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1

Structure and maintenance threshold of laser supported detonation waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maintenance of a Chapman Jouguet laser supported detonation (LSD) wave requires complete absorption of the laser beam in an absorption front travelling supersonically with respect to the upstream gas. A requirement for LSD maintenance is that this distance be less than the radius of the beam. A computational scheme was developed to study the structure of LSD waves in various

G. Weyl; C. Rollins; D. Resendes

1990-01-01

2

Structure and maintenance threshold of laser supported detonation waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Maintenance of a Chapman Jouguet laser supported detonation (LSD) wave requires complete absorption of the laser beam in an absorption front travelling supersonically with respect to the upstream gas. A requirement for LSD maintenance is that this distance be less than the radius of the beam. A computational scheme was developed to study the structure of LSD waves in various gases. A simultaneous solution of the mass and momentum conservation equations yields a (Maxwell) line when p is plotted versus 1/?, the slope of which is related to the velocity of the wave. The physical distance x in the wave corresponding to each point on the Maxwell line is determined by calculating the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption coefficient k as a function of the p and ? and then inverting the equation Iabs (p, ?)=Io (1-exp-?x k dx') for x. The method is used to calculate wave thicknesses for a variety of gases (H2O, LiH) that are being considered as propellant materials for laser propulsion. Results are presented for a laser wavelength of 10.6 ?m and upstream gas densities in the 10-3 to 10-4 g/cc range. The effect of adding a low ionization potential seed to the propellant is explicitly calculated.

Weyl, G.; Rollins, C.; Resendes, D.

1990-07-01

3

Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion  

SciTech Connect

A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition if the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research questions still outstanding in this area. 16 refs., 7 figs.

Kare, J.T.

1989-01-01

4

Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion  

SciTech Connect

A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition of the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the Program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research question still outstanding in this area.

Kare, J. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1990-07-30

5

Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption coefficient and initiation of laser- supported detonation waves in air  

Microsoft Academic Search

The inverse bremsstrahlung absorption coefficient in LASNEX was modified ; for application to laser effects calculations at temperatures below 10 eV. These ; modifications are described and the initiation condition for a laser-supported ; detonation (LSD) wave is crudely estimated for air in the vicinity of a solid ; target. (auth)

Winslow

1973-01-01

6

Numerical Analysis on Non-Equilibrium Mechanism of Laser-Supported Detonation Wave Using Multiply-Charged Ionization  

SciTech Connect

Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), one type of Laser-Supported Plasma (LSP), is considered as the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for laser absorption. In this study, I have numerically simulated the 1-D LSD waves propagating through a helium gas, in which Multiply-charged ionization model is considered for describing an accurate ionization process.

Shiraishi, Hiroyuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Daido Institute of Technology (Japan)

2006-05-02

7

Fundamental Properties of Non-equilibrium Laser-Supported Detonation Wave  

SciTech Connect

For developing laser propulsion, it is very important to analyze the mechanism of Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), because it can generate high pressure and high temperature to be used by laser propulsion can be categorized as one type of hypersonic reacting flows, where exothermicity is supplied not by chemical reaction but by radiation absorption. I have numerically simulated the 1-D and Quasi-1-D LSD waves propagating through an inert gas, which absorbs CO2 gasdynamic laser, using a 2-temperature model. Calculated results show the fundamental properties of the non-equilibrium LSD Waves.

Shiraishi, Hiroyuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Daido Institute of Technology, 10-3 Taki-haru-cho, Minami-ku, Nagoya (Japan)

2004-03-30

8

Internal structure of laser supported detonation waves by two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of the internal structure of the laser supported detonation (LSD) waves, such as the electron density n{sub e} and the electron temperature T{sub e} profiles behind the shock wave were measured using a two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer along with emission spectroscopy. A TEA CO{sub 2} laser with energy of 10 J/pulse produced explosive laser heating in atmospheric air. Results show that the peak values of n{sub e} and T{sub e} were, respectively, about 2 x 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and 30 000 K, during the LSD regime. The temporal variation of the laser absorption coefficient profile estimated from the measured properties reveals that the laser energy was absorbed perfectly in a thin layer behind the shock wave during the LSD regime, as predicted by Raizer's LSD model. However, the absorption layer was much thinner than a plasma layer, the situation of which was not considered in Raizer's model. The measured n{sub e} at the shock front was not zero while the LSD was supported, which implies that the precursor electrons exist ahead of the shock wave.

Shimamura, Kohei; Kawamura, Koichi; Fukuda, Akio; Wang Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya [Department of Advanced Energy, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Hatai, Keigo; Fukui, Akihiro; Arakawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2011-04-15

9

Laser supported detonation wave source of atomic oxygen for aerospace material testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A pulsed high flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen has been developed at Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to perform accelerated erosion testing of spacecraft materials in a simulated low earth orbit (LEO) environment. Molecular oxygen is introduced into an evacuated conical expansion nozzle at several atmospheres pressure through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A laser induced breakdown is generated in the nozzle throat by a pulsed CO2 TEA laser focused to intensities ?109 W/cm2. The resulting plasma is heated in excess of 20,000 K by the ensuing laser supported detonation wave, and then rapidly expands and cools. The nozzle geometry confines the expansion to promote rapid electron-ion recombination into atomic oxygen. The source generates an atomic oxygen beam with fluxes ?1018 atoms per pulse at 8±1.6 km/s with an ion content below 1% for LEO testing. For other applications the beam velocity can be varied over a range from 5 to 13 km/s by changing the discharge conditions. Materials testing has obtained the same surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples as observed on the STS-8 mission, and scanning electron micrographs of the irradiated polymer surfaces reveal an erosion morphology similar to that obtained on low earth orbit.

Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

1990-07-01

10

Numerical Analysis on Thermal Non-Equilibrium Process of Laser-Supported Detonation Wave in Axisymmetric Nozzle  

SciTech Connect

Numerical Analyses on Laser-Supported Plasma (LSP) have been performed for researching the mechanism of laser absorption occurring in the laser propulsion system. Above all, Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), categorized as one type of LSP, is considered as one of the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for performing highly effective propulsion. For simulating generation and propagation of LSD wave, I have performed thermal non-equilibrium analyses by Navier-stokes equations, using a CO{sub 2} gasdynamic laser into an inert gas, where the most important laser absorption mechanism for LSD propagation is Inverse Bremsstrahlung. As a numerical method, TVD scheme taken into account of real gas effects and thermal non-equilibrium effects by using a 2-temperature model, is applied. In this study, I analyze a LSD wave propagating through a conical nozzle, where an inner space of an actual laser propulsion system is simplified.

Shiraishi, Hiroyuki [Daido Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering 10-3 Takiharu-cho, Minami-ku, Nagoya 457-8530 (Japan)

2008-04-28

11

Calculation of laser induced impulse based on the laser supported detonation wave model with dissociation, ionization and radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the laser intensity range that the laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can be maintained, dissociation, ionization and radiation take a substantial part of the incidence laser energy. There is little treatment on the phenomenon in the existing models, which brings obvious discrepancies between their predictions and the experiment results. Taking into account the impact of dissociation, ionization and radiation in the conservations of mass, momentum and energy, a modified LSD wave model is developed which fits the experimental data more effectively rather than the existing models. Taking into consideration the pressure decay of the normal and the radial rarefaction, the laser induced impulse that is delivered to the target surface is calculated in the air; and the dependencies of impulse performance on laser intensity, pulse width, ambient pressure and spot size are indicated. The results confirm that the dissociation is the pivotal factor of the appearance of the momentum coupling coefficient extremum. This study focuses on a more thorough understanding of LSD and the interaction between laser and matter.

Gan, Li; Mousen, Cheng; Xiaokang, Li

2014-03-01

12

Calculation of laser induced impulse based on the laser supported detonation wave model with dissociation, ionization and radiation  

SciTech Connect

In the laser intensity range that the laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can be maintained, dissociation, ionization and radiation take a substantial part of the incidence laser energy. There is little treatment on the phenomenon in the existing models, which brings obvious discrepancies between their predictions and the experiment results. Taking into account the impact of dissociation, ionization and radiation in the conservations of mass, momentum and energy, a modified LSD wave model is developed which fits the experimental data more effectively rather than the existing models. Taking into consideration the pressure decay of the normal and the radial rarefaction, the laser induced impulse that is delivered to the target surface is calculated in the air; and the dependencies of impulse performance on laser intensity, pulse width, ambient pressure and spot size are indicated. The results confirm that the dissociation is the pivotal factor of the appearance of the momentum coupling coefficient extremum. This study focuses on a more thorough understanding of LSD and the interaction between laser and matter.

Gan, Li, E-mail: ligan0001@gmail.com; Mousen, Cheng; Xiaokang, Li [College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China)] [College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China)

2014-03-15

13

Numerical Analysis of Threshold between Laser-Supported Detonation and Combustion Wave Using Thermal Non-Equilibrium and Multi-Charged Ionization Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser-supported Detonation (LSD), which is one type of Laser-supported Plasma (LSP), is an important phenomenon because it can generate high pressures and temperatures for laser absorption. In this study, using thermal-non-equilibrium model, we numerically simulate LSPs, which are categorized as either LSDs or laser-supported combustion-waves (LSCs). For the analysis model, a two-temperature (heavy particle and electron-temperature) model has been used because the electronic mode excites first in laser absorption and a thermal non-equilibrium state easily arises. In the numerical analysis of the LSDs, laser absorption models are particularly important. Therefore, a multi-charged ionization model is considered to evaluate precisely the propagation and the structure transition of the LSD waves in the proximity of the LSC-LSD threshold. In the new model, the transition of the LSD construction near the threshold, which is indicated by the ionization delay length, becomes more practical.

Shiraishi, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Yuya

14

Laser Wavelength Dependency of Laser Supported Detonation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of high power Neodymium glass (Nd:glass) laser allows for application in laser propulsion. The Nd:glass laser is one of a candidate of the driver for the propulsion. However, there is a lack of study with using the solid state laser. Previous studies found that plasma induced using the glass laser absorbs the laser energy during a short laser supported detonation (LSD) regime compared with CO2 lasers. To investigate a laser wavelengths dependency of LSD in comparison with the CO2 laser, we used plasma emission spectroscopy and measured the electron temperature and electron density. As a result, these parameters of the glass laser appear to be higher value than those for the CO2 laser plasma. Besides, the absorption depth behind the shock wave is longer than that one of the CO2 laser. The results reveal that the long depth absorbs the energy conversion efficiency at almost same order despite a short LSD duration, as compared with the CO2 laser.

Shimamura, Kohei; Michigami, Keisuke; Wang, Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

2011-11-01

15

Predicting propagation limits of laser-supported detonation by Hugoniot analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Termination conditions of a laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave were investigated using control volume analysis with a Shimada–Hugoniot curve and a Rayleigh line. Because the geometric configurations strongly affect the termination condition, a rectangular tube was used to create the quasi-one-dimensional configuration. The LSD wave propagation velocity and the pressure behind LSD were measured. Results reveal that the detonation states during detonation and at the propagation limit are overdriven detonation and Chapman–Jouguet detonation, respectively. The termination condition is the minimum velocity criterion for the possible detonation solution. Results were verified using pressure measurements of the stagnation pressure behind the LSD wave.

Shimamura, Kohei; Ofosu, Joseph A.; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Koizumi, Hiroyuki

2015-01-01

16

Influence of the gaseous form on the precursor heating layer of a laser-supported detonation wave using half self-emission half shadowgraph visualization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

After breakdown one of the possible mechanisms of occurrence of laser-produced plasma is noted as laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave. This wave consisting of the shock wave and the beam absorbing plasma travels at 1-10 km/s along the beam channel in the direction opposite to the laser incidence. The laser heating structure is recognized as the ZND model of chemical detonation. However, Shimamura et. al, showed that the plasma proceeds the shock wave during LSD regime. The role of shock compression is relatively smaller than preheating by laser. The conventional model is inconsistent with our paper. To investigate the heating structure of a LSD wave, half self-emission half shadowgraph (HSHS) methods provides the self-emission image from the plasma on the top half and the shadowgraph image of the induced shock wave on the bottom half simultaneously. A TEA CO2 laser was used at 10 J incident energy. The locations of both wave fronts were detected from the brightness distribution of the HSHS images. As a result, the propagation of ionization front precedes that of shock wave front by the order of 10-4 m in air and N2. Preheating layer of N2 is shorter than that of air because O2 in air has the lowest ionization energy. Thus, a characteristic of preionization layer depends on the ionization properties because photoionization by the UV radiation generate the seed electrons ahead of shock wave.

Shimamura, Kohei; Michigami, Keisuke; Ofoso, Joseph; Komursaki, Kimiya

2012-10-01

17

Detonation waves in trinitrotoluene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fabry-Perot, ORVIS, and VISAR laser interferometry are used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of copper and tantalum discs accelerated by detonating trinitrotoluene (TNT) charges and of the interfaces between TNT detonation products and lithium fluoride crystals. TNT detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining detonation and piston supported overdriven (supracompressed) waves. The

John W. Kury; R. Don Breithaupt; Craig M. Tarver

1999-01-01

18

Review of Propulsion Applications of Detonation Waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Applications of detonations to propulsion are reviewed. First, the advantages of the detonation cycle over the constant pressure combustion cycle, typical of conventional propulsion engines, are discussed. Then the early studies of standing normal detonations, intermittent (or pulsed) detonations, rotating detonations, and oblique shock-induced detonations are reviewed. This is followed by a brief discussion of detonation thrusters, laser- supported detonations

K. Kailasanath

2000-01-01

19

Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fabry–Perot laser interferometry is used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of copper, tantalum, or magnesium disks driven by detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based charges and of the interfaces between detonating TATB and transparent salt crystals. Detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining detonation waves propagating through various thicknesses of LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5%

Craig M. Tarver; John W. Kury; R. Don Breithaupt

1997-01-01

20

Detonation waves in trinitrotoluene  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Fabry-Perot, ORVIS, and VISAR laser interferometry are used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories\\u000a of the free surfaces of copper and tantalum discs accelerated by detonating trinitrotoluene (TNT) charges and of the interfaces\\u000a between TNT detonation products and lithium fluoride crystals. TNT detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining\\u000a detonation and piston supported overdriven (supracompressed) waves.

John W. Kury; R. Don Breithaupt; Craig M. Tarver

1999-01-01

21

Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene  

Microsoft Academic Search

FabryâPerot laser interferometry is used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of copper, tantalum, or magnesium disks driven by detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based charges and of the interfaces between detonating TATB and transparent salt crystals. Detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining detonation waves propagating through various thicknesses of LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5%

Craig M. Tarver; John W. Kury; R. Don Breithaupt

1997-01-01

22

Understanding curved detonation waves  

SciTech Connect

The reaction zone of a detonation wave is very small compared to the dynamic length scale for a typical application. Consequently, it is impractical for numerical calculations to fully resolve the reaction zone. A non-zero reaction zone width is critical to describe curved detonation waves because it affects the wave speed. The curvature effect is the result of an the interaction between the rate of energy release and geometric source terms within the reaction zone. When the reaction zone width is determined by the computational cell size rather than the physical scale, the numerics introduces an artificial curvature effect which frequently dominates the physical effect and leads to mesh dependence of simulations. Modified Hugoniot jump conditions are derived which characterize the curvature effect. They express the conservation laws and are not sensitive to the detailed reaction dynamics but instead depend only on the reaction zone width, and averages of pressure and of mass, momentum and energy densities.

Bukiet, B.G. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States); Lackner, K.S.; Menikoff, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-06-01

23

Understanding curved detonation waves  

SciTech Connect

The reaction zone of a detonation wave is very small compared to the dynamic length scale for a typical application. Consequently, it is impractical for numerical calculations to fully resolve the reaction zone. A non-zero reaction zone width is critical to describe curved detonation waves because it affects the wave speed. The curvature effect is the result of an the interaction between the rate of energy release and geometric source terms within the reaction zone. When the reaction zone width is determined by the computational cell size rather than the physical scale, the numerics introduces an artificial curvature effect which frequently dominates the physical effect and leads to mesh dependence of simulations. Modified Hugoniot jump conditions are derived which characterize the curvature effect. They express the conservation laws and are not sensitive to the detailed reaction dynamics but instead depend only on the reaction zone width, and averages of pressure and of mass, momentum and energy densities.

Bukiet, B.G. (New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States)); Lackner, K.S.; Menikoff, R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01

24

Photoionization in the Precursor of Laser Supported Detonation by Ultraviolet Radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The propagation mechanism of laser-supported detonation (LSD) is important for designing laser propulsion for a detonation type thruster. The purpose of this work to was to confirm that photo-ionization in precursor is the predominant LSD sustainment mechanism. First of all, we tried to investigate the dependency of LSD duration on ambient gas species, air and argon. We took a series of high-speed images using the laser shadow-graphy. Besides, to estimate the UV photons emitted from the plasma, we used plasma emission spectroscopy and determined the electron temperature and density. As a result, the LSD duration of argon plasma and air plasma are 0.7 ?s and 0.3 ?s, resp. Besides, argon plasma emitted 1010 to 1014 photons/seconds, which was higher than air plasma. These results reveal that LSD propagation depends on the photon-contributing photoionization. The threshold photon-emission rate of LSD termination gives the elucidation of the LSD termination condition.

Shimamura, Kohei; Michigami, Keisuke; Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

2011-11-01

25

Photoionization in the Precursor of Laser Supported Detonation by Ultraviolet Radiation  

SciTech Connect

The propagation mechanism of laser-supported detonation (LSD) is important for designing laser propulsion for a detonation type thruster. The purpose of this work to was to confirm that photo-ionization in precursor is the predominant LSD sustainment mechanism. First of all, we tried to investigate the dependency of LSD duration on ambient gas species, air and argon. We took a series of high-speed images using the laser shadow-graphy. Besides, to estimate the UV photons emitted from the plasma, we used plasma emission spectroscopy and determined the electron temperature and density. As a result, the LSD duration of argon plasma and air plasma are 0.7 {mu}s and 0.3 {mu}s, resp. Besides, argon plasma emitted 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 14} photons/seconds, which was higher than air plasma. These results reveal that LSD propagation depends on the photon-contributing photoionization. The threshold photon-emission rate of LSD termination gives the elucidation of the LSD termination condition.

Shimamura, Kohei; Michigami, Keisuke; Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya [Department of Advanced Energy, University of Tokyo 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8561 (Japan); Arakawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Tokyo 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

2011-11-10

26

Analytical study of laser-supported combustion waves in hydrogen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Laser supported combustion (LSC) waves are an important ingredient in the fluid mechanics of CW laser propulsion using a hydrogen propellant and 10.6 micron lasers. Therefore, a computer model has been constructed to solve the one-dimensional energy equation with constant pressure and area. Physical processes considered include convection, conduction, absorption of laser energy, radiation energy loss, and accurate properties of equilibrium hydrogen. Calculations for 1, 3, 10 and 30 atm were made for intensities of 10 to the 4th to 10 to the 6th W/sq cm, which gave temperature profiles, wave speed, etc. To pursue the propulsion application, a second computer model was developed to describe the acceleration of the gas emerging from the LSC wave into a variable-pressure, converging streamtube, still including all the above-mentioned physical processes. The results show very high temperatures in LSC waves which absorb all the laser energy, and high radiative losses.

Kemp, N. H.; Root, R. G.

1978-01-01

27

A reexamination of the laser supported combustion wave  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kantrowitz (1972) and Minovitch (1972) have proposed the use of laser sustained plasmas as a means to heat a rocket propellant. Recent studies of laser-powered propulsion have been directed toward the application of high-specific-impulse space propulsion systems for orbital transfer missions. Analyses of rocket performance relied heavily on the concept of the laser-supported combustion (LSC) wave. Raizer (1971) first drew the analogy between laser-sustained plasmas and combustion waves in an analysis. The Raizer model was later applied to hydrogen by Kemp and Root (1979). In connection with certain problems arising with the approach considered by Kemp and Root, the present investigation is concerned with a reexamination of the Raizer model. Attention is given to a numerical approach for the entire LSC wave in hydrogen, taking into account the incorporation of the proper boundary conditions far downstream of the wave.

Keefer, D.; Peters, C.; Crowder, H.

1983-01-01

28

Sharp shock model for propagating detonation waves  

SciTech Connect

Recent analyses of the reactive Euler equations have led to an understanding of the effect of curvature on an underdriven detonation wave. This advance can be incorporated into an improved sharp shock model for propagating detonation waves in hydrodynamic calculations. We illustrate the model with two simple examples: time dependent propagation of a diverging detonation wave in 1-D, and the steady 2-D propagation of a detonation wave in a rate stick. Incorporating this model into a 2-D front tracking code is discussed. 20 refs., 3 figs.

Bukiet, B.; Menikoff, R.

1989-01-01

29

Evaluation of the oblique detonation wave ramjet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential performance of oblique detonation wave ramjets is analyzed in terms of multishock diffusion, oblique detonation waves, and heat release. Results are presented in terms of thrust coefficients and specific impulses for a range of flight Mach numbers of 6 to 16.

Morrison, R. B.

1978-01-01

30

Detonation wave compression in gas turbines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was made of the concept of augmenting the performance of low pressure ratio gas turbines by detonation wave compression of part of the flow. The concept exploits the constant volume heat release of detonation waves to increase the efficiency of the Brayton cycle. In the models studied, a fraction of the compressor output was channeled into detonation ducts where it was processed by transient transverse detonation waves. Gas dynamic studies determined the maximum cycling frequency of detonation ducts, proved that upstream propagation of pressure pulses represented no problems and determined the variations of detonation duct output with time. Mixing and wave compression were used to recombine the combustor and detonation duct flows and a concept for a spiral collector to further smooth the pressure and temperature pulses was presented as an optional component. The best performance was obtained with a single firing of the ducts so that the flow could be re-established before the next detonation was initiated. At the optimum conditions of maximum frequency of the detonation ducts, the gas turbine efficiency was found to be 45 percent while that of a corresponding pressure ratio 5 conventional gas turbine was only 26%. Comparable improvements in specific fuel consumption data were found for gas turbines operating as jet engines, turbofans, and shaft output machines. Direct use of the detonation duct output for jet propulsion proved unsatisfactory. Careful analysis of the models of the fluid flow phenomena led to the conclusion that even more elaborate calculations would not diminish the uncertainties in the analysis of the system. Feasibility of the concept to work as an engine now requires validation in an engineering laboratory experiment.

Wortman, A.

1986-01-01

31

Detonation waves in pentaerythritol tetranitrate  

Microsoft Academic Search

FabryâPerot laser interferometry was used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of tantalum discs accelerated by detonating pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) charges and of the interfaces between PETN detonation products and lithium fluoride crystals. The experimental records were compared to particle velocity histories calculated using very finely zoned meshes of the exact dimensions with the

Craig M. Tarver; R. Don Breithaupt; John W. Kury

1997-01-01

32

Detonation waves in pentaerythritol tetranitrate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fabry–Perot laser interferometry was used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of tantalum discs accelerated by detonating pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) charges and of the interfaces between PETN detonation products and lithium fluoride crystals. The experimental records were compared to particle velocity histories calculated using very finely zoned meshes of the exact dimensions with the

Craig M. Tarver; R. Don Breithaupt; John W. Kury

1997-01-01

33

A quasi-steady divergent detonation wave  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An analytical model of a divergent shock wave is developed in terms of the radius of curvature and width and structure. When the detonation zone is infinitely thin compared to the radius of curvature of the wave, the wave can be considered as a stationary plane, i.e., a Chapman-Jouguet detonation. In the case where the size of the detonation zone is limited and the shock wave is constrained to the shape of the zone, it is shown that the streamlines will change as a function of the radius of curvature. A formulation is defined to take into account a one-dimensional and steady flow, conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, and the divergence of the streamlines. The minimal velocity of the detonation wave is expressed in terms of the maximum of the minimum velocities within the detonation zone at various distances from the shock. The model can be applied to spherical or cylindrical, divergent, steady or unsteady detonation waves from cartridges.

Damamme, G.

1982-09-01

34

High order hybrid numerical simulations of two dimensional detonation waves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to study multi-dimensional unstable detonation waves, a high order numerical scheme suitable for calculating the detailed transverse wave structures of multidimensional detonation waves was developed. The numerical algorithm uses a multi-domain approach so different numerical techniques can be applied for different components of detonation waves. The detonation waves are assumed to undergo an irreversible, unimolecular reaction A yields B. Several cases of unstable two dimensional detonation waves are simulated and detailed transverse wave interactions are documented. The numerical results show the importance of resolving the detonation front without excessive numerical viscosity in order to obtain the correct cellular patterns.

Cai, Wei

1993-01-01

35

Detonation wave profiles in HMX based explosives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detonation wave profiles have been measured in several HMX based plastic bonded explosives including PBX9404, PBX9501, and EDC-37, as well as two HMX powders (coarse and fine) pressed to 65% of crystal density. The powders had 120 and 10 ?m average grain sizes, respectively. Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with projectiles launched in a 72-mm bore gas gun. Impactors, impact velocity, and explosive thickness were chosen so that the run distance to detonation was always less than half the explosive thickness. For the high density plastic bonded explosives, particle velocity wave profiles were measured at an explosive/window interface using two VISAR interferometers. PMMA windows with vapor deposited aluminum mirrors were used for all experiments. Wave profiles for the powdered explosives were measured using magnetic particle velocity gauges. Estimates of the reaction zone parameters were obtained from the profiles using Hugoniots of the explosive and window.

Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Alcon, R. R.

1998-07-01

36

Mach reflection of a ZND detonation wave  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mach reflection of a ZND detonation wave on a wedge is investigated numerically. A two-step chain-branching reaction model is used giving a thermally neutral induction zone followed by a chemical reaction zone for the detonation wave. The presence of a finite reaction zone thickness renders the Mach reflection process non-self-similar. The variation of the height of the Mach stem with distance of propagation does not correspond to a straight curve from the wedge apex as governed by self-similar three-shock theory. However, the present results indicate that in the near field around the wedge apex, and in the far field where the reaction zone thickness is small compared to the distance of travel of the Mach stem, the behavior appears to be self-similar. This corresponds to the so-called frozen and equilibrium limit pointed out by Hornung and Sanderman for strong discontinuity shock waves and by Shepherd et al. for cellular detonations. The critical wedge angle for the transition from regular to Mach reflection is found to correspond to the value determined by self-similar three-shock theory, but not by reactive three-shock theory for a discontinuous detonation front.

Li, J.; Ning, J.; Lee, J. H. S.

2015-03-01

37

Propagation of Axially Symmetric Detonation Waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have studied the non-ideal propagation of detonation waves in LX-10 and in the insensitive explosive TATB. Explosively-driven, 5.8-mm-diameter, 0.125-mm-thick aluminum flyer plates were used to initiate 38-mm-diameter, hemispherical samples of LX-10 pressed to a density of 1.86 g\\/cm³ and of TATB at a density of 1.80 g\\/cm³. The TATB powder was a grade called ultrafine (UFTATB), having an arithmetic

Robert L. Druce; F Roeske; P. Clark Souers; Craig M. Tarver; Charles T. S. Chow; Ronald S. Lee; Estella M. McGuire; George E. Overturf III; Peter A. Vitello

2002-01-01

38

Testing of a Continuous Detonation Wave Engine with Swirled Injection  

E-print Network

by Voitsekhovskii24 in Russia circa 1960 as a rotating instability in rocket motors (see also Clayton and Rogero25 detonation wave engines with swirl to improve mixing were developed. The reactants were ignited in one direction around the annular chamber upon ignition. Instead, detonation waves would propagate

Texas at Arlington, University of

39

Laminar boundary layers behind blast and detonation waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boundary layer flows in air behind nonuniform strong blast waves and in the burned gas of a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and oxygen behind uniform Chapman-Jouguet detonation waves were investigated. The results show that the Prandtl number profoundly influences boundary layer flow. For a blast wave and Pr less than unity it controls a boundary layer velocity overshoot which decreases with increasing Prandtl number. For a Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave similar results are obtained for a Pr = 0.72; however, for an actual Pr = 2.26, a flow reversal occurs away from the wave where the inviscid flow velocity approaches a small value. The viscous exponent was found to have a significant effect on the wall shear stresses and heat transfer. The effect of the wall temperature is small. Velocity profiles were computed for spherical and planar detonation waves. Because of the rapid decrease in density behind a blast wave, the boundary layer thickness becomes very much larger than their detonation wave counterparts at the same wave velocity (but different physical conditions). The velocity boundary layer thickness in air behind a quasistationary planar shock wave is somewhat more than for a planar detonation wave at the same wave velocity (but in different gases). The heat transfer to the wall behind a planar detonation wave was calculated.

Du, X.; Liu, W. S.; Glass, I. I.

1982-08-01

40

Propagation of Axially Symmetric Detonation Waves  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the non-ideal propagation of detonation waves in LX-10 and in the insensitive explosive TATB. Explosively-driven, 5.8-mm-diameter, 0.125-mm-thick aluminum flyer plates were used to initiate 38-mm-diameter, hemispherical samples of LX-10 pressed to a density of 1.86 g/cm{sup 3} and of TATB at a density of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3}. The TATB powder was a grade called ultrafine (UFTATB), having an arithmetic mean particle diameter of about 8-10 {micro}m and a specific surface area of about 4.5 m{sup 2}/g. Using PMMA as a transducer, output pressure was measured at 5 discrete points on the booster using a Fabry-Perot velocimeter. Breakout time was measured on a line across the booster with a streak camera. Each of the experimental geometries was calculated using the Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Model, the JWL++ Model and the Programmed Burn Model. Boosters at both ambient and cold (-20 C and -54 C) temperatures have been experimentally and computationally studied. A comparison of experimental and modeling results is presented.

Druce, R L; Roeske, F; Souers, P C; Tarver, C M; Chow, C T S; Lee, R S; McGuire, E M; Overturf, G E; Vitello, P A

2002-06-26

41

Reactive Flow Modeling of the Interaction of TATB Detonation Waves with Inert Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ignition & Growth model for the shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives is applied to calculating the main features of detonation waves in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based high explosives LX-17, PBX 9502 and EDC-35. Under detonation conditions, TATB based explosives exhibit reaction zone lengths of 2 to 3 mm depending on the interactions between the detonation wave and

Craig M. Tarver; Estella M. McGuire

2002-01-01

42

Links between detonation wave propagation and reactive flow models.  

SciTech Connect

An accurate reactive flow model is necessary to be able to predict the initiation properties of explosives by complicated shock structures, but a very fine the spatial resolution is needed in reactive flow to reproduce the detailed dynamics of a detonation wave. However, it is not often necessary to use a reactive flow model to simulate the motion of a fully-developed detonation wave. In many situations the same results can be obtained with a coarse computational mesh using programmed burn techniques. In the WBL model [Lambourn89,Swift93], an eikonal detonation wave propagates through a body of explosive at a speed which depends on the curvature of the wave. The model describes the motion of the leading shock of the detonation wave. Here we use the level set method for integrating the WBL equations in time [Collyer98,Bdzil93,Osher88,Aslam98]. This method is attractive because complicated detonation wave shapes can be represented simply. It was found possible to initialize the level set field by a set of source points derived from a reactive flow simulation, by taking 'trigger states' from the reactive flow. The level set scheme was generalized further to take account of motion of the material behind the detonation wave, allowing it to be used for simulations coupled with reactive flow, where detonation may propagate through preshocked and moving material. The modified level set scheme was implemented in 1D and 2D Lagrangian hydrocodes. Trial calculations were performed of initiation and detonation in the TATB-based explosive LX-17, using the Lee - Tarver model. A CJ detonation was simulated in order to verify that the modified level set algorithm operated correctly. The detonation speed was in very good agreement with the expected value. Single-shock initiation was simulated. The position - time history of the leading shock from the coupled model was in excellent agreement with full reactive flow; the pressure profiles were similar but not identical, because of the difference in material properties behind the WBL wave and the omission of the von Neumann spike from the WBL profiles. As a more interesting test, we simulated the shock-to-detonation transition on reflection of a weak shock from a rigid boundary. The position - time history of the leading shock was in good agreement. The pressure profiles varied much more than in the single-shock case, because the WBL calculation used the same propagation parameters and for simplicity imposed the same state at the end of the detonation zone as was used in the single-shock simulation. We have previously used quasisteady flow analysis to derive a reaction rate from experimental measurements of the relation between detonation speed and wave curvature, or vice versa [Swift93]. Reactive flow models have been developed for HMX-based explosives based on mesoscale representations of the components of the explosive [Mulford01], and using a temperature-dependent reaction rate which should be valid over a wide range of loading conditions. The quasisteady analysis scheme was extended to allow arbitrary reaction models to be investigated.

Swift, D. C. (Damian C.); White, S. J. (Stephen J.)

2002-01-01

43

Weakly nonlinear dynamics of near-CJ detonation waves  

SciTech Connect

The renewed interest in safety issues for large scale industrial devices and in high speed combustion has driven recent intense efforts to gain a deeper theoretical understanding of detonation wave dynamics. Linear stability analyses, weakly nonlinear bifurcation calculations as well as full scale multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations have been pursued for a standard model problem based on the reactive Euler equations for an ideal gas with constant specific heat capacities and simplified chemical reaction models. Most of these studies are concerned with overdriven detonations. This is true despite the fact that the majority of all detonations observed in nature are running at speeds close to the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) limit value. By focusing on overdriven waves one removes an array of difficulties from the analysis that is associated with the sonic flow conditions in the wake of a CJ-detonation. In particular, the proper formulation of downstream boundary conditions in the CJ-case is a yet unsolved analytical problem. A proper treatment of perturbations in the back of a Chapman-Jouguet detonation has to account for two distinct weakly nonlinear effects in the forward acoustic wave component. The first is a nonlinear interactionof highly temperature sensitive chemistry with the forward acoustic wave component in a transonic boundary layer near the end of the reaction zone. The second is a cumulative three-wave-resonance in the sense of Majda et al. which is active in the near-sonic burnt gas flow and which is essentially independent of the details of the chemical model. In this work, we consider detonations in mixtures with moderate state sensitivity of the chemical reactions. Then, the acoustic perturbations do not influence the chemistry at the order considered and we may concentrate on the second effect; the three-wave resonance.

Bdzil, J.B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Klein, R. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Mechanik)

1993-01-01

44

Weakly nonlinear dynamics of near-CJ detonation waves  

SciTech Connect

The renewed interest in safety issues for large scale industrial devices and in high speed combustion has driven recent intense efforts to gain a deeper theoretical understanding of detonation wave dynamics. Linear stability analyses, weakly nonlinear bifurcation calculations as well as full scale multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations have been pursued for a standard model problem based on the reactive Euler equations for an ideal gas with constant specific heat capacities and simplified chemical reaction models. Most of these studies are concerned with overdriven detonations. This is true despite the fact that the majority of all detonations observed in nature are running at speeds close to the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) limit value. By focusing on overdriven waves one removes an array of difficulties from the analysis that is associated with the sonic flow conditions in the wake of a CJ-detonation. In particular, the proper formulation of downstream boundary conditions in the CJ-case is a yet unsolved analytical problem. A proper treatment of perturbations in the back of a Chapman-Jouguet detonation has to account for two distinct weakly nonlinear effects in the forward acoustic wave component. The first is a nonlinear interactionof highly temperature sensitive chemistry with the forward acoustic wave component in a transonic boundary layer near the end of the reaction zone. The second is a cumulative three-wave-resonance in the sense of Majda et al. which is active in the near-sonic burnt gas flow and which is essentially independent of the details of the chemical model. In this work, we consider detonations in mixtures with moderate state sensitivity of the chemical reactions. Then, the acoustic perturbations do not influence the chemistry at the order considered and we may concentrate on the second effect; the three-wave resonance.

Bdzil, J.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klein, R. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Mechanik

1993-02-01

45

Computational study of detonation wave propagation in narrow channels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical study of the propagation of regular detonation waves is conducted in the context of narrow channels undergoing strong wall confinement. To deal with shock waves, chemical reactions, heat and viscous stresses, a high-order Navier-Stokes solver based on Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) scheme, coupled with the Strang splitting method, is used in the framework of multi-species reacting mixtures. Results show that the wall dissipative effects decrease the speed of the detonation wave compared to the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation velocity. In addition, the multidimensional results reveal that the development of the thermo-diffusive boundary layers behind the leading shock wave induces an expansion flow, which then determines the contour of the sonic envelope. From the Master Equation and the generalized CJ condition, which are derived and compared to the results of the current simulations, the main energy withdrawals are found to be related to the streamline divergence as well as to the growth of the boundary layer. Moreover, a fraction of the released energy is trapped in the vicinity of the wall and does not contribute to drive the shock front. The influence of the channel height is also investigated. It was found that the transverse instabilities are damped when the channel is scaled down, which results in an increase of the dissipative effects. Finally, the validity of the Fay model is discussed with regard to the channel height and the curvature of the detonation front.

Chinnayya, Ashwin; Hadjadj, Abdellah; Ngomo, Davy

2013-03-01

46

Continuous detonation wave engine studies for space application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Continuous Detonation Wave Rocket Engine (CDWRE) for space application is considered in the framework of French R&D and scientific research. A CDWRE demonstrator and a dedicated test bench are designed by MBDA France. At ICARE-CNRS, theoretical and experimental studies on the CDWRE internal processes are under progress. Twodimensional (2D) Euler simulations of a CDWRE combustion chamber have been performed to investigate the effect of geometrical and injection parameters on the internal process and combustion chamber performance. An experimental study is prepared to investigate liquid oxygen breakup and vaporization in a helium flow as well as detonation initiation and propagation in a spray of liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen.

Davidenko, D. M.; Jouot, F.; Kudryavtsev, A. N.; Dupré, G.; Gökalp, I.; Daniau, E.; Falempin, F.

2009-09-01

47

Impact waves and detonation. Part I  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Among the numerous thermodynamic and kinetic problems that have arisen in the application of the gaseous explosive reaction as a source of power in the internal combustion engine, the problem of the mode or way by which the transformation proceeds and the rate at which the heat energy is delivered to the working fluid became very early in the engine's development a problem of prime importance. The work of Becker here given is a notable extension of earlier investigations, because it covers the entire range of the explosive reaction in gases - normal detonation and burning.

Becker, R

1929-01-01

48

Experimental study on transmission of an overdriven detonation wave from propane/oxygen to propane/air  

SciTech Connect

Two sets of experiments were performed to achieve a strong overdriven state in a weaker mixture by propagating an overdriven detonation wave via a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) process. First, preliminary experiments with a propane/oxygen mixture were used to evaluate the attenuation of the overdriven detonation wave in the DDT process. Next, experiments were performed wherein a propane/oxygen mixture was separated from a propane/air mixture by a thin diaphragm to observe the transmission of an overdriven detonation wave. Based on the characteristic relations, a simple wave intersection model was used to calculate the state of the transmitted detonation wave. The results showed that a rarefaction effect must be included to ensure that there is no overestimate of the post-transmission wave properties when the incident detonation wave is overdriven. The strength of the incident overdriven detonation wave plays an important role in the wave transmission process. The experimental results showed that a transmitted overdriven detonation wave occurs instantaneously with a strong incident overdriven detonation wave. The near-CJ state of the incident wave leads to a transmitted shock wave, and then the transition to the overdriven detonation wave occurs downstream. The attenuation process for the overdriven detonation wave decaying to a near-CJ state occurs in all tests. After the attenuation process, an unstable detonation wave was observed in most tests. This may be attributed to the increase in the cell width in the attenuation process that exceeds the detonability cell width limit. (author)

Li, J.; Lai, W.H. [National Cheng Kung University, Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Tainan (China); Chung, K. [National Cheng Kung University, Aerospace Science and Technology Research Center, Tainan (China); Lu, F.K. [University of Texas at Arlington, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Aerodynamics Research Center, TX 76019 (United States)

2008-08-15

49

Shock wave dynamics of novel aluminized detonations and empirical model for temperature evolution from post-detonation combustion fireballs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical forensics of explosion events can play a vital role in investigating the chain of events leading up to the explosion by possibly identifying key spectral characteristics and even molecules in the post-detonation fireball that may serve as the fingerprint for a particular explosive type used. This research characterizes the blast wave and temperature evolution of an explosion fireball in order to improve the classification of aluminized conventional munitions based on a single explosive type such as RDX. High speed 4 kHz visible imagery is collected for 13 field detonations of aluminized novel munitions to study fireball and shock wave dynamics. The 238 mus temporal resolution visible imagery and the 12 ms temporal resolution FTS spectra are the data sets upon which shock wave dynamics and the time dependence of the fireball temperature are studied, respectively. The Sedov-Taylor point blast theory is fitted to data where a constant release (s = 1) of energy upon detonation suggests shock energies of 0.5--8.9 MJ corresponding to efficiencies of 2--15 percent of the RDX heats of detonation with blast dimensionalities indicative of the spherical geometry observed in visible imagery. A drag model fit to data shows initial shock wave speeds of Mach 4.7--8.2 and maximum fireball radii ranging from 4.3--5.8 m with most of the radii reached by 50 ms upon detonation. Initial shock speeds are four times lower than theoretical maximum detonation speed of RDX and likely contributes to the low efficiencies. An inverse correlation exists between blast wave energy and overall aluminum or liner content in the test articles. A two-color best fit Planckian is used to extract temperature profiles from collected Fourier-transform spectrometer spectra. The temperatures decay from initial values of 1290--1850 K to less than 1000 K within 1 s after detonation. A physics-based low-dimensionality empirical model is developed to represent the temperature evolution of post-detonation combustion fireballs. Using a radiative cooling term and a secondary combustion term, the model is able to reduce 82 data points down to five fit parameters. The fit-derived heat of combustion has a 96% correlation with the calculated heat of combustion but has a slope of 0.49 suggesting that only half of the theoretical heat of combustion is realized. Initial temperature is not a good discriminator of detonation events but heat of combustion holds promise as a potential variable for event classification. This model and corresponding analyses might improve the ability of sensing platforms to identify explosive types and sources.

Gordon, J. Motos

50

Shock-wave initiation of heated plastified TATB detonation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Explosive, plastified TATB, attracts attention with its weak sensitivity to shock loads and high temperature stability ( Pthreshold ? 6.5 GPa and Tcrit ? 250 0Q). However, at its cooling to T 250 0Q plastified TATB becomes as sensitive to shock load as octogen base HE: the excitation threshold reduces down to Pthreshold 2.0 GPa. The main physical reason for the HE sensitivity change is reduction in density at heating and, hence, higher porosity of the product (approximately from 2Moreover, increasing temperature increases the growth rate of uhotf spots which additionally increases the shock sensitivity [1]. Heated TATB experiments are also conducted at VNIIEF. The detonation excitation was computed within 1D program system MAG using EOS JWL for HE and EP and LLNL kinetics [1,2,3]. Early successful results of using this kinetics to predict detonation excitation in heated plastified TATB in VNIIEF experiments with short and long loading pulses are presented. Parameters of the chemical zone of the stationary detonation wave in plastified TATB (LX-17) were computed with the data from [1]. Parameters Heated In shell Cooled Unheated ?0 , g/cm3 1.70 1.81 1.84 1.905 D , km/s 7.982 7.764 7.686 7.517 PN, GPa 45.4 45.8 35.7 32.9 PJ, GPa 27.0 27.3 27.2 26.4 ?x , mm 0.504 0.843 1.041 2.912 ?t , ns 63.1 108.6 135.5 387.4 [1] Effect of Confinement and Thermal Cycling on the Shock Initiation of LX-17 P.A. Urtiew, C.M. Tarver, J.L. Maienschein, and W.C. Tao. LLNL. Combustion and Flame 105: 43-53 (1996) [2] C.M. Tarver, P.A. Urtiew and W.C. Tao (LLNL) Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene. J.Appl. Phys. 78(5), September 1995 [3] Craig M. Tarver, John W. Kury and R. Don Breithaupt Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene J. Appl. Phys. 82(8) , 15 October 1997.

Kuzmitsky, Igor; Rudenko, Vladimir; Gatilov, Leonid; Koshelev, Alexandr

1999-06-01

51

Hydrodynamic instabilities and transverse waves in propagation mechanism of gaseous detonations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present study examines the role of transverse waves and hydrodynamic instabilities mainly, Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) in detonation structure using two-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of Euler equations. To compare the numerical results with those of experiments, Navier-Stokes simulations are also performed by utilizing the effect of diffusion in highly irregular detonations. Results for both moderate and low activation energy mixtures reveal that upon collision of two triple points a pair of forward and backward facing jets is formed. As the jets spread, they undergo Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The drastic growth of the forward jet found to have profound role in re-acceleration of the detonation wave at the end of a detonation cell cycle. For irregular detonations, the transverse waves found to have substantial role in propagation mechanism of such detonations. In regular detonations, the lead shock ignites all the gases passing through it, hence, the transverse waves and hydrodynamic instabilities do not play crucial role in propagation mechanism of such regular detonations. In comparison with previous numerical simulations present simulation using single-step kinetics shows a distinct keystone-shaped region at the end of the detonation cell.

Mahmoudi, Y.; Mazaheri, K.; Parvar, S.

2013-10-01

52

Unsteady self-sustained detonation waves in flake aluminum dust/air mixtures  

E-print Network

Self-sustained detonation waves in flake aluminum dust/air mixtures have been studied in a tube of diameter 199 mm and length 32.4 m. A pressure sensor array of 32 sensors mounted around certain circumferences of the tube was used to measure the shape of the detonation front in the circumferential direction and pressure histories of the detonation wave. A two-head spin detonation wave front was observed for the aluminum dust/air mixtures, and the cellular structure resulting from the spinning movement of the triple point was analyzed. The variations in velocity and overpressure of the detonation wave with propagation distance in a cell were studied. The interactions of waves in triple-point configurations were analyzed and the flow-field parameters were calculated. Three types of triple-point configuration exist in the wave front of the detonation wave of an aluminum dust/air mixture. Both strong and weak transverse waves exist in the unstable self-sustained detonation wave.

Liu, Qingming; Zhang, Yunming; Li, Shuzhuan

2015-01-01

53

Linear and nonlinear dynamics of cylindrically and spherically expanding detonation waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nonlinear stability of cylindrically and spherically expanding detonation waves is investigated using numerical simulations for both directly (blast) initiated detonations and cases where the simulations are initialized by placing quasi-steady solutions corresponding to different initial shock radii onto the grid. First, high-resolution one-dimensional (axially or radially symmetric) simulations of pulsating detonations are performed. Emphasis is on comparing with the

Simon D. Watt; Gary J. Sharpe

2005-01-01

54

Super-equilibrium increase of chemical reaction rate in the detonation front and other effects in the detonation wave initiated by a shock wave  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present work the problem of detonation wave formation in a shock tube was considered in one-dimensional formulation. The Monte Carlo non-stationary method of statistical simulation (MCNMSS), also known as DSMC, was used for simulation. The method automatically takes into account all details of mass and heat transfer. At an initial moment, the low-pressure channel (LPC) of the shock tube was filled with gas A while the high-pressure chamber (HPC) was filled with gas C. The cross-sections of the HPC and LPC, as well as the temperatures of gases A and C were equal to each other. At the beginning of the simulation the ratio of pressures in the HPC and LPC was equal to 100. It was assumed that chemical reactions ( and ) took place. The ratio of molecular masses of gases and was taken as 20:20:1. Different reaction thresholds were considered. For the case of a low reaction threshold, the velocity of the resulting detonation wave was found to be higher than the Chapman-Jouguet velocity. A region with constant values of flow parameters inside product was observed. An increase of the reaction threshold led to disappearance of this region and gave rise to something similar to an expansion wave, with peaks of flow parameters at the leading part of the detonation wave. The values of these peaks were found to be constant in time. The velocity of the detonation wave became appreciably lower than the Chapman-Jouguet velocity. Further increase of the reaction threshold led to disappearance of detonation. The reactions and turned out to be very important for initiation of detonation.

Kulikov, S. V.

2013-11-01

55

Simulation of Laser Interaction with Ablative Plasma and ydrodynamic of Laser Supported Plasma(LSP)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A general Godunov finite difference schemes-WENO(Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) Schemes which have fifth-order accuracy was used to make a numerical calculation for 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field under laser ablated solid target. The models of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma and the simplified eos(equation of state) of plasma were considered in the simulation. The plasma field parameters during and after laser duration variation with time are also obtained. The simulation results show that the laser beam power was strong absorbed by plasma of target surface, and the velocity of LSD(Laser Supported Detonation) wave is half of ideal LSD value which derived from C-J detonation theory.

Huifeng, Tong; Zhiping, Tang

2011-06-01

56

Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

Tong, Huifeng; Yuan, Hong; Tang, Zhiping

2013-01-01

57

Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma  

SciTech Connect

When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong [Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-101, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Tang Zhiping [CAS Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

2013-01-28

58

Exploratory study of flow domains arising from detonation waves induced in a wedged channel  

E-print Network

-step chem- ical reaction is assumed for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture. The combus- tion channel increas- ing attention recently because of its potential applications in future hypersonic propulsion configurations arising from wedge-induced deto- nation waves, namely, direct initiation of a detonation wave

Texas at Arlington, University of

59

Chemical reaction and equilibration mechanisms in detonation waves  

SciTech Connect

Experimental and theoretical evidence for the nonequilibrium Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation is presented. High density, high temperature transition state theory is used to calculate unimolecular reaction rate constants for the initial decomposition of gaseous norbornene, liquid nitromethane, and solid, single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate as functions of shock temperature. The calculated rate constants are compared to those derived from experimental induction time measurements at various shock and detonation states. Uncertainties in the calculated shock and von Neumann spike temperatures are the main drawbacks to calculating these reaction rates. Nanosecond measurements of the shock temperatures of unreacted explosives are necessary to reduce these uncertainties.

Tarver, C. M., LLNL

1997-07-01

60

Formation of a detonation wave in the process of chemical condensation of carbon nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new physical phenomenon — the formation of a detonation wave as a result of the condensation of substances — was investigated in detail. A detonation wave was formed under the action of the energy released in a process of chemical condensation of carbon nanoparticles behind a shock wave in the mixture initially containing 10-30% of the carbon suboxide C3O2 or acetylene C2H2 in argon. The propagation of the shock wave in this mixture led to the rapid thermal disintegration of its initial molecules and the subsequent formation of a condensed carbon with a significant energy release. The increase in the temperature and in the pressure of the reacting mixture leads to a strengthening of the shock wave and to its transformation into a detonation wave. The main kinetic characteristics of the reaction of thermal disintegration of the indicated molecules and their subsequent chemical condensation as well as the interrelation of these characteristics with the heat-release processes forming the detonation wave were determined.

Emel'Yanov, A. V.; Eremin, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.

2010-12-01

61

INVESTIGATION OF LASER SUPPORTED DETONATION WAVES AND THERMAL COUPLING USING 2.8um HF LASER IRRADIATED METAL TARGETS  

E-print Network

as a function of target material, irradiance and ambient pressure. High speed photography has been employed, stainless located at the position of the target. A high steel and platinum) and present thermal coupling, stainless steel and platinum targets were measured to be 0,(2-3) x 108 W.cm-2 . Above the LSD threshold

Boyer, Edmond

62

Structure of the detonation wave front in a mixture of nitromethane with acetone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is shown that the leading front of an inhomogeneous detonation wave is a shock wave in which wave structures of the type of triple shock configurations are moving. It was experimentally found that the reaction in these inhomogeneities occurs in oblique shock waves. The reaction sites at the wave front are ring-shaped. In a 75: 25 mixture of nitromethane with acetone, up to 70% of the front surface is occupied by the reaction at the sites in the wave front. Measurements of the mass velocity profile indicate that afterburning takes place in the unloading area behind the Jouguet plane. Calculations of the heat release in the reaction mixture with a decrease in the mass velocity indicate that the material that have not reacted in the inhomogeneities can be ignited in the induction zone. It is suggested that the adiabatic flashes are a mechanism that generates inhomogeneities in the detonation wave front.

Buravova, S. N.

2012-09-01

63

High Order Hybrid Numerical Simulations of Two Dimensional Detonation Waves  

E-print Network

= pressure Q = specific heat formation s = entropy t = time t = tangential direction of shock front- flux in (x, y) coordinates g = Jacobian matrix of mesh transformation K = constant lsk = mesh size for detonation front n = normal direction of shock front (n, m) = mesh size in (, ) direction, respectively p

Cai, Wei

64

AIAA 95-2197 Experimental Investigation of Pulse Detonation Wave  

E-print Network

conventional rocket motors.' This technology may also be used to clean slag offof coal furnaces which would, ignition location, ignition energy, initial pressures, types of fuels and tnrhulence quality is in rocket propulsion. Again there are several advantages that a Pulse Detonation Engine would have over

Texas at Arlington, University of

65

Chemical reaction and equilibration mechanisms in detonation waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental and theoretical evidence for the nonequilibrium Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation is presented. High density, high temperature transition state theory is used to calculate unimolecular reaction rate constants for the initial decomposition of gaseous norbornene, liquid nitromethane, and solid, single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate as functions of shock temperature. The calculated rate constants are compared to those derived

Craig M. Tarver

1998-01-01

66

Shock-Wave and Detonation Studies at ITEP-TWAC Proton Radiography Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years studies of shock and detonation wave phenomena at extreme dynamic conditions were performed at proton radiography facility developed at the 800 MeV proton beam line of ITEP Terawatt Accelerator (ITEP-TWAC). The facility provides a multi-frame imaging capability at 50 ?m spatial and 70 ns temporal resolution. The results of latest studies conducted there are presented, including explosion and detonation of pressed and emulsion high explosives, shock-induced dense non-ideal plasma of argon and xenon and shock loading of non-uniform metal surfaces. New compact explosive generators developed specifically for a use at proton radiography facilities are also presented.

Kolesnikov, Sergey; Dudin, Sergey; Lavrov, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Dmitry; Mintsev, Victor; Shilkin, Nikolay; Ternovoi, Vladimir; Utkin, Alexander; Yakushev, Vladislav; Yuriev, Denis; Fortov, Vladimir; Golubev, Alexander; Kantsyrev, Alexey; Shestov, Lev; Smirnov, Gennady; Turtikov, Vladimir; Sharkov, Boris; Burtsev, Vasily; Zavialov, Nikolay; Kartanov, Sergey; Mikhailov, Anatoly; Rudnev, Alexey; Tatsenko, Mikhail; Zhernokletov, Mikhail

2011-06-01

67

Critical deflagration waves leading to detonation onset under different boundary conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-speed turbulent critical deflagration waves before detonation onset in H2–air mixture propagated into a square cross section channel, which was assembled of optional rigid rough, rigid smooth, or flexible walls. The corresponding propagation characteristic and the influence of the wall boundaries on the propagation were investigated via high-speed shadowgraph and a high-frequency pressure sampling system. As a comprehensive supplement to the different walls effect investigation, the effect of porous absorbing walls on the detonation propagation was also investigated via smoke foils and the high-frequency pressure sampling system. Results are as follows. In the critical deflagration stage, the leading shock and the closely following turbulent flame front travel at a speed of nearly half the CJ detonation velocity. In the preheated zone, a zonary flame arises from the overlapping part of the boundary layer and the pressure waves, and then merges into the mainstream flame. Among these wall boundary conditions, the rigid rough wall plays a most positive role in the formation of the zonary flame and thus accelerates the transition of the deflagration to detonation (DDT), which is due to the boost of the boundary layer growth and the pressure wave reflection. Even though the flexible wall is not conducive to the pressure wave reflection, it brings out a faster boundary layer growth, which plays a more significant role in the zonary flame formation. Additionally, the porous absorbing wall absorbs the transverse wave and yields detonation decay and velocity deficit. After the absorbing wall, below some low initial pressure conditions, no re-initiation occurs and the deflagration propagates in critical deflagration for a relatively long distance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51206182).

Lin, Wei; Zhou, Jin; Fan, Xiao-Hua; Lin, Zhi-Yong

2015-01-01

68

Shock and detonation wave diffraction at a sudden expansion in gas–particle mixtures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical modeling of the propagation of shock and detonation waves is carried out in a duct with an abrupt expansion for\\u000a a heterogeneous mixture of fine particles of aluminum and oxygen. A considerable difference from corresponding flows in pure\\u000a gas is found. The influence of the size and mass loading of particles on the flow and shock wave structure behind

A. V. Fedorov; T. A. Khmel; Yu. V. Kratova

2008-01-01

69

Some recent advances of shock wave physics research at the Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress made in recent years on three topics that have been investigated at the Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research are presented in this report. (1) A new equation of state (EOS) has been derived which can be used from a standard state to predict state variable change along an isobaric path. Good agreements between calculations for some

Fuqian Jing; Hua Tan

2002-01-01

70

Explosively generated shock wave processing of metal powders by instrumented detonics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The highest pressures generated by dynamic processes resulting either from high velocity impact or by spontaneous release of high energy rate substances in direct contact with a metal find superior applications over normal mechanical means. The special feature of explosive loading to the powder materials over traditional methods is its controlled detonation pressure which directly transmits shock energy to the materials which remain entrapped inside powder resulting into several micro-structural changes and hence improved mechanical properties. superalloy powders have been compacted nearer to the theoretical density by shock wave consolidation. In a single experimental set-up, compaction of metal powder and measurement of detonation velocity have been achieved successfully by using instrumented detonics. The thrust on the work is to obtain uniform, crack-free and fracture-less compacts of superalloys having intact crystalline structure as has been examined from FE-SEM, XRD and mechanical studies. Shock wave processing is an emerging technique and receiving much attention of the materials scientists and engineers owing to its excellent advantages over traditional metallurgical methods due to short processing time, scaleup advantage and controlled detonation pressure.

Sharma, A. D.; Sharma, A. K.; Thakur, N.

2013-06-01

71

Numerical investigation of shock wave reflections near the head ends of rotating detonation engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of various chamber geometries on shock wave reflections near the head end of rotating detonation engines was investigated. A hydrogen/air one-step chemical reaction model was used. The results demonstrated that the variation in flow field along the radial direction was not obvious when the chamber width was small, but became progressively more obvious as the chamber width increased. The thrust increased linearly, and the detonation height and the fuel-based gross specific impulse were almost constant as the chamber width increased. Near the head end, shock waves reflected repeatedly between the inner and outer walls. Both regular and Mach reflections were found near the head end. The length of the Mach stem increased as the chamber length increased. When the chamber width, chamber length and injection parameters were the same, the larger inner radius resulted in more shock wave reflections between the inner and outer walls. The greater the ratio of the chamber width to the inner radius, the weaker the shock wave reflection near the head end. The detonation height on the outer wall and the thrust, both increased correspondingly, while the specific impulse was almost constant as the inner radius of the chamber increased. The numerical shock wave reflection phenomena coincided qualitatively with the experimental results.

Zhou, R.; Wang, J.-P.

2013-09-01

72

Deflagration-to-detonation transition by amplification of acoustic waves in type Ia supernovae  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: We study a new mechanism for deflagration-to-detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae (SNe Ia), based on the formation of shocks by amplification of sound waves in the steep density gradients of white dwarfs envelopes. We characterise, in terms of wavelength and amplitude, the perturbations which will ignite a detonation after their amplification. Methods: This study was performed using the well tested HERACLES code, a conservative hydrodynamical code, validated in the present specific application by an analytical description of the propagation of sound waves in white dwarfs. Thermonuclear combustion of the carbon oxygen fuel was treated with the ?-chain nuclear reactions network. Results: In planar geometry we found the critical parameter to be the height of shock formation. When it occurs in the inner dense regions (? > 106 g cm-3) detonation is inevitable but can take an arbitrarily long time. We found that ignition can be achieved for perturbation as low as Mach number: M ~ 0.005, with heating times compatible with typical explosion time scale (a few seconds). On the opposite no ignition occurs when shocks initiated by small amplitude or large wavelength form further away in less dense regions. We show finally that ignition is also achieved in a spherical self-gravitating spherical model of cold C+O white dwarf of 1.430 M?, but due to the spherical damping of sound waves it necessitates stronger perturbation (M ~ 0.02). Small perturbations (M ~ 0.003) could still trigger detonation if a small helium layer is considered. In the context of SNe Ia, one has to consider further the initial expansion of the white dwarf, triggered by the deflagration, prior to the transition to detonation. As the star expands, gradients get flatter and ignition requires increasingly strong perturbations.

Charignon, C.; Chièze, J.-P.

2013-02-01

73

Scale effect of spherical projectiles for stabilization of oblique detonation waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oblique detonation waves (ODWs) were stabilized by launching a spherical projectile with 1.2-1.4 times the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) velocity into detonable mixtures at rest. We used smaller projectiles (3.18 mm diameter) than those (4.76 mm diameter) in our previous studies and investigated the effect of the projectile scale on the stabilization of ODWs. We carried out high time resolution schlieren visualization using a high-speed camera. The detonable mixtures used were stoichiometric oxygen mixtures with acetylene, ethylene or hydrogen. They were diluted with argon with a 50 % volumetric fraction, and a dilute mixture containing 75 % argon was also tested for the acetylene/oxygen mixture. Here, we discuss the detonation stability in terms of the curvature effect arising from the three-dimensional nature of a stabilized ODW around a projectile. The curvature effect attenuated the detonation wave to below its C-J velocity in the vicinity of the projectile before the wave velocity asymptotically reached the C-J velocity in the far field. Our previous study showed that the propagation limit of the curvature effect is responsible for the stabilizing criticality of detonation waves. By obtaining detailed distributions of the wave propagation velocity and radius of curvature at the stabilizing criticality, we showed that the radius of curvature at the local minimum point of the wave propagation velocity represents the critical radius of curvature required for curved self-sustained detonation. In this study, we focused on this critical mode of the stabilized ODW for a small projectile (3.18 mm diameter). Distributions of the wave velocity and radius of curvature were obtained in the critical mode of the stabilized ODW. We compare these distributions with those for a larger projectile (4.76 mm diameter) and discuss the stabilizing criticality. For the small projectile, the observed combustion regimes had qualitatively the same trend for the initial pressure of the mixture as that observed for the large projectile. However, the initial pressure for each combustion regime was quantitatively different for the different projectile scales. The small projectile required a higher initial pressure to stabilize the ODW than the large projectile. For the critical mode of the stabilized ODW, the wave velocity distribution had a local minimum value (0.8-0.9 times the C-J velocity) due to the curvature effect. The radius of curvature at this characteristic point was about five times the projectile radius, regardless of the mixture composition. The radius of curvature normalized by the cell size was about 8-10 and 15 for mixtures diluted with 50 and 75 % argon, respectively, regardless of the projectile diameter. These results mean that the projectile radius (diameter) proportionally affects the geometrical scale of the wave around the projectile, and the fraction of the gas used for dilution affects the cell size required to sustain a curved detonation wave. The stabilizing criticality, expressed as the dimensionless projectile diameter (projectile diameter normalized by cell size), was about 3.5 and 5.5 for mixtures diluted with 50 and 75 % argon, respectively. These criticalities agreed with those of the large projectile of the previous study. This indicates that the dimensionless projectile diameter is a unique parameter for the stabilizing criticality regardless of the projectile diameter.

Maeda, S.; Sumiya, S.; Kasahara, J.; Matsuo, A.

2015-03-01

74

On self-similar blast waves headed by the Chapman-Jouguet detonation.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Consideration of the whole class of self-similar solutions for blast waves bounded by Chapman-Jouguet detonations that propagate into a uniform, quiescent, zero counterpressure atmosphere of a perfect gas with constant specific heats. Since such conditions can be approached quite closely by some actual chemical systems at NTP, this raises the interesting possibility of the existence of Chapman-Jouguet detonations of variable velocity. The principal virtue of the results presented is, however, more of theoretical significance. They represent the limiting case for all the self-similar blast waves headed by gasdynamic discontinuities associated with a deposition of finite amounts of energy, and they exhibit some unique features owing to the singular nature of the Chapman-Jouguet condition.

Oppenheim, A. K.; Kuhl, A. L.; Kamel, M. M.

1972-01-01

75

Relation Between Spark-Ignition Engine Knock, Detonation Waves, and Autoignition as Shown by High-Speed Photography  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A critical review of literature bearing on the autoignition and detonation-wave theories of spark-ignition engine knock and on the nature of gas vibrations associated with combustion and knock results in the conclusion that neither the autoignition theory nor the detonation-wave theory is an adequate explanation of spark-ignition engine knock. A knock theory is proposed, combining the autoignition and detonation-wave theories, which introduces the idea that the detonation wave develops in autoignited or after-burning gases, and ascribes comparatively low-pitched heavy knocks to autoignition but high-pitched pinging knocks to detonation waves with the possibility of combinations of the two types of knocks. Analysis of five shots of knocking combustion, taken with the NACA high-speed motion-picture camera at the rate of 40,000 photographs per second reveals propagation speeds ranging from 3250 to more than 5500 feet per second. The range of propagation speeds from 3250 to more than 5500 feet per second is held to be considered with the proposed combined theory but not with either the simple autoignition theory or the simple detonation-wave theory.

Miller, Cearcy D

1946-01-01

76

The Attenuation of a Detonation Wave by an Aircraft Engine Axial Turbine Stage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Constant Volume Combustion Cycle Engine concept consisting of a Pulse Detonation Combustor (PDC) followed by a conventional axial turbine was simulated numerically to determine the attenuation and reflection of a notional PDC pulse by the turbine. The multi-stage, time-accurate, turbomachinery solver TURBO was used to perform the calculation. The solution domain consisted of one notional detonation tube coupled to 5 vane passages and 8 rotor passages representing 1/8th of the annulus. The detonation tube was implemented as an initial value problem with the thermodynamic state of the tube contents, when the detonation wave is about to exit, provided by a 1D code. Pressure time history data from the numerical simulation was compared to experimental data from a similar configuration to verify that the simulation is giving reasonable results. Analysis of the pressure data showed a spectrally averaged attenuation of about 15 dB across the turbine stage. An evaluation of turbine performance is also presented.

VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane; Turner, Mark G.

2007-01-01

77

Portable fiber optic coupled Doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock wave diagnostics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Testing and analysis of shock wave characteristics such as detonators and ground shock propagation frequently require a method of measuring velocity and displacement of the surface of interest. One method of measurement is Doppler interferometry. The VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) uses Doppler interferometry and has gained wide acceptance as the preferred tool for shock measurement. An important asset of VISAR is that it measures velocity and displacement nonintrusively.

Fleming, Kevin J.

1993-01-01

78

Detonation wave profiles measured in plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm photon doppler velocimetry (PDV)  

SciTech Connect

We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was varied to produce varied distance to detonation, and therefore varied support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of {approx} 3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of {approx} 6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55 C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25 {+-} 0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4 {+-} 0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (> 2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (<< 50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel (nate) J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

79

Geometric scaling for a detonation wave governed by a pressure-dependent reaction rate and yielding confinement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The propagation of detonation waves in reactive media bounded by an inert, compressible layer is examined via computational simulations in two different geometries, axisymmetric cylinders, and two dimensional, planar slabs. For simplicity, an ideal gas equation of state is used with a pressure-dependent reaction rate that results in a detonation wave structure that does not exhibit cellular instability. The detonation is initiated as an ideal Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation with a one-dimensional structure, and then allowed to propagate into a finite diameter or thickness layer of explosive surrounded by an inert layer. The yielding confinement of the inert layer results in the detonation wave decaying to a sub-CJ steady state velocity or failing entirely. Simulations are performed with different values of the reaction rate pressure exponent (n = 2 and 3) and different impedance confinement (greater than, less than, and equal to that of the explosive). The velocity decrement and critical dimension (critical diameter or thickness) are determined, and a 2:1 scaling between the cylinder diameter and slab thickness results is confirmed, in good agreement with curvature-based models of detonation propagation. The measured shock front curvature and detonation velocity relation (DN-?) agrees with the classic model of Wood and Kirkwood. The computational simulations are compared to a simple, analytic model that treats the interaction of the confinement with the detonation products via Newtonian theory and a model that assumes a continuous variation in shock front curvature with the shock angle at the interface with the confinement matching the angle determined by shock polar analysis. The Newtonian model works very well for the case of high impedance confinement, while the shock front curvature model agrees with the simulations for the case of low impedance confinement.

Li, J.; Mi, X.; Higgins, A. J.

2015-02-01

80

The evolution and cellular structure of a detonation subsequent to a head-on interaction with a shock wave  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes the results of a head-on collision between a detonation and a planar shock wave. The evolution of the detonation cellular structure subsequent to the frontal collision was examined through smoked foil experiments. It is shown that a large reduction in cell size is observed following the frontal collision, and that the detonation cell widths are correlated well with the chemical kinetic calculations from the ZND model. From chemical kinetic calculations, the density increase caused by shock compression appears to be the main factor leading to the significant reduction in cell size. It was found that depending on the initial conditions, the transition to the final cellular pattern can be either smooth or spotty. This phenomenon appears to be equivalent to Oppenheim's strong and mild reflected shock ignition experiments. The difference between these two transitions is, however, more related to the stability of the incident detonation and the strength of the perturbation generated by the incident shock. (author)

Botros, Barbara B.; Zhu, YuJian; Lee, John H.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ng, Hoi Dick; Ju, Yiguang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2007-12-15

81

The effect of freestream variations on the propagation of detonation and combustion waves  

E-print Network

, the peak dropped again, after it had crossed the contact surface into the region of lower density, Finally, at about 600 @secs the detonation front entered the low freestream density region; and it continued to propagate forward but slowly declining... in strength. In this region it appears that the front was propagating as a very weak blast wave. One of the effects of the variable freestream on the pressure peak was a drop in magnitude whenever a region of lower density was entered. This effect...

Clark, Marlon Lee

1988-01-01

82

Collision of plane thermonuclear detonation waves in a preliminarily compressed DT mixture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper deals with a one-dimensional problem on symmetric irradiation of a plane DT fuel layer with a thickness 2 H and density ?0 ? 100? s (where ? s is the density of the DT fuel in the solid state at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 4 K) by two identical monoenergetic proton beams with a kinetic energy of 1 MeV, an intensity of 1019 W/cm2, and a duration of 50 ps. The problem is solved in the framework of one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic model that takes into account the equation of state for hydrogen, electron and ion heat conductivities, kinetics of the DT reaction, plasma self-radiation, and plasma heating by ?-particles. The irradiation of the fuel results in the appearance of two counterpropagating detonation waves to the fronts of which rarefaction waves are adjacent. The efficiency of the DT reaction after the collision (reflection from the plane of symmetry) of the detonation waves depends on the spatial homogeneity of thermodynamic functions between the fronts of the reflected detonation waves. At H?0 ? 1 g/cm2, the gain factor is G ? 200, whereas at H?0 ? 5 g/cm2, it is G > 2000. As applied to a cylindrical target that is ignited from ends and in which the cylinder with the fuel is surrounded by a heavy magnetized shell, the obtained values of the burn-up and gain factors are maximum possible. To estimate the ignition energy E ig of a cylindrical target by using solutions to the one-dimensional problem, a quasi-one-dimensional model is developed. The model assumes that the main mechanism of target ignition is fuel heating by ?-particles. The trajectories of ?-particles are limited by a cylindrical surface with a given radius, which is a parameter of the model and is identified with the fuel radius in the target and the radii of the irradiating proton beams. This model reproduces the well-known theoretical dependence E ig ˜ ?{0/-2} and yields E ig = 160 kJ as a lower estimate of the ignition energy for ?0 = 100? s ? 22 g/cm3.

Khishchenko, K. V.; Charakhch'yan, A. A.

2015-03-01

83

A virtual test facility for the efficient simulation of solid material response under strong shock and detonation wave loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

A virtual test facility (VTF) for studying the three-dimensional dynamic response of solid materials subject to strong shock and detonation waves has been constructed as part of the research program of the Center for Simulating the Dynamic Response of Materials at the California Institute of Technology. The compressible fluid flow is simulated with a Carte- sian finite volume method and

Ralf Deiterding; Raul Radovitzky; Sean P. Mauch; Ludovic Noels; Julian C. Cummings; Daniel I. Meiron

2006-01-01

84

The structure and evolution of galacto-detonation waves - Some analytic results in sequential star formation models of spiral galaxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Waves of star formation in a uniform, differentially rotating disk galaxy are treated analytically as a propagating detonation wave front. It is shown, that if single solitary waves could be excited, they would evolve asymptotically to one of two stable spiral forms, each of which rotates with a fixed pattern speed. Simple numerical solutions confirm these results. However, the pattern of waves that develop naturally from an initially localized disturbance is more complex and dies out within a few rotation periods. These results suggest a conclusive observational test for deciding whether sequential star formation is an important determinant of spiral structure in some class of galaxies.

Cowie, L. L.; Rybicki, G. B.

1982-01-01

85

Portable fiber optic coupled doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock wave diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

Testing and analysis of shock wave characteristics such as produced by detonators and ground shock propagation frequently require a method of measuring velocity and displacement of the surface of interest. One method of measurement is doppler interferometry. The VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) uses doppler interferometry and has pined wide acceptance as the preferred tool for shock measurement. An important asset of VISAR is that it measures velocity and displacement non intrusively. The conventional VISAR is not well suited for portability because of its sensitive components, large power and cooling requirements, and hazardous laser beam. A new VISAR using the latest technology in solid state lasers and detectors has been developed and tested. To further enhance this system`s versatility, the unit is fiber optic coupled which allows remote testing, permitting the VISAR to be placed over a kilometer away from the target being measured. Because the laser light is contained in the fiber optic, operation of the system around personnel is far less hazardous. A software package for data reduction has also been developed for use with a personal computer. These new advances have produced a very versatile system with full portability which can be totally powered by batteries or a small generator. This paper describes the solid state VISAR and its peripheral components, fiber optic coupling methods and the fiber optic coupled sensors used for sending and receiving laser radiation.

Fleming, K.J.

1993-03-01

86

Shock wave physics and detonation physics — a stimulus for the emergence of numerous new branches in science and engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the period of the Cold War (1945-1991), Shock Wave Physics and Detonation Physics (SWP&DP) — until the beginning of WWII mostly confined to gas dynamics, high-speed aerodynamics, and military technology (such as aero- and terminal ballistics, armor construction, chemical explosions, supersonic gun, and other firearms developments) — quickly developed into a large interdisciplinary field by its own. This rapid expansion was driven by an enormous financial support and two efficient feedbacks: the Terminal Ballistic Cycleand the Research& Development Cycle. Basic knowledge in SWP&DP, initially gained in the Classic Period(from 1808) and further extended in the Post-Classic Period(from the 1930s to present), is now increasingly used also in other branches of Science and Engineering (S&E). However, also independent S&E branches developed, based upon the fundamentals of SWP&DP, many of those developments will be addressed (see Tab. 2). Thus, shock wave and detonation phenomena are now studied within an enormous range of dimensions, covering microscopic, macroscopic, and cosmic dimensions as well as enormous time spans ranging from nano-/picosecond shock durations (such as produced by ultra-short laser pulses) to shock durations that continue for centuries (such as blast waves emitted from ancient supernova explosions). This paper reviews these developments from a historical perspective.

Krehl, Peter O. K.

2011-07-01

87

Numerical study on the standing morphology of an oblique detonation wave under the influence of an incoming boundary layer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of an incoming boundary layer to the standing morphology of an oblique detonation wave (ODW) induced by a compression ramp is numerically studied in this paper. The Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model is used to perform simulation of detonationboundary- layer interactions. Three different wall conditions are applied to realize control on the boundary-layer separation scales. Accordingly, different standing morphologies of the ODWs are obtained, including smooth ODW (without transverse wave) under no-slip, adiabatic wall condition with large-scale separation, abrupt ODW (with transverse wave) under no-slip, cold wall condition with moderate-scale separation, and bow-shaped detached ODW under slipwall condition without a boundary layer.

Zhou, Jin; Liu, Yu; Lin, Zhi-yong

2015-01-01

88

Analysis of Laser-Generated Impulse In An Airbreathing Pulsed Detonation Engine: Part 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A detailed parametric study of airbreathing engine performance is carried out for the Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator (LTD), a 1.4-m diameter, 120-kg (dry mass) launch vehicle designed to become a microsatellite after reaching orbit. The LTD's pulsed detonation engine employs repetitively ignited, laser-supported detonation waves to develop thrust by expanding high pressure blast waves over an annular, interior shroud surface. This companion paper presents the analytical LTD airbreathing inlet and vehicle aerodynamics models used to predict basic engine performance and vehicle drag characteristics, including inlet total pressure recovery, captured air mass flow rate, ram drag, etc. — all projected vs. flight Mach number and altitude. The results of this parametric study suggest an optimum inlet air gap of 3-cm for the 100-cm diameter centerbody (external compression inlet), and that Mach 5.5 at 30-km is a reasonable choice for transitioning into the rocket mode.

Richard, Jacques C.; Myrabo, Leik N.

2005-04-01

89

Detonations in hydrocarbon fuel blends  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of detonations in high-molecular weight hydrocarbon fuels of interest to pulse detonation engine applications was performed in a 280-mm diameter, 7.3-m long facility. Detonation pressure, wave speed, and cell width measurements were made in JP-10 mixtures and in mixtures representative of the decomposition products of JP-10.Experiments were performed in vapor-phase JP-10 mixtures at 353 K over a range

J. M. Austin; J. E. Shepherd

2003-01-01

90

A summary of hydrogen-air detonation experiments  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic detonation parameters are reviewed for hydrogen-air-diluent detonations and deflagration-to-detonation transitions (DDT). These parameters include the characteristic chemical length scale, such as the detonation cell width, associated with the three-dimensional cellular structure of detonation waves, critical transmission conditions of confined detonations into unconfined environments, critical initiation energy for unconfined detonations, detonability limits, and critical conditions for DDT. The detonation cell width, which depends on hydrogen and diluent concentrations, pressure, and temperature, is an important parameter in the prediction of critical geometry-dependent conditions for the transmission of confined detonations into unconfined environments and the critical energies for the direct initiation of unconfined detonations. Detonability limits depend on both initial and boundary conditions and the limit has been defined as the onset of single head spin. Four flame propagation regimes have been identified and the criterion for DDT in a smooth tube is discussed. 108 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Guirao, C.M.; Knystautas, R.; Lee, J.H.

1989-05-01

91

Molecular dynamics and kinetic study of carbon coagulation in the release wave of detonation products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a combined molecular dynamics and kinetic study of a carbon cluster aggregation process in thermodynamic conditions relevant for the detonation products of oxygen deficient explosives. Molecular dynamics simulations with the LCBOPII potential under gigapascal pressure and high temperatures indicate that (i) the cluster motion in the detonation gas is compatible with Brownian diffusion and (ii) the coalescence probability is 100% for two clusters entering the interaction cutoff distance. We used these results for a subsequent kinetic study with the Smoluchowski model, with realistic models applied for the physical parameters such as viscosity and cluster size. We found that purely aggregational kinetics yield too fast clustering, with moderate influence of the model parameters. In agreement with previous studies, the introduction of surface reactivity through a simple kinetic model is necessary to approach the clustering time scales suggested by experiments (1000 atoms after 100 ns, 10 000 atoms after 1 ?s). However, these models fail to reach all experimental criteria simultaneously and more complex modelling of the surface process seems desirable to go beyond these current limitations.

Chevrot, Guillaume; Sollier, Arnaud; Pineau, Nicolas

2012-02-01

92

Two phase detonation studies conducted in 1971  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A report is presented describing the research conducted on five phases: (1) ignition of fuel drops by a shock wave and passage of a shock wave over a burning drop, (2) the energy release pattern of a two-phase detonation with controlled drop sizes, (3) the attenuation of shock and detonation waves passing over an acoustic liner, (4) experimental and theoretical studies of film detonations, and (5) a simplified analytical model of a rotating two-phase detonation wave in a rocket motor.

Nicholls, J. A.

1972-01-01

93

Analysis of Laser-Generated Impulse In An Airbreathing Pulsed Detonation Engine: Part 1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An investigation is performed on an airbreathing laser propulsion (LP) system designed to propel a 1.4 m diameter, 120-kg (dry mass) vehicle called the Lightcraft Technology Demonstrator (LTD) into low Earth orbit, along with its opto-electronics payload. The LTD concept led directly to the model ?200 lightcraft — recently demonstrated in laboratory and flight experiments at White Sands Missile Range, NM at the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF), using the 10-kW PLVTS CO2 laser. The pulsed detonation wave engine (PDE) employs repetitively ignited, laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves to develop thrust by expanding high pressure blast waves over an annular, interior shroud surface. Numerical simulation of thruster impulse is accomplished with a 1-D cylindrical model of blast waves propagating radially outward from a laser-generated `line-source' of high temperature, high pressure air. External airflow over the LTD structure is also analyzed to predict basic engine/vehicle drag characteristics, including inlet total pressure recovery, and captured air mass flow rate — all projected vs. flight Mach number and altitude.

Richard, Jacques C.; Myrabo, Leik N.

2005-04-01

94

Carbon in detonations  

SciTech Connect

We review three principal results from a five year study of carbon and its properties in detonations and discuss the implications of these results to the behavior of explosives. We first present a new determination of the carbon melt line from release wave velocity measurements in the shocked state. We then outline a colloidal theory of carbon clustering which from diffusion limited coagulation predicts a slow energy release rate for the carbon chemistry. Finally, we show the results from the examination of recovered soot. Here we see support for the colloid theory and find the diamond phase of carbon. The main theme of this paper is that the carbon in detonation products is in the form of a colloidal suspension of carbon clusters which grow through diffusion limited collisions. Even the final state is not bulk graphite or diamond, but is a collection of small, less than 100 /angstrom/A, diamond and graphitic clusters. 23 refs., 4 figs.

Johnson, J.D.

1989-01-01

95

Specific Features of Synthesis of Detonation Nanodiamonds  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is demonstrated that the Chapman-Jouguet parameters for high explosives used in nanodiamond synthesis are located in the region of liquid nanocarbon; therefore, the chemical reaction zone of the detonation wave involves formation of carbon nanodroplets, which are later crystallized into nanodiamonds on the segment of the isentrope of expansion of detonation products, passing through the region of stability of

V. V. Danilenko

2005-01-01

96

Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many energetic systems can be activated via mechanical means. Percussion primers in small caliber ammunition and stab detonators used in medium caliber ammunition are just two examples. Current medium caliber (20-60mm) munitions are detonated through the use of impact sensitive stab detonators. Stab detonators are very sensitive and must be small, as to meet weight and size limitations. A mix

Gash

2005-01-01

97

Preliminary Experimental Investigation on Detonation Initiation in the Ejector of a Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A small pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE) was used as a predetonator to initiate detonation in its ejector. The detonation products discharged from the PDRE was not only ignition source for the ejector but also primary flow which entrained air from environment into the ejector. Stoichiometric liquid kerosene and gaseous oxygen were used as reactants for the PDRE. While in the ejector injected liquid kerosene was used as fuel and entrained air was used as oxidizer. Reactants in the ejector were ignited by the detonation wave and products discharged from the PDRE. Detonation was successfully initiation in present experiments. It was found that flame propagation upstream at the entrance of the ejector was inevitable, which affected the detonation initiation process in the ejector. Disks with orifices were placed at the entrance of the ejector to weaken the flame propagation upstream effect, which would affect the air flow entraining process, but the results show it worked.

Yan, Yu; Fan, Wei; Mu, Yang

2012-12-01

98

Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives  

SciTech Connect

In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

2009-01-16

99

Stability of Detonation Profiles in the ZND Limit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Confirming a conjecture of Lyng–Raoofi–Texier–Zumbrun, we show that stability of strong detonation waves in the ZND, or small-viscosity,\\u000a limit is equivalent to stability of the limiting ZND detonation together with stability of the viscous profile associated\\u000a with the component Neumann shock. Moreover, on bounded frequencies the nonstable eigenvalues of the viscous detonation wave\\u000a converge to those of the limiting ZND

Kevin Zumbrun

2011-01-01

100

Modeling two-dimensional detonations with detonation shock dynamics  

SciTech Connect

In any explosive device, the chemical reaction of the explosive takes place in a thin zone just behind the shock front. The finite size of the reaction zone is responsible for: the pressure generated by the explosive being less near the boundaries, for the detonation velocity being lower near a boundary than away from it, and for the detonation velocity being lower for a divergent wave than for a plane wave. In computer models that are used for engineering design calculations, the simplest treatment of the explosive reaction zone is to ignore it completely. Most explosive modeling is still done this way. The neglected effects are small when the reaction zone is very much smaller than the explosive's physical dimensions. When the ratio of the explosive's detonation reaction-zone length to a representative system dimension is of the order of 1/100, neglecting the reaction zone is not adequate. An obvious solution is to model the reaction zone in full detail. At present, there is not sufficient computer power to do so economically. Recently we have developed an alternative to this standard approach. By transforming the governing equations to the proper intrinsic-coordinate frame, we have simplified the analysis of the two-dimensional reaction-zone problem. When the radius of curvature of the detonation shock is large compared to the reaction-zone length, the calculation of the two-dimensional reaction zone can be reduced to a sequence of one-dimensional problems. 9 refs., 5 figs.

Bdzil, J.B.; Stewart, D.S.

1988-01-01

101

Two phase detonation studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental study of the passage of a shock wave over a burning fuel drop is described. This includes high speed framing photographs of the interaction taken at 500,000 frames per second. A theoretical prediction of the ignition of a fuel drop by a shock wave is presented and the results compared with earlier experimental work. Experimental attempts to generate a detonation in a liquid fuel drop (kerosene)-liquid oxidizer drop (hydrogen peroxide)-inert gas-environment are described. An appendix is included which gives the analytical prediction of power requirements for the drop generator to produce certain size drops at a certain mass rate. A bibliography is also included which lists all of the publications resulting from this research grant.

Nicholls, J. A.; Pierce, T. H.; Miyajima, H.; Oza, R.; Patil, P.

1974-01-01

102

Feasibility and parameter study of a detonation diffuser  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research includes an investigation of the mechanisms of diffraction and reinitiation that enable a detonation diffuser. It describes a set of geometric parameters necessary to design a diffuser for a given detonable mixture and initial channel height. Predetonators with channel height less than the critical height are ineffective because detonations in small channels decouple into separate shock and combustion fronts when the channel height increases. A detonation diffuser allows the channel height to increase by utilizing the decoupled shock wave to reinitiate detonation. In the diffuser, a detonation initially decouples into separate shock and combustion fronts, and then the decoupled shock front reflects from an oblique surface initiating a secondary detonation that survives the expansion. This research investigated the three regions of a detonation diffuser: the initial diffraction, the reflecting surface, and the second diffraction corner. Schlieren video of two-dimensional diffracting detonations recorded the position of the detonation, decoupled shock front and flame front. Observations of the decoupled shocks reflecting from surfaces showed that a 45° reflecting surface must be placed less than 80 mm downstream of the initial diffraction corner to initiate a secondary detonation in more than 91% of repeated trials. Observations of the interaction of diffracting detonations with multiple obstacles revealed that the best performance (smallest separation, and highest Mach number) occurred when the decoupled shock reflected from four separate obstacles at approximately the same time.

Stevens, Christopher A.

103

Continuous detonation reaction engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reaction engine operates on the principles of a controlled condensed detonation rather than on the principles of gas expansion. The detonation results in reaction products that are expelled at a much higher velocity.

Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

1968-01-01

104

Two-Phase Steady Detonation Analysis J.M. Powers, D.S. Stewart, and H. Krier  

E-print Network

-Phase Steady Detonation Analysis J.M. Powers,· D. S. Stewart,t and H. Krier:j: _ University of Illinois for the detonation end states (pressure, density, etc.) as functions of the detonation velocity. C-J theory state at the wave head. (The discussion of detonation structure is the topic of ZND theory.) Cqpyright

105

Methods for proving the equivalency of detonator performance  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges facing engineers is developing newer, safer detonators that are equivalent to devices currently in use. There is no clear consensus on an exact method for drawing equivalence of detonators. This paper summarizes our current efforts to develop diagnostics addressing various aspects of detonator design to better quantify and prove equivalency. We consider various optical techniques to quantify the output pressure and output wave shape. The development of a unique interpretation of streak camera breakouts, known as the apparent center of initiation, will be discussed as a metric for detonation wave shape. Specific examples apply these techniques to the comparison of a new laser-driven detonator with an existing exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonator. Successes and short-comings of the techniques will be discussed.

Munger, Alan C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Akinci, Adrian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomas, Keith A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clarke, Steve A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Eric S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murphy, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

106

Spin detonation in reactive particles-oxidizing gas flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of detonation waves in corn starch particles-oxidizing gas mixtures was studied in a horizontal circular tube having an inside diameter of 141 mm and a test section length of 17.4 m. The results show that a stable self-sustained detonation can be achieved in such a heterogeneous system. The sequence of the transition process was essentially recognized as follows: (1) initial particle ignition, (2) pressure wave amplification by coherent energy release, (3) unsteady reaction shock, and (4) spin detonation. Thus transverse waves play a dominant role in stable detonation propagation in this two-phase system. The spin structure exists both on the circumference and in the inner region of the cross section. For a stable single spin detonation there are two constant velocities at the wave front: axial propagation velocity and angular velocity.

Zhang, F.; Grönig, H.

1991-08-01

107

Experimental Investigation of Detonation Re-initiation Mechanisms Following a Mach Reflection of a Quenched Detonation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detonation waves are supersonic combustion waves that have a multi-shock front structure followed by a spatially non-uniform reaction zone. During propagation, a de-coupled shock-flame complex is periodically re-initiated into an overdriven detonation following a transient Mach reflection process. Past researchers have identified mechanisms that can increase combustion rates and cause localized hot spot re-ignition behind the Mach shock. But due to the small length scales and stochastic behaviour of detonation waves, the important mechanisms that can lead to re-initiation into a detonation requires further clarification. If a detonation is allowed to diffract behind an obstacle, it can quench to form a de-coupled shock-flame complex and if allowed to form a Mach reflection, re-initiation of a detonation can occur. The use of this approach permits the study of re-initiation mechanisms reproducibly with relatively large length scales. The objective of this study is to experimentally elucidate the key mechanisms that can increase chemical reaction rates and sequentially lead to re-initiation of a de-coupled shock-flame complex into an overdriven detonation wave following a Mach reflection. All experiments were carried out in a thin rectangular channel using a stoichiometric mixture of oxy-methane. Three different types of obstacles were used - a half-cylinder, a roughness plate along with the half-cylinder and a full-cylinder. Schlieren visualization was achieved by using a Z-configuration setup, a high speed camera and a high intensity light source. Results indicate that forward jetting of the slip line behind the Mach stem can potentially increase combustion rates by entraining hot burned gas into unburned gas. Following ignition and jet entrainment, a detonation wave first appears along the Mach stem. The transverse wave can form a detonation wave due to rapid combustion of unburned gas which may be attributed to shock interaction with the unburned gas. Alternatively, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can produce vortices along the slipline that may lead to mixing between burned-unburned gases and potentially increase combustion rates near the transverse wave. However, the mechanism(s) that causes the transverse wave to re-initiate into a detonation wave remains to be satisfactorily resolved.

Bhattacharjee, Rohit Ranjan

108

The Physical Effects of Detonation in a Closed Cylindrical Chamber  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Detonation in the internal-combustion engine is studied as a physical process. It is shown that detonation is accompanied by pressure waves within the cylinder charge. Sound theory is applied to the calculation of resonant pressure-wave frequencies. Apparatus is described for direct measurement of pressure-wave frequencies. Frequencies determined from two engines of different cylinder sizes are shown to agree with the values calculated from sound theory. An outline of the theoretically possible modes of vibration in a right circular cylinder with flat ends is included. An appendix by John P. Elting gives a method of calculating pressure in the sound wave following detonation.

Draper, C S

1935-01-01

109

Ignition and Growth Modeling of Detonating TATB Cones and Arcs  

Microsoft Academic Search

. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based explosives LX-17 and PBX 9502 is applied to recent experimental data on converging conical charges plus confined and unconfined arc charges. The conical charges are at first overdriven by the converging flow and then fail to detonate as the radial rarefaction wave slows the reaction rate. Unconfined

Craig Tarver; Steven Chidester

2007-01-01

110

Bidirectional slapper detonator  

DOEpatents

The disclosure is directed to a bidirectional slapper detonator. One embodiment utilizes a single bridge circuit to detonate a pair of opposing initiating pellets. A line generator embodiment uses a plurality of bridges in electrical series to generate opposing cylindrical wavefronts.

McCormick, Robert N. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Melissa D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01

111

Role of interphase interactions during gas detonation in inert porous medium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A mathematical model of detonation in a two-phase mixture consisting of a gaseous monofuel and closely packed noninflammable solid particles is proposed. The structure of detonation waves in a pure gas is compared to that in monodisperse mixtures with various diameters of particles. Two special regimes of detonation are separated, in which (i) gas is immediately inflamed due to shock compression and (ii) ignition starts at the surface of particles, upon reflection of the chock wave front. It is shown that inertial effects during the flow past particles can both increase and decrease the detonation velocities. The calculated detonation velocities well agree with experimental data.

Balapanov, D. M.; Urmancheev, S. F.

2010-07-01

112

The Cellular Structure of Carbon Detonations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We compare two and three-dimensional simulations of the cellular structure of carbon detonations. The initial density of the carbon is taken to be 107 g cm-3. This value has been suggested as the density at which a deflagration to detonation transition may occur in Type Ia supernovae. An initial planar detonation front becomes unstable and develops a complex structure due to the generation of transverse waves. Differences in the amount of asymmetry between the 2D and 3D cases, as well as the relative sizes of individual cells will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the Department of Energy Grant No. B341495 to the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago under the ASCI Strategic Alliances Program.

Fryxell, B.; Timmes, F. X.; Zingale, M.; Dursi, L. J.; Ricker, P.; Olson, K.; Calder, A. C.; Tufo, H.; MacNeice, P.; Truran, J. W.; Rosner, R.

2000-05-01

113

Experimental investigation of deflagration to detonation transition in hydrocarbon-air gaseous mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the results of investigation of deflagration to detonation transition in gas mixtures with exothermic chemical reaction using the experimental method of nonintrusive diagnostics of the process. Schlieren photochronography in the optical sections in different places of the tube is performed using the laser as a source of light. Experimental results of visualization of the transition process in hydrocarbon-air gas mixtures show several different flow patterns: (1) The detonation wave originates in the flame zone. (2) The detonation wave originates between the flame zone and primary shock wave. (3) The secondary combustion zone originates between primary shock and the flame and causes the detonation. (4) Spontaneous flame occurs that leads to the combustion to detonation transition. The influence of the flame zone on the originating strong detonation wave is noticed.

Smirnov, N.N.; Tyurnikov, M.V. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Mechanics and Mathematics] [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Mechanics and Mathematics

1995-03-01

114

Effective use of overdriven detonation in high explosives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Explosives can easily generate the high energy and the ultra-high pressure. The performance of explosive depends on its own chemical poperty, the detonation wave usually propagates with the stable value of pressure behind it, the pressure is so called "Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure." If the higher pressure over C-J pressure can be expected to occur, it is very effective for a development of new materials. We take notice of Overdriven Detonation (following O.D.D.) phenomenon that expects to bring out higher detonation pressures than C-J pressure of explosive. This phenomenon can be occurred when the flyer plate of high velocity impacts the explosive, or the explosive compressed by the advance detonates, or converging detonation of the explosive.

Otsuka, Masahiko; Morimoto, Hideyuki; Nagano, Shirou; Hida, Eiji; Kuroki, Kenji; Itoh, Shigeru

2003-07-01

115

Equations of state for explosive detonation products: The PANDA model  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses a thermochemical model for calculating equations of state (EOS) for the detonation products of explosives. This model, which was first presented at the Eighth Detonation Symposium, is available in the PANDA code and is referred to here as ``the Panda model``. The basic features of the PANDA model are as follows. (1) Statistical-mechanical theories are used to construct EOS tables for each of the chemical species that are to be allowed in the detonation products. (2) The ideal mixing model is used to compute the thermodynamic functions for a mixture of these species, and the composition of the system is determined from assumption of chemical equilibrium. (3) For hydrocode calculations, the detonation product EOS are used in tabular form, together with a reactive burn model that allows description of shock-induced initiation and growth or failure as well as ideal detonation wave propagation. This model has been implemented in the three-dimensional Eulerian code, CTH.

Kerley, G.I.

1994-05-01

116

Measuring In-Situ Mdf Velocity Of Detonation  

DOEpatents

A system for determining the velocity of detonation of a mild detonation fuse mounted on the surface of a device includes placing the device in a predetermined position with respect to an apparatus that carries a couple of sensors that sense the passage of a detonation wave at first and second spaced locations along the fuse. The sensors operate a timer and the time and distance between the locations is used to determine the velocity of detonation. The sensors are preferably electrical contacts that are held spaced from but close to the fuse such that expansion of the fuse caused by detonation causes the fuse to touch the contact, causing an electrical signal to actuate the timer.

Horine, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); James, Jr., Forrest B. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-10-25

117

Influence of and additives on acetylene detonation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of and admixtures (known as detonation suppressors for combustible mixtures) on the development of acetylene detonation was experimentally investigated in a shock tube. The time-resolved images of detonation wave development and propagation were registered using a high-speed streak camera. Shock wave velocity and pressure profiles were measured by five calibrated piezoelectric gauges and the formation of condensed particles was detected by laser light extinction. The induction time of detonation development was determined as the moment of a pressure rise at the end plate of the shock tube. It was shown that additive had no influence on the induction time. For , a significant promoting effect was observed. A simplified kinetic model was suggested and characteristic rates of diacetylene formation were estimated as the limiting stage of acetylene polymerisation. An analysis of the obtained data indicated that the promoting species is atomic chlorine formed by pyrolysis, which interacts with acetylene and produces radical, initiating a chain mechanism of acetylene decomposition. The results of kinetic modelling agree well with the experimental data.

Drakon, A.; Emelianov, A.; Eremin, A.

2014-03-01

118

Detonation Shock Radius Experiments.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A previous passover experiment [1] was designed to create a complex detonation transient used in validating a reduced, asymptotically derived description of detonation shock dynamics (DSD). An underlying question remained on determining the location of the initial detonation shock radius to start the DSD simulation with respect to the dynamical response of the initiation system coupling's to the main charge. This paper concentrates on determining the initial shock radius required of such DSD governed problems. `Cut-back' experiments of PBX-9501 were conducted using an initiation system that sought to optimize the transferred detonation to the desired constant radius, hemispherical shape. Streak camera techniques captured the breakout on three of the prism's surfaces for time-of-arrival data. The paper includes comparisons to simulations using constant volume explosion and high pressure hot spots. The results of the experiments and simulation efforts provide fundamental design considerations for actual explosive systems and verify necessary conditions from which the asymptotic theory of DSD may apply. [1] Lambert, D., Stewart, D. Scott and Yoo, S. and Wescott, B., ``Experimental Validation of Detonation Shock Dynamics in Condensed Explosives. J. of Fluid Mechs., Vol. 546, pp.227-253 (2006).

Lambert, David; Debes, Joshua; Stewart, Scott; Yoo, Sunhee

2007-06-01

119

Reverse slapper detonator  

DOEpatents

A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

Weingart, Richard C. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01

120

Using the tracer method to study detonation processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tracer method was used to study the synthesis of nanodiamonds during detonation of composite explosives. Alloys of TNT\\u000a with RDX, HMX, PETN, and benzotrifuroxan were studied. It was shown that, in all cases, most nanodiamonds were formed from\\u000a TNT carbon. It was concluded that during the chemical reaction in the detonation wave propagating in heterogeneous explosives,\\u000a equilibrium parameters were

N. V. Kozyrev

2008-01-01

121

Synchro-ballistic recording of detonation phenomena  

SciTech Connect

Synchro-ballistic use of rotating-mirror streak cameras allows for detailed recording of high-speed events of known velocity and direction. After an introduction to the synchro-ballistic technique, this paper details two diverse applications of the technique as applied in the field of high-explosives research. In the first series of experiments detonation-front shape is recorded as the arriving detonation shock wave tilts an obliquely mounted mirror, causing reflected light to be deflected from the imaging lens. These tests were conducted for the purpose of calibrating and confirming the asymptotic Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) theory of Bdzil and Stewart. The phase velocities of the events range from ten to thirty millimeters per microsecond. Optical magnification is set for optimal use of the film`s spatial dimension and the phase velocity is adjusted to provide synchronization at the camera`s maximum writing speed. Initial calibration of the technique is undertaken using a cylindrical HE geometry over a range of charge diameters and of sufficient length-to-diameter ratio to insure a stable detonation wave. The final experiment utilizes an arc-shaped explosive charge, resulting in an asymmetric detonation-front record. The second series of experiments consists of photographing a shaped-charge jet having a velocity range of two to nine millimeters per microsecond. To accommodate the range of velocities it is necessary to fire several tests, each synchronized to a different section of the jet. The experimental apparatus consists of a vacuum chamber to preclude atmospheric ablation of the jet tip with shocked-argon back lighting to produce a shadow-graph image.

Critchfield, R.R.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.; Davis, W.C.; Ferm, E.N.; Idar, D.J.

1997-09-01

122

Nonequilibrium detonation of composite explosives  

SciTech Connect

The effect of nonequilibrium diffusional flow on detonation velocities in composite explosives is examined. Detonation conditions are derived for complete equilibrium, temperature and pressure equilibrium, and two forms of pressure equilibrium. Partial equilibria are associated with systems which have not had sufficient time for transport to smooth out the gradients between spatially separate regions. The nonequilibrium detonation conditions are implemented in the CHEQ equation of state code. We show that the detonation velocity decreases as the non-chemical degrees of freedom of the explosive are allowed to equilibrate. It is only when the chemical degrees of freedom are allowed to equilibrate that the detonation velocity increases.

Nichols III, A.L.

1997-07-01

123

Critical reactions for the hydrazine vapor detonations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A detailed kinetic model devoted to the hydrazine vapor detonation has been built. It consists of 33 reversible reactions and 13 species. A reduced kinetic model has been proposed by using the Principal Component Analysis of matrix F (PCAF) method as implemented in KINALC. It is constituted of 26 reactions and 11 species. This model has been shown to be valid over a pressure range of 0.1 to 10 atm. However, the predictions of the models are significantly affected by changes in the enthalpy of formation of N 2H 3. With the help of the full kinetic model, a value of A, the proportionality factor in the ZND model between the induction distance in the detonation wave and the detonation cell size, of 27.5 +/- 3.0 has been derived if one considers that the collision efficiency of N 2H 4 on the thermal decomposition of hydrazine is equal to the one of N 2. The value of A for pure hydrazine detonation is shown to be strongly dependent on the value of the collision efficiency of N 2H 4.

Catoire, L.; Luche, J.; Dupré, G.; Paillard, C.

124

Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators  

SciTech Connect

Many energetic systems can be activated via mechanical means. Percussion primers in small caliber ammunition and stab detonators used in medium caliber ammunition are just two examples. Current medium caliber (20-60mm) munitions are detonated through the use of impact sensitive stab detonators. Stab detonators are very sensitive and must be small, as to meet weight and size limitations. A mix of energetic powders, sensitive to mechanical stimulus, is typically used to ignite such devices. Stab detonators are mechanically activated by forcing a firing pin through the closure disc of the device and into the stab initiating mix. Rapid heating caused by mechanically driven compression and friction of the mixture results in its ignition. The rapid decomposition of these materials generates a pressure/temperature pulse that is sufficient to initiate a transfer charge, which has enough output energy to detonate the main charge. This general type of ignition mix is used in a large variety of primers, igniters, and detonators.[1] Common primer mixes, such as NOL-130, are made up of lead styphnate (basic) 40%, lead azide (dextrinated) 20%, barium nitrate 20%, antimony sulfide 15%, and tetrazene 5%.[1] These materials pose acute and chronic toxicity hazards during mixing of the composition and later in the item life cycle after the item has been field functioned. There is an established need to replace these mixes on toxicity, health, and environmental hazard grounds. This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic solgel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs), which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash metal multilayer and sol-gel to be generic technologies applicable to a wide range of devices, especially in small caliber ammunition and sub-munitions. We will replace the NOL-130 mixture with a nanocomposite that consists of a mechanically robust energetic multilayer foil that has been coated with a sol-gel energetic material. The exothermic reactions are activated in this nanocomposite are the transformation of the multilayer material to its respective intermetallic alloy and the thermite reaction, which is characterized by very high temperatures, a small pressure pulse, and hot particle ejection. The proposed materials and their reaction products consist of, but are not limited to aluminum, nickel, iron, aluminum oxide, titanium, iron oxide and boron. These materials have much more desirable environmental and health characteristics than the NOL-130 composition.

Gash, A

2005-12-21

125

RESPONSE OF ALUMINUM SPHERES IN SITU TO DETONATION  

SciTech Connect

Time sequence x-ray imaging was utilized to determine the response of aluminum spheres embedded in a detonating high-explosive cylinder. The size of these spheres ranged from 3/8-inch to 1/32-inch in diameter. These experiments directly observed the response of the spheres as a function of time after interaction with the detonation wave. As the spheres are entrained in the post-detonation flow field, they are accelerating and their velocity profile is complicated, but can be determined from the radiography. Using the aluminum spheres as tracers, radial velocities of order 1.6 mm/us and horizontal velocities of order 0.08 mm/us were measured at early times post detonation. In terms of response, these data show that the largest sphere deforms and fractures post detonation. The intermediate size spheres suffer negligible deformation, but appear to ablate post detonation. Post detonation, the smallest spheres either react, mechanically disintegrate, atomize as a liquid or some combination of these.

Molitoris, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Batteux, J D; Wong, B M; Villafana, R J; Cracchiola, B A; Forbes, J W

2010-03-26

126

On the theory of the propagation of detonation in gaseous systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The existing theory of detonation is critically examined. It is shown that the considerations with which the steady value of the velocity of detonation is chosen are not convincing. In connection with the problem of the process of the chemical reaction in a detonation wave, the objections raised against the conceptions of Le Chatelier and Vieille of the 19th century with regard to the ignition of the gas by the shock wave are refuted. On the basis of this concept, it is possible to give a rigorous foundation for the existing method of computing the detonation velocity. The distributions of the temperature, the pressure, and the velocity in the detonation wave front as the chemical reaction proceeds, are considered. On the assumption of the absence of losses, the pure compression of the gas in the shock wave at the start of the chemical reaction develops a temperature that is near the temperature of combustion of the given mixture at constant pressure.

Zeldovich, Y B

1950-01-01

127

Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A number of promising alternative rocket propulsion concepts have been developed over the past two decades that take advantage of unsteady combustion waves in order to produce thrust. These concepts include the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE), in which repetitive ignition, propagation, and reflection of detonations and shocks can create a high pressure chamber from which gases may be exhausted in a controlled manner. The Pulse Detonation Rocket Induced Magnetohydrodynamic Ejector (PDRIME) is a modification of the basic PDRE concept, developed by Cambier (1998), which has the potential for performance improvements based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thrust augmentation. The PDRIME has the advantage of both low combustion chamber seeding pressure, per the PDRE concept, and efficient energy distribution in the system, per the rocket-induced MHD ejector (RIME) concept of Cole, et al. (1995). In the initial part of this thesis, we explore flow and performance characteristics of different configurations of the PDRIME, assuming quasi-one-dimensional transient flow and global representations of the effects of MHD phenomena on the gas dynamics. By utilizing high-order accurate solvers, we thus are able to investigate the fundamental physical processes associated with the PDRIME and PDRE concepts and identify potentially promising operating regimes. In the second part of this investigation, the detailed coupling of detonations and electric and magnetic fields are explored. First, a one-dimensional spark-ignited detonation with complex reaction kinetics is fully evaluated and the mechanisms for the different instabilities are analyzed. It is found that complex kinetics in addition to sufficient spatial resolution are required to be able to quantify high frequency as well as low frequency detonation instability modes. Armed with this quantitative understanding, we then examine the interaction of a propagating detonation and the applied MHD, both in one-dimensional and two-dimensional transient simulations. The dynamics of the detonation are found to be affected by the application of magnetic and electric fields. We find that the regularity of one-dimensional cesium-seeded detonations can be significantly altered by reasonable applied magnetic fields (Bz ? 8T), but that it takes a stronger applied field (Bz > 16T) to significantly alter the cellular structure and detonation velocity of a two-dimensional detonation in the time in which these phenomena were observed. This observation is likely attributed to the additional coupling of the two-dimensional detonation with the transverse waves, which are not captured in the one-dimensional simulations. Future studies involving full ionization kinetics including collisional-radiative processes, will be used to examine these processes in further detail.

Cole, Lord Kahil

128

Modeling LX17 Detonation Growth and Decay Using the Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameters for detonation waves in the TATB-based insensitive high explosive LX-17 are applied to two recent experiments. One experiment measures the slow increases in detonation velocity and pressure over several centimeters in confined charges as the steady state Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) values are approached. A second experiment measures the rate of detonation failure in

Craig Tarver; Steven Chidester

2009-01-01

129

Minimum tube diameters for steady propagation of gaseous detonations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent experimental results on detonation limits are reported in this paper. A parametric study was carried out to determine the minimum tube diameters for steady detonation propagation in five different hydrocarbon fuel-oxygen combustible mixtures and in five polycarbonate test tube diameters ranging from 50.8 mm down to a small scale of 1.5 mm. The wave propagation in the tube was monitored by optical fibers. By decreasing the initial pressure, hence the sensitivity of the mixture, the onset of limits is indicated by an abrupt drop in the steady detonation velocity after a short distance of travel. From the measured wave velocities inside the test tube, the critical pressure corresponding to the limit and the minimum tube diameters for the propagation of the detonation can be obtained. The present experimental results are in good agreement with previous studies and show that the measured minimum tube diameters can be reasonably estimated on the basis of the /3 rule over a wide range of conditions, where is the detonation cell size. These new data shall be useful for safety assessment in process industries and in developing and validating models for detonation limits.

Gao, Y.; Ng, H. D.; Lee, J. H. S.

2014-07-01

130

New detonation concepts for propulsion and power generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of related analytical and experimental studies are focused on utilizing detonations for emerging propulsion and power generation devices. An understanding of the physical and thermodynamic processes for this unsteady thermodynamic cycle has taken over 100 years to develop. An overview of the thermodynamic processes and development history is provided. Thermodynamic cycle analysis of detonation-based systems has often been studied using surrogate models. A real gas model is used for a thermal efficiency prediction of a detonation wave based on the work and heat specified by process path diagrams and a control volume analysis. A combined first and second law analysis aids in understanding performance trends for different initial conditions. A cycle analysis model for an airbreathing, rotating detonation wave engine (RDE) is presented. The engine consists of a steady inlet system with an isolator which delivers air into an annular combustor. A detonation wave continuously rotates around the combustor with side relief as the flow expands towards the nozzle. Air and fuel enter the combustor when the rarefaction wave pressure behind the detonation front drops to the inlet supply pressure. To create a stable RDE, the inlet pressure is matched in a convergence process with the average combustor pressure by increasing the annulus channel width with respect to the isolator channel. Performance of this engine is considered using several parametric studies. RDEs require a fuel injection system that can cycle beyond the limits of mechanical valves. Fuel injectors composed of an orifice connected to a small plenum cavity were mounted on a detonation tube. These fuel injectors, termed fluidic valves, utilize their geometry and a supply pressure to deliver fuel and contain no moving parts. Their behavior is characterized in order to determine their feasibility for integration with high-frequency RDEs. Parametric studies have been conducted with the type of fuel injected, the orifice diameter, and the plenum cavity pressure. Results indicate that the detonation wave pressure temporarily interrupts the fluidic valve supply, but the wave products can be quickly expelled by the fresh fuel supply to allow for refueling. The interruption time of the valve scales with injection and detonation wave pressure ratios as well as a characteristic time. The feasibility of using a detonation wave as a source for producing power in conjunction with a linear generator is considered. Such a facility can be constructed by placing a piston--spring system at the end of a pulsed detonation engine (PDE). Once the detonation wave reflects off the piston, oscillations of the system drive the linear generator. An experimental facility was developed to explore the interaction of a gaseous detonation wave with the piston. Experimental results were then used to develop a model for the interaction. Governing equations for two engine designs are developed and trends are established to indicate a feasible design space for future development.

Braun, Eric M.

131

Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials  

DOEpatents

The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives. 3 figs.

Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Kopczewski, M.R.; Schwarz, A.C.

1985-01-04

132

Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials  

DOEpatents

The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives.

Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Kopczewski, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Schwarz, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01

133

Chemical Equilibrium Detonation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energetic materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. The fundamental principles outlined in this chapter pertain to the study of detonation in both gas-phase and condensed-phase energetic materials, but our main focus will be on the condensed ones, particularly on high explosives (HEs). They share many properties with other classes of condensed energetic compounds such as propellants and pyrotechnics, but a detailed understanding of detonation is especially important for numerous HE applications. The usage and study of HE materials goes back more than a century, but many questions remain to be answered, e.g., on their reaction pathways at high pressures and temperatures, chemical properties, etc.

Bastea, Sorin; Fried, Laurence E.

134

The hydrodynamic theory of detonation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report derives equations containing only directly measurable constants for the quantities involved in the hydrodynamic theory of detonation. The stable detonation speed, D, is revealed as having the lowest possible value in the case of positive material velocity, by finding the minimum of the Du curve (u denotes the speed of the gases of combustion). A study of the conditions of energy and impulse in freely suspended detonating systems leads to the disclosure of a rarefaction front traveling at a lower speed behind the detonation front; its velocity is computed. The latent energy of the explosive passes into the steadily growing detonation zone - the region between the detonation front and the rarefaction front. The conclusions lead to a new definition of the concept of shattering power. The calculations are based on the behavior of trinitrotoluene.

Langweiler, Heinz

1939-01-01

135

Precursors in detonations in porous explosives  

SciTech Connect

Photographs of detonation waves in low-density HMX and PETN, made with an image-intensifier camera, show a brilliant band of light in front of the pressure jump. The radiation temperature is estimated to be 12,000 to 14,000/sup 0/K. The spectrum of this light is continuous. A quartz gauge shows a gradual buildup of pressure from the material producing the light. The material has little effect on the propagation of detonation. Further observations, using pellets of plastic-bonded HMX and single crystals of PETN, show that the material thrown off the free surface is transparent, with a leading edge moving at approximately 20 mm/..mu..s. Collision of this material with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) produces a brilliant light with a spectrum that is initially a narrow H/sub ..cap alpha../ line. Quartz gauges measure the rate of pessure buildup of this material.

Spaulding, R.L. Jr.

1981-01-01

136

Material properties effects on the detonation spreading and propagation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF)  

SciTech Connect

Recent dynamic testing of Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) has focused on understanding the material properties affecting the detonation propagation, spreading, behavior and symmetry. Small scale gap testing and wedge testing focus on the sensitivity to shock with the gap test including the effects of particle size and density. Floret testing investigates the detonation spreading as it is affected by particle size, density, and binder content. The polyrho testing illustrates the effects of density and binder content on the detonation velocity. Finally the detonation spreading effect can be most dramatically seen in the Mushroom and Onionskin tests where the variations due to density gradients, pressing methods and geometry can be seen on the wave breakout behavior.

Francois, Elizabeth Green [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kennedy, James E [HERE LLC

2010-01-01

137

Low voltage nonprimary explosive detonator  

DOEpatents

A low voltage, electrically actuated, nonprimary explosive detonator is disclosed wherein said detonation is achieved by means of an explosive train in which a deflagration-to-detonation transition is made to occur. The explosive train is confined within a cylindrical body and positioned adjacent to low voltage ignition means have electrical leads extending outwardly from the cylindrical confining body. Application of a low voltage current to the electrical leads ignites a self-sustained deflagration in a donor portion of the explosive train which then is made to undergo a transition to detonation further down the train.

Dinegar, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Kirkham, John (Newbury, GB2)

1982-01-01

138

The Use of Steady and Pulsed Detonations for Propulsion Systems  

SciTech Connect

Objectives of the ODWE concept studies are: demonstrate the feasibility of the oblique detonation wave engine (ODWE) for hypersonic propulsion; demonstrate the existance and stability of an oblique detonation wave in hypersonic wind tunnels; develop engineering codes which predict the performance characteristics of the ODWE including specific impulse and thrust coefficients for various operating conditions; develop multi-dimensional computer codes which can model all aspects of the ODWE including fuel injection, mixing, ignition, combustion and expansion with fully detailed chemical kinetics and turbulence models; and validate the codes with experimental data use the simulations to predict the ODWE performance for conditions not easily obtained in wind tunnels.

Adelman, H.G.; Menees, G.P.; Cambier, J.L.; Bowles, J.V.

1996-02-01

139

Experimental Study on DDT Characteristics in Spiral Configuration Pulse Detonation Engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work investigated features of the deflagration to detonation transition in a curved tube. A number of experiments were performed to acquire the transition rule of DDT, which would provide the design data and theoretical basis for the curved detonation chamber. The content of research is as follows: (1) Flow resistance experiments of nine detonation chambers have been explored. The results show that the spiral configuration can reduce the axial length of DC, and the total pressure recovery coefficient increases with the spiral pitch. (2) Single-cycle detonation experiments have been conducted using the 9 tubes in the resistance experiments. Liquid-gasoline/air is used as the detonative mixture in all the experiments. The detonation experimental results indicate that there is no detonation wave formed in the straight tube, but in all the selected spiral tubes fully-developed detonation waves have been obtained; compared to the straight tube case, the DDT time decrease with the decreasing of the radius of curvature (RC) by 6.2%˜19.8% in the spiral detonation tubes.

Wang, Wei; Qiu, Hua; Fan, Wei; Xiong, Cha

2013-09-01

140

Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p2/p1 approximately 34 and D approximately 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (approximately = 6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front, In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T, and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Omega. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the NM interaction exerted a negligible influence on system thrust and that the measured I(sub sp) of the system (200 see) exceeded that computed for an equivalent nozzleless rocket (120 see).

Litchford, Ron J.

2001-01-01

141

Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p(sub 2)/p(sub 1) approx. 34 and D approx. 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (=6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front. In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T. and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Ohm. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the MHD interaction exerted a negligible influence on system thrust and that the measured I(sub sp) of the system (200 sec) exceeded that computed for an equivalent nozzleless rocket (120 sec).

Litchford, R. J.; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

142

Numerical study of three-dimensional detonation structure transformations in a narrow square tube: from rectangular and diagonal modes into spinning modes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three-dimensional (3-D) detonation structure transformations from rectangular and diagonal modes into spinning modes in a narrow square tube are investigated by high-resolution simulation. Numerical simulations are performed with a Riemann solver of the HLLC-type, new cell-based structured adaptive mesh refinement data structure, high-order, parallel adaptive mesh refinement reactive flow code. A simplified one-step kinetic reaction model is used to reveal the 3-D detonation structure. The four different types of initial disturbances applied in the ZND profiles lead to the structures of rectangular in phase, rectangular out of phase, rectangular partial out of phase and diagonal, respectively, during the initial stages of detonation propagation. Eventually, all these detonation structures evolve into the self-sustained spinning detonations. The asymmetric disturbance leads to a stable spinning detonation much faster than the rest. The important features in the formation of spinning detonation are revealed using a 3-D visualization, and a remarkable qualitative agreement with experimental and numerical results is obtained with respect to the transverse wave dynamics and detonation front structures. The transverse wave collisions produce the unburnt gas pockets and the energy to sustain the detonation front propagation and distortion. The periodic pressure oscillation of front plays a complex role as it shifts the reaction zone structure with an accompanying change in the driving energy of transition and the detonation parameters which result in the more distorted front and the unstable detonation. Eventually, the unstable distorted detonation evolves into a spinning detonation.

Huang, Y.; Ji, H.; Lien, F.; Tang, H.

2014-07-01

143

Detonator-activated ball shutter  

DOEpatents

A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

McWilliams, Roy A. (Livermore, CA); von Holle, William G. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01

144

Detonator-activated ball shutter  

DOEpatents

A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

1983-08-16

145

Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length.

Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Grubelich, Mark C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01

146

Pulse Detonation Engine Modeled  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pulse Detonation Engine Technology is currently being investigated at Glenn for both airbreathing and rocket propulsion applications. The potential for both mechanical simplicity and high efficiency due to the inherent near-constant-volume combustion process, may make Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE's) well suited for a number of mission profiles. Assessment of PDE cycles requires a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It should capture the essential physics of the system, yet run at speeds that allow parametric analysis. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational-fluid-dynamics-based simulation has been developed that may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used along with a single reactive species transport equation, and submodels to account for dominant loss mechanisms (e.g., viscous losses, heat transfer, and valving) to successfully simulate PDE cycles. A high-resolution numerical integration scheme was chosen to capture the discontinuities associated with detonation, and robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during a given cycle. The accompanying graphs compare experimentally measured and computed performance over a range of operating conditions for a particular PDE. Experimental data were supplied by Fred Schauer and Jeff Stutrud from the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB and by Royce Bradley from Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc. The left graph shows thrust and specific impulse, Isp, as functions of equivalence ratio for a PDE cycle in which the tube is completely filled with a detonable hydrogen/air mixture. The right graph shows thrust and specific impulse as functions of the fraction of the tube that is filled with a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and air. For both figures, the operating frequency was 16 Hz. The agreement between measured and computed values is quite good, both in terms of trend and magnitude. The error is under 10 percent everywhere except for the thrust value at an equivalence ratio of 0.8 in the left figure, where it is 14 percent. The simulation results shown were made using 200 numerical cells. Each cycle of the engine, approximately 0.06 sec, required 2.0 min of CPU time on a Sun Ultra2. The simulation is currently being used to analyze existing experiments, design new experiments, and predict performance in propulsion concepts where the PDE is a component (e.g., hybrid engines and combined cycles).

Paxson, Daniel E.

2001-01-01

147

Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length. 3 figs.

Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.

1999-01-19

148

Detonation diffraction in gases  

SciTech Connect

We have experimentally investigated detonation diffraction out of a round tube into an unconfined half-space. The focus of our study is examining how the extent of detonation cellular instability influences the quantitative and qualitative features of diffraction. Detailed quantitative and qualitative measurements were obtained through simultaneous schlieren imaging, multiple-exposure chemiluminescence imaging, and planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH molecules. Two types of stoichiometric mixtures, highly diluted H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O, were studied in the sub-critical, critical and super-critical regime. These mixture types represent extreme cases in the classification of cellular instability with highly diluted H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixtures having very regular instability structures and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O having very irregular instability structures. The most striking differences between the mixtures occur in the sub-critical and critical regimes, for which the detonation fails to transition into the unconfined half-space. For the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixture, the velocity on the center line was found to decay significantly slower than for the H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture. In case of the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixture, it was evident from simultaneous schlieren-fluorescence images that the reaction front was coupled to the lead shock front up to 2.3 tube diameters from the exit plane. For the H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture, the reaction front velocity decreased to 60% of the corresponding Chapman-Jouguet value at 1.1 tube diameters from the tube exit plane. A geometric acoustic model showed that the observed differences in failure patterns are not caused by the differences in thermodynamic properties of the two mixtures but is linked to the larger effective activation energy and critical decay time in the H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture as compared to the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixture. The re-initiation events appear similar for the two mixtures and are a consequence of local fluctuations at random locations within the region between the lead shock and decoupled reaction zone, resulting in strong transverse detonations sweeping through shocked but largely unreacted gas. (author)

Pintgen, F.; Shepherd, J.E. [California Institute of Technology, Mail stop 105-50, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2009-03-15

149

Design and optimization of a deflagration to detonation transition (ddt) section  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Throughout the previous century, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have used and optimized the `traditional' combustion process called deflagration (subsonic combustion). An alternative form of combustion, detonation (supersonic combustion), can increase the thermal efficiency of the process by anywhere from 20 - 50%. Even though several authors have studied detonation waves since the 1890's and a plethora of papers and books have been published, it was not until 2008 that the first detonation-powered flight took place. It lasted for 10 seconds at 100 ft. altitude. Achieving detonation presents its own challenges: some fuels are not prone to detonate, severe vibrations caused by the cyclic nature of the engine and its intense noise are some of the key areas that need further research. Also, to directly achieve detonation either a high-energy, bulky, ignition system is required, or the combustion chamber must be fairly long (5 ft. or more in some cases). In the latter method, a subsonic flame front accelerates within the combustion chamber until it reaches supersonic speeds, thus detonation is attained. This is called deflagration-todetonation transition (DDT). Previous papers and experiments have shown that obstacles, such as discs with an orifice, located inside the combustion chamber can shorten the distance required to achieve detonation. This paper describes a hands-on implementation of a DDT device. Different disc geometries inside the chamber alter the wave characteristics at the exit of the tube. Although detonation was reached only when using pure oxygen, testing identified an obstacle configuration for LPG and air mixtures that increased pressure and wave speed significantly when compared to baseline or other obstacle configurations. Mixtures of LPG and air were accelerated to Mach 0.96 in the downstream frame of reference, which would indicate a transition to detonation was close. Reasons for not achieving detonation may include poor fuel and oxidizer mixing, and/or the need for a longer DDT section.

Romo, Francisco X.

150

Smooth blasting with the electronic delay detonator  

SciTech Connect

The authors utilized electronic detonators (EDs) to investigate the effect of high detonator delay accuracy on overbreak, remaining rock damage, and surface smoothness, in comparison with that of long-period delay detonators (0.25 sec interval) PDs. The experiments were conducted in a deep mine, in a test site region composed of very hard granodiorite with a seismic wave velocity of about 6.0 km/sec and a uniaxial compressive strength, uniaxial tensile strength, and Young`s modulus of 300 MPa, 12 MPa, and 73 GPa, respectively. The blasting design was for a test tunnel excavation of 8 m{sup 2} in cross section, with an advance per round of 2.5 m. Five rounds were performed, each with a large-hole cut and perimeter holes in a 0.4-m spacing charged with 20-mm-diameter water gel explosive to obtain low charge concentration. EDs were used in the holes on the perimeter of the right half, and PDs were used in all other holes. Following each shot, the cross section was measured by laser to determine amount of overbreak and surface smoothness. In situ seismic prospecting was used to estimate the depth of damage in the remaining rock, and the damage was further investigated by boring into both side walls.

Yamamoto, Masaaki [Asahi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ichijo, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Yoshiharu

1995-12-31

151

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

152

Diamonds in detonation soot  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diamonds 4 to 7 nm in diameter have been identified and partially isolated from soot formed in detonations of carbon-forming composite explosives. The morphology of the soot has been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the identity of the diamond has been established by the electron diffraction pattern of the TEM samples and by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the isolated solid. Graphite is also present in the form of ribbons of turbostatic structure with a thickness of 2 to 4 nm. A fraction, about 25 percent of the soot by weight, was recovered from the crude soot after oxidation of the graphite with fuming perchloric acid. This fraction showed a distinct XRD pattern of diamond and the diffuse band of amorphous carbon. The IR spectrum of these diamonds closely matches that of diamonds recovered from meteorites (Lewis et al., 1987), perhaps indicating similar surface properties after the oxidation. If these diamonds are produced in the detonation itself or during the initial expansion, they exhibit a phenomenal crystal growth rate (5 nm/0.00001 s equal 1.8 m/hr) in a medium with a very low hydrogen/carbon ratio. Because the diamonds will be carried along with the expanding gases, they will be accelerated to velocities approaching 8 km/s.

Greiner, N. Roy; Phillips, Dave; Johnson, J. D.; Volk, Fred

1990-01-01

153

One-Dimensional Shock and Detonation Wave Simulator Philip Caplan Dominic LeBlanc Adam Sirignano Amanda Starr Supervisor: Prof. Andrew J. Higgins April 2012  

E-print Network

(yellow) . Next, a runaway train (red) crashes into the first car. Since the train had a lot of energy, this crash continues down the line of cars and can be thought of as a propagating shock wave. Why a shock wave? Well, the cars, initially at rest, don't see the oncoming crash and are "shocked" when

Peraire, Jaime

154

Investigation of the detonation regimes in gaseous mixtures with suspended starch particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The existence of a secondary discontinuity at the rear of a detonation front shown in experiments by Peraldi and Veyssiere (1986) in stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixtures with suspended 20- ? m starch particles has not been explained satisfactorily. Recently Veyssiere et al. (1997) analyzed these results using a one-dimensional (1-D) numerical model, and concluded that the heat release rate provided by the burning of starch particles in gaseous detonation products is too weak to support a double-front detonation (DFD), in contrast to the case of hybrid mixtures of hydrogen-air with suspended aluminium particles in which a double-front detonation structure was observed by Veyssiere (1986). A two-dimensional (2-D) numerical model was used in the present work to investigate abovementioned experimental results for hybrid mixtures with starch particles. The formation and propagation of the detonation has been examined in the geometry similar to the experimental tube of Peraldi and Veyssiere (1986), which has an area change after 2 m of propagation from the ignition point from a 69 mm dia. section to a 53 mm × 53 mm square cross section corresponding to a 33% area contraction. It is shown that the detonation propagation regime in these experiments has a different nature from the double-front detonation observed in hybrid mixtures with aluminium particles. The detonation propagates as a pseudo-gas detonation (PGD) because starch particles release their heat downstream of the CJ plane giving rise to a non-stationary compression wave. The discontinuity wave at the rear of the detonation front is due to the interaction of the leading detonation front with the tube contraction, and is detected at the farthest pressure gauge location because the tube length is insufficient for the perturbation generated by the tube contraction to decay. Thus, numerical simulations explain experimental observations made by Peraldi and Veyssiere (1986).

Veyssiere, B.; Khasainov, B. A.; Arfi, P.

155

The dynamics of unsteady detonation in ozone  

SciTech Connect

An ultra-fine, sub-micron discrete grid is used to capture the unsteady dynamics of a one-dimensional detonation in an inviscid O - O{sub 2} - O{sub 3} mixture. The ultra-fine grid is necessary to capture the length scales revealed by a complementary analysis of the steady detonation wave structure. For the unsteady calculations, shock-fitting coupled with a high order spatio-temporal discretization scheme combine to render numerical corruption negligible. As a result, mathematically verified solutions for a mixture initially of all O{sub 3} at one atmosphere and 298.15 K have been obtained; the solutions are converging at a rate much faster than the sub-first order convergence rate of all shock-capturing schemes. Additionally, the model has been validated against limited experimental data. Transient calculations show that strongly overdriven waves are stable and moderately overdriven waves unstable. New limit cycle behavior is revealed, and the first high resolution bifurcation diagram for etonation with detailed kinetics is found.

Aslam, Tariq D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Powers, Joseph M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01

156

Detonation spreading in fine TATBs  

SciTech Connect

A test has been devised that permits rapid evaluation of the detonation-spreading (or corner-turning) properties of detonations in insensitive high explosives. The test utilizes a copper witness plate as the medium to capture performance data. Dent depth and shape in the copper are used as quantitative measures of the detonation output and spreading behavior. The merits of the test are that it is easy to perform with no dynamic instrumentation, and the test requires only a few grams of experimental explosive materials.

Kennedy, J.E.; Lee, K.Y.; Spontarelli, T.; Stine, J.R.

1998-12-31

157

Preparation of C60 by Detonation Technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A mixture of TNT (Trinitrotoluene) and natural graphite was detonated in a vacuum container which was immersed into cooling water; detonation products were collected for detecting. The results of mass spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography showed significant signals of C60, which proved that C60 could be synthesized by detonating the mixture of TNT/graphite and the detonation pressure was around 12.3 GPa and the detonation temperature was around 1985 K.

Wei, Xianfeng; Han, Yong; Long, Xinping

2012-11-01

158

The role of cellular structure on increasing the detonability limits of three-step chain-branching detonations  

SciTech Connect

In [1], the dynamics of a pulsating three-step chain-branching detonation were studied. The reaction model consists of, sequentially, chain-initiation, chain-branching and chain-termination steps. The chain-initiation and chain-branching steps are taken to be thermally neutral, with chemical energy release occuring in the chain-termination stage. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether cellular detonation structure can increase the value of the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b} at which fully coupled detonation solutions are observed over those in 1 D. The basic concept is straightforward and has been discussed in [1] and [3]; if T{sub s} drops below T{sub b} at the lead shock, the passage of a transverse shock can increase both the lead shock temperature and the temperature behind the transverse wave back above T{sub b}, thus sustaining an unstable cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} for which a one-dimensional pulsating detonation will fail. Experiments potentially supporting this hypothesis with irregular detonations have been shown in [3] in a shock tube with acoustically absorbing walls. Removal of the transverse waves results in detonation failure, giving way to a decoupled shock-flame complex. A number of questions remain to be addressed regarding the possibility of such a mechanism, and, if so, about the precise mechanisms driving the cellular structure for large T{sub b}. For instance, one might ask what sets the cell size in a chain-branching detonation, particularly could the characteristic cell size be set by the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b}: after a transverse wave shock collision, the strength of the transverse wave weakens as it propagates along the front. If the spacing between shock collisions is too large (cell size), then the transverse shocks may weaken to the extent that the lead shock temperature or that behind the transverse waves is not raised above T{sub b}, losing chemical energy to drive the front in those regions. Failure may result if less than sufficient of the lead shock be driven above n to sustain reaction. Our starting point for generating cellular solutions is as in [I], consisting of an initial ZND wave in the channel, but perturbed here by a density non-uniformity to generate a cellular structure. Exactly how far the detonability limits (value of T{sub b}) can be extended is not addressed here, as such issues relate in part to the way the cellular structure is generated [6]. Our concern here is to investigate the mechanisms of self-sustained cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} above those that lead to 1D pulsating wave failure that can be generated from the initial ZND wave. Finally, we do not consider cellular propagation driven by a process of apparent thermal ignition of hot-spots downstream that tends to appear close to the 20 detonability limit. Such events are subject to the lack of correct thermal diffusive physics in the model and thus to the form of numerical dissipation in the underlying flow algorithm.

Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiyanda, Charles B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quirk, James J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharpe, Gary J [UNIV OF LEEDS, UK

2011-01-27

159

Applications of classical detonation theory  

SciTech Connect

Classical detonation theory is the basis for almost all calculations of explosive systems. One common type of calculation is of the detailed behavior of inert parts driven by explosive, predicting pressures, velocities, positions, densities, energies, etc as functions of time. Another common application of the theory is predicting the detonation state and expansion isentrope of a new explosive or mixtures, perhaps an explosive that has not yet been made. Both types of calculations are discussed.

Davis, W.C.

1994-09-01

160

Theory of interactions of thin strong detonations with turbulent gases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the exact small-amplitude linear Laplace-transform theory describing the propagation of an initially planar detonation front through a gaseous mixture with nonuniform density perturbations, complementing earlier normal-mode results for nonuniform velocity perturbations. The investigation considers the fast-reaction limit in which the detonation thickness is much smaller than the size of the density perturbations, so that the detonation can be treated as an infinitesimally thin front with associated jump conditions given by the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. The analytical development gives the exact transient evolution of the detonation front and the associated disturbance patterns generated behind for a single-mode density field, including explicit expressions for the distributions of density, pressure, and velocity. The results are then used in a Fourier analysis of the detonation interaction with two-dimensional and three-dimensional isotropic density fields to provide integral formulas for the kinetic energy, enstrophy, and density amplification. Dependencies of the solution on the heat-release parameter and propagation Mach number are discussed, along with differences and similarities with results of previous analyses for non-reacting shock waves.

Huete, César; Sánchez, Antonio L.; Williams, Forman A.

2013-07-01

161

Development of an Actuator for Flow Control Utilizing Detonation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Active flow control devices including mass injection systems and zero-net-mass flux actuators (synthetic jets) have been employed to delay flow separation. These devices are capable of interacting with low-speed, subsonic flows, but situations exist where a stronger crossflow interaction is needed. Small actuators that utilize detonation of premixed fuel and oxidizer should be capable of producing supersonic exit jet velocities. An actuator producing exit velocities of this magnitude should provide a more significant interaction with transonic and supersonic crossflows. This concept would be applicable to airfoils on high-speed aircraft as well as inlet and diffuser flow control. The present work consists of the development of a detonation actuator capable of producing a detonation in a single shot (one cycle). Multiple actuator configurations, initial fill pressures, oxidizers, equivalence ratios, ignition energies, and the addition of a turbulence generating device were considered experimentally and computationally. It was found that increased initial fill pressures and the addition of a turbulence generator aided in the detonation process. The actuators successfully produced Chapman-Jouguet detonations and wave speeds on the order of 3000 m/s.

Lonneman, Patrick J.; Cutler, Andrew D.

2004-01-01

162

Detonation tube impulse in sub-atmospheric environments.  

SciTech Connect

The thrust from a multi-cycle, pulse detonation engine operating at practical flight altitudes will vary with the surrounding environment pressure. We have carried out the first experimental study using a detonation tube hung in a ballistic pendulum arrangement within a large pressure vessel in order to determine the effect that the environment has on the single-cycle impulse. The air pressure inside the vessel surrounding the detonation tube varied between 100 and 1.4 kPa while the initial pressure of the stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen mixture inside the tube varied between 100 and 30 kPa. The original impulse model (Wintenberger et al., Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2002) was modified to predict the observed increase in impulse and blow down time as the environment pressure decreased below one atmosphere. Comparisons between the impulse from detonation tubes and ideal, steady flow rockets indicate incomplete expansion of the detonation tube exhaust, resulting in a 37% difference in impulse at a pressure ratio (ratio of pressure behind the Taylor wave to the environment pressure) of 100.

Cooper, Marcia A.; Shepherd, Joseph E. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA)

2005-04-01

163

Influence of walls on pressure behind self-sustained expanding cylindrical and plane detonations in gases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Desbordes et al. (1981) have shown that, in gaseous mixtures, the pressure evolution of self-sustained spherical and hemispherical detonation waves, is quite well predicted by the ideal one-dimensional model of Zeldovitch (1942) and Taylor (1950) (ZT model). It is usually assumed that the properties of the detonation front depend on wall effects in such cases. The present investigation has the objective to obtain more insight into observed phenomena by conducting new experiments in a large-diameter cylindrical detonation tube. The experiments show that the steady detonation velocity in tubes varies with the interior diameter of the tube. The pressure evolution of burnt gases in stable cylindrical expanding detonations is found to be well predicted by the ZT model.

Desbordes, D.; Manson, N.; Brossard, J.

164

Laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts in silica  

SciTech Connect

We develop a model based on simulation and extensive experimentation that explains the behavior of solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts generated in fused silica during high intensity (up to 5 GW/cm{sup 2}) laser exposure. Both experiments and simulations show that the absorption front velocity is constant in time and is nearly linear in laser intensity. Further, this model can explain the dependence of laser damage site size on these parameters. We show that these absorption fronts naturally result from the combination of high-temperature-activated deep subband-gap optical absorptivity, free-electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15 000 K and pressures <10 GPa. The regime of parameter space critical to this problem spans and extends that measured by other means. It serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

Carr, C. W.; Bude, J. D.; DeMange, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-11-01

165

Laser supported solid state absorption fronts in silica  

SciTech Connect

We develop a model based on simulation and experiment that explains the behavior of solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts generated in fused silica during high intensity (up to 5GW/cm{sup 2}) laser exposure. We find that the absorption front velocity is constant in time and is nearly linear in laser intensity. Further, this model can explain the dependence of laser damage site size on these parameters. This behavior is driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. The regime of parameter space critical to this problem spans and extends that measured by other means. It serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

Carr, C W; Bude, J D

2010-02-09

166

The Los Alamos detonating pellet test (DPT): PBX 9501 evaluation tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High explosive (HE) Velocity of Detonation (VOD) measurements are usually conducted using rate-stick-type tests. This method is highly accurate if carefully implemented, but is relatively costly and may require kilograms or more of HE depending on its sensitivity. We present a novel technique for inferring VOD using a single HE pellet, which for Conventional High Explosives (CHEs) can use 10 gm of HE or even less. This attribute makes the Detonating Pellet Test (DPT) ideal for the preliminary performance characterization of newly synthesized HE materials. On the other end of the size spectrum, the DPT can be scaled to very large dimensions so as to minimize the HE load necessary to characterize highly insensitive HEs such as ANFO. The DPT exploits the fact that the detonation emerging from the pellet face can be made highly spherical over some central region. Spherical detonation breakout on the Sample Pellet (SP) face is described by a simple analytic equation, which depends on the VOD and the Center Of Initiation (COI). The latter is determined by separate characterization of the detonator, with a wave refraction correction at the detonator/SP interface. The SP VOD is then determined by fitting the ideal breakout equation, with specified detonator COI, to detonation breakout data obtained via streak camera. We develop the DPT method and appraise it using sample PBX 9501 data in particular, while discussing its benefits and limitations in general.

Preston, D. N.; Hill, L. G.; Tappan, B. C.

2014-05-01

167

Detonation in TATB Hemispheres  

SciTech Connect

Streak camera breakout and Fabry-Perot interferometer data have been taken on the outer surface of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3} TATB hemispherical boosters initiated by slapper detonators at three temperatures. The slapper causes breakout to occur at 54{sup o} at ambient temperatures and 42{sup o} at -54 C, where the axis of rotation is 0{sup o}. The Fabry velocities may be associated with pressures, and these decrease for large timing delays in breakout seen at the colder temperatures. At room temperature, the Fabry pressures appear constant at all angles. Both fresh and decade-old explosive are tested and no difference is seen. The problem has been modeled with reactive flow. Adjustment of the JWL for temperature makes little difference, but cooling to -54 C decreases the rate constant by 1/6th. The problem was run both at constant density and with density differences using two different codes. The ambient code results show that a density difference is probably there but it cannot be quantified.

Druce, B; Souers, P C; Chow, C; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Hrousis, C

2004-03-17

168

Development and qualification testing of a laser-ignited, all-secondary (DDT) detonator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHDIV, NSWC) is conducting a qualification program for a laser-ignited, all-secondary (DDT) explosive detonator. This detonator was developed jointly by IHDIV, NSWC and the Department of Energy's EG&G Mound Applied Technologies facility in Miamisburg, Ohio to accept a laser initiation signal and produce a fully developed shock wave output. The detonator performance requirements were established by the on-going IHDIV, NSWC Laser Initiated Transfer Energy Subsystem (LITES) advanced development program. Qualification of the detonator as a component utilizing existing military specifications is the selected approach for this program. The detonator is a deflagration-to-detonator transfer (DDT) device using a secondary explosive, HMX, to generate the required shock wave output. The prototype development and initial system integration tests for the LITES and for the detonator were reported at the 1992 International Pyrotechnics Society Symposium and at the 1992 Survival and Flight Equipment National Symposium. Recent results are presented for the all-fire sensitivity and qualification tests conducted at two different laser initiation pulses.

Blachowski, Thomas J.; Krivitsky, Darrin Z.; Tipton, Stephen

1994-01-01

169

On the neutralization of bacterial spores in post-detonation flows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In multiple operational scenarios, explosive charges are used to neutralize confined or unconfined stores of bacterial spores. The spore destruction is achieved by post-detonation combustion and mixing of hot detonation product gases with the ambient flow and spore clouds. In this work, blast wave interaction with bacterial spore clouds and the effect of post-detonation combustion on spore neutralization are investigated using numerical simulations. Spherical explosive charges (radius, = 5.9 cm) comprising of nitromethane are modeled in the vicinity of a spore cloud, and the spore kill in the post-detonation flow is quantified. The effect of the mass of the spores and the initial distance, , of the spore cloud from the explosive charge on the percentage of spores neutralized is investigated. When the spores are initially placed within a distance of 3.0, within 0.1 ms after detonation of the charge, all the spores are neutralized by the blast wave and the hot detonation product gases. In contrast, almost all the spores survived the explosion when is greater than 8.0. The percentage of intact spores varied from 0 to 100 for 3.0 8.0 with spore neutralization dependent on time spent by the spores in the post-detonation mixing/combustion zone.

Gottiparthi, K. C.; Schulz, J. C.; Menon, S.

2014-09-01

170

Stability of cosmological detonation fronts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The steady-state propagation of a phase-transition front is classified, according to hydrodynamics, as a deflagration or a detonation, depending on its velocity with respect to the fluid. These propagation modes are further divided into three types, namely, weak, Jouguet, and strong solutions, according to their disturbance of the fluid. However, some of these hydrodynamic modes will not be realized in a phase transition. One particular cause is the presence of instabilities. In this work we study the linear stability of weak detonations, which are generally believed to be stable. After discussing in detail the weak detonation solution, we consider small perturbations of the interface and the fluid configuration. When the balance between the driving and friction forces is taken into account, it turns out that there are actually two different kinds of weak detonations, which behave very differently as functions of the parameters. We show that the branch of stronger weak detonations are unstable, except very close to the Jouguet point, where our approach breaks down.

Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín

2014-05-01

171

DSD front models : nonideal explosive detonation  

SciTech Connect

The Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) method for propagating detonation in numerical simulation of detonation in high explosive (HE) is based on three elements: (1) a subscale theory of multi-dimensional detonation that treats the evolving detonation as a front with dynamics that depends only on metrics of the front (such as curvature, etc.), (2) high-resolution direct numerical sirnuliltion of detonation serving both to test existing subscale theories and suggest modifications, and (3) physical experiments to characterize multi-dimensional detonation propagation on real explosives and to calibrate the front models for use in engineering simulations. In this paper we describe our work on all three of these elements of the DSD method as it applies to detonation in nonideal explosives.

Bdzil, J. B. (John Bohdan); Short, M. (Mark Short); Aslam, T. D. (Tariq D.); Catanach, R. A. (Richard A.); Hill, L. G. (Larry G.)

2001-01-01

172

Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators  

SciTech Connect

The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The implementation of energetic sol-gel coated metallic multilayers, as new small IIDs will result in dramatically reduced environmental risks and improved worker and user safety risks without any sacrifice in the performance of the device. The proposed effort is designed to field an IID that is free of toxic (e.g., tetrazene) and heavy metal constituents (e.g., lead styphnate, lead azide, barium nitrate, and antimony sulfides) present in the NOL-130 initiating mixture and in the lead azide transfer charge of current stab detonators. The preferred materials for this project are nanocomposites consisting of thin foils of metallic multilayers, composed of nanometer thick regions of different metals, coated with a sol-gel derived energetic material. The favored metals for the multilayers will be main-group and early transition metals such as, but not limited to, boron, aluminum, silicon, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. Candidate sol-gel energetic materials include iron (III) oxide/aluminum nanocomposites. It should be noted that more traditional materials than sol-gel might also be used with the flash metals. The metallic multilayers undergo an exothermic transition to a more stable intermetallic alloy with the appropriate mechanical or thermal stimulus. This exothermic transition has sufficient output energy to initiate the more energy dense sol-gel energetic material, or other candidate materials. All of the proposed initiation mix materials and their reaction by products have low toxicity, are safe to handle and dispose of, and provide much less environmental and health concerns than the current composition. We anticipate that the technology and materials proposed here will be produced successfully in production scale with very competitive costs with existing IIDs, when amortized over the production lifetime. The sol-gel process is well known and used extensively in industry for coatings applications. All of the proposed feedstock components are mass-produced and have relatively low costs. The multilayer deposition equipment is commercially available and the technology is wide

Gash, A E

2006-07-07

173

Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition Induced by Hot Jets in a Supersonic Premixed Airstream  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detonation is initiated through a hot jet in a supersonic premixed mixture of H2 and air, which is produced by using a air heater. The results show that initiation fails in the low-equivalence-ratio premixed gas. With the increase of equivalence ratio, the hot jet can induce deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) in the premixed mixture, which an indirect initiation of detonation. Further studies show that the DDT process is due to the combined effect of a local hemispherical explosion shock wave, the bow shock, and the flame produced by the hot jet.

Han, Xu; Zhou, Jin; Lin, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Yu

2013-05-01

174

Multiplicity of detonation regimes in systems with a multi-peaked thermicity  

E-print Network

The study investigates detonations with multiple quasi-steady velocities that have been observed in the past in systems with multi-peaked thermicity, using Fickett's detonation analogue. A steady state analysis of the travelling wave predicts multiple states, however, all but the one with the highest velocity develop a singularity after the sonic point. Simulations show singularities are associated with a shock wave which overtakes all sonic points, establishing a detonation travelling the highest of the predicted velocities. Under a certain parameter range, the steady-state detonation can have multiple sonic points and solutions. Embedded shocks can exist behind sonic points, where they link the weak and strong solutions. Sonic points whose characteristics do not diverge are found to be unstable, and to be the source of the embedded shocks. Numerical simulations show that these shocks are only quasi stable. This is believed to be due to the reaction rates having been chosen to be independent of hydrodynamics...

Lau-Chapdelaine, S SM; Zhang, F; Radulescu, M I

2015-01-01

175

Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent magnet assembly were then installed on Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) rectangular channel pulse detonation research engine. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power extraction experiments were carried out for a range of load impedances in which cesium hydroxide seed (dissolved in methanol) was sprayed into the gaseous oxygen/hydrogen propellants. Positive power extraction was obtained, but preliminary analysis of the data indicated that the plasma electrical conductivity is lower than anticipated and the near-electrode voltage drop is not negligible. It is believed that the electrical conductivity is reduced due to a large population of negative OH ions. This occurs because OH has a strong affinity for capturing free electrons. The effect of near-electrode voltage drop is associated with the high surface-to-volume ratio of the channel (1-inch by 1-inch cross-section) where surface effects play a dominant role. As usual for MHD devices, higher performance will require larger scale devices. Overall, the gathered data is extremely valuable from the standpoint of understanding plasma behavior and for developing empirical scaling laws.

Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

176

Effect of surface roughness of charge hole on detonation propagation of emulsion explosive  

SciTech Connect

In the present study, some experimental work was performed to investigate the effects of surface roughness of the charge hole on the velocity of the precursor air shock wave. Photographic observation was performed using rectangular PMMA tubes with sandpaper on inner wall to simulate surface roughness for various decoupling coefficients. The experimental results indicate that the increase of surface roughness of the tube wall reduces the precursor air shock wave velocity and prevents detonation failure. It is shown that detonation failure occurs when the ratio of the precursor air shock wave velocity to detonation velocity becomes greater than 1.21 in the case of a rectangular PMMA tube. Precursor air shock wave velocity and detonation velocity were measured using PVC pipes of various inner diameters with sandpaper on the inner wall to simulate actual charge hole roughness. Sample explosive confined in polyethylene tubes of 20 mm in diameter was placed on the inner wall of the PVC pipe. The experimental results show that the increase of surface roughness of the PVC pipe decreases the velocity of the precursor air shock wave and improves the detonation propagation of explosive in the PVC pipe. It is shown that detonation failure occurs when the ratio of the precursor air shock wave velocity to detonation velocity exceeds 1.1 times in the case of the PVC pipe. The difference observed between the experiments with a rectangular PMMA tube and those with a circular PVC pipe is due to the difference of precompression mode of unreacted explosive by precursor air shock waves.

Sumiya, Fumihiko; Hirosaki, Yoshikazu; Katoh, Yukio [NOF Corp., Aichi (Japan). Explosive and Blasting Research Group; Wada, Yuji; Ogata, Yuji; Katsuyama, Kunihisa [National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-01

177

Theoretical analysis of rotating two phase detonation in a rocket motor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tangential mode, non-linear wave motion in a liquid propellant rocket engine is studied, using a two phase detonation wave as the reaction model. Because the detonation wave is followed immediately by expansion waves, due to the side relief in the axial direction, it is a Chapman-Jouguet wave. The strength of this wave, which may be characterized by the pressure ratio across the wave, as well as the wave speed and the local wave Mach number, are related to design parameters such as the contraction ratio, chamber speed of sound, chamber diameter, propellant injection density and velocity, and the specific heat ratio of the burned gases. In addition, the distribution of flow properties along the injector face can be computed. Numerical calculations show favorable comparison with experimental findings. Finally, the effects of drop size are discussed and a simple criterion is found to set the lower limit of validity of this strong wave analysis.

Shen, I.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

1973-01-01

178

Numerical study of chemically reacting viscous flow relevant to pulsed detonation engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A computational fluid dynamics code for two-dimensional, multi-species, laminar Navier-Stokes equations is developed to simulate a recently proposed engine concept for a pulsed detonation based propulsion system and to investigate the feasibility of the engine of the concept. The governing equations that include transport phenomena such as viscosity, thermal conduction and diffusion are coupled with chemical reactions. The gas is assumed to be thermally perfect and in chemically non-equilibrium. The stiffness due to coupling the fluid dynamics and the chemical kinetics is properly taken care of by using a time-operator splitting method and a variable coefficient ordinary differential equation solver. A second-order Roe scheme with a minmod limiter is explicitly used for space descretization, while a second-order, two-step Runge-Kutta method is used for time descretization. In space integration, a finite volume method and a cell-centered scheme are employed. The first-order derivatives in the equations of transport properties are discretized by a central differencing with Green's theorem. Detailed chemistry is involved in this study. Two chemical reaction mechanisms are extracted from GRI-Mech, which are forty elementary reactions with thirteen species for a hydrogen-air mixture and twenty-seven reactions with eight species for a hydrogen-oxygen mixture. The code is ported to a high-performance parallel machine with Message-Passing Interface. Code validation is performed with chemical kinetic modeling for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture, an one-dimensional detonation tube, a two-dimensional, inviscid flow over a wedge and a viscous flow over a flat plate. Detonation is initiated using a numerically simulated arc-ignition or shock-induced ignition system. Various freestream conditions are utilized to study the propagation of the detonation in the proposed concept of the engine. Investigation of the detonation propagation is performed for a pulsed detonation rocket and a supersonic combustion chamber. For a pulsed detonation rocket case, the detonation tube is embedded in a mixing chamber where an initiator is added to the main detonation chamber. Propagating detonation waves in a supersonic combustion chamber is investigated for one- and two-dimensional cases. The detonation initiated by an arc and a shock wave is studied in the inviscid and viscous flow, respectively. Various features including a detonation-shock interaction, a detonation diffraction, a base flow and a vortex are observed.

Yi, Tae-Hyeong

2005-11-01

179

Detonation Initiation by Shock Reflection from an Orifice Plate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results from an experimental investigation of the interaction of a “non-ideal” shock wave and a single obstacle are reported. The shock wave is produced ahead of an accelerated flame in a 14 cm inner-diameter tube partially filled with orifice plates. The shock wave interacts with a single larger blockage orifice plate placed 15-45 cm after the last orifice plate in the flame acceleration section of the tube. Experiments were performed with stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen mixtures with varying amounts of nitrogen dilution at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The critical nitrogen dilution was found for detonation initiation. It is shown that detonation initiation occurs if the chemical induction time based on the reflected shock state is shorter than the time required for an acoustic wave to traverse the orifice plate upstream surface, from the inner to the outer diameter. The similarity between the present results and those obtained from previous investigators looking at detonation initiation by ideal shock reflection produced in a shock tube indicates that the phenomenon is not sensitive to the detailed structure of the shock front but only on the average shock strength.

Ciccarelli, G.; de Witt, B.

2006-07-01

180

Chemical Energy Release in Several Recently Discovered Detonation and Deflagration Flows  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several recent experiments on complex detonation and deflagration flows are analyzed in terms of the chemical energy release required to sustain these flows. The observed double cellular structures in detonating gaseous nitromethane–oxygen and NO2–fuel (H2, CH4, and C2H6) mixtures are explained by the amplification of two distinct pressure wave frequencies by two exothermic reactions, the faster reaction forming vibrationally excited

Craig M. Tarver

2010-01-01

181

Rotating Detonation Combustion: A Computational Study for Stationary Power Generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increased availability of gaseous fossil fuels in The US has led to the substantial growth of stationary Gas Turbine (GT) usage for electrical power generation. In fact, from 2013 to 2104, out of the 11 Tera Watts-hour per day produced from fossil fuels, approximately 27% was generated through the combustion of natural gas in stationary GT. The thermodynamic efficiency for simple-cycle GT has increased from 20% to 40% during the last six decades, mainly due to research and development in the fields of combustion science, material science and machine design. However, additional improvements have become more costly and more difficult to obtain as technology is further refined. An alternative to improve GT thermal efficiency is the implementation of a combustion regime leading to pressure-gain; rather than pressure loss across the combustor. One concept being considered for such purpose is Rotating Detonation Combustion (RDC). RDC refers to a combustion regime in which a detonation wave propagates continuously in the azimuthal direction of a cylindrical annular chamber. In RDC, the fuel and oxidizer, injected from separated streams, are mixed near the injection plane and are then consumed by the detonation front traveling inside the annular gap of the combustion chamber. The detonation products then expand in the azimuthal and axial direction away from the detonation front and exit through the combustion chamber outlet. In the present study Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used to predict the performance of Rotating Detonation Combustion (RDC) at operating conditions relevant to GT applications. As part of this study, a modeling strategy for RDC simulations was developed. The validation of the model was performed using benchmark cases with different levels of complexity. First, 2D simulations of non-reactive shock tube and detonation tubes were performed. The numerical predictions that were obtained using different modeling parameters were compared with analytical solutions in order to quantify the numerical error in the simulations. Additionally, experimental data from laboratory scale combustors was used to validate 2D and 3D numerical simulations. The effects of different modeling parameters on RDC predictions was also studied. The validated simulation strategy was then used to assess the performance of RDC for different combustion chamber geometries and operating conditions relevant to GT applications. As a result, the limiting conditions for which continuous detonation and pressure gain combustion can be achieved were predicted and the effect of operating conditions on flow structures and RDC performance was assessed. The modeling strategy and the results from this study could be further used to design more efficient and more stable RDC systems.

Escobar, Sergio

182

Investigation of organic dust detonation in the presence of chemically inert particles  

SciTech Connect

The results of experimental studies of organic dust detonation in the presence of chemically inert particles are presented. Tests were carried out using a vertical detonation tube, and direct streak pictures showing the flame acceleration and pressure and temperature records were obtained. Flax dust, dispersed in an oxygen atmosphere, was used as the fuel, and two kinds of quartz sand were introduced as nonreacting particles. It was found that addition of inert particles caused a linear decrease of the detonation wave velocity but had no special influence on the transition distance. Calculations using the Gordon McBride Code showed that propagation of the detonation wave in a dust-oxygen mixture requires that the dust particles burnout at a level of about 70% but addition of inert particles increased the necessary burnout level to over 80% (with a significant decrease of the detonation wave velocity). The aim of this work was to investigate the processes of flame self acceleration and transition to detonation in mixtures of organic dust with oxygen and to investigate the influence of chemically neutral particles (used as a flame inhibiting agent) on these processes.

Klemens, R.; Kapuscinski, M.; Wolinski, M.; Wolanski, P. (Politechnika Warszawa (Poland). Instytut Techniki Cieplnej); Sichel, M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering)

1994-12-01

183

Fiber Bragg grating sensing of detonation and shock experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An all optical-fiber-based approach to measuring high explosive detonation front position and velocity is described. By measuring total light return using an incoherent light source reflected from a fiber Bragg grating sensor in contact with the explosive, dynamic mapping of the detonation front position and velocity versus time is obtained. We demonstrate two calibration procedures and provide several examples of detonation front measurements: PBX 9502 cylindrical rate stick, radial detonation front in PBX 9501, and PBX 9501 detonation along a curved meridian line. In the cylindrical rate stick measurement, excellent agreement with complementary diagnostics (electrical pins and streak camera imaging) is achieved, demonstrating accuracy in the detonation front velocity to below the 0.3% level when compared to the results from the pin data. In a similar approach, we use embedded fiber grating sensors for dynamic pressure measurements to test the feasibility of these sensors for high pressure shock wave research in gas gun driven flyer plate impact experiments. By applying well-controlled steady shock wave pressure profiles to soft materials such as PMMA, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave. Comparison of the fiber sensor results is then made with traditional methods (velocimetry and electro-magnetic particle velocity gauges) to gauge the accuracy of the approach.

Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Jackson, S. I.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Vincent, S. W.; McCulloch, Q.; Martinez, R. M.; Gilbertson, S. M.; Udd, E.

2013-05-01

184

The development and testing of pulsed detonation engine ground demonstrators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The successful implementation of a PDE running on fuel and air mixtures will require fast-acting fuel-air injection and mixing techniques, detonation initiation techniques such as DDT enhancing devices or a pre-detonator, an effective ignition system that can sustain repeated firing at high rates and a fast and capable, closed-loop control system. The control system requires high-speed transducers for real-time monitoring of the PDE and the detection of the detonation wave speed. It is widely accepted that the detonation properties predicted by C-J detonation relations are fairly accurate in comparison to experimental values. The post-detonation flow properties can also be expressed as a function of wave speed or Mach number. Therefore, the PDE control system can use C-J relations to predict the post-detonation flow properties based on measured initial conditions and compare the values with those obtained from using the wave speed. The controller can then vary the initial conditions within the combustor for the subsequent cycle, by modulating the frequency and duty cycle of the valves, to obtain optimum air and fuel flow rates, as well as modulate the energy and timing of the ignition to achieve the required detonation properties. Five different PDE ground demonstrators were designed, built and tested to study a number of the required sub-systems. This work presents a review of all the systems that were tested, along with suggestions for their improvement. The PDE setups, ranged from a compact PDE with a 19 mm (3/4 in.) i.d., to two 25 mm (1 in.) i.d. setups, to a 101 mm (4 in.) i.d. dual-stage PDE setup with a pre-detonator. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in the smaller PDEs. In the dual-stage PDE, propane-oxygen was used in the pre-detonator, while propane-air mixtures were used in the main combustor. Both rotary valves and solenoid valve injectors were studied. The rotary valves setups were tested at 10 Hz, while the solenoid valves were tested at up to 30 Hz on a 25 mm i.d. PDE. The dual-stage PDE was run at both 1 Hz and 10 Hz using solenoid valves. The two types of valves have their drawbacks and advantages which are discussed, along with ways to enhance their functionality. Rotary valves with stepper motor drives are recommended to be used for air flow control, while an array of solenoid injectors may be used for liquid or gaseous fuel injection. Various DDT enhancing devices were tested, including Shchelkin spirals (with varying thicknesses, lengths and pitches), grooved sleeves and converging-diverging nozzles. The Shchelkin spirals are found to be the most effective of all, at blockage ratios in the region of 50 to 55%. To improve the durability of Shchelkin spirals, it is recommended that they be grooved into the inside of tubes or inserted as replaceable sleeves. Orifice plates with high blockage ratios, in the region of 50 to 80%, are also recommended due to their simple and rugged design. All these devices along with the PDE combustor will require a strong cooling system to prevent damage from the extreme detonation temperatures. High energy (HE) and low energy (LE) ignition systems were tested and compared along with various designs of igniters and automotive spark plugs. It is concluded that while HE ignition may help unsensitized fuel-air mixtures to achieve detonations faster than LE systems, the former have severe drawbacks. The HE igniters get damaged quickly, and require large and heavy power supplies. While the HE ignition is able to reduce ignition delay in a propane-oxygen pre-detonator, it did not show a significant improvement in bringing about DDT in the main combustor using propane-air mixtures. The compact pre-detonator design with a gradual area change transitioning to a larger combustor is found to be effective for detonation initiation, but the pre-detonator concept is recommended for high-speed applications only, since higher speeds requires more sensitive, easily detonable fuels that have short ignition delays and DDT run-up distances. Dynamic pressure transducers, ion detectors and p

Panicker, Philip Koshy

2008-10-01

185

Deflagration to detonation transition fueled by dust layers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The roles which dust layers play in severe dust explosions were investigated in a 70 m long and 30 cm inside diameter horizontal Flame Acceleration Tube (FAT) with one end closed and the other end open to the atmosphere. A variety of dusts such as corn dust, cornstarch, Mira Gel starch, wheat dust, and wood flour were layered on the bottom half of the FAT. To initiate the combustion process, a detonation tube filled with a stoichiometric H2/O2 mixture at room temperature and 1 atm pressure was used to ignite a short presuspended dust cloud with a dust concentration of 500 600 g/m3. Combustion waves generated by this dust cloud travel toward the open end of the FAT and are continuously fueled by the dust/air mixtures. Flame propagation processes in the FAT were closely monitored by a variety of measuring instruments at different locations. The study demonstrates that stable quasi-detonation were reached in some runs, but self-sustained Chapman-Jouguet detonations were not observed possibly due to the limitation of the tube length. Attempts were made to determine the structure of dust detonations fueled by a dust layer. Preliminary evidence indicates that for Mira Gel starch the leading shock is essentially a triple shock configuration which involves a Mach stem and for wheat and wood dusts there possibly exists a multi-headed spin structure.

Li, Y.-C.; Harbaugh, A. S.; Alexander, C. G.; Kauffman, C. W.; Sichel, M.

1995-12-01

186

Multi-Level Analysis of Pulsed Detonation Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present study explores some issues concerning the operational performance of pulsed detonation engines. Zero-, one- and two-dimensional, transient models are employed in a synergistic manner to elucidate the various characteristics that can be expected from each level of analysis. The zero-dimensional model provides rapid parametric trends that help to identify the global characteristics of pulsed detonation engines. The one-dimensional model adds key wave propagation issues that are omitted in the zero-dimensional model and helps to assess its limitations. Finally, the two-dimensional model allows estimates of the first-order multi-dimensional effects and provides an initial multi-dimensional end-correction for the one-dimensional model. The zero-dimensional results indicate that the pulsed detonation engine is competitive with a rocket engine when exhausting to vacuum conditions. At finite back pressures, the PDE out-performs the rocket if the combustion pressure rise from the detonation is added to the chamber pressure in the rocket. If the two peak pressures are the same, the rocket performance is higher. Two-dimensional corrections added to the one-dimensional model result in a modest improvement in predicted specific impulse over the constant pressure boundary condition.

Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

2001-01-01

187

Pulse detonation engines and components thereof  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A pulse detonation engine comprises a primary air inlet; a primary air plenum located in fluid communication with the primary air inlet; a secondary air inlet; a secondary air plenum located in fluid communication with the secondary air inlet, wherein the secondary air plenum is substantially isolated from the primary air plenum; a pulse detonation combustor comprising a pulse detonation chamber, wherein the pulse detonation chamber is located downstream of and in fluid communication with the primary air plenum; a coaxial liner surrounding the pulse detonation combustor defining a cooling plenum, wherein the cooling plenum is in fluid communication with the secondary air plenum; an axial turbine assembly located downstream of and in fluid communication with the pulse detonation combustor and the cooling plenum; and a housing encasing the primary air plenum, the secondary air plenum, the pulse detonation combustor, the coaxial liner, and the axial turbine assembly.

Tangirala, Venkat Eswarlu (Inventor); Rasheed, Adam (Inventor); Vandervort, Christian Lee (Inventor); Dean, Anthony John (Inventor)

2009-01-01

188

Development of a Gas-Fed Pulse Detonation Research Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In response to the growing need for empirical data on pulse detonation engine performance and operation, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and placed into operation a low-cost gas-fed pulse detonation research engine. The guiding design strategy was to achieve a simple and flexible research apparatus, which was inexpensive to build and operate. As such, the engine was designed to operate as a heat sink device, and testing was limited to burst-mode operation with run durations of a few seconds. Wherever possible, maximum use was made of standard off-the-shelf industrial or automotive components. The 5-cm diameter primary tube is about 90-cm long and has been outfitted with a multitude of sensor and optical ports. The primary tube is fed by a coaxial injector through an initiator tube, which is inserted directly into the injector head face. Four auxiliary coaxial injectors are also integrated into the injector head assembly. All propellant flow is controlled with industrial solenoid valves. An automotive electronic ignition system was adapted for use, and spark plugs are mounted in both tubes so that a variety of ignition schemes can be examined. A microprocessor-based fiber-optic engine control system was developed to provide precise control over valve and ignition timing. Initial shakedown testing with hydrogen/oxygen mixtures verified the need for Schelkin spirals in both the initiator and primary tubes to ensure rapid development of the detonation wave. Measured pressure wave time-of-flight indicated detonation velocities of 2.4 km/sec and 2.2 km/sec in the initiator and primary tubes, respectively. These values implied a fuel-lean mixture corresponding to an H2 volume fraction near 0.5. The axial distribution for the detonation velocity was found to be essentially constant along the primary tube. Time-resolved thrust profiles were also acquired for both underfilled and overfilled tube conditions. These profiles are consistent with previous time-resolved measurements on single-cycle tubes where the thrust is found to peak as the detonation wave exits the tube, and decay as the tube blows down.

Litchford, Ron J.; Hutt, John (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

189

MULTI-DIMENSIONAL MODELS FOR DOUBLE DETONATION IN SUB-CHANDRASEKHAR MASS WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect

Using two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations, we study the ''robustness'' of the double detonation scenario for Type Ia supernovae, in which a detonation in the helium shell of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf induces a secondary detonation in the underlying core. We find that a helium detonation cannot easily descend into the core unless it commences (artificially) well above the hottest layer calculated for the helium shell in current presupernova models. Compressional waves induced by the sliding helium detonation, however, robustly generate hot spots which trigger a detonation in the core. Our simulations show that this is true even for non-axisymmetric initial conditions. If the helium is ignited at multiple points, then the internal waves can pass through one another or be reflected, but this added complexity does not defeat the generation of the hot spot. The ignition of very low-mass helium shells depends on whether a thermonuclear runaway can simultaneously commence in a sufficiently large region.

Moll, R.; Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2013-09-10

190

THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect

A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W. [Astronomy Department, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Meyer, B. S. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2013-07-01

191

Modeling of gaseous detonation limits  

Microsoft Academic Search

In view of rocket launch safety and propulsion, the basic processes associated with detonation limits of a gaseous oxyhydrogen mixture have been investigated numerically using a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic code with a two-step chemical-reaction model. It was demonstrated that the cell size and the critical tube diameter were well correlated in the transition processes, confined to unconfined space. This result

T. Fujiwara; S. Taki; K. Hiramatsu

1984-01-01

192

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOEpatents

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1994-11-01

193

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOEpatents

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01

194

Improved detonation modeling with CHEETAH  

SciTech Connect

A Livermore software program called CHEETAH, an important, even indispensable tool for energetic materials researchers worldwide, was made more powerful in the summer of 1997 with the release of CHEETAH 2.0, an advanced version that simulates a wider variety of detonations. Derived from more than 40 years of experiments on high explosives at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos national laboratories, CHEETAH predicts the results from detonating a mixture of specified reactants. It operates by solving thermodynamic equations to predict detonation products and such properties as temperature, pressure, volume, and total energy released. The code is prized by synthesis chemists and other researchers because it allows them to vary the starting molecules and conditions to optimize the desired performance properties. One of the Laboratory`s most popular computer codes, CHEETAH is used at more than 200 sites worldwide, including ones in England, Canada, Sweden, Switzerland, and France. Most sites are defense-related, although a few users, such as Japanese fireworks researchers, are in the civilian sector.

Heller, A.

1997-11-01

195

Optically triggered fire set/detonator system  

DOEpatents

The present invention is directed to a system having a plurality of capacitor discharge units (CDUs) that includes electrical bridge type detonators operatively coupled to respective explosives. A pulse charging circuit is adapted to provide a voltage for each respective capacitor in each CDU. Such capacitors are discharged through the electrical bridge type detonators upon receiving an optical signal to detonate respective operatively coupled explosives at substantially the same time.

Chase, Jay B.; Pincosy, Philip A.; Chato, Donna M.; Kirbie, Hugh; James, Glen F.

2007-03-20

196

Theory and Modeling of Liquid Explosive Detonation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current understanding of the detonation reaction zones of liquid explosives is discussed in this article. The physical and chemical processes that precede and follow exothermic chemical reaction within the detonation reaction zone are discussed within the framework of the nonequilibrium Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation. Nonequilibrium chemical and physical processes cause finite time duration induction zones before

Craig M. Tarver; Paul A. Urtiew

2010-01-01

197

Power and phase spectra for detonating cord  

SciTech Connect

A simple mathematical model is presented for a detonating cord seismic source. This model can be used for most configurations of detonating cord. Power and phase spectra are calculated. Numerical results are presented for a straight strand detonated in the center. Time delays associated with the initiation of vertically travelling energy at low frequencies can be determined from the phase spectra. 2 references, 5 figures.

Burkhard, N.R.

1983-11-01

198

Application of fast infrared detectors to detonation science  

SciTech Connect

Infrared radiometers have been used to make time-resolved emission measurements of shocked explosives. Instruments of moderate time resolution were used to estimate temperatures in shocked but not detonated explosives. The heterogeneity of the shock-induced heating was discovered in pressed explosives by two-band techniques, and the time-resolved emittance or extent of hot spot coverage indicated a great dependence on shock pressures. Temperatures in moderately shocked organic liquids were also measured. Faster response radiometers with 5 ns rise times based on InSb and HgCdTe photovoltaic detectors were constructed and tested. Preliminary data on reactive shocks and detonations reveal a resolution of the heating in the shock wave and the following reaction.

Von Holle, W.G.; McWilliams, R.A.

1982-07-28

199

30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400 Section 56...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators...

2011-07-01

200

30 CFR 56.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 56.6400 Section 56...METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric detonators...

2010-07-01

201

29 CFR 1926.908 - Use of detonating cord.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...in which the explosive core is dry. (f) All detonating cord...short-interval-delay electric blasting caps are used with detonating cord...i) When connecting a blasting cap or an electric blasting cap to detonating cord, the cap...

2010-07-01

202

Detonability of hydrocarbon fuels in air  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Studies were conducted of the detonation of gas-phase mixtures of n-hexane and JP-4, with oxidizers as varied as air and pure oxygen, measuring detonation velocities and cell sizes as a function of stoichiometry and diluent concentration. The induction length of a one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering detonation was calculated on the basis of a theoretical model that employed the reaction kinetics of the hydrocarbon fuels used. Critical energy and critical tube diameter are compared for a relative measure of the heavy hydrocarbon fuels studied; detonation sensitivity appears to increase slightly with increasing carbon number.

Beeson, H. D.; Mcclenagan, R. D.; Bishop, C. V.; Benz, F. J.; Pitz, W. J.; Westbrook, C. K.; Lee, J. H. S.

1991-01-01

203

Laser diode initiated detonators for space applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ensign Bickford Aerospace Company (EBAC) has over ten years of experience in the design and development of laser ordnance systems. Recent efforts have focused on the development of laser diode ordnance systems for space applications. Because the laser initiated detonators contain only insensitive secondary explosives, a high degree of system safety is achieved. Typical performance characteristics of a laser diode initiated detonator are described in this paper, including all-fire level, function time, and output. A finite difference model used at EBAC to predict detonator performance, is described and calculated results are compared to experimental data. Finally, the use of statistically designed experiments to evaluate performance of laser initiated detonators is discussed.

Ewick, David W.; Graham, J. A.; Hawley, J. D.

1993-01-01

204

Laterally Propagating Detonations in Thin Helium Layers on Accreting White Dwarfs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theoretical work has shown that intermediate mass (0.01 M ? < M He < 0.1 M ?) helium shells will unstably ignite on the accreting white dwarf (WD) in an AM CVn binary. For more massive (M > 0.8 M ?) WDs, these helium shells can be dense enough (>5 × 105 g cm-3) that the convectively burning region runs away on a timescale comparable to the sound travel time across the shell, raising the possibility for an explosive outcome rather than an Eddington limited helium novae. The nature of the explosion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) remains ambiguous, is certainly density dependent, and likely breaks spherical symmetry. In the case of detonation, this causes a laterally propagating front whose properties in these geometrically thin and low-density shells we begin to study here. Our calculations show that the radial expansion time of <0.1 s leads to incomplete helium burning, in agreement with recent work by Sim and collaborators, but that the nuclear energy released is still adequate to realize a self-sustaining laterally propagating detonation. These detonations are slower than the Chapman-Jouguet speed of 1.5 × 109 cm s-1, but still fast enough at 0.9 × 109 cm s-1 to go around the star prior to the transit through the star of the inwardly propagating weak shock. Our simulations resolve the subsonic region behind the reaction front in the detonation wave. The two-dimensional nucleosynthesis is shown to be consistent with a truncated one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Döring calculation at the slower detonation speed. The ashes from the lateral detonation are typically He rich, and consist of predominantly 44Ti, 48Cr, along with a small amount of 52Fe, with very little 56Ni and with significant 40Ca in carbon-enriched layers. If this helium detonation results in a Type Ia supernova, its spectral signatures would appear for the first few days after explosion.

Townsley, Dean M.; Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars

2012-08-01

205

Detonation Diffraction into a Confined Volume  

E-print Network

facility was constructed to study this problem, and experiments were conducted to determine under what conditions a planar detonation could be successfully transformed into a cylindrical detonation. Four different fuel-oxidizer mixtures, C?H?+ 2.5 O?, C?H?...

Polley, Nolan Lee

2012-02-14

206

Tritium labeling of detonation nanodiamonds.  

PubMed

For the first time, the radioactive labeling of detonation nanodiamonds was efficiently achieved using a tritium microwave plasma. According to our measurements, the total radioactivity reaches 9120 ± 120 ?Ci mg(-1), with 93% of (3)H atoms tightly bonded to the surface and up to 7% embedded into the diamond core. Such (3)H doping will ensure highly stable radiolabeled nanodiamonds, on which surface functionalization is still allowed. This breakthrough opens the way to biodistribution and pharmacokinetics studies of nanodiamonds, while this approach can be scalable to easily treat bulk quantities of nanodiamonds at low cost. PMID:24492594

Girard, Hugues A; El-Kharbachi, Abdelouahab; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Petit, Tristan; Bergonzo, Philippe; Rousseau, Bernard; Arnault, Jean-Charles

2014-03-18

207

Pulse detonation assembly and hybrid engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A pulse detonation (PD) assembly includes a number of PD chambers adapted to expel respective detonation product streams and a number of barriers disposed between respective pairs of PD chambers. The barriers define, at least in part, a number of sectors that contain at least one PD chamber. A hybrid engine includes a number of PD chambers and barriers. The hybrid engine further includes a turbine assembly having at least one turbine stage, being in flow communication with the PD chambers and being configured to be at least partially driven by the detonation product streams. A segmented hybrid engine includes a number of PD chambers and segments configured to receive and direct the detonation product streams from respective PD chambers. The segmented hybrid engine further includes a turbine assembly configured to be at least partially driven by the detonation product streams.

Rasheed, Adam (Inventor); Dean, Anthony John (Inventor); Vandervort, Christian Lee (Inventor)

2010-01-01

208

Numa Manson on velocity deficits and detonation stability. An invited memorial lecture presented at ICDERS 21  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This memorial paper pays tribute to Professor Numa Manson’s contributions to the understanding of detonation velocity deficits and wave stability. Manson and his colleague Guénoche postulated that a velocity deficit exists in a tube because the chemical reactions are inhibited in a thin layer adjacent to the tube walls. The hydrodynamic theory of detonation was modified to account for this, and it was shown that the deficit varies inversely with the tube diameter. Manson and his students measured detonation velocities in tubes of various diameter. An estimate of the detonation velocity for an infinite tube diameter was obtained by plotting the velocity against the reciprocal of the tube diameter, {?^{-1}} , and extrapolating the line through the data to {?^{-1}=0} . The relative contributions of tube geometry and surface roughness to the deficits were systematically studied. Manson was also one of the early investigators to shed light on the cellular structure of detonation by reporting “vibratory phenomena” seen as striations in streak schlieren photographs. An attempt was made to relate this phenomenon to “dispersions” in the propagation velocity and hence the wave stability. The author has extended Manson’s work by investigating detonations in tubes with yielding walls. Whereas boundary layers were responsible for the gasdynamic expansion and deficits in Manson’s rigid tubes, it was the moving boundaries that caused similar effects in the author’s investigations. The author has repeated the “nozzle” analysis of Fay and Dabora using the detonation cell length as the relevant chemical kinetic length scale, and found reasonable agreement between his experimental results and the model. When the Poitiers data are reinterpreted in light of the modified model, the trends are described quite well. More recent studies have shown that the measured deficits for mixtures characterized by irregular cellular structures do not agree with the Fay-Dabora model. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed.

Murray, S. B.

2008-09-01

209

Exhaust Nozzle for a Multitube Detonative Combustion Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved type of exhaust nozzle has been invented to help optimize the performances of multitube detonative combustion engines. The invention is applicable to both air-breathing and rocket engines used to propel some aircraft and spacecraft, respectively. In a detonative combustion engine, thrust is generated through the expulsion of combustion products from a detonation process in which combustion takes place in a reaction zone coupled to a shock wave. The combustion releases energy to sustain the shock wave, while the shock wave enhances the combustion in the reaction zone. The coupled shockwave/reaction zone, commonly referred to as a detonation, propagates through the reactants at very high speed . typically of the order of several thousands of feet per second (of the order of 1 km/s). The very high speed of the detonation forces combustion to occur very rapidly, thereby contributing to high thermodynamic efficiency. A detonative combustion engine of the type to which the present invention applies includes multiple parallel cylindrical combustion tubes, each closed at the front end and open at the rear end. Each tube is filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture, and then a detonation wave is initiated at the closed end. The wave propagates rapidly through the fuel/oxidizer mixture, producing very high pressure due to the rapid combustion. The high pressure acting on the closed end of the tube contributes to forward thrust. When the detonation wave reaches the open end of the tube, it produces a blast wave, behind which the high-pressure combustion products are expelled from the tube. The process of filling each combustion tube with a detonable fuel/oxidizer mixture and then producing a detonation repeated rapidly to obtain repeated pulses of thrust. Moreover, the multiple combustion tubes are filled and fired in a repeating sequence. Hence, the pressure at the outlet of each combustion tube varies cyclically. A nozzle of the present invention channels the expansion of the pulsed combustion gases from the multiple combustion tubes into a common exhaust stream, in such a manner as to enhance performance in two ways: (1) It reduces the cyclic variations of pressure at the outlets of the combustion tubes so as to keep the pressure approximately constant near the optimum level needed for filling the tubes, regardless of atmospheric pressure at the altitude of operation; and (2) It maximizes the transfer of momentum from the exhaust gas to the engine, thereby maximizing thrust. The figure depicts a typical engine equipped with a nozzle according to the invention. The nozzle includes an interface section comprising multiple intake ports that couple the outlets of the combustion tubes to a common plenum. Proceeding from its upstream to its downstream end, the interface section tapers to a larger cross-sectional area for flow. This taper fosters expansion of the exhaust gases flowing from the outlets of the combustion tubes and contributes to the desired equalization of exhaust combustion pressure. The cross-sectional area for flow in the common plenum is greater than, or at least equal to, the combined cross-sectional flow areas of the combustor tubes. In the common plenum, the exhaust streams from the individual combustion tubes mix to form a single compound subsonic exhaust stream. Downstream of the common plenum is the throat that tapers to a smaller flow cross section. In this throat, the exhaust gases become compressed to form a compound sonic gas stream. Downstream of the throat is an expansion section, which typically has a bell or a conical shape. (The expansion section can be truncated or even eliminated in the case of an air-breathing engine.) After entering the expansion section, the exhaust gases expand rapidly from compound sonic to compound supersonic speeds and are then vented to the environment. The basic invention admits of numerous variations. For example, the combustion tubes can be arranged around the central axin a symmetrical or asymmetrical pattern other than the one shown in the figure. For another examp

Bratkovich, Thomas E.; Williams, Kevin E.; Bussing, Thomas R. A.; Lidstone, Gary L.; Hinkey, John B.

2004-01-01

210

Pulse detonation propulsion: challenges, current status, and future perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper is focused on recent accomplishments in basic and applied research on pulse detonation engines (PDE) and various PDE design concepts. Current understanding of gas and sprary detonations, thermodynamic grounds for detonation-based propulsion, principles of practical implementation of the detonation-based thermodynamic cycle, and various operational constraints of PDEs are discussed.

G. D. Roy; S. M. Frolov; A. A. Borisov; D. W. Netzer

2004-01-01

211

On the Exit Boundary Condition for One-Dimensional Calculations of Pulsed Detonation Engine Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In one-dimensional calculations of pulsed detonation engine (PDE) performance, the exit boundary condition is frequently taken to be a constant static pressure. In reality, for an isolated detonation tube, after the detonation wave arrives at the exit plane, there will be a region of high pressure, which will gradually return to ambient pressure as an almost spherical shock wave expands away from the exit, and weakens. Initially, the flow is supersonic, unaffected by external pressure, but later becomes subsonic. Previous authors have accounted for this situation either by assuming the subsonic pressure decay to be a relaxation phenomenon, or by running a two-dimensional calculation first, including a domain external to the detonation tube, and using the resulting exit pressure temporal distribution as the boundary condition for one-dimensional calculations. These calculations show that the increased pressure does affect the PDE performance. In the present work, a simple model of the exit process is used to estimate the pressure decay time. The planar shock wave emerging from the tube is assumed to transform into a spherical shock wave. The initial strength of the spherical shock wave is determined from comparison with experimental results. Its subsequent propagation, and resulting pressure at the tube exit, is given by a numerical blast wave calculation. The model agrees reasonably well with other, limited, results. Finally, the model was used as the exit boundary condition for a one-dimensional calculation of PDE performance to obtain the thrust wall pressure for a hydrogen-air detonation in tubes of length to diameter ratio (L/D) of 4, and 10, as well as for the original, constant pressure boundary condition. The modified boundary condition had no performance impact for values of L/D > 10, and moderate impact for L/D = 4.

Wilson, Jack; Paxson, Daniel E.

2002-01-01

212

Numerical simulation of detonations in mixtures of gases and solid particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the structure and stability of detonations in mixtures of gases and solid particles via direct numerical simulation. Cases with both reactive and inert particles are considered. First, the two-phase flow model is presented and the assumptions that it is based upon are discussed. Steady-wave structures admitted by the model are subsequently analysed. Next, the algorithm employed for

Miltiadis V. Papalexandris

2004-01-01

213

Improved estimates of separation distances to prevent unacceptable damage to nuclear power plant structures from hydrogen detonation for gaseous hydrogen storage. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides new estimates of separation distances for nuclear power plant gaseous hydrogen storage facilities. Unacceptable damage to plant structures from hydrogen detonations will be prevented by having hydrogen storage facilities meet separation distance criteria recommended in this report. The revised standoff distances are based on improved calculations on hydrogen gas cloud detonations and structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures. Also, the results presented in this study do not depend upon equivalencing a hydrogen detonation to an equivalent TNT detonation. The static and stagnation pressures, wave velocity, and the shock wave impulse delivered to wall surfaces were computed for several different size hydrogen explosions. Separation distance equations were developed and were used to compute the minimum separation distance for six different wall cases and for seven detonating volumes (from 1.59 to 79.67 lbm of hydrogen). These improved calculation results were compared to previous calculations. The ratio between the separation distance predicted in this report versus that predicted for hydrogen detonation in previous calculations varies from 0 to approximately 4. Thus, the separation distances results from the previous calculations can be either overconservative or unconservative depending upon the set of hydrogen detonation parameters that are used. Consequently, it is concluded that the hydrogen-to-TNT detonation equivalency utilized in previous calculations should no longer be used.

Not Available

1994-05-01

214

Detonator comprising a nonlinear transmission line  

DOEpatents

Detonators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the detonator includes a nonlinear transmission line that has a variable capacitance. Capacitance of the nonlinear transmission line is a function of voltage on the nonlinear transmission line. The nonlinear transmission line receives a voltage pulse from a voltage source and compresses the voltage pulse to generate a trigger signal. Compressing the voltage pulse includes increasing amplitude of the voltage pulse and decreasing length of the voltage pulse in time. An igniter receives the trigger signal and detonates an explosive responsive to receipt of the trigger signal.

Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

2014-12-30

215

Premature detonation problem. [Artillery shells  

SciTech Connect

Determining how cavities or voids in the explosive loads of artillery shells cause in-bore premature detonations is important to military authorities. Though answers continue to be elusive, in detailing recent studies of the problem at LASL, some traditional approaches were examined and a new direction of investigation is suggested. The aquarium experiment and the pipe test were devised at LASL to model the events taking place in a base gap, or in an internal cavity, in the load of an accelerating artillery shell. Numerical simulation was used to assess the data from these experiments. Both the experimental and the numerical simulation phases of the project are described. The commonly accepted gas compression, thermal ignition mechanism is not consistent with the results of this study. The dominant mechanism or mechanisms have not been identified.

Pimbley, G.H.; Marshall, E.F.

1980-05-01

216

Experimental study and kinetic modeling of the thermal decomposition of gaseous monomethylhydrazine. Application to detonation sensitivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thermal decomposition of gaseous monomethylhydrazine has been studied in a 38.4 mm i.d. shock tube behind a reflected shock wave at 1040-1370 K, 140-455 kPa and in mixtures containing 97 to 99 mol% argon, by using MMH absorption at 220 nm. A chemical kinetic model based on MMH decomposition profiles has been developed. This model has been used, with some assumptions, to evaluate the detonation sensitivity of pure gaseous MMH. This compound is found to be much less sensitive to detonation than hydrazine.

Catoire, L.; Bassin, X.; Dupre, G.; Paillard, C.

1996-09-01

217

Detonation reactions frozen by free expansion and analyzed by mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The molecular design of new more powerful and less sensitive explosives requires detailed knowledge of reaction mechanisms and compositions of molecular products from explosives having a variety of molecular structures and performance parameters. We describe a new apparatus and method for analyzing detonation reactions using 30--250 mg charges. The apparatus consists of a TOF mass spectrometer interfaced to a high-vacuum firing chamber through a skimmer and a laser-schlieren optical system. The fireball normally produced by a detonation is frozen sequentially from the outside inward in a continuum of stages by free adiabatic expansion into the vacuum. Expansion of a given volume element begins when the rarefaction wave arrives from the free surface of the charge, and we find that no significant mixing occurs during the expansion. In this way the chemical history of the detonation is frozen in time and imprinted on the structure of the expanding frozen fireball. Our apparatus isolates a core sample from the expanding fireball as an undisturbed molecular beam and provides a series of mass spectra derived from successive segments of the core. The assembled data set from each pellet fired is a sequence of 95 mass spectra that characterizes the molecules resistant to change at a succession of times separated by a few (ns) in the detonation reaction. These molecules are associated with the slower (rate-determining) steps or stable products in the reaction sequence and give valuable clues to reaction mechanisms. Our mass spectrometer automatically records expansion velocities of the core segments, and an electronic framing camera concurrently records a sequences of laser-schlieren images of the detonation and expansion. The number of spectra over which a change is observed can be related, through the hydrodynamics of the detonation and expansion, to the rate of that change in the detonating sample.

Greiner, N.R.; Fry, H.A.; Blais, N.C.

1992-09-01

218

Influence of Discrete Sources on Detonation Propagation in a Burgers Equation Analog System  

E-print Network

An analog to the equations of compressible flow that is based on the inviscid Burgers equation is utilized to investigate the effect of spatial discreteness of energy release on the propagation of a detonation wave. While the traditional Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) treatment of a detonation wave assumes that the energy release of the medium is homogeneous through space, the system examined here consists of sources represented by $\\delta$-functions embedded in an otherwise inert medium. The sources are triggered by the passage of the leading shock wave following a delay that is either of fixed period or randomly generated. The solution for wave propagation through a large array ($10^3$-$10^4$) of sources in one dimension can be constructed without the use of a finite difference approximation by tracking the interaction of sawtooth-profiled waves for which an analytic solution is available. A detonation-like wave results from the interaction of the shock and rarefaction waves generated by the sources. The measurement ...

Mi, XiaoCheng

2015-01-01

219

Propagation of detonations in hydrazine vapor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the range of greater hydrazine vapor pressure, detonation speed depends exclusively on the extent of the ammonia decomposition in the second reaction stage. As vapor pressure decreases, the ammonia disintegration speed becomes increasingly slower and the reaction reached in the reaction zone increasingly decreases until finally, in the vapor pressure range between 53 and 16 Torr, the contribution of the second stage to detonation propagation disappears, and only the first stage remains active. Since the disintegration speed of the hydrazine in this pressure range has decreased markedly as well, no level, but rather only spinning, detonations occur. Temporary separations of the impact front and the reaction zone in the process lead to fluctuations of the detonation speed.

Heinrich, H. J.

1985-01-01

220

Detonation Structure Simulation with AMROC Ralf Deiterding  

E-print Network

of hyper- bolic fluid flow problems on logically rectangular grids. The ghost fluid approach is integrated. The triple point trajectories form regular "fish-scale" patterns, so called detonation cells

Barr, Al

221

Equation of state for detonation product gases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on the empirical linear relationship between detonation velocity and loading density, an approximate description for the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state for detonation product gases has been presented. Assuming that the Grüneisen parameter is a function only of volume, we obtained the Grüneisen parameter along CJ states. Thermodynamic identity between the Grüneisen parameter and another non-dimensional material parameter R used in the Rice-Walsh type equation of state introduced by Wu and Jing can be used to derive the enthalpy-pressure-volume equation of state for detonation gases. Behavior of this parameter R as a function of pressure is calculated and revealed that their change with pressure is very gradual and seems to approach a finite value with decreasing pressure. Release isentropes from CJ states of several initial density detonation of PETN is shown.

Nagayama, K.; Kubota, S.

2014-05-01

222

Investigations on deflagration to detonation transition in porous energetic materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The research carried out by this contract was part of a larger effort funded by LANL in the areas of deflagration to detonation in porous energetic materials (DDT) and detonation shock dynamics in high explosives (DSD). In the first three years of the contract the major focus was on DDT. However, some researchers were carried out on DSD theory and numerical implementation. In the last two years the principal focus of the contract was on DSD theory and numerical implementation. However, during the second period some work was also carried out on DDT. The paper discusses DDT modeling and DSD modeling. Abstracts are included on the following topics: modeling deflagration to detonation; DSD theory; DSD wave front tracking; and DSD program burn implementation.

Stewart, D.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1999-07-01

223

Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

2008-01-01

224

Study of detonation initiation in kerosene-oxidizer mixtures in short tubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper describes experimental studies of detonation initiation in a kerosene-oxidizer mixture in a short test tube. The aim of the study is to determine the minimum diameter of the tube and the minimum level of energy that enables direct initiation of the detonation. Knowledge about these values will inform the design of a jet engine combustion chamber in which thermal energy will be generated by a rotating detonation process. The test tube and the oxidizer inside the tube were heated using specially designed heaters installed outside of the tube. The heated oxidizer provided thermal conditions similar to the conditions for a compressor with small to medium static pressure. The study was conducted for four different tube diameters and for various energies of initiation. As a result, measurements of pressure waveforms were obtained for various cases of fuel injection, which were then compared against the results of the shock wave generated by the initiator. This study provides a value for the energy (the pressure of the mixture in the initiator), which provided direct initiation of detonation for a kerosene-oxidizer mixture. Different tube diameters led to the initiation of detonation for various oxygen-nitrogen compositions as an oxidizer.

Kindracki, J.

2014-11-01

225

Chirped fiber Bragg grating detonation velocity sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An all optical-fiber-based approach to measuring high explosive detonation front position and velocity is described. By measuring total light return using an incoherent light source reflected from a linearly chirped fiber Bragg grating sensor in contact with the explosive, dynamic mapping of the detonation front position and velocity versus time is obtained. We demonstrate two calibration procedures and provide several examples of detonation front measurements: PBX 9502 cylindrical rate stick, radial detonation front in PBX 9501, and PBX 9501 detonation along curved meridian line. In the cylindrical rate stick measurement, excellent agreement with complementary diagnostics (electrical pins and streak camera imaging) is achieved, demonstrating accuracy in the detonation front velocity to below the 0.3% level when compared to the results from the pin data. Finally, an estimate on the linear spatial and temporal resolution of the system shows that sub-mm and sub-?s levels are attainable with proper consideration of the recording speed, detection sensitivity, spectrum, and chirp properties of the grating.

Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; McCulloch, Q.; Jackson, S. I.; Vincent, S. W.; Udd, E.

2013-01-01

226

Chirped fiber Bragg grating detonation velocity sensing.  

PubMed

An all optical-fiber-based approach to measuring high explosive detonation front position and velocity is described. By measuring total light return using an incoherent light source reflected from a linearly chirped fiber Bragg grating sensor in contact with the explosive, dynamic mapping of the detonation front position and velocity versus time is obtained. We demonstrate two calibration procedures and provide several examples of detonation front measurements: PBX 9502 cylindrical rate stick, radial detonation front in PBX 9501, and PBX 9501 detonation along curved meridian line. In the cylindrical rate stick measurement, excellent agreement with complementary diagnostics (electrical pins and streak camera imaging) is achieved, demonstrating accuracy in the detonation front velocity to below the 0.3% level when compared to the results from the pin data. Finally, an estimate on the linear spatial and temporal resolution of the system shows that sub-mm and sub-?s levels are attainable with proper consideration of the recording speed, detection sensitivity, spectrum, and chirp properties of the grating. PMID:23387683

Rodriguez, G; Sandberg, R L; McCulloch, Q; Jackson, S I; Vincent, S W; Udd, E

2013-01-01

227

Initiation and Detonation Physics on Millimeter Scales  

SciTech Connect

The LLNL Detonation Science Project has a major interest in understanding the physics of detonation on a millimeter scale. This report summarizes the rate stick experiment results of two high explosives. The GO/NO-GO threshold between varying diameters of ultra-fine TATB (ufTATB) and LX-16 were recorded on an electronic streak camera and analyzed. This report summarizes the failure diameters of rate sticks for ufTATB and LX-16. Failure diameter for the ufTATB explosive, with densities at 1.80 g/cc, begin at 2.34 mm (not maintaining detonation velocity over the entire length of the rate stick). ufTATB rate sticks at the larger 3.18 mm diameter maintain a constant detonation velocity over the complete length. The PETN based and LLNL developed explosive, LX-16, with densities at 1.7 g/cc, shows detonation failure between 0.318 mm and 0.365 mm. Additional tests would be required to narrow this failure diameter further. Many of the tested rate sticks were machined using a femtosecond laser focused into a firing tank - in case of accidental detonation.

Philllips, D F; Benterou, J J; May, C A

2012-03-20

228

Shock wave focusing phenomena  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review is presented of recent studies of the focusing of concave shock waves in gases, fluids and solids by curved boundaries. Various shock wave focusing apparatus that have been tested are described, including a detonation chamber, a setup for focusing weak blast waves and a configuration for obtaining time-stepped shadowgraphs of converging cylindrical shocks. Sample velocity profile data are

H. Groenig

1986-01-01

229

Detonability of H/sub 2/-air-diluent mixtures  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Heated Detonation Tube (HDT). Detonation cell width and velocity results are presented for H/sub 2/-air mixtures, undiluted and diluted with CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O for a range of H/sub 2/ concentration, initial temperature and pressure. The results show that the addition of either CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O significantly increases the detonation cell width and hence reduces the detonability of the mixture. The results also show that the detonation cell width is reduced (detonability is increased) for increased initial temperature and/or pressure.

Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Berman, M.

1987-06-01

230

Detonation nanodiamonds for doping Kevlar.  

PubMed

This paper reports on the first attempt to enclose diamond nanoparticles--produced by detonation--into a Kevlar matrix. A nanocomposite material (40 wt% diamond) was prepared by precipitation from an acidic solution of Kevlar containing dispersed nanodiamonds. In this material, the diamond nanoparticles (Ø = 4 nm) are entirely wrapped in a Kevlar layer about 1 nm thick. In order to understand the interactions between the nanodiamond surface and the polymer, the oxygenated surface functional groups of nanodiamond were identified and titrated by Boehm's method which revealed the exclusive presence of carboxyl groups (0.85 sites per nm2). The hydrogen interactions between these groups and the amide groups of Kevlar destroy the "rod-like" structure and the classical three-dimensional organization of this polymer. The distortion of Kevlar macromolecules allows the wrapping of nanodiamonds and leads to submicrometric assemblies, giving a cauliflower structure reminding a fractal object. Due to this structure, the macroscopic hardness of Kevlar doped by nanodiamonds (1.03 GPa) is smaller than the one of pure Kevlar (2.31 GPa). To our knowledge, this result is the first illustration of the change of the mechanical properties induced by doping the Kevlar with nanoparticles. PMID:21128413

Comet, Marc; Pichot, Vincent; Siegert, Benny; Britz, Fabienne; Spitzer, Denis

2010-07-01

231

Pulse Detonation Engine Air Induction System Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A preliminary mixed-compression inlet design concept for potential pulse-detonation engine (PDE) powered supersonic aircraft was defined and analyzed. The objectives of this research were to conceptually design and integrate an inlet/PDE propulsion system into a supersonic aircraft, perform time-dependent CFD analysis of the inlet flowfield, and to estimate the installed PDE cycle performance. The study was baselined to a NASA Mach 5 Waverider study vehicle in which the baseline over/under turboramjet engines were replaced with a single flowpath PDE propulsion system. As much commonality as possible was maintained with the baseline configuration, including the engine location and forebody lines. Modifications were made to the inlet system's external ramp angles and a rotating cowl lip was incorporated to improve off-design inlet operability and performance. Engines were sized to match the baseline vehicle study's ascent trajectory thrust requirement at Mach 1.2. The majority of this study was focused on a flight Mach number of 3.0. The time-dependent Navier Stokes CFD analyses of a two-dimensional approximation of the inlet was conducted for the Mach 3.0 condition. The Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems-developed FALCON CFD code with a two equation 'k-1' turbulence model was used. The downstream PDE was simulated by an array of four sonic nozzles in which the flow areas were rapidly varied in various opening/closing combinations. Results of the CFD study indicated that the inlet design concept operated successfully at the Mach 3.0 condition, satisfying mass capture, total pressure recovery, and operability requirements. Time-dependent analysis indicated that pressure and expansion waves from the simulated valve perturbations did not effect the inlet's operability or performance.

Pegg, R. J.; Hunter, L. G.; Couch, B. D.

1996-01-01

232

SLAG CHARACTERIZATION AND REMOVAL USING PULSE DETONATION TECHNOLOGY DURING COAL GASIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. Conventional slag removal methods including soot blowers and water lances have great difficulties in removing slags especially from the down stream areas of utility power plant boilers. The detonation wave technique, based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. A slight increase in the boiler efficiency, due to more effective ash/deposit removal and corresponding reduction in plant maintenance downtime and increased heat transfer efficiency, will save millions of dollars in operational costs. Reductions in toxic emissions will also be accomplished due to reduction in coal usage. Detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability, important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. The experimental results describe the parametric study of the input parameters in removing the different types of slag and operating condition. The experimental results show that both the single and multi shot detonation waves have high potential in effectively removing slag deposit from boiler heat transfer surfaces. The results obtained are encouraging and satisfactory. A good indication has also been obtained from the agreement with the preliminary computational fluid dynamics analysis that the wave impacts are more effective in removing slag deposits from tube bundles rather than single tube. This report presents results obtained in effectively removing three different types of slag (economizer, reheater, and air-heater) t a distance of up to 20 cm from the exit of the detonation tube. The experimental results show that the softer slags can be removed more easily. Also closer the slag to the exit of the detonation tube, the better are their removals. Side facing slags are found to shear off without breaking. Wave strength and slag orientation also has different effects on the chipping off of the slag. One of the most important results from this study is the observation that the pressure of the waves plays a vital role in removing slag. The wave frequency is also important after a threshold pressure level is attained.

DR. DANIEL MEI; DR. JIANREN ZHOU; DR. PAUL O. BINEY; DR. ZIAUL HUQUE

1998-07-30

233

Detonative propagation and accelerative expansion of the Crab Nebula shock front.  

PubMed

The accelerative expansion of the Crab Nebula's outer envelope is a mystery in dynamics, as a conventional expanding blast wave decelerates when bumping into the surrounding interstellar medium. Here we show that the strong relativistic pulsar wind bumping into its surrounding nebula induces energy-generating processes and initiates a detonation wave that propagates outward to form the current outer edge, namely, the shock front, of the nebula. The resulting detonation wave, with a reactive downstream, then provides the needed power to maintain propagation of the shock front. Furthermore, relaxation of the curvature-induced reduction of the propagation velocity from the initial state of formation to the asymptotic, planar state of Chapman-Jouguet propagation explains the observed accelerative expansion. Potential richness in incorporating reactive fronts in the description of various astronomical phenomena is expected. PMID:22107499

Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K

2011-10-21

234

Subnanosecond velocity interferometer measurements of detonating PBX-9502  

SciTech Connect

A velocity interferometer system was recently assembled which includes a high speed electronic streak camera to measure the particle velocity-time history of a diffusely reflecting surface. It has been named ORVIS for Optically Recorded Velocity Interferometer System. Measurements were made on detonating PBX-9502 (95/5 mixture of TATB and Kel-F) to determine the structure of the detonation front to see how the results compare with the measurements of Hayes, et al., using electromagnetic gauges embedded in superfine TATB. Measurements were made by reflecting laser light off a copper foil surface and then routing it through a velocity interferometer with a glass etalon in one leg to delay the light by 250 or 500 picoseconds, depending on the setup. The interferometer was tuned such that a pattern of straight fringes was obtained rather than the normal bull's-eye pattern. a cylindrical lens was used to focus each fringe to a dot to concentrate the light. This made the fringe pattern a line of dots which was focused on the slit of an Imacon 790 streak camera capable of streak rates up to 1 mm/ns. With this setup a time resolution of 300 to 500 picoseconds could be attained at the maximum streak rate. These experiments demonstrate that shock-front rise time measurements are now possible to a time resolution of several hundred picoseconds and we feel this approach can be used to attain about 50 picosecond time resolution. It is a powerful method to probe the structure of both shock and detonation waves.

Sheffield, S.A.; Bloomquist, D.D.

1981-01-01

235

Influence of ambient air pressure on the energy conversion of laser-breakdown induced blast waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Influence of ambient pressure on energy conversion efficiency from a Nd?:?glass laser pulse (? = 1.053 µm) to a laser-induced blast wave was investigated at reduced pressure. Temporal incident and transmission power histories were measured using sets of energy meters and photodetectors. A half-shadowgraph half-self-emission method was applied to visualize laser absorption waves. Results show that the blast energy conversion efficiency ?bw decreased monotonically with the decrease in ambient pressure. The decrease was small, from 40% to 38%, for the pressure change from 101 kPa to 50 kPa, but the decrease was considerable, to 24%, when the pressure was reduced to 30 kPa. Compared with a TEA-CO2-laser-induced blast wave (? = 10.6 µm), higher fraction absorption in the laser supported detonation regime ?LSD of 90% was observed, which is influenced slightly by the reduction of ambient pressure. The conversion fraction ?bw/?LSD?90% was achieved at pressure >50 kPa, which is significantly higher than that in a CO2 laser case.

Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

2013-09-01

236

Computational Study of Near-limit Propagation of Detonation in Hydrogen-air Mixtures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computational investigation of the near-limit propagation of detonation in lean and rich hydrogen-air mixtures is presented. The calculations were carried out over an equivalence ratio range of 0.4 to 5.0, pressures ranging from 0.2 bar to 1.0 bar and ambient initial temperature. The computations involved solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with detailed finite-rate chemistry. The numerical method is based on a second-order spatially accurate total-variation-diminishing (TVD) scheme, and a point implicit, first-order-accurate, time marching algorithm. The hydrogen-air combustion was modeled with a 9-species, 19-step reaction mechanism. A multi-level, dynamically adaptive grid was utilized in order to resolve the structure of the detonation. The results of the computations indicate that when hydrogen concentrations are reduced below certain levels, the detonation wave switches from a high-frequency, low amplitude oscillation mode to a low frequency mode exhibiting large fluctuations in the detonation wave speed; that is, a 'galloping' propagation mode is established.

Yungster, S.; Radhakrishnan, K.

2002-01-01

237

30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400 Section...AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric...

2011-07-01

238

30 CFR 57.6400 - Compatibility of electric detonators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Compatibility of electric detonators. 57.6400 Section...AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6400 Compatibility of electric detonators. All electric...

2010-07-01

239

Off-center ignition in type Ia supernova: I. Initial evolution and implications for delayed detonation  

E-print Network

The explosion of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova is known to be sensitive to the manner in which the burning is ignited. Studies of the pre-supernova evolution suggest asymmetric, off-center ignition, and here we explore its consequences in two- and three-dimensional simulations. Compared with centrally ignited models, one-sided ignitions initially burn less and release less energy. For the distributions of ignition points studied, ignition within two hemispheres typically leads to the unbinding of the white dwarf, while ignition within a small fraction of one hemisphere does not. We also examine the spreading of the blast over the surface of the white dwarf that occurs as the first plumes of burning erupt from the star. In particular, our studies test whether the collision of strong compressional waves can trigger a detonation on the far side of the star as has been suggested by Plewa et al. (2004). The maximum temperature reached in these collisions is sensitive to how much burning and expansion has already gone on, and to the dimensionality of the calculation. Though detonations are sometimes observed in 2D models, none ever happens in the corresponding 3D calculations. Collisions between the expansion fronts of multiple bubbles also seem, in the usual case, unable to ignite a detonation. "Gravitationally confined detonation" is therefore not a robust mechanism for the explosion. Detonation may still be possible in these models however, either following a pulsation or by spontaneous detonation if the turbulent energy is high enough.

F. K. Roepke; S. E. Woosley; W. Hillebrandt

2006-09-04

240

Detonator cable initiation system safety investigation: Consequences of energizing the detonator and actuator cables  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to explore and assess the worst-case response of a W89-type weapons system, damaged so as to expose detonator and/or detonator safing strong link (DSSL) cables to the most extreme, credible lightning-discharge, environment. The test program used extremely high-current-level, fast-rise-time (1- to 2-{mu}s) discharges to simulate lightning strikes to either the exposed detonator or DSSL cables. Discharges with peak currents above 700 kA were required to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch a flyer fast enough potentially to detonate weapon high explosive (HE). Detonator-safing-strong-link (DSSL) cables were exploded in direct contact with hot LX-17 and Ultrafine TATB (UFTATB). At maximum charging voltage, the discharge system associated with the HE firing chamber exploded the cables at more than 600-kA peak current; however, neither LX-17 nor UFTATB detonated at 250{degree}C. Tests showed that intense surface arc discharges of more than 700 kA/cm in width across the surface of hot UFTATB [generally the more sensitive of the two insensitive high explosives (IHE)] could not initiate this hot IHE. As an extension to this study, we applied the same technique to test sections of the much-narrower but thicker-cover-layer W87 detonator cable. These tests were performed at the same initial stored electrical energy as that used for the W89 study. Because of the narrower cable conductor in the W87 cables, discharges greater than 550-kA peak current were sufficient to explode the cable and launch a fast flyer. In summary, we found that lightning strikes to exposed DSSL cables cannot directly detonate LX-17 or UFTATB even at high temperatures, and they pose no HE safety threat.

Osher, J.; Chau, H.; Von Holle, W.

1994-03-01

241

Detonation Properties of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ammonium Dinitramide, ADN, has a potential as an oxidizer for underwater high explosives. Pure ADN has a large reaction-zone length and shows a strong non-ideal behaviour. The work presented here is an extension of previous work.(Sensitivity and Performance Characterization of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN). Presented at 11th International Detonation Symposium, Snowmass, CO, 1998.) Experiments for determining the detonation velocity as a function of inverse charge radius and density, reaction-zone length and curvature, and the detonation pressure are presented. Measurements of pressure indicates that no, or weak von-Neumann spike exists, suggesting an immediate chemical decomposition. Experimental data are compared with predicted using thermochemical codes and ZND-theory.

Wätterstam, A.; Östmark, H.; Helte, A.; Karlsson, S.

1999-06-01

242

Thrust Augmentation Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thrust augmentation results of an ongoing study of pulse detonation engine driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE) setup with various ejector configurations. The PDE used in these experiments utilizes ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel, and an equi-molar mixture of oxygen and nitrogen as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. High fidelity thrust measurements were made using an integrated spring damper system. The baseline thrust of the PDE engine was first measured and agrees with experimental and modeling results found in the literature. Thrust augmentation measurements were then made for constant diameter ejectors. The parameter space for the study included ejector length, PDE tube exit to ejector tube inlet overlap distance, and straight versus rounded ejector inlets. The relationship between the thrust augmentation results and various physical phenomena is described. To further understand the flow dynamics, shadow graph images of the exiting shock wave front from the PDE were also made. For the studied parameter space, the results showed a maximum augmentation of 40%. Further increase in augmentation is possible if the geometry of the ejector is tailored, a topic currently studied by numerous groups in the field.

Pal, S.; Santoro, Robert J.; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S.; Lee, S.-Y.

2005-01-01

243

Parameters of the equilibrium gas flow in a detonation equipment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The detonation method of depositing coatings is widely used. However, detonation equipment has been designed from empirical data without a detailed understanding of the process dynamics. Gas flow calculations made using the simplified assumption that the detonation products are an inert gas with a constant adiabatic parameter have resulted in theoretical product temperatures 24% higher than actual. This results in

S. A. Zhdan; V. I. Fedenok

1983-01-01

244

Sulfuric Acid Influence on the Nitrocompounds Detonation Reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The detonation failure diameter df and detonation velocity D of mixtures of nitromethane, trinitrotoluene, dinitrotoluene, and trinitrobenzene with sulfiric acid and oleum have been measured in the wide range of concentrations It was shown that the detonation ability of the nitrocompounds depends significantly on the sulfuric acid content The minimum value of df for the mixture TNTIoleum is about 2

V. N. Gamezo; S. M. Khoroshev; B. N. Kondrikov; G. D. Kozak

1995-01-01

245

Computer modeling of electrical performance of detonators  

SciTech Connect

An empirical model of detonator electrical performance which describes the resistance of the exploding bridgewire (EBW) or exploding foil initiator (EFI or slapper) as a function of energy, deposition will be described. This model features many parameters that can be adjusted to obtain a close fit to experimental data. This has been demonstrated using recent experimental data taken with the cable discharge system located at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper will be a continuation of the paper entitled ``Cable Discharge System for Fundamental Detonator Studies`` presented at the 2nd NASA/DOD/DOE Pyrotechnic Workshop.

Furnberg, C.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Peevy, G.R.; Brigham, W.P.; Lyons, G.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-05-01

246

Waves  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We will review some basic properties of waves and then further explore sound and light. For a quick overview of some properties of all waves, click on this first site. Make sure you fill out your hand out as you work! Waves and Wave Motion : Describing Waves Practice what you've already learned about waves with this site: Waves This site will let you play around some more with transverse waves: Wave on a String Sound waves are mechanical waves, ...

Mrs. Petersen

2014-05-27

247

LATERALLY PROPAGATING DETONATIONS IN THIN HELIUM LAYERS ON ACCRETING WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical work has shown that intermediate mass (0.01 M{sub Sun} < M{sub He} < 0.1 M{sub Sun }) helium shells will unstably ignite on the accreting white dwarf (WD) in an AM CVn binary. For more massive (M > 0.8 M{sub Sun }) WDs, these helium shells can be dense enough (>5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} g cm{sup -3}) that the convectively burning region runs away on a timescale comparable to the sound travel time across the shell, raising the possibility for an explosive outcome rather than an Eddington limited helium novae. The nature of the explosion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) remains ambiguous, is certainly density dependent, and likely breaks spherical symmetry. In the case of detonation, this causes a laterally propagating front whose properties in these geometrically thin and low-density shells we begin to study here. Our calculations show that the radial expansion time of <0.1 s leads to incomplete helium burning, in agreement with recent work by Sim and collaborators, but that the nuclear energy released is still adequate to realize a self-sustaining laterally propagating detonation. These detonations are slower than the Chapman-Jouguet speed of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm s{sup -1}, but still fast enough at 0.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm s{sup -1} to go around the star prior to the transit through the star of the inwardly propagating weak shock. Our simulations resolve the subsonic region behind the reaction front in the detonation wave. The two-dimensional nucleosynthesis is shown to be consistent with a truncated one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering calculation at the slower detonation speed. The ashes from the lateral detonation are typically He rich, and consist of predominantly {sup 44}Ti, {sup 48}Cr, along with a small amount of {sup 52}Fe, with very little {sup 56}Ni and with significant {sup 40}Ca in carbon-enriched layers. If this helium detonation results in a Type Ia supernova, its spectral signatures would appear for the first few days after explosion.

Townsley, Dean M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States); Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars, E-mail: Dean.M.Townsley@ua.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States)

2012-08-10

248

Detonation behavior of LX-14 and PBX-9404: theoretical aspect. [Thermodynamic and hydrodynamic paths after detonation  

SciTech Connect

We recently developed an a priori theory of statistical mechanics to describe post-detonation behavior of explosives. It is based on (1) reliable intermolecular potentials, (2) an accurate statistical mechanical theory of mixtures, and (3) an efficient technique to handle reactive multiphase mixtures. We have computed the detonation properties of LX-14 and PBX-9404. The Gibbs free energy of the mixture indicates that nitrogen will phase-separate from the rest of detonation products as do graphite or diamond. The theoretical Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation velocities agree well with experiment, but the CJ pressures show a small discrepancy. We suggest that CJ experiments have been insensitive to slow carbon formation. Theoretical results of overdriven shocks, the CJ adiabat, and several useful fits to the theory are discussed. 30 references, 7 figures, 5 tables.

Ree, F.H.; van Thiel, M.

1985-03-01

249

Ignition-and-Growth Modeling of NASA Standard Detonator and a Linear Shaped Charge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objective of this study is to quantitatively investigate the ignition and shock sensitivity of NASA Standard Detonator (NSD) and the shock wave propagation of a linear shaped charge (LSC) after being shocked by NSD flyer plate. This combined explosive train was modeled as a coupled Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) model with LS-DYNA hydro code. An ignition-and-growth (I&G) reactive model based on unreacted and reacted Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equations of state was used to simulate the shock initiation. Various NSD-to-LSC stand-off distances were analyzed to calculate the shock initiation (or failure to initiate) and detonation wave propagation along the shaped charge. Simulation results were verified by experimental data which included VISAR tests for NSD flyer plate velocity measurement and an aluminum target severance test for LSC performance verification. Parameters used for the analysis were obtained from various published data or by using CHEETAH thermo-chemical code.

Oguz, Sirri

2010-01-01

250

Pressure Scaling Effects on Ignition and Detonation Initiation in a Pulse Detonation Engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental study was done to examine the effects of elevated initial tube pressure in the Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE). Measured parameters were the ignition time, deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) run-up distance, DDT times, and Chapman- Jouguet (C-J) velocity. Mixed with air, three fuels, i.e., aviation gasoline, ethylene, and hydrogen, were tested at various initial pressures and equivalence ratios.

Andrew Naples; Kenneth Busby; Frederick Schauer

251

Propagation laws for steady curved detonations with chain-branching kinetics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An extension to the theory of detonation shock dynamics is made and new propagation laws are derived for steady, near-CJ (Chapman Jouguet), weakly curved detonations for a chain-branching reaction model having two components. The first is a thermally neutral induction stage governed by an Arrhenius reaction with a large activation energy, which terminates at a location called the transition interface, where instantaneous conversion of fuel into an intermediate species (chain radical) occurs. The second is an exothermic main reaction layer (or chain-recombination zone) having a temperature-independent reaction rate. We make an ansatz that the shock curvature is sufficiently large to have a leading-order influence on the induction zone structure, whereupon it is shown that multi-dimensional effects must necessarily be accounted for in the main reaction layer. Only for exactly cylindrical or spherical waves can such multi-dimensional effects be omitted. A requirement that the main reaction layer structure pass smoothly through a sonic plane leads to a propagation law for the detonation front: a relationship between the detonation velocity, the shock curvature and various shock arclength derivatives of the position of the transition interface.

Short, Mark; Bdzil, John B.

2003-03-01

252

Mechanisms of deflagration-to-detonation transition under initiation by high-voltage nanosecond discharges  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study of detonation initiation in a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture by a high-voltage nanosecond gas discharge was performed in a detonation tube with a single-cell discharge chamber. The discharge study performed in this geometry showed that three modes of discharge development were realized under the experimental conditions: a spark mode with high-temperature channel formation, a streamer mode with nonuniform gas excitation, and a transient mode. Under spark and transient initiation, simultaneous ignition inside the discharge channel occurred, forming a shock wave and leading to a conventional deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) via an adiabatic explosion. The DDT length and time at 1 bar of initial pressure in the square smooth tube with a 20-mm transverse size amounted to 50 mm and 50{mu}s, respectively. The streamer mode of discharge development at an initial pressure of 1 bar resulted in nonuniform mixture excitation and a successful DDT via a gradient mechanism, which was confirmed by high-speed time resolved ICCD imaging. The gradient mechanism implied a longer DDT time of 150{mu}s, a DDT run-up distance of 50 mm, and an initiation energy of 1 J, which is two orders of magnitude less than the direct initiation energy for a planar detonation under these conditions. (author)

Rakitin, Aleksandr E.; Starikovskii, Andrei Yu. [Physics of Nonequilibrium Systems Lab, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutski Lane, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation)

2008-10-15

253

Theoretical and numerical analysis of the photochemical initiation of detonations in hydrogen-oxygen mixtures  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical study of the formation of planar detonations in hydrogen-oxygen mixtures irradiated by a strong light pulse has been carried out for different types of distribution of light intensity, yielding different types of initiation criteria and showing that the Zeldovich criterion for the formation of detonations by nonuniform conditions may not be sufficient. The critical conditions are first estimated using a reduced two-step reaction mechanism for hydrogen-oxygen mixtures. The conditions thus obtained involve parameters that characterize the laser beam (energy, power, and geometry) and the kinetics of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures, including not only the induction time but also the exothermal reaction rate at the final stage of combustion. These critical conditions are also determined by direct numerical simulations involving detailed chemistry coupled with full gas dynamics mechanisms. Particular attention is devoted to elucidating the transition phenomena that develop in the vicinity of the critical conditions where the initiation of detonations is not spontaneous. The temperature gradient, which is responsible for the birth of a shock-reaction wave complex, may, later prevent the detonation formation.

He, L.; Clavin, P. [Univ. d`Aix-Marseille, Marseille (France). Lab. de Rechereche en Combustion

1994-12-31

254

Measurement and scaling analysis of critical energy for direct initiation of gaseous detonations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the critical energies required for direct initiation of spherical detonations in four gaseous fuels (C2H2, C2H4, C3H8 and H2)-oxygen mixtures at different initial pressures, equivalence ratios and with different amounts of argon dilution are reported. Using these data, a scaling analysis is performed based on two main parameters of the problem: the explosion length R o that characterizes the blast wave and a characteristic chemical length that characterizes the detonation. For all the undiluted mixtures considered in this study, it is found that the relationship is closely given by {R_o ? 26 ?} , where ? is the characteristic detonation cell size of the explosive mixture. While for C2H2-2.5O2 mixtures highly diluted with argon, in which cellular instabilities are shown to play a minor role on the detonation propagation, the proportionality factor increases to 37.3, 47 and 54.8 for 50, 65 and 70% argon dilution, respectively. Using the ZND induction length ? I as the characteristic chemical length scale for argon diluted or `stable' mixtures, the explosion length is also found to scale adequately with {R_o ? 2320 ?_I}.

Zhang, B.; Ng, H. D.; Lee, J. H. S.

2012-05-01

255

Vapour explosions: multiphase detonations or deflagrations?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper contains a discussion of the various modes of propagation which may occur when a hot melt transfers its energy explosively to a cold volatile liquid. In particular, the possibility of the existence of detonation-like and deflagration-like behaviour is discussed and two different melt droplet fragmentation models which may lead to these two types of behaviour are presented. The

D. F. Fletcher

1994-01-01

256

Screen Secures Detonator to Explosive Charge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Brass screen sleeve attaches blasting cap to fuse, shaped charge, detonating cord, or other formed explosive. Screen makes it easy to control distance between cap and charge, because user can see both parts, and to cool cap by convection, making use of low-cost blasting caps possible for some hot environments.

Moshenrose, H. D.; Kindsfather, R. A.

1983-01-01

257

Size effect and detonation front curvature  

SciTech Connect

Heat flow in a cylinder with internal heating is used as a basis for deriving a simple theory of detonation front curvature, leading to the prediction of quadratic curve shapes. A thermal conductivity of 50 MW/mm{sup 2} is found for TATB samples.

Souers, P. C., LLNL

1997-07-01

258

Supra-Pressure Detonation of Aluminized Explosive  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results suggest that there is a continuum of reactions induced behind a supra-pressure convergent shock front in explosive cores of coaxial charges. The pressures in convergent fronts continually increase at an increasing rate from the circumference to the charge axis. Furthermore the unreacted explosive enveloped within the front is pre-pressurized at Von Neumann states much greater than from divergent detonation.

Ronald Brown; B. Karosich; J. Gamble; J. Stork; A. Biesterveld; T. Moore; J. Sinibaldi; M. Walpole; A. Lindfors; K. Jackson; R. Koontz; D. Thompson

2007-01-01

259

Transition of porous explosive combustion into detonation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article considers the planar one-dimensional motion of a porous medium consisting of solid contacting particles (explosive grains), with space between particles filled with gas. It is established by the numerical analysis performed that if the work of intergranular pressure forces is expended solely in gas heating, then a smooth transition from combustion to detonation is realized in porous explosives.

I. Sh. Akhatov; P. B. Vainshtein

1984-01-01

260

Deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular HMX  

SciTech Connect

Experimental studies of the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in chemical explosives, specifically, granular HMX, are reviewed. The picture of the DDT process as presented here results from an attempt to incorporate common experimental observations which have heretofore been puzzling. It differs from that presented by G.B. Kistiakowsky in that the role of convective combustion is terminated and mechanical processes are postulated as the means of continuing the reaction buildup until shock waves are formed. In order to validate this picture it will be necessary both to review the experimental literature for observations which may not be reconcilable with it, and to subject each step in the proposed DDT process to detailed scrutiny. (LCL)

Campbell, A.W.

1980-01-01

261

Spontaneous transition of turbulent flames to detonations in unconfined media.  

PubMed

A deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) can occur in environments ranging from experimental and industrial systems to astrophysical thermonuclear (type Ia) supernovae explosions. Substantial progress has been made in explaining the nature of DDT in confined systems with walls, internal obstacles, or preexisting shocks. It remains unclear, however, whether DDT can occur in unconfined media. Here we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to show that for high enough turbulent intensities unconfined, subsonic, premixed, turbulent flames are inherently unstable to DDT. The associated mechanism, based on the nonsteady evolution of flames faster than the Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations, is qualitatively different from the traditionally suggested spontaneous reaction-wave model. Critical turbulent flame speeds, predicted by this mechanism for the onset of DDT, are in agreement with DNS results. PMID:21867073

Poludnenko, Alexei Y; Gardiner, Thomas A; Oran, Elaine S

2011-07-29

262

Hydrogen-oxygen flame acceleration and transition to detonation in channels with no-slip walls for a detailed chemical reaction model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The features of flame acceleration in channels with wall friction and the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) are investigated theoretically and using high resolution numerical simulations of two-dimensional reactive Navier-Stokes equations, including the effects of viscosity, thermal conduction, molecular diffusion, and a detailed chemical reaction mechanism for hydrogen-oxygen gaseous mixture. It is shown that in a wide channel, from the beginning, the flame velocity increases exponentially for a short time and then flame acceleration decreases, ending up with the abrupt increase of the combustion wave velocity and the actual transition to detonation. In a thin channel with a width smaller than the critical value, the exponential increase of the flame velocity is not bounded and ends up with the transition to detonation. The transition to detonation occurs due to the pressure pulse, which is formed at the tip of the accelerating flame. The amplitude of the pressure pulse grows exponentially due to a positive feedback coupling between the pressure pulse and the heat released in the reaction. Finally, large amplitude pressure pulse steepens into a strong shock coupled with the reaction zone forming the overdriven detonation. The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation via the Zeldovich gradient mechanism and its applicability to the deflagration-to-detonation transition is investigated for combustible materials whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics. The results of the high resolution simulations are fully consistent with experimental observations of the flame acceleration and DDT.

Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Liberman, M. A.

2011-05-01

263

Supporting Structure of the LSD Wave in an Energy Absorption Perspective  

SciTech Connect

In Repetitively Pulsed (RP) Laser Propulsion, laser energy irradiated to a vehicle is converted to blast wave enthalpy during the Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) regime. Based on the measured post-LSD electron number density profiles by two-wavelength Mach Zehnder interferometer in a line-focusing optics, electron temperature and absorption coefficient were estimated assuming Local Thermal Equilibrium. A 10J/pulse CO{sub 2} laser was used. As a result, laser absorption was found completed in the layer between the shock wave and the electron density peak. Although the LSD-termination timing was not clear from the shock-front/ionization-front separation in the shadowgraph images, there observed drastic changes in the absorption layer thickness from 0.2 mm to 0.5 mm and in the peak heating rate from 12-17x10{sup 13} kW/m{sup 3} to 5x10{sup 13} kW/m{sup 3} at the termination.

Fukui, Akihiro; Hatai, Keigo; Cho, Shinatora; Arakawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Komurasaki, Kimiya [Department of Advanced Energy, School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo (Japan)

2008-04-28

264

Axisymmetric Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred considerable interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models. In recent work by the author, a quasi-one-dimensional, finite rate chemistry CFD model was utilized to study the gasdynamics and performance characteristics of PDREs over a range of blowdown pressure ratios from 1-1000. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and enable first-order parametric studies of the effect of several nozzle and extension geometries on PDRE performance over a wide range of conditions. However, the quasi-one-dimensional approach is limited in that it cannot properly capture the multidimensional blast wave and flow expansion downstream of the PDRE, nor can it resolve nozzle flow separation if present. Moreover, the previous work was limited to single-pulse calculations. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite rate chemistry model is described and utilized to study these issues in greater detail. Example Mach number contour plots showing the multidimensional blast wave and nozzle exhaust plume are shown. The performance results are compared with the quasi-one-dimensional results from the previous paper. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions are calculated in order to determine the effect of viscous effects in the nozzle flowfield. Additionally, comparisons of the model results to performance data from CalTech, as well as experimental flowfield measurements from Stanford University, are also reported.

Morris, Christopher I.

2005-01-01

265

Self-sustained nonlinear waves in traffic flow  

E-print Network

In analogy to gas-dynamical detonation waves, which consist of a shock with an attached exothermic reaction zone, we consider herein nonlinear traveling wave solutions to the hyperbolic (“inviscid”) continuum traffic ...

Flynn, M. R.

266

Local Ignition in Carbon/Oxygen White Dwarfs -- I: One-zone Ignition and Spherical Shock Ignition of Detonations  

E-print Network

The details of ignition of Type Ia supernovae remain fuzzy, despite the importance of this input for any large-scale model of the final explosion. Here, we begin a process of understanding the ignition of these hotspots by examining the burning of one zone of material, and then investigate the ignition of a detonation due to rapid heating at single point. We numerically measure the ignition delay time for onset of burning in mixtures of degenerate material and provide fitting formula for conditions of relevance in the Type Ia problem. Using the neon abundance as a proxy for the white dwarf metallicity, we then find that ignition times can decrease by ~20% with addition of even 5% of neon by mass. When temperature fluctuations that successfully kindle a region are very rare, such a reduction in ignition time can increase the probability of ignition by orders of magnitude. If the neon comes largely at the expense of carbon, a similar increase in the ignition time can occur. We then consider the ignition of a detonation by an explosive energy input in one localized zone, eg a Sedov blast wave leading to a shock-ignited detonation. Building on previous work on curved detonations, we find that surprisingly large inputs of energy are required to successfully launch a detonation, leading to required matchheads of ~4500 detonation thicknesses - tens of centimeters to hundreds of meters - which is orders of magnitude larger than naive considerations might suggest. This is a very difficult constraint to meet for some pictures of a deflagration-to-detonation transition, such as a Zel'dovich gradient mechanism ignition in the distributed burning regime.

L. Jonathan Dursi; F. X. Timmes

2006-01-02

267

Proton radiography of PBX 9502 detonation shock dynamics confinement sandwich test  

SciTech Connect

Recent results utilizing proton radiography (P-Rad) during the detonation of the high explosive PBX 9502 are presented. Specifically, the effects of confinement of the detonation are examined in the LANL detonation confinement sandwich geometry. The resulting detonation velocity and detonation shock shape are measured. In addition, proton radiography allows one to image the reflected shocks through the detonation products. Comparisons are made with detonation shock dynamics (DSD) and reactive flow models for the lead detonation shock and detonation velocity. In addition, predictions of reflected shocks are made with the reactive flow models.

Aslam, Tariq D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

268

Proton radiographic and numerical of colliding, diverging PBX-9502 detonations.  

SciTech Connect

The Proton radiographic shot PRAD0077 was designed to study the interaction of colliding, diverging PBX-9502 detonations. The shot consisted of a 50 mm by 50 mm cylinder of PBX-9502 initiated on the top and bottom at the axis by a SE-1 detonator and a 12 mm by 12 mm cylinder of 9407. Seven radiographs were taken at times before and after the detonation collision. The system was modeled using the one-dimensional SIN code with C-J Burn in plane and spherically diverging geometry and using the two-dimensional TDL code with C-J Burn and Forest Fire. The system was also modeled with the recently developed AMR Eulerian reactive hydrodynamic code called NOBEL using Forest Fire. The system results in a large dead or nonreactive zone as the detonation attempts to turn the corner which is described by the model using Forest Fire. The peak detonation pressure achieved by the colliding diverging detonation is 50 gpa and density of 3.125 mg/ml which is about the same as that achieved by one-dimensional spherically diverging 9502 detonations but less than the one-dimensional plane 9502 peak colliding detonation pressure of 65 gpa and density of 3.4 mg/ml. The detonation travels for over 10 mm before it starts to expand and turn the corner leaving more than half of the explosive unreacted. The resulting diverging detonation is more curved than a one-dimensional spherical diverging detonation and has a steeper slope behind the detonation front. This results in the colliding pressure decaying faster than one-dimensional colliding spherical diverging pressures decay. The calculations using Forest Fire reproduce the major features of the radiograph and can be used to infer the colliding detonation characteristics.

Mader, Charles L.; Zumbro, J. D. (John D.); Ferm, E. N. (Eric N.)

2002-01-01

269

Thermal degradation of two liquid fuels and detonation tests for pulse detonation engine studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of liquid fuels such as kerosene is of interest for the pulse detonation engine (PDE). Within this context, the aim of this work, which is a preliminary study, was to show the feasibility to initiate a detonation in air with liquid-fuel pyrolysis products, using energies and dimensions of test facility similars to those of PDEs. Therefore, two liquids fuels have been compared, JP10, which is a synthesis fuel generally used in the field of missile applications, and decane, which is one of the major components of standard kerosenes (F-34, Jet A1, ...). The thermal degradation of these fuels was studied with two pyrolysis processes, a batch reactor and a flow reactor. The temperatures varied from 600°C to 1,000°C and residence times for the batch reactor and the flow reactor were, respectively, between 10 30 s and 0.1 2 s. Subsequently, the detonability of synthetic gaseous mixtures, which was a schematisation of the decomposition state after the pyrolysis process, has been studied. The detonability study, regarding nitrogen dilution and equivalence ratio, was investigated in a 50 mm-diameter, 2.5 m-long detonation tube. These dimensions are compatible with applications in the aircraft industry and, more particularly, in PDEs. Therefore, JP10 and decane were compared to choose the best candidate for liquid-fuel PDE studies.

Rocourt, X.; Gillard, P.; Sochet, I.; Piton, D.; Prigent, A.

2007-02-01

270

Shock initiation and detonation study on high concentration H2O2/H2O solutions using in-situ magnetic gauges  

SciTech Connect

Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; homogeneous shock initiation behavior has been observed in the experiments where reaction is observed. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these experiments, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot points, times-to-detonation points that indicate low sensitivity (an input of 13.5 GPa produces detonation in 1 {micro}s compared to 9.5 GPa for neat nitromethane), and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions of over 6.6 km/s.

Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01

271

Pulse Detonation Engines for High Speed Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Revolutionary concepts in propulsion are required in order to achieve high-speed cruise capability in the atmosphere and for low cost reliable systems for earth to orbit missions. One of the advanced concepts under study is the air-breathing pulse detonation engine. Additional work remains in order to establish the role and performance of a PDE in flight applications, either as a stand-alone device or as part of a combined cycle system. In this paper, we shall offer a few remarks on some of these remaining issues, i.e., combined cycle systems, nozzles and exhaust systems and thrust per unit frontal area limitations. Currently, an intensive experimental and numerical effort is underway in order to quantify the propulsion performance characteristics of this device. In this paper, we shall highlight our recent efforts to elucidate the propulsion potential of pulse detonation engines and their possible application to high-speed or hypersonic systems.

Povinelli, Louis A.

2002-01-01

272

Supra-Pressure Detonation of Aluminized Explosive  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results suggest that there is a continuum of reactions induced behind a supra-pressure convergent shock front in explosive cores of coaxial charges. The pressures in convergent fronts continually increase at an increasing rate from the circumference to the charge axis. Furthermore the unreacted explosive enveloped within the front is pre-pressurized at Von Neumann states much greater than from divergent detonation. For the case where the initiating sleeve detonates at constant velocity, the convergent front in the core moves at comparable velocity, suggesting a nearly common Rayleigh line behavior along the front. The sustained chemistry across the front, however, differs along the radii because of the pressure-dependent equilibria. The velocity of a sustained front in a PBXN-111 core circumferentially initiated by thin sleeves of either PBXN-110 or PBXN-112 is increased by approximately 40 percent. Measured peak pressure is approximately 600 times greater than that in a divergent front resulting from point initiation.

Brown, Ronald; Karosich, B.; Gamble, J.; Stork, J.; Biesterveld, A.; Moore, T.; Sinibaldi, J.; Walpole, M.; Lindfors, A.; Jackson, K.; Koontz, R.; Thompson, D.

2007-06-01

273

Convection of a pattern of vorticity through a reacting shock wave  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The passage of a weak vorticity disturbance through a reactive shock wave, or detonation, is examined by means of a linearized treatment. Of special interest is the effect of chemical heat release on the amplification of vorticity in particular, and on the disturbance pattern generated downstream of the detonation in general. It is found that the effect of exothermicity is to amplify the refracted waves. The manner in which the imposed disturbance alters the structure of the detonation itself is also discussed.

Jackson, T. L.; Kapila, A. K.; Hussaini, M. Y.

1989-01-01

274

Size effect and detonation front curvature  

SciTech Connect

Explosive sonic reaction zone lengths are obtained from two sources: the size effect and detonation front curvature, where the edge lag is close to being a direct measure. The curvature comes from a constant energy source plus extra energy released near the walls. The presence of defects can eliminate the central flow of transverse energy to the walls and create a turbulent central section in small reaction zone explosives. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Souers, P.C.; Garza, R. [Energetic Materials Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

1998-07-01

275

DSD front models: nonideal explosive detonation in ANFO  

SciTech Connect

The DSD method for modeling propagating detonation is based on three elements: (1) a subscale theory of multi-dimensional detonation that treats the detonation as a front whose dynamics depends only on metrics of the front (such as curvature, etc.), (2) high-resolution, direct numerical simulation of detonation using Euler equation models, and (3) physical experiments to characterize multi-dimensional detonation propagation in real explosives and to provide data to calibrate DSD front models. In this paper, we describe our work on elements (1) and (3), develop a DSD calibration for the nonideal explosive ANFO and then demonstrate the utility of the ANFO calibration, with an example 3D detonation propagation calculation.

Bdzil, J. B. (John Bohdan); Aslam, T. D. (Tariq D.); Catanach, R. A. (Richard A.); Hill, L. G. (Larry G.); Short, M. (Mark Short)

2002-01-01

276

Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters  

SciTech Connect

We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

2008-05-31

277

Type Ia Supernova Explosion: Gravitationally Confined Detonation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new mechanism for Type Ia supernova explosions in massive white dwarfs. The scenario follows from relaxing assumptions of symmetry and involves a detonation born near the stellar surface. The explosion begins with an essentially central ignition of a deflagration that results in the formation of a buoyancy-driven bubble of hot material that reaches the stellar surface at supersonic speeds. The bubble breakout laterally accelerates fuel-rich outer stellar layers. This material, confined by gravity to the white dwarf, races along the stellar surface and is focused at the location opposite to the point of the bubble breakout. These streams of nuclear fuel carry enough mass and energy to trigger a detonation just above the stellar surface that will incinerate the white dwarf and result in an energetic explosion. The stellar expansion following the deflagration redistributes mass in a way that ensures production of intermediate-mass and iron group elements with ejecta having a strongly layered structure and a mild amount of asymmetry following from the early deflagration phase. This asymmetry, combined with the amount of stellar expansion determined by details of the evolution (principally the energetics of deflagration, timing of detonation, and structure of the progenitor), can be expected to create a family of mildly diverse Type Ia supernova explosions.

Plewa, T.; Calder, A. C.; Lamb, D. Q.

2004-09-01

278

Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high-cycle thermal fatigue behavior has been investigated on a flat Haynes 188 alloy specimen, under the test condition of 30-Hz cycle frequency (33-msec pulse period and 10-msec pulse width including a 0.2-msec pulse spike; ref. 4). Temperature distributions were calculated with one-dimensional finite difference models. The calculations show that that the 0.2-msec pulse spike can cause an additional 40 C temperature fluctuation with an interaction depth of 0.08 mm near the specimen surface region. This temperature swing will be superimposed onto the temperature swing of 80 C that is induced by the 10-msec laser pulse near the 0.53-mm-deep surface interaction region.

Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

2001-01-01

279

A view on the functioning mechanism of EBW detonators -part 2: bridgewire output  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is the second paper of three papers describing the studies to identify the initiating mechanisms in Exploding Bridgewire (EBW) detonators. In this paper the results of experiments to quantify the effect of the bridgewire explosion are described. Experiments have been performed to characterise the output from the bridgewire in terms of the stimulus it would apply to the surrounding explosive in an EBW detonator. The expansion speed of the bridgewire at burst as a function of input energy has been measured using Photonic Doppler Velocimety (PDV). To complement the bridgewire expansion velocity determinations aquarium experiments were carried out in which the shock wave velocity in water was measured, as a function of energy, by high speed photography. The shock pressures were calculated and compared to initiation criteria for PETN.

Lee, E. A.; Drake, R. C.; Richardson, J.

2014-05-01

280

Numerical study of sidewall filling for gas-fed pulse detonation engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pulse detonation engines for aerospace propulsion are required to operate at 50-100 Hz meaning that each pulse is 10-20 ms long. Filling of the engine and the related purging process become dominant due to their long duration compared to ignition and detonation wave propagation. This study uses ANSYS FLUENT to investigate the filling of a 1 m long tube with an internal diameter of 100 mm. Six different configurations were investigated with an endwall port and various sidewall arrangements, including stagger and inclination. A stoichiometric mixture of gaseous octane and air at STP was used to fill the tube at injection rates of 40, 150 and 250 m/s. Phase injection was also investigated and it showed performance improvements such as reduced lling time and reduced propellant escape from the exit.

Rongrat, Wunnarat

281

THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect

We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q. [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Fisher, R. T. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA 02740 (United States); Townsley, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Meakin, C. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Reid, L. B. [NTEC Environmental Technology, Subiaco WA 6008 (Australia)

2012-11-01

282

Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Coatings with Incorporated Detonationally Generated Nanodiamonds  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effect of the substrate chemistry on the morphology of hydroxyapatite-detonational nanodiamond composite coatings grown by a biomimetic approach (immersion in a supersaturated simulated body fluid). When detonational nanodiamond particles were added to the solution, the morphology of the grown for 2 h composite particles was porous but more compact then that of pure hydroxyapatite particles. The nanodiamond particles stimulated the hydroxyapatite growth with different morphology on the various substrates (Ti, Ti alloys, glasses, Si, opal). Biocompatibility assay with MG63 osteoblast cells revealed that the detonational nanodiamond water suspension with low and average concentration of the detonational nanodiamond powder is not toxic to living cells.

Pramatarova, L.; Pecheva, E.; Hikov, T.; Fingarova, D. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Dimitrova, R. [Institute of Organic Chemistry with Centre of Phytochemistry, Sofia (Bulgaria); Spassov, T. [Faculty of Chemistry, Sofia University, Sofia (Bulgaria); Krasteva, N. [Institute of Biophysics, Bulgarian Academy of Science, Sofia (Bulgaria); Mitev, D. [Space Research Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

2010-01-21

283

A library of prompt detonation reaction zone data  

SciTech Connect

Tables are given listing literature data that allows calculation of sonic reaction zones at or near steady-state for promptly detonating explosive cylinders. The data covers homogeneous, heterogeneous, composite, inorganic and binary explosives and allows comparison across the entire explosive field. Table 1 lists detonation front curvatures. Table 2 lists Size Effect data, i.e. the change of detonation velocity with cylinder radius. Table 3 lists failure radii and detonation velocities. Table 4 lists explosive compositions. A total of 51 references dating back into the 1950`s are given. Calculated reaction zones, radii of curvature and growth rate coefficients are listed.

Souers, P. C., LLNL

1998-06-01

284

The delayed-detonation model of Type Ia supernovae. 2: The detonation phase  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The investigation, by use of two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations, of the 'delayed detonation' mechanism of Khokhlov for the explosion of Type Ia supernovae is continued. Previously we found that the deflagration is insufficient to unbind the star. Expansion shuts off the flame; much of this small production of iron group nuclei occurs at lower densities, which reduces the electron-capture problem. Because the degenerate star has an adiabatic exponent only slightly above 4/3, the energy released by deflagration drives a pulsation of large amplitude. During the first expansion phase, adiabatic cooling shuts off the burning, and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability then gives mixing of high-entropy ashes with low-entropy fuel. During the first contraction phase, compressional heating reignites the material. The burning was allowed to develop into a detonation in these nonspherical models. The detonation grows toward spherical symmetry at late times. At these densities (rho approx. 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 8) g cm(exp -3)), either Ni-56 or nuclei of the Si-Ca group are the dominant products of the burning. The bulk yields are sensitive to the density of the star when the transition to detonation occurs. The relevance of the abundances, velocities, mixing, and total energy release to the theory and interpretation of Type Ia supernovae is discussed.

Arnett, David; Livne, Eli

1994-01-01

285

A flash vaporization system for detonation of hydrocarbon fuels in a pulse detonation engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current research by both the US Air Force and Navy is concentrating on obtaining detonations in a pulse detonation engine (PDE) with low vapor pressure, kerosene based jet fuels. These fuels, however, have a low vapor pressure and the performance of a liquid hydrocarbon fueled PDE is significantly hindered by the presence of fuel droplets. A high pressure, fuel flash vaporization system (FVS) has been designed and built to reduce and eliminate the time required to evaporate the fuel droplets. Four fuels are tested: n-heptane, isooctane, aviation gasoline, and JP-8. The fuels vary in volatility and octane number and present a clear picture on the benefits of flash vaporization. Results show the FVS quickly provided a detonable mixture for all of the fuels tested without coking or clogging the fuel lines. Combustion results validated the model used to predict the fuel and air temperatures required to achieve gaseous mixtures with each fuel. The most significant achievement of the research was the detonation of flash vaporized JP-8 and air. The results show that the flash vaporized JP-8 used 20 percent less fuel to ignite the fuel air mixture twice as fast (8 ms from 16 ms) when compared to the unheated JP-8 combustion data. Likewise, the FVS has been validated as a reliable method to create the droplet free mixtures required for liquid hydrocarbon fueled PDEs.

Tucker, Kelly Colin

286

A Numerical and Analytical Study of Detonation Diffraction  

E-print Network

A Numerical and Analytical Study of Detonation Diffraction Thesis by Marco Arienti In Partial Abstract An investigation of detonation diffraction through an abrupt area change has been car- ried out diffraction is closely related to the occurrence of localized re-initiation mechanisms, and is relevant

Barr, Al

287

THEORY OF DETONATION STRUCTURE FOR TWO-PHASE MATERIALS  

E-print Network

THEORY OF DETONATION STRUCTURE FOR TWO-PHASE MATERIALS BY JOSEPH MICHAEL POWERS B.S., University-CHAMPAIGN THE GRADUATE COLLEGE MAY 1988 WE HEREBY RECOMMEND THAT THE THESIS BY JOSEPH MICHAEL POWERS THEORY OF DETONATION to this study. Suzanne Palmer assisted with some of the figures. Finally, I thank my parents, Leo and Mary

288

The equation of state of predominant detonation products  

Microsoft Academic Search

The equation of state of detonation products, when incorporated into an experimentally grounded thermochemical reaction algorithm can be used to predict the performance of explosives. Here we report laser based Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering measurements of the speed of sound from a variety of polar and nonpolar detonation product supercritical fluids and mixtures. The speed of sound data are used

Joseph Zaug; Jonathan Crowhurst; Sorin Bastea; Laurence Fried

2009-01-01

289

Detonation-driven fracture in thin shell structures: Numerical studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combustion that follows a gas explosion quickly evolves into detonation and causes severe damage in thin-walled structures,\\u000a especially structures that contain small internal flaws. Detonation-driven fracture of thin structures is studied numerically\\u000a by a 3D meshfree method. Such scenarios are studied through numerical analysis and compared to experimental data.

Ch. Gato; Yinling Shie

2010-01-01

290

Effects of Fuel Distribution on Detonation Tube Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A pulse detonation engine (PDE) uses a series of high frequency intermittent detonation tubes to generate thrust. The process of filling the detonation tube with fuel and air for each cycle may yield non-uniform mixtures. Lack of mixture uniformity is commonly ignored when calculating detonation tube thrust performance. In this study, detonation cycles featuring idealized non-uniform H2/air mixtures were analyzed using the SPARK two-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD code with 7-step H2/air reaction mechanism. Mixture non-uniformities examined included axial equivalence ratio gradients, transverse equivalence ratio gradients, and partially fueled tubes. Three different average test section equivalence ratios (phi), stoichiometric (phi = 1.00), fuel lean (phi = 0.90), and fuel rich (phi = 1.10), were studied. All mixtures were detonable throughout the detonation tube. It was found that various mixtures representing the same test section equivalence ratio had specific impulses within 1 percent of each other, indicating that good fuel/air mixing is not a prerequisite for optimal detonation tube performance.

Perkins, Hugh Douglas

2002-01-01

291

Direct Observations of Reaction Zone Structure in Propagating Detonations  

E-print Network

of the detonation cell width. The structure of the triple point was studied in a narrow channel using schlieren it propagates in a narrow channel, as shown by Strehlow and Crooker [7]. Schlieren images of detonations in non structure, schlieren images show similar shock configurations to those observed in narrow channels, when

Barr, Al

292

Optical properties of detonation nanodiamond hydrosols  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of the optical properties of hydrosols of 4-nm detonation nanodiamond particles performed in the 0.2-1.1 ?m range have revealed a novel effect, a strong increase of absorption at the edges of the spectral range, and provided its explanation in terms of absorption of radiation by the dimer chains (the so-called Pandey chains) fixed on the surface of a nanodiamond particle. The effect of particle size distribution in a hydrosol on the relative intensity of Rayleigh scattering and light absorption by nanodiamond particles in this range has been analyzed.

Aleksenskii, A. E.; Vul', A. Ya.; Konyakhin, S. V.; Reich, K. V.; Sharonova, L. V.; Eidel'man, E. D.

2012-03-01

293

Equation of state for detonation products  

SciTech Connect

To be useful, an equation of state for detonation products must allow rapid computation. The constraints applied by this requirement have surprising thermodynamic effects. Some of these are discussed here. A simple, complete equation of state is proposed, and its properties are discussed. With the form assumed here, all the useful integrals (except for the Riemann integral) can be written simply and explicitly, so the behavior of the important variables can be easily seen. The complete equation of state is calibrated for PBX9404 and PBX9501.

Davis, W.C.

1998-12-31

294

Amplification of Pressure Waves during Vibrational Equilibration of Excited Chemical Reaction Products  

SciTech Connect

The Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation identified amplification of pressure wavelets during equilibration of vibrationally excited reaction products in the reaction zone as the physical mechanism by which exothermic chemical energy release sustains detonation waves. This mechanism leads to the formation of the well-known, complex three-dimensional structure of a self-sustaining detonation wave. This amplification mechanism is postulated to be a general property of subsonic and supersonic reactive flows occurring during: shock to detonation transition (SDT); hot spot ignition and growth; deflagration to detonation transition (DDT); flame acceleration by shock or compression waves; and acoustic (sound) wave amplification. The existing experimental and theoretical evidence for pressure wave amplification by chemical energy release into highly vibrationally excited product molecules under these reactive flow conditions is reviewed in this paper.

Tarver, C M

2004-05-11

295

On the mechanism of the deflagration-to-detonation transition in a hydrogen-oxygen mixture  

SciTech Connect

The flame acceleration and the physical mechanism underlying the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) have been studied experimentally, theoretically, and using a two-dimensional gasdynamic model for a hydrogen-oxygen gas mixture by taking into account the chain chemical reaction kinetics for eight components. A flame accelerating in a tube is shown to generate shock waves that are formed directly at the flame front just before DDT occurred, producing a layer of compressed gas adjacent to the flame front. A mixture with a density higher than that of the initial gas enters the flame front, is heated, and enters into reaction. As a result, a high-amplitude pressure peak is formed at the flame front. An increase in pressure and density at the leading edge of the flame front accelerates the chemical reaction, causing amplification of the compression wave and an exponentially rapid growth of the pressure peak, which 'drags' the flame behind. A high-amplitude compression wave produces a strong shock immediately ahead of the reaction zone, generating a detonation wave. The theory and numerical simulations of the flame acceleration and the new physical mechanism of DDT are in complete agreement with the experimentally observed flame acceleration, shock formation, and DDT in a hydrogen-oxygen gas mixture.

Liberman, M. A., E-mail: misha.liberman@gmail.co [Uppsala University, Department of Physics (Sweden); Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, M. S., E-mail: mike.kuznetsov@kit.ed [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Rakhimova, T. V.; Chukalovskii, A. A. [Moscow State University, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15

296

On the Initiation Mechanism in Exploding Bridgewire and Laser Detonators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since its invention by Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project era the exploding bridgewire detonator (EBW) has seen tremendous use and study. Recent development of a laser-powered device with detonation properties similar to an EBW is reviving interest in the basic physics of the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) process in both of these devices. Cutback experiments using both laser interferometry and streak camera observations are providing new insight into the initiation mechanism in EBWs. These measurements are being correlated to a DDT model of compaction to detonation and shock to detonation developed previously by Xu and Stewart. The DDT model is incorporated into a high-resolution, multi-material model code for simulating the complete process. Model formulation and the modeling issues required to describe the test data will be discussed.

Stewart, D. Scott; Thomas, Keith A.; Clarke, S.; Mallett, H.; Martin, E.; Martinez, M.; Munger, A.; Saenz, Juan

2006-07-01

297

Detonation engine fed by acetylene-oxygen mixture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The advantages of a constant volume combustion cycle as compared to constant pressure combustion in terms of thermodynamic efficiency has focused the search for advanced propulsion on detonation engines. Detonation of acetylene mixed with oxygen in various proportions is studied using mathematical modeling. Simplified kinetics of acetylene burning includes 11 reactions with 9 components. Deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is obtained in a cylindrical tube with a section of obstacles modeling a Shchelkin spiral; the DDT takes place in this section for a wide range of initial mixture compositions. A modified ka-omega turbulence model is used to simulate flame acceleration in the Shchelkin spiral section of the system. The results of numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which had been performed in the same size detonation chamber and turbulent spiral ring section, and with theoretical data on the Chapman-Jouguet detonation parameters.

Smirnov, N. N.; Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Phylippov, Yu. G.; Koo, Jaye

2014-11-01

298

Jaguar Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Jaguar product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products by analysis of Available Hugoniot and static volumetric data to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationships for the components. Experimental melting points were also utilized to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX—boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using Jaguar are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that the boron does not react near the detonation front or that boron mixtures exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior (as shown by some aluminized explosives), with higher detonation velocities at the initial points. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX—boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the detonation properties of the formulation.

Stiel, L. I.; Baker, E. L.; Capellos, C.

2009-12-01

299

Effect of prill structure on detonation performance of ANFO  

SciTech Connect

While the effects of charge diameter, fuel mix ratio, and temperature on ANFO detonation performance are substantial, the effects of prill type are considerable as well as tailorable. Engineered AN prills provide a means to improve overall performance, primarily by changing the material microstructure through the addition of features designed to enhance hot spot action. To examine the effects of prill type (along with fuel mix ratio and charge diameter) on detonation performance, a series of precision, large-scale, ANFO front-curvature rate-stick tests was performed. Each shot used standard No. 2 diesel for the fuel oil and was essentially unconfined with cardboard confinement. Detonation velocities and front curvatures were measured while actively maintaining consistent shot temperatures. Based on the experimental results, DSD calibrations were performed to model the detonation performance over a range of conditions, and the overall effects of prill microstructure were examined and correlated with detonation performance.

Salyer, Terry R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiyanda, Charles B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zimmerly, Tony [EMRTC NMT

2010-01-01

300

Flow Characterization of a Detonation Gun Facility and First Coating Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A computer-controlled detonation gun based spraying device has been designed and tested to obtain particle velocities over 1200 m/s. The device is able to be operated in two modes based on different flow-physical principles. In one mode, the device functions like a conventional detonation gun in which the powder is accelerated in a blast wave. In the other mode, an extension of the facility with a nozzle uses the detonated gas for an intermittently operated shock tunnel process in which the particles are injected into and accelerated by a quasi-steady high enthalpy nozzle flow with high reservoir conditions. Presented are experimental results of the operation without nozzle in which the device generates moderate to high particle velocities in an intermittent process with a frequency of 5 Hz. A hydrogen/oxygen mixture and Cu and WC-Co (88/12) powders are used in the experiments. Operation performance and tube outflow are characterized by time-resolved Schlieren images and pressure measurements. The particle velocities in the outflow are obtained by laser Doppler anemometry. Different substrate/powder combinations (Al/Cu, Steel/Cu, Al/WC-Co, and Steel/WC-Co) have been investigated by light microscopy and measurements of microhardness.

Henkes, C.; Olivier, H.

2014-06-01

301

Investigation of the Purge Process on the Multi-Cycle Operations of a Pulse Detonation Engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The pulse detonation engine (PDE) is a propulsion system that generates thrust by repetitive detonation. Performance of the PDE, such as specific impulse, has gained much attention. However, the details of operational conditions related to performance have not been clarified. In this study, to investigate these issues, a hydrogen-air PDE was constructed and the effect of the purge process on multi-cycle operations was studied. The exhaust of the burned gas from the PDE was made by rarefaction waves so that it is expected not to create internal disturbance, such as spiral, in the tube so that the burned gas can be exhausted smoothly. A purge process using air was applied to assist the exhaust process in order to prevent failures in multi-cycle operations. The effects of the purge-volume fraction were investigated. As a result, when a purge-air gas filled the region including the spark plug, detonations occurred in a stable manner. Using these conditions, multi-cycle experiments ranging from 10 to 50 Hz were conducted and profiles of the thrust-wall pressure are discussed in detail.

Sakurai, Takashi; Ooko, Akinori; Yoshihashi, Teruo; Obara, Tetsuro; Ohyagi, Shigeharu

302

Detonation characteristics of dimethyl ether and ethanol-air mixtures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detonation cell structure in dimethyl ether vapor and ethanol vapor-air mixtures was measured at atmospheric pressure and initial temperatures in the range of 293-373 K. Tests were carried out in a 6.2-m-long, 10-cm inner diameter tube. For more reactive mixtures, a series of orifice plates were used to promote deflagration-to-detonation transition in the first half of the tube. For less reactive mixtures prompt detonation initiation was achieved with an acetylene-oxygen driver. The soot foil technique was used to capture the detonation cell structure. The measured cell size was compared to the calculated one-dimensional detonation reaction zone length. For fuel-rich dimethyl ether mixtures the calculated reaction zone is highlighted by a temperature gradient profile with two maxima, i.e., double heat release. The detonation cell structure was interpreted as having two characteristic sizes over the full range of mixture compositions. For mixtures at the detonation propagation limits the large cellular structure approached a single-head spin, and the smaller cells approached the size of the tube diameter. There is little evidence to support the idea that the two cell sizes observed on the foils are related to the double heat release predicted for the rich mixtures. There was very little influence of initial temperature on the cell size over the temperature range investigated. A double heat release zone was not predicted for ethanol-air detonations. The detonation cell size for stoichiometric ethanol-air was found to be similar to the size of the small cells for dimethyl ether. The measured cell size for ethanol-air did not vary much with composition in the range of 30-40 mm. For mixtures near stoichiometric it was difficult to discern multiple cell sizes. However, near the detonation limits there was strong evidence of a larger cell structure similar to that observed in dimethyl ether air mixtures.

Diakow, P.; Cross, M.; Ciccarelli, G.

2015-02-01

303

Legal considerations in a nuclear detonation.  

PubMed

This article summarizes public health legal issues that need to be considered in preparing for and responding to nuclear detonation. Laws at the federal, state, territorial, local, tribal, and community levels can have a significant impact on the response to an emergency involving a nuclear detonation and the allocation of scarce resources for affected populations. An understanding of the breadth of these laws, the application of federal, state, and local law, and how each may change in an emergency, is critical to an effective response. Laws can vary from 1 geographic area to the next and may vary in an emergency, affording waivers or other extraordinary actions under federal, state, or local emergency powers. Public health legal requirements that are commonly of concern and should be examined for flexibility, reciprocity, and emergency exceptions include liability protections for providers; licensing and credentialing of providers; consent and privacy protections for patients; occupational safety and employment protections for providers; procedures for obtaining and distributing medical countermeasures and supplies; property use, condemnation, and protection; restrictions on movement of individuals in an emergency area; law enforcement; and reimbursement for care. PMID:21402813

Sherman, Susan E

2011-03-01

304

Bonfire-safe low-voltage detonator  

DOEpatents

A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it bonfire-safe includes a first layer of an explosive charge of CP, or a primary explosive, and a second layer of a secondary organic explosive charge, such as PETN, which has a degradation temperature lower than the autoignition temperature of the CP or primary explosives. The first layer is composed of a pair of increments disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to and in contact with an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The second layer is composed of a plurality of increments disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to and in contact with the first layer on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first layer is loaded under a sufficient high pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to achieve ignition, whereas the second layer is loaded under a sufficient low pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. Each increment of the first and second layers has an axial length-to-diameter ratio of one-half.

Lieberman, Morton L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01

305

Spark-safe low-voltage detonator  

DOEpatents

A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it spark-safe ncludes an organic secondary explosive charge of HMX in the form of a thin pad disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The pad of secondary charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter. The explosive column also includes a first explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in the ignition region of the explosive column next to the secondary charge pad on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to provide mechanical confinement of the pad of secondary charge and physical coupling thereof with the ignition device. The explosive column further includes a second explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to the first CP charge on a side opposite from the pad of secondary charge. The second CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. The first explosive CP charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter, whereas the second explosive CP charge contains a series of increments (nominally 4) each of which has an axial thickness-to-diameter ratio of one to two.

Lieberman, Morton L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01

306

Lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation  

E-print Network

In this paper we present a lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation. In this model the fluid behavior is described by a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann model by Gan et al. [Physica A, 2008, 387: 1721]. The chemical reaction is described by the Lee-Tarver model [Phys. Fluids, 1980, 23: 2362]. The reaction heat is naturally coupled with the flow behavior. Due to the separation of time scales in the chemical and thermodynamic processes, a key technique for a successful simulation is to use the operator-splitting scheme. The new model is verified and validated by well-known benchmark tests. As a specific application of the new model, we studied the simple steady detonation phenomenon. To show the merit of LB model over the traditional ones, we focus on the reaction zone to study the non-equilibrium effects. It is interesting to find that, at the von Neumann peak, the system is nearly in its thermodynamic equilibrium. At the two sides of the von Neumann peak, the system deviates from its equilibri...

Yan, Bo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Ying, Yang-Jun; Li, Hua; 10.1007/s11467-013-0286-z

2013-01-01

307

Simulation of the Reflected Blast Wave froma C-4 Charge  

SciTech Connect

The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 {micro}m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 8 ranges (GR = 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 inches) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 2 inches), which were dominated by jetting effects.

Howard, W M; Kuhl, A L; Tringe, J W

2011-08-01

308

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOEpatents

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01

309

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOEpatents

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07

310

Recent papers from DX-1, detonation science and technology  

SciTech Connect

Over the past year members of DX-1 have participated in several conferences where presentations were made and papers prepared for proceedings. There have also been several papers published in or submitted to refereed journals for publication. Rather that attach all these papers to the DX-1 Quarterly Report, we decided to put them in a Los Alamos report that could be distributed to those who get the quarterly, as well as others that have an interest in the work being done in DX-1 both inside and outside the Laboratory. This compilation does not represent all the work reported during the year because some people have chosen not to include their work here. In particular, there were a number of papers relating to deflagration-to-detonation modeling that were not included. However, this group of papers does present a good picture of much of the unclassified work being done in DX-1. Several of the papers include coauthors from other groups or divisions at the Laboratory, providing an indication of the collaborations in which people in DX-1 are involved. Discussed topics of submitted papers include: shock compression of condensed matter, pyrotechnics, shock waves, molecular spectroscopy, sound speed measurements in PBX-9501, chemical dimerization, and micromechanics of spall and damage in tantalum.

NONE

1996-10-01

311

On the Initiation Mechanism in Exploding Bridgewire and Laser Detonators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since its invention by Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project era the exploding bridgewire detonator (EBW) has seen tremendous use and study. Recent development of a laser-powered device with detonation properties similar to an EBW is reviving interest in the basic physics of the Deflagration-to-Detonation (DDT) process in both of these devices,[1]. Cutback experiments using both laser interferometry and streak camera observations are providing new insight into the initiation mechanism in EBWs. These measurements are being correlated to a DDT model of compaction to detonation and shock to detonation developed previously by Xu and Stewart, [2]. The DDT model is incorporated into a high-resolution, multi-material model code for simulating the complete process. Model formulation and predictions against the test data will be discussed. REFS. [1] A. Munger, J. Kennedy, A. Akinci, and K. Thomas, "Dev. of a Laser Detonator" 30th Int. Pyrotechnics Seminar, Fort Collins, CO, (2004). [2] Xu, S. and Stewart, D. S. Deflagration to detonation transition in porous energetic materials: A model study. J. Eng. Math., 31, 143-172 (1997)

Stewart, D. Scott; Thomas, K.; Saenz, J.

2005-07-01

312

Conditions for Successful Helium Detonations in Astrophysical Environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several models for Type Ia-like supernova events rely on the production of a self-sustained detonation powered by nuclear reactions. In the absence of hydrogen, the fuel that powers these detonations typically consists of either pure helium (He) or a mixture of carbon and oxygen (C/O). Studies that systematically determine the conditions required to initiate detonations in C/O material exist, but until now no analogous investigation of He matter has been conducted. We perform one-dimensional reactive hydrodynamical simulations at a variety of initial density and temperature combinations and find critical length scales for the initiation of He detonations that range between 1 and 1010 cm. A simple estimate of the length scales over which the total consumption of fuel will occur for steady-state detonations is provided by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) formalism. Our initiation lengths are consistently smaller than the corresponding CJ length scales by a factor of ~100, providing opportunities for thermonuclear explosions in a wider range of low-mass white dwarfs (WDs) than previously thought possible. We find that virialized WDs with as little mass as 0.24 M ? can be detonated, and that even less massive WDs can be detonated if a sizable fraction of their mass is raised to a higher adiabat. That the initiation length is exceeded by the CJ length implies that certain systems may not reach nuclear statistical equilibrium within the time it takes a detonation to traverse the object. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that incomplete burning will occur in the majority of He WD detonations and that 40Ca, 44Ti, or 48Cr, rather than 56Ni, is the predominant burning product for many of these events. We anticipate that a measure of the quantity of the intermediate-mass elements and 56Ni produced in a helium-rich thermonuclear explosion can potentially be used to constrain the nature of the progenitor system.

Holcomb, Cole; Guillochon, James; De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

2013-07-01

313

Experimental study on liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The research project on pulse detonation engines has been launched in the Key- Laboratory of High Temperature Gas Dynamics of Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, since 2000. The recent progress on the research project is introduced in this paper with a special emphasis on the experiment on the liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine model. To gain basic understanding on the PDE, three PDE test facilities have been set up and the liquid-fueled one uses gasoline as fuel and oxygen as oxidizer, which can be operated at 20 pulses per second now after some improvements on fuel/oxygen mixing, direct detonation ignitions and the PDE cycle timing.

Mu, Q. H.; Wang, C.; Zhao, W.; Jiang, Z.

314

Theoretical solution of the minimum charge problem for gaseous detonations  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical model was developed for the minimum charge to trigger a gaseous detonation in spherical geometry as a generalization of the Zeldovich model. Careful comparisons were made between the theoretical predictions and experimental data on the minimum charge to trigger detonations in propane-air mixtures. The predictions are an order of magnitude too high, and there is no apparent resolution to the discrepancy. A dynamic model, which takes into account the experimentally observed oscillations in the detonation zone, may be necessary for reliable predictions. 27 refs., 9 figs.

Ostensen, R.W.

1990-12-01

315

Geometry-specific scaling of detonation parameters from front curvature  

SciTech Connect

It has previously been asserted that classical detonation curvature theory predicts that the critical diameter and the diameter-effect curve of a cylindrical high-explosive charge should scale with twice the thickness of an analogous two-dimensional explosive slab. The varied agreement of experimental results with this expectation have led some to question the ability of curvature-based concepts to predict detonation propagation in non-ideal explosives. This study addresses such claims by showing that the expected scaling relationship (hereafter referred to d = 2w) is not consistent with curvature-based Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) theory.

Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-20

316

Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics and Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pulse detonation engines (PDB) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional gas turbines and rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a theoretical thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional engines. However, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to all pulse detonation devices has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance of PDES problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models.

Morris, C. I.

2003-01-01

317

The dynamics of unsteady detonation with diffusion  

SciTech Connect

Here we consider an unsteady detonation with diffusion included. This introduces an interaction between the reaction length scales and diffusion length scales. Detailed kinetics introduce multiple length scales as shown though the spatial eigenvalue analysis of hydrogen-oxygen system; the smallest length scale is {approx} 10{sup 7} m and the largest {approx} 10{sup -2} m; away from equilibrium, the breadth can be larger. In this paper, we consider a simpler set of model equations, similar to the inviscid reactive compressible fluid equations, but include diffusion (in the form of thermal/energy, momentum, and mass diffusion). We will seek to reveal how the complex dynamics already discovered in one-step systems in the inviscid limit changes with the addition of diffusion.

Aslam, Tariq Dennis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romick, Christopher [NOTRE DAME; Powers, Joseph [NOTRE DAME

2010-01-01

318

Adaptive multiresolution computations applied to detonations  

E-print Network

A space-time adaptive method is presented for the reactive Euler equations describing chemically reacting gas flow where a two species model is used for the chemistry. The governing equations are discretized with a finite volume method and dynamic space adaptivity is introduced using multiresolution analysis. A time splitting method of Strang is applied to be able to consider stiff problems while keeping the method explicit. For time adaptivity an improved Runge--Kutta--Fehlberg scheme is used. Applications deal with detonation problems in one and two space dimensions. A comparison of the adaptive scheme with reference computations on a regular grid allow to assess the accuracy and the computational efficiency, in terms of CPU time and memory requirements.

Roussel, Olivier

2015-01-01

319

A laser-supported lowerable surface setup to study the role of ground contact during stepping.  

PubMed

We introduce a laser-supported setup to study the influence of afferent input on muscle activation during walking, using a movable ground platform. This approach allows investigating if and how the activity of stance phase muscles of an insect (e.g. stick insect) responds to a missing ground contact signal. The walking surface consists of a fixed and a lowerable part, which can be lowered to defined levels below the previous ground level at any time point during a walking sequence. As a consequence, the leg under investigation finds either a lower ground level or no ground support at all. The lowerable walking surface consists of a 49 mm × 34 mm stainless steel surface, made slippery and equipped for tarsal contact monitoring, similar to the system that was described by Gruhn and colleagues (Gruhn et al., 2006). The setup controller allows pneumatic lowering of the surface and subsequent detection of tarsal entry into the previous ground level with the help of a thin sheet of laser light and a corresponding detector. Here, we describe basic properties of the new setup and show the results of first experiments to demonstrate its use for the study of sensory and central influences in stepping of a small animal. In the experiments, we compare the effect of ground-support ("control") with either steps into the hole (SiH), ground support at a lower surface level, or the amputation of the tarsus on the onset of EMG activity in the flexor tibiae muscle of the stick insect. PMID:23562598

Berendes, Volker; Dübbert, Michael; Bockemühl, Till; Schmitz, Joscha; Büschges, Ansgar; Gruhn, Matthias

2013-05-15

320

Spark-safe low-voltage detonator  

DOEpatents

A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it spark-safe includes an organic secondary explosive charge of HMX in the form of a thin pad disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The pad of secondary charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter. The explosive column also includes a first explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in the ignition region of the explosive column next to the secondary charge pad on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to provide mechanical confinement of the pad of secondary charge and physical coupling thereof with the ignition device. The explosive column further includes a second explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to the first CP charge on a side opposite from the pad of secondary charge. The second CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. The first explosive CP charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter, whereas the second explosive CP charge contains a series of increments (nominally 4), each of which has an axial thickness-to-diameter ratio of one to two. 2 figs.

Lieberman, M.L.

1988-07-01

321

Attosecond shock waves.  

PubMed

Shock-wave formation is a generic scenario of wave dynamics known in nonlinear acoustics, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, seismology, and detonation physics. Here, we show that, in nonlinear optics, remarkably short, attosecond shock transients can be generated through a strongly coupled spatial and temporal dynamics of ultrashort light pulses, suggesting a pulse self-compression scenario whereby multigigawatt attosecond optical waveforms can be synthesized. PMID:23683197

Zhokhov, P A; Zheltikov, A M

2013-05-01

322

Asymptotic Stability of a Plane CJ Detonation Wave  

E-print Network

reactions. Most of the heat is released in the first reaction, which is assumed to be instantaneous. The rest of the heat, the 'resolved' fraction ffi 2 , is released in the second reaction, which is given a finite rate. The SRHR model reflects the important property that near the end of the reaction zone an O

Soatto, Stefano

323

Theoretical analysis of a rotating two-phase detonation in liquid rocket motors.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A nonlinear analysis to study tangential mode shock instabilities in a thin annular chamber is carried out by employing a one dimensional two phase detonation wave as a reaction model. It is assumed that phase change and reaction take place only within the wave, which is treated as a discontinuity. The annulus is unrolled and the flow is considered as two dimensional with the coordinate system fixed on the wave front. Between waves, the flow is assumed to be isentropic with no interaction between droplets and burned gases. Jump conditions across the wave are solved for two phase flow. The average pressure along the injection plate is related to the design chamber pressure by the use of overall conservation equations. The wave strength is written in terms of the design parameters of the chamber. The results compare favorably with existing experiments. Finally, the effects of drop size on the wave strength are discussed and a simple criterion which sets the lower limit of validity for this strong wave analysis, is presented.

Shen, P. I.-W.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

1972-01-01

324

30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...constructed containers made of nonconductive material, with no metal or other conductive materials exposed inside, except as specified in...is empty or that contains noncombustible materials. (c) When explosives and detonators...

2010-07-01

325

30 CFR 75.1311 - Transporting explosives and detonators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...constructed containers made of nonconductive material, with no metal or other conductive materials exposed inside, except as specified in...is empty or that contains noncombustible materials. (c) When explosives and detonators...

2011-07-01

326

Frequency content of current pulses in slapper detonator bridges  

SciTech Connect

DFT amplitudes are obtained for digital current pulse files. The frequency content of slapper detonator bridge current pulses is obtained. The frequencies are confined well within the passband of the CVR used to sample them.

Carpenter, K H

2006-12-18

327

Ultrafast Detonation of Hydrazoic Acid (HN[subscript 3])  

E-print Network

The fastest self-sustained chemical reactions in nature occur during detonation of energetic materials where reactions are thought to occur on nanosecond or longer time scales in carbon-containing materials. Here we perform ...

Rodriguez, Alejandro W.

328

Chemical-kinetic prediction of critical parameters in gaseous detonations  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical model including a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for hydrogen and hydrocarbon oxidation is used to examine the effects of variations in initial pressure and temperature on the detonation properties of gaseous fuel-oxidizer mixtures. Fuels considered include hydrogen, methane, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene. Induction lengths are computed for initial pressures between 0.1 and 10.0 atmospheres and initial temperatures between 200K and 500K. These induction lengths are then compared with available experimental data for critical energy and critical tube diameter for initiation of spherical detonation, as well as detonation limits in linear tubes. Combined with earlier studies concerning variations in fuel-oxidizer equivalence ratio and degree of dilution with N/sub 2/, the model provides a unified treatment of fuel oxidation kinetics in detonations. 4 figures, 1 table.

Westbrook, C.K.; Urtiew, P.A.

1982-01-12

329

Detonation calculations with a Percus-Yevick equation of state  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chapman-Jouguet detonation calculations were conducted for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), TNT, and ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (AN-FO) explosives using the compressibility form of an equation of state of hard spheres based upon the Percus-Yevick (PY) theory, and a chemical equilibrium detonation code called TIGER. Similar calculations also were conducted with the Becker-Kistiakowsky-Wilson (BKW) equation of state. For PETN, the BKW equation gives

J. C. Edwards; R. F. Chaiken

1974-01-01

330

Model of burning and detonation in rocket motors  

SciTech Connect

Rocket motor dome failure may produce a damaged porous bed of propellant adjacent to the motor case. This porous bed of propellant may burn and ultimately cause detonation of the motor. A numerical model is presented which examines detonation of the solid propellant grain from shocks induced by the burning porous bed. Calculations are made in one- and two-dimensional cylindrical geometry and employ the Forest Fire model of shock-induced decomposition.

Forest, C.A.

1980-01-01

331

Mechanism of detonation of emulsion explosives with microballoons  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mechanism of detonation of emulsion explosives containing microballoons in finite-diameter charges is described. A parametric\\u000a dependence of the detonation velocity on the charge characteristics is obtained. The fact that the reaction-zone width increases\\u000a with decreasing charge porosity is explained. It is shown that the emulsion does not completely burn out at the Chapman-Jouguet\\u000a point. Final formulas for calculating the

A. E. Medvedev; V. M. Fomin; A. Yu. Reshetnyak

2008-01-01

332

The Physics of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Type Ia Supernovae  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

BACKGROUND: The scenario currently best capable of explaining the observational properties of normal bright type Ia supernovae (SNIa), which are of primary importance for cosmology, is the delayed detonation model of the explosion of a white dwarf star with the mass near the Chandrasekhar limit in a single-degenerate binary system. In this model, the explosion starts as a subsonic deflagration that later transitions to a supersonic detonation (deflagration-to-detonation transition, or DDT). Significant progress has been made over the years both experimentally and numerically in elucidating the physics of DDT in terrestrial confined systems. It remains unclear, however, whether and how a detonation can be formed in an unpressurized, unconfined system such as the interior of a WD. Modern large-scale multidimensional models of SNIa cannot capture the DDT process and, thus, are forced to make two crucial assumptions, namely (a) that DDT does occur at some point, and (b) when and where it occurs. As a result, delayed detonation is a parameterized model that must be "tuned" in order to obtain the proper match with the observations. This substantially hinders the possibility of investigating potential sources of systematic errors in the calibration of normal bright SNIa as standard candles. Recently we have carried out a systematic study of the high-speed turbulence-flame interaction through first-principles direct numerical simulations (DNS) using reaction models similar to those describing terrestrial chemical flames. Our analysis has shown that at sufficiently high turbulent intensities, subsonic turbulent flames in unconfined environments, such as the WD interior, are indeed inherently susceptible to DDT. The associated mechanism is based on the unsteady evolution of turbulent flames faster than the Chapman-Jouguet deflagrations. This process is qualitatively different from the traditional spontaneous reaction wave model and does not require the formation of distributed flames. These results provide the first direct ab initio demonstration of DDT in turbulent reactive flows. They show that DDT is indeed possible in unconfined media and provide a detailed physical description of this process. OBJECTIVES: Here we propose to perform the detailed and systematic analysis of the new spontaneous DDT mechanism to demonstrate its applicability in SNIa explosions and to determine precise conditions required for the onset of DDT. Culmination of this effort will be the first DNS-validated subgrid-scale DDT model capable of accurately predicting the time and location of detonation initiation and suitable for use in large-scale SNIa simulations. METHODS: All key stages of the new DDT mechanism will be studied using high-resolution direct numerical simulations of turbulence interaction with both chemical and thermonuclear flames. These will be carried out with fixed grid and adaptive mesh refinement numerical codes that have previously been extensively used in studies of both terrestrial and astrophysical combustion. The results will be incorporated as a subgrid model in large-scale 3D fluid dynamics calculations of SNIa. SIGNIFICANCE: Analysis performed in the course of this work will remove the parameterization of the single-degenerate delayed detonation model on DDT conditions. This, in turn, will open the possibility for meaningful comparison of the observational signatures of this explosion scenario with the photometric, spectroscopic, and polarimetric signatures of SNIa and, thus, for identifying and describing potential sources of systematic errors in SNIa calibration as cosmological standard candles. Substantial improvement of the accuracy of such calibration will be crucial for the success of current and future NASA missions aimed at studying the nature of dark energy.

Poludnenko, Alexei

333

HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation  

SciTech Connect

HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

Reaugh, J E

2011-11-22

334

Deflagration to detonation experiments in granular HMX  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors report on continuing work involving a series of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) experiments in which they study the piston-initiated DDT of heavily confined granular cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX). These experiments were designed to he useful in model development and evaluation. A main focus of these experiments is the effect of density on the DDT event. Particle size distribution and morphology are carefully characterized. In this paper they present recent surface area analysis. Earlier studies demonstrated extensive fracturing and agglomeration in samples at densities as low as 75% TMD as evidenced by dramatic decreases in particle size distribution due to mild stimulus. This is qualitatively confirmed with SEM images and quantitatively studied with gas absorption surface area analysis. Also, in this paper they present initial results using a microwave interferometer technique. Dynamic calibration of the technique was performed, a 35 GHz signal is used to increase resolution, and the system has been designed to be inexpensive for repeated experiments. The distance to where deformation of the inner wall begins for various densities is reported. This result is compared with the microwave interferometer measurements.

Burnside, N.J.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Dickson, P.M.

1998-03-01

335

Reducing the Consequences of a Nuclear Detonation.  

SciTech Connect

The 2002 National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction states that 'the United States must be prepared to respond to the use of WMD against our citizens, our military forces, and those of friends and allies'. Scenario No.1 of the 15 Department of Homeland Security national planning scenarios is an improvised nuclear detonation in the national capitol region. An effective response involves managing large-scale incident response, mass casualty, mass evacuation, and mass decontamination issues. Preparedness planning activities based on this scenario provided difficult challenges in time critical decision making and managing a large number of casualties within the hazard area. Perhaps even more challenging is the need to coordinate a large scale response across multiple jurisdictions and effectively responding with limited infrastructure and resources. Federal response planning continues to make improvements in coordination and recommending protective actions, but much work remains. The most critical life-saving activity depends on actions taken in the first few minutes and hours of an event. The most effective way to reduce the enormous national and international social and economic disruptions from a domestic nuclear explosion is through planning and rapid action, from the individual to the federal response. Anticipating response resources for survivors based on predicted types and distributions of injuries needs to be addressed.

Buddemeier, B R

2007-11-09

336

The development of laser ignited deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators  

SciTech Connect

The use of laser ignited explosive components has been recognized as a safety enhancement over existing electrical explosive devices (EEDs). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance for many years with recent emphasis on developing optical deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators. These low energy optical ordnance devices can be ignited with either a semiconductor diode laser, laser diode arrays or a solid state rod laser. By using a semiconductor laser diode, the safety improvement can be made without sacrificing performance since the input energy required for the laser diode and the explosive output are similar to existing electrical systems. The use of higher powered laser diode arrays or rod lasers may have advantages in fast DDT applications or lossy optical environments such as long fiber applications and applications with numerous optical connectors. Recent results from our continued study of optical ignition of explosive and pyrotechnic materials are presented. These areas of investigation can be separated into three different margin categories: (1) the margin relative to intended inputs ( i.e. powder performance as a function of laser input variation), (2) the margin relative to anticipated environments (i.e. powder performance as a function of thermal environment variation), and (3) the margin relative to unintended environments (i.e. responses to abnormal environments or safety).

Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.

1994-05-01

337

Particle Acceleration in a High Enthalpy Nozzle Flow with a Modified Detonation Gun  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quality of thermal sprayed coatings depends on many factors which have been investigated and are still in scientific focus. Mostly, the coating material is inserted into the spray device as solid powder. The particle condition during the spray process has a strong effect on coating quality. In some cases, higher particle impact energy leads to improved coating quality. Therefore, a computer-controlled detonation gun based spraying device has been designed and tested to obtain particle velocities over 1200 m/s. The device is able to be operated in two modes based on different flow-physical principles. In one mode, the device functions like a conventional detonation gun in which the powder is accelerated in a blast wave. In the other mode, an extension with a nozzle transforms the detonation gun process into an intermittent shock tunnel process in which the particles are accelerated in a high enthalpy nozzle flow with high reservoir conditions. Presented are experimental results of the operation with nozzle in which the device generates very high particle velocities up to a frequency of 5 Hz. A variable particle injection system allows injection of the powder at any point along the nozzle axis to control particle temperature and velocity. A hydrogen/oxygen mixture is used in the experiments. Operation performance and nozzle outflow are characterized by time resolved pressure measurements. The particle conditions inside the nozzle and in the nozzle exit plane are calculated with a quasi-one-dimensional WENO-code of high order. For the experiments, particle velocity is obtained by particle image velocimetry, and particle concentration is qualitatively determined by a laser extinction method. The powders used are WC-Co(88/12), NiCr(80/20), Al2O3, and Cu. Different substrate/powder combinations for varying particle injection positions have been investigated by light microscopy and measurements of microhardness.

Henkes, C.; Olivier, H.

2014-04-01

338

CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL HELIUM DETONATIONS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Several models for Type Ia-like supernova events rely on the production of a self-sustained detonation powered by nuclear reactions. In the absence of hydrogen, the fuel that powers these detonations typically consists of either pure helium (He) or a mixture of carbon and oxygen (C/O). Studies that systematically determine the conditions required to initiate detonations in C/O material exist, but until now no analogous investigation of He matter has been conducted. We perform one-dimensional reactive hydrodynamical simulations at a variety of initial density and temperature combinations and find critical length scales for the initiation of He detonations that range between 1 and 10{sup 10} cm. A simple estimate of the length scales over which the total consumption of fuel will occur for steady-state detonations is provided by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) formalism. Our initiation lengths are consistently smaller than the corresponding CJ length scales by a factor of {approx}100, providing opportunities for thermonuclear explosions in a wider range of low-mass white dwarfs (WDs) than previously thought possible. We find that virialized WDs with as little mass as 0.24 M{sub Sun} can be detonated, and that even less massive WDs can be detonated if a sizable fraction of their mass is raised to a higher adiabat. That the initiation length is exceeded by the CJ length implies that certain systems may not reach nuclear statistical equilibrium within the time it takes a detonation to traverse the object. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that incomplete burning will occur in the majority of He WD detonations and that {sup 40}Ca, {sup 44}Ti, or {sup 48}Cr, rather than {sup 56}Ni, is the predominant burning product for many of these events. We anticipate that a measure of the quantity of the intermediate-mass elements and {sup 56}Ni produced in a helium-rich thermonuclear explosion can potentially be used to constrain the nature of the progenitor system.

Holcomb, Cole; Guillochon, James; De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [TASC, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2013-07-01

339

A Performance Map for Ideal Air Breathing Pulse Detonation Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of an ideal, air breathing Pulse Detonation Engine is described in a manner that is useful for application studies (e.g., as a stand-alone, propulsion system, in combined cycles, or in hybrid turbomachinery cycles). It is shown that the Pulse Detonation Engine may be characterized by an averaged total pressure ratio, which is a unique function of the inlet temperature, the fraction of the inlet flow containing a reacting mixture, and the stoichiometry of the mixture. The inlet temperature and stoichiometry (equivalence ratio) may in turn be combined to form a nondimensional heat addition parameter. For each value of this parameter, the average total enthalpy ratio and total pressure ratio across the device are functions of only the reactant fill fraction. Performance over the entire operating envelope can thus be presented on a single plot of total pressure ratio versus total enthalpy ratio for families of the heat addition parameter. Total pressure ratios are derived from thrust calculations obtained from an experimentally validated, reactive Euler code capable of computing complete Pulse Detonation Engine limit cycles. Results are presented which demonstrate the utility of the described method for assessing performance of the Pulse Detonation Engine in several potential applications. Limitations and assumptions of the analysis are discussed. Details of the particular detonative cycle used for the computations are described.

Paxson, Daniel E.

2001-01-01

340

Investigations on detonation shock dynamics and related topics. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is a final report that summarizes the research findings and research activities supported by the subcontract DOE-LANL-9-XG8-3931P-1 between the University of Illinois (D. S. Stewart Principal Investigator) and the University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory, M-Division). The main focus of the work has been on investigations of Detonation Shock Dynamics. A second emphasis has been on modeling compaction of energetic materials and deflagration to detonation in those materials. The work has led to a number of extensions of the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) and its application as an engineering design method for high explosive systems. The work also enhanced the hydrocode capabilities of researchers in M-Division by modifications to CAVEAT, an existing Los Alamos hydrocode. Linear stability studies of detonation flows were carried out for the purpose of code verification. This work also broadened the existing theory for detonation. The work in this contract has led to the development of one-phase models for dynamic compaction of porous energetic materials and laid the groundwork for subsequent studies. Some work that modeled the discrete heterogeneous behavior of propellant beds was also performed. The contract supported the efforts of D. S. Stewart and a Postdoctoral student H. I. Lee at the University of Illinois.

Stewart, D.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

1993-11-01

341

JAGUAR Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The JAGUAR product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products. Relationships of the Murnaghan form for molar volumes and derived properties were implemented in JAGUAR. Available Hugoniot and static volumertic data were analyzed to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationship for solid boron, boron oxide, boron nitride, boron carbide, and boric acid. Experimental melting points were also utilized with optimization procedures to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX - boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using JAGUAR are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that boron mixtures may exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior, as observed by aluminized combined effects explosives, with higher detonation velocities than would be achieved by a classical Chapman-Jouguet detonation. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX - boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the energy output obtained from the detonation of the formulation.

Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest; Capellos, Christos

2009-06-01

342

30 CFR 75.1328 - Damaged or deteriorated explosives and detonators.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and detonators. (a) Damaged explosives or detonators shall be— (1) Placed in separate containers constructed of nonconductive and nonsparking materials; and (2) Removed from the mine or placed in a magazine and removed when the magazine is...

2011-07-01

343

Detonation study of two-phase flow (reactive particles-gas)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Combustion propagation and developing into detonation in corn starch particles-oxygen mixtures were studied in a horizontal tube. The results show that a stable self-sustained detonation can be achieved in such a two-phase system.

Zhang, F.; Gröning, H.

1990-07-01

344

CHEETAH: A fast thermochemical code for detonation  

SciTech Connect

For more than 20 years, TIGER has been the benchmark thermochemical code in the energetic materials community. TIGER has been widely used because it gives good detonation parameters in a very short period of time. Despite its success, TIGER is beginning to show its age. The program`s chemical equilibrium solver frequently crashes, especially when dealing with many chemical species. It often fails to find the C-J point. Finally, there are many inconveniences for the user stemming from the programs roots in pre-modern FORTRAN. These inconveniences often lead to mistakes in preparing input files and thus erroneous results. We are producing a modern version of TIGER, which combines the best features of the old program with new capabilities, better computational algorithms, and improved packaging. The new code, which will evolve out of TIGER in the next few years, will be called ``CHEETAH.`` Many of the capabilities that will be put into CHEETAH are inspired by the thermochemical code CHEQ. The new capabilities of CHEETAH are: calculate trace levels of chemical compounds for environmental analysis; kinetics capability: CHEETAH will predict chemical compositions as a function of time given individual chemical reaction rates. Initial application: carbon condensation; CHEETAH will incorporate partial reactions; CHEETAH will be based on computer-optimized JCZ3 and BKW parameters. These parameters will be fit to over 20 years of data collected at LLNL. We will run CHEETAH thousands of times to determine the best possible parameter sets; CHEETAH will fit C-J data to JWL`s,and also predict full-wall and half-wall cylinder velocities.

Fried, L.E.

1993-11-01

345

Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation tubes similar to a small pulse detonation engine (PDE). A high-speed valve injects a charge of a mixture of fuel and air at rates of up to 1000 Hz into a constant area tube closed at one end. The reactants detonate in the tube and the products exit as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers are used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device and thrust is measured with a balance. The effects of injection frequency, fuel and air flow rates, tube length, and injection location are considered. Both H2 and C2H4 fuels are considered. Optimum (maximum specific thrust) fuel-air compositions and resonant frequencies are identified. Results are compared to PDE calculations. Design rules are postulated and applications to aerodynamic flow control and propulsion are discussed.

Cutler, Anderw D.

2008-01-01

346

Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method  

DOEpatents

Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto. 10 figs.

Boberg, R.E.; Lee, R.S.; Weingart, R.C.

1989-08-01

347

Metallized Gelled Propellants Combustion Experiments in a Pulse Detonation Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of combustion tests were performed with metallized gelled JP 8/aluminum fuels in a Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE). Nanoparticles of aluminum were used in the 60 to 100 nanometer diameter. Gellants were also of a nanoparticulate type composed of hydrocarbon alkoxide materials. Using simulated air (a nitrogen-oxygen mixture), the ignition potential of metallized gelled fuels with nanoparticle aluminum was investigated. Ignition of the JP 8/aluminum was possible with less than or equal to a 23-wt% oxygen loading in the simulated air. JP 8 fuel alone was unable to ignite with less than 30 percent oxygen loaded simulated air. The tests were single shot tests of the metallized gelled fuel to demonstrate the capability of the fuel to improve fuel detonability. The tests were conducted at ambient temperatures and with maximal detonation pressures of 1340 psia.

Palaszewski, Bryan; Jurns, John; Breisacher, Kevin; Kearns, Kim

2006-01-01

348

Type Ia Supernovae: Burning and Detonation in the Distributed Regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple, semianalytic representation is developed for nuclear burning in Type Ia supernovae in the special case where turbulent eddies completely disrupt the flame. The speed and width of the ``distributed'' flame front are derived. For the conditions considered, the burning front can be considered as a turbulent flame brush composed of corrugated sheets of well-mixed flames. These flames are assumed to have a quasi-steady state structure similar to the laminar flame structure, but controlled by turbulent diffusion. Detonations cannot appear in the system as long as distributed flames are still quasi-steady state, but this condition is violated when the distributed flame width becomes comparable to the size of the largest turbulent eddies. When this happens, a transition to detonation may occur. For current best estimates of the turbulent energy, the most likely density for the transition to detonation is in the range (0.5-1.5)×107 g cm-3.

Woosley, S. E.

2007-10-01

349

Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method  

DOEpatents

Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

Boberg, Ralph E. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Weingart, Richard C. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01

350

Optimal Area Profiles for Ideal Single Nozzle Air-Breathing Pulse Detonation Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of cross-sectional area variation on idealized Pulse Detonation Engine performance are examined numerically. A quasi-one-dimensional, reacting, numerical code is used as the kernel of an algorithm that iteratively determines the correct sequencing of inlet air, inlet fuel, detonation initiation, and cycle time to achieve a limit cycle with specified fuel fraction, and volumetric purge fraction. The algorithm is exercised on a tube with a cross sectional area profile containing two degrees of freedom: overall exit-to-inlet area ratio, and the distance along the tube at which continuous transition from inlet to exit area begins. These two parameters are varied over three flight conditions (defined by inlet total temperature, inlet total pressure and ambient static pressure) and the performance is compared to a straight tube. It is shown that compared to straight tubes, increases of 20 to 35 percent in specific impulse and specific thrust are obtained with tubes of relatively modest area change. The iterative algorithm is described, and its limitations are noted and discussed. Optimized results are presented showing performance measurements, wave diagrams, and area profiles. Suggestions for future investigation are also discussed.

Paxson, Daniel E.

2003-01-01

351

Phenomenon of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Relativistic Detonation of Scalar Fields  

E-print Network

In the modern Universe the existence of various forms of scalar fields is supposed. On the one hand these fields can explain recently discovered positive $\\Lambda$-term(see e.g. Ref. \\cite{ref:Sahni}), on the other hand its form cluster systems creating gravitational wells for galaxies and their clusters. At that a natural hypothesis is the existence of compact configurations ("stars") from scalar fields with a large enough energy density and total mass. The hypothesis is that the energy of these fields can be converted in relativistic plasma by an explosive way. Such process can be initiated by collision of relativistic particles which form a relativistic microscopic fireball. Thus effective temperature can amount to value sufficient for change of phase for scalar fields. Then the wave of relativistic "detonation" similar to the same process in classical physics will be spread from this source. In this paper the parameters of such field star and process of detonation are estimated. If the effect of the indicated change of phase (or something similar to one) exists, it is possible to get the parameters of relativistic plasma (macroscopic fireball) which could generate gamma - bursts. If in the modern Universe there is such unique form of a matter as fields of high density it would be strange for Nature not to take advantage of the possibility to convert their energy to radiation by an explosive way.

V. Folomeev; V. Gurovich; R. Usupov

2000-08-22

352

Initiation and detonation measurements on liquid nitric oxide  

SciTech Connect

Measurements are reported on detonations of homogeneous liquid nitric oxide initially at T = 119 K, /rho//sub o/ = 1.28 g/cm/sup 3/. Plane-shock initiation in mirror-covered wedges demonstrated detonation in preshocked material (superdetonation) that overtook the smooth input shock. Its transverse irregularities continued in the unsupported detonation. The input shock ran ca. 3 mm at U/sub I/ = 3.8 /plus minus/ 0.2 km/s. Behind it the fluid had u/sub p/ = 0.89 /plus minus/ 0.02 km/s, p = 4.3 /plus minus/ 0.03 GPa, /rho/ = 1.67 /plus minus/ 0.03 g/cm/sup 3/, and the superdetonation had D*/sub lab/ /approx/6.9 km/s. In 356-mm long graphite tubes with 25.4-mm inner diameter, measured detonation velocity is D = 5552 /plus minus/ 3 m/s. Failure diameter in graphite is below 8 mm. Free-surface velocities of 1- and 2-mm aluminum plates terminating the detonation axis were near 1.5 km/s approximately as predicted for CJ flow at D/sub /infinity// = 5564 m/s, u/sub p/ = 1.34 km/s impinging on aluminum. Electronic streak photography at d = 20.6 mm in brass registered a smoothly convex detonation front with apparent brightness temperature of 1735 /plus minus/ 40 K as it reached an end window asynchronously. 20 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Schott, G.L.; Davis, W.C.; Chiles, W.C.

1989-01-01

353

Characterization of detonation products of RSI-007 explosive  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PDV and VISAR have been employed to characterize the detonation products of a high-purity CL-20 based explosive. The explosive was part of an exploding foil initiator (EFI) detonator assembly in which the explosive was contained within a Kovar (Fe-Ni-Co alloy) cup. The back surface of the Kovar serves as the witness plate for interferometry measurements. Detailed reverberations corresponding to shock arrival and release are recorded on the witness plate and the isentropic release path of the explosive is inferred though the velocity history. Two separate window materials are bonded to the Kovar cup in subsequent experiments and are used to further refine the release states.

Ager, Timothy; Neel, Christopher; Breaux, Bradley; Vineski, Christopher; Welle, Eric; Lambert, David; Chhabildas, Lalit

2012-03-01

354

Characterization of Detonation Products of RSI-007 Explosive  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PDV and VISAR have been employed to characterize the detonation products of a production quality RSI-007 explosive. The explosive was part of an exploding foil initiator (EFI) detonator assembly in which the explosive was contained within a Kovar (Fe-Ni-Co alloy) cup. The free surface of the Kovar serves as the witness plate for the interferometry measurements. Detailed shock reverberations are recorded on the witness plate and the isentropic release path of the explosive is inferred though the velocity history. Two separate window materials are bonded to the Kovar cup in subsequent experiments and are used to further determine the release state in different pressure regimes.

Ager, Timothy; Neel, Christopher; Chhabildas, Lalit

2011-06-01

355

Strategies for understanding the deflagration-to-detonation transition  

SciTech Connect

The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) phenomenon has been studied for many years. However, no comprehensive model of the DDT process is available. It is important to understand the mechanism by which an explosive will detonate when the source of ignition is a weak shock or flame, and to able to predict this response. We have identified several key areas of the DDT problem which need to be understood before any such prediction can be made, and have established a modest program to obtain a more fundamental understanding of the behavior of explosive under the conditions that can lead to DDT.

Asay, B.W.

1992-01-01

356

Strategies for understanding the deflagration-to-detonation transition  

SciTech Connect

The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) phenomenon has been studied for many years. However, no comprehensive model of the DDT process is available. It is important to understand the mechanism by which an explosive will detonate when the source of ignition is a weak shock or flame, and to able to predict this response. We have identified several key areas of the DDT problem which need to be understood before any such prediction can be made, and have established a modest program to obtain a more fundamental understanding of the behavior of explosive under the conditions that can lead to DDT.

Asay, B.W.

1992-05-01

357

Structure cellulaire de la détonation des mélanges H2 NO2/N2O4Cellular structure of the detonation of gaseous mixtures H2 NO2/N2O4  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calculations of the detonation reaction zone of gaseous reactive mixtures of NO 2/N 2O 4 as oxidizer and H 2, CH 4 or C 2H 6 as fuel, in the range of equivalence ratio ? between 0.5 and 2, show that, for ??1, the chemical energy is released in two distinct and successive exothermic steps with different chemical induction times. The first exothermic stage is mainly due to the reaction NO 2+H?NO+OH, NO being the main oxidizer of the second one. The experimental study conducted on the same range of equivalence ratio (0.5? ??2) shows that, for ??1, the detonation wave of these mixtures contains a double set of cellular structures. A similar result had already been obtained with the detonation of gaseous Nitromethane, the NO 2 group being here included in the molecule. Consequently, the oxidizer NO 2 being either initially separated from the fuel or included inside the molecule of a monopropellant (Nitromethane) is responsible, because of its specific chemical kinetics, of a chemical energy release in two main steps and of the existence of a double cellular structure in the detonation wave for the same range of equivalence ratio. These results reinforce the assumption that the cellular structure of the detonation finds its origin in the strong rates of chemical energy release inside the reaction zone. To cite this article: F. Joubert et al., C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

Joubert, Franckie; Desbordes, Daniel; Presles, Henri-Noël

2003-05-01

358

Thrust Augmentation Measurements Using a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present NASA GRC-funded three-year research project is focused on studying PDE driven ejectors applicable to a hybrid Pulse Detonation/Turbofan Engine. The objective of the study is to characterize the PDE-ejector thrust augmentation. A PDE-ejector system has been designed to provide critical experimental data for assessing the performance enhancements possible with this technology. Completed tasks include demonstration of a thrust stand for measuring average thrust for detonation tube multi-cycle operation, and design of a 72-in.-long, 2.25-in.-diameter (ID) detonation tube and modular ejector assembly. This assembly will allow testing of both straight and contoured ejector geometries. Initial ejectors that have been fabricated are 72-in.-long-constant-diameter tubes (4-, 5-, and 6-in.-diameter) instrumented with high-frequency pressure transducers. The assembly has been designed such that the detonation tube exit can be positioned at various locations within the ejector tube. PDE-ejector system experiments with gaseous ethylene/ nitrogen/oxygen propellants will commence in the very near future. The program benefits from collaborations with Prof. Merkle of University of Tennessee whose PDE-ejector analysis helps guide the experiments. The present research effort will increase the TRL of PDE-ejectors from its current level of 2 to a level of 3.

Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

2003-01-01

359

Formic acid as a detonation product. [CHNO explosives  

SciTech Connect

The TIGER code, with BKWR as the equation of state, predicts values higher than experimental at all densities. Adding formic acid to the library of expected products of detonation used in TIGER calculations lowers the calculated detonation velocities of CHNO explosives at densities near the TMD. With BKWR this results in closer agreement with experimental data in this region for HMX, PETN, and TNT. The calculated velocities of PETN and TNT are still 1 to 2% higher than experimental values. Using the JCZ3 EOS, adjusted to give an experimental value for HMX, the velocities predicted for PETN and TNT are somewhat lower than experimental. Neither EOS has a significant effect at low densities where TIGER calculates velocities too high with or without formic acid. It is also observed that there is a change in slope in the BKWR detonation velocity vs density curve where solid carbon appears in the calculated products. The predicted products of detonation ar significantly different for the two equations of state. At this time formic acid cannot be ruled out as a possible product. We are suggesting that experimental tests be undertaken to resolve the question. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Crawford, P.C.; Lee, E.L.

1986-06-13

360

Microenergetics: Combustion and Detonation at Sub-Millimeter Scales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Sandia National Laboratories, we have coined the term ``microenergetics'' to describe sub-millimeter energetic material studies aimed at gaining knowledge of combustion and detonation behavior at the mesoscale.[1] Our approach is to apply technologies developed by the microelectronics industry to fabricate test samples with well-defined geometries. Substrates have been fabricated from materials such as silicon and ceramics, with channels to contain the energetic material. Energetic materials have been loaded into the channels, either as powders, femtosecond laser-micromachined pellets, or as vapor-deposited films. Ignition of the samples has been achieved by simple hotwires, integrated semiconductor bridges, and also by lasers. Additionally, grain-scale patterning has been performed on explosive films using both oxygen plasma etching and femtosecond laser micromachining.[2] We have demonstrated simple work functions in microenergetic devices, such as piston motion,[1] which is also a relevant diagnostic to examine combustion properties. Detonation has been achieved in deposited explosive films, recorded by high-speed photography.[3] A review of progress on manufacturing and testing will be presented, as well as historical perspectives and future directions. [1] A. S. Tappan, et al., 12th International Detonation Symposium (San Diego, CA, 2002). [2] A. S. Tappan, et al., 36th International Annual Conference of ICT, combined with 32nd International Pyrotechnics Seminar (Karlsruhe Federal Republic of Germany, 2005). [3] A. S. Tappan, et al., 13th International Detonation Symposium (Norfolk, VA, 2006).

Tappan, Alexander S.

2007-06-01

361

Anti-radiation missile optimal detonation strategy study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the characteristics of anti-radiation missile\\/radar target end game, and points out the disadvantages of ARM only with contact burst model. An adaptive burst strategy is put forward to estimate proximity fuze detonation delay-time, so as to improve the destruction probability. A Monte-Carlo simulation study is discussed.

Zhen Zhang; Xiaoyan Qu; Dengwu Ma; Defang Zhu; Ling Wang

2012-01-01

362

Detonation and combustion of explosives: A selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography consists of citations pertinent to the subjects of combustion and detonation of energetic materials, especially, but not exclusively, of secondary solid high explosives. These references were selected from abstracting sources, conference proceedings, reviews, and also individual works. The entries are arranged alphabetically by first author and numbered sequentially. A keyword index is appended.

Dobratz, B. [comp.

1998-08-01

363

Experimental Validation of Detonation Shock Dynamics in Condensed Explosives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments on the HMX-based, condensed explosive PBX-9501 were carried out to validate a reduced asymptotically derived description of detonation shock dynamics (DSD) where it is assumed that the normal detonation shock speed is determined by the total shock curvature. The passover experiment has an embedded lead disk in a right circular cylindrical charge of PBX-9501 and is initiated from the bottom. A range of dynamically changing states, with both divergent (convex) and converging (concave) shock shapes are realized as the detonation passes over the disk. The time of arrival of the detonation shock at the top surface of the charge is recorded and compared against the DSD simulation and a separate multi-material simulation (DNS). A new wide- ranging equation of state (EOS) and rate law is used to describe the explosive and is employed in both the theoretical (DSD) calculations and the multi-material simulations. The experiment, theory and simulation are found to be in excellent agreement.

Stewart, D. Scott; Lambert, David E.; Yoo, Sunhee

2005-11-01

364

EFFECT OF REACTION RATE PERIODICITY ON DETONATION PROPAGATION  

E-print Network

EFFECT OF REACTION RATE PERIODICITY ON DETONATION PROPAGATION Eric O. Morano and Joseph E. Shepherd. As an alternative to homogeneous reaction rates, we implement "synthetic" hot- spots through a depletion rate an empirical reaction rate. There is no general agreement on how to construct such a rate. Other key issues

Barr, Al

365

Effect of scale on the onset of detonations  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Critical conditions for onset of detonations are compared at (1) two significantly different scales, (2) for a range of -air mixtures diluted with C, O, and (3) for two types of geometry – one a long obstructed channel and the other a room with a relatively small aspect ratios.\\u000a For the range of scales, mixtures, and initial conditions tested,

S. B. Dorofeev; V. P. Sidorov; M. S. Kuznetsov; I. D. Matsukov; V. I. Alekseev

2000-01-01

366

Effects of vortical and entropic forcing on detonation dynamics  

E-print Network

to a set of parameters de- scribed below. For a CJ detonation, the heat release parameter Q is expressed, the Prandtl and Lewis numbers are fixed Pr = 0.72 and Le = 1. The isentropic index is set to = 1.2 leading

Texas at Arlington, University of

367

Deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular HMX  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Granular HMX of three degrees of fineness was packed into heavy-walled steel tubes closed at both ends. Ignition was obtained at one end using an intimate mixture of finely divided titanium and boron as an igniter that produced heat with little gas. The distance to detonation was determined by examination of the resulting tube fragments. By inserting tightly-fitted neoprene diaphragms periodically into the HMX column, it was shown that the role of convective combustion was limited to the initial stage of the deflagration to detonation (DDT) process. Experiments in which various combinations of two of the three types of HMX were loaded into the same tube showed that heating by adiabatic shear of explosive grains was an essential factor in the final buildup to detonation. A description of the DDT process is developed in which conductive burning is followed in turn by convective burning, bed collapse with plug formation, onset of accelerated burning at the front of the plug through heating by intercrystalline friction and adiabatic shear, and intense shock formation resulting in high-order detonation.

Campbell, A. W.

1980-01-01

368

The Structure of Carbon Detonation in Type Ia Supernovae  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Type Ia Supernova explosions are thought to begin as deflagrations in the center of accreting white dwarfs. Observations suggest that at some point, the burning undergoes a transition from a deflagration to a detonation front. We describe high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the structure of such a detonation. The pre-detonation material is assumed to be pure C12 at a density of 107 g cm-3. A cellular structure develops behind the front, leaving pockets of unburned fuel. The cellular instability is unlikely to have any observational consequences at this density, since the cell size is only a few centimeters. However, as the detonation approaches the surface, the cell size will become comparable to the radius of the star, leaving a nonspherical distribution of reaction products and modifying the spectral signature of the explosion. The calculations were performed on 1000 processors of ASCI Blue Pacific at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using the Flash Code developed at the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. They represent by far the largest simulations ever carried out on the detailed structure of burning fronts in Type Ia supernovae. This work was supported in part by the Department of Energy Grant No. B341495 to the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago under the ASCI Strategic Alliances Program and by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

Fryxell, B.; Timmes, F. X.; Zingale, M.; Dursi, L. J.; Ricker, P.; Olson, K.; Calder, A. C.; Tufo, H.; Truran, J. W.; Rosner, R.; MacNeice, P.

2000-12-01

369

Detonation equation of state at LLNL, 1995. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

JWL`s and 1-D Look-up tables are shown to work for ``one-track`` experiments like cylinder shots and the expanding sphere. They fail for ``many-track`` experiments like the compressed sphere. As long as the one-track experiment has dimensions larger than the explosive`s reaction zone and the explosive is near-ideal, a general JWL with R{sub 1} = 4.5 and R{sub 2} = 1.5 can be constructed, with both {omega} and E{sub o} being calculated from thermochemical codes. These general JWL`s allow comparison between various explosives plus recalculation of the JWL for different densities. The Bigplate experiment complements the cylinder test by providing continuous oblique angles of shock incidence from 0{degrees} to 70{degrees}. Explosive reaction zone lengths are determined from metal plate thicknesses, extrapolated run-to-detonation distances, radius size effects and detonation front curvature. Simple theories of the cylinder test, Bigplate, the cylinder size effect and detonation front curvature are given. The detonation front lag at the cylinder edge is shown to be proportional to the half-power of the reaction zone length. By calibrating for wall blow-out, a full set of reaction zone lengths from PETN to ANFO are obtained. The 1800--2100 K freezing effect is shown to be caused by rapid cooling of the product gases. Compiled comparative data for about 80 explosives is listed. Ten Chapters plus an Appendix.

Souers, P.C.; Wu, B.; Haselman, L.C. Jr.

1996-02-01

370

Transplutonium elements processed from rock debris of underground detonations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Six-step chemical processing method extracts minute quantities of transplutonium elements found in rock debris following a nuclear detonation. The process consists of dissolution of rock, feed preparation, liquid-liquid extraction, final purification of transplutonium elements and plutonium, and separation of the transplutonium elements.

Bloomquist, C. A. A.; Harvey, H. W.; Hoh, J. C.; Horwitz, E. P.

1969-01-01

371

A slow reaction rate in detonations due to carbon clustering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theoretical calculations have been made to estimate the rate of heat release due to the carbon clustering process in detonations where elemental carbon is a reaction product. The process is assumed to be diffusion limited. Diffusion constants are determined using modified Enskog theory and the Stokes-Einstein relation. The carbon cluster energy is treated by a surface correction to the bulk.

M. S. Shaw; J. D. Johnson

1987-01-01

372

Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics And Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi-1-D, finite-rate chemistry computational fluid dynamics model for PDREs is described and implemented. Four different PDRE geometries are evaluated in this work: a baseline detonation tube, a detonation tube with a straight extension, and a detonation tube with two types of converging-diverging (C-D) nozzles. The effect of extension length and C-D nozzle area ratio on the single-shot gasdynamics and performance of a PDRE is studied over a wide range of blowdown pressure ratios (1-1000). The results indicate that a C-D nozzle is generally more effective than a straight extension in improving PDRE performance, particularly at higher pressure ratios. Additionally, the results show that the blowdown process of the C-D nozzle systems could be beneficially cut off well before the pressure at the end-wall reaches the ambient value. The performance results are also compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

Morris, Christopher I.

2004-01-01

373

An experimental study of laser-supported plasmas for laser propulsion: Center director's discretionary fund project DFP-82-33  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rudiments of a rocket thruster, which receives its enthalpy from an energy source which is remotely beamed from a laser, is described. An experimental study, now partially complete, is discussed which will eventually provide a detailed understanding of the physics for assessing the feasibility of using hydrogen plasmas for accepting and converting this energy to enthalpy. A plasma ignition scheme which uses a pulsed CO2 laser was develped and the properites of the ignition spark documented, including breakdown intensities in hydrogen. A complete diagnostic system capable of determining plasma temperature and the plasma absorptivitiy for subsequent steady-state absorption of a high power CO2 laser beam are developed and demonstrative use is discussed for the preliminary case study, a two atmosphere laser supported argon plasma.

Eskridge, R. H.; Mccay, T. D.; Vanzandt, D. M.

1987-01-01

374

Front curvature rate stick measurements and detonation shock dynamics calibration for PBX 9502 over a wide temperature range  

SciTech Connect

Detonation velocity and wave shape are measured for PBX 9502 (95 wt.% TATB, 5 wt.% Kel-F 800) rate sticks at the temperatures {minus}55, 25, and 75 C. At each temperature three different diameters were fired: 50 mm, 18 mm, and 8, 10, and 12 mm respectively for the hot, ambient, and cold sticks. The measured wave shapes are fit with an analytic form and the fitting parameters are tabulated along with thermal expansion and diameter effect data. The simplest detonation shock dynamics (DSD) model assumes a unique calibration function relating the local normal wave speed D{sub n} to the local total curvature {kappa}. The data confirm this notion for sufficiently small curvature, but at large curvature the curves for different charge diameters diverge. Global optimization is used to determine a best single D{sub n}-{kappa} function at each initial temperature T{sub 0}. From these curves a D{sub n}({kappa},T{sub 0}) calibration surface is generated that allows computation of problems with temperature gradients.

Hill, L.G.; Bdzil, J.B.; Aslam, T.D.

1998-12-31

375

The Fluidic Obstacle Technique: An Approach for Enhancing Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Pulsed Detonation Engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current research explored the fluidic obstacle technique and obtained relative performance estimates of this new approach for enhancement of de agration-to-detonation transition. Optimization of conventional physical obstacles has comprised the majority of de agration-to-detonation enhancement research but these devices ultimately degrade the performance of a pulsed detonation engine. Therefore, a new approach has been investigated that demonstrates a fluidic obstacle has the potential to maximize turbulence production and enhance the flame acceleration process, leading to successful DDT. A fluidic obstacle is also able to reduce total pressure losses, "heat soaking", and ignition times. A reduction in these variables serves to maximize available thrust. In addition, the fluidic obstacle technique is an active combustion control method capable of adapting to off-design conditions. Steady non-reacting and unsteady reacting flow have been utilized in two facilities, namely the UB Combustion Laboratory and AFRL Detonation Engine Research facility, to provide experimental measurements and observations into the feasibility of this new approach.

Knox, Benjamin W.

376

TRAVELING IONOSPHERIC DISTURBANCES ASSOCIATED WITH NUCLEAR DETONATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis of ionospheric data taken from 54 ionosonde observatories throughout the orld indicates the presence of several traveling ionospheric disturbances originating from the five high-altitude nuclear tests conducted over Johnston Island in 1962. These disturbances were propagated over large distances and were observed as changes in the F2-1ayer critical frequency. They are interpreted as a series of waves that

W. J. Breitling; R. A. Kupferman; G. J. Gassmann

1967-01-01

377

A Review of Direct Numerical Simulations of Astrophysical Detonations and Their Implications  

SciTech Connect

Multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of astrophysical detonations in degenerate matter have revealed that the nuclear burning is typically characterized by cellular structure caused by transverse instabilities in the detonation front. Type Ia supernova modelers often use one- dimensional DNS of detonations as inputs or constraints for their whole star simulations. While these one-dimensional studies are useful tools, the true nature of the detonation is multi-dimensional. The multi-dimensional structure of the burning influences the speed, stability, and the composition of the detonation and its burning products, and therefore, could have an impact on the spectra of Type Ia supernovae. Considerable effort has been expended modeling Type Ia supernovae at densities above 1 107 g cm 3 where the complexities of turbulent burning dominate the flame propagation. However, most full star models turn the nuclear burning schemes off when the density falls below 1 107 g cm 3 and distributed burning begins. The deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is believed to occur at just these densities and consequently they are the densities important for studying the properties of the subsequent detonation. This work will review the status of DNS studies of detonations and their possible implications for Type Ia supernova models. It will cover the development of Detonation theory from the first simple Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation models to the current models based on the time-dependent, compressible, reactive flow Euler equations of fluid dynamics.

Parete-Koon, Suzanne T [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Smith, Chris R [ORNL; Papatheodore, Thomas L [ORNL

2013-01-01

378

A review of direct numerical simulations of astrophysical detonations and their implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of astrophysical detonations in degenerate matter have revealed that the nuclear burning is typically characterized by cellular structure caused by transverse instabilities in the detonation front. Type Ia supernova modelers often use onedimensional DNS of detonations as inputs or constraints for their whole star simulations.While these one-dimensional studies are useful tools, the true nature of the detonation is multi-dimensional. The multi-dimensional structure of the burning influences the speed, stability, and the composition of the detonation and its burning products, and therefore, could have an impact on the spectra of Type Ia supernovae. Considerable effort has been expended modeling Type Ia supernovae at densities above 1×107 g·cm-3 where the complexities of turbulent burning dominate the flame propagation. However, most full star models turn the nuclear burning schemes off when the density falls below 1×107 g·cm-3 and distributed burning begins. The deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is believed to occur at just these densities and consequently they are the densities important for studying the properties of the subsequent detonation. This work will review the status of DNS studies of detonations and their possible implications for Type Ia supernova models. It will cover the development of Detonation theory from the first simple Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation models to the current models based on the time-dependent, compressible, reactive flow Euler equations of fluid dynamics.

Parete-Koon, Suzanne T.; Smith, Christopher R.; Papatheodore, Thomas L.; Messer, O. E. Bronson

2013-04-01

379

Research on filling process of fuel and oxidant during detonation based on absorption spectrum technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on detonation process is of great significance for the control optimization of pulse detonation engine. Based on absorption spectrum technology, the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant during detonation is researched. As one of the most important products, H2O is selected as the target of detonation diagnosis. Fiber distributed detonation test system is designed to enable the detonation diagnosis under adverse conditions in detonation process. The test system is verified to be reliable. Laser signals at different working frequency (5Hz, 10Hz and 20Hz) are detected. Change of relative laser intensity in one detonation circle is analyzed. The duration of filling process is inferred from the change of laser intensity, which is about 100~110ms. The peak of absorption spectrum is used to present the concentration of H2O during the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant. Absorption spectrum is calculated, and the change of absorption peak is analyzed. Duration of filling process calculated with absorption peak consisted with the result inferred from the change of relative laser intensity. The pulse detonation engine worked normally and obtained the maximum thrust at 10Hz under experiment conditions. The results are verified through H2O gas concentration monitoring during detonation.

Lv, Xiao-Jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-Sheng

2014-12-01

380

A Study of Detonation Propagation and Diffraction with Compliant Confinement  

SciTech Connect

A previous computational study of diffracting detonations with the ignition-and-growth model demonstrated that contrary to experimental observations, the computed solution did not exhibit dead zones. For a rigidly confined explosive it was found that while diffraction past a sharp corner did lead to a temporary separation of the lead shock from the reaction zone, the detonation re-established itself in due course and no pockets of unreacted material were left behind. The present investigation continues to focus on the potential for detonation failure within the ignition-and-growth (IG) model, but now for a compliant confinement of the explosive. The aim of the present paper is two fold. First, in order to compute solutions of the governing equations for multi-material reactive flow, a numerical method of solution is developed and discussed. The method is a Godunov-type, fractional-step scheme which incorporates an energy correction to suppress numerical oscillations that would occur near the material interface separating the reactive material and the inert confiner for standard conservative schemes. The numerical method uses adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on overlapping grids, and the accuracy of solutions is well tested using a two-dimensional rate-stick problem for both strong and weak inert confinements. The second aim of the paper is to extend the previous computational study of the IG model by considering two related problems. In the first problem, the corner-turning configuration is re-examined, and it is shown that in the matter of detonation failure, the absence of rigid confinement does not affect the outcome in a material way; sustained dead zones continue to elude the model. In the second problem, detonations propagating down a compliantly confined pencil-shaped configuration are computed for a variety of cone angles of the tapered section. It is found, in accord with experimental observation, that if the cone angle is small enough, the detonation fails prior to reaching the cone tip. For both the corner-turning and the pencil-shaped configurations, mechanisms underlying the behavior of the computed solutions are identified. It is concluded that disagreement between computation and experiment in the corner-turning case lies in the absence, in the model, of a mechanism that allows the explosive to undergo desensitization when subjected to a weak shock.

Banks, J; Schwendeman, D; Kapila, A; Henshaw, W

2007-08-13

381

Method for attenuating seismic shock from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort  

DOEpatents

In situ oil shale retorts are formed in formation containing oil shale by excavating at least one void in each retort site. Explosive is placed in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within each retort site adjacent such a void, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. This produces a large explosion which generates seismic shock waves traveling outwardly from the blast site through the underground formation. Sensitive equipment which could be damaged by seismic shock traveling to it straight through unfragmented formation is shielded from such an explosion by placing such equipment in the shadow of a fragmented mass in an in situ retort formed prior to the explosion. The fragmented mass attenuates the velocity and magnitude of seismic shock waves traveling toward such sensitive equipment prior to the shock wave reaching the vicinity of such equipment.

Studebaker, Irving G. (Grand Junction, CO); Hefelfinger, Richard (Grand Junction, CO)

1980-01-01

382

Performance Impact of Deflagration to Detonation Transition Enhancing Obstacles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A sub-model is developed to account for the drag and heat transfer enhancement resulting from deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) inducing obstacles commonly used in pulse detonation engines (PDE). The sub-model is incorporated as a source term in a time-accurate, quasi-onedimensional, CFD-based PDE simulation. The simulation and sub-model are then validated through comparison with a particular experiment in which limited DDT obstacle parameters were varied. The simulation is then used to examine the relative contributions from drag and heat transfer to the reduced thrust which is observed. It is found that heat transfer is far more significant than aerodynamic drag in this particular experiment.

Paxson, Daniel E.; Schauer, Frederick; Hopper, David

2012-01-01

383

CIRCUMSTELLAR ABSORPTION IN DOUBLE DETONATION TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect

Upon formation, degenerate He core white dwarfs are surrounded by a radiative H-rich layer primarily supported by ideal gas pressure. In this Letter, we examine the effect of this H-rich layer on mass transfer in He+C/O double white dwarf binaries that will eventually merge and possibly yield a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in the double detonation scenario. Because its thermal profile and equation of state differ from the underlying He core, the H-rich layer is transferred stably onto the C/O white dwarf prior to the He core's tidal disruption. We find that this material is ejected from the binary system and sweeps up the surrounding interstellar medium hundreds to thousands of years before the SN Ia. The close match between the resulting circumstellar medium profiles and values inferred from recent observations of circumstellar absorption in SNe Ia gives further credence to the resurgent double detonation scenario.

Shen, Ken J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Guillochon, James [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Foley, Ryan J., E-mail: kenshen@astro.berkeley.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-06-20

384

Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap  

SciTech Connect

This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

Casey, Leslie A.

2014-01-13

385

Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approx. 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

2006-01-01

386

Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approximately 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

2006-01-01

387

Molecular dynamics simulations of detonation on the roadrunner supercomputer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The temporal and spatial scales intrinsic to a real detonating explosive are extremely difficult to capture using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Nevertheless, MD remains very attractive since it allows for the resolution of dynamic phenomena at the atomic scale. Large-scale reactive MD simulations in three dimensions require immense computational resources even when simple reactive force fields are employed. We focus on the REBO force field for 'AB' since it has been shown to support a detonation while being simple, analytic, and short-ranged. The transition from two-to three- dimensional simulations is being facilitated by the port of the REBO force field in the parallel MD code SPaSM to LANL's petaflop supercomputer 'Roadrunner'. We provide a detailed discussion of the challenges associated with computing interatomic forces on a hybrid Opteron/Cell BE computational architecture.

Mniszewski, Susan; Cawkwell, Marc; Germann, Timothy C.

2012-03-01

388

Engineering models of deflagration-to-detonation transition  

SciTech Connect

For the past two years, Los Alamos has supported research into the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in damaged energetic materials as part of the explosives safety program. This program supported both a theory/modeling group and an experimentation group. The goal of the theory/modeling group was to examine the various modeling structures (one-phase models, two-phase models, etc.) and select from these a structure suitable to model accidental initiation of detonation in damaged explosives. The experimental data on low-velocity piston supported DDT in granular explosive was to serve as a test bed to help in the selection process. Three theoretical models have been examined in the course of this study: (1) the Baer-Nunziato (BN) model, (2) the Stewart-Prasad-Asay (SPA) model and (3) the Bdzil-Kapila-Stewart model. Here we describe these models, discuss their properties, and compare their features.

Bdzil, J.B.; Son, S.F.

1995-07-01

389

Polar Coordinate Lattice Boltzmann Kinetic Modeling of Detonation Phenomena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel polar coordinate lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for detonation phenomena is presented and applied to investigate typical implosion and explosion processes. In this model, the change of discrete distribution function due to local chemical reaction is dynamically coupled into the modified lattice Boltzmann equation which could recover the Navier—Stokes equations, including contribution of chemical reaction, via the Chapman—Enskog expansion. For the numerical investigations, the main focuses are the nonequilibrium behaviors in these processes. The system at the disc center is always in its thermodynamic equilibrium in the highly symmetric case. The internal kinetic energies in different degrees of freedom around the detonation front do not coincide. The dependence of the reaction rate on the pressure, influences of the shock strength and reaction rate on the departure amplitude of the system from its local thermodynamic equilibrium are probed.

Lin, Chuan-Dong; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Li, Ying-Jun

2014-11-01

390

Shock and detonation processes studied at the nanoscale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report recent advances on shock and detonation processes studied at the nanoscale using several simulation techniques. Concerning shock physics, example of the investigation of spallation phenomena in copper and tantalum using large scale Molecular Dynamics will be given. Concerning High Energetic materials, example of the use of Monte Carlo techniques to build the equation of state (EOS) of nitromethane is shown. Thermodynamic properties of detonation products are computed using Reactive Monte Carlo simulations, including an explicit treatment of carbon clusters based on reactive potential results. Finally, we develop equilibrium methods for the simulation of isentropic processes (either during the compression or the release of a material), that we applied to study the release of a monoatomic liquid. These results are compared to the direct non-equilibrium MD simulations of the same process, showing that the isentropic approximation is not strictly valid.

Maillet, Jean-Bernard

2009-06-01

391

Polar coordinate lattice Boltzmann kinetic modeling of detonation phenomena  

E-print Network

A novel polar coordinate lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for detonation phenomena is presented and applied to investigate typical implosion and explosion processes. In this model, the change of discrete distribution function due to local chemical reaction is dynamically coupled into in the modified lattice Boltzmann equation, which could recovery the Navier-Stokes equations, including contribution of chemical reaction, via the Chapman-Enskog expansion. For the numerical investigations, the main focuses are the nonequilibrium behaviors in these processes. The system at the disc center is always in its thermodynamic equilibrium. The internal kinetic energies in different degrees freedoms around the detonation front do not coincide due to the fluid viscosity. They show the maximum difference at the inflexion point where the pressure has the largest spatial derivative. The dependence of the reaction rate on the pressure, influences of the shock strength and reaction rate on the departure amplitude of the system from its local thermodynamic equilibrium are probed.

Chuandong Lin; Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

2014-08-31

392

Verification of 2-D Detonation Shock Dynamics in conjunction with Los Alamos Lagrangian hydrocode  

SciTech Connect

As the latest version of the fast-tube Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) solver is linked with the Los Alamos Lagrangian hydrocode, verification problems from a 2006 DSD report (LA-14277 [1]) have been duplicated with some of the verification criteria changed to more quantitative ones. The observed error convergence is as good as or better than reported in [1], quite possibly due to the careful treatment of floating point numbers to ensure that their precision level is maintained throughout the code. This report duplicates the three sample verification problems in LA-14277 [1] using the Los Alamos ASC Lagrangian hydrocode (FLAG), official release of 3.2 Alpha6 with a few modifications. This version of FLAG is linked with the latest fast-tube Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) version beta 2 solver released in 2011 as part of the LanlDSD software product [2]. New verification criteria are used for the arcwave problem where two specific locations are chosen for burn arrival time comparison. For this report FLAG's internal driver code prepares the distance function ({Psi}) and material ID fields from its hydro setup, instead of the stand-alone driver that is being utilized by the other LANL hydrocodes currently interfaced to LanlDSD. As it is implemented in version 3.2 Alpha6, the {Psi} and material ID fields and other parameters are passed from FLAG to the DSD solver directly, and the burn table is directly passed back to FLAG as part of the calling arguments. The burn-front arrival time 'exact' solutions, mentioned in the sequel for the rate-stick and 'arc-wave' problems, are computed using a pair of special-purpose Fortran codes provided by Aslam [3]. In each case an ansatz for the form of the solution is made in which the radius from the detonator center point is used as the independent space coordinate. This leads to a simplified, problem-specific, 1D form of the governing equation. This equation is solved using 2nd-order spatial differencing and the forward Euler method on a very fine temporal and geometric mesh. The boundary conditions are handled exactly at the correct location, with second order accuracy. Care has been taken to ensure that this solution is fully converged. Most other technical details are omitted here as they are comprehensively discussed in [1].

Aida, Toru [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Walter, John W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aslam, Tariq D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2013-01-29

393

Measurements and calculations of detonation propulsion performance in helium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Previously obtained results are extended to helium ambient gas to help in the assessment of performance in the atmospheres of the major planets. Measurements confirm benefits derived form detonating propellant over conventional chemical rocket propulsion. Benefits however, are reduced at high pressures in low molecular weight gas. Numerical calculations by means of a monodimensional hydrodynamic code follow the different trends obtained experimentally for high and low molecular weight gas and also offer new insights on the time behavior of the process.

Kim, K.; Back, L. H.; Varsi, G.

1974-01-01

394

One-dimensional overdriven detonations with branched-chain kinetics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamics of time-dependent, planar propagation of gaseous detonations is addressed on the basis of a three-step chemistry model that describes branched-chain processes. Relevant nondimensional parameters are the ratio of the heat release to the thermal enthalpy at the Neumann state, the nondimensional activation energies for the initiation and branching steps, the ratio of the branching time to the initiation time and the ratio of the branching time to the recombination time. The limit of strong overdrive is considered, in which pressure remains constant downstream from the leading shock in the first approximation, and the ratio of specific heats ? is taken to be near unity. A two-term expansion in the strong overdrive factor is introduced, and an integral equation is derived describing the nonlinear dynamics and exhibiting a bifurcation parameter, the reciprocal of the product of (?-1), the nondimensional heat release and the nondimensional branching activation energy, with an acoustic correction. A stability analysis shows that, depending on values of the parameters, either the mode of lowest frequency or a mode of higher frequency may be most unstable. Numerical integrations exhibit different conditions under which oscillations die, low-frequency oscillations prevail, high-frequency oscillations prevail, highly nonlinear oscillations persist, or detonation failure occurs. This type of parametric analysis is feasible because of the relative simplicity of the model, which still is more realistic than a one-step, Arrhenius chemical approximation. In particular, by addressing the limit of slow radical recombination compared with branching, explicit results are derived for the critical value of the bifurcation parameter, involving the ratio of the recombination time to the induction time. The results help to clarify the general nature of one-dimensional detonation instability and provide simplifications that can be employed in efficiently relating gaseous detonation behavior to the true underlying chemistry.

Sánchez, Antonio L.; Carretero, Manuel; Clavin, Paul; Williams, Forman A.

2001-03-01

395

Model determines if falling, live TCP gun will detonate  

SciTech Connect

BHP Research has developed a mathematical model to determine if a falling, live tubing-conveyed perforating (TCP) gun assembly will detonate upon impacting the bottom of a well. If the model finds that the falling fun exceeds the critical velocity, the gun assembly dimensions, fluid properties, or casing dimensions should be changed. BHP has successfully used the model to design downhole completions for the Challis oil field in the Timor Sea.

Inayat-Hussain, A.A.; Owen, P.J. (BHP Research, Melbourne Lab, Clayton (Australia)); Nuttall, D.E. (BHP Petroleum Pty. Ltd., Winnellie (Australia))

1992-11-09

396

Numerical simulation of a 100-ton ANFO detonation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work describes the results from a US government-owned hydrocode (SHAMRC, Second-Order Hydrodynamic Automatic Mesh Refinement Code) that simulated an explosive detonation experiment with 100,000 kg of Ammonium Nitrate-Fuel Oil (ANFO) and 2,080 kg of Composition B (CompB). The explosive surface charge was nearly hemispherical and detonated in desert terrain. Two-dimensional axisymmetric (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulations were conducted, with the 3D model providing a more accurate representation of the experimental setup geometry. Both 2D and 3D simulations yielded overpressure and impulse waveforms that agreed qualitatively with experiment, including the capture of the secondary shock observed in the experiment. The 2D simulation predicted the primary shock arrival time correctly but secondary shock arrival time was early. The 2D-predicted impulse waveforms agreed very well with the experiment, especially at later calculation times, and prediction of the early part of the impulse waveform (associated with the initial peak) was better quantitatively for 2D compared to 3D. The 3D simulation also predicted the primary shock arrival time correctly, and secondary shock arrival times in 3D were closer to the experiment than in the 2D results. The 3D-predicted impulse waveform had better quantitative agreement than 2D for the later part of the impulse waveform. The results of this numerical study show that SHAMRC may be used reliably to predict phenomena associated with the 100-ton detonation. The ultimate fidelity of the simulations was limited by both computer time and memory. The results obtained provide good accuracy and indicate that the code is well suited to predicting the outcomes of explosive detonations.

Weber, P. W.; Millage, K. K.; Crepeau, J. E.; Happ, H. J.; Gitterman, Y.; Needham, C. E.

2015-03-01

397

Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi 1-D, finite-rate chemistry CFD model for a PDRE & described and implemented. A parametric study of the effect of blowdown pressure ratio on the performance of an optimized, fixed PDRE nozzle configuration is reported. The results are compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

Morris, Christopher I.

2003-01-01

398

Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Research at NASA Marshall  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi 1-D, finite-rate chemistry CFD model for a PDRE is described and implemented. A parametric study of the effect of blowdown pressure ratio on the performance of an optimized, fixed PDRE nozzle configuration is reported. The results are compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

Morris, Christopher I.

2003-01-01

399

Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants  

DOEpatents

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01

400

Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants  

DOEpatents

A simulator is disclosed which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1995-05-09

401

Preparation of C60 by Detonation a Mixture of Trinitrotoluene and Graphite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To explore the practicability of C60 synthesis under extreme conditions (high pressure and high temperature), trinitrotoluene (TNT), trinitramine (RDX) and graphite mixtures of different proportions were detonated in a vacuum container, and the detonation products were collected for detecting. The results of mass spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography showed significant signals of C60, which proved that C60 could be synthesized by detonating the mixture of TNT and graphite (in 6:4 and 7:3 mass ratio, respectively), the detonation pressure and temperature were calculated around 13 GPa and 2000 K, respectively. Both experiment results and theoretical analysis showed the importance of detonation pressure and cooling temperature in detonation synthesis of C60.

Wei, Xianfeng; Han, Yong; Liu, Liu; Long, Xinping

2013-01-01

402

Shock and Detonation Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

WX-9 serves the Laboratory and the Nation by delivering quality technical results, serving customers that include the Nuclear Weapons Program (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security and other government agencies. The scientific expertise of the group encompasses equations-of-state, shock compression science, phase transformations, detonation physics including explosives initiation, detonation propagation, and reaction rates, spectroscopic methods and velocimetry, and detonation and equation-of-state theory. We are also internationally-recognized in ultra-fast laser shock methods and associated diagnostics, and are active in the area of ultra-sensitive explosives detection. The facility capital enabling the group to fulfill its missions include a number of laser systems, both for laser-driven shocks, and spectroscopic analysis, high pressure gas-driven guns and powder guns for high velocity plate impact experiments, explosively-driven techniques, static high pressure devices including diamond anvil cells and dilatometers coupled with spectroscopic probes, and machine shops and target fabrication facilities.

Robbins, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22

403

Equation of state, initiation, and detonation of pure ammonium nitrate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a widely used fertilizer and mining explosive throughout the world. One of the more common explosives using AN is called ANFO, a mixture of AN prills and fuel oil in a 94:6 ratio by weight. The AN prills are specially made to absorb the fuel oil, forming a mixture that reacts under shock loading through a diffusion-controlled process, resulting in a non-ideal explosive with detonation velocities around 4 km/s. While there are a number of studies on ANFO, there are only a few studies relating to the equation of state (EOS) and detonation properties of pure AN - resulting mainly from studies of accidents that have occurred during transportation of large quantities of AN. We present the results of a series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on pressed AN ranging in density from 1.72 to 0.9 g/cm^3. Several of the high density experiments were performed in front surface impact geometry, in which pressed AN disks were built into the projectile front and impacted onto LiF windows. Additional experiments at low density have been done in ``half cell'' multiple magnetic gauge gun experiments. From this work a complete unreacted EOS has been developed, as well as some initiation and detonation information. Additional high pressure x-ray diffraction experiments in diamond anvil cells have provided a static isotherm for AN.

Robbins, D. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Velisavljevic, N.; Stahl, D. B.

2009-06-01

404

The deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular HMX  

SciTech Connect

The transition from deflagration to detonation in porous beds of explosive and propellant has received considerable attention both experimentally and theoretically. In many cases, the use of a hot-gas-producing igniter complicates the interpretation and subsequent modeling of experiments because considerable effort is required to account for the effect of the igniter gases on the granular bed. Hot-wire ignition is less intrusive; however, the ignition front is not planar. Thus the early events in these experiments cannot be approximated as one-dimensional. We have studied the deflagration-to-detonation behavior of granular HMX confined in steel tubes with x-radiography, light emission, stress gauges, and various pin techniques. Simplification and consistency of results were obtained by igniting the HMX with a piston (initially at rest and in contact with the HMX) driven into the bed. A gasless igniter is used to stare the burning of the piston propellant (low-density HMX) providing the piston with a smooth initial motion. Analysis of the data gives a detailed picture of the DDT process under these conditions. The qualitative and quantitative experimental results show the transition from the burning to detonation is discontinuous. The results are discussed in terms of a descriptive model.

McAfee, J.M.; Asay, B.; Campbell, A.W.; Ramsay, J.B.

1991-01-01

405

DDT Characteristics of Laser Driven Exploding Bridgewire Detonators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The initiation and performance characteristics of Laser Exploding Bridgewire (LEBW) detonators loaded with CL-20, CP and BNCP were examined. LEBW devices, in name, as well as in function, exhibit similarities to their electrically driven counterparts with the exception that the means for energy deposition into the driving metal media results from photon absorption instead of electrical joule heating. CP and BNCP were chosen due to their well-known propensity to rapidly undergo a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) and CL-20 was chosen to explore its utility as a DDT explosive. The explosive loading within the LEBW detonators were similar in nature to traditional EBW devices with regard to %TMD loading of the initial increment as well as quantity of energetic materials. Comparisons of the energy fluences required for initiation of the explosives will be discussed. Additionally, streak camera measurements will be reviewed that were conducted at what would be considered ``hard-fire'' fluence levels as well as conditions closer to the mean firing fluence levels of initiation.

Welle, Eric

2005-07-01

406

A viscoplastic model of expanding cylindrical shells subjected to internal explosive detonations  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic flux compression generators rely on the expansion of thin ductile shells to generate magnetic fields. These thin shells are filled with high explosives, which when detonated, cause the shell to expand to over 200% strain at strain-rates on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. Experimental data indicate the development and growth of multiple plastic instabilities which appear in a quasi-periodic pattern on the surfaces of the shells. These quasi-periodic instabilities are connected by localized zones of intense shear that are oriented approximately 45{degree} from the outward radial direction. The quasi-periodic instabilities continue to develop and eventually become through-cracks, causing the shell to fragment. A viscoplastic constitutive model is formulated to model the high strain-rate expansion and provide insight into the development of plastic instabilities. The formulation of the viscoplastic constitutive model includes the effects of shock heating and damage in the form of microvoid nucleation, growth, and coalescence in the expanding shell. This model uses the Johnson-Cook strength model with the Mie-Grueneisen equation of state and a modified Gurson yield surface. The constitutive model includes the modifications proposed by Tvergaard and the plastic strain controlled nucleation introduced by Neeleman. The constitutive model is implemented as a user material subroutine into ABAQUS/Explicit, which is a commercially available nonlinear explicit dynamic finite element program. A cylindrical shell is modeled using both axisymmetric and plane strain elements. Two experiments were conducted involving plane wave detonated, explosively filled, copper cylinders. Instability, displacement, and velocity data were recorded using a fast framing camera and a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Good agreement is shown between the numerical results and experimental data. An additional explosively bulged cylinder experiment was also performed and a photomicrograph of an instability is shown to provide a qualitative comparison between the experimental observations and the numerical predictions.

Martineau, R.L.

1998-04-01

407

Temperature activated absorption during laser-induced damage: The evolution of laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts  

SciTech Connect

Previously we have shown that the size of laser induced damage sites in both KDP and SiO{sub 2} is largely governed by the duration of the laser pulse which creates them. Here we present a model based on experiment and simulation that accounts for this behavior. Specifically, we show that solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts are generated during a damage event and that these fronts propagate at constant velocities for laser intensities up to 4 GW/cm{sup 2}. It is the constant absorption front velocity that leads to the dependence of laser damage site size on pulse duration. We show that these absorption fronts are driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. In addition to the practical application of selecting an optimal laser for pre-initiation of large aperture optics, this work serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

Carr, C W; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Demange, P

2010-10-26

408

Influence of interatomic bonding potentials on detonation properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dependences of the macroscopic detonation properties of a two-dimensional (2D) diatomic (AB) molecular system on the fundamental molecular properties were investigated. This includes examining the detonation velocity, reaction zone thickness, and critical width as functions of the exothermicity (Q) of the gas-phase reaction [AB?(1/2)(A2+B2)] and the gas-phase dissociation energy (DeAB) for AB?A+B . Following previous work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a reactive empirical bond-order potential were used to characterize the shock-induced response of a diatomic AB molecular solid, which exothermically reacts to produce A2 and B2 gaseous products. Nonequilibrium MD simulations reveal that there is a linear dependence between the square of the detonation velocity and both of these molecular parameters. The detonation velocities were shown to be consistent with the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) model, demonstrating that these dependences arise from how the equation of state of the products and reactants are affected. Equilibrium MD simulations of microcanonical ensembles were used to determine the CJ states for varying Q ’s, and radial distribution functions characterize the atomic structure. The character of this material near the CJ conditions was found to be somewhat unusual, consisting of polyatomic clusters rather than discrete molecular species. It was also found that there was a minimum value of Q and a maximum value of DeAB for which a pseudo-one-dimensional detonation could not be sustained. The reaction zone of this material was characterized under both equilibrium (CJ) and transient (underdriven) conditions. The basic structure is consistent with the Zeldovich-von Neumann-Döring model, with a sharp shock rise and a reaction zone that extends to 200-300Å . The underdriven systems show a buildup process which requires an extensive time to approach equilibrium conditions. The rate stick failure diameter (critical width in 2D) was also found to depend on Q and DeAB . The dependence on Q could be explained in terms of the reaction zone properties.

Heim, Andrew J.; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Germann, Timothy C.; Holian, Brad Lee; Kober, Edward M.; Lomdahl, Peter S.

2007-08-01

409

Detonation discrimination techniques using a near-infrared focal plane array camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research investigates the classification of battlespace detonations, specifically the determination of munitions type and size using image features from an infrared wavelength camera. Experimental data are collected for the detonation of several types of conventional munitions with different high explosive materials and different weights. Key features are identified for discriminating various types and sizes of detonation flashes. These features include statistical parameters derived from the time dependence of fireball size. Using Fisher linear discriminant techniques, these features are projected onto a line such that the projected points are maximally clustered for different classes of detonations. Bayesian decision boundaries for classification are then determined.

Dills, Anthony N.; Perram, Glen P.; Gustafson, Steven C.

2004-08-01

410

Space Shuttle Main Engine fuel preburner augmented spark igniter shutdown detonations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Detonations were experienced in the Space Shuttle Main Engine fuel preburner (FPB) augmented spark igniter (ASI) during engine cutoff. Several of these resulted in over pressures sufficient to damage the FPB ASI oxidizer system. The detonations initiated in the FPB ASI oxidizer line when residual oxidizer (oxygen) in the line mixed with backflowing fuel (hydrogen) and detonated. This paper reviews the damage history to the FPB ASI oxidizer system, an engineering assessment of the problem cause, a verification of the mechanisms, the hazards associated with the detonations, and the solution implemented.

Dexter, C. E.; Mccay, T. D.

1986-01-01

411

Detonation charge size versus coda magnitude relations in California and Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Magnitude-charge size relations have important uses in forensic seismology and are used in Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty monitoring. I derive empirical magnitude versus detonation-charge-size relationships for 322 detonations located by permanent seismic networks in California and Nevada. These detonations, used in 41 different seismic refraction or network calibration experiments, ranged in yield (charge size) between 25 and 106 kg; coda magnitudes reported for them ranged from 0.5 to 3.9. Almost all represent simultaneous (single-fired) detonations of one or more boreholes. Repeated detonations at the same shotpoint suggest that the reported coda magnitudes are repeatable, on average, to within 0.1 magnitude unit. An empirical linear regression for these 322 detonations yields M = 0.31 + 0.50 log10(weight [kg]). The detonations compiled here demonstrate that the Khalturin et al. (1998) relationship, developed mainly for data from large chemical explosions but which fits data from nuclear blasts, can be used to estimate the minimum charge size for coda magnitudes between 0.5 and 3.9. Drilling, loading, and shooting logs indicate that the explosive specification, loading method, and effectiveness of tamp are the primary factors determining the efficiency of a detonation. These records indicate that locating a detonation within the water table is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition for an efficient shot.

Brocher, T.M.

2003-01-01

412

[Research on diagnosis of gas-liquid detonation exhaust based on double optical path absortion spectroscopy technique].  

PubMed

The effect detection of detonation exhaust can provide measurement data for exploring the formation mechanism of detonation, the promotion of detonation efficiency and the reduction of fuel waste. Based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technique combined with double optical path cross-correlation algorithm, the article raises the diagnosis method to realize the on-line testing of detonation exhaust velocity, temperature and H2O gas concentration. The double optical path testing system is designed and set up for the valveless pulse detonation engine with the diameter of 80 mm. By scanning H2O absorption lines of 1343nm with a high frequency of 50 kHz, the on-line detection of gas-liquid pulse detonation exhaust is realized. The results show that the optical testing system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technique can capture the detailed characteristics of pulse detonation exhaust in the transient process of detonation. The duration of single detonation is 85 ms under laboratory conditions, among which supersonic injection time is 5.7 ms and subsonic injection time is 19.3 ms. The valveless pulse detonation engine used can work under frequency of 11 Hz. The velocity of detonation overflowing the detonation tube is 1,172 m x s(-1), the maximum temperature of detonation exhaust near the nozzle is 2 412 K. There is a transitory platform in the velocity curve as well as the temperature curve. H2O gas concentration changes between 0-7% during detonation under experimental conditions. The research can provide measurement data for the detonation process diagnosis and analysis, which is of significance to advance the detonation mechanism research and promote the research of pulse detonation engine control technology. PMID:25208369

Lü, Xiao-Jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-Sheng

2014-03-01

413

Re-initiation phenomenon of gaseous detonation induced by shock reflection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The two-dimensional, time-dependent, reactive Navier-Stokes equations including the effects of viscosity, thermal conduction and molecular diffusion were solved to reveal the wave evolution and chemical dynamics involved in the re-initiation process. The computation was performed for hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures at the low initial pressure (8.00 kPa), using detailed chemical reaction model. The results show that, the decoupled leading shock reflects on the right wall of the vertical branch. High temperature and pressure behind the reflected shock induce the generation of hot spots and local explosion. Therefore, the re-initiation of gaseous detonation occurs. In the re-initiation area, there exist very high OH concentration and no H 2 concentration. However, in front of reflected shock, there exist relatively high H 2 concentration and no OH radicals. Additionally, the shock-flame interaction induces RM instability. This results in the fast mixing between hot reacted gas mixture and the relatively cold unreacted gas mixture and accelerates the chemical reactions. However, the shock-flame interaction contributes much less to the re-initiation, in contrast with shock reflection. The transition of leading shock from regular reflection to Mach reflection happens during the re-initiation. The computed evolution of wave structures involved in the re-initiation is qualitatively agreeable with that from the experimental schlieren images.

Wang, C. J.; Xu, S. L.

2007-02-01

414

The Wave Power Group  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Wave Power Group at the University of Edinburgh has produced a site primarily depicting its research into alternative power sources. Visitors will find a short history of the group, formed in 1974 after Steven Slater invented equipment to convert ocean wave energy into electricity. This is followed by descriptions of the group's recent efforts to develop similar technologies, including the curved wave tank and the 3D wave tank. The site is not limited to projects dealing with energy, however. It also discusses the potential development of a rain making machine and an instrument to detonate land minds without direct human involvement. Finally, visitors can view clips from the Power of Change video, which illustrate the works of the group. Engineers and students interested in alternative power research and other unique answers to global challenges will find this site extremely valuable.

415

EVALUATING THE USE OF SNOW-COVERED RANGES TO ESTIMATE THE EXPLOSIVES RESIDUES THAT RESULT FROM DETONATION OF ARMY MUNITIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Estimating the amounts of residues remaining after munitions detonate is complicated by the presence of residues from previous detonations and the difficulty in easily obtaining adequately sized samples to overcome spatial heterogeneity in residue deposition. This study was cond...

416

Detonations in Hydrocarbon Fuel Blends J.M. Austin and J.E. Shepherd  

E-print Network

Detonations in Hydrocarbon Fuel Blends J.M. Austin and J.E. Shepherd Graduate Aeronautical in high-molecular weight hydrocarbon fuels of interest to pulse detonation engine applications of the peak in hydroxyl mole fraction. 2 #12;Introduction Liquid hydrocarbons are the fuel of choice

Low, Steven H.

417

Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame  

E-print Network

Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame S. E. Woosley1 , A. R. Kerstein2 , and A. J. Aspden3 ABSTRACT The flame in a Type Ia supernova is a conglomerate of these regions can be supersonic and could initiate a detonation. Subject headings: supernovae: general

418

Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 A numerical study of detonation diffraction  

E-print Network

of the reaction rate to temperature. We study in detail three highly resolved cases of detonation diffraction in the equation that describes the temperature rate of change of a fluid element, expressed in the shock feature in detonation diffraction. For a single-step reaction model of order nr, the rate of reaction

Goddard III, William A.

419

Copyright 1997, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. Recent Advances in Detonation Techniques  

E-print Network

, Ronkonkoma, New York 11779 Detonations can be used to generate a high-pressure gas of high acoustic speed to a performance comparison between these two modes, com- parisons with other high-performance techniques in Detonation Techniques for High-Enthalpy Facilities Frank K. Lu,* Donald R. Wilson,f W. Scott Stuessy

Texas at Arlington, University of

420

Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

Povinelli, Louis A.

2001-01-01

421

Method and system for making integrated solid-state fire-sets and detonators  

DOEpatents

A slapper detonator comprises a solid-state high-voltage capacitor, a low-jitter dielectric breakdown switch and trigger circuitry, a detonator transmission line, an exploding foil bridge, and a flier material. All these components are fabricated in a single solid-state device using thin film deposition techniques.

O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA); Druce, Robert L. (Union City, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01

422

Method and system for making integrated solid-state fire-sets and detonators  

DOEpatents

A slapper detonator comprises a solid-state high-voltage capacitor, a low-jitter dielectric breakdown switch and trigger circuitry, a detonator transmission line, an exploding foil bridge, and a flier material. All these components are fabricated in a single solid-state device using thin film deposition techniques. 13 figs.

O`Brien, D.W.; Druce, R.L.; Johnson, G.W.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Lee, R.S.

1998-03-24

423

Meshfree particle simulation of the detonation process for high explosives in shaped charge unlined cavity configurations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The numerical simulation of the detonation of a high explosive (HE) is generally not an easy task for traditional grid based methods. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method, as a meshfree, Lagrangian and particle method, provides a very attractive approach in dealing with large deformations and large inhomogeneities in the extremely transient high explosive detonation and later expansion process. This paper

M. B. Liu; G. R. Liu; K. Y. Lam; Z. Zong

2003-01-01

424

Deflagration to detonation transition in mixtures of alkane LNG\\/LPG constituents with Oâ\\/Nâ  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deflagration to detonation transitions (DDT) of methane, methane\\/ethane, ethane, propane, and butane in mixtures with increasing dilution of nitrogen have been studied in a smooth 2'' id detonation tube with a length\\/diameter ratio of 220. The results obtained demonstrate the presence of two regimes of DDT depending on the reactivity of the mixture. The first regime displays rapid acceleration to

R. P. Lindstedt; H. J. Michels

1988-01-01