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Sample records for lassa virus glycoprotein

  1. Protection of rhesus monkeys from fatal Lassa fever by vaccination with a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the Lassa virus glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Hoch, S P; McCormick, J B; Auperin, D; Brown, B G; Castor, M; Perez, G; Ruo, S; Conaty, A; Brammer, L; Bauer, S

    1989-01-01

    Lassa fever is an acute febrile disease of West Africa, where there are as many as 300,000 infections a year and an estimated 3000 deaths. As control of the rodent host is impracticable at present, the best immediate prospect is vaccination. We tested as potential vaccines in rhesus monkeys a closely related virus, Mopeia virus (two monkeys), and a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the Lassa virus glycoprotein gene, V-LSGPC (four monkeys). Two monkeys vaccinated with the New York Board of Health strain of vaccinia virus as controls died after challenge with Lassa virus. The two monkeys vaccinated with Mopeia virus developed antibodies measurable by radioimmunoprecipitation prior to challenge, and they survived challenge by Lassa virus with minimal physical or physiologic disturbances. However, both showed a transient, low-titer Lassa viremia. Two of the four animals vaccinated with V-LSGPC had antibodies to both Lassa glycoproteins, as determined by radioimmunoprecipitation. All four animals survived a challenge of Lassa virus but experienced a transient febrile illness and moderate physiologic changes following challenge. Virus was recoverable from each of these animals, but at low titer and only during a brief period, as observed for the Mopeia-protected animals. We conclude that V-LSGPC can protect rhesus monkeys against death from Lassa fever. PMID:2911575

  2. A recombinant Yellow Fever 17D vaccine expressing Lassa virus glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Bredenbeek, Peter J.; Molenkamp, Richard; Spaan, Willy J.M.; Deubel, Vincent; Marianneau, Phillippe; Salvato, Maria S.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Zapata, Juan; Tikhonov, Ilia; Patterson, Jean; Carrion, Ricardo; Ticer, Anysha; Brasky, Kathleen; Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2006-01-01

    The Yellow Fever Vaccine 17D (YFV17D) has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) resulting in construction of YFV17D/LASV-GPC recombinant virus. The virus was replication-competent and processed the LASV-GPC in cell cultures. The recombinant replicated poorly in guinea pigs but still elicited specific antibodies against LASV and YFV17D antigens. A single subcutaneous injection of the recombinant vaccine protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal Lassa Fever. This study demonstrates the potential to develop an YFV17D-based bivalent vaccine against two viruses that are endemic in the same area of Africa. PMID:16412488

  3. A recombinant Yellow Fever 17D vaccine expressing Lassa virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Bredenbeek, Peter J; Molenkamp, Richard; Spaan, Willy J M; Deubel, Vincent; Marianneau, Phillippe; Salvato, Maria S; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Zapata, Juan; Tikhonov, Ilia; Patterson, Jean; Carrion, Ricardo; Ticer, Anysha; Brasky, Kathleen; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2006-02-20

    The Yellow Fever Vaccine 17D (YFV17D) has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) resulting in construction of YFV17D/LASV-GPC recombinant virus. The virus was replication-competent and processed the LASV-GPC in cell cultures. The recombinant replicated poorly in guinea pigs but still elicited specific antibodies against LASV and YFV17D antigens. A single subcutaneous injection of the recombinant vaccine protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal Lassa Fever. This study demonstrates the potential to develop an YFV17D-based bivalent vaccine against two viruses that are endemic in the same area of Africa. PMID:16412488

  4. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James E.; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Cross, Robert W.; Yenni, Rachael E.; Elliott, Deborah H.; Rouelle, Julie A.; Kannadka, Chandrika B.; Smira, Ashley A.; Garry, Courtney E.; Bradley, Benjamin T.; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Boisen, Matt L.; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Zandonatti, Michelle A.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C.; Andersen, Kristian G.; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J.; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C.; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A.; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Follarin, Onikepe A.; Schieffelin, John S.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Kulakoski, Peter C.; Wilson, Russell B.; Happi, Christian T.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Gevao, Sahr M.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  5. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James E; Hastie, Kathryn M; Cross, Robert W; Yenni, Rachael E; Elliott, Deborah H; Rouelle, Julie A; Kannadka, Chandrika B; Smira, Ashley A; Garry, Courtney E; Bradley, Benjamin T; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G; Boisen, Matt L; Hartnett, Jessica N; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Rowland, Megan M; Heinrich, Megan L; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C; Andersen, Kristian G; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A; Okokhere, Peter O; Follarin, Onikepe A; Schieffelin, John S; Pitts, Kelly R; Geisbert, Joan B; Kulakoski, Peter C; Wilson, Russell B; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C; Gevao, Sahr M; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Geisbert, Thomas W; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M; Garry, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  6. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K.; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C. Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A.; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits. PMID:26849049

  7. Detection of Lassa Virus, Mali

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Lopez, Job E.; Sogoba, Nafomon; Traore’, Sékou F.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Ebihara, Hideki; Branco, Luis; Garry, Robert F.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether Lassa virus was circulating in southern Mali, we tested samples from small mammals from 3 villages, including Soromba, where in 2009 a British citizen probably contracted a lethal Lassa virus infection. We report the isolation and genetic characterization of Lassa virus from an area previously unknown for Lassa fever. PMID:20587185

  8. Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Carrion, Ricardo; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean; Goicochea, Marco; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2011-02-01

    Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV-GP1 and -GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF proteins and LASV GP antigens in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa. PMID:21145373

  9. Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J.; Bredenbeek, Peter J.; Carrion, Ricardo; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean; Goicochea, Marco; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S.; Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2010-01-01

    Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV GP1 and GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and –GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF and LASV GP proteins in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1&GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1&GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa. PMID:21145373

  10. Lassa virus entry requires a trigger-induced receptor switch

    PubMed Central

    Jae, Lucas T.; Raaben, Matthijs; Herbert, Andrew S.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Soh, Timothy; Stubbs, Sarah H.; Janssen, Hans; Damme, Markus; Saftig, Paul; Whelan, Sean P.; Dye, John M.; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.

    2014-01-01

    Lassa virus spreads from rodents to humans and can lead to lethal hemorrhagic fever. Despite its broad tropism, chicken cells were reported to resist infection thirty years ago. We show that Lassa virus readily engaged its cell surface receptor α-dystroglycan in avian cells, but virus entry in susceptible species involved a pH-dependent switch to an intracellular receptor, the lysosome-resident protein LAMP1. Iterative haploid screens revealed that the sialyltransferase ST3GAL4 was required for the interaction of the virus glycoprotein with LAMP1. A single glycosylated residue in LAMP1, present in susceptible species but absent in birds, was essential for interaction with the Lassa virus envelope protein and subsequent infection. The resistance of Lamp1-deficient mice to Lassa virus highlights the relevance of this receptor switch in vivo. PMID:24970085

  11. New Hosts of The Lassa Virus.

    PubMed

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Cadar, Daniel; Magassouba, N'Faly; Obadare, Adeoba; Kourouma, Fode; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Fasogbon, Samuel; Igbokwe, Joseph; Rieger, Toni; Bockholt, Sabrina; Jérôme, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Garigliany, Mutien; Lorenzen, Stephan; Igbahenah, Felix; Fichet, Jean-Nicolas; Ortsega, Daniel; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans, killing several thousand people in West Africa annually. For 40 years, the Natal multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis, has been assumed to be the sole host of LASV. We found evidence that LASV is also hosted by other rodent species: the African wood mouse Hylomyscus pamfi in Nigeria, and the Guinea multimammate mouse Mastomys erythroleucus in both Nigeria and Guinea. Virus strains from these animals were isolated in the BSL-4 laboratory and fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of viral genes coding for glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, polymerase and matrix protein show that Lassa strains detected in M. erythroleucus belong to lineages III and IV. The strain from H. pamfi clusters close to lineage I (for S gene) and between II &III (for L gene). Discovery of new rodent hosts has implications for LASV evolution and its spread into new areas within West Africa. PMID:27140942

  12. New Hosts of The Lassa Virus

    PubMed Central

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Cadar, Daniel; Magassouba, N’Faly; Obadare, Adeoba; Kourouma, Fode; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Fasogbon, Samuel; Igbokwe, Joseph; Rieger, Toni; Bockholt, Sabrina; Jérôme, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Garigliany, Mutien; Lorenzen, Stephan; Igbahenah, Felix; Fichet, Jean-Nicolas; Ortsega, Daniel; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans, killing several thousand people in West Africa annually. For 40 years, the Natal multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis, has been assumed to be the sole host of LASV. We found evidence that LASV is also hosted by other rodent species: the African wood mouse Hylomyscus pamfi in Nigeria, and the Guinea multimammate mouse Mastomys erythroleucus in both Nigeria and Guinea. Virus strains from these animals were isolated in the BSL-4 laboratory and fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of viral genes coding for glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, polymerase and matrix protein show that Lassa strains detected in M. erythroleucus belong to lineages III and IV. The strain from H. pamfi clusters close to lineage I (for S gene) and between II & III (for L gene). Discovery of new rodent hosts has implications for LASV evolution and its spread into new areas within West Africa. PMID:27140942

  13. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, Kathleen A.; Broderick, Kate E.; Wilkinson, Eric R.; Shaia, Carl I.; Bell, Todd M.; Shurtleff, Amy C.; Spik, Kristin W.; Badger, Catherine V.; Guttieri, Mary C.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC) that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC). This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs) using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6) with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development. PMID:26344112

  14. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kathleen A; Broderick, Kate E; Wilkinson, Eric R; Shaia, Carl I; Bell, Todd M; Shurtleff, Amy C; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine V; Guttieri, Mary C; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC) that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC). This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs) using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6) with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development. PMID:26344112

  15. Detection of Lassa virus RNA in specimens from patients with Lassa fever by using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lunkenheimer, K; Hufert, F T; Schmitz, H

    1990-01-01

    Suitable oligonucleotide primers and probes were synthesized to amplify Lassa virus (Josiah strain)-specific nucleoprotein and glycoprotein gene fragments by using reverse transcription combined with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our primers did not amplify the related lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. By using PCR, about 50 50% tissue culture infective doses could be detected in the supernatant of infected cells. Furthermore, in all five serum specimens and four of five urine specimens of patients with acute Lassa fever, viral RNA could be demonstrated. Negative results were obtained with all serum and urine specimens of healthy subjects. Our data suggest that PCR may be applied as an alternative to virus isolation in the rapid diagnosis of Lassa fever. Images PMID:2279999

  16. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever Virus Infection: I. Susceptibility of Mice to Recombinant Lassa Gp/LCMV Chimeric Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew M.; Cruite, Justin; Welch, Megan J.; Sullivan, Brian; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a BSL-4 restricted agent. To allow study of infection by LASV under BSL-2 conditions, we generated a recombinant virus in which the LASV glycoprotein (Gp) was placed on the backbone of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) Cl13 nucleoprotein, Z and polymerase genes (rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp). The recombinant virus displayed high tropism for dendritic cells following in vitro or in vivo infection. Inoculation of immunocompetent adults resulted in an acute infection, generation of virus-specific CD8+ T cells and clearance of the infection. Inoculation of newborn mice with rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp resulted in a life-long persistent infection. Interestingly, adoptive transfer of rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp immune memory cells into such persistently infected mice failed to purge virus but, in contrast, cleared virus from mice persistently infected with wt LCMV Cl13. PMID:23684417

  17. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever virus infection: I. Susceptibility of mice to recombinant Lassa Gp/LCMV chimeric virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew M; Cruite, Justin; Welch, Megan J; Sullivan, Brian; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2013-08-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a BSL-4 restricted agent. To allow study of infection by LASV under BSL-2 conditions, we generated a recombinant virus in which the LASV glycoprotein (Gp) was placed on the backbone of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) Cl13 nucleoprotein, Z and polymerase genes (rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp). The recombinant virus displayed high tropism for dendritic cells following in vitro or in vivo infection. Inoculation of immunocompetent adults resulted in an acute infection, generation of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells and clearance of the infection. Inoculation of newborn mice with rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp resulted in a life-long persistent infection. Interestingly, adoptive transfer of rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp immune memory cells into such persistently infected mice failed to purge virus but, in contrast, cleared virus from mice persistently infected with wt LCMV Cl13. PMID:23684417

  18. A live attenuated vaccine for Lassa fever made by reassortment of Lassa and Mopeia viruses.

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, Igor S; Patterson, Jean; Carrion, Ricardo; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Ticer, Anysha; Zapata, Juan; Brasky, Kathleen; Geiger, Robert; Hubbard, Gene B; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S

    2005-11-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) and Mopeia virus (MOPV) are closely related Old World arenaviruses that can exchange genomic segments (reassort) during coinfection. Clone ML29, selected from a library of MOPV/LASV (MOP/LAS) reassortants, encodes the major antigens (nucleocapsid and glycoprotein) of LASV and the RNA polymerase and zinc-binding protein of MOPV. Replication of ML29 was attenuated in guinea pigs and nonhuman primates. In murine adoptive-transfer experiments, as little as 150 PFU of ML29 induced protective cell-mediated immunity. All strain 13 guinea pigs vaccinated with clone ML29 survived at least 70 days after LASV challenge without either disease signs or histological lesions. Rhesus macaques inoculated with clone ML29 developed primary virus-specific T cells capable of secreting gamma interferon in response to homologous MOP/LAS and heterologous MOPV and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Detailed examination of two rhesus macaques infected with this MOPV/LAS reassortant revealed no histological lesions or disease signs. Thus, ML29 is a promising attenuated vaccine candidate for Lassa fever. PMID:16254329

  19. A Live Attenuated Vaccine for Lassa Fever Made by Reassortment of Lassa and Mopeia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.; Patterson, Jean; Carrion, Ricardo; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Ticer, Anysha; Zapata, Juan; Brasky, Kathleen; Geiger, Robert; Hubbard, Gene B.; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S.

    2005-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) and Mopeia virus (MOPV) are closely related Old World arenaviruses that can exchange genomic segments (reassort) during coinfection. Clone ML29, selected from a library of MOPV/LASV (MOP/LAS) reassortants, encodes the major antigens (nucleocapsid and glycoprotein) of LASV and the RNA polymerase and zinc-binding protein of MOPV. Replication of ML29 was attenuated in guinea pigs and nonhuman primates. In murine adoptive-transfer experiments, as little as 150 PFU of ML29 induced protective cell-mediated immunity. All strain 13 guinea pigs vaccinated with clone ML29 survived at least 70 days after LASV challenge without either disease signs or histological lesions. Rhesus macaques inoculated with clone ML29 developed primary virus-specific T cells capable of secreting gamma interferon in response to homologous MOP/LAS and heterologous MOPV and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Detailed examination of two rhesus macaques infected with this MOPV/LAS reassortant revealed no histological lesions or disease signs. Thus, ML29 is a promising attenuated vaccine candidate for Lassa fever. PMID:16254329

  20. A Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Lassa Fever Vaccine Protects Guinea Pigs and Macaques against Challenge with Geographically and Genetically Distinct Lassa Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Mire, Chad; Rosenke, Kyle; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Geisbert, Thomas; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Background Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic in several West African countries and is the etiological agent of Lassa fever. Despite the high annual incidence and significant morbidity and mortality rates, currently there are no approved vaccines to prevent infection or disease in humans. Genetically, LASV demonstrates a high degree of diversity that correlates with geographic distribution. The genetic heterogeneity observed between geographically distinct viruses raises concerns over the potential efficacy of a “universal” LASV vaccine. To date, several experimental LASV vaccines have been developed; however, few have been evaluated against challenge with various genetically unique Lassa virus isolates in relevant animal models. Methodologies/principle findings Here we demonstrate that a single, prophylactic immunization with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the glycoproteins of LASV strain Josiah from Sierra Leone protects strain 13 guinea pigs from infection / disease following challenge with LASV isolates originating from Liberia, Mali and Nigeria. Similarly, the VSV-based LASV vaccine yields complete protection against a lethal challenge with the Liberian LASV isolate in the gold-standard macaque model of Lassa fever. Conclusions/significance Our results demonstrate the VSV-based LASV vaccine is capable of preventing morbidity and mortality associated with non-homologous LASV challenge in two animal models of Lassa fever. Additionally, this work highlights the need for the further development of disease models for geographical distinct LASV strains, particularly those from Nigeria, in order to comprehensively evaluate potential vaccines and therapies against this prominent agent of viral hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25884628

  1. Sequence Variability and Geographic Distribution of Lassa Virus, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Stockelman, Michael G.; Moses, Lina M.; Park, Matthew; Stenger, David A.; Ansumana, Rashid; Bausch, Daniel G.; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to parts of West Africa and causes highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) is the only known reservoir of LASV. Most human infections result from zoonotic transmission. The very diverse LASV genome has 4 major lineages associated with different geographic locations. We used reverse transcription PCR and resequencing microarrays to detect LASV in 41 of 214 samples from rodents captured at 8 locations in Sierra Leone. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein precursor (GPC), and polymerase (L) genes showed 5 separate clades within lineage IV of LASV in this country. The sequence diversity was higher than previously observed; mean diversity was 7.01% for nucleoprotein gene at the nucleotide level. These results may have major implications for designing diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents for LASV infections in Sierra Leone. PMID:25811712

  2. Recent isolations of Lassa virus from Nigerian rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Herta; Fabiyi, A.; Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    Rodents were trapped in the Benue-Plateau and North-Eastern States of Nigeria where Lassa fever had been reported in previous years. Eight Lassa virus strains were isolated from tissues and blood of rodents identified in the field as being of 3 different species: Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus, and Mus minutoides. All the infected rodents were collected in village habitats. These isolations indicate the presence of Lassa virus in wild rodents in Nigeria during periods when no human infections were evident. Prior studies in Sierra Leone have indicated that a single rodent species, M. natalensis, may be the important reservoir host of Lassa virus. Since the present study indicates that other rodent species may be involved as well, the ecology of Lassa virus may be more complicated than was heretofore supposed. In view of the importance of determining the geographic and species range of rodent hosts of Lassa virus, and because of the problems inherent in rodent identification under austere field conditions, it is urgent that further studies be conducted in the same areas of Nigeria to confirm these findings. PMID:1085216

  3. Lassa virus-like particles displaying all major immunological determinants as a vaccine candidate for Lassa hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is a neglected tropical disease with significant impact on the health care system, society, and economy of Western and Central African nations where it is endemic. Treatment of acute Lassa fever infections has successfully utilized intravenous administration of ribavirin, a nucleotide analogue drug, but this is not an approved use; efficacy of oral administration has not been demonstrated. To date, several potential new vaccine platforms have been explored, but none have progressed toward clinical trials and commercialization. Therefore, the development of a robust vaccine platform that could be generated in sufficient quantities and at a low cost per dose could herald a subcontinent-wide vaccination program. This would move Lassa endemic areas toward the control and reduction of major outbreaks and endemic infections. To this end, we have employed efficient mammalian expression systems to generate a Lassa virus (LASV)-like particle (VLP)-based modular vaccine platform. Results A mammalian expression system that generated large quantities of LASV VLP in human cells at small scale settings was developed. These VLP contained the major immunological determinants of the virus: glycoprotein complex, nucleoprotein, and Z matrix protein, with known post-translational modifications. The viral proteins packaged into LASV VLP were characterized, including glycosylation profiles of glycoprotein subunits GP1 and GP2, and structural compartmentalization of each polypeptide. The host cell protein component of LASV VLP was also partially analyzed, namely glycoprotein incorporation, though the identity of these proteins remain unknown. All combinations of LASV Z, GPC, and NP proteins that generated VLP did not incorporate host cell ribosomes, a known component of native arenaviral particles, despite detection of small RNA species packaged into pseudoparticles. Although VLP did not contain the same host cell components as the native virion, electron

  4. Lassa Virus Seroprevalence in Sibirilia Commune, Bougouni District, Southern Mali

    PubMed Central

    Sogoba, Nafomon; Rosenke, Kyle; Adjemian, Jennifer; Diawara, Sory Ibrahim; Maiga, Ousmane; Keita, Moussa; Konaté, Drissa; Keita, Abdoul Salam; Sissoko, Ibrahim; Boisen, Matt; Nelson, Diana; Oottamasathien, Darin; Millett, Molly; Garry, Robert F.; Branco, Luis M.; Traoré, Sékou F.; Doumbia, Seydou; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to several nations in West Africa. In Mali, LASV was unknown until an exported case of Lassa fever was reported in 2009. Since that time, rodent surveys have found evidence of LASV-infected Mastomys natalensis rats in several communities in southern Mali, near the border with Côte d’Ivoire. Despite increased awareness, to date only a single case of Lassa fever has been confirmed in Mali. We conducted a survey to determine the prevalence of LASV exposure among persons in 3 villages in southern Mali where the presence of infected rodents has been documented. LASV IgG seroprevalence ranged from 14.5% to 44% per village. No sex bias was noted; however, seropositivity rates increased with participant age. These findings confirm human LASV exposure in Mali and suggest that LASV infection/Lassa fever is a potential public health concern in southern Mali. PMID:26981786

  5. Imported lassa fever in Germany: molecular characterization of a new lassa virus strain.

    PubMed Central

    Günther, S.; Emmerich, P.; Laue, T.; Kühle, O.; Asper, M.; Jung, A.; Grewing, T.; ter Meulen, J.; Schmitz, H.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a new Lassa virus strain imported into Germany by a traveler who had visited Ghana, Côte D'Ivoire, and Burkina Faso. This strain, designated "AV," originated from a region in West Africa where Lassa fever has not been reported. Viral S RNA isolated from the patient's serum was amplified and sequenced. A long-range reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction allowed amplification of the full-length (3.4 kb) S RNA. The coding sequences of strain AV differed from those of all known Lassa prototype strains (Josiah, Nigeria, and LP) by approximately 20%, mainly at third codon positions. Phylogenetically, strain AV appears to be most closely related to strain Josiah from Sierra Leone. Lassa viruses comprise a group of genetically highly diverse strains, which has implications for vaccine development. The new method for full-length S RNA amplification may facilitate identification and molecular analysis of new arenaviruses or arenavirus strains. PMID:10998376

  6. Identification of Cell Surface Molecules Involved in Dystroglycan-Independent Lassa Virus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Ströher, Ute; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Although O-mannosylated dystroglycan is a receptor for Lassa virus, a causative agent of Lassa fever, recent findings suggest the existence of an alternative receptor(s). Here we identified four molecules as receptors for Lassa virus: Axl and Tyro3, from the TAM family, and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial calcium-dependent lectin (LSECtin), from the C-type lectin family. These molecules enhanced the binding of Lassa virus to cells and mediated infection independently of dystroglycan. Axl- or Tyro3-mediated infection required intracellular signaling via the tyrosine kinase activity of Axl or Tyro3, whereas DC-SIGN- or LSECtin-mediated infection and binding were dependent on a specific carbohydrate and on ions. The identification of these four molecules as Lassa virus receptors advances our understanding of Lassa virus cell entry. PMID:22156524

  7. Passive antibody therapy of Lassa fever in cynomolgus monkeys: importance of neutralizing antibody and Lassa virus strain.

    PubMed Central

    Jahrling, P B; Peters, C J

    1984-01-01

    Lassa virus-infected cynomolgus monkeys were passively immunized with immune plasma of primate or human origin to gain insight into criteria for plasma selection and administration to human Lassa fever patients. Protective efficacy was correlated with neutralizing antibody concentrations, expressed as a log10 neutralization index (LNI). Convalescent Lassa-immune monkey plasma was titrated for protective efficacy in monkeys by intravenous inoculation with dilutions of plasma on the day of subcutaneous Lassa virus inoculation (day 0) and again on days 3 and 6. Monkeys that received undiluted plasma (LNI = 4.1) (1 ml/kg per treatment) survived a lethal viral dose, whereas those given a 1:3 dilution (LNI = 2.6) of this same plasma (1 ml/kg per treatment) died. Protection was restored when the volume of the 1:3 plasma dilution was increased to 3 ml/kg per treatment. Plasma diluted 1:9 or more (LNI = 1.5 or less) delayed onset and suppressed the magnitude of viremia but failed to confer protection at 3 ml/kg per treatment. Immunological enhancement, defined as increased viremia or accelerated death, did not occur following inadequate treatment. Human convalescent plasma also protected recipient monkeys; reductions in mortality and viremia were accurately predicted by the LNI of the plasma. Plasma of Liberian origin neutralized a Liberian Lassa strain more effectively than a Sierra Leone strain in vitro (LNI = 2.8 and 1.6, respectively) and protected monkeys more effectively against the Liberian strain. Geographic origin is thus a factor in the selection of optimal plasma for treatment of human Lassa fever, since geographically matched plasma is more likely to contain adequate LNI titers against homologous Lassa virus strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6715049

  8. Effective Vaccine for Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Hoch, S. P.; Hutwagner, L.; Brown, B.; McCormick, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    Lassa fever has been estimated to cause 5,000 deaths annually in West Africa. Recently, war in the zone where Lassa fever is hyperendemic has severely impeded control and treatment. Vaccination is the most viable control measure. There is no correlation between antibody levels and outcome in human patients, and inactivated vaccines produce high titers of antibodies to all viral proteins but do not prevent virus replication and death in nonhuman primates. Accordingly, we vaccinated 44 macaques with vaccinia virus-expressed Lassa virus structural proteins separately and in combination, with the object of inducing a predominantly TH1-type immune response. Following Lassa virus challenge, all unvaccinated animals died (0% survival). Nine of 10 animals vaccinated with all proteins survived (90% survival). Although no animals that received full-length glycoprotein alone had a high titer of antibody, 17 of 19 survived challenge (88%). In contrast, all animals vaccinated with nucleoprotein developed high titers of antibody but 12 of 15 died (20% survival). All animals vaccinated with single glycoproteins, G1 or G2, died, but all those that received both single glycoproteins (G1 plus G2) at separate sites survived, showing that both glycoproteins are independently important in protection. Neither group had demonstrable antibody levels prior to challenge. We demonstrate that in primates, immune responses to epitopes on both glycoproteins are required to protect against lethal challenge with Lassa virus without having untoward side effects and that this protection is likely to be primarily cell mediated. We show that an effective, safe vaccine against Lassa virus can and should be made and that its evaluation for human populations is a matter of humanitarian priority. PMID:10888616

  9. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/CO gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/CO radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. The authors found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  10. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/Co gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/Co radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. We found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  11. Pathogenesis of Lassa virus infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Jahrling, P B; Smith, S; Hesse, R A; Rhoderick, J B

    1982-01-01

    A rodent model for human Lassa fever was developed which uses inbred (strain 13) and outbred (Hartley) guinea pigs. Strain 13 guinea pigs were uniformly susceptible to lethal infection by 2 or more PFU of Lassa virus strain Josiah. In contrast, no more than 30% of the Hartley guinea pigs died regardless of the virus dose. In lethally infected strain 13 guinea pigs, peak titers of virus (10(7) to 10(8) PFU) occurred in the spleen and lymph nodes at 8 to 9 days, in the salivary glands at 11 days, and in the lung at 14 to 16 days. Virus reached low titers (10(4) PFU) in the plasma and brain and intermediate titers in the liver, adrenal glands, kidney, pancreas, and heart. In moribund animals, the most consistent and severe histological lesion as an interstitial pneumonia. In contrast, the brain was only minimally involved. The immune response of lethally infected strain 13 guinea pigs, as measured by the indirect fluorescent antibody test, was detectable within 10 days of infection and was similar in timing and intensity to the fluorescent antibody test response of both lethally infected and surviving outbred animals. In contrast to the fluorescent antibody response, neutralizing antibody developed late in convalescence and was thus detected only in surviving outbred guinea pigs. The availability of a rodent model for human Lassa fever in uniformly susceptible strain 13 guinea pigs should facilitate detailed pathophysiological studies and efficacy testing of antiviral drugs, candidate vaccines, and immunotherapy regimens to develop control methods for this life-threatening disease in humans. Images PMID:6749685

  12. Clinical Sequencing Uncovers Origins and Evolution of Lassa Virus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shapiro, B Jesse; Matranga, Christian B; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E; Moses, Lina M; Folarin, Onikepe A; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M; Gire, Stephen K; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J; Ryan, Elizabeth M; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A; Lukens, Amanda K; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B; Lander, Eric S; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F; Okokhere, Peter O; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Akpede, George O; Asogun, Danny A; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Happi, Christian T; Garry, Robert F; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2015-08-13

    The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us of how little is known about biosafety level 4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26276630

  13. Stampidine prevents mortality in an experimental mouse model of viral hemorrhagic fever caused by lassa virus

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M; Petkevich, Alexander S; Vassilev, Alexei O; Tibbles, Heather E; Titov, Leonid

    2004-01-01

    Background The potential use of microorganisms as agents of biological warfare (BW) is a growing concern. Lassa virus, a member of the Arenavirus class of Hemorrhagic fever (HF) viruses has emerged as a worldwide concern among public health officials. The purpose of the present study was to further elucidate the antiviral activity spectrum of stampidine, a novel nucleoside analog with potent anti-viral activity against the immunodeficiency viruses HIV-1, HIV-2, and FIV, by examining its effects on survival of mice challenged with Lassa virus. Methods We examined the therapeutic effect of Stampidine in CBA mice inoculated with intracerebral injections of the Josiah strain of Lassa virus. Mice were treated either with vehicle or nontoxic doses of stampidine administered intraperitoneally 24 hours prior to, 1 hour prior to, and 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours, and 96 hours after virus inoculation. Results The probability of survival following the Lassa challenge was significantly improved for stampidine treated mice (Kaplan Meier, Chi-squared = 11.7, df = 2, Log-Rank p-value = 0.003). Conclusion Therefore, stampidine shows clinical potential as a new agent for treatment of viral hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa virus. PMID:14720304

  14. Characterization of the interaction of lassa fever virus with its cellular receptor alpha-dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Stefan; Rojek, Jillian M; Perez, Mar; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2005-05-01

    The cellular receptor for the Old World arenaviruses Lassa fever virus (LFV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has recently been identified as alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG), a cell surface receptor that provides a molecular link between the extracellular matrix and the actin-based cytoskeleton. In the present study, we show that LFV binds to alpha-DG with high affinity in the low-nanomolar range. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with LFV glycoprotein (GP) adopted the receptor binding characteristics of LFV and depended on alpha-DG for infection of cells. Mapping of the binding site of LFV on alpha-DG revealed that LFV binding required the same domains of alpha-DG that are involved in the binding of LCMV. Further, LFV was found to efficiently compete with laminin alpha1 and alpha2 chains for alpha-DG binding. Together with our previous studies on receptor binding of the prototypic immunosuppressive LCMV isolate LCMV clone 13, these findings indicate a high degree of conservation in the receptor binding characteristics between the highly human-pathogenic LFV and murine-immunosuppressive LCMV isolates. PMID:15857984

  15. Characterization of the Interaction of Lassa Fever Virus with Its Cellular Receptor α-Dystroglycan

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Stefan; Rojek, Jillian M.; Perez, Mar; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2005-01-01

    The cellular receptor for the Old World arenaviruses Lassa fever virus (LFV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has recently been identified as α-dystroglycan (α-DG), a cell surface receptor that provides a molecular link between the extracellular matrix and the actin-based cytoskeleton. In the present study, we show that LFV binds to α-DG with high affinity in the low-nanomolar range. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with LFV glycoprotein (GP) adopted the receptor binding characteristics of LFV and depended on α-DG for infection of cells. Mapping of the binding site of LFV on α-DG revealed that LFV binding required the same domains of α-DG that are involved in the binding of LCMV. Further, LFV was found to efficiently compete with laminin α1 and α2 chains for α-DG binding. Together with our previous studies on receptor binding of the prototypic immunosuppressive LCMV isolate LCMV clone 13, these findings indicate a high degree of conservation in the receptor binding characteristics between the highly human-pathogenic LFV and murine-immunosuppressive LCMV isolates. PMID:15857984

  16. Development of a New Vaccine for the Prevention of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Recent importation of Lassa fever into Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States by travelers on commercial airlines from Africa underscores the public health challenge of emerging viruses. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines for Lassa fever, and no experimental vaccine has completely protected nonhuman primates against a lethal challenge. Methods and Findings We developed a replication-competent vaccine against Lassa virus based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vectors expressing the Lassa viral glycoprotein. A single intramuscular vaccination of the Lassa vaccine elicited a protective immune response in nonhuman primates against a lethal Lassa virus challenge. Vaccine shedding was not detected in the monkeys, and none of the animals developed fever or other symptoms of illness associated with vaccination. The Lassa vaccine induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses in the four vaccinated and challenged monkeys. Despite a transient Lassa viremia in vaccinated animals 7 d after challenge, the vaccinated animals showed no evidence of clinical disease. In contrast, the two control animals developed severe symptoms including rashes, facial edema, and elevated liver enzymes, and ultimately succumbed to the Lassa infection. Conclusion Our data suggest that the Lassa vaccine candidate based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus is safe and highly efficacious in a relevant animal model that faithfully reproduces human disease. PMID:15971954

  17. Preparation and use of erythrocyte-globulin conjugates to Lassa virus in reversed passive hemagglutination and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Goldwasser, R A; Elliott, L H; Johnson, K M

    1980-01-01

    Conditions were defined for functional covalent coupling of anti-Lassa virus globulins to glutaraldehyde-fixed chicken erythrocytes. Tolylene-2,4-diisocyanate in a reaction mixture containing not more than 0.01 M NaCl produced uniformly good conjugates which were used in reversed passive hemagglutination (RPH) and reversed passive hemagglutination inhibition (RPHI) tests to detect Lassa virus antigens in infected cell cultures and specific antigens in Vero cell cultures. Identical results were obtained with this method and with immunofluorescent-antibody (IFA) staining in the detection and identification of Lassa virus isolated from human and rodent specimens from West Africa. The RPHI method was equal to IFA for serological diagnosis of acute human Lassa virus infection and superior to IFA, complement fixation, and a radioimmunoassay procedure for detection of Lassa virus antibodies in a human population where this infection is endemic. PMID:7000810

  18. Genomic profiling of host responses to Lassa virus: therapeutic potential from primate to man

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C; Salvato, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    Lassa virus infection elicits distinctive changes in host gene expression and metabolism. We focus on changes in host gene expression that may be biomarkers that discriminate individual pathogens or may help to provide a prognosis for disease. In addition to assessing mRNA changes, functional studies are also needed to discriminate causes of disease from mechanisms of host resistance. Host responses that drive pathogenesis are likely to be targets for prevention or therapy. Host responses to Lassa or its related arenaviruses have been monitored in cell culture, in animal models of hemorrhagic fever, in Lassa-infected nonhuman primates and, to a limited extent, in infected human beings. Here, we describe results from those studies and discuss potential targets for reducing virus replication and mitigating disease. PMID:25844088

  19. NMR assignment of the arenaviral protein Z from Lassa fever virus.

    PubMed

    Volpon, Laurent; Osborne, Michael J; Borden, Katherine L B

    2008-06-01

    The arenavirus protein Z from Lassa fever virus was recently found to inhibit mRNA translation through direct interaction with eIF4E. Here, we report the NMR assignment of this RING-containing protein that was determined by triple resonance NMR techniques. PMID:18958179

  20. NMR assignment of the arenaviral protein Z from Lassa fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Michael J.; Borden, Katherine L.B.

    2008-01-01

    The arenavirus protein Z from Lassa fever virus was recently found to inhibit mRNA translation through direct interaction with eIF4E. Here, we report the NMR assignment of this RING-containing protein that was determined by triple resonance NMR techniques. PMID:18958179

  1. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  2. Geographic Distribution and Genetic Characterization of Lassa Virus in Sub-Saharan Mali

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Sogoba, Nafomon; Lopez, Job E.; Maiga, Ousmane; Dahlstrom, Eric; Zivcec, Marko; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Fischer, Robert J.; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Munster, Vincent J.; Branco, Luis; Garry, Robert; Porcella, Stephen F.; Schwan, Tom G.; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is an acute viral illness characterized by multi-organ failure and hemorrhagic manifestations. Lassa fever is most frequently diagnosed in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea, although sporadic cases have been recorded in other West African countries, including Mali. The etiological agent of Lassa fever is Lassa virus (LASV), an Arenavirus which is maintained in nature and frequently transmitted to humans by Mastomys natalensis. The purpose of this study was to better define the geographic distribution of LASV-infected rodents in sub-Saharan Mali. Methodologies/Principal Findings Small mammals were live-trapped at various locations across Mali for the purpose of identifying potential zoonotic pathogens. Serological and molecular assays were employed and determined LASV infected rodents were exclusively found in the southern Mali near the border of Côte d'Ivoire. Overall, 19.4% of Mastomys natalensis sampled in this region had evidence of LASV infection, with prevalence rates for individual villages ranging from 0 to 52%. Full-length genomic sequences were determined using high throughput sequencing methodologies for LASV isolates generated from tissue samples of rodents collected in four villages and confirmed the phylogenetic clustering of Malian LASV with strain AV. Conclusions/Significance The risk of human infections with LASV is greatest in villages in southern Mali. Lassa fever should be considered in the differential diagnosis for febrile individuals and appropriate diagnostic techniques need to be established to determine the incidence of infection and disease in these regions. PMID:24340119

  3. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Walker, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  4. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  5. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Pauza, C David; Djavani, Mahmoud M; Rodas, Juan D; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2011-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  6. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  7. Early blood profiles of virus infection in a monkey model for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Djavani, Mahmoud M; Crasta, Oswald R; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Fei, Zhangjun; Folkerts, Otto; Sobral, Bruno; Swindells, Mark; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Pauza, C David; Lukashevich, Igor S; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti; Salvato, Maria S

    2007-08-01

    Acute arenavirus disease in primates, like Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, begins with flu-like symptoms and leads to death approximately 2 weeks after infection. Our goal was to identify molecular changes in blood that are related to disease progression. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) infected intravenously with a lethal dose of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) provide a model for Lassa virus infection of humans. Blood samples taken before and during the course of infection were used to monitor gene expression changes that paralleled disease onset. Changes in blood showed major disruptions in eicosanoid, immune response, and hormone response pathways. Approximately 12% of host genes alter their expression after LCMV infection, and a subset of these genes can discriminate between virulent and non-virulent LCMV infection. Major transcription changes have been given preliminary confirmation by quantitative PCR and protein studies and will be valuable candidates for future validation as biomarkers for arenavirus disease. PMID:17522210

  8. Early Blood Profiles of Virus Infection in a Monkey Model for Lassa Fever▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Crasta, Oswald R.; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Fei, Zhangjun; Folkerts, Otto; Sobral, Bruno; Swindells, Mark; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Pauza, C. David; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti; Salvato, Maria S.

    2007-01-01

    Acute arenavirus disease in primates, like Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, begins with flu-like symptoms and leads to death approximately 2 weeks after infection. Our goal was to identify molecular changes in blood that are related to disease progression. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) infected intravenously with a lethal dose of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) provide a model for Lassa virus infection of humans. Blood samples taken before and during the course of infection were used to monitor gene expression changes that paralleled disease onset. Changes in blood showed major disruptions in eicosanoid, immune response, and hormone response pathways. Approximately 12% of host genes alter their expression after LCMV infection, and a subset of these genes can discriminate between virulent and nonvirulent LCMV infection. Major transcription changes have been given preliminary confirmation by quantitative PCR and protein studies and will be valuable candidates for future validation as biomarkers for arenavirus disease. PMID:17522210

  9. [Characterization of contacts of the population of Guinea with synanthropic rodents as Lassa fever virus carriers].

    PubMed

    Inapogui, A P; Konstantinov, O K; Lapshov, V N; Comara, S K

    2007-01-01

    Questionnaire surveys made in 17 villages from 3 ecological zones of Guinea have provided evidence for the population's contact with synanthropic rodents as Lassa fever virus carriers. Over 100 rodents are quarterly captured in the houses of the traditional type in the villages located in the savanna woodland. Less than 10 specimens are captured at the food warehouses. There are more than 100 rodents in the majority of houses of the traditional type in the villages located in the secondary forest. In the villages of rainy tropical forests, the capture rate is low--10 to 100 rodents. The main rodent capturers are boys and young men (aged 7 to 20 years) who are principal rodent meat eaters; although almost the whole population, particularly in rural areas, consumes this meat in varying degrees. The proportion of captured rats of the genus Mastomys (the carrier of Lassa fever virus) in the town of Kindia is 11%. In the rural area, it is much higher (as high as 94%) in the villages located in the rainy tropical forests. It is estimated that one trapper quarterly catches 0.2 (in the savanna woodland) to 6.9 (in the secondary forests) infected rats, which agrees with the data of a serological survey of Guinea's population. By and large, the majority of the Guinean population may be referred to as a group at risk for Lassa fever due to their permanent contacts with rodents. PMID:17436732

  10. Clinical laboratory, virologic, and pathologic changes in hamsters experimentally infected with Pirital virus (Arenaviridae): a rodent model of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, Elena; Mateo, Rosa I; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Popov, Vsevolod L; Newman, Patrick C; Tesh, Robert B

    2006-06-01

    The clinical laboratory, virologic, and pathologic changes occurring in hamsters after infection with Pirital virus (Arenaviridae) are described. Pirital virus infection in the hamsters was characterized by high titered viremia, leukocytosis, coagulopathy, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, hepatocellular and splenic necrosis, and marked elevation of serum transaminase levels. All of the animals died within 9 days. The clinical and histopathological findings in the Pirital virus-infected hamsters were very similar to those reported in severe human cases of Lassa fever, suggesting that this new animal model could serve as a low-cost and relatively safe alternative for studying the pathogenesis and therapy of Lassa fever. PMID:16760527

  11. The sensitivity and specificity of Lassa virus IgM by ELISA as screening tool at early phase of Lassa fever infection

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, Titus S.; Nwegbu, Maxwell M.; Asogun, Daniel; Adomeh, Donatus I.; Okokhere, Peter O.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis, prompt treatment, and disease containment are vital measures in the management of Lassa fever (LF), a lethal and contagious arenaviral hemorrhagic disease prevalent in West Africa. Lassa Virus (LAV)-specific Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) test, the gold standard for diagnosis, is unavailable in most centers. Serologic detection of LAV IgM is a more accessible tool and this work was to investigate its adequacy as an early marker for LF. Patients and Methods: A prospective case–control study conducted July 2007-March 2011 in a tertiary referral health center in Nigeria. Blood samples for test and control were evaluated for Lassa specific antigens and IgM using RT-PCR (primers S36+ and LVS 339) and indirect ELISA (Lassa Nucleo-protein (NP)-Antigen) respectively. RT-PCR outcome was used as standard to test for the sensitivity and specificity of IgM. Results: Of the 37 confirmed cases of LF infection by RT-PCR, 21 (57%) were IgM positive. Amongst the 35 confirmed negative cases (control group), eight were IgM positive. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the IgM assay were 57% and 77% respectively. The negative and positive predictive values of the IgM serological assay were 63% and 72%, respectively, while the efficiency of the test was 67%. Conclusion: The specificity and sensitivity of IgM as a screening tool for early detection of LF appear weak and, hence, the need for a reliable LF “rapid screening kit” since RT-PCR is unavailable in most centers. In the interim, “high clinical index of suspicion,” irrespective of IgM status, requires urgent referral to confirmatory centers. PMID:23661877

  12. Physicochemical inactivation of Lassa, Ebola, and Marburg viruses and effect on clinical laboratory analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.W.; McCormick, J.B.

    1984-09-01

    Clinical specimens from patients infected with Lassa, Ebola, or Marburg virus may present a serious biohazard to laboratory workers. The authors have examined the effects of heat, alteration of pH, and gamma radiation on these viruses in human blood and on the electrolytes, enzymes, and coagulation factors measured in laboratory tests that are important in the care of an infected patient. Heating serum at 60 degrees C for 1 h reduced high titers of these viruses to noninfectious levels without altering the serum levels of glucose, blood urea nitrogen, and electrolytes. Dilution of blood in 3% acetic acid, diluent for a leukocyte count, inactivated all of these viruses. All of the methods tested for viral inactivation markedly altered certain serum proteins, making these methods unsuitable for samples that are to be tested for certain enzyme levels and coagulation factors.

  13. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs. PMID:26456301

  14. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B.; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs. PMID:26456301

  15. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage

    PubMed Central

    Manning, John T.; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200–300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa. PMID:26483768

  16. Interaction of Sindbis virus glycoproteins during morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K J; Scupham, R K; Pfeil, J A; Wan, K; Sagik, B P; Bose, H R

    1977-01-01

    In cells infected with the Sindbis temperature-sensitive mutants ts-23 and ts-10 (complementation group D), which contain a defect in the envelope glycoprotein E1, the precursor polypeptide PE2 is not cleaved to the envelope glycoprotein E2 at the nonpermissive temperature. This defect is phenotypically identical to the defect observed in the complementation group E mutant, ts-20. The lesion in ts-23 is reversible upon shift to permissive temperature, whereas that of ts-10 is not. Antiserum against whole virus, E1, or E2 also prevents the cleavage of PE2 in cells infected with wild-type Sindbis virus. Because the cleavage of PE2 is inhibited by the lesion in mutants that are genotypically distinct and by anti-E1 or -E2 serum, it appears that PE2 and E1 exist as a complex in the membrane of the infected cell. Images PMID:833949

  17. Spatial and temporal evolution of Lassa virus in the natural host population in Upper Guinea.

    PubMed

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Ölschläger, Stephan; Strecker, Thomas; Koivogui, Lamine; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Camara, Amara Bongo; Soropogui, Barré; Magassouba, N'Faly; Günther, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at reconstructing the spatial and temporal evolution of Lassa virus (LASV) in the natural host population. To this end, we generated 132 partial nucleoprotein sequences of LASV from M. natalensis trapped in 12 villages around Faranah, Upper Guinea, over a period of 12 years. This study reveals two main features of LASV evolution in M. natalensis. First, the virus evolves in the reservoir with a molecular clock rate of 9 (7-11) × 10(-4) position(-1) year(-1) implying that contemporary LASV lineages circulate in the Faranah area since less than 100 years. Second, viruses circulating in a specific village are diverse and polyphyletic. We observed, however, there are monophyletic clusters at village and sub-village level at specific points in time. In conclusion, our data indicate that the temporal and spatial pattern of LASV evolution in the natural reservoir is characterized by a combination of stationary circulation within a village and virus movement between villages. The latter feature is relevant for rodent control strategies, as it implies that recurrence of the virus from neighbouring villages may occur in villages where the virus has previously been eradicated. PMID:26911443

  18. Spatial and temporal evolution of Lassa virus in the natural host population in Upper Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Ölschläger, Stephan; Strecker, Thomas; Koivogui, Lamine; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Camara, Amara Bongo; Soropogui, Barré; Magassouba, N’Faly; Günther, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at reconstructing the spatial and temporal evolution of Lassa virus (LASV) in the natural host population. To this end, we generated 132 partial nucleoprotein sequences of LASV from M. natalensis trapped in 12 villages around Faranah, Upper Guinea, over a period of 12 years. This study reveals two main features of LASV evolution in M. natalensis. First, the virus evolves in the reservoir with a molecular clock rate of 9 (7–11) × 10–4 position–1 year–1 implying that contemporary LASV lineages circulate in the Faranah area since less than 100 years. Second, viruses circulating in a specific village are diverse and polyphyletic. We observed, however, there are monophyletic clusters at village and sub-village level at specific points in time. In conclusion, our data indicate that the temporal and spatial pattern of LASV evolution in the natural reservoir is characterized by a combination of stationary circulation within a village and virus movement between villages. The latter feature is relevant for rodent control strategies, as it implies that recurrence of the virus from neighbouring villages may occur in villages where the virus has previously been eradicated. PMID:26911443

  19. The Impact of Human Conflict on the Genetics of Mastomys natalensis and Lassa Virus in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan; Wirth, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes have been shown to play an important role in the emergence of new human diseases of zoonotic origin. The contribution of social factors to their spread, especially conflicts followed by mass movement of populations, has not been extensively investigated. Here we reveal the effects of civil war on the phylogeography of a zoonotic emerging infectious disease by concomitantly studying the population structure, evolution and demography of Lassa virus and its natural reservoir, the rodent Mastomys natalensis, in Guinea, West Africa. Analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences enabled us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of Lassa virus, which appeared 750 to 900 years ago in Nigeria and only recently spread across western Africa (170 years ago). Bayesian demographic inferences revealed that both the host and the virus populations have gone recently through severe genetic bottlenecks. The timing of these events matches civil war-related mass movements of refugees and accompanying environmental degradation. Forest and habitat destruction and human predation of the natural reservoir are likely explanations for the sharp decline observed in the rodent populations, the consequent virus population decline, and the coincident increased incidence of Lassa fever in these regions. Interestingly, we were also able to detect a similar pattern in Nigeria coinciding with the Biafra war. Our findings show that anthropogenic factors may profoundly impact the population genetics of a virus and its reservoir within the context of an emerging infectious disease. PMID:22615894

  20. The impact of human conflict on the genetics of Mastomys natalensis and Lassa virus in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Lalis, Aude; Leblois, Raphaël; Lecompte, Emilie; Denys, Christiane; Ter Meulen, Jan; Wirth, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes have been shown to play an important role in the emergence of new human diseases of zoonotic origin. The contribution of social factors to their spread, especially conflicts followed by mass movement of populations, has not been extensively investigated. Here we reveal the effects of civil war on the phylogeography of a zoonotic emerging infectious disease by concomitantly studying the population structure, evolution and demography of Lassa virus and its natural reservoir, the rodent Mastomys natalensis, in Guinea, West Africa. Analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences enabled us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of Lassa virus, which appeared 750 to 900 years ago in Nigeria and only recently spread across western Africa (170 years ago). Bayesian demographic inferences revealed that both the host and the virus populations have gone recently through severe genetic bottlenecks. The timing of these events matches civil war-related mass movements of refugees and accompanying environmental degradation. Forest and habitat destruction and human predation of the natural reservoir are likely explanations for the sharp decline observed in the rodent populations, the consequent virus population decline, and the coincident increased incidence of Lassa fever in these regions. Interestingly, we were also able to detect a similar pattern in Nigeria coinciding with the Biafra war. Our findings show that anthropogenic factors may profoundly impact the population genetics of a virus and its reservoir within the context of an emerging infectious disease. PMID:22615894

  1. Lassa fever virus peptides predicted by computational analysis induce epitope-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte responses in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Boesen, Agnieszka; Sundar, Krishnan; Coico, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa fever virus (LV). Although the precise host defense mechanism(s) that affords protection against LV is not completely understood, cellular immunity mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) plays a pivotal role in controlling viral replication and LV infection. To date, there have been no reports mapping major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-binding CTL epitopes for LV. Using computer-assisted algorithms, we identified five HLA-A2.1-binding peptides of LV glycoprotein (GP) and two peptides from LV nucleoprotein (NP). Synthesized peptides were examined for their ability to bind to MHC class I molecules using a flow cytometric assay that measures peptide stabilization of class I. Three of the LV-GP peptides tested (LLGTFTWTL, SLYKGVYEL, and YLISIFLHL) stabilized HLA-A2. The LV-NP peptides tested failed to stabilize this HLA-A2. We then investigated the ability of the HLA-A2-binding LV-GP peptides to generate peptide-specific CTLs in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice. Functional assays used to confirm CTL activation included gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays and intracellular cytokine staining of CD8+ T cells from peptide-primed mice. CTL assays were also performed to verify the cytolytic activity of peptide-pulsed target cells. Each of the LV-GP peptides induced CTL responses in HLA-A2-transgenic mice. MHC class I tetramers prepared using one LV-GP peptide that showed the highest cytolytic index (LLGTFTWTL) confirmed that peptide-binding CD8+ T cells were present in pooled lymphocytes harvested from peptide-primed mice. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence of LV-derived GP epitopes that may be useful in the development of protective immunogens for this hemorrhagic virus. PMID:16210487

  2. Lassa Fever Virus Peptides Predicted by Computational Analysis Induce Epitope-Specific Cytotoxic-T-Lymphocyte Responses in HLA-A2.1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boesen, Agnieszka; Sundar, Krishnan; Coico, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa fever virus (LV). Although the precise host defense mechanism(s) that affords protection against LV is not completely understood, cellular immunity mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) plays a pivotal role in controlling viral replication and LV infection. To date, there have been no reports mapping major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-binding CTL epitopes for LV. Using computer-assisted algorithms, we identified five HLA-A2.1-binding peptides of LV glycoprotein (GP) and two peptides from LV nucleoprotein (NP). Synthesized peptides were examined for their ability to bind to MHC class I molecules using a flow cytometric assay that measures peptide stabilization of class I. Three of the LV-GP peptides tested (LLGTFTWTL, SLYKGVYEL, and YLISIFLHL) stabilized HLA-A2. The LV-NP peptides tested failed to stabilize this HLA-A2. We then investigated the ability of the HLA-A2-binding LV-GP peptides to generate peptide-specific CTLs in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice. Functional assays used to confirm CTL activation included gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays and intracellular cytokine staining of CD8+ T cells from peptide-primed mice. CTL assays were also performed to verify the cytolytic activity of peptide-pulsed target cells. Each of the LV-GP peptides induced CTL responses in HLA-A2-transgenic mice. MHC class I tetramers prepared using one LV-GP peptide that showed the highest cytolytic index (LLGTFTWTL) confirmed that peptide-binding CD8+ T cells were present in pooled lymphocytes harvested from peptide-primed mice. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence of LV-derived GP epitopes that may be useful in the development of protective immunogens for this hemorrhagic virus. PMID:16210487

  3. Lassa fever, Marburg and Ebola virus diseases and other exotic diseases: is there a risk to Canada?

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    There are seven exotic diseases of concern; three of these, the most unpredictable and least understood, are Lassa fever, Marburg virus disease and Ebola virus disease. In this article the epidemiologic aspects of these diseases are discussed, with particular emphasis on exportation from their indigenous areas in Africa and on the occurrence of secondary cases. Any of these conditions could be brought into Canada either by aeromedical evacuation or inadvertently. Between 1972 and 1978 there were seven occasions when Canada could have been involved with handling cases of Lassa fever. The Government of Canada has purchased several containment bed and transit isolators. These units, with filtered air under negative pressure, accommodate infectious patients being transported and cared for without contaminating medical attendants or the environment. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:570088

  4. Diagnosis and Clinical Virology of Lassa Fever as Evaluated by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Indirect Fluorescent-Antibody Test, and Virus Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Bausch, D. G.; Rollin, P. E.; Demby, A. H.; Coulibaly, M.; Kanu, J.; Conteh, A. S.; Wagoner, K. D.; McMullan, L. K.; Bowen, M. D.; Peters, C. J.; Ksiazek, T. G.

    2000-01-01

    The Lassa virus (an arenavirus) is found in West Africa, where it sometimes causes a severe hemorrhagic illness called Lassa fever. Laboratory diagnosis has traditionally been by the indirect fluorescent-antibody (IFA) test. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for Lassa virus antigen and immunoglobulin M (IgM) and G (IgG) antibodies have been developed that are thought to be more sensitive and specific. We compared ELISA and IFA testing on sera from 305 suspected cases of Lassa fever by using virus isolation with a positive reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) test as the “gold standard.” Virus isolation and RT-PCR were positive on 50 (16%) of the 305 suspected cases. Taken together, Lassa virus antigen and IgM ELISAs were 88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 77 to 95%) sensitive and 90% (95% CI, 88 to 91%) specific for acute infection. Due to the stringent gold standard used, these likely represent underestimates. Diagnosis could often be made on a single serum specimen. Antigen detection was particularly useful in providing early diagnosis as well as prognostic information. Level of antigenemia varied inversely with survival. Detection by ELISA of IgG antibody early in the course of illness helped rule out acute Lassa virus infection. The presence of IFA during both acute and convalescent stages of infection, as well as significant interobserver variation in reading the slides, made interpretation difficult. However, the assay provided useful prognostic information, the presence of IFA early in the course of illness correlating with death. The high sensitivity and specificity, capability for early diagnosis, and prognostic value of the ELISAs make them the diagnostic tests of choice for the detection of Lassa fever. PMID:10878062

  5. Inhibitors of cellular kinases with broad-spectrum antiviral activity for hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Emma L; McMullan, Laura K; Lo, Michael K; Spengler, Jessica R; Bergeron, Éric; Albariño, César G; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Flint, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Host cell kinases are important for the replication of a number of hemorrhagic fever viruses. We tested a panel of kinase inhibitors for their ability to block the replication of multiple hemorrhagic fever viruses. OSU-03012 inhibited the replication of Lassa, Ebola, Marburg and Nipah viruses, whereas BIBX 1382 dihydrochloride inhibited Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses. BIBX 1382 blocked both Lassa and Ebola virus glycoprotein-dependent cell entry. These compounds may be used as tools to understand conserved virus-host interactions, and implicate host cell kinases that may be targets for broad spectrum therapeutic intervention. PMID:25986249

  6. Pseudorabies Virus Glycoprotein M Inhibits Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Barbara G.; Nixdorf, Ralf; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A transient transfection-fusion assay was established to investigate membrane fusion mediated by pseudorabies virus (PrV) glycoproteins. Plasmids expressing PrV glycoproteins under control of the immediate-early 1 promoter-enhancer of human cytomegalovirus were transfected into rabbit kidney cells, and the extent of cell fusion was quantitated 27 to 42 h after transfection. Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH, and gL resulted in formation of polykaryocytes, as has been shown for homologous proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) (A. Turner, B. Bruun, T. Minson, and H. Browne, J. Virol. 72:873–875, 1998). However, in contrast to HSV-1, fusion was also observed when the gD-encoding plasmid was omitted, which indicates that PrV gB, gH, and gL are sufficient to mediate fusion. Fusogenic activity was enhanced when a carboxy-terminally truncated version of gB (gB-008) lacking the C-terminal 29 amino acids was used instead of wild-type gB. With gB-008, only gH was required in addition for fusion. A very rapid and extended fusion was observed after cotransfection of plasmids encoding gB-008 and gDH, a hybrid protein consisting of the N-terminal 271 amino acids of gD fused to the 590 C-terminal amino acids of gH. This protein has been shown to substitute for gH, gD, and gL function in the respective viral mutants (B. G. Klupp and T. C. Mettenleiter, J. Virol. 73:3014–3022, 1999). Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV gC, gE, gI, gK, and UL20 with gB-008 and gDH had no effect on fusion. However, inclusion of a gM-expressing plasmid strongly reduced the extent of fusion. An inhibitory effect was also observed after inclusion of plasmids encoding gM homologs of equine herpesvirus 1 or infectious laryngotracheitis virus but only in conjunction with expression of the gM complex partner, the gN homolog. Inhibition by PrV gM was not limited to PrV glycoprotein-mediated fusion but also affected fusion induced by the F protein of bovine

  7. Processing of virus-specific glycoproteins of varicella zoster virus

    SciTech Connect

    Namazue, J.; Campo-Vera, H.; Kitamura, K.; Okuno, T.; Yamanishi, K.

    1985-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoproteins were used to study the processing of three glycoproteins with molecular weights of 83K-94K (gp 2), 64K (gp 3), and 55K (gp 5). Immunoprecipitation experiments performed with VZV-infected cells, pulse labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine in the presence of tunicamycin, suggest that O-linked oligosaccharide is present on the glycoprotein of gp 2. Use of the enzyme endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H revealed that the fully processed form of gp 3 had high-mannose type and that of gp 5 had only complex type of N-linked oligosaccharides. Experiments with monensin suggest that the precursor form (116K) of gp 3 is cleaved during the processing from Golgi apparatus to cell surface membrane. The extension of O-linked oligosaccharide chain and the complex type of N-linked oligosaccharide chains also occurs during this processing.

  8. Dimerization of Tetherin Is Not Essential for Its Antiviral Activity against Lassa and Marburg Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Toshie; Sakurai, Akira; Yasuda, Jiro

    2009-01-01

    Tetherin (also known as BST2, CD317 or HM1.24) has recently been reported to inhibit a wide range of viruses. However, the antiviral mechanism of action of tetherin has not been determined. Both ends of the tetherin molecule are associated with the plasma membrane and it forms a homodimer. Therefore, a model in which progeny virions are retained on the cell surface by dimer formation between tetherin molecules on the viral envelope and plasma membrane has been proposed as the antiviral mechanism of action of this molecule. To investigate this possibility, we examined the correlation between dimerization and antiviral activity of tetherin in Lassa and Marburg virus-like particle production systems using tetherin mutants deficient in dimer formation. However, the tetherin mutant with complete loss of dimerization activity still showed apparent antiviral activity, indicating that dimerization of tetherin is not essential for its antiviral activity. This suggests that tetherin retains progeny virions on the cell surface by a mechanism other than dimerization. PMID:19742323

  9. Role of envelope glycoproteins in intracellular virus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The possible role viral glycoproteins in intracellular maturation was studied by using two different viruses, avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a coronavirus, and Punta Toro virus (PTV), a bunyavirus. Using the antibiotic tunicamycin, which inhibits glycosylation of N-linked glycoproteins, it was shown that coronavirus particles are formed in the absence of glycosylation. Analysis of the protein composition of these particles indicated that they contain an unglycosylated form of the membrane-associated E1 glycoprotein but lack the E2 spike glycoprotein. A cDNA clone derived from the PTV M RNA genome segment, which encodes the G1 and G2 glycoproteins, was cloned into vaccinia virus. Studies by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the glycoproteins synthesized from this recombinant were found to accumulate intracellularly at the Golgi complex, where virus budding usually takes place. Surface immunoprecipitation and {sup 125}I-protein A binding assays also demonstrated that a majority of the glycoproteins are retained intracellularly and are not transported to the cellular surface. The sequences which encode the G1 and G2 glycoproteins were independently cloned into vaccinia virus as well.

  10. Solubilization of glycoproteins of envelope viruses by detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, V.E.; Zaides, V.M.; Artamsnov, A.F.; Isaeva, E.S.; Zhdanov, V.M.

    1986-11-20

    The action of a number of known ionic and nonionic detergents, as well as the new nonionic detergent MESK, on envelope viruses was investigated. It was shown that the nonionic detergents MESK, Triton X-100, and octyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranoside selectively solubilize the outer glycoproteins of the virus particles. The nonionic detergent MESK has the mildest action. Using MESK, purified glycoproteins of influenza, parainfluenza, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, rabies, and herpes viruses were obtained. The procedure for obtaining glycoproteins includes incubation of the virus suspension with the detergent MESK, removal of subvirus structures by centrifuging, and purification of glycoproteins from detergents by dialysis. Isolated glycoproteins retain a native structure and biological activity and possess high immunogenicity. The detergent MESK is promising for laboratory tests and with respect to the production of subunit vaccines.

  11. Conserved residues in Lassa fever virus Z protein modulate viral infectivity at the level of the ribonucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Buchmeier, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Arenaviruses are negative-strand RNA viruses that cause human diseases such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, and Lassa hemorrhagic fever. No licensed vaccines exist, and current treatment is limited to ribavirin. The prototypic arenavirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), is a model for dissecting virus-host interactions in persistent and acute disease. The RING finger protein Z has been identified as the driving force of arenaviral budding and acts as the viral matrix protein. While residues in Z required for viral budding have been described, residues that govern the Z matrix function(s) have yet to be fully elucidated. Because this matrix function is integral to viral assembly, we reasoned that this would be reflected in sequence conservation. Using sequence alignment, we identified several conserved residues in Z outside the RING and late domains. Nine residues were each mutated to alanine in Lassa fever virus Z. All of the mutations affected the expression of an LCMV minigenome and the infectivity of virus-like particles, but to greatly varying degrees. Interestingly, no mutations appeared to affect Z-mediated budding or association with viral GP. Our findings provide direct experimental evidence supporting a role for Z in the modulation of the activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex and its packaging into mature infectious viral particles. PMID:21228230

  12. Conserved Residues in Lassa Fever Virus Z Protein Modulate Viral Infectivity at the Level of the Ribonucleoprotein▿

    PubMed Central

    Capul, Althea A.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses are negative-strand RNA viruses that cause human diseases such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, and Lassa hemorrhagic fever. No licensed vaccines exist, and current treatment is limited to ribavirin. The prototypic arenavirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), is a model for dissecting virus-host interactions in persistent and acute disease. The RING finger protein Z has been identified as the driving force of arenaviral budding and acts as the viral matrix protein. While residues in Z required for viral budding have been described, residues that govern the Z matrix function(s) have yet to be fully elucidated. Because this matrix function is integral to viral assembly, we reasoned that this would be reflected in sequence conservation. Using sequence alignment, we identified several conserved residues in Z outside the RING and late domains. Nine residues were each mutated to alanine in Lassa fever virus Z. All of the mutations affected the expression of an LCMV minigenome and the infectivity of virus-like particles, but to greatly varying degrees. Interestingly, no mutations appeared to affect Z-mediated budding or association with viral GP. Our findings provide direct experimental evidence supporting a role for Z in the modulation of the activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex and its packaging into mature infectious viral particles. PMID:21228230

  13. Mastomys natalensis and Lassa fever, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Emilie; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Daffis, Stéphane; Koulémou, Kékoura; Sylla, Oumar; Kourouma, Fodé; Doré, Amadou; Soropogui, Barré; Aniskin, Vladimir; Allali, Bernard; Kouassi Kan, Stéphane; Lalis, Aude; Koivogui, Lamine; Günther, Stephan; Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan

    2006-12-01

    PCR screening of 1,482 murid rodents from 13 genera caught in 18 different localities of Guinea, West Africa, showed Lassa virus infection only in molecularly typed Mastomys natalensis. Distribution of this rodent and relative abundance compared with M. erythroleucus correlates geographically with Lassa virus seroprevalence in humans. PMID:17326956

  14. Mastomys natalensis and Lassa Fever, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Daffis, Stéphane; Koulémou, Kékoura; Sylla, Oumar; Kourouma, Fodé; Doré, Amadou; Soropogui, Barré; Aniskin, Vladimir; Allali, Bernard; Kan, Stéphane Kouassi; Lalis, Aude; Koivogui, Lamine; Günther, Stephan; Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    PCR screening of 1,482 murid rodents from 13 genera caught in 18 different localities of Guinea, West Africa, showed Lassa virus infection only in molecularly typed Mastomys natalensis. Distribution of this rodent and relative abundance compared with M. erythroleucus correlates geographically with Lassa virus seroprevalence in humans. PMID:17326956

  15. Transcriptional Profiling of the Circulating Immune Response to Lassa Virus in an Aerosol Model of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Honko, Anna N.; Garamszegi, Sara; Caballero, Ignacio S.; Johnson, Joshua C.; Mucker, Eric M.; Trefry, John C.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Connor, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a significant human pathogen that is endemic to several countries in West Africa. Infection with LASV leads to the development of hemorrhagic fever in a significant number of cases, and it is estimated that thousands die each year from the disease. Little is known about the complex immune mechanisms governing the response to LASV or the genetic determinants of susceptibility and resistance to infection. In the study presented here, we have used a whole-genome, microarray-based approach to determine the temporal host response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of non-human primates (NHP) following aerosol exposure to LASV. Sequential sampling over the entire disease course showed that there are strong transcriptional changes of the immune response to LASV exposure, including the early induction of interferon-responsive genes and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. However, this increase in early innate responses was coupled with a lack of pro-inflammatory cytokine response in LASV exposed NHPs. There was a distinct lack of cytokines such as IL1β and IL23α, while immunosuppressive cytokines such as IL27 and IL6 were upregulated. Comparison of IRF/STAT1-stimulated gene expression with the viral load in LASV exposed NHPs suggests that mRNA expression significantly precedes viremia, and thus might be used for early diagnostics of the disease. Our results provide a transcriptomic survey of the circulating immune response to hemorrhagic LASV exposure and provide a foundation for biomarker identification to allow clinical diagnosis of LASV infection through analysis of the host response. PMID:23638192

  16. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Pannetier, Delphine; Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome. PMID:24421914

  17. Production of CXC and CC Chemokines by Human Antigen-Presenting Cells in Response to Lassa Virus or Closely Related Immunogenic Viruses, and in Cynomolgus Monkeys with Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome. PMID:24421914

  18. EXPRESSION OF THE MAIZE MOSAIC VIRUS GLYCOPROTEIN IN INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize mosaic virus (genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent-propagative manner by Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper. Like other rhabdoviruses, the MMV genome encodes a surface glycoprotein that is likely involved in virus attachment and entry into host ce...

  19. Lassa Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... an acute viral illness that occurs in west Africa. The illness was discovered in 1969 when two ... Lassa fever is endemic in parts of west Africa including Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria; however, ...

  20. Reversible conformational changes and fusion activity of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Y; Tuffereau, C; Segretain, D; Knossow, M; Flamand, A

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the implication of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G) in the first steps of the viral cycle, we studied the pH dependence of virus-induced fusion and hemagglutination, as well as modifications of the structure and properties of the viral glycoprotein following pH acidification. Our results suggest that the G protein adopts at least three distinct configurations, each associated with different properties. At neutral pH, G did not fuse membranes or hemagglutinate erythrocytes. It was insensitive to digestion with bromelain and trypsin. At pH 6.4, the glycoprotein became sensitive to proteases. Hemagglutination was at its maximum and then sharply decreased with the pH. No fusion was detected. Aggregation of virus was also observed. The third configuration, at below pH 6.1, was associated with the appearance of fusion. Some neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were able to differentiate these three configurations. Preincubation of the virus at below pH 6 inhibited fusion, but this inhibition, like the structural modifications of the glycoprotein, was reversible when G was reincubated at neutral pH. Images PMID:1870204

  1. Zidampidine, an aryl phosphate derivative of AZT: in vivo pharmacokinetics, metabolism, toxicity, and anti-viral efficacy against hemorrhagic fever caused by Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Uckun, F M; Venkatachalam, T K; Erbeck, D; Chen, C L; Petkevich, A S; Vassilev, A

    2005-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and toxicity of Zidampidine, an aryl phosphate derivative of AZT, 3'-azidothymidine-5'-[p-bromophenyl methoxyalaninyl phosphate] were investigated in CD-1 mice. Following iv injection, Zidampidine was rapidly converted to its metabolites Ala-AZT-MP and AZT. Zidampidine was not toxic to mice at doses up to 250mg/kg. We next examined the therapeutic effect of Zidampidine in CBA mice challenged with intracerebral injections of the Josiah strain of Lassa virus. Mice were treated either with vehicle or non-toxic doses of Zidampidine administered intraperitoneally 24h prior, 1h prior, and 24, 48, 72, and 96h after virus inoculation. The probability of survival following the Lassa challenge was significantly improved for Zidampidine-treated mice (Kaplan Meier, Log-Rank p value<0.0001). This pilot study provides the basis for future preclinical evaluation of Zidampidine and its potential as a new agent for the treatment of viral hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa virus. PMID:15809163

  2. Intracellular processing of the Newcastle disease virus fusion glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T.; Ward, L.J.; Semerjian, A.

    1985-03-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (Fo) of Newcastle disease virus is cleaved at an intracellular site into F1 and F2. This result was confirmed by comparing the transit time of the fusion protein to the cell surface with the time course of cleavage of Fo. The time required for cleavage of half of the pulse-labeled Fo protein is ca. 40 min faster than the half time of the transit of the fusion protein to the cell surface. To determine the cell compartment in which cleavage occurs, use was made of inhibitors which block glycoprotein migration at specific points and posttranslational modifications known to occur in specific cell membranes. Cleavage of Fo is inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; thus, cleavage does not occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Monensin blocks the incorporation of Newcastle disease virus glycoproteins into virions and blocks the cleavage of the fusion glycoprotein. However, Fo cannot be radioactively labeled with (/sup 3/H) fucose, whereas F1 is readily labeled. These results argue that cleavage occurs in the trans Golgi membranes or in a cell compartment occupied by glycoproteins quite soon after their transit through the trans Golgi membranes. The implications of the results presented for the transit times of the fusion protein between subcellular organelles are discussed.

  3. Characterization and mapping of a nonessential pseudorabies virus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, M.W.; Wathen, L.M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Antigenic variants of pseudorabies virus (PRV) containing mutations in a viral glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 82,000 (gIII) were isolated by selecting for resistance to a complement-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MCA82-2) directed against gIII. These mutants were completely resistant to neutralization with MCA82-2 in the presence of complement. Two mutants selected for further studies either did not express gIII or expressed an improperly processed form of the glycoproteins. The mutations were also associated with an altered plaque morphology (syncytium formation). The gIII gene was mapped by the marker rescue of a gIII/sup -/ mutant with cloned restriction enzyme fragments to the long unique region of the PRV genome between 0.376 and 0.383 map units. This corresponds to the map location of a glycoprotein described by Robbins et al. Since gIII is nonessential for viral replication in cell culture and has several other characteristics in common with the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC, gIII may represent the PRV equivalent to herpes simplex virus gC.

  4. Mokola virus glycoprotein and chimeric proteins can replace rabies virus glycoprotein in the rescue of infectious defective rabies virus particles.

    PubMed Central

    Mebatsion, T; Schnell, M J; Conzelmann, K K

    1995-01-01

    A reverse genetics approach which allows the generation of infectious defective rabies virus (RV) particles entirely from plasmid-encoded genomes and proteins (K.-K. Conzelmann and M. Schnell, J. Virol. 68:713-719, 1994) was used to investigate the ability of a heterologous lyssavirus glycoprotein (G) and chimeric G constructs to function in the formation of infectious RV-like particles. Virions containing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene (SDI-CAT) were generated in cells simultaneously expressing the genomic RNA analog, the RV N, P, M, and L proteins, and engineered G constructs from transfected plasmids. The infectivity of particles was determined by a CAT assay after passage to helper virus-infected cells. The heterologous G protein from Eth-16 virus (Mokola virus, lyssavirus serotype 3) as well as a construct in which the ectodomain of RV G was fused to the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of the Eth-16 virus G rescued infectious SDI-CAT particles. In contrast, a chimeric protein composed of the amino-terminal half of the Eth-16 virus G and the carboxy-terminal half of RV G failed to produce infectious particles. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to convert the antigenic site III of RV G to the corresponding sequence of Eth-16 G. This chimeric protein rescued infectious SDI-CAT particles as efficiently as RV G. Virions containing the chimeric protein were specifically neutralized by an anti-Eth-16 virus serum and escaped neutralization by a monoclonal antibody directed against RV antigenic site III. The results show that entire structural domains as well as short surface epitopes of lyssavirus G proteins may be exchanged without affecting the structure required to mediate infection of cells. PMID:7853476

  5. A recombinant rabies virus expressing vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein fails to protect against rabies virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Heather D.; McGettigan, James P.; Siler, Catherine A.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the importance of the rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) in protection against rabies, we constructed a recombinant RV (rRV) in which the RV G ecto- and transmembrane domains were replaced with the corresponding regions of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein (rRV-VSV-G). We were able to recover rRV-VSV-G and found that particle production was equal to rRV. However, the budding of the chimeric virus was delayed and infectious titers were reduced 10-fold compared with the parental rRV strain containing RV G. Biochemical analysis showed equal replication rates of both viruses, and similar amounts of wild-type and chimeric G were present in the respective viral particles. Additional studies were performed to determine whether the immune response against rRV-VSV-G was sufficient to protect against rabies. Mice were primed with rRV or rRV-VSV-G and challenged with a pathogenic strain of RV 12 days later. Similar immune responses against the internal viral proteins of both viruses indicated successful infection. All mice receiving the rRV vaccine survived the challenge, whereas immunization with rRV-VSV-G did not induce protection. The results confirm the crucial role of RV G in an RV vaccine. PMID:11114165

  6. Raccoon poxvirus rabies virus glycoprotein recombinant vaccine in sheep.

    PubMed

    DeMartini, J C; Bickle, H M; Brodie, S J; He, B X; Esposito, J J

    1993-01-01

    Twenty sheep were divided into groups and inoculated by various routes with recombinant raccoon poxvirus expressing the CVS rabies virus glycoprotein (rRCNV-G) or with raccoon poxvirus (RCNV). The apparent innocuous pathologic responses to each virus coupled with development of high levels of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies in animals vaccinated with rRCNV-G intradermally or intramuscularly suggested that the recombinant is effective and that RCNV would be a suitable substrate for further development of sheep vaccines. Poor antibody response to rRCNV-G given orally implied that it would be relatively harmless if inadvertently ingested by sheep. Virus transmission between vaccinated and sentinel sheep was not observed or detected serologically. PMID:8240013

  7. Rapid Detection and Quantification of RNA of Ebola and Marburg Viruses, Lassa Virus, Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Rift Valley Fever Virus, Dengue Virus, and Yellow Fever Virus by Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Drosten, Christian; Göttig, Stephan; Schilling, Stefan; Asper, Marcel; Panning, Marcus; Schmitz, Herbert; Günther, Stephan

    2002-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are acute infections with high case fatality rates. Important VHF agents are Ebola and Marburg viruses (MBGV/EBOV), Lassa virus (LASV), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), dengue virus (DENV), and yellow fever virus (YFV). VHFs are clinically difficult to diagnose and to distinguish; a rapid and reliable laboratory diagnosis is required in suspected cases. We have established six one-step, real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays for these pathogens based on the Superscript reverse transcriptase-Platinum Taq polymerase enzyme mixture. Novel primers and/or 5′-nuclease detection probes were designed for RVFV, DENV, YFV, and CCHFV by using the latest DNA database entries. PCR products were detected in real time on a LightCycler instrument by using 5′-nuclease technology (RVFV, DENV, and YFV) or SybrGreen dye intercalation (MBGV/EBOV, LASV, and CCHFV). The inhibitory effect of SybrGreen on reverse transcription was overcome by initial immobilization of the dye in the reaction capillaries. Universal cycling conditions for SybrGreen and 5′-nuclease probe detection were established. Thus, up to three assays could be performed in parallel, facilitating rapid testing for several pathogens. All assays were thoroughly optimized and validated in terms of analytical sensitivity by using in vitro-transcribed RNA. The ≥95% detection limits as determined by probit regression analysis ranged from 1,545 to 2,835 viral genome equivalents/ml of serum (8.6 to 16 RNA copies per assay). The suitability of the assays was exemplified by detection and quantification of viral RNA in serum samples of VHF patients. PMID:12089242

  8. Characterization of the glycoproteins of bat-derived influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Junki; Nao, Naganori; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Maeda, Ken; Ogawa, Hirohito; Yoshida, Reiko; Igarashi, Manabu; Takada, Ayato

    2016-01-15

    Recently found bat-derived influenza viruses (BatIVs) have hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene segments distinct from those of previously known influenza A viruses. However, pathogenicities of these BatIVs remain unknown since infectious virus strains have not been isolated yet. To gain insight into the biological properties of BatIVs, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSVs) pseudotyped with the BatIV HA and NA. We found that VSVs pseudotyped with BatIV HAs and NAs efficiently infected particular bat cell lines but not those derived from primates, and that proteolytic cleavage with a trypsin-like protease was necessary for HA-mediated virus entry. Treatment of the susceptible bat cells with some enzymes and inhibitors revealed that BatIV HAs might recognize some cellular glycoproteins as receptors rather than the sialic acids used for the other known influenza viruses. These data provide fundamental information on the mechanisms underlying the cellular entry and host restriction of BatIVs. PMID:26605499

  9. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented. Both patients developed severe sensorineural hearing loss at acute phases of the infections. Conclusion Sensorineural hearing loss from Lassa fever infections can occur in both acute and convalescent stages and is probably induced by an immune response. PMID:19178735

  10. A fatal case of Lassa fever in London, January 2009.

    PubMed

    Kitching, A; Addiman, S; Cathcart, S; Bischop, L; Krahé, D; Nicholas, M; Coakley, J; Lloyd, G; Brooks, T; Morgan, D; Turbitt, D

    2009-02-12

    In January 2009, the eleventh [corrected] case of Lassa fever imported to the United Kingdom was diagnosed in London. Risk assessment of 328 healthcare contacts with potential direct exposure to Lassa virus - through contact with the case or exposure to bodily fluids - was undertaken. No contacts were assessed to be at high risk of infection and no secondary clinical cases identified. PMID:19215723

  11. Imported Lassa fever--New Jersey, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-10-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral illness caused by Lassa virus, which is hosted by rodents in the Mastomys natalensis species complex and rarely imported to countries outside of those areas in Africa where the disease is endemic. Lassa fever is characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, and chest and abdominal pain. Approximately 15%-20% of patients hospitalized for Lassa fever die from the illness; however, approximately 80% of human infections with Lassa virus are mild or asymptomatic, and 1% of infections overall result in death. On August 28, 2004, a man aged 38 years residing in New Jersey died from Lassa fever after returning from travel to West Africa. This report summarizes the clinical and epidemiologic investigations conducted by federal, state, and local public health agencies. The findings illustrate the need for clinicians and public health officials to remain alert to emerging infectious diseases and to institute appropriate measures to promptly identify and limit spread of unusual pathogens. PMID:15457145

  12. Lassa fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2004-04-01

    Lassa fever remains a serious challenge to public health in West Africa threatening both local residents in rural areas and those who serve them, particularly medical care providers. Given the ecology of the rodent host and conditions in the endemic area, a vaccine is mandatory for control. The challenge is to overcome the scientific, political and economic obstacles to producing a human use vaccine candidate. There are some scientific issues to resolve. It is known that the G-protein confers protection but we do not know its duration. If the N-protein is also included there may be a better duration of protection but it is unclear whether the N-protein as a vaccine may possibly enhance the infection. The original vaccinia vector must be replaced by new vectors, chimeras or by delivering DNA in some format. A live vaccine is attractive because it can confer protection in a single shot. A killed vaccine is more stable, particularly for distribution in the tropics but usually requires repeated shots. For practical reasons a live vaccine format should probably be pursued, which could then be combined with a yellow fever vaccine, using the same cold chains, since this disease occupies the same endemic areas in West Africa. Lassa vaccine initiatives have suffered from a lack of funding in the past but bioterrorism has brought new resources to Lassa virus science. Adequate funding and applications of new vaccine technologies give hope that we may soon see a vaccine in clinical trials. However, the difficulty of conducting trials in endemic areas and lack of political stability remain serious problems. PMID:15056044

  13. [Immune efficacy of rabies virus glycoprotein expressed by baculovirus vector].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Shou-Feng; Liu, Ye; Fu, Yun-Hong; Sun, Cheng-Long; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ting; Song, Fei-Fei; Hu, Rong-Liang

    2012-09-01

    To construct a recombinant baculovirus expressing glycoprotein (GP) of RV SRV9 strain and test the immunological efficacy in mice, open reading frame of rabies virus GP gene of SRV9 strain was cloned into the shuttle vector Bacmid to construct the recombinant shuttle plasmid Bacmid-G and transfection was performed into S f9 cells with the recombinant shuttle plasmid. CPE appeared in cell cultures was identified by electronmicroscopy. Western-blot, IFA and immunity tests in mice were performed to identify the immunoreactivity and immunogenicity of the expression products. Our results showed a recombinant baculovirus expressing GP protein of rabies virus SRV9 was obtained. The expression products possessed a favorable immunogenicity and fall immunized mice could develop 100% protective level of anti-rabies neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, The SRV9 glycoprotein expressed by the recombinant baculovirus in this study had good immunogenicity and could induce anti-rabies neutralizing antibody, which laid the foundation of further development of rabies subunit vaccine. PMID:23233923

  14. Antibodies Targeting Novel Neutralizing Epitopes of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein Preclude Genotype 2 Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Huiying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianghua; Xie, Xingwang; Wei, Lai

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no effective vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, partly due to our insufficient understanding of the virus glycoprotein immunology. Most neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were identified using glycoprotein immunogens, such as recombinant E1E2, HCV pseudoparticles or cell culture derived HCV. However, the fact that in the HCV acute infection phase, only a small proportion of patients are self-resolved accompanied with the emergence of nAbs, indicates the limited immunogenicity of glycoprotein itself to induce effective antibodies against a highly evolved virus. Secondly, in previous reports, the immunogen sequence was mostly the genotype of the 1a H77 strain. Rarely, other genotypes/subtypes have been studied, although theoretically one genotype/subtype immunogen is able to induce cross-genotype neutralizing antibodies. To overcome these drawbacks and find potential novel neutralizing epitopes, 57 overlapping peptides encompassing the full-length glycoprotein E1E2 of subtype 1b were synthesized to immunize BALB/c mice, and the neutralizing reactive of the induced antisera against HCVpp genotypes 1–6 was determined. We defined a domain comprising amino acids (aa) 192–221, 232–251, 262–281 and 292–331 of E1, and 421–543, 564–583, 594–618 and 634–673 of E2, as the neutralizing regions of HCV glycoprotein. Peptides PUHI26 (aa 444–463) and PUHI45 (aa 604–618)-induced antisera displayed the most potent broad neutralizing reactive. Two monoclonal antibodies recognizing the PUHI26 and PUHI45 epitopes efficiently precluded genotype 2 viral (HCVcc JFH and J6 strains) infection, but they did not neutralize other genotypes. Our study mapped a neutralizing epitope region of HCV glycoprotein using a novel immunization strategy, and identified two monoclonal antibodies effective in preventing genotype 2 virus infection. PMID:26406225

  15. Antibodies Targeting Novel Neutralizing Epitopes of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein Preclude Genotype 2 Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Liu, Ruyu; Rao, Huiying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianghua; Xie, Xingwang; Wei, Lai

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no effective vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, partly due to our insufficient understanding of the virus glycoprotein immunology. Most neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were identified using glycoprotein immunogens, such as recombinant E1E2, HCV pseudoparticles or cell culture derived HCV. However, the fact that in the HCV acute infection phase, only a small proportion of patients are self-resolved accompanied with the emergence of nAbs, indicates the limited immunogenicity of glycoprotein itself to induce effective antibodies against a highly evolved virus. Secondly, in previous reports, the immunogen sequence was mostly the genotype of the 1a H77 strain. Rarely, other genotypes/subtypes have been studied, although theoretically one genotype/subtype immunogen is able to induce cross-genotype neutralizing antibodies. To overcome these drawbacks and find potential novel neutralizing epitopes, 57 overlapping peptides encompassing the full-length glycoprotein E1E2 of subtype 1b were synthesized to immunize BALB/c mice, and the neutralizing reactive of the induced antisera against HCVpp genotypes 1-6 was determined. We defined a domain comprising amino acids (aa) 192-221, 232-251, 262-281 and 292-331 of E1, and 421-543, 564-583, 594-618 and 634-673 of E2, as the neutralizing regions of HCV glycoprotein. Peptides PUHI26 (aa 444-463) and PUHI45 (aa 604-618)-induced antisera displayed the most potent broad neutralizing reactive. Two monoclonal antibodies recognizing the PUHI26 and PUHI45 epitopes efficiently precluded genotype 2 viral (HCVcc JFH and J6 strains) infection, but they did not neutralize other genotypes. Our study mapped a neutralizing epitope region of HCV glycoprotein using a novel immunization strategy, and identified two monoclonal antibodies effective in preventing genotype 2 virus infection. PMID:26406225

  16. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals. PMID:25764477

  17. Characterization of pseudorabies virus glycoprotein B expressed by canine herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Y; Xuan, X; Kimura, M; Otsuka, H

    1999-10-01

    A recombinant canine herpesvirus (CHV) which expressed glycoprotein B (gB) of pseudorabies virus (PrV) was constructed. The antigenicity of the PrV gB expressed by the recombinant CHV is similar to that of the native PrV. The expressed PrV gB was shown to be transported to the surface of infected cells as judged by an indirected immunofluorescence test. Antibodies raised in mice immunized with the recombinant CHV neutralized the infectivity of PrV in vitro. It is known that the authentic PrV gB exists as a glycoprotein complex, which consists of gBa, gBb and gBc. In MDCK cells, PrV gB expressed by the recombinant CHV was processed like authentic PrV gB, suggesting that the cleavage mechanism of PrV gB depends on a functional cleavage domain from PrV gB gene and protease from infected cells. PMID:10563288

  18. Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Prevents Latent Herpes in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Kenneth J.; Mackett, Michael; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis; Moss, Bernard

    1985-05-01

    In humans, herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection and then often a latent ganglionic infection that persists for life. Because these latent infections can recur periodically, vaccines are needed that can protect against both primary and latent herpes simplex infections. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D gene under control of defined early or late vaccinia virus promoters were constructed. Tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses synthesized a glycosylated protein that had the same mass (60,000 daltons) as the glycoprotein D produced by HSV-1. Immunization of mice with one of these recombinant viruses by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal routes resulted in the production of antibodies that neutralized HSV-1 and protected the mice against subsequent lethal challenge with HSV-1 or HSV-2. Immunization with the recombinant virus also protected the majority of the mice against the development of a latent HSV-1 infection of the trigeminal ganglia. This is the first demonstration that a genetically engineered vaccine can prevent the development of latency.

  19. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Nieusma, Travis; Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Cogburn, Kristin E.; Hua, Yuanzi; Dai, Xiaoping; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun

    2014-08-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a Hepacivirus, is a major cause of viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 mediate fusion and entry into host cells and are the primary targets of the humoral immune response. The crystal structure of the E2 core bound to broadly neutralizing antibody AR3C at 2.65 angstroms reveals a compact architecture composed of a central immunoglobulin-fold β sandwich flanked by two additional protein layers. The CD81 receptor binding site was identified by electron microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis and overlaps with the AR3C epitope. The x-ray and electron microscopy E2 structures differ markedly from predictions of an extended, three-domain, class II fusion protein fold and therefore provide valuable information for HCV drug and vaccine design.

  20. Antibody Derived Peptides for Detection of Ebola Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    López-Pacheco, Felipe; Pérez-Chavarría, Roberto; González-Vázquez, Juan Carlos; González-González, Everardo; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Ponce-Ponce de León, César Alejandro; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Background Current Ebola virus (EBOV) detection methods are costly and impractical for epidemic scenarios. Different immune-based assays have been reported for the detection and quantification of Ebola virus (EBOV) proteins. In particular, several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been described that bind the capsid glycoprotein (GP) of EBOV GP. However, the currently available platforms for the design and production of full-length mAbs are cumbersome and costly. The use of antibody fragments, rather than full-length antibodies, might represent a cost-effective alternative for the development of diagnostic and possibly even therapeutic alternatives for EBOV. Methods/Principal Findings We report the design and expression of three recombinant anti-GP mAb fragments in Escherichia coli cultures. These fragments contained the heavy and light variable portions of the three well-studied anti-GP full-length mAbs 13C6, 13F6, and KZ52, and are consequently named scFv-13C6, scFv-13F6, and Fab-KZ52, respectively. All three fragments exhibited specific anti-GP binding activity in ELISA experiments comparable to that of full-length anti-GP antibodies (i.e., the same order of magnitude) and they are easily and economically produced in bacterial cultures. Conclusion/Significance Antibody fragments might represent a useful, effective, and low cost alternative to full-length antibodies in Ebola related capture and diagnostics applications. PMID:26489048

  1. Synonymous codon usage pattern in glycoprotein gene of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Morla, Sudhir; Makhija, Aditi; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-06-10

    Rabies virus (RABV) is the causative agent of a fatal nervous system ailment. The disease is zoonotic and prevalent in many developing countries. The glycoprotein (G) of RABV is the major antigenic determinant of the virus and plays a pivotal role in its neurovirulence. Various aspects of 'G' protein biology have been explored, but the factors affecting the nucleotide choice and synonymous codon usage have never been reported. In the present study, we have analyzed the relative synonymous codon usage and effective number of codons (Nc) using 132 'G' protein genes of RABV. Corresponding analysis was used to calculate major trends in codon usage. The correlation between base composition and codon usage as well as the plot between Nc and GC3 suggest that mutational pressure is the major factor that influences the codon usage in the G gene of RABV. In addition, factors like aromaticity, aliphatic index and hydropathy have shown slight correlation suggesting that natural selection also contributes to the codon usage variations of the 'G' gene. In conclusion, codon usage bias in 'G' gene of RABV is mainly by mutational pressure and natural selection. PMID:26945626

  2. Development of Recombinant Newcastle Disease Viruses Expressing the Glycoprotein (G) of Avian Metapneumovirus as Bivalent Vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using reverse genetics technology, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota strain-based recombinant viruses were engineered to express the glycoprotein (G) of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), subtype A, B or C, as bivalent vaccines. These recombinant viruses were slightly attenuated in vivo, yet maintaine...

  3. The Lassa fever virus L gene: nucleotide sequence, comparison, and precipitation of a predicted 250 kDa protein with monospecific antiserum

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Shapiro, Keli; Sanchez, Anthony; Ravkov, Eugene; Nichol, Stuart T.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2008-01-01

    The large (L) RNA segment of Lassa fever virus (LAS) encodes a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp or L protein). Similar to other arenaviruses, the LAS L protein is encoded on the genome-complementary strand and is predicted to be 2218 amino acids in length (253 kDa). It has an unusually large non-coding region adjacent to its translation start site. The LAS L protein contains six motifs of conserved amino acids that have been found among arenavirus L proteins and core RdRp of other segmented negative-stranded (SNS) viruses (Arena-, Bunya- and Orthomyxoviridae). Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRp of 20 SNS viruses reveals that arenavirus L proteins represent a distinct cluster divided into LAS–lymphocytic choriomeningitis and Tacaribe–Pichinde virus lineages. Monospecific serum against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the most conserved central domain precipitates a 250 kDa product from LAS and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected cells. PMID:9049403

  4. Resolution of two surface glycoproteins from human parainfluenza-3 virus by crossed immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holling, R A; Guskey, L E

    1984-07-01

    The technique of two-dimensional crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) was used to resolve two glycoproteins from purified human parainfluenza type 3 virus. Virus preparations were extracted with Triton X-100 and fractionated by centrifugation in a Beckman airfuge. Two immunoprecipitates were detected by CIE in the supernatant fractions, but were not found in the pellets from extracted virus. Viral glycoproteins labeled with [35S]methionine were isolated by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A (Con A) agarose columns, resolved by CIE and detected by autoradiography. Resolution of two glycoprotein peaks from as little as 4.5 micrograms of protein from extracted virus is consistent with results from polyacrylamide gel patterns showing two unique glycoproteins with molecular weights of 48 kd and 65 kd. PMID:6088566

  5. Recombinant Measles Virus Vaccine Expressing the Nipah Virus Glycoprotein Protects against Lethal Nipah Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Misako; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Ikeda, Fusako; Ishii, Miho; Nagata, Noriyo; Jacquot, Frederic; Raoul, Hervé; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV) vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G). Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi). Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans. PMID:23516477

  6. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Misako; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Ikeda, Fusako; Ishii, Miho; Nagata, Noriyo; Jacquot, Frederic; Raoul, Hervé; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV) vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G). Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi). Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans. PMID:23516477

  7. Identification and antigenicity of the major envelope glycoprotein of lymphadenopathy-associated virus

    SciTech Connect

    Montagnier, L.; Clavel, F.; Krust, B.; Chamaret, S.; Rey, F.; Barre-Sinoussi, F.; Chermann, J.C.

    1985-07-15

    The major envelope glycoprotein of the causative agent of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV) has been identified and characterized. The glycoprotein has an apparent molecular weight of 110,000-120,000 under denaturing conditions in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Upon deglycosylation by a specific endoglycosydase, its size is reduced to 80,000. Cellular precursors of this glycoprotein have been detected with apparent molecular weight of 150,000 and 135,000. Nearly all AIDS and pre-AIDS patients have detectable antibodies against this viral glycoprotein.

  8. Use of lambdagt11 to isolate genes for two pseudorabies virus glycoproteins with homology to herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovskis, E.A.; Timmins, J.G.; Post, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    A library of pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA fragments was constructed in the expression cloning vector lambdagt11. The library was screened with antisera which reacted with mixtures of PRV proteins to isolate recombinant bacteriophages expressing PRV proteins. By the nature of the lambdagt11 vector, the cloned proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli as ..beta..-galactosidase fusion proteins. The fusion proteins from 35 of these phages were purified and injected into mice to raise antisera. The antisera were screened by several different assays, including immunoprecipitation of (/sup 14/C)glucosamine-labeled PRV proteins. This method identified phages expressing three different PRV glycoproteins: the secreted glycoprotein, gX; gI; and a glycoprotein that had not been previously identified, which we designate gp63. The gp63 and gI genes map adjacent to each other in the small unique region of the PRV genome. The DNA sequence was determined for the region of the genome encoding gp63 and gI. It was found that gp63 has a region of homology with a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) protein, encoded by US7, and also with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gpIV. The gI protein sequence has a region of homology with HSV-1 gE and VZV gpI. It is concluded that PRV, HSV, and VZV all have a cluster of homologous glycoprotein genes in the small unique components of their genomes and that the organization of these genes is conserved.

  9. Vesicular stomatitis virus with the rabies virus glycoprotein directs retrograde transsynaptic transport among neurons in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Kevin T.; Saunders, Arpiar B.; Oldenburg, Ian A.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.; Cepko, Constance L.

    2012-01-01

    Defining the connections among neurons is critical to our understanding of the structure and function of the nervous system. Recombinant viruses engineered to transmit across synapses provide a powerful approach for the dissection of neuronal circuitry in vivo. We recently demonstrated that recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) can be endowed with anterograde or retrograde transsynaptic tracing ability by providing the virus with different glycoproteins. Here we extend the characterization of the transmission and gene expression of recombinant VSV (rVSV) with the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G), and provide examples of its activity relative to the anterograde transsynaptic tracer form of rVSV. rVSV with RABV-G was found to drive strong expression of transgenes and to spread rapidly from neuron to neuron in only a retrograde manner. Depending upon how the RABV-G was delivered, VSV served as a polysynaptic or monosynaptic tracer, or was able to define projections through axonal uptake and retrograde transport. In animals co-infected with rVSV in its anterograde form, rVSV with RABV-G could be used to begin to characterize the similarities and differences in connections to different areas. rVSV with RABV-G provides a flexible, rapid, and versatile tracing tool that complements the previously described VSV-based anterograde transsynaptic tracer. PMID:23403489

  10. Toremifene interacts with and destabilizes the Ebola virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuguang; Ren, Jingshan; Harlos, Karl; Jones, Daniel M; Zeltina, Antra; Bowden, Thomas A; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I

    2016-07-01

    Ebola viruses (EBOVs) are responsible for repeated outbreaks of fatal infections, including the recent deadly epidemic in West Africa. There are currently no approved therapeutic drugs or vaccines for the disease. EBOV has a membrane envelope decorated by trimers of a glycoprotein (GP, cleaved by furin to form GP1 and GP2 subunits), which is solely responsible for host cell attachment, endosomal entry and membrane fusion. GP is thus a primary target for the development of antiviral drugs. Here we report the first, to our knowledge, unliganded structure of EBOV GP, and high-resolution complexes of GP with the anticancer drug toremifene and the painkiller ibuprofen. The high-resolution apo structure gives a more complete and accurate picture of the molecule, and allows conformational changes introduced by antibody and receptor binding to be deciphered. Unexpectedly, both toremifene and ibuprofen bind in a cavity between the attachment (GP1) and fusion (GP2) subunits at the entrance to a large tunnel that links with equivalent tunnels from the other monomers of the trimer at the three-fold axis. Protein–drug interactions with both GP1 and GP2 are predominately hydrophobic. Residues lining the binding site are highly conserved among filoviruses except Marburg virus (MARV), suggesting that MARV may not bind these drugs. Thermal shift assays show up to a 14 °C decrease in the protein melting temperature after toremifene binding, while ibuprofen has only a marginal effect and is a less potent inhibitor. These results suggest that inhibitor binding destabilizes GP and triggers premature release of GP2, thereby preventing fusion between the viral and endosome membranes. Thus, these complex structures reveal the mechanism of inhibition and may guide the development of more powerful anti-EBOV drugs. PMID:27362232

  11. Interactome analysis of herpes simplex virus 1 envelope glycoprotein H.

    PubMed

    Hirohata, Yoshitaka; Kato, Akihisa; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Koyanagi, Naoto; Arii, Jun; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2015-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) envelope glycoprotein H (gH) is important for viral entry into cells and nuclear egress of nucleocapsids. To clarify additional novel roles of gH during HSV-1 replication, host cell proteins that interact with gH were screened for by tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics in 293T cells transiently expressing gH. This screen identified 123 host cell proteins as potential gH interactors. Of these proteins, general control nonderepressive-1 (GCN1), a trans-acting positive effector of GCN2 kinase that regulates phosphorylation of the α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), was subsequently confirmed to interact with gH in HSV-1-infected cells. eIF2α phosphorylation is known to downregulate protein synthesis, and various viruses have evolved mechanisms to prevent the accumulation of phosphorylated eIF2α in infected cells. Here, it was shown that GCN1 knockdown reduces phosphorylation of eIF2α in HSV-1-infected cells and that the gH-null mutation increases eIF2α in HSV-1-infected cells, whereas gH overexpression in the absence of other HSV-1 proteins reduces eIF2α phosphorylation. These findings suggest that GCN1 can regulate eIF2α phosphorylation in HSV-1-infected cells and that the GCN1-binding viral partner gH is necessary and sufficient to prevent the accumulation of phosphorylated eIF2α. Our database of 123 host cell proteins potentially interacting with gH will be useful for future studies aimed at unveiling further novel functions of gH and the roles of cellular proteins in HSV-1-infected cells. PMID:25808324

  12. Purification and structural characterization of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, G.E.; Baker, S.A.; Merajver, S.D.; Coligan, J.E.; Levine, M.; Glorioso, J.C.; Nairn, R.

    1987-01-27

    Purification of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C (gC) in microgram amounts yielded sufficient material for an analysis of its secondary structure. Purification was facilitated by using the mutant virus gC-3, which bears a point mutation that interrupts the putative hydrophobic membrane anchor sequence, causing the secretion of gC-3 protein into the cell culture medium. gC-3 protein was purified by size fractionation of concentrated culture medium from infected cells on a gel filtration column of Sephacryl S-200, followed by immunoaffinity chromatography on a column constructed of gC-specific monoclonal antibodies cross-linked to a protein A-Sepharose CL-4B matrix. Purified gC-3 had a molecular weight of 130,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the size expected for gC, was reactive with gC-specific monoclonal antibodies in protein immunoblots, and contained amino acid sequences characteristic of gC as determined by radiochemical amino acid microsequence analyses. Polyclonal antisera obtained from a rabbit immunized with gC-3 reacted with wild-type gC in immunoprecipitation, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoelectroblot (western blot) assays. Deglycosylation by treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid reduced the molecular weight of gC-3 by approximately 35%. Analyses of both native and deglycosylated gC-3 by Raman spectroscopy showed that the native molecule consists of about 17%..cap alpha..-helix, 24% ..beta..-sheet, and 60% disordered secondary structures, whereas deglycosylated gC-3 consists of about 8% ..cap alpha..-helix, 10% ..beta..-sheet, 81% disordered structures. These data were in good agreement with the 11% ..cap alpha..-helix, 18% ..beta..-sheet, 61% ..beta..-turn, and 9% disordered structures calculated from Chou-Fasman analysis of the primary sequence of gC-3.

  13. Immunogenicity of varicella zoster virus glycoprotein E DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    BAO, LIDAO; WEI, GUOMIN; GAN, HONGMEI; REN, XIANHUA; MA, RUILIAN; WANG, YI; LV, HAIJUN

    2016-01-01

    In the present study a eukaryotic expression vector of varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein E (gE) was constructed and enabled to express in COS7 cells. Furthermore, a specific immune response against the VZV gE eukaryotic expression plasmid was induced in BALB/c mice. The VZV gE gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector, pcDNA3.1. The recombinant vector was subsequently transfected into COS7 cells using a liposome transfection reagent. The recombinant protein was instantaneously expressed by the transfected cells, as detected by immunohistochemistry, and the recombinant pcDNA-VZV gE plasmid was subsequently used to immunize mice. Tissue expression levels were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. In addition, the levels of serum antibodies and spleen lymphocyte proliferation activity were investigated. The amplified target gene included the full-length gE gene (~2.7 kb), and the recombinant expression vector induced gE expression in COS7 cells. In addition, the expression plasmid induced sustained expression in vivo following immunization of mice. Furthermore, the plasmid was capable of inducing specific antibody production and effectively stimulating T cell proliferation. Effective humoral and cellular immunity was triggered in the mice immunized with the VZV gE eukaryotic expression vector. The results of the present study laid the foundation for future research into a VZV DNA vaccine. PMID:27168804

  14. Seroreactive recombinant herpes simplex virus type 2-specific glycoprotein G.

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, D L; Smith, C M; Rose, J M; Brandis, J; Coates, S R

    1991-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genome codes for an envelope protein, glycoprotein G (gG), which contains predominantly type 2-specific epitopes. A portion of this gG gene has been expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. Expression was regulated by a lambda phage pL promoter. The 60,000-molecular-weight recombinant protein was purified by ion-exchange chromatography. Amino acid sequence analysis confirmed the N terminus of the purified protein. Mice immunized with recombinant gG developed antibodies reactive with native HSV-2 protein, but not with HSV-1 protein, in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. The serological activity of this purified recombinant gG protein was evaluated by immunoblot assay. This protein was reactive with an HSV-2 gG monoclonal antibody. It was also reactive with HSV-2 rabbit antiserum but not with HSV-1 rabbit antiserum. Of 15 patient serum samples known to have antibody to HSV-2, 14 were reactive with this recombinant type 2-specific gG protein, and none of 15 HSV antibody-negative patient serum samples showed reactivity. In agreement with the expected prevalence of HSV-2 infection, 27.6% of 134 serum samples from random normal individuals had antibodies reactive with recombinant gG. This recombinant gG protein may be of value in detecting HSV-2-specific antibody responses in patients infected with HSV-2. Images PMID:1653787

  15. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mary Ellen; Koser, Martin; Xiao Sa; Siler, Catherine; McGettigan, James P.; Calkins, Catherine; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J. . E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu

    2006-09-30

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems.

  16. Molecular optimization of rabies virus glycoprotein expression in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Ben Azoun, Safa; Belhaj, Aicha Eya; Göngrich, Rebecca; Gasser, Brigitte; Kallel, Héla

    2016-05-01

    In this work, different approaches were investigated to enhance the expression rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) in the yeast Pichia pastoris; this membrane protein is responsible for the synthesis of rabies neutralizing antibodies. First, the impact of synonymous codon usage bias was examined and an optimized RABV-G gene was synthesized. Nevertheless, data showed that the secretion of the optimized RABV-G gene was not tremendously increased as compared with the non-optimized one. In addition, similar levels of RABV-G were obtained when α-factor mating factor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the acid phosphatase PHO1 was used as a secretion signal. Therefore, sequence optimization and secretion signal were not the major bottlenecks for high-level expression of RABV-G in P. pastoris. Unfolded protein response (UPR) was induced in clones containing high copy number of RABV-G expression cassette indicating that folding was the limiting step for RABV-G secretion. To circumvent this limitation, co-overexpression of five factors involved in oxidative protein folding was investigated. Among these factors only PDI1, ERO1 and GPX1 proved their benefit to enhance the expression. The highest expression level of RABV-G reached 1230 ng ml(-1) . Competitive neutralizing assay confirmed that the recombinant protein was produced in the correct conformational form in this host. PMID:26880068

  17. Vaccinia recombinant virus expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein: safety and efficacy trials in Canadian wildlife.

    PubMed

    Artois, M; Charlton, K M; Tolson, N D; Casey, G A; Knowles, M K; Campbell, J B

    1990-10-01

    Twenty-six meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), ten woodchucks (Marmota monax), thirteen grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), thirteen ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis), six red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and eight great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) received vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (V-RG) by direct instillation into the oral cavity. Each of ten coyotes (Canis latrans) received the virus in two vaccine-laden baits. Several voles and most of the gulls died from diseases unrelated to vaccination during the observation period, but all other animals remained healthy and survived. These deaths from causes other than vaccination and the absence of any lesions suggestive of vaccinia infection indicate that it is unlikely that any animal suffered or died as a result of V-RG administration. In addition several animals showed an unexpected high level of rabies neutralizing antibodies. PMID:2249183

  18. Vaccinia recombinant virus expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein: safety and efficacy trials in Canadian wildlife.

    PubMed Central

    Artois, M; Charlton, K M; Tolson, N D; Casey, G A; Knowles, M K; Campbell, J B

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-six meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus), ten woodchucks (Marmota monax), thirteen grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), thirteen ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis), six red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and eight great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) received vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (V-RG) by direct instillation into the oral cavity. Each of ten coyotes (Canis latrans) received the virus in two vaccine-laden baits. Several voles and most of the gulls died from diseases unrelated to vaccination during the observation period, but all other animals remained healthy and survived. These deaths from causes other than vaccination and the absence of any lesions suggestive of vaccinia infection indicate that it is unlikely that any animal suffered or died as a result of V-RG administration. In addition several animals showed an unexpected high level of rabies neutralizing antibodies. PMID:2249183

  19. Expression and characterization of glycophospholipid-anchored human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, K; Johnston, P B; Roberts, S J; Dubay, J W; Hunter, E

    1993-01-01

    Four chimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env genes were constructed which encoded the extracellular domain of either the wild-type or a cleavage-defective HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp160) fused at one of two different positions in env to a C-terminal glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) attachment signal from the mouse Thy-1.1 glycoprotein. All four of the constructs encoded glycoproteins that were efficiently expressed when Rev was supplied in trans, and the two cleavable forms were processed normally to gp120 and a chimeric "gp41." The chimeric glycoproteins, in contrast to the wild-type glycoprotein, could be cleaved from the surface of transfected cells by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, indicating that they were anchored in the plasma membrane by a GPI moiety. These GPI-anchored glycoproteins were transported intracellularly at a rate only slightly lower than that of the full-length HIV-1 glycoprotein and were present on the cell surface in equivalent amounts. Nevertheless, all four glycoproteins were defective in mediating both cell-cell and virus-cell fusion as determined by syncytium formation in COS-1-HeLa-T4 cell mixtures and trans complementation of an env-defective HIV-1 genome. Images PMID:8102410

  20. A Single gD Glycoprotein Can Mediate Infection by Herpes simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses display hundreds of gD glycoproteins, and yet their neutralization requires tens of thousands of antibodies per virion, leading us to ask whether a wild-type virion with just a single free gD is still infective. By quantitative analysis of fluorescently labeled virus particles and virus neutralization assays, we show that entry of a wild-type HSV virion to a cell does indeed require just one or two of the approximately 300 gD glycoproteins to be left unbound by monoclonal antibody. This indicates that HSV entry is an extraordinarily efficient process, functioning at the level of single molecular complexes. PMID:23837576

  1. Lassa fever in West Africa: evidence for an expanded region of endemicity.

    PubMed

    Sogoba, N; Feldmann, H; Safronetz, D

    2012-09-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia (known as the Mano River region) and Nigeria and Lassa fever cases from these countries are being reported annually. Recent investigations have found evidence for an expanded endemicity zone between the two known Lassa endemic regions indicating that LASV is more widely distributed throughout the Tropical Wooded Savanna ecozone in West Africa. PMID:22958249

  2. The rabies virus glycoprotein determines the distribution of different rabies virus strains in the brain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiuzhen; Mohankumar, Puliyur S; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthies J; Fu, Zhen F

    2002-08-01

    The contribution of rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) in viral distribution in the brain was examined by immunohistochemistry following stereotaxic inoculation into the rat hippocampus. Viruses used in this study include the highly neuroinvasive challenge virus standard strains (CVS-N2C and CVS-B2C) and the nonneuroinvasive attenuated SN-10 strain, as well as SN-10-derived recombinant viruses expressing the G gene from CVS-N2C (RN2C) or CVS-B2C (RB2C). The distribution of recombinant viruses in the brain was similar to those of the parental viruses from which the G was derived. For example, while CVS-B2C- and RB2C-infected neurons were seen preferentially in the hippocampus, cortex, and hypothalamus, CVS-N2C- and RN2C-infected neurons were preferentially found in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus. SN-10 infected efficiently almost all the brain regions. To further study the role of the RV G in virus spreading, we examined the distribution of RV antigen in brains infected with a recombinant RV in which the SN-10 G was replaced with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G (SN-10-VG) was examined. The spreading of SN-10-VG to the cortex and the thalamus was drastically reduced, but the number of infected neurons in hippocampus and hypothalamus, particularly the paraventricular nucleus, was similar to the SN-10 virus. This pattern of spreading resembles that of VSV. Together, our data demonstrate that it is the G protein that determines the distribution pattern of RV in the brain. PMID:12161819

  3. A Recombinant Hendra Virus G Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Protects Nonhuman Primates against Hendra Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mire, Chad E.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Agans, Krystle N.; Feng, Yan-Ru; Fenton, Karla A.; Bossart, Katharine N.; Yan, Lianying; Chan, Yee-Peng; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic emerging virus belonging to the family Paramyxoviridae. HeV causes severe and often fatal respiratory and/or neurologic disease in both animals and humans. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral drugs approved for human use. A number of animal models have been developed for studying HeV infection, with the African green monkey (AGM) appearing to most faithfully reproduce the human disease. Here, we assessed the utility of a newly developed recombinant subunit vaccine based on the HeV attachment (G) glycoprotein in the AGM model. Four AGMs were vaccinated with two doses of the HeV vaccine (sGHeV) containing Alhydrogel, four AGMs received the sGHeV with Alhydrogel and CpG, and four control animals did not receive the sGHeV vaccine. Animals were challenged with a high dose of infectious HeV 21 days after the boost vaccination. None of the eight specifically vaccinated animals showed any evidence of clinical illness and survived the challenge. All four controls became severely ill with symptoms consistent with HeV infection, and three of the four animals succumbed 8 days after exposure. Success of the recombinant subunit vaccine in AGMs provides pivotal data in supporting its further preclinical development for potential human use. IMPORTANCE A Hendra virus attachment (G) glycoprotein subunit vaccine was tested in nonhuman primates to assess its ability to protect them from a lethal infection with Hendra virus. It was found that all vaccinated African green monkeys were completely protected against subsequent Hendra virus infection and disease. The success of this new subunit vaccine in nonhuman primates provides critical data in support of its further development for future human use. PMID:24522928

  4. HSV-1 Glycoproteins Are Delivered to Virus Assembly Sites Through Dynamin-Dependent Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Albecka, Anna; Laine, Romain F; Janssen, Anne F J; Kaminski, Clemens F; Crump, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a large enveloped DNA virus that belongs to the family of Herpesviridae. It has been recently shown that the cytoplasmic membranes that wrap the newly assembled capsids are endocytic compartments derived from the plasma membrane. Here, we show that dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a major role in this process. Dominant-negative dynamin and clathrin adaptor AP180 significantly decrease virus production. Moreover, inhibitors targeting dynamin and clathrin lead to a decreased transport of glycoproteins to cytoplasmic capsids, confirming that glycoproteins are delivered to assembly sites via endocytosis. We also show that certain combinations of glycoproteins colocalize with each other and with the components of clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytosis pathways. Importantly, we demonstrate that the uptake of neutralizing antibodies that bind to glycoproteins when they become exposed on the cell surface during virus particle assembly leads to the production of non-infectious HSV-1. Our results demonstrate that transport of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane prior to endocytosis is the major route by which these proteins are localized to the cytoplasmic virus assembly compartments. This highlights the importance of endocytosis as a major protein-sorting event during HSV-1 envelopment. PMID:26459807

  5. Mutating Conserved Cysteines in the Alphavirus E2 Glycoprotein Causes Virus-Specific Assembly Defects

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Anthony J.; Sokoloski, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    There are 80 trimeric, glycoprotein spikes that cover the surface of an alphavirus particle. The spikes, which are composed of three E2 and E1 glycoprotein heterodimers, are responsible for receptor binding and mediating fusion between the viral and host-cell membranes during entry. In addition, the cytoplasmic domain of E2 interacts with the nucleocapsid core during the last stages of particle assembly, possibly to aid in particle stability. During assembly, the spikes are nonfusogenic until the E3 glycoprotein is cleaved from E2 in the trans-Golgi network. Thus, a mutation in E2 potentially has effects on virus entry, spike assembly, or spike maturation. E2 is a highly conserved, cysteine-rich transmembrane glycoprotein. We made single cysteine-to-serine mutations within two distinct regions of the E2 ectodomain in both Sindbis virus and Ross River virus. Each of the E2 Cys mutants produced fewer infectious particles than wild-type virus. Further characterization of the mutant viruses revealed differences in particle morphology, fusion activity, and polyprotein cleavage between Sindbis and Ross River virus mutants, despite the mutations being made at corresponding positions in E2. The nonconserved assembly defects suggest that E2 folding and function is species dependent, possibly due to interactions with a virus-specific chaperone. PMID:22238319

  6. Early diagnosis of Lassa fever by reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Demby, A H; Chamberlain, J; Brown, D W; Clegg, C S

    1994-01-01

    We developed a method based on a coupled reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for the detection of Lassa virus using primers specific for regions of the S RNA segment which are well conserved between isolates from Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria. The specificity of the assay was confirmed by Southern blotting with a chemiluminescent probe. The assay was able to detect 1 to 10 copies of a plasmid or an RNA transcript containing the target sequence. There was complete concordance between RT-PCR and virus culture for the detection of Lassa virus in a set of 29 positive and 32 negative serum samples obtained on admission to the hospital from patients suspected of having Lassa fever in Sierra Leone. Specificity was confirmed by the failure of amplification of specific products from serum samples collected from 129 healthy blood donors in Sierra Leone or from tissue culture supernatants from cells infected with related arenaviruses (Mopeia, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Tacaribe, and Pichinde viruses). Sequential serum samples from 29 hospitalized patients confirmed to have Lassa fever were tested by RT-PCR and for Lassa virus-specific antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IF). RT-PCR detected virus RNA in 79% of the patients at the time of admission, comparing favorably with IF, which detected antibodies in only 21% of the patients. Lassa virus RNA was detected by RT-PCR in all 29 patients by the third day of admission, whereas antibody was detectable by IF in only 52% of the patients. These results point to an important role for RT-PCR in the management of suspected cases of Lassa fever. Images PMID:7883875

  7. Rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein expression levels are not critical for pathogenicity of RV.

    PubMed

    Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J

    2011-01-01

    Previous comparisons of different rabies virus (RV) strains suggested an inverse relationship between pathogenicity and the amount of glycoprotein produced in infected cells. In order to provide more insight into this relationship, we pursued an experimental approach that allowed us to alter the glycoprotein expression level without altering the glycoprotein sequence, thereby eliminating the contribution of amino acid changes to differences in viral virulence. To this end, we constructed an infectious clone of the highly pathogenic rabies virus strain CVS-N2c and replaced its cognate glycoprotein gene with synthetic versions in which silent mutations were introduced to replace wild-type codons with the most or least frequently used synonymous codons. A recombinant N2c variant containing the fully codon-optimized G gene and three variants carrying a partially codon-deoptimized G gene were recovered on mouse neuroblastoma cells and shown to express 2- to 3-fold more and less glycoprotein, respectively, than wild-type N2c. Pathogenicity studies in mice revealed the WT-N2c virus to be the most pathogenic strain. Variants containing partially codon-deoptimized glycoprotein genes or the codon-optimized gene were less pathogenic than WT-N2c but still caused significant mortality. We conclude that the expression level of the glycoprotein gene does have an impact on pathogenicity but is not a dominant factor that determines pathogenicity. Thus, strategies such as changes in codon usage that aim solely at altering the expression level of the glycoprotein gene do not suffice to render a pathogenic rabies virus apathogenic and are not a viable and safe approach for attenuation of a pathogenic strain. PMID:21068252

  8. Rabies Virus (RV) Glycoprotein Expression Levels Are Not Critical for Pathogenicity of RV▿

    PubMed Central

    Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous comparisons of different rabies virus (RV) strains suggested an inverse relationship between pathogenicity and the amount of glycoprotein produced in infected cells. In order to provide more insight into this relationship, we pursued an experimental approach that allowed us to alter the glycoprotein expression level without altering the glycoprotein sequence, thereby eliminating the contribution of amino acid changes to differences in viral virulence. To this end, we constructed an infectious clone of the highly pathogenic rabies virus strain CVS-N2c and replaced its cognate glycoprotein gene with synthetic versions in which silent mutations were introduced to replace wild-type codons with the most or least frequently used synonymous codons. A recombinant N2c variant containing the fully codon-optimized G gene and three variants carrying a partially codon-deoptimized G gene were recovered on mouse neuroblastoma cells and shown to express 2- to 3-fold more and less glycoprotein, respectively, than wild-type N2c. Pathogenicity studies in mice revealed the WT-N2c virus to be the most pathogenic strain. Variants containing partially codon-deoptimized glycoprotein genes or the codon-optimized gene were less pathogenic than WT-N2c but still caused significant mortality. We conclude that the expression level of the glycoprotein gene does have an impact on pathogenicity but is not a dominant factor that determines pathogenicity. Thus, strategies such as changes in codon usage that aim solely at altering the expression level of the glycoprotein gene do not suffice to render a pathogenic rabies virus apathogenic and are not a viable and safe approach for attenuation of a pathogenic strain. PMID:21068252

  9. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B by a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus and Protection of Mice against Lethal Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, Edouard M.; Eberle, Richard; Baldick, Joseph L.; Moss, Bernard; Willey, Dru E.; Notkins, Abner L.; Openshaw, Harry

    1987-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strain F gene encoding glycoprotein gB was isolated and modified at the 5' end by in vitro oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The modified gB gene was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome and expressed under the control of a vaccinia virus promoter. The mature gB glycoprotein produced by the vaccinia virus recombinant was glycosylated, was expressed at the cell surface, and was indistinguishable from authentic HSV-1 gB in terms of electrophoretic mobility. Mice immunized intradermally with the recombinant vaccinia virus produced gB-specific neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to a lethal HSV-1 challenge.

  10. Lassa fever in West African sub-region: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, O; Ajuluchukwu, E; Uneke, C J

    2007-03-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral zoonotic illness caused by Lassa virus, an arenavirus known to be responsible for a severe haemorrhagic fever characterised by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and, chest and abdominal pain. The virus exhibits persistent, asymptomatic infection with profuse urinary virus excretion in the ubiquitous rodent vector, Mastomys natalensis. Lassa fever is endemic in West Africa and has been reported from Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia, and Nigeria. Some studies indicate that 300,000 to 500,000 cases of Lassa fever and 5000 deaths occur yearly across West Africa. Studies reported in English, that investigated Lassa fever with reference to West Africa were identified using the Medline Entrez-PubMed search and were used for this review. The scarcity of resources available for health care delivery system and the political instability that characterise the West African countries would continue to impede efforts for the control of Lassa fever in the sub-region. There is need for adequate training of health care workers regarding diagnostics, intensive care of patients under isolation, contact tracing, adequate precautionary measures in handling infectious laboratory specimens, control of the vector as well as care and disposal of infectious waste. PMID:17378212

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Chandipura virus glycoprotein G

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Eduard; Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K.; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Gaudin, Yves; Albertini, Aurélie A.

    2012-01-01

    Fusion in members of the Rhabdoviridae virus family is mediated by the G glycoprotein. At low pH, the G glycoprotein catalyzes fusion between viral and endosomal membranes by undergoing a major conformational change from a pre-fusion trimer to a post-fusion trimer. The structure of the G glycoprotein from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV G), the prototype of Vesiculovirus, has recently been solved in its trimeric pre-fusion and post-fusion conformations; however, little is known about the structural details of the transition. In this work, a soluble form of the ectodomain of Chandipura virus G glycoprotein (CHAV Gth) was purified using limited proteolysis of purified virus; this soluble ectodomain was also crystallized. This protein shares 41% amino-acid identity with VSV G and thus its structure could provide further clues about the structural transition of rhabdoviral glycoproteins induced by low pH. Crystals of CHAV Gth obtained at pH 7.5 diffracted X-rays to 3.1 Å resolution. These crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 150.3, b = 228.2, c = 78.8 Å. Preliminary analysis of the data based on the space group and the self-rotation function indicated that there was no trimeric association of the protomers. This unusual oligomeric status could result from the presence of fusion intermediates in the crystal. PMID:22949203

  12. Effect of the ionophore monensin on herpes simplex virus type 1-induced cell fusion, glycoprotein synthesis, and virion infectivity.

    PubMed

    Kousoulas, K G; Bzik, D J; Person, S

    1983-01-01

    The ionophore monensin inhibited the formation of mature, fully glycosylated glycoproteins gB, gC, and gD during herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of human embryonic lung cells. Underglycosylated forms, including the apparent high-mannose precursor forms of the major glycoproteins, appeared. Monensin inhibited virus-induced cell fusion. Infectious virions produced in the presence of monensin appeared to contain predominantly underglycosylated glycoproteins. PMID:6307921

  13. A new rabies vaccine based on a recombinant ORF virus (parapoxvirus) expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Amann, Ralf; Rohde, Jörg; Wulle, Ulrich; Conlee, Douglas; Raue, Rudiger; Martinon, Olivier; Rziha, Hanns-Joachim

    2013-02-01

    The present study describes the generation of a new Orf virus (ORFV) recombinant, D1701-V-RabG, expressing the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein that is correctly presented on the surface of infected cells without the need of replication or production of infectious recombinant virus. One single immunization with recombinant ORFV can stimulate high RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers in mice, cats, and dogs, representing all nonpermissive hosts for the ORFV vector. The protective immune response against severe lethal challenge infection was analyzed in detail in mice using different dosages, numbers, and routes for immunization with the ORFV recombinant. Long-term levels of VNA could be elicited that remained greater than 0.5 IU per ml serum, indicative for the protective status. Single applications of higher doses (10(7) PFU) can be sufficient to confer complete protection against intracranial (i.c.) challenge, whereas booster immunization was needed for protection by the application of lower dosages. Anamnestic immune responses were achieved by each of the seven tested routes of inoculation, including oral application. Finally, in vivo antibody-mediated depletion of CD4-positive and/or CD8-posititve T cell subpopulations during immunization and/or challenge infection attested the importance of CD4 T cells for the induction of protective immunity by D1701-V-RabG. This report demonstrates another example of the potential of the ORFV vector and also indicates the capability of the new recombinant for vaccination of animals. PMID:23175365

  14. A replication-deficient rabies virus vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein is highly attenuated for neurovirulence

    SciTech Connect

    Papaneri, Amy B.; Wirblich, Christoph; Cann, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Blaney, Joseph E.

    2012-12-05

    We are developing inactivated and live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein for use in humans and endangered wildlife, respectively. Here, we further characterize the pathogenesis of the live-attenuated RABV/EBOV vaccine candidates in mice in an effort to define their growth properties and potential for safety. RABV vaccines expressing GP (RV-GP) or a replication-deficient derivative with a deletion of the RABV G gene (RV{Delta}G-GP) are both avirulent after intracerebral inoculation of adult mice. Furthermore, RV{Delta}G-GP is completely avirulent upon intracerebral inoculation of suckling mice unlike parental RABV vaccine or RV-GP. Analysis of RV{Delta}G-GP in the brain by quantitative PCR, determination of virus titer, and immunohistochemistry indicated greatly restricted virus replication. In summary, our findings indicate that RV-GP retains the attenuation phenotype of the live-attenuated RABV vaccine, and RV{Delta}G-GP would appear to be an even safer alternative for use in wildlife or consideration for human use.

  15. Cross-linking of glycoprotein oligomers during herpes simplex virus type 1 entry.

    PubMed

    Handler, C G; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1996-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has 10 glycoproteins in its envelope. Glycoprotein B (gB), gC, gD, gH, and gL have been implicated in virus entry. We previously used chemical cross-linking to show that these five glycoproteins were close enough to each other to be cross-linked into homodimeric and hetero-oligomeric forms; hetero-oligomers of gB-gC, gC-gD, gD-gB, gH-gL, gC-gL and gD-gL were found in purified virions. To better understand the roles of these glycoproteins in viral entry, we have modified a standard HSV penetration assay to include cross-linkers. This allowed us to examine changes in associations of viral glycoproteins during the entry process. HSV-1(KOS) was adsorbed at 4 degrees C to human neuroblastoma cells (SY5Y). The temperature was raised to 37 degrees C and cells were treated with cross-linker at various times after the temperature shift. Cytoplasmic extracts were examined by Western blotting (immunoblotting) for viral glycoproteins. We found that (i) as in virus alone, the length and concentration of the cross-linking agent affected the number of specific complexes isolated; (ii) the same glycoprotein patterns found in purified virions were also present after attachment of virions to cells; and (iii) the ability to cross-link HSV glycoproteins changed as virus penetration proceeded, e.g., gB and gD complexes which were present during attachment disappeared with increasing time, and their disappearance paralleled the kinetics of penetration. However, this phenomenon appeared to be selective since it was not observed with gC oligomers. In addition, we examined the cross-linking patterns of gB and gD in null viruses K082 and KOSgD beta. Neither of these mutants, which attach but cannot penetrate, showed changes in glycoprotein cross-linking over time. We speculate that these changes are due to conformational changes which preclude cross-linking or spatial alterations which dissociate the glycoprotein interactions during the penetration events. PMID

  16. Early Activation of Primary Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Nipah Virus Glycoprotein-Containing Particles.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Tanja C; Maisner, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus that causes pronounced infection of brain endothelia and central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Using primary porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells, we showed that upregulation of E-selectin precedes cytokine induction and is induced not only by infectious NiV but also by NiV-glycoprotein-containing virus-like particles. This demonstrates that very early events in NiV brain endothelial infection do not depend on NiV replication but can be triggered by the NiV glycoproteins alone. PMID:26676791

  17. Early Activation of Primary Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Nipah Virus Glycoprotein-Containing Particles

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Tanja C.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus that causes pronounced infection of brain endothelia and central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Using primary porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells, we showed that upregulation of E-selectin precedes cytokine induction and is induced not only by infectious NiV but also by NiV-glycoprotein-containing virus-like particles. This demonstrates that very early events in NiV brain endothelial infection do not depend on NiV replication but can be triggered by the NiV glycoproteins alone. PMID:26676791

  18. Cryo-electron Microscopy Structure of the Native Prototype Foamy Virus Glycoprotein and Virus Architecture.

    PubMed

    Effantin, Grégory; Estrozi, Leandro F; Aschman, Nick; Renesto, Patricia; Stanke, Nicole; Lindemann, Dirk; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2016-07-01

    Foamy viruses (FV) belong to the genus Spumavirus, which forms a distinct lineage in the Retroviridae family. Although the infection in natural hosts and zoonotic transmission to humans is asymptomatic, FVs can replicate well in human cells making it an attractive gene therapy vector candidate. Here we present cryo-electron microscopy and (cryo-)electron tomography ultrastructural data on purified prototype FV (PFV) and PFV infected cells. Mature PFV particles have a distinct morphology with a capsid of constant dimension as well as a less ordered shell of density between the capsid and the membrane likely formed by the Gag N-terminal domain and the cytoplasmic part of the Env leader peptide gp18LP. The viral membrane contains trimeric Env glycoproteins partly arranged in interlocked hexagonal assemblies. In situ 3D reconstruction by subtomogram averaging of wild type Env and of a Env gp48TM- gp80SU cleavage site mutant showed a similar spike architecture as well as stabilization of the hexagonal lattice by clear connections between lower densities of neighboring trimers. Cryo-EM was employed to obtain a 9 Å resolution map of the glycoprotein in its pre-fusion state, which revealed extensive trimer interactions by the receptor binding subunit gp80SU at the top of the spike and three central helices derived from the fusion protein subunit gp48TM. The lower part of Env, presumably composed of interlaced parts of gp48TM, gp80SU and gp18LP anchors the spike at the membrane. We propose that the gp48TM density continues into three central transmembrane helices, which interact with three outer transmembrane helices derived from gp18LP. Our ultrastructural data and 9 Å resolution glycoprotein structure provide important new insights into the molecular architecture of PFV and its distinct evolutionary relationship with other members of the Retroviridae. PMID:27399201

  19. Cryo-electron Microscopy Structure of the Native Prototype Foamy Virus Glycoprotein and Virus Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Effantin, Grégory; Estrozi, Leandro F.; Aschman, Nick; Renesto, Patricia; Stanke, Nicole; Lindemann, Dirk; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FV) belong to the genus Spumavirus, which forms a distinct lineage in the Retroviridae family. Although the infection in natural hosts and zoonotic transmission to humans is asymptomatic, FVs can replicate well in human cells making it an attractive gene therapy vector candidate. Here we present cryo-electron microscopy and (cryo-)electron tomography ultrastructural data on purified prototype FV (PFV) and PFV infected cells. Mature PFV particles have a distinct morphology with a capsid of constant dimension as well as a less ordered shell of density between the capsid and the membrane likely formed by the Gag N-terminal domain and the cytoplasmic part of the Env leader peptide gp18LP. The viral membrane contains trimeric Env glycoproteins partly arranged in interlocked hexagonal assemblies. In situ 3D reconstruction by subtomogram averaging of wild type Env and of a Env gp48TM- gp80SU cleavage site mutant showed a similar spike architecture as well as stabilization of the hexagonal lattice by clear connections between lower densities of neighboring trimers. Cryo-EM was employed to obtain a 9 Å resolution map of the glycoprotein in its pre-fusion state, which revealed extensive trimer interactions by the receptor binding subunit gp80SU at the top of the spike and three central helices derived from the fusion protein subunit gp48TM. The lower part of Env, presumably composed of interlaced parts of gp48TM, gp80SU and gp18LP anchors the spike at the membrane. We propose that the gp48TM density continues into three central transmembrane helices, which interact with three outer transmembrane helices derived from gp18LP. Our ultrastructural data and 9 Å resolution glycoprotein structure provide important new insights into the molecular architecture of PFV and its distinct evolutionary relationship with other members of the Retroviridae. PMID:27399201

  20. 1-Cinnamoyl-3,11-dihydroxymeliacarpin delays glycoprotein transport restraining virus multiplication without cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Carlos A; Alché, Laura E; Barquero, Andrea A

    2010-02-26

    The 1-cinnamoyl-3,11-dihydroxymeliacarpin (CDM), isolated from extracts of Melia azedarach L., displays antiviral and immunomodulating properties. CDM is the first reported tetranortriterpenoid responsible for the alkalinization of intracellular compartments affecting both, viral endocytic and exocytic pathways. Considering that viral glycoprotein synthesis is completely dependent upon cellular membrane trafficking, we questioned whether CDM might also interfere with the normal transport of cellular glycoproteins. This study demonstrates that CDM promoted a transient block in the transport of two cellular glycoproteins, the transferrin receptor (TfR) and TNF-alpha. Nevertheless, CDM did not affect the transferrin binding ability of TfR and did not impede the TNF-alpha secretion. On the other hand, CDM disturbed the intracellular localization of capsid, glycoprotein and tegument proteins simultaneously in the same HSV-1 infected cells. Besides, we show that concanamycin A and monensin provoke a permanent blockage of viral and cellular glycoproteins, in contrast to the delay observed after CDM treatment. Thus, the delay on glycoprotein transport caused by CDM would account for the strong inhibition on virus multiplication without interfering with the bioactivity of cellular glycoproteins. PMID:20097166

  1. A Hendra virus G glycoprotein subunit vaccine protects African green monkeys from Nipah virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Bossart, Katharine N; Rockx, Barry; Feldmann, Friederike; Brining, Doug; Scott, Dana; LaCasse, Rachel; Geisbert, Joan B; Feng, Yan-Ru; Chan, Yee-Peng; Hickey, Andrew C; Broder, Christopher C; Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-08-01

    In the 1990s, Hendra virus and Nipah virus (NiV), two closely related and previously unrecognized paramyxoviruses that cause severe disease and death in humans and a variety of animals, were discovered in Australia and Malaysia, respectively. Outbreaks of disease have occurred nearly every year since NiV was first discovered, with case fatality ranging from 10 to 100%. In the African green monkey (AGM), NiV causes a severe lethal respiratory and/or neurological disease that essentially mirrors fatal human disease. Thus, the AGM represents a reliable disease model for vaccine and therapeutic efficacy testing. We show that vaccination of AGMs with a recombinant subunit vaccine based on the henipavirus attachment G glycoprotein affords complete protection against subsequent NiV infection with no evidence of clinical disease, virus replication, or pathology observed in any challenged subjects. Success of the recombinant subunit vaccine in nonhuman primates provides crucial data in supporting its further preclinical development for potential human use. PMID:22875827

  2. [Comparative studies of sera from cattle with complete leukemia virus and glycoprotein antigens].

    PubMed

    Mateva, V; Vasileva, L

    1980-01-01

    One hundred cattle serums were investigated by the AGTD-test with two antigens: an antigen produced by the whole virus and an antigen containing glycoproteins. Of all serums studied 44 showed a specific precipitation in case the glycoprotein antigen was used. In case the antigen from the whole virus was used 41 serums showed a specific precipitation line, while in 3 of the serums two precipitation lines were observed. Fifty six serums proved negative, containing no antibodies against bovine leucosis virus, after antigens were used. In 2 of the serums non specific precipitation lines were obtained when the antigen from whole virus was used. the precipitation lines produced by both antigenes did not differ in intensity and time of manifestation. PMID:6251597

  3. Cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein protects nonhuman primates from Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Andrea; Murphy, Aisling A.; Feldmann, Friederike; Parkins, Christopher J.; Haddock, Elaine; Hanley, Patrick W.; Emery, Matthew J.; Engelmann, Flora; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Feldmann, Heinz; Jarvis, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Ebolaviruses pose significant public health problems due to their high lethality, unpredictable emergence, and localization to the poorest areas of the world. In addition to implementation of standard public health control procedures, a number of experimental human vaccines are being explored as a further means for outbreak control. Recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vectors are a novel vaccine platform that have been shown to induce substantial levels of durable, but primarily T-cell-biased responses against the encoded heterologous target antigen. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of rhesus CMV (RhCMV) expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) to provide protective immunity to rhesus macaques against lethal EBOV challenge. Surprisingly, vaccination was associated with high levels of GP-specific antibodies, but with no detectable GP-directed cellular immunity. PMID:26876974

  4. Structure of a trimeric variant of the Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B

    SciTech Connect

    Backovic, Marija; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2009-03-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus that is associated with development of malignancies of lymphoid tissue. EBV infections are life-long and occur in >90% of the population. Herpesviruses enter host cells in a process that involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The fusion apparatus is comprised of envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and a heterodimeric complex made of glycoproteins H and L. Glycoprotein B is the most conserved envelope glycoprotein in human herpesviruses, and the structure of gB from Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of the secreted EBV gB ectodomain, which forms 16-nm long spike-like trimers, structurally homologous to the postfusion trimers of the fusion protein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Comparative structural analyses of EBV gB and VSV G, which has been solved in its pre and postfusion states, shed light on gB residues that may be involved in conformational changes and membrane fusion. Also, the EBV gB structure reveals that, despite the high sequence conservation of gB in herpesviruses, the relative orientations of individual domains, the surface charge distributions, and the structural details of EBV gB differ from the HSV-1 protein, indicating regions and residues that may have important roles in virus-specific entry.

  5. A Historical Look at the First Reported Cases of Lassa Fever: IgG Antibodies 40 Years After Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Nell; Schieffelin, John S.; Moses, Lina M.; Bennett, Andrew J.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa fever is an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. One important question regarding Lassa fever is the duration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody after infection. We were able to locate three persons who worked in Nigeria dating back to the 1940s, two of whom were integrally involved in the early outbreaks and investigations of Lassa fever in the late 1960s, including the person from whom Lassa virus was first isolated. Two persons had high titers of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibody over 40 years after infection, indicating the potential for long-term duration of these antibodies. One person was likely infected in 1952, 17 years before the first recognized outbreak. We briefly recount the fascinating stories of these three pioneers and their important contribution to our understanding of Lassa fever. PMID:23390223

  6. A Historical Look at the First Reported Cases of Lassa Fever: IgG Antibodies 40 Years After Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Bond, Nell; Schieffelin, John S; Moses, Lina M; Bennett, Andrew J; Bausch, Daniel G

    2012-12-31

    Lassa fever is an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. One important question regarding Lassa fever is the duration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody after infection. We were able to locate three persons who worked in Nigeria dating back to the 1940s, two of whom were integrally involved in the early outbreaks and investigations of Lassa fever in the late 1960s, including the person from whom Lassa virus was first isolated. Two persons had high titers of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibody over 40 years after infection, indicating the potential for long-term duration of these antibodies. One person was likely infected in 1952, 17 years before the first recognized outbreak. We briefly recount the fascinating stories of these three pioneers and their important contribution to our understanding of Lassa fever. PMID:23277481

  7. A historical look at the first reported cases of Lassa fever: IgG antibodies 40 years after acute infection.

    PubMed

    Bond, Nell; Schieffelin, John S; Moses, Lina M; Bennett, Andrew J; Bausch, Daniel G

    2013-02-01

    Lassa fever is an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. One important question regarding Lassa fever is the duration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody after infection. We were able to locate three persons who worked in Nigeria dating back to the 1940s, two of whom were integrally involved in the early outbreaks and investigations of Lassa fever in the late 1960s, including the person from whom Lassa virus was first isolated. Two persons had high titers of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibody over 40 years after infection, indicating the potential for long-term duration of these antibodies. One person was likely infected in 1952, 17 years before the first recognized outbreak. We briefly recount the fascinating stories of these three pioneers and their important contribution to our understanding of Lassa fever. PMID:23390223

  8. Anterograde Glycoprotein-Dependent Transport of Newly Generated Rabies Virus in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Anja; Nolden, Tobias; Schröter, Josephine; Römer-Oberdörfer, Angela; Gluska, Shani; Perlson, Eran

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rabies virus (RABV) spread is widely accepted to occur only by retrograde axonal transport. However, examples of anterograde RABV spread in peripheral neurons such as dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons indicated a possible bidirectional transport by an uncharacterized mechanism. Here, we analyzed the axonal transport of fluorescence-labeled RABV in DRG neurons by live-cell microscopy. Both entry-related retrograde transport of RABV after infection at axon endings and postreplicative transport of newly formed virus were visualized in compartmentalized DRG neuron cultures. Whereas entry-related transport at 1.5 μm/s occurred only retrogradely, after 2 days of infection, multiple particles were observed in axons moving in both the anterograde and retrograde directions. The dynamics of postreplicative retrograde transport (1.6 μm/s) were similar to those of entry-related retrograde transport. In contrast, anterograde particle transport at 3.4 μm/s was faster, indicating active particle transport. Interestingly, RABV missing the glycoproteins did not move anterogradely within the axon. Thus, anterograde RABV particle transport depended on the RABV glycoprotein. Moreover, colocalization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) and glycoprotein in distal axonal regions as well as cotransport of labeled RNPs with membrane-anchored mCherry reporter confirmed that either complete enveloped virus particles or vesicle associated RNPs were transported. Our data show that anterograde RABV movement in peripheral DRG neurons occurs by active motor protein-dependent transport. We propose two models for postreplicative long-distance transport in peripheral neurons: either transport of complete virus particles or cotransport of RNPs and G-containing vesicles through axons to release virus at distal sites of infected DRG neurons. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus retrograde axonal transport by dynein motors supports virus spread over long distances and

  9. Structure of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in the Postfusion Conformation Reveals Preservation of Neutralizing Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-09-16

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) invades host cells via a type I fusion (F) glycoprotein that undergoes dramatic structural rearrangements during the fusion process. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, such as 101F, palivizumab, and motavizumab, target two major antigenic sites on the RSV F glycoprotein. The structures of these sites as peptide complexes with motavizumab and 101F have been previously determined, but a structure for the trimeric RSV F glycoprotein ectodomain has remained elusive. To address this issue, we undertook structural and biophysical studies on stable ectodomain constructs. Here, we present the 2.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of the trimeric RSV F ectodomain in its postfusion conformation. The structure revealed that the 101F and motavizumab epitopes are present in the postfusion state and that their conformations are similar to those observed in the antibody-bound peptide structures. Both antibodies bound the postfusion F glycoprotein with high affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Modeling of the antibodies bound to the F glycoprotein predicts that the 101F epitope is larger than the linear peptide and restricted to a single protomer in the trimer, whereas motavizumab likely contacts residues on two protomers, indicating a quaternary epitope. Mechanistically, these results suggest that 101F and motavizumab can bind to multiple conformations of the fusion glycoprotein and can neutralize late in the entry process. The structural preservation of neutralizing epitopes in the postfusion state suggests that this conformation can elicit neutralizing antibodies and serve as a useful vaccine antigen.

  10. Requirements for Cell Rounding and Surface Protein Down-Regulation by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Francica, Joseph R.; Matukonis, Meghan K.; Bates, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Ebola virus causes an acute hemorrhagic fever that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The viral glycoprotein is thought to contribute to pathogenesis, though precise mechanisms are unknown. Cellular pathogenesis can be modeled in vitro by expression of the Ebola viral glycoprotein (GP) in cells, which causes dramatic morphological changes, including cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation. These effects are known to be dependent on the presence of a highly glycosylated region of the glycoprotein, the mucin domain. Here we show that the mucin domain from the highly pathogenic Zaire subtype of Ebola virus is sufficient to cause characteristic cytopathology when expressed in the context of a foreign glycoprotein. Similarly to full length Ebola GP, expression of the mucin domain causes rounding, detachment from the extracellular matrix, and the down-regulation of cell surface levels of β1 integrin and major histocompatibility complex class 1. These effects were not seen when the mucin domain was expressed in the context of a glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored isoform of the foreign glycoprotein. In contrast to earlier analysis of full length Ebola glycoproteins, chimeras carrying the mucin domains from the Zaire and Reston strains appear to cause similar levels of down-modulation and cell detachment. Cytopathology associated with Ebola glycoprotein expression does not occur when GP expression is restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast to a previously published report, our results demonstrate that GP-induced surface protein down-regulation is not mediated through a dynamin-dependent pathway. Overall, these results support a model in which the mucin domain of Ebola GP acts at the cell surface to induce protein down modulation and cytopathic effects. PMID:19013626

  11. Glycosylation of dengue virus glycoproteins and their interactions with carbohydrate receptors: possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Idris, Fakhriedzwan; Muharram, Siti Hanna; Diah, Suwarni

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus, an RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, affects 50 million individuals annually, and approximately 500,000-1,000,000 of these infections lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. With no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatments available to prevent dengue infection, dengue is considered a major public health problem in subtropical and tropical regions. The virus, like other enveloped viruses, uses the host's cellular enzymes to synthesize its structural (C, E, and prM/M) and nonstructural proteins (NS1-5) and, subsequently, to glycosylate these proteins to produce complete and functional glycoproteins. The structural glycoproteins, specifically the E protein, are known to interact with the host's carbohydrate receptors through the viral proteins' N-glycosylation sites and thus mediate the viral invasion of cells. This review focuses on the involvement of dengue glycoproteins in the course of infection and the virus' exploitation of the host's glycans, especially the interactions between host receptors and carbohydrate moieties. We also discuss the recent developments in antiviral therapies that target these processes and interactions, focusing specifically on the use of carbohydrate-binding agents derived from plants, commonly known as lectins, to inhibit the progression of infection. PMID:27068162

  12. Delayed Infection after Immunization with a Peptide from the Transmembrane Glycoprotein of the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, J.; Moraillon, A.; Crespeau, F.; Baud, S.; Sonigo, P.; Pancino, G.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in the quantitative assessment of viral burden, by permitting the extension of criteria applied to assess the efficacy of vaccines from all-or-none protection to diminution of the viral burden, may allow the identification of original immunogens of value in combined vaccines. Peptides corresponding to three domains of the envelope glycoproteins of feline immunodeficiency virus that are recognized during natural infection were used to immunize cats. After challenge with a primary isolate of feline immunodeficiency virus, the development of acute infection was monitored by quantitative assessment of the viral burden in plasma and tissues by competitive reverse transcription-PCR, by measurement of the humoral response developed to viral components, and by lymphocyte subset analysis. Whereas immunization with two peptides derived from the surface glycoprotein had no effect on the early course of infection, immunization with a peptide derived from the transmembrane glycoprotein delayed infection, as reflected by a diminished viral burden in the early phase of primary infection and delayed seroconversion. This peptide, located in the membrane-proximal region of the extracellular domain, has homology to an epitope of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 recognized by a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody. These results suggest that lentivirus transmembrane glycoproteins share a determinant in the juxtamembrane ectodomain which could be of importance in the design of vaccines against AIDS. PMID:9499101

  13. Binding of a neutralizing antibody to dengue virus alters the arrangement of surface glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lok, Shee-Mei; Kostyuchenko, Victor; Nybakken, Grant E.; Holdaway, Heather A.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Sedlak, Dagmar; Fremont, Daved H.; Chipman, Paul R.; Roehrig, John T.; Diamond, Michael S.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-04-02

    The monoclonal antibody 1A1D-2 has been shown to strongly neutralize dengue virus serotypes 1, 2 and 3, primarily by inhibiting attachment to host cells. A crystal structure of its antigen binding fragment (Fab) complexed with domain III of the viral envelope glycoprotein, E, showed that the epitope would be partially occluded in the known structure of the mature dengue virus. Nevertheless, antibody could bind to the virus at 37 degrees C, suggesting that the virus is in dynamic motion making hidden epitopes briefly available. A cryo-electron microscope image reconstruction of the virus:Fab complex showed large changes in the organization of the E protein that exposed the epitopes on two of the three E molecules in each of the 60 icosahedral asymmetric units of the virus. The changes in the structure of the viral surface are presumably responsible for inhibiting attachment to cells.

  14. Genotyping of Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) based on the glycoprotein gene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, W.-S.; Oh, M.-J.; Nishizawa, T.; Park, J.-W.; Kurath, G.; Yoshimizu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein (G) gene nucleotide sequences of four Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates. All Korean isolates were closely related to Japanese isolates of genogroup JRt rather than to those of North American and European genogroups. It is believed that Korean IHNV has been most likely introduced from Japan to Korea by the movement of contaminated fish eggs. Among the Korean isolates, phylogenetically distinct virus types were obtained from sites north and south of a large mountain range, suggesting the possibility of more than one introduction of virus from Japan. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  15. A novel rabies vaccine based on a recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 expressing rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhai; Zhou, Ming; Gao, Xiudan; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W; Fu, Zhen F; He, Biao

    2013-03-01

    Untreated rabies virus (RABV) infection leads to death. Vaccine and postexposure treatment have been effective in preventing RABV infection. However, due to cost, rabies vaccination and treatment have not been widely used in developing countries. There are 55,000 human death caused by rabies annually. An efficacious and cost-effective rabies vaccine is needed. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is thought to contribute to kennel cough, and kennel cough vaccines containing live PIV5 have been used in dogs for many years. In this work, a PIV5-vectored rabies vaccine was tested in mice. A recombinant PIV5 encoding RABV glycoprotein (G) (rPIV5-RV-G) was administered to mice via intranasal (i.n.), intramuscular (i.m.), and oral inoculation. The vaccinated mice were challenged with a 50% lethal challenge dose (LD(50)) of RABV challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24) intracerebrally. A single dose of 10(6) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G was sufficient for 100% protection when administered via the i.n. route. The mice vaccinated with a single dose of 10(8) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G via the i.m. route showed very robust protection (90% to 100%). Intriguingly, the mice vaccinated orally with a single dose of 10(8) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G showed a 50% survival rate, which is comparable to the 60% survival rate among mice inoculated with an attenuated rabies vaccine strain, recombinant LBNSE. This is first report of an orally effective rabies vaccine candidate in animals based on PIV5 as a vector. These results indicate that rPIV5-RV-G is an excellent candidate for a new generation of recombinant rabies vaccine for humans and animals and PIV5 is a potential vector for oral vaccines. PMID:23269806

  16. Utilization of C-C chemokine receptor 5 by the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239.

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, L; Choe, H; Martin, K A; Farzan, M; Ponath, P D; Wu, L; Newman, W; Gerard, N; Gerard, C; Sodroski, J

    1997-01-01

    We examined chemokine receptors for the ability to facilitate the infection of CD4-expressing cells by viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239. Expression of either human or simian C-C chemokine receptor CCR5 allowed the SIVmac239 envelope glycoproteins to mediate virus entry and cell-to-cell fusion. Thus, distantly related immunodeficiency viruses such as SIV and the primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates can utilize CCR5 as an entry cofactor. PMID:9032394

  17. Dimeric Architecture of the Hendra Virus Attachment Glycoprotein: Evidence for a Conserved Mode of Assembly▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Thomas A.; Crispin, Max; Harvey, David J.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Stuart, David I.

    2010-01-01

    Hendra virus is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus within the Paramyxoviridae family which, together with Nipah virus, forms the Henipavirus genus. Infection with bat-borne Hendra virus leads to a disease with high mortality rates in humans. We determined the crystal structure of the unliganded six-bladed β-propeller domain and compared it to the previously reported structure of Hendra virus attachment glycoprotein (HeV-G) in complex with its cellular receptor, ephrin-B2. As observed for the related unliganded Nipah virus structure, there is plasticity in the Glu579-Pro590 and Lys236-Ala245 ephrin-binding loops prior to receptor engagement. These data reveal that henipaviral attachment glycoproteins undergo common structural transitions upon receptor binding and further define the structural template for antihenipaviral drug design. Our analysis also provides experimental evidence for a dimeric arrangement of HeV-G that exhibits striking similarity to those observed in crystal structures of related paramyxovirus receptor-binding glycoproteins. The biological relevance of this dimer is further supported by the positional analysis of glycosylation sites from across the paramyxoviruses. In HeV-G, the sites lie away from the putative dimer interface and remain accessible to α-mannosidase processing on oligomerization. We therefore propose that the overall mode of dimer assembly is conserved for all paramyxoviruses; however, while the geometry of dimerization is rather closely similar for those viruses that bind flexible glycan receptors, significant (up to 60°) and different reconfigurations of the subunit packing (associated with a significant decrease in the size of the dimer interface) have accompanied the independent switching to high-affinity protein receptor binding in Hendra and measles viruses. PMID:20375167

  18. Structure of the Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by X-ray Crystallography, Small-angle X-ray Scattering, and Electron Microscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Brunotte, Linda; Kerber, Romy; Shang, Weifeng; Hauer, Florian; Hass, Meike; Gabriel, Martin; Lelke, Michaela; Busch, Carola; Stark, Holger; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Betzel, Christian; Perbandt, Markus; Günther, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Lassa virus (LASV) strain AV was expressed in a recombinant baculovirus system. The crystal structure of full-length NP was solved at a resolution of 2.45 Å. The overall fold corresponds to that of NP of LASV strain Josiah (Qi, X., Lan, S., Wang, W., Schelde, L. M., Dong, H., Wallat, G. D., Ly, H., Liang, Y., and Dong, C. (2010) Nature 468, 779–783) with a root mean square deviation of 0.67 Å for all atoms (6.3% difference in primary sequence). As the packing in the crystal offers two different trimer architectures for the biological assembly, the quaternary structure of NP in solution was determined by small-angle x-ray scattering and EM. After classification and averaging of >6000 EM raw images, trimeric centrosymmetric structures were obtained, which correspond in size and shape to one trimer in the crystal structure formed around a crystallographic 3-fold rotation axis (symmetric trimer). The symmetric trimer is also a good model for the small-angle x-ray scattering data and could be well embedded into the ab initio model. The N-terminal domain of NP contains a deep nucleotide-binding cavity that has been proposed to bind cellular cap structures for priming viral mRNA synthesis. All residues implicated in m7GpppN binding were exchanged, and the transcription/replication phenotype of the NP mutant was tested using a LASV replicon system. None of the mutants showed a specific defect in mRNA expression; most were globally defective in RNA synthesis. In conclusion, we describe the full-length crystal structure and the quaternary structure in solution of LASV NP. The nucleotide-binding pocket of NP could not be assigned a specific role in viral mRNA synthesis. PMID:21917929

  19. Identification of a Novel Virulence Determinant Within the E2 Structural Glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) E2 glycoprotein contains a discrete epitope (TAVSPTTLR, residues 829-837 of CSFV polyprotein) recognized by monoclonal antibody (mAb) WH303, used to differentiate CSFV from related ruminant Pestiviruses, Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) and Border Disease Virus ...

  20. Measles virus-induced immune suppression in the cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) model depends on viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, S; Eisenhuth, I; Fooks, A; Clegg, J C; Schnorr, J J; Schneider-Schaulies, S; ter Meulen, V

    1997-01-01

    Immune suppression during measles accounts for most of the morbidity and mortality associated with the virus infection. Experimental study of this phenomenon has been hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model. We have used the cotton rat to demonstrate that mitogen-induced proliferation of spleen cells from measles virus-infected animals is impaired. Proliferation inhibition is seen in all lymphocyte subsets and is not dependent on viral replication. Cells which express the viral glycoproteins (hemagglutinin and fusion protein) transiently by transfection induce proliferation inhibition after intraperitoneal inoculation, whereas application of a recombinant measles virus in which measles virus glycoproteins are replaced with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein does not have an antiproliferative effect. Therefore, in vivo expression of measles virus glycoproteins is sufficient and necessary to induce inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation. PMID:9311794

  1. Envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: profound influences on immune functions.

    PubMed Central

    Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S

    1996-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) leads to progressive destruction of the CD4+ T-cell subset, resulting in immune deficiency and AIDS. The specific binding of the viral external envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1, gp120, to the CD4 molecules initiates viral entry. In the past few years, several studies have indicated that the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein with cells and molecules of the immune system leads to pleiotropic biological effects on immune functions, which include effects on differentiation of CD34+ lymphoid progenitor cells and thymocytes, aberrant activation and cytokine secretion patterns of mature T cells, induction of apoptosis, B-cell hyperactivity, inhibition of T-cell dependent B-cell differentiation, modulation of macrophage functions, interactions with components of complement, and effects on neuronal cells. The amino acid sequence homologies of the envelope glycoproteins with several cellular proteins have suggested that molecular mimicry may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. This review summarizes work done by several investigators demonstrating the profound biological effects of envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1 on immune system cells. Extensive studies have also been done on interactions of the viral envelope proteins with components of the immune system which may be important for eliciting a "protective immune response." Understanding the influences of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins on the immune system may provide valuable insights into HIV-1 disease pathogenesis and carries implications for the trials of HIV-1 envelope protein vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:8801439

  2. Rabies-virus-glycoprotein-pseudotyped recombinant baculovirus vaccine confers complete protection against lethal rabies virus challenge in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qunfeng; Yu, Fulai; Xu, Jinfang; Li, Yang; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo; Fu, Zhen F; Fang, Liurong

    2014-06-25

    Rabies virus has been an ongoing threat to humans and animals. Here, we developed a new strategy to generate a rabies virus vaccine based on a pseudotyped baculovirus. The recombinant baculovirus (BV-RVG/RVG) was pseudotyped with the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) and also simultaneously expressed another RVG under the control of the immediate early CMV promoter. In vitro, this RVG-pseudotyped baculovirus vector induced syncytium formation in insect cells and displayed more efficient gene delivery into mammalian cells. Mice immunized with BV-RVG/RVG developed higher levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies, and conferred 100% protection against rabies viral challenge. These data indicate that the RVG-pseudotyped baculovirus BV-RVG/RVG can be used as an alternative strategy to develop a safe and efficacious vaccine against the rabies virus. PMID:24793501

  3. Chimeric Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus with Attachment and Fusion Glycoproteins Replaced by Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stope, Matthias B.; Karger, Axel; Schmidt, Ulrike; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2001-01-01

    Chimeric bovine respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV) expressing glycoproteins of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3) instead of BRSV glycoproteins were generated from cDNA. In the BRSV antigenome cDNA, the open reading frames of the major BRSV glycoproteins, attachment protein G and fusion protein F, were replaced individually or together by those of the BPIV-3 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and/or fusion (F) glycoproteins. Recombinant virus could not be recovered from cDNA when the BRSV F open reading frame was replaced by the BPIV-3 F open reading frame. However, cDNA recovery of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HNF, with both glycoproteins replaced simultaneously, and of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HN, with the BRSV G protein replaced by BPIV-3 HN, was successful. The replication rates of both chimeras were similar to that of standard rBRSV. Moreover, rBRSV-HNF was neutralized by antibodies specific for BPIV-3, but not by antibodies specific to BRSV, demonstrating that the BRSV glycoproteins can be functionally replaced by BPIV-3 glycoproteins. In contrast, rBRSV-HN was neutralized by BRSV-specific antisera, but not by BPIV-3 specific sera, showing that infection of rBRSV-HN is mediated by BRSV F. Hemadsorption of cells infected with rBRSV-HNF and rBRSV-HN proved that BPIV-3 HN protein expressed by rBRSV is functional. Colocalization of the BPIV-3 glycoproteins with BRSV M protein was demonstrated by confocal laser scan microscopy. Moreover, protein analysis revealed that the BPIV-3 glycoproteins were present in chimeric virions. Taken together, these data indicate that the heterologous glycoproteins were not only expressed but were incorporated into the envelope of recombinant BRSV. Thus, the envelope glycoproteins derived from a member of the Respirovirus genus can together functionally replace their homologs in a Pneumovirus background. PMID:11533200

  4. Epitope dampening monotypic measles virus hemagglutinin glycoprotein results in resistance to cocktail of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lech, Patrycja J; Tobin, Gregory J; Bushnell, Ruth; Gutschenritter, Emily; Pham, Linh D; Nace, Rebecca; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc; Muller, Claude P; Russell, Stephen J; Nara, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) is serologically monotypic. Life-long immunity is conferred by a single attack of measles or following vaccination with the MV vaccine. This is contrary to viruses such as influenza, which readily develop resistance to the immune system and recur. A better understanding of factors that restrain MV to one serotype may allow us to predict if MV will remain monotypic in the future and influence the design of novel MV vaccines and therapeutics. MV hemagglutinin (H) glycoprotein, binds to cellular receptors and subsequently triggers the fusion (F) glycoprotein to fuse the virus into the cell. H is also the major target for neutralizing antibodies. To explore if MV remains monotypic due to a lack of plasticity of the H glycoprotein, we used the technology of Immune Dampening to generate viruses with rationally designed N-linked glycosylation sites and mutations in different epitopes and screened for viruses that escaped monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We then combined rationally designed mutations with naturally selected mutations to generate a virus resistant to a cocktail of neutralizing mAbs targeting four different epitopes simultaneously. Two epitopes were protected by engineered N-linked glycosylations and two epitopes acquired escape mutations via two consecutive rounds of artificial selection in the presence of mAbs. Three of these epitopes were targeted by mAbs known to interfere with receptor binding. Results demonstrate that, within the epitopes analyzed, H can tolerate mutations in different residues and additional N-linked glycosylations to escape mAbs. Understanding the degree of change that H can tolerate is important as we follow its evolution in a host whose immunity is vaccine induced by genotype A strains instead of multiple genetically distinct wild-type MVs. PMID:23300970

  5. Molecular Diagnostics for Lassa Fever at Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Nigeria: Lessons Learnt from Two Years of Laboratory Operation

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Meike; Gabriel, Martin; Ölschläger, Stephan; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Folarin, Onikepe; Phelan, Eric; Ehiane, Philomena E.; Ifeh, Veritas E.; Uyigue, Eghosasere A.; Oladapo, Yemisi T.; Muoebonam, Ekene B.; Osunde, Osagie; Dongo, Andrew; Okokhere, Peter O.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Momoh, Mojeed; Alikah, Sylvester O.; Akhuemokhan, Odigie C.; Imomeh, Peter; Odike, Maxy A. C.; Gire, Stephen; Andersen, Kristian; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Happi, Christian T.; Akpede, George O.; Günther, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. However, none of the hospitals in the endemic areas of Nigeria has the capacity to perform Lassa virus diagnostics. Case identification and management solely relies on non-specific clinical criteria. The Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH) in the central senatorial district of Edo State struggled with this challenge for many years. Methodology/Principal Findings A laboratory for molecular diagnosis of Lassa fever, complying with basic standards of diagnostic PCR facilities, was established at ISTH in 2008. During 2009 through 2010, samples of 1,650 suspected cases were processed, of which 198 (12%) tested positive by Lassa virus RT-PCR. No remarkable demographic differences were observed between PCR-positive and negative patients. The case fatality rate for Lassa fever was 31%. Nearly two thirds of confirmed cases attended the emergency departments of ISTH. The time window for therapeutic intervention was extremely short, as 50% of the fatal cases died within 2 days of hospitalization—often before ribavirin treatment could be commenced. Fatal Lassa fever cases were older (p = 0.005), had lower body temperature (p<0.0001), and had higher creatinine (p<0.0001) and blood urea levels (p<0.0001) than survivors. Lassa fever incidence in the hospital followed a seasonal pattern with a peak between November and March. Lassa virus sequences obtained from the patients originating from Edo State formed—within lineage II—a separate clade that could be further subdivided into three clusters. Conclusions/Significance Lassa fever case management was improved at a tertiary health institution in Nigeria through establishment of a laboratory for routine diagnostics of Lassa virus. Data collected in two years of operation demonstrate that Lassa fever is a serious public health problem in Edo State and reveal new insights into the disease in hospitalized patients. PMID:23029594

  6. Dissection of the Antibody Response against Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins in Naturally Infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen-Yu; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Ponce de Leon, Manuel; Lou, Huan; Wald, Anna; Krummenacher, Claude; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the extent of the polyclonal antibody (PAb) repertoire elicited by herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins during natural infection and how these antibodies affect virus neutralization. Here, we examined IgGs from 10 HSV-seropositive individuals originally classified as high or low virus shedders. All PAbs neutralized virus to various extents. We determined which HSV entry glycoproteins these PAbs were directed against: glycoproteins gB, gD, and gC were recognized by all sera, but fewer sera reacted against gH/gL. We previously characterized multiple mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and mapped those with high neutralizing activity to the crystal structures of gD, gB, and gH/gL. We used a biosensor competition assay to determine whether there were corresponding human antibodies to those epitopes. All 10 samples had neutralizing IgGs to gD epitopes, but there were variations in which epitopes were seen in individual samples. Surprisingly, only three samples contained neutralizing IgGs to gB epitopes. To further dissect the nature of these IgGs, we developed a method to select out gD- and gB-specific IgGs from four representative sera via affinity chromatography, allowing us to determine the contribution of antibodies against each glycoprotein to the overall neutralization capacity of the serum. In two cases, gD and gB accounted for all of the neutralizing activity against HSV-2, with a modest amount of HSV-1 neutralization directed against gC. In the other two samples, the dominant response was to gD. IMPORTANCE Antibodies targeting functional epitopes on HSV entry glycoproteins mediate HSV neutralization. Virus-neutralizing epitopes have been defined and characterized using murine monoclonal antibodies. However, it is largely unknown whether these same epitopes are targeted by the humoral response to HSV infection in humans. We have shown that during natural infection, virus-neutralizing antibodies are principally

  7. Protective Efficacy of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Delivering Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Asisa; Kupke, Alexandra; Song, Fei; Jany, Sylvia; Fux, Robert; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Schmidt, Jörg; Becker, Christin; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe respiratory disease in humans. We tested a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccine expressing full-length MERS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein by immunizing BALB/c mice with either intramuscular or subcutaneous regimens. In all cases, MVA-MERS-S induced MERS-CoV-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-neutralizing antibodies. Vaccinated mice were protected against MERS-CoV challenge infection after transduction with the human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 receptor. This MERS-CoV infection model demonstrates the safety and efficacy of the candidate vaccine. PMID:26018172

  8. Chimeric rabies viruses for trans-species comparison of lyssavirus glycoprotein ectodomain functions in virus replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Genz, Berit; Nolden, Tobias; Negatsch, Alexandra; Teifke, Jens-Peter; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Finke, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The glycoprotein G of lyssaviruses is the major determinant of virus pathogenicity and serves as a target for immunological responses to virus infections. However, assessment of the exact contribution of lyssavirus G proteins to observed differences in the pathogenicity of lyssavirus species is challenging, since the direct comparison of natural lyssaviruses does not allow specific ascription to individual virus proteins or domains. Here we describe the generation and characterization of recombinant rabies viruses (RABV) that express chimeric G proteins comprising of a RABV cytoplasma domain fused to transmembrane and ectodomain G sequences of a virulent RABV (challenge virus standard; CVS-11) or two European bat lyssaviruses (EBLV- and EBLV-2). These "envelope-switched" recombinant viruses were recovered from cDNAs. Similar growth kinetics and protein expression in neuroblastoma cell cultures and successful targeting of primary neurons showed that the chimeric G proteins were able to replace the authentic G protein in a RABV based virus vector. Inoculation of six week old CD-1 mice by the intracranial (i. c.) route of infection further demonstrated that all recombinant viruses were able to spread in the brain and to induce disease. The "envelope-switched" RABV therefore represent an important tool to further investigate the influence of lyssavirus ectodomains on virus tropism, and pathogenicity. PMID:22712419

  9. Genetic Changes at the Glycoprotein Editing Site Associated With Serial Passage of Sudan Virus.

    PubMed

    Alfson, Kendra J; Avena, Laura E; Beadles, Michael W; Menzie, Heather; Patterson, Jean L; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony

    2015-10-01

    Sudan virus (SUDV), like the closely related Ebola virus (EBOV), is a filovirus that causes severe hemorrhagic disease. They both contain an RNA editing site in the glycoprotein gene that controls expression of soluble and full-length protein. We tested the consequences of cell culture passage on the genome sequence at the SUDV editing site locus and determined whether this affected virulence. Passage resulted in expansion of the SUDV editing site, similar to that observed with EBOV. We compared viruses possessing either the wild-type or expanded editing site, using a nonhuman primate model of disease. Despite differences in virus serum titer at one time point, there were no significant differences in time to death or any other measured parameter. These data imply that changes at this locus were not important for SUDV lethality. PMID:25920319

  10. Characterization of soluble glycoprotein D-mediated herpes simplex virus type 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvitov, Marianna; Frampton, Arthur R.; Shah, Waris A.; Wendell, Steven K.; Ozuer, Ali; Kapacee, Zoher; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C. . E-mail: glorioso@pitt.edu

    2007-04-10

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry into permissive cells involves attachment to cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fusion of the virus envelope with the cell membrane triggered by the binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to cognate receptors. In this study, we characterized the observation that soluble forms of the gD ectodomain (sgD) can mediate entry of gD-deficient HSV-1. We examined the efficiency and receptor specificity of this activity and used sequential incubation protocols to determine the order and stability of the initial interactions required for entry. Surprisingly, virus binding to GAGs did not increase the efficiency of sgD-mediated entry and gD-deficient virus was capable of attaching to GAG-deficient cells in the absence of sgD. These observations suggested a novel binding interaction that may play a role in normal HSV infection.

  11. Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Sindbis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Allows Single Particle Analysis of Virus Budding from Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Joyce; Tang, Jinghua; Taylor, Aaron B.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne alphavirus. Here we generated and characterized a fluorescent protein-tagged (FP-tagged) SINV and found that the presence of the FP-tag (mCherry) affected glycoprotein transport to the plasma membrane whereas the specific infectivity of the virus was not affected. We examined the virions by transmission electron cryo-microscopy and determined the arrangement of the FP-tag on the surface of the virion. The fluorescent proteins are arranged icosahedrally on the virus surface in a stable manner that did not adversely affect receptor binding or fusion functions of E2 and E1, respectively. The delay in surface expression of the viral glycoproteins, as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis, contributed to a 10-fold reduction in mCherry-E2 virus titer. There is a 1:1 ratio of mCherry to E2 incorporated into the virion, which leads to a strong fluorescence signal and thus facilitates single-particle tracking experiments. We used the FP-tagged virus for high-resolution live-cell imaging to study the spatial and temporal aspects of alphavirus assembly and budding from mammalian cells. These processes were further analyzed by thin section microscopy. The results demonstrate that SINV buds from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is dispersed into the surrounding media or spread to neighboring cells facilitated by its close association with filopodial extensions. PMID:26633461

  12. Nonreplicating viral vectors as potential vaccines: recombinant canarypox virus expressing measles virus fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Weinberg, R; Tartaglia, J; Richardson, C; Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D; Appel, M; Norton, E; Paoletti, E

    1992-03-01

    The development of canarypox virus (CPV) recombinants expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and fusion (F) glycoproteins of measles virus (MV) is described. Inoculation of the CPV-MV recombinants into avian or nonavian tissue culture substrates led to the expression of authentic MVF and MVHA as determined by radioimmunoprecipitation and surface immunofluorescence. In contrast to avian-derived tissue culture, no productive replication of the CPV recombinant was evident in tissue culture cells derived from nonavian origin. On inoculation of dogs, a species restricted for avipoxvirus replication, the recombinants elicited a protective immune response against a lethal canine distemper virus (CDV) challenge. The level of MV neutralizing antibodies and the level of protection induced against CDV challenge achieved by the host-restricted CPV vector were equivalent to that obtained by vaccinia virus vectors expressing the same MV antigens. PMID:1736535

  13. Pathogenesis of lassa fever in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lassa virus (LASV) infection causes an acute and sometimes fatal hemorrhagic disease in humans and nonhuman primates; however, little is known about the development of Lassa fever. Here, we performed a pilot study to begin to understand the progression of LASV infection in nonhuman primates. Methods Six cynomolgus monkeys were experimentally infected with LASV. Tissues from three animals were examined at an early- to mid-stage of disease and compared with tissues from three animals collected at terminal stages of disease. Results Dendritic cells were identified as a prominent target of LASV infection in a variety of tissues in all animals at day 7 while Kupffer cells, hepatocytes, adrenal cortical cells, and endothelial cells were more frequently infected with LASV in tissues of terminal animals (days 13.5-17). Meningoencephalitis and neuronal necrosis were noteworthy findings in terminal animals. Evidence of coagulopathy was noted; however, the degree of fibrin deposition in tissues was less prominent than has been reported in other viral hemorrhagic fevers. Conclusion The sequence of pathogenic events identified in this study begins to shed light on the development of disease processes during Lassa fever and also may provide new targets for rational prophylactic and chemotherapeutic interventions. PMID:21548931

  14. Lassa fever: review of epidemiology and epizootiology

    PubMed Central

    Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    The basic ecology of Lassa fever appears to involve enzootic transmission of virus in commensal populations of a single murine species, Mastomys natalensis. Virus may spill over from the rodent cycle to man by various routes. Secondary spread between humans may occur within domiciliary groups, and persons infected within the community who develop clinical disease may introduce the virus into hospital and begin a cycle of nosocomial infection. Between 1969, when Lassa fever was first described, and June 1975, the disease was recognized on 9 discrete occasions, affecting 114 persons. Over one-third of these infections were acquired by person-to-person spread within hospitals. In only one outbreak (in Sierra Leone) were the majority of cases acquired in the community. Recent observations have indicated hyperendemic disease in eastern Sierra Leone. Cases have occurred in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, and serological evidence exists for activity of the virus elsewhere in West and Central Africa. Seasonal factors appear to play a role in the appearance of human cases. Attack rates have been higher in adults than in children. The source of infection and potential routes of virus transmission in the various epidemics are discussed, and perspectives for future epidemiological research are presented. PMID:782738

  15. Specialization of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoproteins for B Lymphocytes in Chronically Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Douam, Florian; Bobay, Louis-Marie; Maurin, Guillemette; Fresquet, Judith; Calland, Noémie; Maisse, Carine; Durand, Tony; Cosset, François-Loïc; Féray, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) productively infects hepatocytes. Virion surface glycoproteins E1 and E2 play a major role in this restricted cell tropism by mediating virus entry into particular cell types. However, several pieces of evidence have suggested the ability of patient-derived HCV particles to infect peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The viral determinants and mechanisms mediating such events remain poorly understood. Here, we aimed at isolating viral determinants of HCV entry into B lymphocytes. For this purpose, we constructed a library of full E1E2 sequences isolated from serum and B lymphocytes of four chronically infected patients. We observed a strong phylogenetic compartmentalization of E1E2 sequences isolated from B lymphocytes in one patient, indicating that E1E2 glycoproteins can represent important mediators of the strong segregation of two specialized populations in some patients. Most of the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were functional and allowed transduction of hepatocyte cell lines using HCV-derived pseudoparticles. Strikingly, introduction of envelope glycoproteins isolated from B lymphocytes into the HCV JFH-1 replicating virus switched the entry tropism of this nonlymphotropic virus from hepatotropism to lymphotropism. Significant detection of viral RNA and viral proteins within B cells was restricted to infections with JFH-1 harboring E1E2 from lymphocytes and depended on an endocytic, pH-dependent entry pathway. Here, we achieved for the first time the isolation of HCV viral proteins carrying entry-related lymphotropism determinants. The identification of genetic determinants within E1E2 represents a first step for a better understanding of the complex relationship between HCV infection, viral persistence, and extrahepatic disorders. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) mainly replicates within the liver. However, it has been shown that patient-derived HCV particles can slightly infect lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo, highlighting

  16. Mapping the neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, C.; Chien, M.S.; Landolt, M.L.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the fish rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were used to select 20 MAb escape mutants. The nucleotide sequence of the entire glycoprotein (G) gene was determined for six mutants representing differing cross-neutralization patterns and each had a single nucleotide change leading to a single amino acid substitution within one of three regions of the protein. These data were used to design nested PCR primers to amplify portions of the G gene of the 14 remaining mutants. When the PCR products from these mutants were sequenced, they also had single nucleotide substitutions coding for amino acid substitutions at the same, or nearby, locations. Of the 20 mutants for which all or part of the glycoprotein gene was sequenced, two MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 230-231 (antigenic site I) and the remaining MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 272-276 (antigenic site II). Two MAbs that selected mutants mapping to amino acids 272-276, selected other mutants that mapped to amino acids 78-81, raising the possibility that this portion of the N terminus of the protein was part of a discontinuous epitope defining antigenic site II. CLUSTAL alignment of the glycoproteins of rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and IHNV revealed similarities in the location of the neutralizing epitopes and a high degree of conservation among cysteine residues, indicating that the glycoproteins of three different genera of animal rhabdoviruses may share a similar three-dimensional structure in spite of extensive sequence divergence.

  17. Exchange transfusion of a patient with fulminant Lassa fever.

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, D.; Bennett, D.; Machin, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    We report a patient with fulminant Lassa fever who responded dramatically to a 2.5-litre exchange transfusion of whole blood. On admission he was semicomatose with facial oedema and oral haemorrhage; his platelets showed markedly depressed aggregation to ADP; and his plasma inhibited the aggregation responses of normal platelets in vitro. Exchange transfusion resulted in rapid clinical improvement, recovery of platelet function, and disappearance of platelet-inhibitory activity in plasma. The patient died 2 weeks later from an acute encephalopathy. His initial response was sufficiently impressive to suggest that further evaluation of this therapeutic approach is justified in selected patients with overwhelming Lassa virus infection. PMID:2041853

  18. B epitopes and selection pressures in feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Pancino, G; Chappey, C; Saurin, W; Sonigo, P

    1993-01-01

    In order to map linear B epitopes in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) envelope glycoproteins (Env), a random library of FIV Env polypeptides fused to beta-galactosidase and expressed in Escherichia coli was screened by using sera from experimentally FIV-infected cats. We mapped five antibody-binding domains in the surface envelope glycoprotein (SU1 to SU5) and four in the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (TM1 to TM4). Immunological analysis with 48 serum samples from naturally or experimentally infected cats of diverse origins revealed a broad group reactivity for epitopes SU2, TM2, and TM3, whereas SU3 appeared as strictly type specific. To study selection pressures acting on the identified immunogenic domains, we analyzed structural constraints and distribution of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations (amino acids unchanged or changed). Two linear B epitopes (SU3 and TM4) appeared to be submitted to positive selection for change, a pattern of evolution predicting their possible involvement in antiviral protection. These experiments provide a pertinent choice of oligopeptides for further analysis of the protective response against FIV envelope glycoproteins, as a model to understand the role of antibody escape in lentiviral persistence and to design feline AIDS vaccines. Images PMID:7678301

  19. Virion Glycoprotein-Mediated Immune Evasion by Human Cytomegalovirus: a Sticky Virus Makes a Slick Getaway.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Thomas J; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-09-01

    The prototypic herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) exhibits the extraordinary ability to establish latency and maintain a chronic infection throughout the life of its human host. This is even more remarkable considering the robust adaptive immune response elicited by infection and reactivation from latency. In addition to the ability of CMV to exist in a quiescent latent state, its persistence is enabled by a large repertoire of viral proteins that subvert immune defense mechanisms, such as NK cell activation and major histocompatibility complex antigen presentation, within the cell. However, dissemination outside the cell presents a unique existential challenge to the CMV virion, which is studded with antigenic glycoprotein complexes targeted by a potent neutralizing antibody response. The CMV virion envelope proteins, which are critical mediators of cell attachment and entry, possess various characteristics that can mitigate the humoral immune response and prevent viral clearance. Here we review the CMV glycoprotein complexes crucial for cell attachment and entry and propose inherent properties of these proteins involved in evading the CMV humoral immune response. These include viral glycoprotein polymorphism, epitope competition, Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis, glycan shielding, and cell-to-cell spread. The consequences of CMV virion glycoprotein-mediated immune evasion have a major impact on persistence of the virus in the population, and a comprehensive understanding of these evasion strategies will assist in designing effective CMV biologics and vaccines to limit CMV-associated disease. PMID:27307580

  20. Surveillance of Lassa fever in missionaries stationed in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Frame, John D.

    1975-01-01

    To determine the distribution of Lassa virus in West Africa, a serological survey was undertaken. A number of mission hospital supplied sera from patients admitted with a history of fever and specimens were also collected in New York from missionaries who had experienced an unusual febrile illness while working in Africa. More cases of Lassa fever were detected among missionaries than among Africans, possibly because many African patients had left hospital before the complement fixation tests had become positive. Although most adults had fairly high fever and some were prostrated, fever was less severe in the children examined. In general the findings confirm that not all Lassa fever patients have the severe syndrome described in the original reports. PMID:1085213

  1. Sensitivity analysis in a Lassa fever deterministic mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Doko, Umar Chado; Mamuda, Mamman

    2015-05-01

    Lassa virus that causes the Lassa fever is on the list of potential bio-weapons agents. It was recently imported into Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States as a consequence of the rapid growth of international traffic. A model with five mutually exclusive compartments related to Lassa fever is presented and the basic reproduction number analyzed. A sensitivity analysis of the deterministic model is performed. This is done in order to determine the relative importance of the model parameters to the disease transmission. The result of the sensitivity analysis shows that the most sensitive parameter is the human immigration, followed by human recovery rate, then person to person contact. This suggests that control strategies should target human immigration, effective drugs for treatment and education to reduced person to person contact.

  2. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Bastida-González; Yersin, Celaya-Trejo; José, Correa-Basurto; Paola, Zárate-Segura

    2016-01-01

    The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-terminal of the ectodomain plays an important role; to understand these interactions between the G proteins, a mechanistic study of their functions was performed with a molecular model of G protein in its trimeric form. This verified its 3D conformation. The molecular modeling of G protein was performed by a I-TASSER server and was evaluated via a Rachamandran plot and ERRAT program obtained 84.64% and 89.9% of the residues in the favorable regions and overall quality factor, respectively. The molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on RABVG trimer at 310 K. From these theoretical studies, we retrieved the RMSD values from Cα atoms to assess stability. Preliminary model of G protein of rabies virus stable at 12 ns with molecular dynamics was obtained. PMID:27294109

  3. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Bastida-González; Yersin, Celaya-Trejo; José, Correa-Basurto; Paola, Zárate-Segura

    2016-01-01

    The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-terminal of the ectodomain plays an important role; to understand these interactions between the G proteins, a mechanistic study of their functions was performed with a molecular model of G protein in its trimeric form. This verified its 3D conformation. The molecular modeling of G protein was performed by a I-TASSER server and was evaluated via a Rachamandran plot and ERRAT program obtained 84.64% and 89.9% of the residues in the favorable regions and overall quality factor, respectively. The molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on RABVG trimer at 310 K. From these theoretical studies, we retrieved the RMSD values from Cα atoms to assess stability. Preliminary model of G protein of rabies virus stable at 12 ns with molecular dynamics was obtained. PMID:27294109

  4. Enhancement of feline immunodeficiency virus infection after immunization with envelope glycoprotein subunit vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Siebelink, K H; Tijhaar, E; Huisman, R C; Huisman, W; de Ronde, A; Darby, I H; Francis, M J; Rimmelzwaan, G F; Osterhaus, A D

    1995-01-01

    Cats were immunized three times with different recombinant feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) candidate vaccines. Recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV)-expressed envelope glycoprotein with (vGR657) or without (vGR657 x 15) the cleavage site and an FIV envelope bacterial fusion protein (beta-Galactosidase-Env) were incorporated into immune-stimulating complexes or adjuvanted with Quil A. Although all immunized cats developed antibodies against the envelope protein, only the cats vaccinated with the rVV-expressed envelope glycoproteins developed antibodies which neutralized FIV infection of Crandell feline kidney cells. These antibodies failed to neutralize infection of thymocytes with a molecularly cloned homologous FIV. After the third immunization the cats were challenged with homologous FIV. Two weeks after challenge the cell-associated viral load proved to be significantly higher in the cats immunized with vGR657 and vGR657 x 15 than in the other cats. The cats immunized with vGR657 and vGR657 x 15 also developed antibodies against the Gag proteins more rapidly than the cats immunized with beta-Galactosidase-Env or the control cats. This suggested that immunization with rVV-expressed glycoprotein of FIV results in enhanced infectivity of FIV. It was shown that the observed enhancement could be transferred to naive cats with plasma collected at the day of challenge. PMID:7745719

  5. Virion envelope glycoproteins as epidermiological markers of Venezuelan encephalitis virus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, M E; Scherer, W F

    1980-01-01

    Virion polypeptide compositions of 26 isolates of Venezuelan encephalitis virus were analyzed by a reproducible and comparative technique of discontinuous sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis. Although the molecular weight of the core polypeptide for each isolate was 36,000, numbers and molecular weights of envelope glycoproteins were heterogeneous. Isolates associated with human, but not equine, disease usually had two glycoproteins of 50,000 to 51,000 and 51,000 to 55,000 molecular weight, whereas isolates associated with both human and equine disease usually had an additional, third polypeptide band of either 45,000 to 46,000 or 56,000 to 58,000 molecular weight. The former isolates were in hemagglutination inhibition subtypes I-D, I-E, III, or IV, and the latter were in subtypes I-A, I-B, I-C, or II. Thus virion envelope glycoproteins should be useful markers of Venezuelan encephalitis virus isolates in epidemiological investigations. PMID:7372798

  6. N-Linked Glycosylation Status Of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia E2 Glycoprotein Influences Virulence In Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2 is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). Previous studies indicate that E2 is involved in several functions including virus attachment and entry to target cells, production of antibodies, induction of protective immune response in swine, and virulence. Her...

  7. N-LINKED GLYCOSYLATION STATUS OF CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER VIRUS STRAIN BRECIA E2 GLYCOPROTEIN INFLUENCES VIRULENCE IN SWINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2 is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). Although E2 have been involved in virus attachment to target cells, the induction of a protective immune response as well in the process of viral pathogenesis, the role of glycosylation in the functionality of the p...

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein gC Mediates Immune Evasion In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lubinski, John M.; Wang, Liyang; Soulika, Athena M.; Burger, Reinhard; Wetsel, Rick A.; Colten, Harvey; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Lambris, John D.; Friedman, Harvey M.

    1998-01-01

    Many microorganisms encode proteins that interact with molecules involved in host immunity; however, few of these molecules have been proven to promote immune evasion in vivo. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein C (gC) binds complement component C3 and inhibits complement-mediated virus neutralization and lysis of infected cells in vitro. To investigate the importance of the interaction between gC and C3 in vivo, we studied the virulence of a gC-null strain in complement-intact and C3-deficient animals. Using a vaginal infection model in complement-intact guinea pigs, we showed that gC-null virus grows to lower titers and produces less severe vaginitis than wild-type or gC rescued virus, indicating a role for gC in virulence. To determine the importance of complement, studies were performed with C3-deficient guinea pigs; the results demonstrated significant increases in vaginal titers of gC-null virus, while wild-type and gC rescued viruses showed nonsignificant changes in titers. Similar findings were observed for mice where gC null virus produced significantly less disease than gC rescued virus at the skin inoculation site. Proof that C3 is important was provided by studies of C3 knockout mice, where disease scores of gC-null virus were significantly higher than in complement-intact mice. The results indicate that gC-null virus is approximately 100-fold (2 log10) less virulent that wild-type virus in animals and that gC-C3 interactions are involved in pathogenesis. PMID:9733869

  9. Resistance to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection Induced by Immunization of Cotton Rats with a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Expressing the RSV G Glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, Narayanasamy; Prince, Gregory A.; Murphy, Brian R.; Venkatesan, Sundararajan; Chanock, Robert M.; Moss, Bernard

    1986-03-01

    A cDNA copy of the G glycoprotein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was placed under control of a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the thymidine kinase locus of the vaccinia virus genome. The recombinant vaccinia virus retained infectivity and expressed a 93-kDa protein that migrated with the authentic RSV G glycoprotein upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Glycosylation of the expressed protein and transport to the cell surface were demonstrated in the absence of other RSV proteins. Cotton rats that were inoculated intradermally with the infectious recombinant virus produced serum antibody to the G glycoprotein that neutralized RSV in vitro. Furthermore, the vaccinated animals were resistant to lower respiratory tract infection upon intranasal inoculation with RSV and had reduced titers of RSV in the nose.

  10. [Generation and preliminary immunological efficacy of a recombinant human adenovirus-rabies virus glycoprotein].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Shou-Feng; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Jin-Xia; Hu, Rong-Liang

    2011-09-01

    To construct a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing glycoprotein (GP) of attenuated rabies virus SRV9 and testing immunological efficacy on the immunized mice. Open reading frame of rabies virus GP gene of SRV9 strain was cloned into the shuttle vector of adenovirus expression system in multiple cloning sites to construct the recombinant shuttle plasmid pacAd5 CMV-Gs9, cotransfection was performed into 293AD cells mediated by FuGENE Transfection Reagent with linearized backbone plasmid and recombinant shuttle plasmid, cell cultures were collected after CPE appearance and were identified by PCR and electronmicroscopy, virus titer was measured in 293AD cells. Kunming mice were intraperitoneally injected with 10(6) TCID50 adenovirus, blood for serum preparation was collected through caudal vein pre-immune and post-immune and tested for VNA appearance by fluorescent antibody virus neutralization test (FAVN) detection. Recombinant shuttle plasmid pacAd5 CMV-Gs9 was constructed correctly. A recombinant human adenovirus type 5 was obtained expressing GP protein of rabies virus SRV9. The virus titer reached 10(6) CFU/mL at the least. All mice developed a certain amount of the anti-rabies neutralizing antibody 14 days after intraperitoneal inoculation, while the effective protection rates were 90%. In conclusion, Recombinant adenovirus expressing the rabies virus GP was constructed successfully and a certain amount of neutralizing antibodies were induced in mice, which laid the material foundation for further development of new rabies vaccine. PMID:21998956

  11. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai,R.; Kar, K.; Anthony, K.; Gould, L.; Ledizet, M.; Fikrig, E.; Marasco, W.; Koski, R.; Modis, Y.

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics.

  12. Ebola virus glycoprotein Fc fusion protein confers protection against lethal challenge in vaccinated mice

    PubMed Central

    Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Bradfute, Steven B.; Jacques, Jerome; Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Nakamura, Siham; Morshed, Sufi; Wood, Steven C.; Bavari, Sina

    2011-01-01

    Ebola virus is a Filoviridae that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and induces high morbidity and mortality rates. Filoviruses are classified as "Category A bioterrorism agents", and currently there are no licensed therapeutics or vaccines to treat and prevent infection. The Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) is sufficient to protect individuals against infection, and several vaccines based on GP are under development including recombinant adenovirus, parainfluenza virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and virus-like particles. Here we describe the development of a GP Fc fusion protein as a vaccine candidate. We expressed the extracellular domain of the Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV) GP fused to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 (ZEBOVGP-Fc) in mammalian cells and showed that GP undergoes the complex furin cleavage and processing observed in the native membrane-bound GP. Mice immunized with ZEBOVGP-Fc developed T-cell immunity against ZEBOV GP and neutralizing antibodies against replication-competent VSV-G deleted recombinant VSV containing ZEBOV GP. The ZEBOVGP-Fc vaccinated mice were protected against challenge with a lethal dose of ZEBOV. These results show that vaccination with the ZEBOVGP-Fc fusion protein alone without the need of a viral vector or assembly into virus-like particles is sufficient to induce protective immunity against ZEBOV in mice. Our data suggested that Filovirus GP Fc fusion proteins could be developed as a simple, safe, efficacious, and cost effective vaccine against Filovirus infection for human use. PMID:21329775

  13. Evaluation of immunological responses to a glycoprotein G deficient candidate vaccine strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Joanne M; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Browning, Glenn F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Gilkerson, James R; Alcami, Antonio; Hartley, Carol A

    2010-02-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), an alphaherpesvirus, causes severe respiratory disease in poultry. Glycoprotein G (gG) is a virulence factor in ILTV. Recent studies have shown that gG-deficient ILTV is an effective attenuated vaccine however the function of ILTV gG is unknown. This study examined the function and in vivo relevance of ILTV gG. The results showed that ILTV gG binds to chemokines with high affinity and inhibits leukocyte chemotaxis. Specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens infected with gG-deficient virus had altered tracheal leukocyte populations and lower serum antibody levels compared with those infected with the parent virus. The findings suggest that the absence of chemokine-binding activity during infection with gG-deficient ILTV results in altered host immune responses. PMID:19932672

  14. Autophagy and the Effects of Its Inhibition on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein Biosynthesis and Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Erin M.; Carpenter, John E.; Jackson, Wallen

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy and the effects of its inhibition or induction were investigated during the entire infectious cycle of varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a human herpesvirus. As a baseline, we first enumerated the number of autophagosomes per cell after VZV infection compared with the number after induction of autophagy following serum starvation or treatment with tunicamycin or trehalose. Punctum induction by VZV was similar in degree to punctum induction by trehalose in uninfected cells. Treatment of infected cells with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) markedly reduced the viral titer, as determined by assays measuring both cell-free virus and infectious foci (P < 0.0001). We next examined a virion-enriched band purified by density gradient sedimentation and observed that treatment with 3-MA decreased the amount of VZV gE, while treatment with trehalose increased the amount of gE in the same band. Because VZV gE is the most abundant glycoprotein, we selected gE as a representative viral glycoprotein. To further investigate the role of autophagy in VZV glycoprotein biosynthesis as well as confirm the results obtained with 3-MA inhibition, we transfected cells with ATG5 small interfering RNA to block autophagosome formation. VZV-induced syncytium formation was markedly reduced by ATG5 knockdown (P < 0.0001). Further, we found that both expression and glycan processing of VZV gE were decreased after ATG5 knockdown, while expression of the nonglycosylated IE62 tegument protein was unchanged. Taken together, our cumulative results not only documented abundant autophagy within VZV-infected cells throughout the infectious cycle but also demonstrated that VZV-induced autophagy facilitated VZV glycoprotein biosynthesis and processing. PMID:24198400

  15. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control. PMID:26012219

  16. The effect of ammonium chloride and tunicamycin on the glycoprotein content and infectivity of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Kousoulas, K G; Bzik, D J; DeLuca, N; Person, S

    1983-03-01

    Infectious virions of MP, a syncytial strain of herpes simplex virus type 1, are formed in the presence of 50 mM NH4Cl. Underglycosylated virion glycoproteins are synthesized in infected cells and are incorporated into virions in the presence of the same concentration of NH4Cl. We conclude that fully glycosylated glycoproteins are not required for viral infectivity. Virus particles, deficient in glycosylated glycoproteins, are assembled in the presence of tunicamycin but they are not infectious. The decrease in infectivity could be due to the decreased amount of the gB or possibly other peptides and/or to the lack of the high-mannose saccharides of precursor glycoproteins. PMID:6301148

  17. Effect of ammonium chloride and tunicamycin on the glycoprotein content and infectivity of herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kousoulas, K.G.; Bzik, D.J.; DeLuca, N.; Person, S.

    1983-01-01

    Infectious virions of MP, a syncytial strain of herpes simplex virus type 1, are formed in the presence of 50 mM NH/sub 4/Cl. Underglycosylated virion glycoproteins are synthesized in infected cells and are incorporated into virions in the presence of the same concentration of NH/sub 4/Cl. We conclude that fully glycosylated glycoproteins are not required for viral infectivity. Virus particles, deficient in glycosylated glycoproteins, are assembled in the presence of tunicamycin but they are not infectious. The decrease in infectivity could be due to the decreased amount of the gB or possibly other peptides and/or to the lack of the high-mannose saccharides of precursor glycoproteins. 32 references, 4 figures.

  18. Rabies virus glycoprotein variants display different patterns in rabies monosynaptic tracing

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takuma; Morimoto, Kinjiro

    2014-01-01

    Rabies virus (RV) has been widely used to trace multi-synaptic neuronal circuits. The recent development of glycoprotein-deficient rabies virus (RV-ΔG) expressing various proteins has enabled analyzes of both the structure and function of neuronal circuits. The main advantage of RV-ΔG is its ability to trace monosynaptic circuits by the complementation of rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG), but it has the disadvantage of cytotoxicity. Several strain variants of RV have different biological characteristics, such as synaptic spreading and cytotoxicity, mainly due to amino acid mutations in RVG. We developed an improved protocol for the production of a highly attenuated strain of RV-ΔG and assessed whether RVG variants affect rabies monosynaptic tracing and the health of infected neurons. We demonstrated that (1) rabies monosynaptic tracing with RVG variants traced different subsets of presynaptic partners, (2) RVG of the attenuated strain also labeled astrocytes, and (3) the cytotoxicity of RV-ΔG did not depend on RVG but on RV-ΔG. These findings indicate that RVG variants are an important determinant of rabies monosynaptic tracing. PMID:24427117

  19. N-Glycosylation Profiling of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Envelope Glycoprotein 5

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a positive-sense ssRNA virus whose envelope contains four glycoproteins and three nonglycosylated proteins. Glycans of major envelope glycoprotein 5 (GP5) are proposed as important for virus assembly and entry into permissive cells. Structural characterization of GP5 glycans would facilitate the mechanistic understanding of these processes. Thus, we purified the PRRSV type 2 prototype strain, VR2332, and analyzed the virion-associated glycans by both biochemical and mass spectrometric methods. Endoglycosidase digestion showed that GP5 was the primary protein substrate, and that the carbohydrate moieties were primarily complex-type N-glycans. Mass spectrometric analysis (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) of GP5 N-glycans revealed an abundance of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) oligomers in addition to sialic acids. GlcNAc and LacNAc accessibility to ligands was confirmed by lectin co-precipitation. Our findings help to explain PRRSV infection of cells lacking sialoadhesin and provide a glycan database to facilitate molecular structural studies of PRRSV. PMID:25726973

  20. Functional characterization of the Sindbis virus E2 glycoprotein by transposon linker-insertion mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K.; Kuhn, Richard J. . E-mail: kuhnr@purdue.edu

    2007-06-20

    The glycoprotein envelope of alphaviruses consists of two proteins, E1 and E2. E1 is responsible for fusion and E2 is responsible for receptor binding. An atomic structure is available for E1, but one for E2 has not been reported. In this study, transposon linker-insertion mutagenesis was used to probe the function of different domains of E2. A library of mutants, containing 19 amino acid insertions in the E2 glycoprotein sequence of the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV), was generated. Fifty-seven independent E2 insertions were characterized, of which more than half (67%) gave rise to viable virus. The wild-type-like mutants identify regions that accommodate insertions without perturbing virus production and can be used to insert targeting moieties to direct SINV to specific receptors. The defective and lethal mutants give insight into regions of E2 important for protein stability, transport to the cell membrane, E1-E2 contacts, and receptor binding.

  1. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein mutations that affect membrane fusion activity and abolish virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, B L; Whitt, M A

    1995-01-01

    We have introduced amino acid substitutions into two regions of the extracellular domain of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein (G protein) and examined the effect of these mutations on protein transport, low-pH-induced stability of G protein oligomers, and membrane fusion activity. We suggested previously that the region between amino acids 118 and 139 may be important for the membrane fusion activity of G protein, on the basis of the characterization of a fusion-defective G protein mutant (M. A. Whitt, P. Zagouras, B. Crise, and J. K. Rose, J. Virol. 64:4907-4913, 1990). It has also been postulated by others that this region as well as the region between amino acids 181 and 212 may constitute putative internal fusion domains of VSV G protein. In this report, we show that three different amino acids substitutions between residues 118 and 139 (G-124-->E, P-127-->D, and A-133-->K) either altered or abolished low-pH-dependent membrane fusion activity. In contrast, substitutions between residues 192 and 212 resulted either in G proteins that had wild-type fusion activity or in mutant proteins in which the mutation prevented transport of G protein to the cell surface. Two of the substitutions between residues 118 and 139 (G-124-->E and P-127-->D) resulted in G proteins that were fusion defective at pH 5.7, although syncytia were observed after cells were treated with fusion buffer at pH 5.5, albeit at levels significantly less than that induced by wild-type G protein. Interestingly, when either G-124-->E or P-127-->D was incorporated into tsO45 virions, the resulting particles were not infectious, presumably because the viral envelope was not able to fuse with the proper intracellular membrane. These results support the hypothesis that the region between amino acids 118 and 139 is important for the membrane fusion activity of VSV G protein and may constitute an internal fusion domain. PMID:7853475

  2. A molecular epidemiological study targeting the glycoprotein gene of rabies virus isolates from China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Sheng-Li; Yan, Jia-Xin; Xu, Ge-Lin; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Ming, Ping-Gang; Liu, Sheng-Ya; Wu, Jie; Ming, He-Tian; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Xiao, Qi-You; Dong, Guan-Mu; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2007-03-01

    A group of 31 rabies viruses (RABVs), recovered primarily from dogs, one deer and one human case, were collected from various areas in China between 1989 and 2006. Complete G gene sequences determined for these isolates indicated identities of nucleotide and amino acid sequences of >or=87% and 93.8%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of these and some additional Chinese isolates clearly supported the placement of all Chinese viruses in Lyssavirus genotype 1 and divided all Chinese isolates between four distinct groups (I-IV). Several variants identified within the most commonly encountered group I were distributed according to their geographical origins. A comparison of representative Chinese viruses with other isolates retrieved world-wide indicated a close evolutionary relationship between China group I and II viruses and those of Indonesia while China group III viruses formed an outlying branch to variants from Malaysia and Thailand. China group IV viruses were closely related to several vaccine strains. The predicted glycoprotein sequences of these RABVs variants are presented and discussed with respect to the utility of the anti-rabies biologicals currently employed in China. PMID:17129631

  3. Mutations in the Carboxi Terminal Region of E2 Glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus is Responsible for Viral Attenuation in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reported that chimeric virus 319.1 virus containing the E2 glycoprotein gene from Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) vaccine strain CS with the genetic background of virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BIC virus) was attenuated in pigs. To identify the amino acids mediating 319.1 virus attenuation...

  4. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Envelope Glycoproteins E1 and E2 Contain Reduced Cysteine Residues Essential for Virus Entry*

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Johanna; Boo, Irene; Poumbourios, Pantelis; Drummer, Heidi E.

    2011-01-01

    The HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 contain eight and 18 highly conserved cysteine residues, respectively. Here, we examined the oxidation state of E1E2 heterodimers incorporated into retroviral pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) and investigated the significance of free sulfhydryl groups in cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) and HCVpp entry. Alkylation of free sulfhydryl groups on HCVcc/pp with a membrane-impermeable sulfhydryl-alkylating reagent 4-(N-maleimido)benzyl-α-trimethylammonium iodide (M135) prior to virus attachment to cells abolished infectivity in a dose-dependent manner. Labeling of HCVpp envelope proteins with EZ-Link maleimide-PEG2-biotin (maleimide-biotin) detected free thiol groups in both E1 and E2. Unlike retroviruses that employ disulfide reduction to facilitate virus entry, the infectivity of alkylated HCVcc could not be rescued by addition of exogenous reducing agents. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCVcc bound to target cells was not affected by addition of M135 indicative of a change in glycoprotein oxidation state from reduced to oxidized following virus attachment to cells. By contrast, HCVpp entry was reduced by 61% when treated with M135 immediately following attachment to cells, suggesting that the two model systems might demonstrate variations in oxidation kinetics. Glycoprotein oxidation was not altered following binding of HCVpp incorporated E1E2 to soluble heparin or recombinant CD81. These results suggest that HCV entry is dependent on the presence of free thiol groups in E1 and E2 prior to cellular attachment and reveals a new essential component of the HCV entry process. PMID:21768113

  5. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 contain reduced cysteine residues essential for virus entry.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Johanna; Boo, Irene; Poumbourios, Pantelis; Drummer, Heidi E

    2011-09-16

    The HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 contain eight and 18 highly conserved cysteine residues, respectively. Here, we examined the oxidation state of E1E2 heterodimers incorporated into retroviral pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) and investigated the significance of free sulfhydryl groups in cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) and HCVpp entry. Alkylation of free sulfhydryl groups on HCVcc/pp with a membrane-impermeable sulfhydryl-alkylating reagent 4-(N-maleimido)benzyl-α-trimethylammonium iodide (M135) prior to virus attachment to cells abolished infectivity in a dose-dependent manner. Labeling of HCVpp envelope proteins with EZ-Link maleimide-PEG2-biotin (maleimide-biotin) detected free thiol groups in both E1 and E2. Unlike retroviruses that employ disulfide reduction to facilitate virus entry, the infectivity of alkylated HCVcc could not be rescued by addition of exogenous reducing agents. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCVcc bound to target cells was not affected by addition of M135 indicative of a change in glycoprotein oxidation state from reduced to oxidized following virus attachment to cells. By contrast, HCVpp entry was reduced by 61% when treated with M135 immediately following attachment to cells, suggesting that the two model systems might demonstrate variations in oxidation kinetics. Glycoprotein oxidation was not altered following binding of HCVpp incorporated E1E2 to soluble heparin or recombinant CD81. These results suggest that HCV entry is dependent on the presence of free thiol groups in E1 and E2 prior to cellular attachment and reveals a new essential component of the HCV entry process. PMID:21768113

  6. Development of recombinant canine adenovirus type-2 expressing the Gn glycoprotein of Seoul virus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ziguo; Zhang, Xiuxiang; Zhang, Shoufeng; Liu, Ye; Gao, Shengyan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Huijuan; Wang, Xiaohu; Hu, Rongliang

    2008-05-01

    Seoul virus glycoprotein Gn is a major structural protein and candidate antigen of hantavirus that induces a highly immunogenic response for hantavirus vaccine. In this study, a replication-competent recombinant canine adenovirus type-2 expressing Gn was constructed by the in vitro ligation method. The Gn expression cassette, including the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoter/enhancer and the SV40 early mRNA polyadenylation signal, was cloned into the SspI site of the E3 region which is not essential for proliferation of CAV-2. Expression of Gn was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. PMID:18249007

  7. Resting lymphocyte transduction with measles virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors relies on CD46 and SLAM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qi; Schneider, Irene C.; Gallet, Manuela; Kneissl, Sabrina; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-05-10

    The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) were recently shown to mediate transduction of resting lymphocytes by lentiviral vectors. MV vaccine strains use CD46 or signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as receptor for cell entry. A panel of H protein mutants derived from vaccine strain or wild-type MVs that lost or gained CD46 or SLAM receptor usage were investigated for their ability to mediate gene transfer into unstimulated T lymphocytes. The results demonstrate that CD46 is sufficient for efficient vector particle association with unstimulated lymphocytes. For stable gene transfer into these cells, however, both MV receptors were found to be essential.

  8. Alteration of a second putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 of Classical Swine Fever Virus alters virus replication and virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2, the major envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), is involved in several critical virus functions including cell attachment, host range susceptibility, and virulence in natural hosts. Functional structural analysis of E2 based on Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity dis...

  9. Application of recombinant adenoviruses expressing glycoprotein or nucleoprotein of rabies virus to Korean raccoon dogs

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jiyoung; Kim, Ha-Hyun; Jo, Hyun-Ye; Choi, Sung-Suk; Kim, Jong-Taek; Cho, In-Soo; Kim, Hee-Won

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A new rabies vaccine for animals, including raccoon dogs, in Korea is needed to eradicate rabies infection. In this study, we constructed two recombinant adenoviruses expressing the glycoprotein or nucleoprotein of the rabies virus (RABV). We then investigated the safety and immunogenicity of these strains in raccoon dogs, depending on inoculation route. Materials and Methods Recombinant adenoviruses expressing the glycoprotein (Ad-0910G) or nucleoprotein (Ad-0910N) of rabies were constructed in 293A cells using an adenoviral system. One-year-old raccoon dogs underwent intramuscular (IM) inoculation or oral administration of the recombinant Ad-0910G and Ad-0910N. Clinical symptoms were observed and virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNA) against RABV were measured at 0, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after the immunization. Raccoons were considered positive if VNA titers were ≥ 0.1 IU/mL. Results Raccoon dogs inoculated with the combined Ad-0910G and Ad-0910N virus via the IM route did not exhibit any clinical sign of rabies during the observation period. All raccoon dogs (n = 7) immunized IM had high VNA titers, ranging from 0.17 to 41.6 IU/mL at 2 weeks after inoculation, but 70% (7/10) of raccoon dogs administered viruses via the oral route responded by 6 weeks after administration against RABV. Conclusion Raccoon dogs inoculated with Ad-0910G and Ad-0910N viruses showed no adverse effects. Immunization with the combined Ad-0910G and Ad-0910N strains may play an important role in inducing VNA against RABV in raccoon dogs. PMID:26273578

  10. Importance of the intracytoplasmic domain of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope glycoprotein for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luciw, P A; Shaw, K E; Shacklett, B L; Marthas, M L

    1998-12-01

    SIVmac1A11 and SIVmac239 are nonpathogenic and pathogenic molecular clones in rhesus macaques, respectively. Although these viruses exhibit approximately 98% nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology, differences are found in the length of the translation frames for several genes. SIVmac239 has a premature stop codon in nef, whereas SIVmac1A11 has a premature stop codon in vpr and two premature stop codons in the intracytoplasmic domain of the env-transmembrane (TM) subunit. Recombinant viruses, constructed through reciprocal exchange of large DNA restriction enzyme fragments between SIVmac1A11 and SIVmac239, were evaluated in adult rhesus macaques. This in vivo analysis revealed that two or more regions of the SIVmac genome were essential for high virus load and disease progression (Marthas et al., 1993. J. Virol. 67, 6047-6055). An important gap in knowledge remaining from this study was whether the premature stop codons in env-TM of recombinant virus SIV1A11/239gag-env/1A11 (Full-length vpr and nef, two stop codons in env-TM) reverted to coding triplets in vivo. Here, we report that viral sequences in macaques, which succumbed to an AIDS-like disease after infection with SIV1A11/239gag-env/1A11, exhibited reversion of both env-TM stop codons. In addition, antibodies to the intracytoplasmic domain of env-TM were detected in macaques containing revertant virus and showing disease; this finding indicates that this domain of the env glycoprotein was expressed in vivo. Thus selection for viral variants with full-length env-TM demonstrated that the cytoplasmic domain of the SIVmac env glycoprotein plays a role in viral persistence and immunodeficiency in primates. PMID:9875311

  11. Evidence suggesting that HCV p7 protects E2 glycoprotein from premature degradation during virus production.

    PubMed

    Atoom, Ali M; Jones, Daniel M; Russell, Rodney S

    2013-09-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome encodes a 63 amino acid (aa) protein, p7, which is located between the structural and non-structural proteins. p7 localizes to endoplasmic reticulum membranes and is composed of two transmembrane domains (TM1 and TM2) and a cytoplasmic loop. While its exact role is unknown, p7 is crucial for assembly and/or release of infectious virus production in cell culture, as well as infectivity in chimpanzees. The contribution of p7 to the HCV life cycle may result from at least two distinct roles. Firstly, several studies have shown that p7 acts as an ion channel, the functionality of which is critical for infection. Secondly, p7 interacts with NS2 in a manner that may regulate the targeting of other structural proteins during the assembly process. In this study, we observed that mutations in TM1 and the cytoplasmic loop of p7 decreased infectious virus production in a single-cycle virus production assay. Analysis of intra- and extracellular virus titers indicated that p7 functions at a stage prior to generation of infectious particles. These effects were not due to altered RNA replication since no effects on levels of NS3 or NS5A protein were observed, and were not a consequence of altered recruitment of core protein to lipid droplets. Similarly, these mutations seemingly did not prevent nucleocapsid oligomerization. Importantly, we found that an alanine triplet substitution including the two basic residues of the cytoplasmic loop, which is integral to p7 ion channel function, significantly reduced E2 glycoprotein levels. A time course experiment tracking E2 levels indicated that E2 was degraded over time, as opposed to being synthesized in reduced quantities. The results of this study provide strong evidence that one of the functions of p7 is to protect HCV glycoproteins from premature degradation during virion morphogenesis. PMID:23816605

  12. Importance of the short cytoplasmic domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein for fusion activity and envelope glycoprotein incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Celma, Cristina C.P.; Paladino, Monica G.; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2007-09-30

    The mature form of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of lentiviruses is a heterodimer composed of the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) possesses a TM glycoprotein with a cytoplasmic tail of approximately 53 amino acids which is unusually short compared with that of the other lentiviral glycoproteins (more than 100 residues). To investigate the relevance of the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain to Env-mediated viral functions, we characterized the biological properties of a series of Env glycoproteins progressively shortened from the carboxyl terminus. All the mutant Env proteins were efficiently expressed in feline cells and processed into the SU and TM subunits. Deletion of 5 or 11 amino acids from the TM C-terminus did not significantly affect Env surface expression, fusogenic activity or Env incorporation into virions, whereas removal of 17 or 23 residues impaired Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Further truncation of the FIV TM by 29 residues resulted in an Env glycoprotein that was poorly expressed at the cell surface, exhibited only 20% of the wild-type Env fusogenic capacity and was inefficiently incorporated into virions. Remarkably, deletion of the TM C-terminal 35 or 41 amino acids restored or even enhanced Env biological functions. Indeed, these mutant Env glycoproteins bearing cytoplasmic domains of 18 or 12 amino acids were found to be significantly more fusogenic than the wild-type Env and were efficiently incorporated into virions. Interestingly, truncation of the TM cytoplasmic domain to only 6 amino acids did not affect Env incorporation into virions but abrogated Env fusogenicity. Finally, removal of the entire TM cytoplasmic tail or deletion of as many as 6 amino acids into the membrane-spanning domain led to a complete loss of Env functions. Our results demonstrate that despite its relatively short length, the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain plays an important role in modulating Env-mediated viral functions.

  13. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of glycoprotein of rabies virus isolated from several species in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sato, Go; Itou, Takuya; Shoji, Youko; Miura, Yasuo; Mikami, Takeshi; Ito, Mikako; Kurane, Ichiro; Samara, Samir I; Carvalho, Adolorata A B; Nociti, Darci P; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo

    2004-07-01

    Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the region containing the glycoprotein (G) gene, which is related to pathogenicity and antigenicity, and the G-L intergenic region were carried out in 14 Brazilian rabies virus isolates. The isolates were classified as dog-related rabies virus (DRRV) or vampire bat-related rabies virus (VRRV), by nucleoprotein (N) analysis. The nucleotide and amino acid (AA) homologies of the area containing the G protein gene and G-L intergenic region were generally lower than those of the ectodomain. In both regions, nucleotide and deduced AA homologies were lower among VRRVs than among DRRVs. There were AA differences between DRRV and VRRV at 3 antigenic sites and epitopes (IIa, WB+ and III), suggesting that DRRV and VRRV can be distinguished by differences of antigenicity. In a comparison of phylogenetic trees between the ectodomain and the area containing the G protein gene and G-L intergenic region, the branching patterns of the chiropteran and carnivoran rabies virus groups differed, whereas there were clear similarities in patterns within the DRRV and VRRV groups. Additionally, the VRRV isolates were more closely related to chiropteran strains isolated from Latin America than to Brazilian DRRV. These results indicate that Brazilian rabies virus isolates can be classified as DRRV or VRRV by analysis of the G gene and the G-L intergenic region, as well as by N gene analysis. PMID:15297743

  14. Glycoprotein G deficient infectious laryngotracheitis virus is a candidate attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Joanne M; Browning, Glenn F; Hartley, Carol A; Gilkerson, James R

    2007-05-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), an alphaherpesvirus, causes respiratory disease in chickens and is currently controlled by vaccination with conventionally attenuated virus strains. These vaccines have limitations because of residual pathogenicity and reversion to virulence, suggesting that a novel vaccine strain that lacks virulence gene(s) may enhance disease control. Glycoprotein G (gG) has recently been identified as a virulence factor in ILTV. In this study the immunogenicity and relative pathogenicity of gG deficient ILTV was investigated in SPF chickens. Birds vaccinated with gG deficient ILTV were protected against clinical signs of disease following challenge with virulent ILTV and gG deficient ILTV was also shown to be less pathogenic than currently available commercial vaccine strains. Thus gG deficient ILTV appears to have potential as a vaccine candidate. PMID:17316926

  15. Comparison of the immunogenicity of two inactivated recombinant rabies viruses overexpressing the glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Navid, Muhammad Tariq; Li, Yingying; Zhou, Ming; Cui, Min; Fu, Zhen F; Tang, Lijun; Zhao, Ling

    2016-10-01

    Two recombinant rabies viruses overexpressing their glycoprotein (G) were compared in this study, with the overexpressed G inserted between P and M genes (named LBNSE-PM-G), and between the G and L genes (named LBNSE-GL-G), respectively. LBNSE-PM-G produced more G protein and induced stronger apoptosis than LBNSE-GL-G in infected cells, while the amount of virion-incorporated G in LBNSE-PM-G was less than in LBNSE-GL-G. Mice immunized with inactivated LBNSE-PM-G produced lower titers of virus-neutralizing antibody, and this recombinant conferred worse protection than LBNSE-GL-G. Our results suggest that over expressed G gene inserted between G and L, but not between P and M, enhanced the immunogenicity when used as an inactivated rabies vaccine. PMID:27438075

  16. The Ebola virus glycoprotein mediates entry via a non-classical dynamin-dependent macropinocytic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Mulherkar, Nirupama; Raaben, Matthijs; Torre, Juan Carlos de la; Whelan, Sean P.; Chandran, Kartik

    2011-10-25

    Ebola virus (EBOV) has been reported to enter cultured cell lines via a dynamin-2-independent macropinocytic pathway or clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The route(s) of productive EBOV internalization into physiologically relevant cell types remain unexplored, and viral-host requirements for this process are incompletely understood. Here, we use electron microscopy and complementary chemical and genetic approaches to demonstrate that the viral glycoprotein, GP, induces macropinocytic uptake of viral particles into cells. GP's highly-glycosylated mucin domain is dispensable for virus-induced macropinocytosis, arguing that interactions between other sequences in GP and the host cell surface are responsible. Unexpectedly, we also found a requirement for the large GTPase dynamin-2, which is proposed to be dispensable for several types of macropinocytosis. Our results provide evidence that EBOV uses an atypical dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like entry pathway to enter Vero cells, adherent human peripheral blood-derived monocytes, and a mouse dendritic cell line.

  17. Immunogenicity of a recombinant lumpy skin disease virus (neethling vaccine strain) expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein in cattle.

    PubMed

    Aspden, Kate; van Dijk, Alberdina A; Bingham, John; Cox, Dermot; Passmore, Jo-Ann; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2002-06-21

    Rabies virus (RV) readily infects cattle and causes a fatal neurological disease. A stable vaccine, which does not require the maintenance of a cold chain and that is administered once to elicit lifelong immunity to rabies would be advantageous. The present study describes the construction of a live recombinant lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) vaccine, expressing the glycoprotein of rabies virus (RG) and assessment of its ability to generate a humoral and cellular immune response against rabies virus in cattle. Cattle inoculated with the recombinant virus (rLSDV-RG) developed humoral immunity that was demonstrated in ELISA and neutralisation assays to RV. High titres of up to 1513IU/ml of RV neutralising antibodies were induced. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rLSDV-RG-immunised animals demonstrated the ability to proliferate in response to stimulation with inactivated RV, whereas the animal vaccinated with wild type LSDV did not. This recombinant vaccine candidate thus has the potential to be used in ruminants as a cost-effective vaccine against both lumpy skin disease (LSD) and rabies. PMID:12034095

  18. A Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Elicits a Strong Rift Valley Fever Virus Neutralizing Antibody Response in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Maxim; McVey, D. Scott; Wilson, William; Morozov, Igor; Young, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family, is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes serious morbidity and mortality in livestock and humans. The recent spread of the virus beyond its traditional endemic boundaries in Africa to the Arabian Peninsula coupled with the presence of susceptible vectors in nonendemic countries has created increased interest in RVF vaccines. Subunit vaccines composed of specific virus proteins expressed in eukaryotic or prokaryotic expression systems are shown to elicit neutralizing antibodies in susceptible hosts. RVFV structural proteins, amino-terminus glycoprotein (Gn), and carboxyl-terminus glycoprotein (Gc), were expressed using a recombinant baculovirus expression system. The recombinant proteins were reconstituted as a GnGc subunit vaccine formulation and evaluated for immunogenicity in a target species, sheep. Six sheep were each immunized with a primary dose of 50 μg of each vaccine immunogen with the adjuvant montanide ISA25; at day 21, postvaccination, each animal received a second dose of the same vaccine. The vaccine induced a strong antibody response in all animals as determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT80) showed the primary dose of the vaccine was sufficient to elicit potentially protective virus neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 40 to 160, and the second vaccine dose boosted the titer to more than 1280. Furthermore, all animals tested positive for neutralizing antibodies at day 328 postvaccination. ELISA analysis using the recombinant nucleocapsid protein as a negative marker antigen indicated that the vaccine candidate is DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) compatible and represents a promising vaccine platform for RVFV infection in susceptible species. PMID:25325319

  19. The paramyxovirus simian virus 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein, but not the fusion glycoprotein, is internalized via coated pits and enters the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Leser, G P; Ector, K J; Lamb, R A

    1996-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) glycoproteins of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) are expressed on the surface of virus-infected cells. Although the F protein was found to be expressed stably, the HN protein was internalized from the plasma membrane. HN protein lacks known internalization signals in its cytoplasmic domain that are common to many integral membrane proteins that are internalized via clathrin-coated pits. Thus, the cellular pathway of HN protein internalization was examined. Biochemical analysis indicated that HN was lost from the cell surface with a t1/2 of approximately 45-50 min and turned over with a t1/2 of approximately 2 h. Immunofluorescent analysis showed internalized SV5 HN in vesicle-like structures in a juxtanuclear pattern coincident with the localization of ovalbumin. In contrast the SV5 F glycoprotein and the HN glycoprotein of the highly related parainfluenza virus 3 (hPIV-3) were found only on the cell surface. Immunogold staining of HN on the surface of SV5-infected CV-1 cells and examination using electron microscopy, showed heavy surface labeling that gradually decreased with time. Concomitantly, gold particles were detected in the endosomal system and with increasing time, gold-labeled structures having the morphology of lysosomes were observed. On the plasma membrane approximately 5% of the gold-labeled HN was found in coated pits. The inhibition of the pinching-off of coated pits from the plasma membrane by cytosol acidification significantly reduced HN internalization. Internalized HN was co-localized with gold-conjugated transferrin, a marker for the early endosomal compartments, and with gold-conjugated bovine serum albumin, a marker for late endosomal compartments. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the HN glycoprotein is internalized via clathrin-coated pits and delivered to the endocytic pathway. Images PMID:8741847

  20. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  1. Low temperature-dependent salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein processing and recombinant virus-like particle formation.

    PubMed

    Metz, Stefan W; Feenstra, Femke; Villoing, Stephane; van Hulten, Marielle C; van Lent, Jan W; Koumans, Joseph; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) and sleeping disease (SD) are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV), an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus). SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish. Outbreaks of SAV are associated with large economic losses of ~17 to 50 million $/year. Current control strategies rely on vaccination with inactivated virus formulations that are cumbersome to obtain and have intrinsic safety risks. In this research we were able to obtain non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs) of SAV via expression of recombinant baculoviruses encoding SAV capsid protein and two major immunodominant viral glycoproteins, E1 and E2 in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells. However, this was only achieved when a temperature shift from 27°C to lower temperatures was applied. At 27°C, precursor E2 (PE2) was misfolded and not processed by host furin into mature E2. Hence, E2 was detected neither on the surface of infected cells nor as VLPs in the culture fluid. However, when temperatures during protein expression were lowered, PE2 was processed into mature E2 in a temperature-dependent manner and VLPs were abundantly produced. So, temperature shift-down during synthesis is a prerequisite for correct SAV glycoprotein processing and recombinant VLP production. PMID:21991361

  2. Low Temperature-Dependent Salmonid Alphavirus Glycoprotein Processing and Recombinant Virus-Like Particle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Villoing, Stephane; van Hulten, Marielle C.; van Lent, Jan W.; Koumans, Joseph; Vlak, Just M.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) and sleeping disease (SD) are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV), an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus). SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish. Outbreaks of SAV are associated with large economic losses of ∼17 to 50 million $/year. Current control strategies rely on vaccination with inactivated virus formulations that are cumbersome to obtain and have intrinsic safety risks. In this research we were able to obtain non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs) of SAV via expression of recombinant baculoviruses encoding SAV capsid protein and two major immunodominant viral glycoproteins, E1 and E2 in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells. However, this was only achieved when a temperature shift from 27°C to lower temperatures was applied. At 27°C, precursor E2 (PE2) was misfolded and not processed by host furin into mature E2. Hence, E2 was detected neither on the surface of infected cells nor as VLPs in the culture fluid. However, when temperatures during protein expression were lowered, PE2 was processed into mature E2 in a temperature-dependent manner and VLPs were abundantly produced. So, temperature shift-down during synthesis is a prerequisite for correct SAV glycoprotein processing and recombinant VLP production. PMID:21991361

  3. Receptor choice determinants in the envelope glycoproteins of amphotropic, xenotropic, and polytropic murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Battini, J L; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1992-01-01

    The envelope glycoproteins (SU) of mammalian type C retroviruses possess an amino-terminal domain of about 200 residues, which is involved in binding a cell surface receptor. In this domain, highly conserved amino acid sequences are interrupted by two segments of variable length and sequence, VRA and VRB. We have studied the role of these variable regions in receptor recognition and binding by constructing chimeric molecules in which portions of the amino-terminal domains from amphotropic (4070A), xenotropic (NZB), and polytropic (MCF 247) murine leukemia virus SU proteins were permuted. These chimeras, which exchanged either one or two variable regions, were expressed at the surface of replication-defective viral particles by a pseudotyping assay. Wild-type or recombinant env genes were transfected into a cell line producing Moloney murine leukemia virus particles devoid of envelope glycoproteins in which a retrovirus vector genome carrying an Escherichia coli lacZ gene was packaged. The host range and sensitivity to interference of pseudotyped virions were assayed, and we observed which permutations resulted in receptor switch or loss of function. Our results indicate that the determinants of receptor choice are found within the just 120 amino acids of SU proteins. Downstream sequences contribute to the stabilization of the receptor-specific structure. PMID:1310758

  4. Folding of rabies virus glycoprotein: epitope acquisition and interaction with endoplasmic reticulum chaperones.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Y

    1997-01-01

    Four well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against rabies virus glycoprotein (G) were used to study G folding in vivo. Two of the MAbs were able to immunoprecipitate incompletely oxidized folding intermediates. The two others recognized G only after folding was completed. By using these MAbs, the ability of G to undergo low-pH-induced conformational changes during folding was also investigated. It appeared that some domains acquire this ability before folding is completed. In addition, interactions between unfolded G and some of the molecular chaperones were analyzed. Unfolded G was associated with BiP and calnexin. Association with BiP was maximal immediately after the pulse, whereas association with calnexin was maximal after 5 to 10 min of chase. The effects of tunicamycin and castanospermine on chaperone binding and folding were also studied. In the presence of both drugs, calnexin binding was reduced, consistent with the view that calnexin specifically recognizes monoglucosylated oligosaccharides, but some residual binding was still observed, indicating that calnexin also recognizes the polypeptide chain. In the presence of both drugs, association with BiP was increased and prolonged and folding was impaired. However, the global effects of the drugs were different, since folding was much more efficient in the presence of castanospermine than in the presence of tunicamycin. Taken together, these results provide the basis to draw a schematic view of rabies virus glycoprotein folding. PMID:9094649

  5. A reassessment of the evolutionary timescale of bat rabies viruses based upon glycoprotein gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Natalia A; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Ellison, James A; Taylor, Steven T; Bergman, David L; Dew, Beverly; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2013-10-01

    Rabies, an acute progressive encephalomyelitis caused by viruses in the genus Lyssavirus, is one of the oldest known infectious diseases. Although dogs and other carnivores represent the greatest threat to public health as rabies reservoirs, it is commonly accepted that bats are the primary evolutionary hosts of lyssaviruses. Despite early historical documentation of rabies, molecular clock analyses indicate a quite young age of lyssaviruses, which is confusing. For example, the results obtained for partial and complete nucleoprotein gene sequences of rabies viruses (RABV), or for a limited number of glycoprotein gene sequences, indicated that the time of the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for current bat RABV diversity in the Americas lies in the seventeenth to eighteenth centuries and might be directly or indirectly associated with the European colonization. Conversely, several other reports demonstrated high genetic similarity between lyssavirus isolates, including RABV, obtained within a time interval of 25-50 years. In the present study, we attempted to re-estimate the age of several North American bat RABV lineages based on the largest set of complete and partial glycoprotein gene sequences compiled to date (n = 201) employing a codon substitution model. Although our results overlap with previous estimates in marginal areas of the 95 % high probability density (HPD), they suggest a longer evolutionary history of American bat RABV lineages (TMRCA at least 732 years, with a 95 % HPD 436-1107 years). PMID:23839669

  6. Membrane proteins specified by herpes simplex viruses. V. Identification of an Fc-binding glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Baucke, R B; Spear, P G

    1979-01-01

    A glycoprotein with affinity for the Fc region of immunoglobulin was isolated from extracts of cultured cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1, and experiments were done to characterize its properties and to investigate whether it could account for the Fc-binding activity previously demonstrated on the surfaces of intact herpes simplex virus-infected cells. The technique of affinity chromatography was used to identify and isolate the Fc-binding glycoprotein and to demonstrate the specificity of its interaction with immunoglobulin G-Fc. Although three electrophoretically distinguishable Fc-binding polypeptides were identified by affinity chromatography, these three species appear to be different forms of the same translation product, based on comparisons of proteolytic digestion products and on the kinetics of appearance of each form after a brief pulse with radioactive amino acids. The results suggest that one polypeptide, designated pE, is processed to yield gE1, which is in turn processed to yield gE2. Both gE1 and gE2 are glycosylated membrane proteins and both can be labeled by the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination of intact infected cells, indicating the presence of these proteins in surface membranes of the cells. Increases in the amounts of gE1 and gE2 at the cell surface were found to parallel the increase in Fc-binding activity of intact infected cells. Images PMID:229267

  7. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  8. Advanced vaccine candidates for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-11-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered. PMID:23202493

  9. Advanced Vaccine Candidates for Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered. PMID:23202493

  10. Aberrant trafficking of hepatitis B virus glycoproteins in cells in which N-glycan processing is inhibited

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xuanyong; Mehta, Anand; Dadmarz, Mitra; Dwek, Raymond; Blumberg, Baruch S.; Block, Timothy M.

    1997-01-01

    The role of N-glycan trimming in glycoprotein fate and function is unclear. We have recently shown that hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA is not efficiently secreted from cells in which α-glucosidase mediated N-glycan trimming is inhibited. Here it is shown that, in cells in glucosidase-inhibited cells, viral DNA, accompanied by envelope and core proteins, most likely accumulate within lysosomal compartments. Pulse–chase experiments show that although the viral glycoproteins (L, M, and S) are dysfunctional, in the sense that they do not mediate virion egress and are not efficiently secreted from the cell, they all still leave the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Surprisingly, however, the glycoproteins retained within the cell were not rapidly degraded, appearing as aggregates, enriched for L and M, with intracellular half-lives exceeding 20 h. Moreover, by 24 h after synthesis, a substantial fraction of the detained glycoproteins appeared to return to the ER, although a considerable amount was also found in the lysosomes. To our knowledge, this is the first report that shows, as a consequence of inhibiting glycosylation processing, certain glycoproteins (i) become dysfunctional and aggregate, yet still depart from the ER, and (ii) have extended rather than shortened half-lives. Taken together, these data suggest that proper intracellular routing of HBV glycoproteins requires ER glucosidase function. It is hypothesized that failure to process N-glycan causes HBV glycoproteins to aggregate and that impaired protein–protein interactions and trafficking are the result of misfolding. PMID:9122203

  11. The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins interact with cellular chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum and MV infection upregulates chaperone expression.

    PubMed

    Bolt, G

    2001-01-01

    The present study examines the coprecipitation of measles virus (MV) glycoproteins with host cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone proteins. Both the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) glycoproteins interacted with calnexin and GRP78, whereas interaction with calreticulin was only demonstrated for the H glycoprotein. The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor castanospermine reduced and delayed the association of F proteins with calnexin. We have previously shown that alpha-glucosidase activity is important for the functionality and antigenicity of the MV F glycoprotein and for release of MV particles from infected cells. Thus, interaction with calnexin appears vital for processing of nascent MV F protein into its functional conformation. In contrast to many other viral glycoproteins, a substantial proportion of the pulsed MV glycoproteins remained associated with ER chaperones for more than 2(1/2) h. Thus, the slow and incomplete migration of MV glycoproteins to the cell surface may result from their retention by ER chaperones, probably due to malfolding. MV infection upregulated the cellular expression of calreticulin and GRP78 and also increased their presence at the cell surface. The chaperone proteins are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, and their induction by MV may play a role for the pathogenesis of measles and its sequelae. PMID:11765911

  12. Crystal Structure of the Pre-fusion Nipah Virus Fusion Glycoprotein Reveals a Novel Hexamer-of-Trimers Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somnath; Yan, Lianying; Feng, YanRu; Wang, Lin-Fa; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lee, Benhur; Zhou, Z. Hong; Broder, Christopher C.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a paramyxovirus that infects host cells through the coordinated efforts of two envelope glycoproteins. The G glycoprotein attaches to cell receptors, triggering the fusion (F) glycoprotein to execute membrane fusion. Here we report the first crystal structure of the pre-fusion form of the NiV-F glycoprotein ectodomain. Interestingly this structure also revealed a hexamer-of-trimers encircling a central axis. Electron tomography of Nipah virus-like particles supported the hexameric pre-fusion model, and biochemical analyses supported the hexamer-of-trimers F assembly in solution. Importantly, structure-assisted site-directed mutagenesis of the interfaces between F trimers highlighted the functional relevance of the hexameric assembly. Shown here, in both cell-cell fusion and virus-cell fusion systems, our results suggested that this hexamer-of-trimers assembly was important during fusion pore formation. We propose that this assembly would stabilize the pre-fusion F conformation prior to cell attachment and facilitate the coordinated transition to a post-fusion conformation of all six F trimers upon triggering of a single trimer. Together, our data reveal a novel and functional pre-fusion architecture of a paramyxoviral fusion glycoprotein. PMID:26646856

  13. Crystal structure of glycoprotein E2 from bovine viral diarrhea virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Wang, Jimin; Kanai, Ryuta; Modis, Yorgo

    2013-01-01

    Pestiviruses, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, are important animal pathogens and are closely related to hepatitis C virus, which remains a major global health threat. They have an outer lipid envelope bearing two glycoproteins, E1 and E2, required for cell entry. They deliver their genome into the host cell cytoplasm by fusion of their envelope with a cellular membrane. The crystal structure of bovine viral diarrhea virus E2 reveals a unique protein architecture consisting of two Ig-like domains followed by an elongated β-stranded domain with a new fold. E2 forms end-to-end homodimers with a conserved C-terminal motif rich in aromatic residues at the contact. A disulfide bond across the interface explains the acid resistance of pestiviruses and their requirement for a redox activation step to initiate fusion. From the structure of E2, we propose alternative possible membrane fusion mechanisms. We expect the pestivirus fusion apparatus to be conserved in hepatitis C virus. PMID:23569276

  14. Positive evolution of the glycoprotein (GP) gene is related to transmission of the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Jing, Y X; Wang, L N; Wu, X M; Song, C X

    2016-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a fatal disease caused by the negative-strand RNA of the Ebola virus. A high-intensity outbreak of this fever was reported in West Africa last year; however, there is currently no definitive treatment strategy available for this disease. In this study, we analyzed the molecular evolutionary history and attempted to determine the positive selection sites in the Ebola genes using multiple-genomic sequences of the various Ebola virus subtypes, in order to gain greater clarity into the evolution of the virus and its various subtypes. Only the glycoprotein (GP) gene was positively selected among the 8 Ebola genes, with the other genes remaining in the purification stage. The positive selection sites in the GP gene were identified by a random-site model; these sites were found to be located in the mucin-like region, which is associated with transmembrane protein binding. Additionally, different branches of the phylogenetic tree displayed different positive sites, which in turn was responsible for differences in the cell adhesion ability of the virus. In conclusion, the pattern of positive sites in the GP gene is associated with the epidemiology and prevalence of Ebola in different areas. PMID:27051001

  15. Amino-terminal sequence of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.J.; Long, D.; Hogue-Angeletti, R.; Cohen, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus is a structural component of the virion envelope which stimulates production of high titers of herpes simplex virus type-common neutralizing antibody. The authors caried out automated N-terminal amino acid sequencing studies on radiolabeled preparations of gD-1 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 1) and gD-2 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 2). Although some differences were noted, particularly in the methionine and alanine profiles for gD-1 and gD-2, the amino acid sequence of a number of the first 30 residues of the amino terminus of gD-1 and gD-2 appears to be quite similar. For both proteins, the first residue is a lysine. When we compared out sequence data for gD-1 with those predicted by nucleic acid sequencing, the two sequences could be aligned (with one exception) starting at residue 26 (lysine) of the predicted sequence. Thus, the first 25 amino acids of the predicted sequence are absent from the polypeptides isolated from infected cells.

  16. Efficient generation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotypes bearing morbilliviral glycoproteins and their use in quantifying virus neutralising antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Drew, Angharad A.; Takahashi, Emi; McDonald, Michael; Baron, Michael D.; Gilbert, Martin; Cleaveland, Sarah; Haydon, Daniel T.; Hosie, Margaret J.; Willett, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Morbillivirus neutralising antibodies are traditionally measured using either plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNTs) or live virus microneutralisation tests (micro-NTs). While both test formats provide a reliable assessment of the strength and specificity of the humoral response, they are restricted by the limited number of viral strains that can be studied and often present significant biological safety concerns to the operator. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of morbillivirus neutralising antibodies. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of canine distemper virus (CDV) on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Further, by exchanging the glycoprotein expression construct, responses against distinct viral strains or species may be measured. Using this technique, we demonstrate cross neutralisation between CDV and peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). As an example of the value of the technique, we demonstrate that UK dogs vary in the breadth of immunity induced by CDV vaccination; in some dogs the neutralising response is CDV-specific while, in others, the neutralising response extends to the ruminant morbillivirus PPRV. This technique will facilitate a comprehensive comparison of cross-neutralisation to be conducted across the morbilliviruses. PMID:26706278

  17. Efficient generation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotypes bearing morbilliviral glycoproteins and their use in quantifying virus neutralising antibodies.

    PubMed

    Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Drew, Angharad A; Takahashi, Emi; McDonald, Michael; Baron, Michael D; Gilbert, Martin; Cleaveland, Sarah; Haydon, Daniel T; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-02-01

    Morbillivirus neutralising antibodies are traditionally measured using either plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNTs) or live virus microneutralisation tests (micro-NTs). While both test formats provide a reliable assessment of the strength and specificity of the humoral response, they are restricted by the limited number of viral strains that can be studied and often present significant biological safety concerns to the operator. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of morbillivirus neutralising antibodies. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of canine distemper virus (CDV) on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Further, by exchanging the glycoprotein expression construct, responses against distinct viral strains or species may be measured. Using this technique, we demonstrate cross neutralisation between CDV and peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). As an example of the value of the technique, we demonstrate that UK dogs vary in the breadth of immunity induced by CDV vaccination; in some dogs the neutralising response is CDV-specific while, in others, the neutralising response extends to the ruminant morbillivirus PPRV. This technique will facilitate a comprehensive comparison of cross-neutralisation to be conducted across the morbilliviruses. PMID:26706278

  18. Characterization of epitopes on the rabies virus glycoprotein by selection and analysis of escape mutants.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Firouzeh; Wandeler, Alexander I; Nadin-Davis, Susan A

    2016-07-15

    The glycoprotein (G) is the only surface protein of the lyssavirus particle and the only viral product known to be capable of eliciting the production of neutralizing antibodies. In this study, the isolation of escape mutants resistant to monoclonal antibody (Mab) neutralization was attempted by a selection strategy employing four distinct rabies virus strains: the extensively passaged Evelyn Rokitnicki Abelseth (ERA) strain and three field isolates representing two bat-associated variants and the Western Canada skunk variant (WSKV). No escape mutants were generated from either of the bat-associated viral variants but two neutralization mutants were derived from the WSKV isolate. Seven independent ERA mutants were recovered using Mabs directed against antigenic sites I (four mutants) and IIIa (three mutants) of the glycoprotein. The cross-neutralization patterns of these viral mutants were used to determine the precise location and nature of the G protein epitopes recognized by these Mabs. Nucleotide sequencing of the G gene indicated that those mutants derived using Mabs directed to antigenic site (AS) III all contained amino acid substitutions in this site. However, of the four mutants selected with AS I Mabs, two bore mutations within AS I as expected while the remaining two carried mutations in AS II. WSKV mutants exhibited mutations at the sites appropriate for the Mabs used in their selection. All ERA mutant preparations were more cytopathogenic than the parental virus when propagated in cell culture; when in vivo pathogenicity in mice was examined, three of these mutants exhibited reduced pathogenicity while the remaining four mutants exhibited comparable pathogenic properties to those of the parent virus. PMID:27132040

  19. A Substitution in the Transmembrane Region of the Glycoprotein Leads to an Unstable Attenuation of Machupo Virus

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Michael; Koma, Takaaki; Seregin, Alexey; Huang, Cheng; Miller, Milagros; Smith, Jennifer; Yun, Nadezhda; Smith, Jeanon

    2014-01-01

    Machupo virus (MACV) is the etiologic agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF). Utilizing a reverse-genetics system recently developed, we report the rescue of a rationally modified recombinant MACV containing a single mutation in the transmembrane region of the glycoprotein. Following challenge of susceptible mice, we identified a significant reduction in virulence in the novel virus. We also identified an instability leading to reversion of the single mutation to a wild-type genotype. PMID:25031335

  20. Lassa fever: the challenges of curtailing a deadly disease.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, Titus

    2012-01-01

    Today Lassa fever is mainly a disease of the developing world, however several imported cases have been reported in different parts of the world and there are growing concerns of the potentials of Lassa fever Virus as a biological weapon. Yet no tangible solution to this problem has been developed nearly half a decade after its identification. Hence, the paper is aimed at appraising the problems associated with LAF illness; the challenges in curbing the epidemic and recommendations on important focal points. A Review based on the documents from the EFAS conference 2011 and literature search on PubMed, Scopus and Science direct. The retrieval of relevant papers was via the University of British Columbia and University of Toronto Libraries. The two major search engines returned 61 and 920 articles respectively. Out of these, the final 26 articles that met the criteria were selected. Relevant information on epidemiology, burden of management and control were obtained. Prompt and effective containment of the Lassa fever disease in Lassa village four decades ago could have saved the West African sub-region and indeed the entire globe from the devastating effect and threats posed by this illness. That was a hard lesson calling for much more proactive measures towards the eradication of the illness at primary, secondary and tertiary levels of health care. PMID:22593791

  1. Lassa fever: the challenges of curtailing a deadly disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, Titus

    2012-01-01

    Today Lassa fever is mainly a disease of the developing world, however several imported cases have been reported in different parts of the world and there are growing concerns of the potentials of Lassa fever Virus as a biological weapon. Yet no tangible solution to this problem has been developed nearly half a decade after its identification. Hence, the paper is aimed at appraising the problems associated with LAF illness; the challenges in curbing the epidemic and recommendations on important focal points. A Review based on the documents from the EFAS conference 2011 and literature search on PubMed, Scopus and Science direct. The retrieval of relevant papers was via the University of British Columbia and University of Toronto Libraries. The two major search engines returned 61 and 920 articles respectively. Out of these, the final 26 articles that met the criteria were selected. Relevant information on epidemiology, burden of management and control were obtained. Prompt and effective containment of the Lassa fever disease in Lassa village four decades ago could have saved the West African sub-region and indeed the entire globe from the devastating effect and threats posed by this illness. That was a hard lesson calling for much more proactive measures towards the eradication of the illness at primary, secondary and tertiary levels of health care. PMID:22593791

  2. New monoclonal antibodies to the Ebola virus glycoprotein: Identification and analysis of the amino acid sequence of the variable domains.

    PubMed

    Panina, A A; Aliev, T K; Shemchukova, O B; Dement'yeva, I G; Varlamov, N E; Pozdnyakova, L P; Bokov, M N; Dolgikh, D A; Sveshnikov, P G; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2016-03-01

    We determined the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of variable domains of three new monoclonal antibodies to the glycoprotein of Ebola virus capsid. The framework and hypervariable regions of immunoglobulin heavy and light chains were identified. The primary structures were confirmed using massspectrometry analysis. Immunoglobulin database search showed the uniqueness of the sequences obtained. PMID:27193713

  3. N-linked Glycosylation of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Erns Glycoprotein Alters Virulence in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erns is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). We recently reported the influence of glycosylation of E2 in the virulence of CSFV strain Brescia. Here, we studied the effect of Erns N-linked glycosylation pattern on virulence of CSFV strain Brescia in swine. ...

  4. A recombinant measles vaccine virus expressing wild-type glycoproteins: consequences for viral spread and cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Johnston, I C; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J; Schneider-Schaulies, S

    1999-08-01

    Wild-type, lymphotropic strains of measles virus (MV) and tissue culture-adapted MV vaccine strains possess different cell tropisms. This observation has led to attempts to identify the viral receptors and to characterize the functions of the MV glycoproteins. We have functionally analyzed the interactions of MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of vaccine (Edmonston) and wild-type (WTF) strains in different combinations in transfected cells. Cell-cell fusion occurs when both Edmonston F and H proteins are expressed in HeLa or Vero cells. The expression of WTF glycoproteins in HeLa cells did not result in syncytia, yet they fused efficiently with cells of lymphocytic origin. To further investigate the role of the MV glycoproteins in virus cell entry and also the role of other viral proteins in cell tropism, we generated recombinant vaccine MVs containing one or both glycoproteins from WTF. These viruses were viable and grew similarly in lymphocytic cells. Recombinant viruses expressing the WTFH protein showed a restricted spread in HeLa cells but spread efficiently in Vero cells. Parental WTF remained restricted in both cell types. Therefore, not only differential receptor usage but also other cell-specific factors are important in determining MV cell tropism. PMID:10400788

  5. Herpes simplex viruses lacking glycoprotein D are unable to inhibit virus penetration: quantitative evidence for virus-specific cell surface receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.C.; Ligas, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein D (gD) plays an essential role in the entry of virus into cells. HSV mutants unable to express gD were constructed. The mutants can be propagated on VD60 cells, which supply the viruses with gD; however, virus particles lacking gD were produced in mutant-infected Vero cells. Virus particles with or without gD adsorbed to a large number of sites on the cell surface; however, virions lacking gD did not enter cells. Cells pretreated with UV-inactivated virions containing gD were resistant to infection with HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. In contrast, cell pretreated with UV-inactivated virions lacking gD could be infected with HSV-1 and HSV-2. If infectious HSV-1 was added prior to UV-inactivated virus particles containing gD, the infectious virus entered cells and replicated. Therefore, virus particles containing gD appear to block specific cell surface receptors which are very limited in number. Particles lacking gD are presumably unable to interact with these receptors, suggesting that gD is an essential receptor-binding polypeptide.

  6. Proteolytic cleavage of glycoprotein B is dispensable for in vitro replication, but required for syncytium formation of pseudorabies virus.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Katsunori

    2007-07-01

    Glycoprotein B (gB) is the most conserved glycoprotein among herpesviruses and it plays important roles in virus infectivity. In most herpesviruses, including pseudorabies virus (PRV), gB is cleaved by a cellular protease into two disulfide-linked subunits. In the present study, I found that the PRV gB generated in human colon carcinoma LoVo cells, which lack the ubiquitous protease furin, remained in the uncleaved form and the virus replicated in these cells without cell fusion. The uncleaved gB was converted into its subunits after furin digestion. The virus also replicated in Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells without cell fusion in the presence of a furin inhibitor, whereas distinct syncytia were formed in the absence of the inhibitor. LoVo cells constitutively expressing furin showed cell fusion when they were infected with the virus. Penetration kinetics assays revealed that the virus carrying uncleaved gB penetrated the cells at the same rate as the virus carrying cleaved gB. These results indicate that PRV gB is cleaved by furin and that the cleavage is dispensable for virus replication in vitro. Furthermore, gB cleavage is involved in syncytium formation but not in penetration kinetics, suggesting that different mechanisms operate between cell-cell fusion and virus-cell fusion by PRV. PMID:17554016

  7. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  8. Co-translational Processing of Glycoprotein 3 from Equine Arteritis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Matczuk, Anna Karolina; Kunec, Dušan; Veit, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Signal peptide cleavage and N-glycosylation of proteins are co-translational processes, but little is known about their interplay if they compete for adjacent sites. Here we report two unique findings for processing of glycoprotein 3 of equine arteritis virus. Glycoprotein 3 (Gp3) contains an N-terminal signal peptide, which is not removed, although bioinformatics predicts cleavage with high probability. There is an overlapping sequon, NNTT, adjacent to the signal peptide that we show to be glycosylated at both asparagines. Exchanging the overlapping sequon and blocking glycosylation allows signal peptide cleavage, indicating that carbohydrate attachment inhibits processing of a potentially cleavable signal peptide. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that a similar processing scheme may exist for some cellular proteins. Membrane fractionation and secretion experiments revealed that the signal peptide of Gp3 does not act as a membrane anchor, indicating that it is completely translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane attachment is caused by the hydrophobic C terminus of Gp3, which, however, does not span the membrane but rather attaches the protein peripherally to endoplasmic reticulum membranes. PMID:24142700

  9. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  10. Stable rescue of a glycoprotein gII deletion mutant of pseudorabies virus by glycoprotein gI of bovine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Kopp, A; Mettenleiter, T C

    1992-05-01

    Glycoproteins homologous to glycoprotein B (gB) of herpes simplex virus constitute the most highly conserved group of herpesvirus glycoproteins. This strong conservation of amino acid sequences might be indicative of a common functional role. Indeed, gB homologs have been implicated in the processes of viral entry and virus-mediated cell-cell fusion. Recently, we showed that pseudorabies virus (PrV) lacking the essential gB-homologous glycoprotein gII could be propagated on a cell line expressing the gB homolog of bovine herpesvirus 1, gI(BHV-1), leading to a phenotypic complementation of the gII defect (I. Rauh, F. Weiland, F. Fehler, G. Keil, and T.C. Mettenleiter, J. Virol. 65:621-631, 1991). However, this pseudotypic virus could still replicate only on complementing cell lines, thereby limiting experimental approaches to analyze the effects of the gB exchange in detail. We describe here the construction and isolation of a PrV recombinant, 9112C2, that lacks gII(PrV) but instead stably carries and expresses the gene encoding gI(BHV-1). The recombinant is able to replicate on noncomplementing cells with growth kinetics and final titers similar to those of its gII-positive wild-type PrV parent. Neutralization tests and immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated incorporation of gI(BHV-1) into 9112C2 virions with concomitant absence of gII(PrV). Analysis of in vitro host ranges of wild-type PrV, BHV-1, and recombinant 9112C2 showed that in cells of pig, rabbit, canine, monkey, or human origin, the plating efficiency of 9112C2 was similar to that of its PrV parent. Exchange of gII(PrV) for gI(BHV-1) in recombinant 9112C2 or by phenotypic complementation of gII- PrV propagated on gI(BHV-1)-expressing cell lines resulted in penetration kinetics intermediate between those of wild-type PrV and BHV-1. In conclusion, we report the first isolation of a viral recombinant in which a lethal glycoprotein mutation has been rescued by a homologous glycoprotein of a different