On the Exit Boundary Condition for One-Dimensional Calculations of Pulsed Detonation Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2002-01-01

    In one-dimensional calculations of pulsed detonation engine (PDE) performance, the exit boundary condition is frequently taken to be a constant static pressure. In reality, for an isolated detonation tube, after the detonation wave arrives at the exit plane, there will be a region of high pressure, which will gradually return to ambient pressure as an almost spherical shock wave expands away from the exit, and weakens. Initially, the flow is supersonic, unaffected by external pressure, but later becomes subsonic. Previous authors have accounted for this situation either by assuming the subsonic pressure decay to be a relaxation phenomenon, or by running a two-dimensional calculation first, including a domain external to the detonation tube, and using the resulting exit pressure temporal distribution as the boundary condition for one-dimensional calculations. These calculations show that the increased pressure does affect the PDE performance. In the present work, a simple model of the exit process is used to estimate the pressure decay time. The planar shock wave emerging from the tube is assumed to transform into a spherical shock wave. The initial strength of the spherical shock wave is determined from comparison with experimental results. Its subsequent propagation, and resulting pressure at the tube exit, is given by a numerical blast wave calculation. The model agrees reasonably well with other, limited, results. Finally, the model was used as the exit boundary condition for a one-dimensional calculation of PDE performance to obtain the thrust wall pressure for a hydrogen-air detonation in tubes of length to diameter ratio (L/D) of 4, and 10, as well as for the original, constant pressure boundary condition. The modified boundary condition had no performance impact for values of L/D > 10, and moderate impact for L/D = 4.

  6. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Table 1 of ANSI B16.5 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106). 7.4The possibility of galvanic... in paragraph 11.1.7. 4.2Deflagration—A combustion wave that propagates subsonically (as measured at... to the unburned gas ahead of the flame front. 4.3Detonation—A reaction in a combustion...

  7. Numerical modeling of shock-to-detonation transition in energetic materials Ju Zhang a,1

    E-print Network

    Freund, Jonathan B.

    . In the first, we consider the passage of a shock wave through pure HMX in which a line of hot spots of the kindNumerical modeling of shock-to-detonation transition in energetic materials Ju Zhang a,1 , Thomas L. Jackson a, , John D. Buckmaster b , Jonathan B. Freund c,d a Computational Science and Engineering

  8. Physical Model of Low Velocity Detonation in Plasticized HMX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkin, Konstantin; Taranik, Michail; Tsarenkova, Svetlana; Shnitko, Alexander

    2007-06-01

    Phenomenon of low velocity detonation (LVD) is known many years, but its physical mechanism has not been understood in details, yet. A physical model of LVD is presented in the given report. The main idea of the model is that LVD in dense plasticized explosives may take place only when due to the lateral unloading the pressure at the leading shock front is reduced as compared to that at normal detonation (ND). As a result, the chemical reaction rate and, hence, the energy released between the leading shock front and the sound surface must be lesser as compared to that at ND. But, from other side, this may be enough to sustain the stationary regime of the LVD propagation. The model has been implemented in 2-D hydrocode and verified by means of computer modeling of the experiments (Leuret e.a., 1998) where LVD was observed in plasticized HMX. The results of our calculations supports the suggestion that LVD wave in plasticized HMX is a complex of the leading shock wave having pressure near 1 GPa and the compression wave following the front. Stationary propagation of such structure is possible only when some specific combination of the energy release rate and the lateral unloading intensity takes place.

  9. Impact sensitivity and the maximum heat of detonation.

    PubMed

    Politzer, Peter; Murray, Jane S

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that a large heat of detonation is undesirable from the standpoint of the impact sensitivity of an explosive and also unnecessary from the standpoints of its detonation velocity and detonation pressure. High values of the latter properties can be achieved even with a moderate heat of detonation, and this in turn enhances the likelihood of relatively low sensitivity. PMID:26381911

  10. Improved estimates of separation distances to prevent unacceptable damage to nuclear power plant structures from hydrogen detonation for gaseous hydrogen storage. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report provides new estimates of separation distances for nuclear power plant gaseous hydrogen storage facilities. Unacceptable damage to plant structures from hydrogen detonations will be prevented by having hydrogen storage facilities meet separation distance criteria recommended in this report. The revised standoff distances are based on improved calculations on hydrogen gas cloud detonations and structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures. Also, the results presented in this study do not depend upon equivalencing a hydrogen detonation to an equivalent TNT detonation. The static and stagnation pressures, wave velocity, and the shock wave impulse delivered to wall surfaces were computed for several different size hydrogen explosions. Separation distance equations were developed and were used to compute the minimum separation distance for six different wall cases and for seven detonating volumes (from 1.59 to 79.67 lbm of hydrogen). These improved calculation results were compared to previous calculations. The ratio between the separation distance predicted in this report versus that predicted for hydrogen detonation in previous calculations varies from 0 to approximately 4. Thus, the separation distances results from the previous calculations can be either overconservative or unconservative depending upon the set of hydrogen detonation parameters that are used. Consequently, it is concluded that the hydrogen-to-TNT detonation equivalency utilized in previous calculations should no longer be used.

  11. Slag characterization and removal using pulse detonation for coal gasification. Quarterly research report, July 1--September 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, Z.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.; Zhou, J.; Ali, M.R.

    1996-10-25

    Boiler slagging and fouling as a result of inorganic impurities in combustion gases being deposited on heat transfer tubes have caused severe problems in coal-fired power plant operation. These problems are fuel, system design, and operating condition dependent. Conventional slag and ash removal methods include the use of in situ blowing or jet-type devices such as air or steam soot blowers and water lances. Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. The detonation wave technique based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. These detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. Several tests have been performed with single shot detonation wave at University of Texas at Arlington to remove the slag deposit. To hold the slag deposit samples at the exit of detonation tube, two types of fixture was designed and fabricated. They are axial arrangement and triangular arrangement. The slag deposits from the utility boilers have been used to prepare the slag samples for the test. The experimental results show that the single shot detonation wave is capable of removing the entire slag (types of slag deposited on economizer, and air-heater, i.e., relatively softer slags) and 30% of the reheater slag (which is harder) even at a distance of 6 in. from the exit of a detonation engine tube. Wave strength and slag orientation also have different effects on the chipping off of the slag. The annual report discusses about the results obtained in effectively removing the slag.

  12. Influence of ambient air pressure on the energy conversion of laser-breakdown induced blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-01

    Influence of ambient pressure on energy conversion efficiency from a Nd?:?glass laser pulse (? = 1.053 µm) to a laser-induced blast wave was investigated at reduced pressure. Temporal incident and transmission power histories were measured using sets of energy meters and photodetectors. A half-shadowgraph half-self-emission method was applied to visualize laser absorption waves. Results show that the blast energy conversion efficiency ?bw decreased monotonically with the decrease in ambient pressure. The decrease was small, from 40% to 38%, for the pressure change from 101 kPa to 50 kPa, but the decrease was considerable, to 24%, when the pressure was reduced to 30 kPa. Compared with a TEA-CO2-laser-induced blast wave (? = 10.6 µm), higher fraction absorption in the laser supported detonation regime ?LSD of 90% was observed, which is influenced slightly by the reduction of ambient pressure. The conversion fraction ?bw/?LSD?90% was achieved at pressure >50 kPa, which is significantly higher than that in a CO2 laser case.

  13. Influence of Discrete Sources on Detonation Propagation in a Burgers Equation Analog System

    E-print Network

    Mi, XiaoCheng

    2015-01-01

    An analog to the equations of compressible flow that is based on the inviscid Burgers equation is utilized to investigate the effect of spatial discreteness of energy release on the propagation of a detonation wave. While the traditional Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) treatment of a detonation wave assumes that the energy release of the medium is homogeneous through space, the system examined here consists of sources represented by $\\delta$-functions embedded in an otherwise inert medium. The sources are triggered by the passage of the leading shock wave following a delay that is either of fixed period or randomly generated. The solution for wave propagation through a large array ($10^3$-$10^4$) of sources in one dimension can be constructed without the use of a finite difference approximation by tracking the interaction of sawtooth-profiled waves for which an analytic solution is available. A detonation-like wave results from the interaction of the shock and rarefaction waves generated by the sources. The measurement ...

  14. Detonation shock dynamics with an acceleration relation for nitromethane and TATB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Damian; Kraus, Richard; Mulford, Roberta; White, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    The propagation of curved detonation waves has been treated phenomenologically through models of the speed D of a detonation wave as a function of its curvature K, in the Whitham-Bdzil-Lambourn model, also known as detonation shock dynamics. D(K) relations, and the edge angle with adjacent material, have been deduced from the steady shape of detonation waves in long rods and slabs of explosive. Nonlinear D(K) relations have proven necessary to interpret data from charges of different diameter, and even then the D(K) relation may not transfer between diameters. This is an indication that the D(K) relation oversimplifies the kinematics. It is also possible to interpret wave-shape data in terms of an acceleration relation, as used in Brun's Jouguet relaxe model. One form of acceleration behavior is to couple an asymptotic D(K) relation with a time-dependent relaxation toward it from the instantaneous, local speed. This approach is also capable of modeling overdriving of a detonation by a booster. Using archival data for the TATB-based explosive EDC35 and for nitromethane, we found that a simple linear asymptotic D(K) relation with a constant relaxation rate was able to reproduce the experimental wave-shapes better, with fewer parameters, than a nonlinear instantaneous D(K) relation. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN TWO-DIMENSIONAL DELAYED DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, K.; Roepke, F.K.; Fink, M.; Hillebrandt, W.; Travaglio, C.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2010-03-20

    For the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), different scenarios have been suggested. In these, the propagation of the burning front through the exploding white dwarf (WD) star proceeds in different modes, and consequently imprints of the explosion model on the nucleosynthetic yields can be expected. The nucleosynthetic characteristics of various explosion mechanisms are explored based on three two-dimensional explosion simulations representing extreme cases: a pure turbulent deflagration, a delayed detonation following an approximately spherical ignition of the initial deflagration, and a delayed detonation arising from a highly asymmetric deflagration ignition. Apart from this initial condition, the deflagration stage is treated in a parameter-free approach. The detonation is initiated when the turbulent burning enters the distributed burning regime. This occurs at densities around 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}-relatively low as compared to existing nucleosynthesis studies for one-dimensional spherically symmetric models. The burning in these multidimensional models is different from that in one-dimensional simulations as the detonation wave propagates both into unburned material in the high-density region near the center of a WD and into the low-density region near the surface. Thus, the resulting yield is a mixture of different explosive burning products, from carbon-burning products at low densities to complete silicon-burning products at the highest densities, as well as electron-capture products synthesized at the deflagration stage. Detailed calculations of the nucleosynthesis in all three models are presented. In contrast to the deflagration model, the delayed detonations produce a characteristic layered structure and the yields largely satisfy constraints from Galactic chemical evolution. In the asymmetric delayed detonation model, the region filled with electron capture species (e.g., {sup 58}Ni, {sup 54}Fe) is within a shell, showing a large off-set, above the bulk of {sup 56}Ni distribution, while species produced by the detonation are distributed more spherically.

  16. Detonator comprising a nonlinear transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-12-30

    Detonators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the detonator includes a nonlinear transmission line that has a variable capacitance. Capacitance of the nonlinear transmission line is a function of voltage on the nonlinear transmission line. The nonlinear transmission line receives a voltage pulse from a voltage source and compresses the voltage pulse to generate a trigger signal. Compressing the voltage pulse includes increasing amplitude of the voltage pulse and decreasing length of the voltage pulse in time. An igniter receives the trigger signal and detonates an explosive responsive to receipt of the trigger signal.

  17. Eigenvalue Detonation of Combined Effects Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellos, C.; Baker, E. L.; Nicolich, S.; Balas, W.; Pincay, J.; Stiel, L. I.

    2007-12-01

    Theory and performance for recently developed combined—effects aluminized explosives are presented. Our recently developed combined-effects aluminized explosives (PAX-29C, PAX-30, PAX-42) are capable of achieving excellent metal pushing, as well as high blast energies. Metal pushing capability refers to the early volume expansion work produced during the first few volume expansions associated with cylinder and wall velocities and Gurney energies. Eigenvalue detonation explains the observed detonation states achieved by these combined effects explosives. Cylinder expansion data and thermochemical calculations (JAGUAR and CHEETAH) verify the eigenvalue detonation behavior.

  18. Investigations on deflagration to detonation transition in porous energetic materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S.

    1999-07-01

    The research carried out by this contract was part of a larger effort funded by LANL in the areas of deflagration to detonation in porous energetic materials (DDT) and detonation shock dynamics in high explosives (DSD). In the first three years of the contract the major focus was on DDT. However, some researchers were carried out on DSD theory and numerical implementation. In the last two years the principal focus of the contract was on DSD theory and numerical implementation. However, during the second period some work was also carried out on DDT. The paper discusses DDT modeling and DSD modeling. Abstracts are included on the following topics: modeling deflagration to detonation; DSD theory; DSD wave front tracking; and DSD program burn implementation.

  19. Estimation of the Shock to Detonation Region Inside an Energetic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemlinger, Erik; Stowe, David; Treadway, Sean; Czech, Christopher; Cogar, John

    2015-06-01

    A series of six tests were conducted investigating shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) in cylindrical samples of Composition B (CompB). A 40mm (1.57 in) powder gun was used to launch 1.905 cm (0.75 in) diameter spherical steel fragments at a mean velocity of 1519.73 m/s (4986 ft/s) into the CompB. For each test 9 piezoelectric pins were placed 1.27 cm (0.5 in) below the surface of the CompB and situated to form a plane that bisects the CompB sample. The pins were positioned such that 8 were along the side of the cylinder with the 9th pin opposite the impact location of the cylinder. The 9 pins were used to record the detonation wave time of arrival (TOA). Using the piezoelectric pin TOA a basic kinematic equation can be written for the velocity between the start of the detonation wave and the TOA at the pin. A system of 4 equations is used to solve for the location in the plane, the velocity, and time when the detonation wave initiated. This approach was used for each of the 126 unique combinations of piezoelectric pins to estimate a region where the SDT transition occurred. Approved for Public Release 15-MDA-8097 (20 January 15).

  20. Free-field microwave interferometry for detonation front tracking and run-to-detonation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Philip; Glover, Brian; Gunderson, Jake; Perry, Lee

    2012-03-01

    A quadrature interferometer used in a free-field measurement mode has, with the aid of a high directivity horn antenna, been successfully used to measure the detonation front of PBX-9501 within a dielectric can. Using the known length of explosive, a relative dielectric permittivity of 3.84 has been calculated for the 34 GHz frequency used. Using this value, the displacement vs. time of the detonation front can be found and hence the velocity of detonation may be calculated. This technique shows good promise as a method of measuring the run-to-detonation distance in explosives using a totally non-contacting technique.

  1. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

  2. Study of detonation initiation in kerosene-oxidizer mixtures in short tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindracki, J.

    2014-11-01

    The paper describes experimental studies of detonation initiation in a kerosene-oxidizer mixture in a short test tube. The aim of the study is to determine the minimum diameter of the tube and the minimum level of energy that enables direct initiation of the detonation. Knowledge about these values will inform the design of a jet engine combustion chamber in which thermal energy will be generated by a rotating detonation process. The test tube and the oxidizer inside the tube were heated using specially designed heaters installed outside of the tube. The heated oxidizer provided thermal conditions similar to the conditions for a compressor with small to medium static pressure. The study was conducted for four different tube diameters and for various energies of initiation. As a result, measurements of pressure waveforms were obtained for various cases of fuel injection, which were then compared against the results of the shock wave generated by the initiator. This study provides a value for the energy (the pressure of the mixture in the initiator), which provided direct initiation of detonation for a kerosene-oxidizer mixture. Different tube diameters led to the initiation of detonation for various oxygen-nitrogen compositions as an oxidizer.

  3. Double-HE-Layer Detonation-Confinement Sandwich Tests: The Effect of Slow-Layer Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Larry

    2013-06-01

    Over a period of several years, we have explored the phenomenon in which slabs of high explosives (HEs) with differing detonation speeds are joined along one of their faces. Both are initiated (usually by a line-wave generator) at one edge. If there were no coupling between the layers, the detonation in the fast HE would outrun that in the slow HE. In reality, the detonation in the fast HE transmits an oblique shock into the slow HE, the phase speed of which is equal to the speed of the fast HE. This has one of two effects depending on the particulars. First, the oblique shock transmitted to the slow HE can pre-shock and deaden it, extinguishing the detonation in the slow HE. Second, the oblique shock can transversely initiate the slow layer, pulling its detonation along at the fast HE speed. When the second occurs, it does so at the ``penalty'' of a nominally dead layer, which forms in the slow HE adjacent to the material interface. We present the results of tests in which the fast layer was 3-mm-thick PBX 9501 (95 wt% HMX), and the slow layer was 8-mm-thick PBX 9502 (95 wt% TATB). The purpose was to observe the effect of slow layer density on the ``dead'' layer thickness. Very little effect was observed across the nominal PBX 9502 density range, 1.885-1.895 g/cc.

  4. Propagation of detonations in hydrazine vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    In the range of greater hydrazine vapor pressure, detonation speed depends exclusively on the extent of the ammonia decomposition in the second reaction stage. As vapor pressure decreases, the ammonia disintegration speed becomes increasingly slower and the reaction reached in the reaction zone increasingly decreases until finally, in the vapor pressure range between 53 and 16 Torr, the contribution of the second stage to detonation propagation disappears, and only the first stage remains active. Since the disintegration speed of the hydrazine in this pressure range has decreased markedly as well, no level, but rather only spinning, detonations occur. Temporary separations of the impact front and the reaction zone in the process lead to fluctuations of the detonation speed.

  5. Initiation and Detonation Physics on Millimeter Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Philllips, D F; Benterou, J J; May, C A

    2012-03-20

    The LLNL Detonation Science Project has a major interest in understanding the physics of detonation on a millimeter scale. This report summarizes the rate stick experiment results of two high explosives. The GO/NO-GO threshold between varying diameters of ultra-fine TATB (ufTATB) and LX-16 were recorded on an electronic streak camera and analyzed. This report summarizes the failure diameters of rate sticks for ufTATB and LX-16. Failure diameter for the ufTATB explosive, with densities at 1.80 g/cc, begin at 2.34 mm (not maintaining detonation velocity over the entire length of the rate stick). ufTATB rate sticks at the larger 3.18 mm diameter maintain a constant detonation velocity over the complete length. The PETN based and LLNL developed explosive, LX-16, with densities at 1.7 g/cc, shows detonation failure between 0.318 mm and 0.365 mm. Additional tests would be required to narrow this failure diameter further. Many of the tested rate sticks were machined using a femtosecond laser focused into a firing tank - in case of accidental detonation.

  6. Chirped fiber Bragg grating detonation velocity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; McCulloch, Q.; Jackson, S. I.; Vincent, S. W.; Udd, E.

    2013-01-01

    An all optical-fiber-based approach to measuring high explosive detonation front position and velocity is described. By measuring total light return using an incoherent light source reflected from a linearly chirped fiber Bragg grating sensor in contact with the explosive, dynamic mapping of the detonation front position and velocity versus time is obtained. We demonstrate two calibration procedures and provide several examples of detonation front measurements: PBX 9502 cylindrical rate stick, radial detonation front in PBX 9501, and PBX 9501 detonation along curved meridian line. In the cylindrical rate stick measurement, excellent agreement with complementary diagnostics (electrical pins and streak camera imaging) is achieved, demonstrating accuracy in the detonation front velocity to below the 0.3% level when compared to the results from the pin data. Finally, an estimate on the linear spatial and temporal resolution of the system shows that sub-mm and sub-?s levels are attainable with proper consideration of the recording speed, detection sensitivity, spectrum, and chirp properties of the grating.

  7. Deflagration to detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlov, A.M.; Oran, E.S.; Wheeler, J.C.

    1996-12-03

    The authors derive the criteria for deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) in a Type Ia supernova. The theory is based on the two major assumptions: (i) detonation is triggered via the Zeldovich gradient mechanism inside a region of mixed fuel and products, (ii) the mixed region is produced by a turbulent mixing of fuel and products either inside an active deflagration front or during the global expansion and subsequent contraction of an exploding white dwarf. The authors determine the critical size of the mixed region required to initiate a detonation in a degenerate carbon oxygen mixture. This critical length is much larger than the width of the reaction front of a Chapman-Jouguet detonation. However, at densities greater than = 5 x 10{sup 6} g/cc, it is much smaller than the size of a white dwarf. They derive the critical turbulent intensity required to create the mixed region inside an active deflagration front in which a detonation can form. They conclude that the density rho sub sigma at which a detonation can form in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf is low, approximately less than 2 to 5 x 10{sup 6} g/cc, but greater than 5 x 10{sup 6} g/cc.

  8. Deflagration to Detonation Transition in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-print Network

    A. M. Khokhlov; E. S. Oran; J. Craig Wheeler

    1996-12-23

    We derive the criteria for deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) in a Type Ia supernova. The theory is based on the two major assumptions: (i) detonation is triggered via the Zeldovich gradient mechanism inside a region of mixed fuel and products, (ii) the mixed region is produced by a turbulent mixing of fuel and products either inside an active deflagration front or during the global expansion and subsequent contraction of an exploding white dwarf. We determine the critical size of the mixed region required to initiate a detonation in a degenerate carbon-oxygen mixture. This critical length is much larger than the width of the reaction front of a Chapman-Jouguet detonation. However, at densities greater than simeq 5 x 10^6 g cm^-3, it is much smaller than the size of a white dwarf. We derive the critical turbulent intensity required to create the mixed region inside an active deflagration front in which a detonation can form. We conclude that the density rho_tr at which a detonation can form in a carbon-oxygem white dwarf is low, less than 2 - 5 x 10^7 g cm^-3, but greater than 5 x 10^6 g cm^-3.

  9. 46th AIAA Aerospace Science Meeting and Exhibit, 7-10 January 2008, Reno, Nevada Shock-Fitted Calculation of Unsteady Detonation in

    E-print Network

    2008-1036 46th AIAA Aerospace Science Meeting and Exhibit, 7-10 January 2008, Reno, Nevada Shock overdriven waves are stable and moderately overdriven waves unstable. I. Introduction Recently, a shock revealed by a complementary analysis of the steady detonation wave structure. For the unsteady calculations

  10. Detonative propagation and accelerative expansion of the Crab Nebula shock front.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K

    2011-10-21

    The accelerative expansion of the Crab Nebula's outer envelope is a mystery in dynamics, as a conventional expanding blast wave decelerates when bumping into the surrounding interstellar medium. Here we show that the strong relativistic pulsar wind bumping into its surrounding nebula induces energy-generating processes and initiates a detonation wave that propagates outward to form the current outer edge, namely, the shock front, of the nebula. The resulting detonation wave, with a reactive downstream, then provides the needed power to maintain propagation of the shock front. Furthermore, relaxation of the curvature-induced reduction of the propagation velocity from the initial state of formation to the asymptotic, planar state of Chapman-Jouguet propagation explains the observed accelerative expansion. Potential richness in incorporating reactive fronts in the description of various astronomical phenomena is expected. PMID:22107499

  11. Two-headed detonation in reactive particle-oxidizing gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Grönig, H.

    1992-10-01

    The structure and the propagation mechanism of stable two-headed detonation waves in a heterogeneous cornstarch particle-oxygen mixture have been studied in a circular tube 141 mm in diameter. Pressure transducers and double response gauges responding to both the shock and combustion front have been used for observations in a 0.5 m long test section, which has 32 gauge positions arranged on four circumferences. The results show that at the detonation wave front, two Mach triple-point configurations exist on the periphery. The collision of the two triple points leads to an overdriven wave followed by a transient decay, which requires continual regeneration by collisions for sustained propagation. The trajectory of the two triple points form a single cell, whose width is equal to ? times the tube diameter. Degeneration of a transient two-headed mode results in one kind of onset mechanisms of a stable single-headed spin.

  12. Detonability of H/sub 2/-air-diluent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Berman, M.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the Heated Detonation Tube (HDT). Detonation cell width and velocity results are presented for H/sub 2/-air mixtures, undiluted and diluted with CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O for a range of H/sub 2/ concentration, initial temperature and pressure. The results show that the addition of either CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O significantly increases the detonation cell width and hence reduces the detonability of the mixture. The results also show that the detonation cell width is reduced (detonability is increased) for increased initial temperature and/or pressure.

  13. Gaseous detonation synthesis and characterization of nano-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Honghao; Wu, Linsong; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Gaseous detonation is a new method of heating the precursor of nanomaterials into gas, and integrating it with combustible gas as mixture to be detonated for the synthesis of nanomaterials. In this paper, the mixed gas of oxygen and hydrogen is used as the source for detonation, to synthesize nano TiO2, nano SiO2 and nano SnO2 through gaseous detonation method, characterization and analysis of the products, it was found that the products from gaseous detonation method were of high purity, good dispersion, smaller particle size and even distribution. It also shows that for the synthesis of nano-oxides, gaseous detonation is universal.

  14. Pulse Detonation Engine Air Induction System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, R. J.; Hunter, L. G.; Couch, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    A preliminary mixed-compression inlet design concept for potential pulse-detonation engine (PDE) powered supersonic aircraft was defined and analyzed. The objectives of this research were to conceptually design and integrate an inlet/PDE propulsion system into a supersonic aircraft, perform time-dependent CFD analysis of the inlet flowfield, and to estimate the installed PDE cycle performance. The study was baselined to a NASA Mach 5 Waverider study vehicle in which the baseline over/under turboramjet engines were replaced with a single flowpath PDE propulsion system. As much commonality as possible was maintained with the baseline configuration, including the engine location and forebody lines. Modifications were made to the inlet system's external ramp angles and a rotating cowl lip was incorporated to improve off-design inlet operability and performance. Engines were sized to match the baseline vehicle study's ascent trajectory thrust requirement at Mach 1.2. The majority of this study was focused on a flight Mach number of 3.0. The time-dependent Navier Stokes CFD analyses of a two-dimensional approximation of the inlet was conducted for the Mach 3.0 condition. The Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems-developed FALCON CFD code with a two equation 'k-1' turbulence model was used. The downstream PDE was simulated by an array of four sonic nozzles in which the flow areas were rapidly varied in various opening/closing combinations. Results of the CFD study indicated that the inlet design concept operated successfully at the Mach 3.0 condition, satisfying mass capture, total pressure recovery, and operability requirements. Time-dependent analysis indicated that pressure and expansion waves from the simulated valve perturbations did not effect the inlet's operability or performance.

  15. Study on the Mechanism of the Deflagration to Detonation Transition Process of Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Yangjun; Hu, Xiaomian; Wei, Lan

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we presented a numerical study of the mechanisms of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process of explosives to assess its thermal stability. We treated the modeling system as a mixture of solid explosives and gaseous reaction products. We utilized a one-dimensional two-phase flow modeling approach with space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. Simulation results show a plug area of high density with relatively slow chemical reactions, whose forward boundary is the fast running shock wave, and rearward boundary is the burning wave.We identified a criterion of steady detonation through a detailed analysis of the characteristics of the reaction process: steady detonation occurs at locations where different physical quantities, such as pressure, density, temperature and velocity, reach peak values simultaneously.We also simulated the high temperature DDT tube experiments of HMX-based high explosive. We found good agreement between the simulation results of detonation velocity and run length determined by the above criterion and the experimental results.

  16. Computational Study of Near-limit Propagation of Detonation in Hydrogen-air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, S.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    2002-01-01

    A computational investigation of the near-limit propagation of detonation in lean and rich hydrogen-air mixtures is presented. The calculations were carried out over an equivalence ratio range of 0.4 to 5.0, pressures ranging from 0.2 bar to 1.0 bar and ambient initial temperature. The computations involved solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with detailed finite-rate chemistry. The numerical method is based on a second-order spatially accurate total-variation-diminishing (TVD) scheme, and a point implicit, first-order-accurate, time marching algorithm. The hydrogen-air combustion was modeled with a 9-species, 19-step reaction mechanism. A multi-level, dynamically adaptive grid was utilized in order to resolve the structure of the detonation. The results of the computations indicate that when hydrogen concentrations are reduced below certain levels, the detonation wave switches from a high-frequency, low amplitude oscillation mode to a low frequency mode exhibiting large fluctuations in the detonation wave speed; that is, a 'galloping' propagation mode is established.

  17. Use of Microwave Technique for Study of Isentropic Detonation Products Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Belsky, Vladimir; Zhernokletov, Mikhail; Mikhaylov, Anatoly; Rodionov, Alexey; Sedov, Alexander; Russian Federal Nuclear Center-Vniief 607190, Sarov, Nizhniy Novgorod Reg., Russia Team

    2013-06-01

    Application of the microwave technique for research of explosives and their detonation products can give a number of advantages as compared to the other experimental techniques. This technique makes it possible to perform a continuous recording of the shock and detonation waves motion directly in explosive. A significant advantage of the technique consists in absence of influence on investigated process, because there are no any sensors, optic fiber etc. in an explosive volume. The microwave technique was used for isentropic detonation products expansion study of HMX/TATB-based explosive compound. For determination of states on the expansion adiabat of detonation products, the experimental series was conducted. In these experiments we recorded time dependences of the shock wave velocities in dielectric microwave-transparent barriers, which were in contact with explosive samples. A low power 94 GHz quadrature interferometer was used. The conducted experiments showed that the use of microwave technique gives a big amount of interesting experimental data with a considerable research simplification.

  18. Supporting Structure of the LSD Wave in an Energy Absorption Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Akihiro; Hatai, Keigo; Cho, Shinatora; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2008-04-28

    In Repetitively Pulsed (RP) Laser Propulsion, laser energy irradiated to a vehicle is converted to blast wave enthalpy during the Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) regime. Based on the measured post-LSD electron number density profiles by two-wavelength Mach Zehnder interferometer in a line-focusing optics, electron temperature and absorption coefficient were estimated assuming Local Thermal Equilibrium. A 10J/pulse CO{sub 2} laser was used. As a result, laser absorption was found completed in the layer between the shock wave and the electron density peak. Although the LSD-termination timing was not clear from the shock-front/ionization-front separation in the shadowgraph images, there observed drastic changes in the absorption layer thickness from 0.2 mm to 0.5 mm and in the peak heating rate from 12-17x10{sup 13} kW/m{sup 3} to 5x10{sup 13} kW/m{sup 3} at the termination.

  19. Preliminary Studies of a Pulsed Detonation Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Adelman, H. G.; Menees, G. P.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In the new era of space exploration, there is a strong need for more efficient, cheaper and more reliable propulsion devices. With dramatic increase in specific impulse, the overall mass of fuel to be lifted into orbit is decreased, and this leads, in turn, to much lower mass requirements at lift-off, higher payload ratios and lower launch costs. The Pulsed Detonation engine (PDE) has received much attention lately due to its unique combination of simplicity, light-weight and efficiency. Current investigations focus principally on its use as a low speed, airbreathing engine, although other applications have also been proposed. Its use as a rocket propulsion device was first proposed in 1988 by the present authors. The superior efficiency of the Pulsed Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE) is due to the near constant volume combustion process of a detonation wave. Our preliminary estimates suggest that the PDRE is theoretically capable of achieving specific impulses as high as 720 sec, a dramatic improvement over the current 480 sec of conventional rocket engines, making it competitive with nuclear thermal rockets. In addition to this remarkable efficiency, the PDRE may eliminate the need for high pressure cryogenic turbopumps, a principal source of failures. The heat transfer rates are also much lower, eliminating the need for nozzle cooling. Overall, the engine is more reliable and has a much lower weight. This paper will describe in detail the operation of the PDRE and calculate its performance, through numerical simulations. Engineering issues will be addressed and discussed, and the impact on mission profiles will also be presented. Finally, the performance of the PDRE using in-situ resources, such as CO and O2 from the martian atmosphere, will also be computed.

  20. Plasma-assisted ignition and deflagration-to-detonation transition.

    PubMed

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nickolay; Rakitin, Aleksandr

    2012-02-13

    Non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and to become an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation gas turbine engines, piston engines, RAMjets, SCRAMjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. The analysis of discharge processes shows that the discharge energy can be deposited into the desired internal degrees of freedom of molecules when varying the reduced electric field, E/n, at which the discharge is maintained. The amount of deposited energy is controlled by other discharge and gas parameters, including electric pulse duration, discharge current, gas number density, gas temperature, etc. As a rule, the dominant mechanism of the effect of non-equilibrium plasma on ignition and combustion is associated with the generation of active particles in the discharge plasma. For plasma-assisted ignition and combustion in mixtures containing air, the most promising active species are O atoms and, to a smaller extent, some other neutral atoms and radicals. These active particles are efficiently produced in high-voltage, nanosecond, pulse discharges owing to electron-impact dissociation of molecules and electron-impact excitation of N(2) electronic states, followed by collisional quenching of these states to dissociate the molecules. Mechanisms of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) initiation by non-equilibrium plasma were analysed. For longitudinal discharges with a high power density in a plasma channel, two fast DDT mechanisms have been observed. When initiated by a spark or a transient discharge, the mixture ignited simultaneously over the volume of the discharge channel, producing a shock wave with a Mach number greater than 2 and a flame. A gradient mechanism of DDT similar to that proposed by Zeldovich has been observed experimentally under streamer initiation. PMID:22213667

  1. Detonation nanodiamonds for doping Kevlar.

    PubMed

    Comet, Marc; Pichot, Vincent; Siegert, Benny; Britz, Fabienne; Spitzer, Denis

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports on the first attempt to enclose diamond nanoparticles--produced by detonation--into a Kevlar matrix. A nanocomposite material (40 wt% diamond) was prepared by precipitation from an acidic solution of Kevlar containing dispersed nanodiamonds. In this material, the diamond nanoparticles (Ø = 4 nm) are entirely wrapped in a Kevlar layer about 1 nm thick. In order to understand the interactions between the nanodiamond surface and the polymer, the oxygenated surface functional groups of nanodiamond were identified and titrated by Boehm's method which revealed the exclusive presence of carboxyl groups (0.85 sites per nm2). The hydrogen interactions between these groups and the amide groups of Kevlar destroy the "rod-like" structure and the classical three-dimensional organization of this polymer. The distortion of Kevlar macromolecules allows the wrapping of nanodiamonds and leads to submicrometric assemblies, giving a cauliflower structure reminding a fractal object. Due to this structure, the macroscopic hardness of Kevlar doped by nanodiamonds (1.03 GPa) is smaller than the one of pure Kevlar (2.31 GPa). To our knowledge, this result is the first illustration of the change of the mechanical properties induced by doping the Kevlar with nanoparticles. PMID:21128413

  2. Turbulent Mixing and Afterburn in Post-Detonation Flow with Dense Particle Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Suresh

    2015-06-01

    Reactive metal particles are used as additives in most explosives to enhance afterburn and augment the impact of the explosive. The afterburn is highly dependent on the particle dispersal and mixing in the post-detonation flow. The post-detonation flow is generally characterized by hydrodynamic instabilities emanating from the interaction of the blast waves with the detonation product gases and the ambient air. Further, influenced by the particles, the flow evolves and develops turbulent structures, which play vital role in determining mixing and combustion. Past studies in the field in open literature are reviewed along with some recent studies conducted using three dimensional numerical simulations of particle dispersal and combustion in the post-detonation flow. Spherical nitromethane charges enveloped by particle shells of varying thickness are considered along with dense loading effects. In dense flows, the particles block the flow of the gases and therefore, the role of the inter-particle interactions on particle dispersal cannot be ignored. Thus, both dense and dilute effects must be modeled simultaneously to simulate the post-detonation flow. A hybrid equation of state is employed to study the evolution of flow from detonation initiation till the late time mixing and afterburn. The particle dispersal pattern in each case is compared with the available experimental results. The burn rate and the energy release in each case is quantified and the effect of total mass of the particles and the particle size is analyzed in detail. Strengths and limitations of the various methods used for such studies as well as the uncertainties in the modeling strategies are also highlighted. Supported by Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  3. Structure and properties of detonation soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    MalKOV, I.Y.; Titiov, V.M.

    1996-05-01

    The influence of TNT/RDX (50/50) detonation parameters and conservation conditions of detonation products during their expansion in hermetic detonation chamber on structure and phase composition of the detonation carbon has been considered. Systematic studies made it possible to establish the real structure of detonation carbon depending on experimental conditions. It has been shown that both during explosion in a chamber and thermal annealing in vacuum the nanoparticles of diamond have the tendency to transform not into graphite particles, as was assumed earlier, but into onionlike structures of fullerene series, composed of closed concentric carbon shells, the so-called carbon onions. The nanometer carbon particles have been obtained which comprise a diamond nucleus surrounded by a graphite-like mantle composed of quasi-spherical carbon shells which are the intermediate products of annealing of nanodiamond. The influence of initial sizes of the diamond particles and temperature on the annealing of diamond has been studied. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Pulsed Detonation Operation of an Axial Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, David; St. George, Andrew; Driscoll, Robert; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gas Dynamics and Propulsion Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    A detonation is by its nature a more thermodynamically efficient combustion mode than deflagration. Several attempts are underway to integrate detonating combustion into turbomachines in order to realize the increased efficiency available, save resources and reduce emissions. One approach to this challenge is to employ pulsed detonations as from pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) and use the pulsed outflow to drive a turbine. The difficulty with this approach is that turbines, especially the more efficient axial turbines suffer in efficiency when their inflow is pulsed. At present there is not even a commonly acknowledged turbine efficiency measure which works reasonably for a pulsed input. The present work investigates the efficiency of an axial turbine with pulsed flow. Initial tests are performed with non-combusting flow in order to study the influence of pulsation on the turbine performance. This cold flow will admit a broader range of instrumentation which can be inserted within the turbine. This allows time-resolved measure of the flow angles which have a pronounced effect on the turbine performance. Later tests with detonating inflow yield global measures and these are compared to the non-combusting results. Work sponsored by Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc.

  5. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311 Section...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized...distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  11. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized...distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  12. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized...distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  13. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized...distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  14. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  15. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  17. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  18. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized...distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  19. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground...circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site...between 25 to 50 feet of the electric detonators if stray current tests, conducted as...

  20. GPU-based simulation of the two-dimensional unstable structure of gaseous oblique detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, H.H.; Kiyanda, C.B.; Ng, H.D.; Morgan, G.H.; Nikiforakis, N.

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, the two-dimensional structure of unstable oblique detonations induced by the wedge from a supersonic combustible gas flow is simulated using the reactive Euler equations with a one-step Arrhenius chemistry model. A wide range of activation energy of the combustible mixture is considered. Computations are performed on the Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) to reduce the simulation runtimes. A large computational domain covered by a uniform mesh with high grid resolution is used to properly capture the development of instabilities and the formation of different transverse wave structures. After the initiation point, where the oblique shock transits into a detonation, an instability begins to manifest and in all cases, the left-running transverse waves first appear, followed by the subsequent emergence of right-running transverse waves forming the dual-head triple point structure. This study shows that for low activation energies, a long computational length must be carefully considered to reveal the unstable surface due to the slow growth rate of the instability. For high activation energies, the flow behind the unstable oblique detonation features the formation of unburnt gas pockets and strong vortex-pressure wave interaction resulting in a chaotic-like vortical structure.

  1. Finite element code development for modeling detonation of HMX composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Adam; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2015-06-01

    In this talk, we present a hydrodynamics code for modeling shock and detonation waves in HMX. A stable efficient solution strategy based on a Taylor-Galerkin finite element (FE) discretization was developed to solve the reactive Euler equations. In our code, well calibrated equations of state for the solid unreacted material and gaseous reaction products have been implemented, along with a chemical reaction scheme and a mixing rule to define the properties of partially reacted states. A linear Gruneisen equation of state was employed for the unreacted HMX calibrated from experiments. The JWL form was used to model the EOS of gaseous reaction products. It is assumed that the unreacted explosive and reaction products are in both pressure and temperature equilibrium. The overall specific volume and internal energy was computed using the rule of mixtures. Arrhenius kinetics scheme was integrated to model the chemical reactions. A locally controlled dissipation was introduced that induces a non-oscillatory stabilized scheme for the shock front. The FE model was validated using analytical solutions for sod shock and ZND strong detonation models and then used to perform 2D and 3D shock simulations. We will present benchmark problems for geometries in which a single HMX crystal is subjected to a shock condition. Our current progress towards developing microstructural models of HMX/binder composite will also be discussed.

  2. Some observations on the initiation and onset of detonation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Geraint

    2012-02-13

    The results of experimental studies during which transition to detonation events occurred are presented. These observations and their interpretation are then discussed, and the conditions for the onset of detonation are described, with particular attention paid to the nature of the phenomena of deflagration-to-detonation transition. The resulting implications for predicting detonation evolution using computational fluid dynamic methods in practical applications are also discussed. PMID:22213666

  3. Detonator cable initiation system safety investigation: Consequences of energizing the detonator and actuator cables

    SciTech Connect

    Osher, J.; Chau, H.; Von Holle, W.

    1994-03-01

    This study was performed to explore and assess the worst-case response of a W89-type weapons system, damaged so as to expose detonator and/or detonator safing strong link (DSSL) cables to the most extreme, credible lightning-discharge, environment. The test program used extremely high-current-level, fast-rise-time (1- to 2-{mu}s) discharges to simulate lightning strikes to either the exposed detonator or DSSL cables. Discharges with peak currents above 700 kA were required to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch a flyer fast enough potentially to detonate weapon high explosive (HE). Detonator-safing-strong-link (DSSL) cables were exploded in direct contact with hot LX-17 and Ultrafine TATB (UFTATB). At maximum charging voltage, the discharge system associated with the HE firing chamber exploded the cables at more than 600-kA peak current; however, neither LX-17 nor UFTATB detonated at 250{degree}C. Tests showed that intense surface arc discharges of more than 700 kA/cm in width across the surface of hot UFTATB [generally the more sensitive of the two insensitive high explosives (IHE)] could not initiate this hot IHE. As an extension to this study, we applied the same technique to test sections of the much-narrower but thicker-cover-layer W87 detonator cable. These tests were performed at the same initial stored electrical energy as that used for the W89 study. Because of the narrower cable conductor in the W87 cables, discharges greater than 550-kA peak current were sufficient to explode the cable and launch a fast flyer. In summary, we found that lightning strikes to exposed DSSL cables cannot directly detonate LX-17 or UFTATB even at high temperatures, and they pose no HE safety threat.

  4. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-11-17

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O within ?10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O productions.

  5. Detonation Performance Testing of LX-19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Samuel; Aslam, Tariq; Jackson, Scott

    2015-06-01

    CL-20 was developed at the Naval Surface Weapons Center at China Lake, CA in the mid 80's. Being less sensitive than PETN, but considerably more powerful than HMX, it is the highest energy and density compound known among organic chemicals. LX-19 was developed at LLNL in the early 90's. It is a high-energy plastic bonded explosive, composed of 95.8 wt% CL-20 and 4.2 wt% Estane binder, and is similar to LX-14 (composed of HMX and Estane), but with greater sensitivity characteristics with use of the more energetic CL-20 explosive. We report detonation performance results for unconfined cylindrical rate sticks of LX-19. The experimental diameter effects are shown, along with detonation front shapes, and reaction zone profiles for different test diameters. This data is critical for calibration to Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD). LA-UR-15-20672.

  6. CP DDT detonators. I. Design sensitivity study

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, W.; Fronabarger, J.W.; Lieberman, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    A standard CP detonator design has been used to study a variety of design parameters including test temperature, closure disk thicknes, powder column diameter, transition column diameter, powder column confinement, igniter charge holder material, bridgewire diameter, fire pulse energy, fire pulse duration and fire pulse current. The data indicated a minimum function time for such detonators of approximately 7 ..mu..s, which is limited by the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) process. DDT can be achieved in the presence of some venting but is inhibited by charge holder materials which provide the poor confinement. Increasing the powder column diameter or the transition column diameter results in longer function times. With increasing temperature, output increases and function time decreases.

  7. Quantic Industries Inc. slapper detonator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, J.L.; Lee, R.S.; Hodgin, R.L.

    1994-05-01

    Under the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) Small Business Technology Transfer Program, assistance was given to Quantic Industries Inc. to use the High Explosive Applications Facility (HEAF), its apparatus, and LLNL expertise to characterize the performance of Quantic`s micro-clad copper/kapton slapper detonator assemblies and establish their threshold to detonate HNS-IV. The project involved measuring the performance of these slapper detonators, otherwise known as Exploding Foil Initiators (EFI`s), manufactured by Quantic Industries Inc. Slapper performance was measured by using a laser velocimeter, which is an expensive and specialized facility which Quantic does not own. The authors measured slapper velocity vs. time as a function of charging voltage. Quantic supplied slappers which were coated with {approximately}100 nm of Al to provide a reflective surface for the laser velocimeter measurements. LLNL provided to a capacitor discharge unit (CDU) to fire the slappers and matched the Quantic CDU waveforms as close as possible.

  8. Eigenvalue Detonation of Combined Effects Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellos, Christos; Baker, Ernest; Balas, Wendy; Nicolich, Steven; Stiel, Leonard

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports on the development of theory and performance for recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives. Traditional high energy explosives used for metal pushing incorporate high loading percentages of HMX or RDX, whereas blast explosives incorporate some percentage of aluminum. However, the high blast explosives produce increased blast energies, with reduced metal pushing capability due to late time aluminum reaction. Metal pushing capability refers to the early volume expansion work produced during the first few volume expansions associated with cylinder wall velocities and Gurney energies. Our Recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives (PAX-29C, PAX-30, PAX-42) are capable of achieving excellent metal pushing and high blast energies. Traditional Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory does not explain the observed detonation states achieved by these combined effects explosives. This work demonstrates, with the use of cylinder expansion data and thermochemical code calculations (JAGUAR and CHEETAH), that eigenvalue detonation theory explains the observed behavior.

  9. 30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in a round shall be from the same manufacturer and shall have similar...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400 Section 56.6400 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators to be fired in...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported underground... transported by any cars or vehicles— (1) The cars or vehicles shall be marked with warnings to identify...

  12. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 57.6402... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized....

  13. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 56.6402... Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized. Such circuits need not...

  14. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 56.6402... Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized. Such circuits need not...

  15. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 56.6402... Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized. Such circuits need not...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 57.6402... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized....

  17. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 56.6402... Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized. Such circuits need not...

  18. 30 CFR 56.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 56.6402... Electric Blasting § 56.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized. Such circuits need not...

  19. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 57.6402... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized....

  20. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 57.6402... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized....

  1. 30 CFR 57.6402 - Deenergized circuits near detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Deenergized circuits near detonators. 57.6402... Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6402 Deenergized circuits near detonators. Electrical distribution circuits within 50 feet of electric detonators at the blast site shall be deenergized....

  2. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transporting explosives and detonators. 75.1311... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1311 Transporting explosives and detonators. (a) When explosives and detonators are to be transported...

  6. Experimental study of a pulse detonation rocket with Shchelkin spiral

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    while a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) occurs at lower energies but requires excessiveExperimental study of a pulse detonation rocket with Shchelkin spiral F.K. Lu, J.M. Meyers, and D There is much recent interest in the development of propulsion systems using high- frequency pulsed detonations

  7. Purely Gasdynamic Multidimensional Indirect Detonation Initiation Using Localized Acoustic

    E-print Network

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    initiation or by Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition (DDT). Direct initiation uses a large amount of energyPurely Gasdynamic Multidimensional Indirect Detonation Initiation Using Localized Acoustic detonation initiation process is presented that can be independent of diffusion, viscosity and turbulence

  8. Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Timescale Detonation J.D. Regele

    E-print Network

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    into a finite volume of reactive gas is the initiator for planar deflagration to detonation transition (DDT a physically plausible description of detonation initiation through a transition from deflagrationNumerical Modeling of Acoustic Timescale Detonation Initiation J.D. Regele , D.R. Kassoy and O

  9. LATERALLY PROPAGATING DETONATIONS IN THIN HELIUM LAYERS ON ACCRETING WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Dean M.; Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars

    2012-08-10

    Theoretical work has shown that intermediate mass (0.01 M{sub Sun} < M{sub He} < 0.1 M{sub Sun }) helium shells will unstably ignite on the accreting white dwarf (WD) in an AM CVn binary. For more massive (M > 0.8 M{sub Sun }) WDs, these helium shells can be dense enough (>5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} g cm{sup -3}) that the convectively burning region runs away on a timescale comparable to the sound travel time across the shell, raising the possibility for an explosive outcome rather than an Eddington limited helium novae. The nature of the explosion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) remains ambiguous, is certainly density dependent, and likely breaks spherical symmetry. In the case of detonation, this causes a laterally propagating front whose properties in these geometrically thin and low-density shells we begin to study here. Our calculations show that the radial expansion time of <0.1 s leads to incomplete helium burning, in agreement with recent work by Sim and collaborators, but that the nuclear energy released is still adequate to realize a self-sustaining laterally propagating detonation. These detonations are slower than the Chapman-Jouguet speed of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm s{sup -1}, but still fast enough at 0.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm s{sup -1} to go around the star prior to the transit through the star of the inwardly propagating weak shock. Our simulations resolve the subsonic region behind the reaction front in the detonation wave. The two-dimensional nucleosynthesis is shown to be consistent with a truncated one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering calculation at the slower detonation speed. The ashes from the lateral detonation are typically He rich, and consist of predominantly {sup 44}Ti, {sup 48}Cr, along with a small amount of {sup 52}Fe, with very little {sup 56}Ni and with significant {sup 40}Ca in carbon-enriched layers. If this helium detonation results in a Type Ia supernova, its spectral signatures would appear for the first few days after explosion.

  10. Detonations and deflagrations in cosmological phase transitions

    E-print Network

    Ariel Megevand; Alejandro D. Sanchez

    2009-05-22

    We study the steady state motion of bubble walls in cosmological phase transitions. Taking into account the boundary and continuity conditions for the fluid variables, we calculate numerically the wall velocity as a function of the nucleation temperature, the latent heat, and a friction parameter. We determine regions in the space of these parameters in which detonations and/or deflagrations are allowed. In order to apply the results to a physical case, we calculate these quantities in a specific model, which consists of an extension of the Standard Model with singlet scalar fields. We also obtain analytic approximations for the wall velocity, both in the case of deflagrations and of detonations.

  11. Detonations and deflagrations in cosmological phase transitions

    E-print Network

    Megevand, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    We study the steady state motion of bubble walls in cosmological phase transitions. Taking into account the boundary and continuity conditions for the fluid variables, we calculate numerically the wall velocity as a function of the nucleation temperature, the latent heat, and a friction parameter. We determine regions in the space of these parameters in which detonations and/or deflagrations are allowed. In order to apply the results to a physical case, we calculate these quantities in a specific model, which consists of an extension of the Standard Model with singlet scalar fields. We also obtain analytic approximations for deflagrations and detonations.

  12. Computer modeling of electrical performance of detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Furnberg, C.M.; Peevy, G.R.; Brigham, W.P.; Lyons, G.R.

    1995-05-01

    An empirical model of detonator electrical performance which describes the resistance of the exploding bridgewire (EBW) or exploding foil initiator (EFI or slapper) as a function of energy, deposition will be described. This model features many parameters that can be adjusted to obtain a close fit to experimental data. This has been demonstrated using recent experimental data taken with the cable discharge system located at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper will be a continuation of the paper entitled ``Cable Discharge System for Fundamental Detonator Studies`` presented at the 2nd NASA/DOD/DOE Pyrotechnic Workshop.

  13. Detonation synthesis of nano-size materials

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J.; Davis, J.; Wong, C.

    1996-07-01

    The detonation of explosives typically creates 100`s of kbar pressures and 1,000`s K temperatures. These pressures and temperatures last for only a fraction of a microsecond as the products expand. Nucleation and growth of crystalline materials can occur under these conditions. Recovery of these materials is difficult but can occur in some circumstances. This paper describes the detonation synthesis facility, recovery of nano-size diamond, and plans to synthesize other nano-size materials by modifying the chemical composition of explosive compounds. The characterization of nano-size diamonds by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy will also be reported.

  14. Ignition-and-Growth Modeling of NASA Standard Detonator and a Linear Shaped Charge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguz, Sirri

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to quantitatively investigate the ignition and shock sensitivity of NASA Standard Detonator (NSD) and the shock wave propagation of a linear shaped charge (LSC) after being shocked by NSD flyer plate. This combined explosive train was modeled as a coupled Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) model with LS-DYNA hydro code. An ignition-and-growth (I&G) reactive model based on unreacted and reacted Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equations of state was used to simulate the shock initiation. Various NSD-to-LSC stand-off distances were analyzed to calculate the shock initiation (or failure to initiate) and detonation wave propagation along the shaped charge. Simulation results were verified by experimental data which included VISAR tests for NSD flyer plate velocity measurement and an aluminum target severance test for LSC performance verification. Parameters used for the analysis were obtained from various published data or by using CHEETAH thermo-chemical code.

  15. Influence of quantum effects on the initiation of ignition and detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakon, A. V.; Emelianov, A. V.; Eremin, A. V.; Petrushevich, Yu. V.; Starostin, A. N.; Taran, M. D.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-05-01

    A theoretical analysis that allows one to quantify the quantum corrections to the rate constants of endothermic reactions associated with an increase in the high-energy tails of the momentum distribution functions at high pressures due to a manifestation of the uncertainty principle for the energy of the colliding particles at a high collision frequency is performed. The initiation of ignition of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures is investigated and special series of experiments on the initiation of detonation waves of condensation in carbon suboxide and acetylene at elevated pressures near the low-temperature limits have been carried out. The experimentally observed deviations in the Arrhenius dependences of the induction periods of the initiation of hydrogen ignition and detonation waves of condensation are shown to be well described by the proposed quantum corrections.

  16. A simple model for the dependence on local detonation speed of the product entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, David C.; Whitworth, Nicholas J.

    2012-03-01

    The generation of a burn time field as a pre-processing step ahead of a hydrocode calculation has been mostly upgraded in the explosives modelling community from the historical model of singlespeed programmed burn to DSD/WBL (Detonation Shock Dynamics / Whitham Bdzil Lambourn). The problem with this advance is that the previously conventional approach to the hydrodynamic stage of the model results in the entropy of the detonation products (s) having the wrong correlation with detonation speed (D). Instead of being higher where D is lower, the conventional method leads to s being lower where D is lower, resulting in a completely fictitious enhancement of available energy where the burn is degraded! A technique is described which removes this deficiency of the historical model when used with a DSD-generated burn time field. By treating the conventional JWL equation as a semi-empirical expression for the local expansion isentrope, and constraining the local parameter set for consistency with D, it is possible to obtain the two desirable outcomes that the model of the detonation wave is internally consistent, and s is realistically correlated with D.

  17. Mechanisms of deflagration-to-detonation transition under initiation by high-voltage nanosecond discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rakitin, Aleksandr E.; Starikovskii, Andrei Yu.

    2008-10-15

    An experimental study of detonation initiation in a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture by a high-voltage nanosecond gas discharge was performed in a detonation tube with a single-cell discharge chamber. The discharge study performed in this geometry showed that three modes of discharge development were realized under the experimental conditions: a spark mode with high-temperature channel formation, a streamer mode with nonuniform gas excitation, and a transient mode. Under spark and transient initiation, simultaneous ignition inside the discharge channel occurred, forming a shock wave and leading to a conventional deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) via an adiabatic explosion. The DDT length and time at 1 bar of initial pressure in the square smooth tube with a 20-mm transverse size amounted to 50 mm and 50{mu}s, respectively. The streamer mode of discharge development at an initial pressure of 1 bar resulted in nonuniform mixture excitation and a successful DDT via a gradient mechanism, which was confirmed by high-speed time resolved ICCD imaging. The gradient mechanism implied a longer DDT time of 150{mu}s, a DDT run-up distance of 50 mm, and an initiation energy of 1 J, which is two orders of magnitude less than the direct initiation energy for a planar detonation under these conditions. (author)

  18. A Multi-Component Model that Describes Weak Detonation in Blast Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Asay, Blaine; Bdzil, John; Foster, Joseph; Hernández, Alberto; Lambert, David

    2015-06-01

    Recently our group proposed a conceptual, multi-component model of an explosive material that admits weak (sonic) detonation. The weak detonation has the property that its propagation speed and wave structure is a function of the reaction rate of decomposition of reactants to products. The simplest version of the model assumes that a blast explosive has three components, reactants, intermediates and products. For many cases of interest this model is applicable if the first step is an endothermic reaction to intermediates followed by an exothermic reaction to products. Analysis shows that the properties of the weak detonation depend on the ratio of the first and second reaction rates. The decomposition steps, each can be endothermic or exothermic, but the overall reaction must be exothermic. We present both a theoretical and an engineering analysis of a typical explosive in this class and demonstrate by means of accompanying numerical simulations, that a three component reactive flow model that has a fast exothermic step to intermediates, followed by a slower endothermic step to final products produces weak detonation. Supported by FA8651-10-1-0004 (AFRL/RW) and N000014-12-1-0555 (ONR).

  19. Spontaneous transition of turbulent flames to detonations in unconfined media.

    PubMed

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y; Gardiner, Thomas A; Oran, Elaine S

    2011-07-29

    A deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) can occur in environments ranging from experimental and industrial systems to astrophysical thermonuclear (type Ia) supernovae explosions. Substantial progress has been made in explaining the nature of DDT in confined systems with walls, internal obstacles, or preexisting shocks. It remains unclear, however, whether DDT can occur in unconfined media. Here we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to show that for high enough turbulent intensities unconfined, subsonic, premixed, turbulent flames are inherently unstable to DDT. The associated mechanism, based on the nonsteady evolution of flames faster than the Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations, is qualitatively different from the traditionally suggested spontaneous reaction-wave model. Critical turbulent flame speeds, predicted by this mechanism for the onset of DDT, are in agreement with DNS results. PMID:21867073

  20. Hydrogen-oxygen flame acceleration and transition to detonation in channels with no-slip walls for a detailed chemical reaction model.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M F; Kiverin, A D; Liberman, M A

    2011-05-01

    The features of flame acceleration in channels with wall friction and the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) are investigated theoretically and using high resolution numerical simulations of two-dimensional reactive Navier-Stokes equations, including the effects of viscosity, thermal conduction, molecular diffusion, and a detailed chemical reaction mechanism for hydrogen-oxygen gaseous mixture. It is shown that in a wide channel, from the beginning, the flame velocity increases exponentially for a short time and then flame acceleration decreases, ending up with the abrupt increase of the combustion wave velocity and the actual transition to detonation. In a thin channel with a width smaller than the critical value, the exponential increase of the flame velocity is not bounded and ends up with the transition to detonation. The transition to detonation occurs due to the pressure pulse, which is formed at the tip of the accelerating flame. The amplitude of the pressure pulse grows exponentially due to a positive feedback coupling between the pressure pulse and the heat released in the reaction. Finally, large amplitude pressure pulse steepens into a strong shock coupled with the reaction zone forming the overdriven detonation. The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation via the Zeldovich gradient mechanism and its applicability to the deflagration-to-detonation transition is investigated for combustible materials whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics. The results of the high resolution simulations are fully consistent with experimental observations of the flame acceleration and DDT. PMID:21728653

  1. Detonation and Shock Reactivity Properties of Explosives Containing RDX and Reduced Sensitivity RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Gerrit

    2005-07-01

    The detonation and shock reactivity properties of two monomodal research explosives were measured to assess how these properties change when different quality RDX is used. One explosive contained class 1 (coarse) RDX and HTPB binder; the other explosive contained reduced sensitivity (high quality) class 1 RDX (I-RDX) and HTPB binder. Experiments preformed included wave curvature, rate stick and flyer plate experiments. Wave curvature and rate stick experiments indicate that the reaction zone length is shorter for the explosive containing RDX. Our results show that decrement and wave curvature results are bounded by the results of Moulard and coworkers^1,2 for similar explosives containing fine and very coarse RDX particles. We will also present work of ongoing shock reactivity experiments. In these experiments, a flyer impacts an explosive sample containing multiple embedded pressure gauges. Analyses of the pressure gauge records allow us to determine shock reactivity trends for each explosive. ^1Moulard, H., Kury, J.W., Delclos, A., Proceedings of Eighth Symposium (International) on Detonation, Albuquerque, NM, 1985, pg. 902-913. ^2 Moulard, H., Proceedings of the Ninth Symposium (International) on Detonation, Portland, Oregon, 1989, pg. 18-24.

  2. Nonlinear Stability of Viscous Roll Waves

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Mathew A.; Zumbrun, Kevin; Noble, Pascal

    2011-03-01

    in the related shock wave case, assuming only symmetrizability of the hyperbolic part. The second is resolved by the observation that, similarly as in the relaxation and detonation cases, sources occurring in nonconservative components experience decay...

  3. Screen Secures Detonator to Explosive Charge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moshenrose, H. D.; Kindsfather, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Brass screen sleeve attaches blasting cap to fuse, shaped charge, detonating cord, or other formed explosive. Screen makes it easy to control distance between cap and charge, because user can see both parts, and to cool cap by convection, making use of low-cost blasting caps possible for some hot environments.

  4. EBW's and EFI's: The other electric detonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varosh, Ron

    1994-01-01

    Exploding Bridgewire Detonators (EBW) and Exploding Foil Initiators (EFI) which were originally developed for military applications, have found numerous uses in the non-military commercial market while still retaining their military uses. While not as common as the more familiar hot wire initiators, EBW's and EFI's have definite advantages in certain applications. These advantages, and disadvantages, are discussed for typical designs.

  5. Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Tagawa, H.; Malliakos, A.

    1995-12-31

    The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant product,s and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below.

  6. Convection of a pattern of vorticity through a reacting shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Kapila, A. K.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The passage of a weak vorticity disturbance through a reactive shock wave, or detonation, is examined by means of a linearized treatment. Of special interest is the effect of chemical heat release on the amplification of vorticity in particular, and on the disturbance pattern generated downstream of the detonation in general. It is found that the effect of exothermicity is to amplify the refracted waves. The manner in which the imposed disturbance alters the structure of the detonation itself is also discussed.

  7. Convection of a pattern of vorticity through a reacting shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Kapila, A. K.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The passage of a weak vorticity disturbance through a reactive shock wave, or detonation, is examined by means of a linearized treatment. Of special interest is the effect of chemical heat release on the amplification of vorticity in particular, and on the disturbance pattern generated downstream of the detonation in general. It is found that the effect of exothermicity is to amplify the refracted waves. The manner in which the imposed disturbance alters the structure of the detonation itself is also discussed.

  8. Local Ignition in Carbon/Oxygen White Dwarfs -- I: One-zone Ignition and Spherical Shock Ignition of Detonations

    E-print Network

    L. Jonathan Dursi; F. X. Timmes

    2006-01-02

    The details of ignition of Type Ia supernovae remain fuzzy, despite the importance of this input for any large-scale model of the final explosion. Here, we begin a process of understanding the ignition of these hotspots by examining the burning of one zone of material, and then investigate the ignition of a detonation due to rapid heating at single point. We numerically measure the ignition delay time for onset of burning in mixtures of degenerate material and provide fitting formula for conditions of relevance in the Type Ia problem. Using the neon abundance as a proxy for the white dwarf metallicity, we then find that ignition times can decrease by ~20% with addition of even 5% of neon by mass. When temperature fluctuations that successfully kindle a region are very rare, such a reduction in ignition time can increase the probability of ignition by orders of magnitude. If the neon comes largely at the expense of carbon, a similar increase in the ignition time can occur. We then consider the ignition of a detonation by an explosive energy input in one localized zone, eg a Sedov blast wave leading to a shock-ignited detonation. Building on previous work on curved detonations, we find that surprisingly large inputs of energy are required to successfully launch a detonation, leading to required matchheads of ~4500 detonation thicknesses - tens of centimeters to hundreds of meters - which is orders of magnitude larger than naive considerations might suggest. This is a very difficult constraint to meet for some pictures of a deflagration-to-detonation transition, such as a Zel'dovich gradient mechanism ignition in the distributed burning regime.

  9. Wave combustors for trans-atmospheric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Adelman, Henry G.; Cambier, Jean-Luc; Bowles, Jeffrey V.

    1989-01-01

    The Wave Combustor is an airbreathing hypersonic propulsion system which utilizes shock and detonation waves to enhance fuel-air mixing and combustion in supersonic flow. In this concept, an oblique shock wave in the combustor can act as a flameholder by increasing the pressure and temperature of the air-fuel mixture and thereby decreasing the ignition delay. If the oblique shock is sufficiently strong, then the combustion front and the shock wave can couple into a detonation wave. In this case, combustion occurs almost instantaneously in a thin zone behind the wave front. The result is a shorter, lighter engine compared to the scramjet. This engine, which is called the Oblique Detonation Wave Engine (ODWE), can then be utilized to provide a smaller, lighter vehicle or to provide a higher payload capability for a given vehicle weight. An analysis of the performance of a conceptual trans-atmospheric vehicle powered by an ODWE is given here.

  10. PULSATING REVERSE DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. I. DETONATION IGNITION

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, Eduardo; GarcIa-Senz, Domingo E-mail: domingo.garcia@upc.edu

    2009-04-20

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf (WD). Although several scenarios have been proposed and explored by means of one, two, and three-dimensional simulations, the key point still is the understanding of the conditions under which a stable detonation can form in a destabilized WD. One of the possibilities that have been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to the pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass WD, followed by formation of an accretion shock around a carbon-oxygen rich core. The accretion shock confines the core and transforms kinetic energy from the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work we explore the robustness of the detonation ignition for different PRD models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M {sub defl}. The evolution of the WD up to the formation of the accretion shock has been followed with a three-dimensional hydrodynamical code with nuclear reactions turned off. We found that detonation conditions are achieved for a wide range of M {sub defl}. However, if the nuclear energy released during the deflagration phase is close to the WD binding energy ({approx}0.46 x 10{sup 51} erg {yields} M {sub defl} {approx} 0.30 M {sub sun}) the accretion shock cannot heat and confine the core efficiently and detonation conditions are not robustly achieved.

  11. Shock initiation and detonation study on high concentration H2O2/H2O solutions using in-situ magnetic gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Stephen A; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B; Gibson, L Lee; Bartram, Brian D; Engelke, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; homogeneous shock initiation behavior has been observed in the experiments where reaction is observed. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these experiments, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot points, times-to-detonation points that indicate low sensitivity (an input of 13.5 GPa produces detonation in 1 {micro}s compared to 9.5 GPa for neat nitromethane), and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions of over 6.6 km/s.

  12. Performance Enhancements on a Pulsed Detonation Engine J.M. Meyers*, F.K. Lu

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    -propulsive devices is the transition of deflagration and weak detonation into CJ detonation. The longer of DDT (deflagration to detonation) and weak detonation transition length of great importance. One1 Performance Enhancements on a Pulsed Detonation Engine J.M. Meyers*, F.K. Lu , D.R. Wilson

  13. Time variation in the reaction-zone structure of two-phase spray detonations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. H.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the time-varying detonation structure in a monodisperse spray is presented. The theory identifies experimentally observed reaction-zone overpressures as deriving from blast waves formed therein by the explosive ignition of the spray droplets, and follows in time the motion, change in strength, and interactions of these blast waves with one another, and with the leading shock. The results are compared with experimental data by modeling the motion of a finite-size circular pressure transducer through the theoretical data field in an x-t space.

  14. Implementation of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics for Detonation of Explosive with Application to Rock Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, R.; Deb, D.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents a methodology in the SPH framework to analyze physical phenomena those occur in detonation process of an explosive. It mainly investigates the dynamic failure mechanism in surrounding brittle rock media under blast-induced stress wave and expansion of high pressure product gases. A program burn model is implemented along with JWL equation of state to simulate the reaction zone in between unreacted explosive and product gas. Numerical examples of detonation of one- and two-dimensional explosive slab have been carried out to investigate the effect of reaction zone in detonation process and outward dispersion of gaseous product. The results are compared with those obtained from existing solutions. A procedure is also developed in SPH framework to apply continuity conditions between gas and rock interface boundaries. The modified Grady-Kipp damage model for the onset of tensile yielding and Drucker-Prager model for shear failure are implemented for elasto-plastic analysis of rock medium. The results show that high compressive stress causes high crack density in the vicinity of blast hole. The major principal stress (tensile) is responsible for forming radial cracks from the blast hole. Spalling zones are also developed due to stress waves reflected from the free surfaces.

  15. Pulsating reverse detonation models of Type Ia supernovae. I: Detonation ignition

    E-print Network

    Bravo, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. Although several scenarios have been proposed and explored by means of one, two, and three-dimensional simulations, the key point still is the understanding of the conditions under which a stable detonation can form in a destabilized white dwarf. One of the possibilities that have been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to the pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, followed by formation of an accretion shock around a carbon-oxygen rich core. The accretion shock confines the core and transforms kinetic energy from the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work we explore the robustness of the detonation ignition for different PRD models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M_defl. The ev...

  16. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high-cycle thermal fatigue behavior has been investigated on a flat Haynes 188 alloy specimen, under the test condition of 30-Hz cycle frequency (33-msec pulse period and 10-msec pulse width including a 0.2-msec pulse spike; ref. 4). Temperature distributions were calculated with one-dimensional finite difference models. The calculations show that that the 0.2-msec pulse spike can cause an additional 40 C temperature fluctuation with an interaction depth of 0.08 mm near the specimen surface region. This temperature swing will be superimposed onto the temperature swing of 80 C that is induced by the 10-msec laser pulse near the 0.53-mm-deep surface interaction region.

  17. Cable Discharge System for fundamental detonator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peevy, Gregg R.; Barnhart, Steven G.; Brigham, William P.

    1994-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently completed the modification and installation of a cable discharge system (CDS) which will be used to study the physics of exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonators and exploding foil initiators (EFI or slapper). Of primary interest are the burst characteristics of these devices when subjected to the constant current pulse delivered by this system. The burst process involves the heating of the bridge material to a conductive plasma and is essential in describing the electrical properties of the bridgewire foil for use in diagnostics or computer models. The CDS described herein is capable of delivering up to an 8000 A pulse of 3 micron duration. Experiments conducted with the CDS to characterize the EBW and EFI burst behavior are also described. In addition, the CDS simultaneous VISAR capability permits updating the EFI electrical Gurney analysis parameters used in our computer simulation codes. Examples of CDS generated data for a typical EFI and EBW detonator are provided.

  18. Detonation in shocked homogeneous high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.; Souers, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied shock-induced changes in homogeneous high explosives including nitromethane, tetranitromethane, and single crystals of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by using fast time-resolved emission and Raman spectroscopy at a two-stage light-gas gun. The results reveal three distinct steps during which the homogeneous explosives chemically evolve to final detonation products. These are (1) the initiation of shock compressed high explosives after an induction period, (2) thermal explosion of shock-compressed and/or reacting materials, and (3) a decay to a steady-state representing a transition to the detonation of uncompressed high explosives. Based on a gray-body approximation, we have obtained the CJ temperatures: 3800 K for nitromethane, 2950 K for tetranitromethane, and 4100 K for PETN. We compare the data with various thermochemical equilibrium calculations. In this paper we will also show a preliminary result of single-shot time-resolved Raman spectroscopy applied to shock-compressed nitromethane.

  19. Pulse Detonation Engines for High Speed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2002-01-01

    Revolutionary concepts in propulsion are required in order to achieve high-speed cruise capability in the atmosphere and for low cost reliable systems for earth to orbit missions. One of the advanced concepts under study is the air-breathing pulse detonation engine. Additional work remains in order to establish the role and performance of a PDE in flight applications, either as a stand-alone device or as part of a combined cycle system. In this paper, we shall offer a few remarks on some of these remaining issues, i.e., combined cycle systems, nozzles and exhaust systems and thrust per unit frontal area limitations. Currently, an intensive experimental and numerical effort is underway in order to quantify the propulsion performance characteristics of this device. In this paper, we shall highlight our recent efforts to elucidate the propulsion potential of pulse detonation engines and their possible application to high-speed or hypersonic systems.

  20. Numerical study of sidewall filling for gas-fed pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongrat, Wunnarat

    Pulse detonation engines for aerospace propulsion are required to operate at 50-100 Hz meaning that each pulse is 10-20 ms long. Filling of the engine and the related purging process become dominant due to their long duration compared to ignition and detonation wave propagation. This study uses ANSYS FLUENT to investigate the filling of a 1 m long tube with an internal diameter of 100 mm. Six different configurations were investigated with an endwall port and various sidewall arrangements, including stagger and inclination. A stoichiometric mixture of gaseous octane and air at STP was used to fill the tube at injection rates of 40, 150 and 250 m/s. Phase injection was also investigated and it showed performance improvements such as reduced lling time and reduced propellant escape from the exit.

  1. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  2. Thermodesorption of impurities from detonation nanodiamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, D. G.; Makarov, S. V.; Plotnikov, V. A.

    2012-02-01

    The molecular composition of volatile compounds belonging to the impurity subsystem of detonation nanodiamond particles has been analyzed. It is established that the main volatile impurities are water, hydrogen, nitrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide. In the course of annealing, the concentration of these volatile impurities exhibits a significant decrease, the sample weight loss reaching up to 20%. This process is accompanied by both endo- and exothermal effects.

  3. Insensitive detonator apparatus for initiating large failure diameter explosives

    DOEpatents

    Perry, III, William Leroy

    2015-07-28

    A munition according to a preferred embodiment can include a detonator system having a detonator that is selectively coupled to a microwave source that functions to selectively prime, activate, initiate, and/or sensitize an insensitive explosive material for detonation. The preferred detonator can include an explosive cavity having a barrier within which an insensitive explosive material is disposed and a waveguide coupled to the explosive cavity. The preferred system can further include a microwave source coupled to the waveguide such that microwaves enter the explosive cavity and impinge on the insensitive explosive material to sensitize the explosive material for detonation. In use the preferred embodiments permit the deployment and use of munitions that are maintained in an insensitive state until the actual time of use, thereby substantially preventing unauthorized or unintended detonation thereof.

  4. Amplification of Pressure Waves during Vibrational Equilibration of Excited Chemical Reaction Products

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-05-11

    The Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation identified amplification of pressure wavelets during equilibration of vibrationally excited reaction products in the reaction zone as the physical mechanism by which exothermic chemical energy release sustains detonation waves. This mechanism leads to the formation of the well-known, complex three-dimensional structure of a self-sustaining detonation wave. This amplification mechanism is postulated to be a general property of subsonic and supersonic reactive flows occurring during: shock to detonation transition (SDT); hot spot ignition and growth; deflagration to detonation transition (DDT); flame acceleration by shock or compression waves; and acoustic (sound) wave amplification. The existing experimental and theoretical evidence for pressure wave amplification by chemical energy release into highly vibrationally excited product molecules under these reactive flow conditions is reviewed in this paper.

  5. Close-in Blast Waves from Spherical Charges*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, William; Kuhl, Allen

    2011-06-01

    We study the close-in blast waves created by the detonation of spherical high explosives (HE) charges, via numerical simulations with our Arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE3D) code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (200 ?m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in air, and the reflection of the blast wave from an ideal surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and air were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. The results were analyzed to evaluate the: (i) free air pressure-range curves: ?ps (R) , (ii) free air impulse curves, (iii) reflected pressure-range curves, and (iv) reflected impulse-range curves. A variety of explosives were studied. Conclusions are: (i) close-in (R < 10 cm /g 1 / 3) , each explosive had its own (unique) blast wave (e.g., ?ps (R , HE) ~ a /Rn , where n is different for each explosive); (ii) these close-in blast waves do not scale with the ``Heat of Detonation'' of the explosive (because close-in, there is not enough time to fully couple the chemical energy to the air via piston work); (iii) instead they are related to the detonation conditions inside the charge. Scaling laws will be proposed for such close-in blast waves.

  6. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; CACS Collaboration; ALCF Team

    2015-06-01

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N2 and H2O within 10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct uni-molecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N2 and H2O productions. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research Grant No. N000014-12-1-0555 and the Basic Research Program of Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Grant No. HDTRA1-08-1-0036. All the simulations were performed at USC and Argonne LCF.

  7. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  8. BNCP prototype detonator studies using a semiconductor bridge initiator

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, D.W.; Fronabarger, J.W.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    We report on experiments with prototype BNCP detonators incorporating a semiconductor bridge, SCB. We tested two device designs; one for DoD and one for DOE applications. We report tests with the DoD detonator using different firing conditions and two different grain sizes of BNCP. The DOE detonator utilized a 50 {mu}F CDU firing set with a 24 V all-fire condition.

  9. THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Reid, L. B.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  10. Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Coatings with Incorporated Detonationally Generated Nanodiamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Pramatarova, L.; Pecheva, E.; Hikov, T.; Fingarova, D.; Dimitrova, R.; Spassov, T.; Krasteva, N.; Mitev, D.

    2010-01-21

    We studied the effect of the substrate chemistry on the morphology of hydroxyapatite-detonational nanodiamond composite coatings grown by a biomimetic approach (immersion in a supersaturated simulated body fluid). When detonational nanodiamond particles were added to the solution, the morphology of the grown for 2 h composite particles was porous but more compact then that of pure hydroxyapatite particles. The nanodiamond particles stimulated the hydroxyapatite growth with different morphology on the various substrates (Ti, Ti alloys, glasses, Si, opal). Biocompatibility assay with MG63 osteoblast cells revealed that the detonational nanodiamond water suspension with low and average concentration of the detonational nanodiamond powder is not toxic to living cells.

  11. A library of prompt detonation reaction zone data

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Tables are given listing literature data that allows calculation of sonic reaction zones at or near steady-state for promptly detonating explosive cylinders. The data covers homogeneous, heterogeneous, composite, inorganic and binary explosives and allows comparison across the entire explosive field. Table 1 lists detonation front curvatures. Table 2 lists Size Effect data, i.e. the change of detonation velocity with cylinder radius. Table 3 lists failure radii and detonation velocities. Table 4 lists explosive compositions. A total of 51 references dating back into the 1950`s are given. Calculated reaction zones, radii of curvature and growth rate coefficients are listed.

  12. Detonation shock dynamics calibration for non-ideal HE: ANFO

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Salyer, Terry R; Aslam, Tariq D; Kiyanda, Charles B; Morris, John S; Zimmerley, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Linear D{sub n}-{kappa} detonation shock dynamics (DSD) filling forms are obtained for four ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) mixtures involving variations in the ammonium nitrate prill properties and ANFO stoichiometries. The detonation of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) mixtures is considered to be highly nonideal involving long reaction zones ({approx} several cms), low detonation energies and large failure diameters ({approx} 10s-100s cms). A number of experimental programs have been undertaken to understand ANFO detonation properties as a function of the AN properties [1]-[7]. Given the highly heterogeneous nature of ANFO mixtures (typical high explosive (HE) grade AN prills are porous with a range of diameters) a predictive reactive flow simulation of ANFO detonation will present significant challenges. At Los Alamos, a simulation capability has been developed for predicting the propagation of detonation in non-ideal HE and the work conducted on surrounding materials via a combination of a detonation shock dynamics (DSD) approach and a modified programmed burn method known as the pseudo-reaction-zone (or PRZ) method that accounts for the long detonation reaction zone. In the following, linear D{sub n}-{kappa} DSD fitting forms are obtained for four ammonium nitrate-fuel oil mixtures involving variation in the ammonium nitrate prill properties and ANFO stoichiometries. A detonation shock dynamics calibration for ANFO consisting of regular porous HE grade AN in a 94/6 wt.% AN to FO mix has been obtained in [7].

  13. Safety and performance enhancement circuit for primary explosive detonators

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Ronald W. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-04-04

    A safety and performance enhancement arrangement for primary explosive detonators. This arrangement involves a circuit containing an energy storage capacitor and preset self-trigger to protect the primary explosive detonator from electrostatic discharge (ESD). The circuit does not discharge into the detonator until a sufficient level of charge is acquired on the capacitor. The circuit parameters are designed so that normal ESD environments cannot charge the protection circuit to a level to achieve discharge. When functioned, the performance of the detonator is also improved because of the close coupling of the stored energy.

  14. Experimental study of the detonation of technical grade ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presles, Henri-Noël; Vidal, Pierre; Khasainov, Boris

    2009-11-01

    The detonation of technical grade ammonium nitrate at the density ?=0.666 g/cm confined in PVC and steel tubes was experimentally studied. The results show that the detonation is self-sustained and steady in steel tubes with diameter as small as 12 mm. Critical detonation diameter lies between 8 and 12 mm in 2 mm thick steel tubes and between 55 and 81 mm in PVC tubes. These values testify a strong detonation sensitivity of this product. To cite this article: H.-N. Presles et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  15. Simulation of the Reflected Blast Wave froma C-4 Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Kuhl, A L; Tringe, J W

    2011-08-01

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 {micro}m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 8 ranges (GR = 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 inches) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 2 inches), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  16. Waves

    E-print Network

    LaCure, Mari Mae

    2010-04-29

    Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

  17. On the mechanism of the deflagration-to-detonation transition in a hydrogen-oxygen mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, M. A.; Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Chukalovskii, A. A.

    2010-10-15

    The flame acceleration and the physical mechanism underlying the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) have been studied experimentally, theoretically, and using a two-dimensional gasdynamic model for a hydrogen-oxygen gas mixture by taking into account the chain chemical reaction kinetics for eight components. A flame accelerating in a tube is shown to generate shock waves that are formed directly at the flame front just before DDT occurred, producing a layer of compressed gas adjacent to the flame front. A mixture with a density higher than that of the initial gas enters the flame front, is heated, and enters into reaction. As a result, a high-amplitude pressure peak is formed at the flame front. An increase in pressure and density at the leading edge of the flame front accelerates the chemical reaction, causing amplification of the compression wave and an exponentially rapid growth of the pressure peak, which 'drags' the flame behind. A high-amplitude compression wave produces a strong shock immediately ahead of the reaction zone, generating a detonation wave. The theory and numerical simulations of the flame acceleration and the new physical mechanism of DDT are in complete agreement with the experimentally observed flame acceleration, shock formation, and DDT in a hydrogen-oxygen gas mixture.

  18. First-Principles Petascale Simulations for Predicting Deflagration to Detonation Transition in Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlov, Alexei; Austin, Joanna

    2015-03-02

    Hydrogen has emerged as an important fuel across a range of industries as a means of achieving energy independence and to reduce emissions. DDT and the resulting detonation waves in hydrogen-oxygen can have especially catastrophic consequences in a variety of industrial and energy producing settings related to hydrogen. First-principles numerical simulations of flame acceleration and DDT are required for an in-depth understanding of the phenomena and facilitating design of safe hydrogen systems. The goals of this project were (1) to develop first-principles petascale reactive flow Navier-Stokes simulation code for predicting gaseous high-speed combustion and detonation (HSCD) phenomena and (2) demonstrate feasibility of first-principles simulations of rapid flame acceleration and deflagrationto- detonation transition (DDT) in stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture (2H2 + O2). The goals of the project have been accomplished. We have developed a novel numerical simulation code, named HSCD, for performing first-principles direct numerical simulations of high-speed hydrogen combustion. We carried out a series of validating numerical simulations of inert and reactive shock reflection experiments in shock tubes. We then performed a pilot numerical simulation of flame acceleration in a long pipe. The simulation showed the transition of the rapidly accelerating flame into a detonation. The DDT simulations were performed using BG/Q Mira at the Argonne National Laboratiory, currently the fourth fastest super-computer in the world. The HSCD is currently being actively used on BG/QMira for a systematic study of the DDT processes using computational resources provided through the 2014-2016 INCITE allocation ”First-principles simulations of high-speed combustion and detonation.” While the project was focused on hydrogen-oxygen and on DDT, with appropriate modifications of the input physics (reaction kinetics, transport coefficients, equation of state) the code has a much broader applicability to petascale simulations of high speed combustion and detonation phenomena in reacting gases, and to high speed viscous gaseous flows in general. Project activities included three major steps – (1) development of physical and numerical models, (2) code validation, and (3) demonstration simulation of flame acceleration and DDT in a long pipe.

  19. A flash vaporization system for detonation of hydrocarbon fuels in a pulse detonation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Kelly Colin

    Current research by both the US Air Force and Navy is concentrating on obtaining detonations in a pulse detonation engine (PDE) with low vapor pressure, kerosene based jet fuels. These fuels, however, have a low vapor pressure and the performance of a liquid hydrocarbon fueled PDE is significantly hindered by the presence of fuel droplets. A high pressure, fuel flash vaporization system (FVS) has been designed and built to reduce and eliminate the time required to evaporate the fuel droplets. Four fuels are tested: n-heptane, isooctane, aviation gasoline, and JP-8. The fuels vary in volatility and octane number and present a clear picture on the benefits of flash vaporization. Results show the FVS quickly provided a detonable mixture for all of the fuels tested without coking or clogging the fuel lines. Combustion results validated the model used to predict the fuel and air temperatures required to achieve gaseous mixtures with each fuel. The most significant achievement of the research was the detonation of flash vaporized JP-8 and air. The results show that the flash vaporized JP-8 used 20 percent less fuel to ignite the fuel air mixture twice as fast (8 ms from 16 ms) when compared to the unheated JP-8 combustion data. Likewise, the FVS has been validated as a reliable method to create the droplet free mixtures required for liquid hydrocarbon fueled PDEs.

  20. The delayed-detonation model of Type Ia supernovae. 2: The detonation phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, David; Livne, Eli

    1994-01-01

    The investigation, by use of two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations, of the 'delayed detonation' mechanism of Khokhlov for the explosion of Type Ia supernovae is continued. Previously we found that the deflagration is insufficient to unbind the star. Expansion shuts off the flame; much of this small production of iron group nuclei occurs at lower densities, which reduces the electron-capture problem. Because the degenerate star has an adiabatic exponent only slightly above 4/3, the energy released by deflagration drives a pulsation of large amplitude. During the first expansion phase, adiabatic cooling shuts off the burning, and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability then gives mixing of high-entropy ashes with low-entropy fuel. During the first contraction phase, compressional heating reignites the material. The burning was allowed to develop into a detonation in these nonspherical models. The detonation grows toward spherical symmetry at late times. At these densities (rho approx. 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 8) g cm(exp -3)), either Ni-56 or nuclei of the Si-Ca group are the dominant products of the burning. The bulk yields are sensitive to the density of the star when the transition to detonation occurs. The relevance of the abundances, velocities, mixing, and total energy release to the theory and interpretation of Type Ia supernovae is discussed.

  1. Attosecond shock waves.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, P A; Zheltikov, A M

    2013-05-01

    Shock-wave formation is a generic scenario of wave dynamics known in nonlinear acoustics, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, seismology, and detonation physics. Here, we show that, in nonlinear optics, remarkably short, attosecond shock transients can be generated through a strongly coupled spatial and temporal dynamics of ultrashort light pulses, suggesting a pulse self-compression scenario whereby multigigawatt attosecond optical waveforms can be synthesized. PMID:23683197

  2. Flow Characterization of a Detonation Gun Facility and First Coating Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, C.; Olivier, H.

    2014-06-01

    A computer-controlled detonation gun based spraying device has been designed and tested to obtain particle velocities over 1200 m/s. The device is able to be operated in two modes based on different flow-physical principles. In one mode, the device functions like a conventional detonation gun in which the powder is accelerated in a blast wave. In the other mode, an extension of the facility with a nozzle uses the detonated gas for an intermittently operated shock tunnel process in which the particles are injected into and accelerated by a quasi-steady high enthalpy nozzle flow with high reservoir conditions. Presented are experimental results of the operation without nozzle in which the device generates moderate to high particle velocities in an intermittent process with a frequency of 5 Hz. A hydrogen/oxygen mixture and Cu and WC-Co (88/12) powders are used in the experiments. Operation performance and tube outflow are characterized by time-resolved Schlieren images and pressure measurements. The particle velocities in the outflow are obtained by laser Doppler anemometry. Different substrate/powder combinations (Al/Cu, Steel/Cu, Al/WC-Co, and Steel/WC-Co) have been investigated by light microscopy and measurements of microhardness.

  3. Effects of Fuel Distribution on Detonation Tube Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Hugh Douglas

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation engine (PDE) uses a series of high frequency intermittent detonation tubes to generate thrust. The process of filling the detonation tube with fuel and air for each cycle may yield non-uniform mixtures. Lack of mixture uniformity is commonly ignored when calculating detonation tube thrust performance. In this study, detonation cycles featuring idealized non-uniform H2/air mixtures were analyzed using the SPARK two-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD code with 7-step H2/air reaction mechanism. Mixture non-uniformities examined included axial equivalence ratio gradients, transverse equivalence ratio gradients, and partially fueled tubes. Three different average test section equivalence ratios (phi), stoichiometric (phi = 1.00), fuel lean (phi = 0.90), and fuel rich (phi = 1.10), were studied. All mixtures were detonable throughout the detonation tube. It was found that various mixtures representing the same test section equivalence ratio had specific impulses within 1 percent of each other, indicating that good fuel/air mixing is not a prerequisite for optimal detonation tube performance.

  4. Modeling of a detonation driven, linear electric generator facility

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Modeling of a detonation driven, linear electric generator facility E.M. Braun, E. Baydar, and F.K. Lu 1 Introduction The pulsed detonation engine (PDE) has been developed over several decades due demonstrated that a PDE can be used for power generation and may be more efficient than a deflagration

  5. SN 2012hn: a tidal detonation event?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    We propose for a 30 kilosecond observation of SN 2102hn, a Ca-rich gap transient. These enigmatic objects, with properties intermediate between those of classical novae and Type Ia supernovae, can be well-explained by tidal detonations of low mass white dwarfs by intermediate mass black holes. In such a case, fall-back accretion of the tidal debris would power an X-ray source for which we propose to search. Because supermassive black holes will swallow white dwarfs whole, a successful outcome to this proposal would both explain the Ca-rich gap transients *and* establish the existence of intermediate mass black holes.

  6. Laser image recording on detonation nanodiamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, G M; Mikheev, K G; Mogileva, T N; Puzyr, A P; Bondar, V S

    2014-01-31

    A focused He – Ne laser beam is shown to cause local blackening of semitransparent detonation nanodiamond (DND) films at incident power densities above 600 W cm{sup -2}. Data obtained with a Raman spectrometer and low-power 632.8-nm laser source indicate that the blackening is accompanied by a decrease in broadband background luminescence and emergence of sharp Raman peaks corresponding to the structures of nanodiamond and sp{sup 2} carbon. The feasibility of image recording on DND films by a focused He – Ne laser beam is demonstrated. (letters)

  7. Shock-to-Detonation Transition simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-07-14

    Shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) experiments with embedded velocity gauges provide data that can be used for both calibration and validation of high explosive (HE) burn models. Typically, a series of experiments is performed for each HE in which the initial shock pressure is varied. Here we describe a methodology for automating a series of SDT simulations and comparing numerical tracer particle velocities with the experimental gauge data. Illustrative examples are shown for PBX 9502 using the HE models implemented in the xRage ASC code at LANL.

  8. Optical properties of detonation nanodiamond hydrosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksenskii, A. E.; Vul', A. Ya.; Konyakhin, S. V.; Reich, K. V.; Sharonova, L. V.; Eidel'man, E. D.

    2012-03-01

    Studies of the optical properties of hydrosols of 4-nm detonation nanodiamond particles performed in the 0.2-1.1 ?m range have revealed a novel effect, a strong increase of absorption at the edges of the spectral range, and provided its explanation in terms of absorption of radiation by the dimer chains (the so-called Pandey chains) fixed on the surface of a nanodiamond particle. The effect of particle size distribution in a hydrosol on the relative intensity of Rayleigh scattering and light absorption by nanodiamond particles in this range has been analyzed.

  9. Detonation engine fed by acetylene-oxygen mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, N. N.; Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Phylippov, Yu. G.; Koo, Jaye

    2014-11-01

    The advantages of a constant volume combustion cycle as compared to constant pressure combustion in terms of thermodynamic efficiency has focused the search for advanced propulsion on detonation engines. Detonation of acetylene mixed with oxygen in various proportions is studied using mathematical modeling. Simplified kinetics of acetylene burning includes 11 reactions with 9 components. Deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is obtained in a cylindrical tube with a section of obstacles modeling a Shchelkin spiral; the DDT takes place in this section for a wide range of initial mixture compositions. A modified ka-omega turbulence model is used to simulate flame acceleration in the Shchelkin spiral section of the system. The results of numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which had been performed in the same size detonation chamber and turbulent spiral ring section, and with theoretical data on the Chapman-Jouguet detonation parameters.

  10. Pulsating reverse detonation models of Type Ia supernovae. II: Explosion

    E-print Network

    Bravo, Eduardo; Cabezon, Ruben M; Dominguez, Inmaculada

    2009-01-01

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. However, all attempts to find a convincing ignition mechanism based on a delayed detonation in a destabilized, expanding, white dwarf have been elusive so far. One of the possibilities that has been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, followed by formation of an accretion shock that confines a carbon-oxygen rich core, while transforming the kinetic energy of the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work we present three dimensional numerical simulations of PRD models from the time of detonation initiation up to homologous expansion. Different models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M_defl, give explosions spanning a range of kinetic energies...

  11. On the Initiation Mechanism in Exploding Bridgewire and Laser Detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Thomas, Keith A.; Clarke, S.; Mallett, H.; Martin, E.; Martinez, M.; Munger, A.; Saenz, Juan

    2006-07-01

    Since its invention by Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project era the exploding bridgewire detonator (EBW) has seen tremendous use and study. Recent development of a laser-powered device with detonation properties similar to an EBW is reviving interest in the basic physics of the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) process in both of these devices. Cutback experiments using both laser interferometry and streak camera observations are providing new insight into the initiation mechanism in EBWs. These measurements are being correlated to a DDT model of compaction to detonation and shock to detonation developed previously by Xu and Stewart. The DDT model is incorporated into a high-resolution, multi-material model code for simulating the complete process. Model formulation and the modeling issues required to describe the test data will be discussed.

  12. Effect of prill structure on detonation performance of ANFO

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, Terry R; Short, Mark; Kiyanda, Charles B; Morris, John S; Zimmerly, Tony

    2010-01-01

    While the effects of charge diameter, fuel mix ratio, and temperature on ANFO detonation performance are substantial, the effects of prill type are considerable as well as tailorable. Engineered AN prills provide a means to improve overall performance, primarily by changing the material microstructure through the addition of features designed to enhance hot spot action. To examine the effects of prill type (along with fuel mix ratio and charge diameter) on detonation performance, a series of precision, large-scale, ANFO front-curvature rate-stick tests was performed. Each shot used standard No. 2 diesel for the fuel oil and was essentially unconfined with cardboard confinement. Detonation velocities and front curvatures were measured while actively maintaining consistent shot temperatures. Based on the experimental results, DSD calibrations were performed to model the detonation performance over a range of conditions, and the overall effects of prill microstructure were examined and correlated with detonation performance.

  13. Jaguar Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, L. I.; Baker, E. L.; Capellos, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Jaguar product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products by analysis of Available Hugoniot and static volumetric data to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationships for the components. Experimental melting points were also utilized to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX—boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using Jaguar are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that the boron does not react near the detonation front or that boron mixtures exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior (as shown by some aluminized explosives), with higher detonation velocities at the initial points. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX—boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the detonation properties of the formulation.

  14. SURFACE DETONATIONS IN DOUBLE DEGENERATE BINARY SYSTEMS TRIGGERED BY ACCRETION STREAM INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Dan, Marius; Rosswog, Stephan

    2010-01-20

    We present three-dimensional simulations on a new mechanism for the detonation of a sub-Chandrasekhar CO white dwarf in a dynamically unstable system where the secondary is either a pure He white dwarf or an He/CO hybrid. For dynamically unstable systems where the accretion stream directly impacts the surface of the primary, the final tens of orbits can have mass accretion rates that range from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3} M {sub sun} s{sup -1}, leading to the rapid accumulation of helium on the surface of the primary. After {approx}10{sup -2} M {sub sun} of helium has been accreted, the ram pressure of the hot helium torus can deflect the accretion stream such that the stream no longer directly impacts the surface. The velocity difference between the stream and the torus produces shearing which seeds large-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities along the interface between the two regions. These instabilities eventually grow into dense knots of material that periodically strike the surface of the primary, adiabatically compressing the underlying helium torus. If the temperature of the compressed material is raised above a critical temperature, the timescale for triple-{alpha} reactions becomes comparable to the dynamical timescale, leading to the detonation of the primary's helium envelope. This detonation drives shock waves into the primary which tend to concentrate at one or more focal points within the primary's CO core. If a relatively small amount of mass is raised above a critical temperature and density at these focal points, the CO core may itself be detonated.

  15. Detonation characteristics of dimethyl ether and ethanol-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakow, P.; Cross, M.; Ciccarelli, G.

    2015-05-01

    The detonation cell structure in dimethyl ether vapor and ethanol vapor-air mixtures was measured at atmospheric pressure and initial temperatures in the range of 293-373 K. Tests were carried out in a 6.2-m-long, 10-cm inner diameter tube. For more reactive mixtures, a series of orifice plates were used to promote deflagration-to-detonation transition in the first half of the tube. For less reactive mixtures prompt detonation initiation was achieved with an acetylene-oxygen driver. The soot foil technique was used to capture the detonation cell structure. The measured cell size was compared to the calculated one-dimensional detonation reaction zone length. For fuel-rich dimethyl ether mixtures the calculated reaction zone is highlighted by a temperature gradient profile with two maxima, i.e., double heat release. The detonation cell structure was interpreted as having two characteristic sizes over the full range of mixture compositions. For mixtures at the detonation propagation limits the large cellular structure approached a single-head spin, and the smaller cells approached the size of the tube diameter. There is little evidence to support the idea that the two cell sizes observed on the foils are related to the double heat release predicted for the rich mixtures. There was very little influence of initial temperature on the cell size over the temperature range investigated. A double heat release zone was not predicted for ethanol-air detonations. The detonation cell size for stoichiometric ethanol-air was found to be similar to the size of the small cells for dimethyl ether. The measured cell size for ethanol-air did not vary much with composition in the range of 30-40 mm. For mixtures near stoichiometric it was difficult to discern multiple cell sizes. However, near the detonation limits there was strong evidence of a larger cell structure similar to that observed in dimethyl ether air mixtures.

  16. 47th AIAA Aerospace Science Meeting and Exhibit, 5-8 January 2009, Orlando, Florida The Dynamics of Unsteady Detonation in Ozone

    E-print Network

    2009-0632 47th AIAA Aerospace Science Meeting and Exhibit, 5-8 January 2009, Orlando, Florida revealed by a complementary analysis of the steady detonation wave structure. For the unsteady calculations, shock-fitting coupled with a high order spatio-temporal discretization scheme combine to render

  17. Unique passive diagnostic for slapper detonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brigham, William P.; Schwartz, John J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find a material and configuration that could reliably detect the proper functioning of a slapper (non-explosive) detonator. Because of the small size of the slapper geometry (on the order of a 15 mils), most diagnostic techniques are not suitable. This program has the additional requirements that the device would be used on centrifuge so that it could not use any electrical power or output signals. This required that the diagnostic be completely passive. The paper describes the three facets of the development effort: complete characterization of the slapper using VISAR measurements, selection of the diagnostic material and configuration, and testing of the prototype designs. The VISAR testing required that use of a special optical probe to allow the laser light to reach both bridges of the dual-slapper detonator. Results are given in the form of flyer velocity as a function of the initiating charge voltage level. The selected diagnostic design functions in a manner similar to a dent block except that the impact of the Kapton disk from a properly-functioning slapper causes a fracture pattern. A quick visual inspection is all that is needed to determine if the flyer velocity exceeded the threshold value. Sub-threshold velocities produce a substantially different appearance.

  18. Spark-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOEpatents

    Lieberman, Morton L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it spark-safe ncludes an organic secondary explosive charge of HMX in the form of a thin pad disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The pad of secondary charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter. The explosive column also includes a first explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in the ignition region of the explosive column next to the secondary charge pad on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to provide mechanical confinement of the pad of secondary charge and physical coupling thereof with the ignition device. The explosive column further includes a second explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to the first CP charge on a side opposite from the pad of secondary charge. The second CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. The first explosive CP charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter, whereas the second explosive CP charge contains a series of increments (nominally 4) each of which has an axial thickness-to-diameter ratio of one to two.

  19. Bonfire-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOEpatents

    Lieberman, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it bonfire-safe includes a first layer of an explosive charge of CP, or a primary explosive, and a second layer of a secondary organic explosive charge, such as PETN, which has a degradation temperature lower than the autoignition temperature of the CP or primary explosives. The first layer is composed of a pair of increments disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to and in contact with an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The second layer is composed of a plurality of increments disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to and in contact with the first layer on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first layer is loaded under a sufficient high pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to achieve ignition, whereas the second layer is loaded under a sufficient low pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. Each increment of the first and second layers has an axial length-to-diameter ratio of one-half. 2 figs.

  20. Bonfire-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOEpatents

    Lieberman, Morton L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it bonfire-safe includes a first layer of an explosive charge of CP, or a primary explosive, and a second layer of a secondary organic explosive charge, such as PETN, which has a degradation temperature lower than the autoignition temperature of the CP or primary explosives. The first layer is composed of a pair of increments disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to and in contact with an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The second layer is composed of a plurality of increments disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to and in contact with the first layer on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first layer is loaded under a sufficient high pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to achieve ignition, whereas the second layer is loaded under a sufficient low pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. Each increment of the first and second layers has an axial length-to-diameter ratio of one-half.

  1. Deflagration-to-detonation in granular HMX: Ignition, kinetics, and shock formation

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, J.M.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.

    1993-06-01

    Experimental studies and analysis of the deflagration-to detonation transition (DDT) in granular HMX are continued. Experiments performed using a direct-gasless igniter exhibit the same phenomenology as those ignited with a piston. Simple kinetics and mechanics describe the formation of the {approximately}100% TMD plug in terms of competing pressurization processes. A mass-conservation analysis of the experimentally observed structures shows how the low velocities characteristic of convective burning are amplified to shock-wave velocities through non-convective processes.

  2. Investigation of instabilities affecting detonations: Improving the resolution using block-structured adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, Prashaanth

    The unstable nature of detonation waves is a result of the critical relationship between the hydrodynamic shock and the chemical reactions sustaining the shock. A perturbative analysis of the critical point is quite challenging due to the multiple spatio-temporal scales involved along with the non-linear nature of the shock-reaction mechanism. The author's research attempts to provide detailed resolution of the instabilities at the shock front. Another key aspect of the present research is to develop an understanding of the causality between the non-linear dynamics of the front and the eventual breakdown of the sub-structures. An accurate numerical simulation of detonation waves requires a very efficient solution of the Euler equations in conservation form with detailed, non-equilibrium chemistry. The difference in the flow and reaction length scales results in very stiff source terms, requiring the problem to be solved with adaptive mesh refinement. For this purpose, Berger-Colella's block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) strategy has been developed and applied to time-explicit finite volume methods. The block-structured technique uses a hierarchy of parent-child sub-grids, integrated recursively over time. One novel approach to partition the problem within a large supercomputer was the use of modified Peano-Hilbert space filling curves. The AMR framework was merged with CLAWPACK, a package providing finite volume numerical methods tailored for wave-propagation problems. The stiffness problem is bypassed by using a 1st order Godunov or a 2nd order Strang splitting technique, where the flow variables and source terms are integrated independently. A linearly explicit fourth-order Runge-Kutta integrator is used for the flow, and an ODE solver was used to overcome the numerical stiffness. Second-order spatial resolution is obtained by using a second-order Roe-HLL scheme with the inclusion of numerical viscosity to stabilize the solution near the discontinuity. The scheme is made monotonic by coupling the van Albada limiter with the higher order MUSCL-Hancock extrapolation to the primitive variables of the Euler equations. Simulations using simplified single-step and detailed chemical kinetics have been provided. In detonations with simplified chemistry, the one-dimensional longitudinal instabilities have been simulated, and a mechanism forcing the collapse of the period-doubling modes was identified. The transverse instabilities were simulated for a 2D detonation, and the corresponding transverse wave was shown to be unstable with a periodic normal mode. Also, a Floquet analysis was carried out with the three-dimensional inviscid Euler equations for a longitudinally stable case. Using domain decomposition to identify the global eigenfunctions corresponding to the two least stable eigenvalues, it was found that the bifurcation of limit cycles in three dimensions follows a period doubling process similar to that proven to occur in one dimension and it is because of transverse instabilities. For detonations with detailed chemistry, the one dimensional simulations for two cases were presented and validated with experimental results. The 2D simulation shows the re-initiation of the triple point leading to the formation of cellular structure of the detonation wave. Some of the important features in the front were identified and explained.

  3. 30 CFR 75.1328 - Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... detonators. 75.1328 Section 75.1328 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Blasting § 75.1328 Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. (a) Damaged explosives or detonators...) Damaged detonators shall be shunted, if practicable, either before being removed from the mine or...

  4. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Development of a Compact Liquid Fueled Pulsed Detonation

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    diameter of tube DCJ = theoretical CJ detonation velocity DDT = deflagration to detonation transition Detonation Engine with Predetonator Philip K. Panicker* Aerodynamic Research Center (ARC), University, USA A compact PDE platform has been constructed, which features a pre-detonator with 1 in. i

  5. Recent papers from DX-1, detonation science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Over the past year members of DX-1 have participated in several conferences where presentations were made and papers prepared for proceedings. There have also been several papers published in or submitted to refereed journals for publication. Rather that attach all these papers to the DX-1 Quarterly Report, we decided to put them in a Los Alamos report that could be distributed to those who get the quarterly, as well as others that have an interest in the work being done in DX-1 both inside and outside the Laboratory. This compilation does not represent all the work reported during the year because some people have chosen not to include their work here. In particular, there were a number of papers relating to deflagration-to-detonation modeling that were not included. However, this group of papers does present a good picture of much of the unclassified work being done in DX-1. Several of the papers include coauthors from other groups or divisions at the Laboratory, providing an indication of the collaborations in which people in DX-1 are involved. Discussed topics of submitted papers include: shock compression of condensed matter, pyrotechnics, shock waves, molecular spectroscopy, sound speed measurements in PBX-9501, chemical dimerization, and micromechanics of spall and damage in tantalum.

  6. Numerical models for afterburning of TNT detonation products in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, L.; Zhang, F.; Ripley, R. C.

    2013-11-01

    Afterburning occurs when fuel-rich explosive detonation products react with oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere. This energy release can further contribute to the air blast, resulting in a more severe explosion hazard particularly in confined scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the products equation of state (EOS) on the prediction of the efficiency of trinitrotoluene (TNT) afterburning and the times of arrival of reverberating shock waves in a closed chamber. A new EOS is proposed, denoted the Afterburning (AB) EOS. This EOS employs the JWL EOS in the high pressure regime, transitioning to a Variable-Gamma (VG) EOS at lower pressures. Simulations of three TNT charges suspended in a explosion chamber were performed. When compared to numerical results using existing methods, it was determined that the Afterburning EOS delays the shock arrival times giving better agreement with the experimental measurements in the early to mid time. In the late time, the Afterburning EOS roughly halved the error between the experimental measurements and results obtained using existing methods. Use of the Afterburning EOS for products with the Variable-Gamma EOS for the surrounding air further significantly improved results, both in the transient solution and the quasi-static pressure. This final combination of EOS and mixture model is recommended for future studies involving afterburning explosives, particularly those in partial and full confinement.

  7. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

  8. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-02-07

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

  9. Nearly spherical constant power detonation waves driven by focused radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Y. H.

    1973-01-01

    Shape and inner flow of a tridimensional spark are studied. The spark is created by focusing a laser beam in a gas. A second order fully non-linear equation is derived for the radial velocity on the axis of symmetry in the neighborhood of the origin. Solutions to that equation display the existence of a forbidden region near the focus, thus indicating the limits of applicability of a small perturbation solution.

  10. On the Initiation Mechanism in Exploding Bridgewire and Laser Detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Thomas, K.; Saenz, J.

    2005-07-01

    Since its invention by Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project era the exploding bridgewire detonator (EBW) has seen tremendous use and study. Recent development of a laser-powered device with detonation properties similar to an EBW is reviving interest in the basic physics of the Deflagration-to-Detonation (DDT) process in both of these devices,[1]. Cutback experiments using both laser interferometry and streak camera observations are providing new insight into the initiation mechanism in EBWs. These measurements are being correlated to a DDT model of compaction to detonation and shock to detonation developed previously by Xu and Stewart, [2]. The DDT model is incorporated into a high-resolution, multi-material model code for simulating the complete process. Model formulation and predictions against the test data will be discussed. REFS. [1] A. Munger, J. Kennedy, A. Akinci, and K. Thomas, "Dev. of a Laser Detonator" 30th Int. Pyrotechnics Seminar, Fort Collins, CO, (2004). [2] Xu, S. and Stewart, D. S. Deflagration to detonation transition in porous energetic materials: A model study. J. Eng. Math., 31, 143-172 (1997)

  11. Optimum Performance of Explosives in a Quasistatic Detonation Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ernest; Stiel, Leonard

    2015-06-01

    Analyses were conducted on the behavior of explosives in a quasistatic detonation cycle. This type of cycle has been proposed for the determination of the maximum work that can be performed by the explosive. The Jaguar thermochemical equilibrium program enabled the direct analyses of explosive performance at the various steps in the detonation cycle. In all cases the explosive is initially detonated to a point on the Hugoniot curve for the reaction products. The maximum work that can be obtained from the explosive is equal to the P-V work on the isentrope for expansion after detonation to atmosperic pressure, minus one-half the square of the particle velocity at the detonation point. This quantity is calculated form the internal energy of the explosive at the initial and final atmospheric temperatures. Cycle efficiencies (net work/ heat added) are also calculated with these procedures. For several explosives including TNT RDX, and aluminized compositions, maximum work effects. were established through the Jaguar calculations for Hugoniot points corresponding to C-J, overdriven, underdriven and constant volume detonations. As expected, detonation to the C-J point is found to result in the maximum net work in all cases.

  12. Mechanisms for Detonation Initiation in Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamezo, Vadim N.; Oran, E. S.

    2008-03-01

    We consider possible mechanisms for detonation initiation in an exploding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. According to current models of Type Ia supernovae, the explosion starts as a thermonuclear deflagration, but ends as a detonation. The process of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) is still not well understood, though there are several scenarios that may lead to the detonation initiation. These include mixing between burned and unburned materials, shock-flame interactions, and large-scale pulsations. Theory and simulations of DDT phenomena in terrestrial chemical systems show that DDT often involves formation of reactivity gradients that help to generate strong shocks. The same gradient mechanism may be responsible for the detonation initiation in Type Ia Supernovae, in particular, in the mixing scenario. Detonations can also be ignited when shocks interacting with thermonuclear flames accelerate, or strong shocks allow a direct detonation initiation. We analyze length scales associated with different mechanisms. This work was supported in part by the NASA ATP program (NRA NNH05ZDA001N-AT) and by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) through the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDB) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional gas turbines and rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a theoretical thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional engines. However, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to all pulse detonation devices has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance of PDES problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models.

  14. The dynamics of unsteady detonation with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis; Romick, Christopher; Powers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Here we consider an unsteady detonation with diffusion included. This introduces an interaction between the reaction length scales and diffusion length scales. Detailed kinetics introduce multiple length scales as shown though the spatial eigenvalue analysis of hydrogen-oxygen system; the smallest length scale is {approx} 10{sup 7} m and the largest {approx} 10{sup -2} m; away from equilibrium, the breadth can be larger. In this paper, we consider a simpler set of model equations, similar to the inviscid reactive compressible fluid equations, but include diffusion (in the form of thermal/energy, momentum, and mass diffusion). We will seek to reveal how the complex dynamics already discovered in one-step systems in the inviscid limit changes with the addition of diffusion.

  15. Thermonuclear detonations ensuing white dwarf mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, M.; Guillochon, J.; Brüggen, M.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Rosswog, S.

    2015-12-01

    The merger of two white dwarfs (WDs) has for many years not been considered as the favoured model for the progenitor system of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). But recent years have seen a change of opinion as a number of studies, both observational and theoretical, have concluded that they should contribute significantly to the observed SN Ia rate. In this paper, we study the ignition and propagation of detonation through post-merger remnants and we follow the resulting nucleosynthesis up to the point where a homologous expansion is reached. In our study we cover the entire range of WD masses and compositions. For the emergence of a detonation we study three different setups. The first two are guided by the merger remnants from our earlier simulations, while for the third one the ignitions were set by placing hotspots with properties determined by spatially resolved calculations taken from the literature. There are some caveats to our approach which we investigate. We carefully compare the nucleosynthetic yields of successful explosions with SN Ia observations. Only three of our models are consistent with all the imposed constraints and potentially lead to a standard Type Ia event. The first one, a 0.45 M? helium (He) + 0.9 M? carbon-oxygen (CO) WD system produces a sub-luminous, SN 1991bg-like event while the other two, a 0.45 M? He+1.1 M? oxygen-neon WD system and a 1.05 + 1.05 M? system with two CO WDs, are good candidates for common SNe Ia.

  16. Spark-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOEpatents

    Lieberman, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it spark-safe includes an organic secondary explosive charge of HMX in the form of a thin pad disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The pad of secondary charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter. The explosive column also includes a first explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in the ignition region of the explosive column next to the secondary charge pad on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to provide mechanical confinement of the pad of secondary charge and physical coupling thereof with the ignition device. The explosive column further includes a second explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to the first CP charge on a side opposite from the pad of secondary charge. The second CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. The first explosive CP charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter, whereas the second explosive CP charge contains a series of increments (nominally 4), each of which has an axial thickness-to-diameter ratio of one to two. 2 figs.

  17. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    E-print Network

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    We propose the following model equation, u[subscript t]+1/2(u[superscript 2]-uu[subscript s])[subscript x]=f(x,u[subscript s]) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting ...

  18. 33 CFR 154.2106 - Detonation arresters installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... arrester, line size expansions must be in a straight pipe run and must be no closer than 120 times the pipe's diameter from the detonation arrester unless the manufacturer has test data to show the...

  19. Ultrafast Detonation of Hydrazoic Acid (HN[subscript 3])

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.

    The fastest self-sustained chemical reactions in nature occur during detonation of energetic materials where reactions are thought to occur on nanosecond or longer time scales in carbon-containing materials. Here we perform ...

  20. [Detonation temperature measurement of epoxypropane using instantaneous spectrum method].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Ping; Xiao, Hai-Bo; Hu, Dong; Yuan, Chang-Ying

    2008-03-01

    After solving the problems of synchronization of the measuring system and the avoidance of false trigger signal, the instantaneous emission spectrum of epoxypropane with an exposure time of 2 micros and a resolution of 0.2 nm was acquired from a side window of a shock tube at the very moment when the epoxypropane transformed from deflagration to detonation. The measuring system consists of an advanced intensified charge-coupled-device spectroscopic detector, a digital delay generator DG535, an explosion shock tube and optical fibers. The DDT process was monitored by pressure transducers. After correcting the intensity of the spectrum obtained, the background curve of the heat radiation intensity of the detonation was given immediately. The detonation temperature of 2 416 K for epoxypropane was derived from fitting the curve with Planck blackbody formula by least squares principle. The detonation temperature of epoxypropane can provide an experimental datum for analyzing the microscopic mechanism of DDT process. PMID:18536396

  1. Theory of weakly nonlinear self-sustained detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, Luiz M.; Kasimov, Aslan R.; Rosales, Rodolfo R.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a theory of weakly nonlinear multi-dimensional self sustained detonations based on asymptotic analysis of the reactive compressible Navier-Stokes equations. We show that these equations can be reduced to a model consisting of a forced, unsteady, small disturbance, transonic equation and a rate equation for the heat release. In one spatial dimension, the model simplifies to a forced Burgers equation. Through analysis, numerical calculations and comparison with the reactive Euler equations, the model is demonstrated to capture such essential dynamical characteristics of detonations as the steady-state structure, the linear stability spectrum, the period-doubling sequence of bifurcations and chaos in one-dimensional detonations and cellular structures in multi- dimensional detonations.

  2. Jaguar Analyses of Experimental Detonation Values for Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard I.; Baker, Ernest L.; Capellos, Christos

    2004-07-01

    Comparisons of JAGUAR C-J velocities with experimental detonation values for a number of explosives indicate that only slight, if any, aluminum reaction occurs at the detonation front even if small or sub-micron particles are utilized. For sub-micron particles, it is important to account for the presence of aluminum oxide in the explosive formulation. The agreement with the calculated JAGUAR values for zero aluminum reaction is within 2% for most experimental detonation velocities considered. Comparisons of experimental cylinder velocities by JAGUAR analytical procedures indicate that with small aluminum particles substantial aluminum reaction occurs at low values of the radial expansion, even though little reaction is observed at the detonation front.

  3. Turbulent fronts of quantum detonation in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, D. A.

    2013-08-01

    Dipolar-controlled quantum deflagration going over into quantum detonation in the elongated Mn12 Ac molecular magnet in a strong transverse field has been considered within the full three-dimensional model. It is shown that within the dipolar window around tunneling resonances the deflagration front is nonflat. With increasing bias, dipolar instability makes the front turbulent, while its speed reaches sonic values, which is a signature of detonation.

  4. Model of burning and detonation in rocket motors

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Rocket motor dome failure may produce a damaged porous bed of propellant adjacent to the motor case. This porous bed of propellant may burn and ultimately cause detonation of the motor. A numerical model is presented which examines detonation of the solid propellant grain from shocks induced by the burning porous bed. Calculations are made in one- and two-dimensional cylindrical geometry and employ the Forest Fire model of shock-induced decomposition.

  5. Dynamic compaction of granular materials in a tube with wall friction, applied to deflagration-to-detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Kapila, A.K.

    1995-09-01

    A theoretical problem is considered in which a granular material is pushed through a tube of arbitrary cross-section by a constant velocity piston against the resistance of compaction work and wall friction. The crushing of the material is dictated by a simple yet physically reasonable compaction law. By considering two special cases - the limit of vanishing friction and the quasistatic limit - we identify the two basic compaction wave structures. We then consider the general case in which the two waves interact. Estimates suggest that for typical deflagration-to-detonation tests explosive at the wall melts on time scales short compared to the experiment.

  6. A small-scale experiment using microwave interferometry to investigate detonation and shock-to-detonation transition in pressed TATB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renslow, Peter John

    A small-scale characterization test utilizing microwave interferometry was developed to dynamically measure detonation and run to detonation distance in explosives. The technique was demonstrated by conducting two experimental series on the well-characterized explosive triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB). In the first experiment series, the detonation velocity was observed at varying porosity. The velocity during TATB detonation matched well with predictions made using CHEETAH and an empirical relation from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The microwave interferometer also captured unsteady propagation of the reaction when a low density charge was near the failure diameter. In the second experiment series, Pop-plots were produced using data obtained from shock initiation of the TATB through a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) attenuator. The results compared well to wedge test data from LANL despite the microwave interferometer test being of substantially smaller scale. The results showed the test method is attractive for rapid characterization of new and improvised explosive materials.

  7. The Physics of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei

    BACKGROUND: The scenario currently best capable of explaining the observational properties of normal bright type Ia supernovae (SNIa), which are of primary importance for cosmology, is the delayed detonation model of the explosion of a white dwarf star with the mass near the Chandrasekhar limit in a single-degenerate binary system. In this model, the explosion starts as a subsonic deflagration that later transitions to a supersonic detonation (deflagration-to-detonation transition, or DDT). Significant progress has been made over the years both experimentally and numerically in elucidating the physics of DDT in terrestrial confined systems. It remains unclear, however, whether and how a detonation can be formed in an unpressurized, unconfined system such as the interior of a WD. Modern large-scale multidimensional models of SNIa cannot capture the DDT process and, thus, are forced to make two crucial assumptions, namely (a) that DDT does occur at some point, and (b) when and where it occurs. As a result, delayed detonation is a parameterized model that must be "tuned" in order to obtain the proper match with the observations. This substantially hinders the possibility of investigating potential sources of systematic errors in the calibration of normal bright SNIa as standard candles. Recently we have carried out a systematic study of the high-speed turbulence-flame interaction through first-principles direct numerical simulations (DNS) using reaction models similar to those describing terrestrial chemical flames. Our analysis has shown that at sufficiently high turbulent intensities, subsonic turbulent flames in unconfined environments, such as the WD interior, are indeed inherently susceptible to DDT. The associated mechanism is based on the unsteady evolution of turbulent flames faster than the Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations. This process is qualitatively different from the traditional spontaneous reaction wave model and does not require the formation of distributed flames. These results provide the first direct ab initio demonstration of DDT in turbulent reactive flows. They show that DDT is indeed possible in unconfined media and provide a detailed physical description of this process. OBJECTIVES: Here we propose to perform the detailed and systematic analysis of the new spontaneous DDT mechanism to demonstrate its applicability in SNIa explosions and to determine precise conditions required for the onset of DDT. Culmination of this effort will be the first DNS-validated subgrid-scale DDT model capable of accurately predicting the time and location of detonation initiation and suitable for use in large-scale SNIa simulations. METHODS: All key stages of the new DDT mechanism will be studied using high-resolution direct numerical simulations of turbulence interaction with both chemical and thermonuclear flames. These will be carried out with fixed grid and adaptive mesh refinement numerical codes that have previously been extensively used in studies of both terrestrial and astrophysical combustion. The results will be incorporated as a subgrid model in large-scale 3D fluid dynamics calculations of SNIa. SIGNIFICANCE: Analysis performed in the course of this work will remove the parameterization of the single-degenerate delayed detonation model on DDT conditions. This, in turn, will open the possibility for meaningful comparison of the observational signatures of this explosion scenario with the photometric, spectroscopic, and polarimetric signatures of SNIa and, thus, for identifying and describing potential sources of systematic errors in SNIa calibration as cosmological standard candles. Substantial improvement of the accuracy of such calibration will be crucial for the success of current and future NASA missions aimed at studying the nature of dark energy.

  8. Determination of sound velocities of "overcompressed" detonation in HMX-based explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernokletov, Mikhail V.; Kovalev, Alexey E.; Bel'sky, Vladimir M.; Bogdanov, Evgeny N.

    2015-09-01

    The authors present results of determination of sound velocities in explosion products (EP) of HMX-based explosive overcompressed up to the pressures of 50-85 GPa by overtaking unloading method. The radiowave and optical methods are used to record the time when a front of overcompressed detonation wave in investigated sample of high explosive (HE) is overtaken by expansion wave, which propagates from the back surface of impactor with sound velocity. The data on sound velocities, which were independently obtained by two different methods, were in agreement. The methods with use of radiointerferometer and indicator liquid are rather effective for determination of sound velocities in overcompresed EP and for investigation of parameters at the Jouget point of various HEs, which are required for calibration of their equations of state (EOS).

  9. An experimental study of laser-supported plasmas for laser propulsion: Center director's discretionary fund project DFP-82-33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, R. H.; Mccay, T. D.; Vanzandt, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    The rudiments of a rocket thruster, which receives its enthalpy from an energy source which is remotely beamed from a laser, is described. An experimental study, now partially complete, is discussed which will eventually provide a detailed understanding of the physics for assessing the feasibility of using hydrogen plasmas for accepting and converting this energy to enthalpy. A plasma ignition scheme which uses a pulsed CO2 laser was develped and the properites of the ignition spark documented, including breakdown intensities in hydrogen. A complete diagnostic system capable of determining plasma temperature and the plasma absorptivitiy for subsequent steady-state absorption of a high power CO2 laser beam are developed and demonstrative use is discussed for the preliminary case study, a two atmosphere laser supported argon plasma.

  10. Simulation of the reflected blast wave from a C-4 charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. Michael; Kuhl, Allen L.; Tringe, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 ?m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 7 ranges (GR = 0, 5.08, 10.16, 15.24, 20.32, 25.4, and 30.48 cm) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 5 cm), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  11. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22

    HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

  12. Particle Acceleration in a High Enthalpy Nozzle Flow with a Modified Detonation Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, C.; Olivier, H.

    2014-04-01

    The quality of thermal sprayed coatings depends on many factors which have been investigated and are still in scientific focus. Mostly, the coating material is inserted into the spray device as solid powder. The particle condition during the spray process has a strong effect on coating quality. In some cases, higher particle impact energy leads to improved coating quality. Therefore, a computer-controlled detonation gun based spraying device has been designed and tested to obtain particle velocities over 1200 m/s. The device is able to be operated in two modes based on different flow-physical principles. In one mode, the device functions like a conventional detonation gun in which the powder is accelerated in a blast wave. In the other mode, an extension with a nozzle transforms the detonation gun process into an intermittent shock tunnel process in which the particles are accelerated in a high enthalpy nozzle flow with high reservoir conditions. Presented are experimental results of the operation with nozzle in which the device generates very high particle velocities up to a frequency of 5 Hz. A variable particle injection system allows injection of the powder at any point along the nozzle axis to control particle temperature and velocity. A hydrogen/oxygen mixture is used in the experiments. Operation performance and nozzle outflow are characterized by time resolved pressure measurements. The particle conditions inside the nozzle and in the nozzle exit plane are calculated with a quasi-one-dimensional WENO-code of high order. For the experiments, particle velocity is obtained by particle image velocimetry, and particle concentration is qualitatively determined by a laser extinction method. The powders used are WC-Co(88/12), NiCr(80/20), Al2O3, and Cu. Different substrate/powder combinations for varying particle injection positions have been investigated by light microscopy and measurements of microhardness.

  13. Color camera pyrometry for high explosive detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Densmore, John; Biss, Matthew; Homan, Barrie; McNesby, Kevin

    2011-06-01

    Temperature measurements of high-explosive and combustion processes are difficult because of the speed and environment of the events. We have characterized and calibrated a digital high-speed color camera that may be used as an optical pyrometer to overcome these challenges. The camera provides both high temporal and spatial resolution. The color filter array of the sensor uses three color filters to measure the spectral distribution of the imaged light. A two-color ratio method is used to calculate a temperature using the color filter array raw image data and a gray-body assumption. If the raw image data is not available, temperatures may be calculated from processed images or movies depending on proper analysis of the digital color imaging pipeline. We analyze three transformations within the pipeline (demosaicing, white balance, and gamma-correction) to determine their effect on the calculated temperature. Using this technique with a Vision Research Phantom color camera, we have measured the temperature of exploded C-4 charges. The surface temperature of the resulting fireball rapidly increases after detonation and then decayed to a constant value of approximately 1980 K. Processed images indicates that the temperature remains constant until the light intensity decreased below the background value.

  14. Reducing the Consequences of a Nuclear Detonation.

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, B R

    2007-11-09

    The 2002 National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction states that 'the United States must be prepared to respond to the use of WMD against our citizens, our military forces, and those of friends and allies'. Scenario No.1 of the 15 Department of Homeland Security national planning scenarios is an improvised nuclear detonation in the national capitol region. An effective response involves managing large-scale incident response, mass casualty, mass evacuation, and mass decontamination issues. Preparedness planning activities based on this scenario provided difficult challenges in time critical decision making and managing a large number of casualties within the hazard area. Perhaps even more challenging is the need to coordinate a large scale response across multiple jurisdictions and effectively responding with limited infrastructure and resources. Federal response planning continues to make improvements in coordination and recommending protective actions, but much work remains. The most critical life-saving activity depends on actions taken in the first few minutes and hours of an event. The most effective way to reduce the enormous national and international social and economic disruptions from a domestic nuclear explosion is through planning and rapid action, from the individual to the federal response. Anticipating response resources for survivors based on predicted types and distributions of injuries needs to be addressed.

  15. Deflagration to detonation experiments in granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Burnside, N.J.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Dickson, P.M.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper the authors report on continuing work involving a series of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) experiments in which they study the piston-initiated DDT of heavily confined granular cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX). These experiments were designed to he useful in model development and evaluation. A main focus of these experiments is the effect of density on the DDT event. Particle size distribution and morphology are carefully characterized. In this paper they present recent surface area analysis. Earlier studies demonstrated extensive fracturing and agglomeration in samples at densities as low as 75% TMD as evidenced by dramatic decreases in particle size distribution due to mild stimulus. This is qualitatively confirmed with SEM images and quantitatively studied with gas absorption surface area analysis. Also, in this paper they present initial results using a microwave interferometer technique. Dynamic calibration of the technique was performed, a 35 GHz signal is used to increase resolution, and the system has been designed to be inexpensive for repeated experiments. The distance to where deformation of the inner wall begins for various densities is reported. This result is compared with the microwave interferometer measurements.

  16. The development of laser ignited deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Harlan, J.G.

    1993-11-01

    The use of laser ignited explosive components has been recognized as a safety enhancement over existing electrical explosive devices (EEDs). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance for many years with recent emphasis on developing optical deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators. These low energy optical ordnance devices can be ignited with either a semiconductor diode laser, laser diode arrays or a solid state rod laser. By using a semiconductor laser diode, the safety improvement can be made without sacrificing performance since the input energy required for the laser diode and the explosive output are similar to existing electrical systems. The use of higher powered laser diode arrays or rod lasers may have advantages in fast DDT applications or lossy optical environments such as long fiber applications and applications with numerous optical connectors. Recent results from our continued study of optical ignition of explosive and pyrotechnic materials are presented. These areas of investigation can be separated into three different margin categories: (1) the margin relative to intended inputs (i.e. powder performance as a function of laser input variation), (2) the margin relative to anticipated environments (i.e. powder performance as a function of thermal environment variation), and (3) the margin relative to unintended environments (i.e. responses to abnormal environments or safety).

  17. The development of laser ignited deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.

    1994-05-01

    The use of laser ignited explosive components has been recognized as a safety enhancement over existing electrical explosive devices (EEDs). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance for many years with recent emphasis on developing optical deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators. These low energy optical ordnance devices can be ignited with either a semiconductor diode laser, laser diode arrays or a solid state rod laser. By using a semiconductor laser diode, the safety improvement can be made without sacrificing performance since the input energy required for the laser diode and the explosive output are similar to existing electrical systems. The use of higher powered laser diode arrays or rod lasers may have advantages in fast DDT applications or lossy optical environments such as long fiber applications and applications with numerous optical connectors. Recent results from our continued study of optical ignition of explosive and pyrotechnic materials are presented. These areas of investigation can be separated into three different margin categories: (1) the margin relative to intended inputs ( i.e. powder performance as a function of laser input variation), (2) the margin relative to anticipated environments (i.e. powder performance as a function of thermal environment variation), and (3) the margin relative to unintended environments (i.e. responses to abnormal environments or safety).

  18. Measurements of the DDT Process in Exploding Bridgewire Detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Eric S.; Thomas, Keith A.; Clarke, Steven A.; Kennedy, James E.; Stewart, D. Scott

    2006-07-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) of low density (0.88 g/cc) PETN during exploding bridgewire (EBW) initiation has been studied using laser interferometry and streak photography. Cutback experiments using VISAR have confirmed a 1.0 mm run-distance to detonation in this low density PETN powder. In a detonation system using a combination of low and high density powders, an apparent center of initiation (COI) analysis of streak data has yielded a surprisingly similar result. This data suggested that a compaction of low density powder to near theoretical maximum density (TMD) may occur before the onset of detonation, which is consistent with work done previously. These experiments show this is not the case and COI analysis reveals a non-ideal initial propagation front. Additionally, data show that although function time increases significantly with decreasing firing voltage, the apparent COI changes very little. This indicates that the detonation criterion is not dependent upon the rate of deflagration, but on a volume of material that must be burned in a confined space to create the critical pressure needed at the compaction front.

  19. PULSATING REVERSE DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. EXPLOSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, Eduardo; Garcia-Senz, Domingo; Cabezon, Ruben M.; DomInguez, Inmaculada E-mail: domingo.garcia@upc.edu E-mail: inma@ugr.es

    2009-04-20

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf (WD). However, all attempts to find a convincing ignition mechanism based on a delayed detonation in a destabilized, expanding, white dwarf have been elusive so far. One of the possibilities that has been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass WD, followed by formation of an accretion shock that confines a carbon-oxygen rich core, while transforming the kinetic energy of the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work, we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of PRD models from the time of detonation initiation up to homologous expansion. Different models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M {sub defl}, give explosions spanning a range of kinetic energies, K {approx} (1.0-1.2) x 10{sup 51} erg, and {sup 56}Ni masses, M({sup 56}Ni) {approx} 0.6-0.8 M {sub sun}, which are compatible with what is expected for typical Type Ia supernovae. Spectra and light curves of angle-averaged spherically symmetric versions of the PRD models are discussed. Type Ia supernova spectra pose the most stringent requirements on PRD models.

  20. A Performance Map for Ideal Air Breathing Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of an ideal, air breathing Pulse Detonation Engine is described in a manner that is useful for application studies (e.g., as a stand-alone, propulsion system, in combined cycles, or in hybrid turbomachinery cycles). It is shown that the Pulse Detonation Engine may be characterized by an averaged total pressure ratio, which is a unique function of the inlet temperature, the fraction of the inlet flow containing a reacting mixture, and the stoichiometry of the mixture. The inlet temperature and stoichiometry (equivalence ratio) may in turn be combined to form a nondimensional heat addition parameter. For each value of this parameter, the average total enthalpy ratio and total pressure ratio across the device are functions of only the reactant fill fraction. Performance over the entire operating envelope can thus be presented on a single plot of total pressure ratio versus total enthalpy ratio for families of the heat addition parameter. Total pressure ratios are derived from thrust calculations obtained from an experimentally validated, reactive Euler code capable of computing complete Pulse Detonation Engine limit cycles. Results are presented which demonstrate the utility of the described method for assessing performance of the Pulse Detonation Engine in several potential applications. Limitations and assumptions of the analysis are discussed. Details of the particular detonative cycle used for the computations are described.

  1. Investigations on detonation shock dynamics and related topics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S.

    1993-11-01

    This document is a final report that summarizes the research findings and research activities supported by the subcontract DOE-LANL-9-XG8-3931P-1 between the University of Illinois (D. S. Stewart Principal Investigator) and the University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory, M-Division). The main focus of the work has been on investigations of Detonation Shock Dynamics. A second emphasis has been on modeling compaction of energetic materials and deflagration to detonation in those materials. The work has led to a number of extensions of the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) and its application as an engineering design method for high explosive systems. The work also enhanced the hydrocode capabilities of researchers in M-Division by modifications to CAVEAT, an existing Los Alamos hydrocode. Linear stability studies of detonation flows were carried out for the purpose of code verification. This work also broadened the existing theory for detonation. The work in this contract has led to the development of one-phase models for dynamic compaction of porous energetic materials and laid the groundwork for subsequent studies. Some work that modeled the discrete heterogeneous behavior of propellant beds was also performed. The contract supported the efforts of D. S. Stewart and a Postdoctoral student H. I. Lee at the University of Illinois.

  2. JAGUAR Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest; Capellos, Christos

    2009-06-01

    The JAGUAR product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products. Relationships of the Murnaghan form for molar volumes and derived properties were implemented in JAGUAR. Available Hugoniot and static volumertic data were analyzed to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationship for solid boron, boron oxide, boron nitride, boron carbide, and boric acid. Experimental melting points were also utilized with optimization procedures to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX - boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using JAGUAR are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that boron mixtures may exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior, as observed by aluminized combined effects explosives, with higher detonation velocities than would be achieved by a classical Chapman-Jouguet detonation. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX - boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the energy output obtained from the detonation of the formulation.

  3. Transient Detonation Processes in a Plastic Bonded Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keith A.; Martin, Eric S.; Kennedy, James E.; Garcia, Ismael A.; Foster, Joseph C.

    2002-07-01

    Experiments involving the transfer of detonation from small booster charges of PBXN-5 (95% HMX and 5% Viton A) into larger charges of various plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) have produced some surprising results and have stimulated investigation into the factors governing observed responses. To understand these results, we conducted a series of tests with different miniature detonator-booster configurations using laser velocimetry to quantify the pressure pulse that is transmitted from the PBXN-5 booster. Models were used to determine the ideal explosive behavior for comparison with the measured results. The differences are interpreted as being due to transient behavior and late-time energy release from the booster charge. We characterize these behaviors as evidence of microdetonics, where we define microdetonics as the study of less-than-CJ detonation performance due to curvature and/or transient behavior. This provides useful insights into the fundamentals of the detonation process that can feed into advanced modeling approaches such as Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD).

  4. 30 CFR 75.1328 - Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. 75.1328 Section...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1328 Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. (a) Damaged...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1312 - Explosives and detonators in underground magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explosives and detonators in underground magazines...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1312 Explosives and detonators in underground...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1328 - Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. 75.1328 Section...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1328 Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. (a) Damaged...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1328 - Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. 75.1328 Section...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1328 Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. (a) Damaged...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1328 - Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. 75.1328 Section...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1328 Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. (a) Damaged...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1312 - Explosives and detonators in underground magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Explosives and detonators in underground magazines...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1312 Explosives and detonators in underground...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1313 - Explosives and detonators outside of magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Explosives and detonators outside of magazines. 75...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1313 Explosives and detonators outside of magazines....

  11. 30 CFR 75.1313 - Explosives and detonators outside of magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and detonators outside of magazines. 75...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1313 Explosives and detonators outside of magazines....

  12. 30 CFR 75.1313 - Explosives and detonators outside of magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Explosives and detonators outside of magazines. 75...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1313 Explosives and detonators outside of magazines....

  13. 30 CFR 75.1328 - Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. 75.1328 Section...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1328 Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators. (a) Damaged...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1313 - Explosives and detonators outside of magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explosives and detonators outside of magazines. 75...SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1313 Explosives and detonators outside of magazines....

  15. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  16. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  18. Optimal Area Profiles for Ideal Single Nozzle Air-Breathing Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of cross-sectional area variation on idealized Pulse Detonation Engine performance are examined numerically. A quasi-one-dimensional, reacting, numerical code is used as the kernel of an algorithm that iteratively determines the correct sequencing of inlet air, inlet fuel, detonation initiation, and cycle time to achieve a limit cycle with specified fuel fraction, and volumetric purge fraction. The algorithm is exercised on a tube with a cross sectional area profile containing two degrees of freedom: overall exit-to-inlet area ratio, and the distance along the tube at which continuous transition from inlet to exit area begins. These two parameters are varied over three flight conditions (defined by inlet total temperature, inlet total pressure and ambient static pressure) and the performance is compared to a straight tube. It is shown that compared to straight tubes, increases of 20 to 35 percent in specific impulse and specific thrust are obtained with tubes of relatively modest area change. The iterative algorithm is described, and its limitations are noted and discussed. Optimized results are presented showing performance measurements, wave diagrams, and area profiles. Suggestions for future investigation are also discussed.

  19. A Simple Model for the Dependence on Local Detonation Speed (D) of the Product Entropy (S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, David

    2011-06-01

    The generation of a burn time field as a pre-processing step ahead of a hydrocode calculation has been mostly upgraded in the explosives modelling community from the historical model of single-speed programmed burn to DSD. However, with this advance has come the problem that the previously conventional approach to the hydrodynamic stage of the model results in S having the wrong correlation with D. Instead of being higher where the detonation speed is lower, i.e. where reaction occurs at lower compression, the conventional method leads to S being lower where D is lower, resulting in a completely fictitious enhancement of available energy where the burn is degraded! A technique is described which removes this deficiency of the historical model when used with a DSD-generated burn time field. By treating the conventional JWL equation as a semi-empirical expression for the local expansion isentrope, and constraining the local parameter set for consistency with D, it is possible to obtain the two desirable outcomes that the model of the detonation wave is internally consistent, and S is realistically correlated with D.

  20. CHEETAH: A fast thermochemical code for detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.E.

    1993-11-01

    For more than 20 years, TIGER has been the benchmark thermochemical code in the energetic materials community. TIGER has been widely used because it gives good detonation parameters in a very short period of time. Despite its success, TIGER is beginning to show its age. The program`s chemical equilibrium solver frequently crashes, especially when dealing with many chemical species. It often fails to find the C-J point. Finally, there are many inconveniences for the user stemming from the programs roots in pre-modern FORTRAN. These inconveniences often lead to mistakes in preparing input files and thus erroneous results. We are producing a modern version of TIGER, which combines the best features of the old program with new capabilities, better computational algorithms, and improved packaging. The new code, which will evolve out of TIGER in the next few years, will be called ``CHEETAH.`` Many of the capabilities that will be put into CHEETAH are inspired by the thermochemical code CHEQ. The new capabilities of CHEETAH are: calculate trace levels of chemical compounds for environmental analysis; kinetics capability: CHEETAH will predict chemical compositions as a function of time given individual chemical reaction rates. Initial application: carbon condensation; CHEETAH will incorporate partial reactions; CHEETAH will be based on computer-optimized JCZ3 and BKW parameters. These parameters will be fit to over 20 years of data collected at LLNL. We will run CHEETAH thousands of times to determine the best possible parameter sets; CHEETAH will fit C-J data to JWL`s,and also predict full-wall and half-wall cylinder velocities.