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Sample records for latently infected cell

  1. The Role of Latently Infected B Cells in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana Citlali; Horwitz, Marc Steven

    2015-01-01

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, it is believed that previous infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) may contribute in the development of MS. EBV has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematous, and cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma. EBV establishes a life-long latency in B cells with occasional reactivation of the virus throughout the individual’s life. The role played by B cells in MS pathology has been largely studied, yet is not clearly understood. In MS patients, Rituximab, a novel treatment that targets CD20+ B cells, has proven to have successful results in diminishing the number of relapses in remitting relapsing MS; however, the mechanism of how this drug acts has not been clearly established. In this review, we analyze the evidence of how B cells latently infected with EBV might be altering the immune system response and helping in the development of MS. We will also discuss how animal models, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (γHV-68), can be used as powerful tools in the study of the relationship between EBV, MS, and B cells. PMID:26579121

  2. Peripheral Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells Are a Novel Reservoir of Latent HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Archin, Nancie M.; Bateson, Rosalie; Dahl, Noelle P.; Crooks, Amanda M.; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Garrido, Carolina; Margolis, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Eradication of HIV infection will require the identification of all cellular reservoirs that harbor latent infection. Despite low or lack of CD4 receptor expression on Vδ2 T cells, infection of these cells has previously been reported. We found that upregulation of the CD4 receptor may render primary Vδ2 cells target for HIV infection in vitro and we propose that HIV-induced immune activation may allow infection of γδ T cells in vivo. We assessed the presence of latent HIV infection by measurements of DNA and outgrowth assays within Vδ2 cells in 18 aviremic patients on long-standing antiretroviral therapy. In 14 patients we recovered latent but replication-competent HIV from highly purified Vδ2 cells demonstrating that peripheral Vδ2 T cells are a previously unrecognized reservoir in which latent HIV infection is unexpectedly frequent. PMID:26473478

  3. Electrical response of a B lymphoma cell line latently infected with Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Safavieh, Mohammadali; Khetani, Sultan; Juillard, Franceline; Kaul, Vivasvat; Kanakasabapathy, Manoj Kumar; Kaye, Kenneth M; Shafiee, Hadi

    2016-06-15

    Certain viruses, such as herpesviruses, are capable of persistent and latent infection of host cells. Distinguishing and separating live, latently infected cells from uninfected cells is not easily attainable using current approaches. The ability to perform such separation would greatly enhance the ability to study primary, infected cells and potentially enable elimination of latently infected cells from the host. Here, the dielectrophoretic response of B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) were investigated and compared to uninfected B cells. We evaluated the effect of applied voltage, signal frequency, and flow rate of the sample on the cell capture efficiency. We achieved 37.1%±8.5% difference in capture efficiencies between latently KSHV-infected and uninfected BJAB B lymphoma cells at the chip operational conditions of 1V, 50kHz and 0.02μl/min sample flow rate. Our results show that latently infected B lymphoma cells demonstrated significantly different electrical response compared to uninfected B cells and DEP-based microchips can be potentially used for sorting latently infected cells based on their electrical properties. PMID:26851580

  4. Activation and lysis of human CD4 cells latently infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Asokan, Mangaiarkarasi; Wu, Lan; Wang, Keyun; Hataye, Jason; Casazza, Joseph P.; Guo, Xiaoti; Shi, Wei; Georgiev, Ivelin; Zhou, Tongqing; Chen, Xuejun; O'Dell, Sijy; Todd, John-Paul; Kwong, Peter D.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Yang, Zhi-yong; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of AIDS with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains lifelong largely because the virus persists in latent reservoirs. Elimination of latently infected cells could therefore reduce treatment duration and facilitate immune reconstitution. Here we report an approach to reduce the viral reservoir by activating dormant viral gene expression and directing T lymphocytes to lyse previously latent, HIV-1-infected cells. An immunomodulatory protein was created that combines the specificity of a HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody with that of an antibody to the CD3 component of the T-cell receptor. CD3 engagement by the protein can stimulate T-cell activation that induces proviral gene expression in latently infected T cells. It further stimulates CD8 T-cell effector function and redirects T cells to lyse these previously latent-infected cells through recognition of newly expressed Env. This immunomodulatory protein could potentially help to eliminate latently infected cells and deplete the viral reservoir in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26485194

  5. Killing of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected fibroblasts during latent infection by activated natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Nick C; Goodier, Martin R; Robey, Rebecca C; Bower, Mark; Gotch, Frances M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes life-long infection by evading clearance by the host immune system. In de novo infection and lytic replication, KSHV escapes cytotoxic T cells and NK cells through downregulation of MHC class-I and ICAM-1 molecules and associated antigens involved in forming and sustaining the immunological synapse. However, the efficacy of such mechanisms in the context of the predominantly latent KSHV infection reported in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesions is unclear. Using primary dermal fibroblasts in a novel in vitro model of chronic latent KSHV infection, we generated target cells with viral loads similar to those in spindle cells extracted from KS lesions. We show that latently KSHV-infected fibroblasts had normal levels of MHC-class I, ICAM-1, HLA-E and NKG2D ligand expression, were resistant to NK-cell natural cytotoxicity and were highly susceptible to killing by cytokine-activated immunocompetent NK cells. KSHV-infected fibroblasts expressed normal levels of IFN-γR1 and responded to exogenous IFN-γ by upregulating MHC class I, ICAM-1 and HLA-E and resisting activated NK-cell killing. These data demonstrate that physiologically relevant levels of latent KSHV infection in primary cells cause limited activation of resting NK cells and confer little specific resistance to control by activated NK cells. PMID:21509779

  6. Signaling through Toll-like receptors triggers HIV-1 replication in latently infected mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, J Bruce; Little, Dawn M; Villinger, Francois; Ellis, Jane E; Ansari, Aftab A

    2004-04-01

    Evidence that human progenitor mast cells are susceptible to infection with CCR5-tropic strains of HIV-1 and that circulating HIV-1-infected FcepsilonRIalpha(+) cells with a similar progenitor phenotype have been isolated from AIDS patients has led to speculation that mast cells may serve as a potential reservoir for infectious HIV-1. In this study, progenitor mast cells, developed in vitro from CD34(+) cord blood stem cells, were experimentally infected with the CCR5-tropic strain HIV-1Bal after 28 days in culture as they reached their HIV-1-susceptible progenitor stage. HIV-1 p24 Ag levels were readily detectable by day 7 postinfection (PI), peaked at 2-3 wk PI as mature (tryptase/chymase-positive) HIV-1 infection-resistant mast cells emerged, and then steadily declined to below detectable limits by 10 wk PI, at which point integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA was confirmed by PCR quantitation in ( approximately 34% of) latently infected mast cells. Stimulation by ligands for Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, or TLR9 significantly enhanced viral replication in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both HIV-1-infected progenitor and latently infected mature mast cells, without promoting degranulation, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, or dysregulation of TLR agonist-induced cytokine production in infected mast cells. Limiting dilution analysis of TLR activated, latently infected mature mast cells indicated that one in four was capable of establishing productive infections in A301 sentinel cells. Taken together, these results indicate that mast cells may serve both as a viral reservoir and as a model for studying mechanisms of postintegration latency in HIV infection. PMID:15034054

  7. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, B. A.; Lau, B.; Jackson, S. E.; Wills, M. R.; Sinclair, J. H.; Poole, E.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  8. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells.

    PubMed

    Krishna, B A; Lau, B; Jackson, S E; Wills, M R; Sinclair, J H; Poole, E

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  9. CD4 T Cell Responses in Latent and Chronic Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Senta; Mandaric, Sanja; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of tasks which is fulfilled by CD4 T cells in the setting of viral infections is large, ranging from support of CD8 T cells and humoral immunity to exertion of direct antiviral effector functions. While our knowledge about the differentiation pathways, plasticity, and memory of CD4 T cell responses upon acute infections or immunizations has significantly increased during the past years, much less is still known about CD4 T cell differentiation and their beneficial or pathological functions during persistent viral infections. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the differentiation, direct or indirect antiviral effector functions, and the regulation of virus-specific CD4 T cells in the setting of persistent latent or active chronic viral infections with a particular emphasis on herpes virus infections for the former and chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection for the latter. PMID:23717308

  10. Selected Drugs with Reported Secondary Cell-Differentiating Capacity Prime Latent HIV-1 Infection for Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Takao; Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Kappes, John; Jones, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Reactivation of latent HIV-1 infection is considered our best therapeutic means to eliminate the latent HIV-1 reservoir. Past therapeutic attempts to systemically trigger HIV-1 reactivation using single drugs were unsuccessful. We thus sought to identify drug combinations consisting of one component that would lower the HIV-1 reactivation threshold and a synergistic activator. With aclacinomycin and dactinomycin, we initially identified two FDA-approved drugs that primed latent HIV-1 infection in T cell lines and in primary T cells for reactivation and facilitated complete reactivation at the population level. This effect was correlated not with the reported primary drug effects but with the cell-differentiating capacity of the drugs. We thus tested other cell-differentiating drugs/compounds such as cytarabine and aphidicolin and found that they also primed latent HIV-1 infection for reactivation. This finding extends the therapeutic promise of N′-N′-hexamethylene-bisacetamide (HMBA), another cell-differentiating agent that has been reported to trigger HIV-1 reactivation, into the group of FDA-approved drugs. To this end, it is also noteworthy that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a polar compound that was initially developed as a second-generation cell-differentiating agent using HMBA as a structural template and which is now marketed as the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat, also has been reported to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. Our findings suggest that drugs with primary or secondary cell-differentiating capacity should be revisited as HIV-1-reactivating agents as some could potentially be repositioned as candidate drugs to be included in an induction therapy to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:22696646

  11. Selected drugs with reported secondary cell-differentiating capacity prime latent HIV-1 infection for reactivation.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Takao; Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Kappes, John; Jones, Jennifer; Kutsch, Olaf

    2012-09-01

    Reactivation of latent HIV-1 infection is considered our best therapeutic means to eliminate the latent HIV-1 reservoir. Past therapeutic attempts to systemically trigger HIV-1 reactivation using single drugs were unsuccessful. We thus sought to identify drug combinations consisting of one component that would lower the HIV-1 reactivation threshold and a synergistic activator. With aclacinomycin and dactinomycin, we initially identified two FDA-approved drugs that primed latent HIV-1 infection in T cell lines and in primary T cells for reactivation and facilitated complete reactivation at the population level. This effect was correlated not with the reported primary drug effects but with the cell-differentiating capacity of the drugs. We thus tested other cell-differentiating drugs/compounds such as cytarabine and aphidicolin and found that they also primed latent HIV-1 infection for reactivation. This finding extends the therapeutic promise of N'-N'-hexamethylene-bisacetamide (HMBA), another cell-differentiating agent that has been reported to trigger HIV-1 reactivation, into the group of FDA-approved drugs. To this end, it is also noteworthy that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a polar compound that was initially developed as a second-generation cell-differentiating agent using HMBA as a structural template and which is now marketed as the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat, also has been reported to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. Our findings suggest that drugs with primary or secondary cell-differentiating capacity should be revisited as HIV-1-reactivating agents as some could potentially be repositioned as candidate drugs to be included in an induction therapy to trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:22696646

  12. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  13. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  14. Photodynamic therapy induced production of cytokines by latent Epstein Barr virus infected epithelial tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koon, H. K.; Lo, K. W.; Lung, M. L.; Chang, C. K. C.; Wong, R. N. S.; Mak, N. K.

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a method to treat cancer or non-cancer diseases by activation of the light-sensitive photosensitizers. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of certain cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and B cell lymphoma. This study aims to examine the effects of EBV infection on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cells after the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM PDT treatment. Epithelial tumor cell lines HONE-1 and latent EBV-infected HONE-1 (EBV-HONE-1) cells were used in this study. Cells were treated with the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM for 24 hours before light irradiation. RT-PCR and quantitative ELISA methods were used for the evaluation of mRNA expression and production of cytokines, respectively. Results show that Zn-BC-AM PDT increases the production of IL-1a and IL-1b in EBV-HONE-1. Over a 10-fold increase in the production of IL-6 was observed in the culture supernatant of Zn-BC-AM PDT-treated HONE-1 cells. PDT-induced IL-6 production was observed in HONE-1 cells. EBV-HONE-1 has a higher background level of IL-8 production than the HONE-1. The production of IL-8 was suppressed in EBV-HONE-1cells after Zn-BC-AM PDT. Our results indicate that the response of HONE-1 cells to Zn-BC-AM PDT depends on the presence of latent EBV infection. Since IL-8 is a cytokine with angiogenic activity, Zn-BC-AM PDT may exert an anti-angiogenic effect through the suppression of IL-8 production by the EBV-infected cells.

  15. Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a dangerous infectious disease characterized by a tight interplay between mycobacteria and host cells in granulomatous lesions (granulomas) during the latent, asymptomatic stage of infection. Mycobacterium-host cell relationships were analyzed in granulomas obtained from various organs of BALB/c mice with chronic TB infection caused by in vivo exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria were found to be morphologically and functionally heterogeneous (in size, shape, and replication rates in colonies) in granuloma macrophages, dendritic cells, and multinucleate Langhans giant cells. Cord formation by BCG-mycobacteria in granuloma cells has been observed. Granuloma macrophages retained their ability to ingest damaged lymphocytes and thrombocytes in the phagosomes; however, their ability to destroy BCG-mycobacteria contained in these cells was compromised. No colocalization of BCG-mycobacteria and the LysoTracker dye was observed in the mouse cells. Various relationships between granuloma cells and BCG-mycobacteria were observed in different mice belonging to the same line. Several mice totally eliminated mycobacterial infection. Granulomas in the other mice had mycobacteria actively replicating in cells of different types and forming cords, which is an indicator of mycobacterial virulence and, probably, a marker of the activation of tuberculous infection in animals. PMID:26064970

  16. Transcriptional activation of bovine leukemia virus in blood cells from experimentally infected, asymptomatic sheep with latent infections.

    PubMed Central

    Lagarias, D M; Radke, K

    1989-01-01

    Infection by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is characterized by a long latency period, after which some individuals develop B-cell tumors. The behavior of BLV and related retroviruses during the latency period between initial infection and subsequent tumorigenesis is poorly understood. We used in situ hybridization to detect BLV transcripts in individual peripheral blood mononuclear cells from experimentally infected, asymptomatic sheep with latent infections. Viral RNA was not found in most peripheral blood cells that had been isolated as rapidly as possible from circulating blood, but it was present in rare cells. BLV RNA transcripts increased in a biphasic manner within a few hours after the blood cells were placed in culture. Exposure to fetal bovine serum was identified as the principal cause of this transcriptional activation, which occurred in fewer than 1 in 1,000 cells. Agents known to activate immune cells polyclonally caused a further increase in the number of cells containing BLV RNA within 8 h. In some cases, the numbers of viral transcripts within individual cells also increased. Thus, BLV is not detectably expressed in most resting lymphocytes circulating in the blood, but its transcription is activated by components of fetal bovine serum and can be augmented by molecules that mimic activation of immune cells. This activation, which might occur in lymphoid tissue during an immune response, may lead to the synthesis of viral regulatory proteins that are thought to initiate tumorigenesis through host cell genes. Images PMID:2539506

  17. Anti-HIV Designer T Cells Progressively Eradicate a Latently Infected Cell Line by Sequentially Inducing HIV Reactivation then Killing the Newly Gp120-Positive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Gautam K; Sango, Kaori; Selliah, Nithianandan; Ma, Qiangzhong; Skowron, Gail; Junghans, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    The current antiretroviral therapy (ART) can effectively reduce plasma HIV loads to undetectable levels, but cannot eliminate latently infected resting memory CD4 T cells that persist for the lifetime of infected patients. Therefore, designing new therapeutic approaches to eliminate these latently infected cells or the cells that produce HIV upon reactivation from latency is a priority in the ART era in order to progress to a cure of HIV. Here, we show that “designer” T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), CD4-CD28-CD3ζ, can target and kill HIV Env-expressing cells. Further, they secrete effector cytokines upon contact with HIV Env+ target cells that can reactivate latent HIV in a cell line model, thereby exposing those cells to recognition and killing by anti-HIV CAR+ T cells. Taken to the limit, this process could form the basis for an eventual functional or sterilizing cure for HIV in patients. PMID:24074590

  18. Analysis of human immunodeficiency virus-infected tissues by amplification and in situ hybridization reveals latent and permissive infections at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Embretson, J; Zupancic, M; Beneke, J; Till, M; Wolinsky, S; Ribas, J L; Burke, A; Haase, A T

    1993-01-01

    Latent and productive viral infections are at the extremes of the spectrum of virus-cell interactions that are thought to play a major role in the ability of such important human pathogens as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to elude host defenses and cause disease. The recent development of PCR-based methods to amplify target sequences in individual cells in routinely fixed tissues affords opportunities to directly examine the subtle and covert virus-cell relationships at the latent end of the spectrum that are inaccessible to analysis by conventional in situ hybridization techniques. We have now used PCR in situ with in situ hybridization to document latent and permissive HIV infection in routinely fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. In one of the first specimens we examined, a tumor biopsy from an HIV-infected individual, we found many of the lymphocytes and lymphocytes infiltrating the tumor had HIV DNA that was detectable only by PCR in situ. The fraction of positive cells varied regionally, but there were foci where most of the cells contained HIV DNA. Most of these lymphocytes and macrophages are latently infected, as we could detect HIV RNA in fewer than one in a thousand of these cells. We also detected HIV RNA, surprisingly, in 6% of the tumor cells, where the number of copies of viral RNA per cell was equivalent to productively infected cell lines. The alternative states of HIV-gene expression and high local concentration of latently infected lymphocytes and monocytes revealed by these studies conceptually supports models of lentiviral pathogenesis that attribute persistence to the reservoir of latently infected cells and disease to the consequences of viral-gene expression in this population. The magnitude of infection of lymphocytes documented in this report is also consistent with the emerging view that HIV infection per se could contribute substantially to depletion of immune cells in AIDS. Images PMID:8419941

  19. Stable Phenotypic Changes of the Host T Cells Are Essential to the Long-Term Stability of Latent HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seu, Lillian; Sabbaj, Steffanie; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Anderson, Joshua C.; Davies, Elizabeth; Wolschendorf, Frank; Willey, Christopher D.; Saag, Michael S.; Goepfert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extreme stability of the latent HIV-1 reservoir in the CD4+ memory T cell population prevents viral eradication with current antiretroviral therapy. It has been demonstrated that homeostatic T cell proliferation and clonal expansion of latently infected T cells due to viral integration into specific genes contribute to this extraordinary reservoir stability. Nevertheless, given the constant exposure of the memory T cell population to specific antigen or bystander activation, this reservoir stability seems remarkable, unless it is assumed that latent HIV-1 resides exclusively in memory T cells that recognize rare antigens. Another explanation for the stability of the reservoir could be that the latent HIV-1 reservoir is associated with an unresponsive T cell phenotype. We demonstrate here that host cells of latent HIV-1 infection events were functionally altered in ways that are consistent with the idea of an anergic, unresponsive T cell phenotype. Manipulations that induced or mimicked an anergic T cell state promoted latent HIV-1 infection. Kinome analysis data reflected this altered host cell phenotype at a system-wide level and revealed how the stable kinase activity changes networked to stabilize latent HIV-1 infection. Protein-protein interaction networks generated from kinome data could further be used to guide targeted genetic or pharmacological manipulations that alter the stability of latent HIV-1 infection. In summary, our data demonstrate that stable changes to the signal transduction and transcription factor network of latently HIV-1 infected host cells are essential to the ability of HIV-1 to establish and maintain latent HIV-1 infection status. IMPORTANCE The extreme stability of the latent HIV-1 reservoir allows the infection to persist for the lifetime of a patient, despite completely suppressive antiretroviral therapy. This extreme reservoir stability is somewhat surprising, since the latently HIV-1 infected CD4+ memory T cells that

  20. Genome-wide analysis of T cell responses during acute and latent simian varicella virus infections in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Haberthur, Kristen; Kraft, Aubrey; Arnold, Nicole; Park, Byung; Meyer, Christine; Asquith, Mark; Dewane, Jesse; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2013-11-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the etiological agent of varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (HZ [shingles]). Clinical observations suggest that VZV-specific T cell immunity plays a more critical role than humoral immunity in the prevention of VZV reactivation and development of herpes zoster. Although numerous studies have characterized T cell responses directed against select VZV open reading frames (ORFs), a comprehensive analysis of the T cell response to the entire VZV genome has not yet been conducted. We have recently shown that intrabronchial inoculation of young rhesus macaques with simian varicella virus (SVV), a homolog of VZV, recapitulates the hallmarks of acute and latent VZV infection in humans. In this study, we characterized the specificity of T cell responses during acute and latent SVV infection. Animals generated a robust and broad T cell response directed against both structural and nonstructural viral proteins during acute infection in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and peripheral blood. During latency, T cell responses were detected only in the BAL fluid and were lower and more restricted than those observed during acute infection. Interestingly, we identified a small set of ORFs that were immunogenic during both acute and latent infection in the BAL fluid. Given the close genome relatedness of SVV and VZV, our studies highlight immunogenic ORFs that may be further investigated as potential components of novel VZV vaccines that specifically boost T cell immunity. PMID:23986583

  1. Dual-Affinity Re-Targeting proteins direct T cell–mediated cytolysis of latently HIV-infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Julia A.M.; Pickeral, Joy; Liu, Liqin; Stanfield-Oakley, Sherry A.; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Garrido, Carolina; Pollara, Justin; LaBranche, Celia; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M. Anthony; Yang, Yinhua; Parks, Robert; Archin, Nancie; Allard, Brigitte; Kirchherr, Jennifer; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Gay, Cynthia L.; Cohen, Myron S.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Soderberg, Kelly; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David; Moore, Paul; Johnson, Syd; Koenig, Scott; Haynes, Barton F.; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L.; Margolis, David M.; Ferrari, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of HIV-specific immunity is likely required to eliminate latent HIV infection. Here, we have developed an immunotherapeutic modality aimed to improve T cell–mediated clearance of HIV-1–infected cells. Specifically, we employed Dual-Affinity Re-Targeting (DART) proteins, which are bispecific, antibody-based molecules that can bind 2 distinct cell-surface molecules simultaneously. We designed DARTs with a monovalent HIV-1 envelope-binding (Env-binding) arm that was derived from broadly binding, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity–mediating antibodies known to bind to HIV-infected target cells coupled to a monovalent CD3 binding arm designed to engage cytolytic effector T cells (referred to as HIVxCD3 DARTs). Thus, these DARTs redirected polyclonal T cells to specifically engage with and kill Env-expressing cells, including CD4+ T cells infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, thereby obviating the requirement for HIV-specific immunity. Using lymphocytes from patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), we demonstrated that DARTs mediate CD8+ T cell clearance of CD4+ T cells that are superinfected with the HIV-1 strain JR-CSF or infected with autologous reservoir viruses isolated from HIV-infected–patient resting CD4+ T cells. Moreover, DARTs mediated CD8+ T cell clearance of HIV from resting CD4+ T cell cultures following induction of latent virus expression. Combined with HIV latency reversing agents, HIVxCD3 DARTs have the potential to be effective immunotherapeutic agents to clear latent HIV-1 reservoirs in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26413868

  2. Genome-wide analysis of histone modifications in latently HIV-1 infected T cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jihwan; Lim, Chae Hyun; Ham, Seokjin; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Roh, Tae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The transcriptional silencing of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) provirus in latently infected cells is a major hurdle on the pathway to HIV-1 elimination. The epigenetic mechanisms established by histone modifications may affect the transcriptional silencing of HIV-1 and viral latency. A systematic epigenome profiling could be applicable to develop new epigenetic diagnostic markers for detecting HIV-1 latency. Design: The HIV-1 latency cell lines (NCHA1, NCHA2 and ACH2] were compared with CD4+ T-cell line (A3.01). Methods: The histone modification profiles obtained from chromatin immunoprecipiation followed by sequencing (ChIP-Seq) for histone H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were systematically examined and differential gene expression patterns along with levels of histone modifications were used for network analysis. Results: The HIV-1 latency gave rise to downregulation of histone H3K4me3 and H3K9ac levels in 387 and 493 regions and upregulation in 451 and 962 sites, respectively. By network analysis, five gene clusters were associated with downregulated histone modifications and six gene clusters came up with upregulated histone modifications. Integration of gene expression with epigenetic information revealed that the cell cycle regulatory genes such as CDKN1A (p21) and cyclin D2 (CCND2) identified by differentially modified histones might play an important role in maintaining the HIV-1 latency. Conclusion: The transcriptional regulation by epigenetic memory should play a key role in the evolution and maintenance of HIV-1 latency accompanied by modulation of signalling molecules in the host cells. PMID:24762674

  3. The switch from latent to productive infection in epstein-barr virus-infected B cells is associated with sensitization to NK cell killing.

    PubMed

    Pappworth, Isabel Y; Wang, Eddie C; Rowe, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Following activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cells from latent to productive (lytic) infection, there is a concomitant reduction in the level of cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and an impaired antigen-presenting function that may facilitate evasion from EBV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. In some other herpesviruses studied, most notably human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), evasion of virus-specific CD8+ effector responses via downregulation of surface MHC class I molecules is supplemented with specific mechanisms for evading NK cells. We now report that EBV differs from HCMV in this respect. While latently infected EBV-positive B cells were resistant to lysis by two NK lines and by primary polyclonal NK cells from peripheral blood, these effectors efficiently killed cells activated into the lytic cycle. Susceptibility to NK lysis coincided not only with downregulation of HLA-A, -B, and -C molecules that bind to the KIR family of inhibitory receptors on NK cells but also with downregulation of HLA-E molecules binding the CD94/NKG2A inhibitory receptors. Conversely, ULBP-1 and CD112, ligands for the NK cell-activating receptors NKG2D and DNAM-1, respectively, were elevated. Susceptibility of the virus-producing target cells to NK cell lysis was partially reversed by blocking ULBP-1 or CD112 with specific antibodies. These results highlight a fundamental difference between EBV and HCMV with regards to evasion of innate immunity. PMID:17079298

  4. Latent cytomegalovirus infection enhances anti-tumour cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C+ NK cells in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bigley, A B; Rezvani, K; Shah, N; Sekine, T; Balneger, N; Pistillo, M; Agha, N; Kunz, H; O'Connor, D P; Bollard, C M; Simpson, R J

    2016-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection markedly expands NKG2C+/NKG2A- NK cells, which are potent killers of infected cells expressing human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E. As HLA-E is also over-expressed in several haematological malignancies and CMV has been linked to a reduced risk of leukaemic relapse, we determined the impact of latent CMV infection on NK cell cytotoxicity against four tumour target cell lines with varying levels of HLA-E expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 (leukaemia origin) and U266 (multiple myeloma origin) target cells was strikingly greater in healthy CMV-seropositive donors than seronegative donors and was associated strongly with target cell HLA-E and NK cell NKG2C expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E transfected lymphoma target cells (221.AEH) was ∼threefold higher with CMV, while NK cell cytotoxicity against non-transfected 721.221 cells was identical between the CMV groups. NK cell degranulation (CD107a(+) ) and interferon (IFN)-γ production to 221.AEH cells was localized almost exclusively to the NKG2C subset, and antibody blocking of NKG2C completely eliminated the effect of CMV on NK cell cytotoxicity against 221.AEH cells. Moreover, 221.AEH feeder cells and interleukin (IL)-15 were found to expand NKG2C(+) /NKG2A(-) NK cells preferentially from CMV-seronegative donors and increase NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E(+) tumour cell lines. We conclude that latent CMV infection enhances NK cell cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C(+) NK cells, which may be beneficial in preventing the initiation and progression of haematological malignancies characterized by high HLA-E expression. PMID:26940026

  5. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells. PMID:27066505

  6. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  7. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S

    2015-10-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo. PMID:26496627

  8. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo. PMID:26496627

  9. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recentmore » clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.« less

  10. A Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, AR-42, Reactivates HIV-1 from Chronically and Latently Infected CD4+ T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Mates, Jessica M.; de Silva, Suresh; Lustberg, Mark; Van Deusen, Kelsey; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Wu, Li; Kwiek, Jesse J.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) latency is a major barrier to a cure of AIDS. Latently infected cells harbor an integrated HIV-1 genome but are not actively producing HIV-1. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, such as vorinostat (SAHA), have been shown to reactivate latent HIV-1. AR-42, a modified HDAC inhibitor, has demonstrated efficacy against malignant melanoma, meningioma, and acute myeloid leukemia and is currently used in clinical trials for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma. In this study, we evaluated the ability of AR-42 to reactivate HIV-1 in the two established CD4+ T-cell line models of HIV-1 latency. In HIV-1 chronically infected ACH-2 cells, AR-42-induced histone acetylation was more potent and robust than that of vorinostat. Although AR-42 and vorinostat were equipotent in their ability to reactivate HIV-1, AR-42-induced maximal HIV-1 reactivation was twofold greater than vorinostat in ACH-2 and J-Lat (clone 9.2) cells. These data provide rationale for assessing the efficacy of AR-42-mediated HIV-1 reactivation within primary CD4+ T-cells. PMID:26855567

  11. Circulating herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1)-specific CD8+ T cells do not access HSV-1 latently infected trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapeutic vaccines can be designed to enhance existing T cell memory populations for increased protection against re-infection. In the case of herpes simplex virus type 1, recurrent disease results from reactivation of latent virus in sensory ganglia, which is controlled in part by a ganglia-resident HSV-specific memory CD8+ T cell population. Thus, an important goal of a therapeutic HSV-1 vaccine would be to enhance this population. Methods HSV-1-infected mice were treated with TAK-779 to block CCR5- and CXCR3-mediated CD8+ T cell migration during both acute and latent infections. Additionally, HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells were transferred into HSV-1 latently infected mice to mimic the effect of a therapeutic vaccine, and their migration into trigeminal ganglia (TG) was traced during steady-state latency, or during recovery of the TG-resident memory CD8+ T cell population following stress-, and corticosterone-induced depletion and HSV-1 reactivation from latency. Bromodeoxy uridine (BrdU) incorporation measured cell proliferation in vivo. Results TAK-779 treatment during acute HSV-1 infection reduced the number of infiltrating CD8+ T cells but did not alter the number of viral genome copies. TAK-779 treatment during HSV latency did not affect the size of the TG-resident memory CD8+ T cell population. Transferred HSV-specific CD8+ T cells failed to access latently infected TG during steady-state latency, or during recovery of the TG resident HSV-specific CD8+ T cell population following exposure of latently infected mice to stress and corticosterone. Recovery of the HSV-specific CD8+ T cell population after stress and corticosterone treatment occurred with homeostatic levels of cell division and did not require CD4+ T cell help. Conclusions Our findings are consistent with the notion that the CD8+ T cells in latently infected TG are a tissue-resident memory (Trm) population that is maintained without replenishment from the periphery, and that when this

  12. Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection induces changes in multifunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sauzullo, Ilaria; Mengoni, Fabio; Mascia, Claudia; Rossi, Raffaella; Lichtner, Miriam; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mastroianni, Claudio M

    2016-02-01

    To ascertain whether multiparametric flow cytometry assessment of multifunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells can distinguish between untreated and treated patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), we enrolled 14 LTBI subjects treated with isoniazid (INH) therapy, 16 untreated LTBI patients, and 25 healthy controls. The analysis of mono-functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells producing single cytokines showed significant differences only between uninfected and infected LTBI subjects (both treated and untreated). Conversely, the analysis of multifunctional CD4(+) T cells revealed a significant reduction in the frequency of two CD4(+) T cells subsets, those producing IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α simultaneously (triple positive; p = 0.005) and those producing IL-2 alone (p = 0.0359), as well as a shift towards T cells producing only one cytokine in treated as compared to untreated LTBI subjects. Assigning a triple-positive CD4(+) T cells a cut-off >0.082 %, 94 % of untreated LTBI patients were scored as positive, as compared to only 28 % of treated LTBI patients and none of the healthy controls. No significant differences between untreated and treated LTBI subjects in terms of Mtb-specific CD8(+) T cell cytokine profiles (p > 0.05) were identified. The significant changes in the cytokine profiles of Mtb-specific T cells after INH therapy suggest that analysis of multifunctional T cells may be a promising means for the monitoring of LTBI treatment success. PMID:26108901

  13. Limited but durable changes to cellular gene expression in a model of latent adenovirus infection are reflected in childhood leukemic cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ornelles, D.A.; Gooding, L.R.; Dickherber, M.L.; Policard, M.; Garnett-Benson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal lymphocytes support latent infections of species C adenoviruses. Because infected lymphocytes resist re-infection with adenovirus, we sought to identify changes in cellular gene expression that could inhibit the infectious process. The expression of over 30,000 genes was evaluated by microarray in persistently infected B-and T-lymphocytic cells. BBS9, BNIP3, BTG3, CXADR, SLFN11 and SPARCL1 were the only genes differentially expressed between mock and infected B cells. Most of these genes are associated with oncogenesis or cancer progression. Histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors released the repression of some of these genes. Cellular and viral gene expression was compared among leukemic cell lines following adenovirus infection. Childhood leukemic B-cell lines resist adenovirus infection and also show reduced expression of CXADR and SPARCL. Thus adenovirus induces limited changes to infected B-cell lines that are similar to changes observed in childhood leukemic cell lines. PMID:27085068

  14. Limited but durable changes to cellular gene expression in a model of latent adenovirus infection are reflected in childhood leukemic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ornelles, D A; Gooding, L R; Dickherber, M L; Policard, M; Garnett-Benson, C

    2016-07-01

    Mucosal lymphocytes support latent infections of species C adenoviruses. Because infected lymphocytes resist re-infection with adenovirus, we sought to identify changes in cellular gene expression that could inhibit the infectious process. The expression of over 30,000 genes was evaluated by microarray in persistently infected B-and T-lymphocytic cells. BBS9, BNIP3, BTG3, CXADR, SLFN11 and SPARCL1 were the only genes differentially expressed between mock and infected B cells. Most of these genes are associated with oncogenesis or cancer progression. Histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors released the repression of some of these genes. Cellular and viral gene expression was compared among leukemic cell lines following adenovirus infection. Childhood leukemic B-cell lines resist adenovirus infection and also show reduced expression of CXADR and SPARCL. Thus adenovirus induces limited changes to infected B-cell lines that are similar to changes observed in childhood leukemic cell lines. PMID:27085068

  15. Optimization of chemical induction conditions for human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) reactivation with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) from latently-infected BC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenbin; Galvin, Teresa A; Ma, Hailun; Ma, Yunkun; Muller, Jacqueline; Khan, Arifa S

    2011-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) persists as episomal DNA in latently-infected cells and can establish two alternative life cycles, latent or lytic. 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is a known inducer of HHV-8 in several human primary effusion lymphoma cell lines and has been widely used for HHV-8 reactivation; however, induction conditions have differed, resulting in varying levels of virus expression. We have used HHV-8 latently-infected BC-3 cells as a model to determine critical parameters for optimizing virus reactivation by TPA. We found that cell growth properties and drug treatment conditions were important for maximum reactivation of HHV-8. Addition of TPA to cells in the early log phase of a sigmoidal growth curve, which was tightly associated with high percentage of the cells in early S phase and with lower histone deacetylase activity in the cells, provided the optimum cell conditions for latent virus to switch to lytic replication. Furthermore, increasing TPA concentration (up to 320 ng per ml) at 48 h exposure time resulted in increased virus production. The results demonstrate the use of a step-wise strategy with chemical induction that may facilitate broad detection of latent DNA viruses and novel virus discovery. PMID:21470875

  16. Cis and Trans Acting Factors Involved in Human Cytomegalovirus Experimental and Natural Latent Infection of CD14 (+) Monocytes and CD34 (+) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pari, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    The parameters involved in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latent infection in CD14 (+) and CD34 (+) cells remain poorly identified. Using next generation sequencing we deduced the transcriptome of HCMV latently infected CD14 (+) and CD34 (+) cells in experimental as well as natural latency settings. The gene expression profile from natural infection in HCMV seropositive donors closely matched experimental latency models, and included two long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), RNA4.9 and RNA2.7 as well as the mRNAs encoding replication factors UL84 and UL44. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on experimentally infected CD14 (+) monocytes followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) were employed to demonstrate both UL84 and UL44 proteins interacted with the latent viral genome and overlapped at 5 of the 8 loci identified. RNA4.9 interacts with components of the polycomb repression complex (PRC) as well as with the MIE promoter region where the enrichment of the repressive H3K27me3 mark suggests that this lncRNA represses transcription. Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE), which identifies nucleosome-depleted viral DNA, was used to confirm that latent mRNAs were associated with actively transcribed, FAIRE analysis also showed that the terminal repeat (TR) region of the latent viral genome is depleted of nucleosomes suggesting that this region may contain an element mediating viral genome maintenance. ChIP assays show that the viral TR region interacts with factors associated with the pre replication complex and a plasmid subclone containing the HCMV TR element persisted in latently infected CD14 (+) monocytes, strongly suggesting that the TR region mediates viral chromosome maintenance. PMID:23717203

  17. Zebularine reactivates silenced E-cadherin but unlike 5-Azacytidine does not induce switching from latent to lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection in Burkitt's lymphoma Akata cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sieta P; Rechsteiner, Markus P; Berger, Christoph; Sigrist, Jürg A; Nadal, David; Bernasconi, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of regulatory genes by aberrant methylation contributes to tumorigenesis. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTI) represent promising new drugs for anti-cancer therapies. The DNMTI 5-Azacytidine is effective against myelodysplastic syndrome, but induces switching of latent to lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in vitro and results in EBV DNA demethylation with the potential of induction of lytic EBV in vivo. This is of considerable concern given that recurrent lytic EBV has been linked with an increased incidence of EBV-associated lymphomas. Based on the distinct properties of action we hypothesized that the newer DNMTI Zebularine might differ from 5-Azacytidine in its potential to induce switching from latent to lytic EBV. Here we show that both 5-Azacytidine and Zebularine are able to induce expression of E-cadherin, a cellular gene frequently silenced by hypermethylation in cancers, and thus demonstrate that both DNMTI are active in our experimental setting consisting of EBV-harboring Burkitt's lymphoma Akata cells. Quantification of mRNA expression of EBV genes revealed that 5-Azacytidine induces switching from latent to lytic EBV and, in addition, that the immediate-early lytic infection progresses to early and late lytic infection. Furthermore, 5-Azacytidine induced upregulation of the latent EBV genes LMP2A, LMP2B, and EBNA2 in a similar fashion as observed following switching of latent to lytic EBV upon cross-linking of the B-cell receptor. In striking contrast, Zebularine did not exhibit any effect neither on lytic nor on latent EBV gene expression. Thus, Zebularine might be safer than 5-Azacytidine for the treatment of cancers in EBV carriers and could also be applied against EBV-harboring tumors, since it does not induce switching from latent to lytic EBV which may result in secondary EBV-associated malignancies. PMID:17214905

  18. Human peripheral blood and bone marrow Epstein-Barr virus-specific T-cell repertoire in latent infection reveals distinct memory T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Manuel; Na, Il-Kang; Letsch, Anne; Haase, Doreen; Bauer, Sandra; Meisel, Christian; Roemhild, Andy; Reinke, Petra; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2010-06-01

    EBV infection leads to life-long viral persistence. Although EBV infection can result in chronic disease and malignant transformation, most carriers remain disease-free as a result of effective control by T cells. EBV-specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells could be demonstrated in acute and chronic infection as well as during latency. Recent studies, however, provide evidence that assessing IFN-gamma alone is insufficient to assess the quantity and quality of a T-cell response. Using overlapping peptide pools of latent EBV nuclear antigen 1 and lytic BZLF-1 protein and multicolor flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the majority of ex vivo EBV-reactive T cells in healthy virus carriers are indeed IL-2- and/or TNF-producing memory cells, the latter being significantly more frequent in BM. After in vitro expansion, a substantial number of EBV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells retained a CC-chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7)-positive memory phenotype. Based on their cytokine profiles, six different EBV-specific T-cell subsets could be distinguished with TNF-single or TNF/IL-2-double producing cells expressing the highest CCR7 levels resembling early-differentiated memory T cells. Our study delineates the memory T-cell profile of a protective immune response and provides a basis for analyzing T-cell responses in EBV-associated diseases. PMID:20232341

  19. Tuning of AKT-pathway by Nef and its blockade by protease inhibitors results in limited recovery in latently HIV infected T-cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Colin, Laurence; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Bouchat, Sophie; Varin, Audrey; Larbi, Anis; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Kabeya, Kabamba; Vanhulle, Caroline; Delacourt, Nadège; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Coquard, Laurie; Borch, Alexandra; König, Renate; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stephane; Rohr, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Fulop, Tamas; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Akt signaling plays a central role in many biological processes, which are key players in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. We found that Akt interacts with HIV-1 Nef protein. In primary T cells treated with exogenous Nef or acutely infected with Nef-expressing HIV-1 in vitro, Akt became phosphorylated on serine473 and threonine308. In vitro, Akt activation mediated by Nef in T-cells was blocked by HIV protease inhibitors (PI), but not by reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). Ex vivo, we found that the Akt pathway is hyperactivated in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from cART naïve HIV-1-infected patients. PBLs isolated from PI-treated patients, but not from RTI-treated patients, exhibited decreased Akt activation, T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production. We found that PI but not RTI can block HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected J-Lat lymphoid cells stimulated with various stimuli. Using luciferase measurement, we further confirmed that Nef-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latency in 1G5 cells was blocked by PI parallel to decreased Akt activation. Our results indicate that PI-mediated blockade of Akt activation could impact the HIV-1 reservoir and support the need to further assess the therapeutic use of HIV-1 PI in order to curtail latently infected cells in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:27076174

  20. Tuning of AKT-pathway by Nef and its blockade by protease inhibitors results in limited recovery in latently HIV infected T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Colin, Laurence; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Bouchat, Sophie; Varin, Audrey; Larbi, Anis; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Kabeya, Kabamba; Vanhulle, Caroline; Delacourt, Nadège; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Coquard, Laurie; Borch, Alexandra; König, Renate; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stephane; Rohr, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Fulop, Tamas; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Akt signaling plays a central role in many biological processes, which are key players in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. We found that Akt interacts with HIV-1 Nef protein. In primary T cells treated with exogenous Nef or acutely infected with Nef-expressing HIV-1 in vitro, Akt became phosphorylated on serine(473) and threonine(308). In vitro, Akt activation mediated by Nef in T-cells was blocked by HIV protease inhibitors (PI), but not by reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). Ex vivo, we found that the Akt pathway is hyperactivated in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from cART naïve HIV-1-infected patients. PBLs isolated from PI-treated patients, but not from RTI-treated patients, exhibited decreased Akt activation, T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production. We found that PI but not RTI can block HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected J-Lat lymphoid cells stimulated with various stimuli. Using luciferase measurement, we further confirmed that Nef-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latency in 1G5 cells was blocked by PI parallel to decreased Akt activation. Our results indicate that PI-mediated blockade of Akt activation could impact the HIV-1 reservoir and support the need to further assess the therapeutic use of HIV-1 PI in order to curtail latently infected cells in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:27076174

  1. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome and latent infection gene expression in normal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; de Rivera, Michelle Wendoline Garcia-Niño; Hoshino, Miyako; Sakashita, Hideaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Nozaki, Tadashige; González-López, Blanca Silvia; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    A relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cancer of lymphoid and epithelial tissues such as Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma, and oral cancer has been reported. EBV is transmitted orally and infects B cells and epithelial cells. However, it has remained uncertain whether EBV plays a role in carcinogenesis of oral mucosal tissue. In the present study, we detected the EBV genome and latent EBV gene expression in normal mucosal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to clarify whether EBV is involved in carcinogenesis of the oral cavity. We examined 333 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples (morphologically normal oral mucosa 30 samples, gingivitis 32, tonsillitis 17, oral epithelial dysplasia 83, OSCC 150, and NPC 21). EBV latent infection genes (EBNA-2, LMP-1) were detected not only in OSCC (50.2 %, 10.7 %) but also in severe epithelial dysplasia (66.7 %, 44.4 %), mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia (43.1 %, 18.5 %), gingivitis (78.1 %, 21.9 %), and normal mucosa (83.3 %, 23.3 %). Furthermore, the intensity of EBV latent infection gene expression (EBER, LMP-1) was significantly higher in severe epithelial dysplasia (94.4 %, 72.2 %) than in OSCC (34.7 %, 38.7 %). These results suggest that EBV latent infection genes and their increased expression in severe epithelial dysplasia might play an important role in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the oral cavity. PMID:26449822

  2. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Induces Nrf2 Activation in Latently Infected Endothelial Cells through SQSTM1 Phosphorylation and Interaction with Polyubiquitinated Keap1

    PubMed Central

    Gjyshi, Olsi; Flaherty, Stephanie; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Johnson, Karen E.; Chandran, Bala

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the cellular master regulator of the antioxidant response, dissociates from its inhibitor Keap1 when activated by stress signals and participates in the pathogenesis of viral infections and tumorigenesis. Early during de novo infection of endothelial cells, KSHV induces Nrf2 through an intricate mechanism involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). When we investigated the Nrf2 activity during latent KSHV infection, we observed increased nuclear serine-40-phosphorylated Nrf2 in human KS lesions compared to that in healthy tissues. Using KSHV long-term-infected endothelial cells (LTC) as a cellular model for KS, we demonstrated that KSHV infection induces Nrf2 constitutively by extending its half-life, increasing its phosphorylation by protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) via the infection-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/PGE2 axis and inducing its nuclear localization. Nrf2 knockdown in LTC decreased expression of antioxidant genes and genes involved in KS pathogenesis such as the NAD(P)H quinone oxidase 1 (NQO1), gamma glutamylcysteine synthase heavy unit (γGCSH), the cysteine transporter (xCT), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) genes. Nrf2 activation was independent of oxidative stress but dependent on the autophagic protein sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1; p62). SQSTM1 levels were elevated in LTC, a consequence of protein accumulation due to decreased autophagy and Nrf2-mediated transcriptional activation. SQSTM1 was phosphorylated on serine-351 and -403, while Keap1 was polyubiquitinated with lysine-63–ubiquitin chains, modifications known to increase their mutual affinity and interaction, leading to Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. The latent KSHV protein Fas-associated death domain-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-inhibitory protein (vFLIP) increased SQSTM1 expression and activated Nrf2. Collectively, these results demonstrate that KSHV

  3. Tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay values are associated with antimicrobial peptides expression in  polymorphonuclear cells during latent tuberculous infection.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto; Serrano-Escobedo, Carmen J; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Rivas-Santiago, Cesar; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    It has been reported that patients with progressive tuberculosis (TB) express abundant amounts of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) cathelicidin (LL-37) and human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) in circulating cells, whereas latent TB infected donors showed no differences when compared with purified protein derivative (PPD) and QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT)-healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether LL-37 and HNP-1 production correlates with higher tuberculin skin test (TST) and QFT values in TB household contacts. Twenty-six TB household contact individuals between 26-58 years old TST and QFT positive with at last two years of latent TB infection were recruited. AMPs production by polymorphonuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry and correlation between TST and QFT values was analysed. Our results showed that there is a positive correlation between levels of HNP-1 and LL-37 production with reactivity to TST and/or QFT levels. This preliminary study suggests the potential use of the expression levels of these peptides as biomarkers for progression in latent infected individuals. PMID:24937049

  4. Tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay values are associated with antimicrobial peptides expression in  polymorphonuclear cells during latent tuberculous infection

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto; Serrano-Escobedo, Carmen J; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Rivas-Santiago, Cesar; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that patients with progressive tuberculosis (TB) express abundant amounts of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) cathelicidin (LL-37) and human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) in circulating cells, whereas latent TB infected donors showed no differences when compared with purified protein derivative (PPD) and QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT)-healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether LL-37 and HNP-1 production correlates with higher tuberculin skin test (TST) and QFT values in TB household contacts. Twenty-six TB household contact individuals between 26-58 years old TST and QFT positive with at last two years of latent TB infection were recruited. AMPs production by polymorphonuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry and correlation between TST and QFT values was analysed. Our results showed that there is a positive correlation between levels of HNP-1 and LL-37 production with reactivity to TST and/or QFT levels. This preliminary study suggests the potential use of the expression levels of these peptides as biomarkers for progression in latent infected individuals. PMID:24937049

  5. Latent infection of myeloid progenitors by human cytomegalovirus protects cells from FAS-mediated apoptosis through the cellular IL-10/PEA-15 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jonathan C. H.; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection of primary CD34+ progenitor cells by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in their increased survival in the face of pro-apoptotic signals. For instance, we have shown previously that primary myeloid cells are refractory to FAS-mediated killing and that cellular IL-10 (cIL-10) is an important survival factor for this effect. However, how cIL-10 mediates this protection is unclear. Here, we have shown that cIL-10 signalling leading to upregulation of the cellular factor PEA-15 mediates latency-associated protection of CD34+ progenitor cells from the extrinsic death pathway. PMID:25957098

  6. The effects of age and latent cytomegalovirus infection on the redeployment of CD8+ T cell subsets in response to acute exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Guillaume; Bollard, Catherine M; Bigley, Austin B; Hanley, Patrick J; Blaney, James W; LaVoy, Emily C P; Pircher, Hanspeter; Simpson, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic exercise evokes a rapid redeployment of cytotoxic T cell subsets with high expression of β2 adrenergic receptors, presumably to enhance immunosurveillance during acute stress. As this response is affected by age and infection history, this study examined latent CMV infection as a potential confounder to age-related differences in blood CD8+ T-cell responses to exercise. Healthy young (n=16) and older (n=16) humans counterbalanced by CMV IgG serostatus (positive or negative) exercised for 30-min at ∼80% peak cycling power. Those with CMV redeployed ∼2-times more CD8+ T-cells and ∼6-times more KLRG1+/CD28- and CD45RA+/CCR7- CD8+ subsets than non-infected exercisers. Seronegative older exercisers had an impaired redeployment of total CD8+ T-cells, CD45RA+/CCR7+ and KLRG1-/CD28+ CD8+ subsets compared to young. Redeployed CD8+ T-cell numbers were similar between infected young and old. CMVpp65 specific CD8+ cells in HLA/A2(∗) subjects increased ∼2.7-fold after exercise, a response that was driven by the KLRG1+/CD28-/CD8+ subset. Stimulating PBMCs before and after exercise with CMVpp65 and CMV IE-1 antigens and overlapping peptide pools revealed a 2.1 and 4.4-fold increases in CMVpp65 and CMV IE-1 IFN-γ secreting cells respectively. The breadth of the T cell response was maintained after exercise with the magnitude of the response being amplified across the entire epitope repertoire. To conclude, latent CMV infection overrides age-related impairments in CD8+ T-cell redeployment with exercise. We also show for the first time that many T-cells redeployed with exercise are specific to CMVpp65 and CMV IE-1 antigens, have broad epitope specificity, and are mostly of a high-differentiated effector memory phenotype. PMID:23684819

  7. Glucocorticosteroids trigger reactivation of human cytomegalovirus from latently infected myeloid cells and increase the risk for HCMV infection in D+R+ liver transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Ellen; Sauviller, Sarah; Lau, Betty; Kesteleyn, Bart; Griffiths, Paul; Burroughs, Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Graft rejection in transplant patients is managed clinically by suppressing T-cell function with immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisolone and methylprednisolone. In such immunocompromised hosts, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen and can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Currently, the effect of glucocorticosteroids (GCSs) on the HCMV life cycle remains unclear. Previous reports showed enhanced lytic replication of HCMV in vitro in the presence of GCSs. In the present study, we explored the implications of steroid exposure on latency and reactivation. We observed a direct effect of several GCSs used in the clinic on the activation of a quiescent viral major immediate-early promoter in stably transfected THP-1 monocytic cells. This activation was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist Ru486 and by shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GR. Consistent with this observation, prednisolone treatment of latently infected primary monocytes resulted in HCMV reactivation. Analysis of the phenotype of these cells showed that treatment with GCSs was correlated with differentiation to an anti-inflammatory macrophage-like cell type. On the basis that these observations may be pertinent to HCMV reactivation in post-transplant settings, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence, viral kinetics and viral load of HCMV in liver transplant patients in the presence or absence of GCS treatment. We observed that combination therapy of baseline prednisolone and augmented methylprednisolone, upon organ rejection, significantly increased the incidence of HCMV infection in the intermediate risk group where donor and recipient are both HCMV seropositive (D+R+) to levels comparable with the high risk D+R− group. PMID:25312585

  8. Glucocorticosteroids trigger reactivation of human cytomegalovirus from latently infected myeloid cells and increase the risk for HCMV infection in D+R+ liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Ellen; Sauviller, Sarah; Lau, Betty; Kesteleyn, Bart; Griffiths, Paul; Burroughs, Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Sinclair, John; Van Loock, Marnix

    2015-01-01

    Graft rejection in transplant patients is managed clinically by suppressing T-cell function with immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisolone and methylprednisolone. In such immunocompromised hosts, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen and can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Currently, the effect of glucocorticosteroids (GCSs) on the HCMV life cycle remains unclear. Previous reports showed enhanced lytic replication of HCMV in vitro in the presence of GCSs. In the present study, we explored the implications of steroid exposure on latency and reactivation. We observed a direct effect of several GCSs used in the clinic on the activation of a quiescent viral major immediate-early promoter in stably transfected THP-1 monocytic cells. This activation was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist Ru486 and by shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GR. Consistent with this observation, prednisolone treatment of latently infected primary monocytes resulted in HCMV reactivation. Analysis of the phenotype of these cells showed that treatment with GCSs was correlated with differentiation to an anti-inflammatory macrophage-like cell type. On the basis that these observations may be pertinent to HCMV reactivation in post-transplant settings, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence, viral kinetics and viral load of HCMV in liver transplant patients in the presence or absence of GCS treatment. We observed that combination therapy of baseline prednisolone and augmented methylprednisolone, upon organ rejection, significantly increased the incidence of HCMV infection in the intermediate risk group where donor and recipient are both HCMV seropositive (D+R+) to levels comparable with the high risk D+R- group. PMID:25312585

  9. CD4+ T cell polyfunctional profile in HIV-TB coinfection are similar between individuals with latent and active TB infection

    PubMed Central

    Canaday, David H.; Sridaran, Sankar; Van Epps, Puja; Aung, Htin; Burant, Christopher J.; Nsereko, Mary; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Betts, Michael R.; Toossi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cell counts of HIV-infected individuals with pulmonary TB (PTB) are higher than with other opportunistic infections suggesting that progression to PTB is not merely due to T cell depletion but also dysfunction. There are limited data examining T cell functional signatures in human HIV-TB co-infection particularly in PTB which accounts for about 80% of active TB disease overall. We examined a cohort of HIV-infected anti-retroviral naïve individuals in Kampala, Uganda, a TB endemic area using multi-parametric flow cytometry analysis to determine IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, and TNF-α production in CD4+ memory T cell subsets. The cytokine frequency and polyfunctionality profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV-infected persons with latent TB infection (LTBI) or PTB is comparable. This similarity suggests that LTBI may represent a smoldering state of persistent MTB replication rather than dormant infection. This may be a contributory mechanism to the significantly increased risk of progression to PTB in this population. PMID:25956974

  10. Lytic Gene Expression Is Frequent in HSV-1 Latent Infection and Correlates with the Engagement of a Cell-Intrinsic Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Joel Z.; Russell, Tiffany A.; Spelman, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are significant human pathogens that provide one of the best-described examples of viral latency and reactivation. HSV latency occurs in sensory neurons, being characterized by the absence of virus replication and only fragmentary evidence of protein production. In mouse models, HSV latency is especially stable but the detection of some lytic gene transcription and the ongoing presence of activated immune cells in latent ganglia have been used to suggest that this state is not entirely quiescent. Alternatively, these findings can be interpreted as signs of a low, but constant level of abortive reactivation punctuating otherwise silent latency. Using single cell analysis of transcription in mouse dorsal root ganglia, we reveal that HSV-1 latency is highly dynamic in the majority of neurons. Specifically, transcription from areas of the HSV genome associated with at least one viral lytic gene occurs in nearly two thirds of latently-infected neurons and more than half of these have RNA from more than one lytic gene locus. Further, bioinformatics analyses of host transcription showed that progressive appearance of these lytic transcripts correlated with alterations in expression of cellular genes. These data show for the first time that transcription consistent with lytic gene expression is a frequent event, taking place in the majority of HSV latently-infected neurons. Furthermore, this transcription is of biological significance in that it influences host gene expression. We suggest that the maintenance of HSV latency involves an active host response to frequent viral activity. PMID:25058429

  11. Early and sustained expression of latent and host modulating genes in coordinated transcriptional program of KSHV productive primary infection of human primary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Min; Zhou, Fu-Chun; Ye, Feng-Chun; Pan, Hong-Yi; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Coordinated expression of viral genes in primary infection is essential for successful infection of host cells. We examined the expression profiles of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) transcripts in productive primary infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells by whole-genome reverse-transcription real-time quantitative PCR. The latent transcripts were expressed early and sustained at high levels throughout the infection while the lytic transcripts were expressed in the order of immediate early, early, and lytic transcripts, all of which culminated before the production of infectious virions. Significantly, transcripts encoding genes with host modulating functions, including mitogenic and cell cycle-regulatory, immune-modulating, and anti-apoptotic genes, were expressed before those encoding viral structure and replication genes, and sustained at high levels throughout the infection, suggesting KSHV manipulation of host environment to facilitate infection. The KSHV transcriptional program in a primary infection defined in this study should provide a basis for further investigation of virus–cell interactions. PMID:16154170

  12. Investigation of Functional Activity of Cells in Granulomatous Inflammatory Lesions from Mice with Latent Tuberculous Infection in the New Ex Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The new ex vivo model system measuring functional input of individual granuloma cells to formation of granulomatous inflammatory lesions in mice with latent tuberculous infection has been developed and described in the current study. Monolayer cultures of cells that migrated from individual granulomas were established in the proposed culture settings for mouse spleen and lung granulomas induced by in vivo exposure to BCG vaccine. The cellular composition of individual granulomas was analyzed. The expression of the leukocyte surface markers such as phagocytic receptors CD11b, CD11c, CD14, and CD16/CD32 and the expression of the costimulatory molecules CD80, CD83, and CD86 were tested as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines (IFNγ and IL-1α) and growth factors (GM-CSF and FGFb) for cells of individual granulomas. The colocalization of the phagocytic receptors and costimulatory molecules in the surface microdomains of granuloma cells (with and without acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria) has also been detected. It was found that some part of cytokine macrophage producers have carried acid-fast mycobacteria. Detected modulation in dynamics of production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and leukocyte surface markers by granuloma cells has indicated continued processes of activation and deactivation of granuloma inflammation cells during the latent tuberculous infection progress in mice. PMID:24198843

  13. Secreted Oral Epithelial Cell Membrane Vesicles Induce Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation in Latently Infected B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Swan, Kenneth; Zhang, Xin; Cao, Subing; Brett, Zoe; Drury, Stacy; Fewell, Claire; Puetter, Adriane; Wang, Xia; Ferris, MaryBeth; Sullivan, Deborah E.; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the oral epithelium, peripheral stores of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are transmitted from infiltrating B cells to epithelial cells. Once the virus is transmitted to epithelial cells, the highly permissive nature of this cell type for lytic replication allows virus amplification and exchange to other hosts. Since the initial transfer of EBV from B cells to epithelial cells requires transitioning of the B-cell to a state that induces virus reactivation, we hypothesized that there might be epithelium-specific signals that allow the infiltrating B cells to sense the appropriate environment to initiate reactivation and begin this exchange process. We previously found that the epithelium-specific miR-200 family of microRNAs promotes EBV lytic replication. Here we show that there are high levels of miR-200 family members in oral and tonsillar epithelia and in saliva. Analysis of cultured oral epithelial cells (OKF6) showed that they actively secrete membrane vesicles (exosomes) that are enriched with miR-200 family members. Coculturing of EBV-positive B cells with OKF6 cells induced viral reactivation. Further, treatment of EBV-positive B cells with OKF6 cell-derived membrane vesicles promoted reactivation. Using a cell system that does not naturally express miR-200 family members, we found that enforced expression of a miR-200 family member produced membrane vesicles that were able to induce the lytic cascade in EBV-positive B cells. We propose that membrane vesicles secreted by oral and tonsillar epithelial cells may serve as a tissue-specific environmental cue that initiates reactivation in B cells, promoting the transfer of virus from peripheral B-cell stores to the oral epithelium to facilitate virus amplification and exchange to other hosts. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an important human pathogen that is causally associated with several lymphomas and carcinomas. The switch from latency to the lytic cycle is critical for successful host infection

  14. The Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus MicroRNA MiR-UL148D during Latent Infection in Primary Myeloid Cells Inhibits Activin A-triggered Secretion of IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Betty; Poole, Emma; Krishna, Benjamin; Sellart, Immaculada; Wills, Mark R.; Murphy, Eain; Sinclair, John

    2016-01-01

    The successful establishment and maintenance of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is dependent on the expression of a subset of viral genes. Whilst the exact spectrum and functions of these genes are far from clear, inroads have been made for protein-coding genes. In contrast, little is known about the expression of non-coding RNAs. Here we show that HCMV encoded miRNAs are expressed de novo during latent infection of primary myeloid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-UL148D, one of the most highly expressed viral miRNAs during latent infection, directly targets the cellular receptor ACVR1B of the activin signalling axis. Consistent with this, we observed upregulation of ACVR1B expression during latent infection with a miR-UL148D deletion virus (ΔmiR-UL148D). Importantly, we observed that monocytes latently infected with ΔmiR-UL148D are more responsive to activin A stimulation, as demonstrated by their increased secretion of IL-6. Collectively, our data indicates miR-UL148D inhibits ACVR1B expression in latently infected cells to limit proinflammatory cytokine secretion, perhaps as an immune evasion strategy or to postpone cytokine-induced reactivation until conditions are more favourable. This is the first demonstration of an HCMV miRNA function during latency in primary myeloid cells, implicating that small RNA species may contribute significantly to latent infection. PMID:27491954

  15. Interaction between Endogenous Bacterial Flora and Latent HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Victoriano, Ann Florence B.; Imai, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    Human commensal bacteria do not normally cause any diseases. However, in certain pathological conditions, they exhibit a number of curious behaviors. In HIV infection, these bacteria exhibit bidirectional relationships: whereas they cause opportunistic infections based on immunological deterioration, they also augment HIV replication, in particular, viral replication from latently infected cells, which is attributable to the effect of butyric acid produced by certain anaerobic bacteria by modifying the state of chromatin. Here, we review recent evidence supporting the contributory role of such endogenous microbes in disrupting HIV latency and its potential link to the clinical progression of AIDS. PMID:23616411

  16. Human Herpesvirus 6 Latently Infects Early Bone Marrow Progenitors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Morris, Christine; Maiorana, Antonio; Garber, Richard; Bonacorsi, Goretta; Donelli, Amedea; Marasca, Roberto; Tabilio, Antonio; Torelli, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the in vivo tropism of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) for hemopoietic cells in patients with latent HHV-6 infection. Having used a variety of cell purification, molecular, cytogenetic, and immunocytochemical procedures, we report the first evidence that HHV-6 latently infects early bone marrow progenitor cells and that HHV-6 may be transmitted longitudinally to cells which differentiate along the committed pathways. PMID:9847383

  17. Potential of Radiation-Induced Cellular Stress for Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 and Killing of Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-02-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV-1 for last two decades has reduced mortality of patients through extension of nonsymptomatic phase of infection. However, HIV-1 can be preserved in long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals, and potentially in macrophages and astrocytes. Reactivation of viral replication is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus (shock and kill strategy). In this opinion piece, we consider potential application of therapeutic doses of irradiation, the well-known and effective stress signal that induces DNA damage and activates cellular stress response, to resolve two problems: activate HIV-1 replication and virion production in persistent reservoirs under cART and deplete infected cells through selective cell killing using DNA damage responses. PMID:26765533

  18. Latent porcine circovirus type 2-infected domestic pigs: A potential infection model for the effective development of vaccines against latent or chronic virus induced diseases.

    PubMed

    Sydler, Titus; Brägger, Stefanie; Handke, Martin; Hartnack, Sonja; Lewis, Fraser I; Sidler, Xaver; Brugnera, Enrico

    2016-02-17

    Until recently, knowledge of the pathogenicity of Circoviridae and Anelloviridae family members was limited. Our previous discoveries provided clues toward resolving this issue based on studies of the latent nature of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) genotype group members. We developed a conventional pig infection model that indicated that weaners already harbored latent PCV2 infection in the thymus, which enabled the viruses to specifically modulate the maturation of T-helper cells. This finding raised the possibility that the thymi of normal fetuses were already infected with PCV2. The present findings further substantiate our hypothesis that PCV2 masquerades as the host by infecting fetuses before they acquire immune-competence. We provide the first demonstration that all domestic pig fetuses preferentially harbor latent PCV2-infected cells in their thymi. These PCV2-infected cells are different from thymocytes and are located in the medulla of the fetal thymus. These latent PCV2-infected cells in fetuses are found at the same location and share characteristics with the infected cells observed in adolescent pigs. Moreover, fetuses also harbor these infected cells in other lymph system organs. We provide the first demonstration that the fetal thymus virus pools are minimally affected by sow vaccination, highlighting the immune-privileged character of this organ. Furthermore, we found a striking reduction in virus-infected cells in the fetal spleen and an increase in PCV2-infected cells in the fetal intestine of anti-PCV2-vaccinated mothers. These data indicate that specific immune response interactions occur between mothers and their progeny that are not dependent on the humoral immunity of the mother and cannot be attributed to the rudimentary humoral responses of the fetuses because these pig fetuses do not have any PCV2-specific antibodies. These shifts in our understanding of the PCV2-infected cell pool will lead to different avenues in the search for

  19. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Revaccination of Adults with Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Induces Long-Lived BCG-Reactive NK Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Sara; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Johnson, John L; Hughes, Jane E; Smit, Erica; Murphy, Melissa; Toefy, Asma; Lerumo, Lesedi; Hopley, Christiaan; Pienaar, Bernadette; Chheng, Phalkun; Nemes, Elisa; Hoft, Daniel F; Hanekom, Willem A; Boom, W Henry; Hatherill, Mark; Scriba, Thomas J

    2016-08-15

    One third of the global population is estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis We performed a phase I randomized controlled trial of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) before revaccination with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in healthy, tuberculin skin test-positive (≥15-mm induration), HIV-negative South African adults. We hypothesized that preclearance of latent bacilli with IPT modulates BCG immunogenicity following revaccination. Frequencies and coexpression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17, and/or IL-22 in CD4 T cells and IFN-γ-expressing CD8 T, γδ T, CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like, and NK cells in response to BCG were measured using whole blood intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry. We analyzed 72 participants who were revaccinated with BCG after IPT (n = 33) or without prior IPT (n = 39). IPT had little effect on frequencies or cytokine coexpression patterns of M. tuberculosis- or BCG-specific responses. Revaccination transiently boosted BCG-specific Th1 cytokine-expressing CD4, CD8, and γδ T cells. Despite high frequencies of IFN-γ-expressing BCG-reactive CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like cells and CD3(-)CD56(dim) and CD3(-)CD56(hi) NK cells at baseline, BCG revaccination boosted these responses, which remained elevated up to 1 y after revaccination. Such BCG-reactive memory NK cells were induced by BCG vaccination in infants, whereas in vitro IFN-γ expression by NK cells upon BCG stimulation was dependent on IL-12 and IL-18. Our data suggest that isoniazid preclearance of M. tuberculosis bacilli has little effect on the magnitude, persistence, or functional attributes of lymphocyte responses boosted by BCG revaccination. Our study highlights the surprising durability of BCG-boosted memory NKT-like and NK cells expressing antimycobacterial effector molecules, which may be novel targets for tuberculosis vaccines. PMID:27412415

  20. HIV-1 integration landscape during latent and active infection

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Lillian; Silva, Israel T.; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Rosales, Rafael A.; Parrish, Erica H.; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Czartoski, Julie L.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Lehmann, Clara; Klein, Florian; Caskey, Marina; Walker, Bruce D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Jankovic, Mila; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The barrier to curing HIV-1 is thought to reside primarily in CD4+ T cells containing silent proviruses. To characterize these latently infected cells, we studied the integration profile of HIV-1 in viremic progressors, individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy, and viremic controllers. Clonally expanded T cells represented the majority of all integrations and increased during therapy. However, none of the 75 expanded T cell clones assayed contained intact virus. In contrast, the cells bearing single integration events decreased in frequency over time on therapy, and the surviving cells were enriched for HIV-1 integration in silent regions of the genome. Finally, there was a strong preference for integration into, or in close proximity to Alu repeats, which were also enriched in local hotspots for integration. The data indicate that dividing clonally expanded T cells contain defective proviruses, and that the replication competent reservoir is primarily found in CD4+ T cells that remain relatively quiescent. PMID:25635456

  1. RNA-guided endonuclease provides a therapeutic strategy to cure latent herpesviridae infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbin; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Latent viral infection is a persistent cause of human disease. Although standard antiviral therapies can suppress active viral replication, no existing treatment can effectively eradicate latent infection and therefore a cure is lacking for many prevalent viral diseases. The prokaryotic immune system clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas evolved as a natural response to phage infections, and we demonstrate here that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be adapted for antiviral treatment in human cells by specifically targeting the genomes of latent viral infections. Patient-derived cells from a Burkitt’s lymphoma with latent Epstein–Barr virus infection showed dramatic proliferation arrest and a concomitant decrease in viral load after exposure to a CRISPR/Cas9 vector targeted to the viral genome. PMID:25157128

  2. The Effects of Age and Latent Cytomegalovirus Infection on NK-Cell Phenotype and Exercise Responsiveness in Man

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Austin B.; Spielmann, Guillaume; Agha, Nadia; Simpson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The redeployment of NK-cells in response to an acute bout of exercise is thought to be an integral component of the “fight-or-flight” response, preparing the body for potential injury or infection. We showed previously that CMV seropositivity impairs the redeployment of NK-cells with exercise in the young. In the current study, we examined the effect of aging on the redeployment of NK-cells with exercise in the context of CMV. We show here that CMV blunts the exercise-induced redeployment of NK-cells in both younger (23–39 yrs) and older (50–64 yrs) subjects with older CMVneg subjects showing the largest postexercise mobilization and 1 h postexercise egress of NK-cells. The blunted exercise response in CMVpos individuals was associated with a decreased relative redeployment of the CD158a+ and CD57+ NK-cell subsets in younger and older individuals. In addition, we show that aging is associated with a CMV-independent increase in the proportion of NK-cells expressing the terminal differentiation marker CD57, while CMV is associated with an age-dependent decrease in the proportion of NK-cells expressing the inhibitory receptors KLRG1 (in the younger group) and CD158a (in the older group). Collectively, these data suggest that CMV may decrease NK-cell mediated immunosurveillance after exercise in both younger and older individuals. PMID:26583066

  3. The Effects of Age and Latent Cytomegalovirus Infection on NK-Cell Phenotype and Exercise Responsiveness in Man.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Austin B; Spielmann, Guillaume; Agha, Nadia; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    The redeployment of NK-cells in response to an acute bout of exercise is thought to be an integral component of the "fight-or-flight" response, preparing the body for potential injury or infection. We showed previously that CMV seropositivity impairs the redeployment of NK-cells with exercise in the young. In the current study, we examined the effect of aging on the redeployment of NK-cells with exercise in the context of CMV. We show here that CMV blunts the exercise-induced redeployment of NK-cells in both younger (23-39 yrs) and older (50-64 yrs) subjects with older CMV(neg) subjects showing the largest postexercise mobilization and 1 h postexercise egress of NK-cells. The blunted exercise response in CMV(pos) individuals was associated with a decreased relative redeployment of the CD158a+ and CD57+ NK-cell subsets in younger and older individuals. In addition, we show that aging is associated with a CMV-independent increase in the proportion of NK-cells expressing the terminal differentiation marker CD57, while CMV is associated with an age-dependent decrease in the proportion of NK-cells expressing the inhibitory receptors KLRG1 (in the younger group) and CD158a (in the older group). Collectively, these data suggest that CMV may decrease NK-cell mediated immunosurveillance after exercise in both younger and older individuals. PMID:26583066

  4. Acute exercise preferentially redeploys NK-cells with a highly-differentiated phenotype and augments cytotoxicity against lymphoma and multiple myeloma target cells. Part II: impact of latent cytomegalovirus infection and catecholamine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Austin B; Rezvani, Katayoun; Pistillo, Mira; Reed, Justin; Agha, Nadia; Kunz, Hawley; O'Connor, Daniel P; Sekine, Takuya; Bollard, Catherine M; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    We showed previously that acute exercise is associated with a preferential redeployment of highly-differentiated NK-cells and increased cytotoxicity against HLA-expressing tumor cell lines during exercise recovery. In this part II study, we retrospectively analyzed these findings in the context of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and performed additional experiments to explore potential mechanisms underpinning the marked reduction in NK-cell redeployment with exercise in CMV-seropositive individuals. We show here that latent CMV infection impairs NK-cell mobilization with exercise, only when the intensity of the exercise bout exceeds the individual blood lactate threshold (BLT). This impaired mobilization is associated with increased proportions of poorly exercise-responsive NK-cell subsets (NKG2C+/KIR-, NKG2C+/NKG2A-, and NKG2C+/CD57+) and decreased NK-cell β(2)-adrenergic receptor (AR) expression in those with CMV. As a result, NK-cell production of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in response to in vitro isoproterenol (synthetic β-agonist) stimulation was drastically lower in those with CMV (6.0 vs. 20.3pmol/mL, p<0.001) and correlated highly with the proportion of NKG2C+/CD57+ NK-cells (R(2)=0.97). Moreover, NK-cell cytotoxic activity (NKCA) against the K562 (36.6% vs. 22.7%, p<0.05), U266 (23.6% vs. 15.9%, p<0.05), and 221.AEH (41.3% vs. 13.3%, p<0.001) cell lines was increased at baseline in those infected with CMV; however, latent CMV infection abated the post-exercise increase in NKCA as a result of decreased NK-cell mobilization. Additionally, NKCA per cell against the U266 (0.24 vs. 0.12, p<0.01), RPMI-8226 (0.17 vs. 0.11, p<0.05), and 221.AEH (0.18 vs. 0.11, p<0.05) cell lines was increased 1h post-exercise (relative to baseline) in CMV-seronegative subjects, but not in those infected with CMV. Collectively, these data indicate that latent CMV infection may compromise NK-cell mediated immunosurveillance after acute exercise due to an increased proportion of

  5. In Vitro Immunomodulation of a Whole Blood IFN-γ Release Assay Enhances T Cell Responses in Subjects with Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Rajiv L.; Suhosk, Megan M.; Banaei, Niaz

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of innate immunity via pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) modulates adaptive immune responses. PRR ligands are being exploited as vaccine adjuvants and as therapeutics, but their utility in diagnostics has not been explored. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are functional T cell assays used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI); however, novel approaches are needed to improve their sensitivity. Methods In vitro immunomodulation of a whole blood IGRA (QuantiFERON®-TB GOLD In-Tube) with Toll-like receptor agonists poly(I:C), LPS, and imiquimod was performed on blood from subjects with LTBI and negative controls. Results In vitro immunomodulation significantly enhanced the response of T cells stimulated with M. tuberculosis antigens from subjects with LTBI but not from uninfected controls. Immunomodulation of IGRA revealed T cell responses in subjects with LTBI whose T cells otherwise do not respond to in vitro stimulation with antigens alone. Similar to their in vivo functions, addition of poly(I:C) and LPS to whole blood induced secretion of inflammatory cytokines and IFN-α and enhanced the surface expression of antigen presenting and costimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells. Conclusions In vitro immunomodulation of whole blood IGRA may be an effective strategy for enhancing the sensitivity of T cells for diagnosis of LTBI. PMID:23144722

  6. Latent Tuberculosis Infection: Myths, Models, and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge on human latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) based on clinical studies and observations, as well as experimental in vitro and animal models. Several key terms are defined, including “latency,” “persistence,” “dormancy,” and “antibiotic tolerance.” Dogmas prevalent in the field are critically examined based on available clinical and experimental data, including the long-held beliefs that infection is either latent or active, that LTBI represents a small population of nonreplicating, “dormant” bacilli, and that caseous granulomas are the haven for LTBI. The role of host factors, such as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, T regulatory cells, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), in controlling TB infection is discussed. We also highlight microbial regulatory and metabolic pathways implicated in bacillary growth restriction and antibiotic tolerance under various physiologically relevant conditions. Finally, we pose several clinically important questions, which remain unanswered and will serve to stimulate future research on LTBI. PMID:25184558

  7. Current treatment options for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Bocchino, Marialuisa; Matarese, Alessandro; Sanduzzi, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a key component in TB control strategies worldwide. However, as people with LTBI are neither symptomatic nor contagious, any screening decision should be weighed carefully against the potential benefit of preventing active disease in those who are known to be at higher risk and are willing to accept therapy for LTBI. This means that a targeted approach is desirable to maximize cost effectiveness and to guarantee patient adherence. We focus on LTBI treatment strategies in patient populations at increased risk of developing active TB, including candidates for treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α blockers. In the last 40 years, isoniazid (INH) has represented the keystone of LTBI therapy across the world. Although INH remains the first therapeutic option, alternative treatments that are effective and associated with increased adherence and economic savings are available. Current recommendations, toxicity, compliance, and cost issues are discussed in detail in this review. A balanced relationship between the patient and healthcare provider could increase adherence, while cost-saving treatment strategies with higher effectiveness, fewer side effects, and of shorter duration should be offered as preferred. PMID:24789003

  8. Impact of latent infection treatment in indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Yuhara, Lucia Suemi; Sacchi, Flávia Patussi Correia; Croda, Julio

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to identify risk factors associated with latent tuberculosis (TB), examine the development of active disease among contacts, and assess the effectiveness of treating latent infection in indigenous Brazilians from January 2006 to December 2011. This was a retrospective study consisting of 1,371 tuberculosis contacts, 392 of whom underwent treatment for latent infection. Morbidity-from-TB data were obtained from the Information System for Disease Notification (SINAN) database, and the contacts' data were collected from the clinical records using forms employed by Special Department of Indigenous Health (SESAI) multidisciplinary teams, according to SESAI's instructions. The variables that were associated with latent infection among the contacts were age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.04) and close contact with a smear-positive index case (OR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.59-3.22). The variables associated with the development of active TB among the contacts were a tuberculin skin test (TST) ≥10 mm (relative risk [RR]: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.07-1.17), age (RR: 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00-1.03), and treatment of latent infection (RR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01-0.27). The estimated number of latent infection treatments needed to prevent one case of active TB among the contacts was 51 treatments (95% CI: 33-182). In contacts with TST ≥10 mm, 10 (95% CI: 6-19) latent infection treatments were necessary to prevent one case of active TB. Age and close contact with a smear-positive index case were associated with latent TB. Screening with TST is a high priority among individuals contacting smear-positive index cases. Age and TST are associated with the development of active TB among contacts, and treatment of latent infection is an effective measure to control TB in indigenous communities. PMID:23936264

  9. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  10. Treatment guidelines for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been established as valid for patients at high risk for developing active tuberculosis. Treatment of LTBI is also considered an important strategy for eliminating tuberculosis (TB) in Japan. In recent years, interferon-gamma release assays have come into widespread use; isoniazid (INH) preventive therapy for HIV patients has come to be recommended worldwide; and there have been increases in both types of biologics used in the treatment of immune diseases as well as the diseases susceptible to treatment. In light of the above facts, the Prevention Committee and the Treatment Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis have jointly drafted these guidelines. In determining subjects for LTBI treatment, the following must be considered: 1) risk of TB infection/ development; 2) infection diagnosis; 3) chest image diagnosis; 4) the impact of TB development; 5) the possible manifestation of side effects; and 6) the prospects of treatment completion. LTBI treatment is actively considered when relative risk is deemed 4 or higher, including risk factors such as the following: HIV/AIDS, organ transplants (immunosuppressant use), silicosis, dialysis due to chronic renal failure, recent TB infection (within 2 years), fibronodular shadows in chest radiographs (untreated old TB), the use of biologics, and large doses of corticosteroids. Although the risk is lower, the following risk factors require consideration of LTBI treatment when 2 or more of them are present: use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, use of other immunosuppressants, diabetes, being underweight, smoking, gastrectomy, and so on. In principle, INH is administered for a period of 6 or 9 months. When INH cannot be used, rifampicin is administered for a period of 4 or 6 months. It is believed that there are no reasons to support long-term LTBI treatment for immunosuppressed patients in Japan, where the risk of infection is not considered markedly high

  11. Tuberculin Skin Testing Compared with T-Cell Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific and Nonspecific Antigens for Detection of Latent Infection in Persons with Recent Tuberculosis Contact

    PubMed Central

    Arend, Sandra M.; Engelhard, Anrik C. F.; Groot, Gertjan; de Boer, Kirsten; Andersen, Peter; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; van Dissel, Jaap T.

    2001-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) is used for the identification of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) but lacks specificity in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated individuals, who constitute an increasing proportion of TB patients and their contacts from regions where TB is endemic. In previous studies, T-cell responses to ESAT-6 and CFP-10, M. tuberculosis-specific antigens that are absent from BCG, were sensitive and specific for detection of active TB. We studied 44 close contacts of a patient with smear-positive pulmonary TB and compared the standard screening procedure for LTBI by TST or chest radiographs with T-cell responses to M. tuberculosis-specific and nonspecific antigens. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cocultured with ESAT-6, CFP-10, TB10.4 (each as recombinant antigen and as a mixture of overlapping synthetic peptides), M. tuberculosis sonicate, purified protein derivative (PPD), and short-term culture filtrate, using gamma interferon production as the response measure. LTBI screening was by TST in 36 participants and by chest radiographs in 8 persons. Nineteen contacts were categorized as TST negative, 12 were categorized as TST positive, and 5 had indeterminate TST results. Recombinant antigens and peptide mixtures gave similar results. Responses to TB10.4 were neither sensitive nor specific for LTBI. T-cell responses to ESAT-6 and CFP-10 were less sensitive for detection of LTBI than those to PPD (67 versus 100%) but considerably more specific (100 versus 72%). The specificity of the TST or in vitro responses to PPD will be even less when the proportion of BCG-vaccinated persons among TB contacts evaluated for LTBI increases. PMID:11687445

  12. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Does Not Induce Apoptosis in Human Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Hüfner, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can establish lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia. Latently infected ganglia contain CD8+ T cells, which secrete granzyme B and are thus capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry and single-cell reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), higher frequency and transcript levels of caspase-3 were found in HSV-1-negative compared to HSV-1-positive ganglia and neurons, respectively. No terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay-positive neurons were detected. The infiltrating T cells do not induce apoptosis in latently infected neurons. PMID:25762734

  13. Restricted expression of herpes simplex virus lytic genes during establishment of latent infection by thymidine kinase-negative mutant viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Kosz-Vnenchak, M; Coen, D M; Knipe, D M

    1990-01-01

    Infection of cells by herpes simplex virus (HSV) can lead to either lytic, productive infection or nonlytic, latent infection. The factors influencing this infection pathway decision are largely unknown. Thymidine kinase-negative mutant viruses can establish latent infection in neurons of mouse trigeminal ganglia but do not replicate productively in these cells. We show that during the early stages of establishment of latency by these mutants, expression of viral lytic genes is drastically reduced or undetectable as assayed by in situ hybridization. Thus, establishment of latent infection by HSV can occur despite severely restricted levels of lytic gene expression. This suggests that the block to productive replication during establishment of latent infection by HSV occurs before or early during the expression of alpha genes. Images PMID:2170678

  14. Impact of Latent Infection Treatment in Indigenous Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yuhara, Lucia Suemi; Sacchi, Flávia Patussi Correia; Croda, Julio

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to identify risk factors associated with latent tuberculosis (TB), examine the development of active disease among contacts, and assess the effectiveness of treating latent infection in indigenous Brazilians from January 2006 to December 2011. This was a retrospective study consisting of 1,371 tuberculosis contacts, 392 of whom underwent treatment for latent infection. Morbidity-from-TB data were obtained from the Information System for Disease Notification (SINAN) database, and the contacts’ data were collected from the clinical records using forms employed by Special Department of Indigenous Health (SESAI) multidisciplinary teams, according to SESAI’s instructions. The variables that were associated with latent infection among the contacts were age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.04) and close contact with a smear-positive index case (OR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.59–3.22). The variables associated with the development of active TB among the contacts were a tuberculin skin test (TST) ≥10 mm (relative risk [RR]: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.07–1.17), age (RR: 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00–1.03), and treatment of latent infection (RR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01–0.27). The estimated number of latent infection treatments needed to prevent one case of active TB among the contacts was 51 treatments (95% CI: 33–182). In contacts with TST ≥10 mm, 10 (95% CI: 6–19) latent infection treatments were necessary to prevent one case of active TB. Age and close contact with a smear-positive index case were associated with latent TB. Screening with TST is a high priority among individuals contacting smear-positive index cases. Age and TST are associated with the development of active TB among contacts, and treatment of latent infection is an effective measure to control TB in indigenous communities. PMID:23936264

  15. Measurement of phenotype and absolute number of circulating heparin-binding hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and purified protein derivative antigen-specific CD4 T cells can discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Paul; Barkham, Timothy M S; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T

    2015-02-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154(+) TNF-α(+) cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154(+) TNF-α(+) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) and CD154(+) TNF-α(+) CXCR3(+). Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  16. Discriminating Active Tuberculosis from Latent Tuberculosis Infection by flow cytometric measurement of CD161-expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianting; Xu, Qian; Chen, Qi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Mingxia; Cai, Yi; Liu, Haiying; Zhou, Yiping; Deng, Guofang; Deng, Qunyi; Zhou, Boping; Kornfeld, Hardy; Chen, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) significantly increases the possibility for early diagnosis of tuberculosis, but IGRAs alone cannot discriminate active TB from LTBI. Therefore, fast and reliable discrimination of active tuberculosis, especially bacteriology negative tuberculosis, from LTBI is a great necessity. Here we established an assay based on flow cytometric multiparameter assay assessing expression of CD161 along with CD3, CD4, and CD8, whereby a set of indices formulated by the percentages of CD3+CD161+, CD3+CD4+CD161+ and CD3+CD8+CD161+ T cells multiplied with lymphocyte/monocyte ratio were established. Application of the CD3+CD8+CD161+ index to compare a cohort of active tuberculosis with a cohort of LTBI or health control yielded 0.7662 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6559–0.8552) or 0.7922 (95%  CI 0.6846–0.8763) for sensitivity and 0.9048 (95%  CI 0.8209–0.9580) or 0.8939 (95% CI 0.8392–0.9349) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB+; the corresponding results were 0.7481 (95%  CI 0.6648–0.8198) or 0.7557 (95%  CI 0.6730–0.8265) for sensitivity and 0.8571 (95%  CI 0.7637–0.9239) or 0.8603 (95%  CI 0.8008–0.9075) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB−. Our results reveal that in combination with IGRAs, CD161-based indices provide a novel, fast diagnostic solution addressing the limitation of current tuberculosis diagnostics. PMID:26643453

  17. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eipers, Peter G.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2011-02-05

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-{alpha} resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  18. Microscopic Analyses of Latent and Visible Monilinia fructicola Infections in Nectarines

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Benitez, Carlos; Melgarejo, Paloma; De Cal, Antonieta; Fontaniella, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the histologic features of a latent Monilinia fructicola infection and brown rot in infected fruit. This report informs on the results of an investigation whose aim was to analyze the microanatomy of nectarines with a latent and visible M. fructicola infection. Mature nectarines were inoculated with an M. fructicola isolate and incubated at 25°C for 0, 24, 48, 72, or 96 hours in the dark. For investigating the latent infection process, the inoculated nectarines were first incubated at 25°C for 24 hours in the dark and then incubated at 4°C for 72, 144, 216, and 288 hours in the dark. At the end of the incubation, samples of nectarine tissue were excised from the inoculation points and prepared for light and transmission electron microscopic examinations. No signs of disease were seen on the surface of nectarines with a latent infection over the 288-hour incubation period. When the tissue samples were microscopically examined, M. fructicola colonized the stomata and this stomatal colonization progressively increased over time and was associated with gradual collapse of the epidermal cells and colonization of the subepidermis. In nectarines with visible brown rot, the disease usually appeared after 24 hours on the surface and in the uppermost layers of epidermal cells, which began to collapse after 48 hours. Subsequently, the diseased tissues of the nectarines displayed (a) colonization of the epidermis and mesocarp by M. fructicola with thin and thick hyphae, (b) collapse and disruption of epidermal and mesocarpic cells, (c) lysogenic cavities in the subepidermis and mesocarp, (d) degradation of the cuticle and epidermis, and (e) M. fructicola sporulation. M. fructicola is active during latent infections because slow and progressive colonization of nectarine subcuticular cells by the fungus occurs. PMID:27494620

  19. Characterization of Omental Immune Aggregates during Establishment of a Latent Gammaherpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kathleen S.; Collins, Christopher M.; Speck, Samuel H.

    2012-01-01

    Herpesviruses are characterized by their ability to establish lifelong latent infection. The gammaherpesvirus subfamily is distinguished by lymphotropism, establishing and maintaining latent infection predominantly in B lymphocytes. Consequently, gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis is closely linked to normal B cell physiology. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) pathogenesis in laboratory mice has been extensively studied as a model system to gain insights into the nature of gammaherpesvirus infection in B cells and their associated lymphoid compartments. In addition to B cells, MHV68 infection of macrophages contributes significantly to the frequency of viral genome-positive cells in the peritoneal cavity throughout latency. The omentum, a sheet of richly-vascularized adipose tissue, resides in the peritoneal cavity and contains clusters of immune cell aggregates termed milky spots. Although the value of the omentum in surgical wound-healing has long been appreciated, the unique properties of this tissue and its contribution to both innate and adaptive immunity have only recently been recognized. To determine whether the omentum plays a role in gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis we examined this site during early MHV68 infection and long-term latency. Following intraperitoneal infection, immune aggregates within the omentum expanded in size and number and contained virus-infected cells. Notably, a germinal-center B cell population appeared in the omentum of infected animals with earlier kinetics and greater magnitude than that observed in the spleen. Furthermore, the omentum harbored a stable frequency of viral genome-positive cells through early and into long-term latency, while removal of the omentum prior to infection resulted in a slight decrease in the establishment of splenic latency following intraperitoneal infection. These data provide the first evidence that the omentum is a site of chronic MHV68 infection that may contribute to the maintenance of chronic infection

  20. Characterization of a Latent Virus-Like Infection of Symbiotic Zooxanthellae▿

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Jayme; Munn, Colin B.; Wilson, William H.

    2007-01-01

    A latent virus-like agent, which we designated zooxanthella filamentous virus 1 (ZFV1), was isolated from Symbiodinium sp. strain CCMP 2465 and characterized. Transmission electron microscopy and analytical flow cytometry revealed the presence of a new group of distinctive filamentous virus-like particles after exposure of the zooxanthellae to UV light. Examination of thin sections of the zooxanthellae revealed the formation and proliferation of filamentous virus-like particles in the UV-induced cells. Assessment of Symbiodinium sp. cultures was used here as a model to show the effects of UV irradiance and induction of potential latent viruses. The unique host-virus system described here provides insight into the role of latent infections in zooxanthellae through environmentally regulated viral induction mechanisms. PMID:17351090

  1. Characterization of a latent virus-like infection of symbiotic zooxanthellae.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Jayme; Munn, Colin B; Wilson, William H

    2007-05-01

    A latent virus-like agent, which we designated zooxanthella filamentous virus 1 (ZFV1), was isolated from Symbiodinium sp. strain CCMP 2465 and characterized. Transmission electron microscopy and analytical flow cytometry revealed the presence of a new group of distinctive filamentous virus-like particles after exposure of the zooxanthellae to UV light. Examination of thin sections of the zooxanthellae revealed the formation and proliferation of filamentous virus-like particles in the UV-induced cells. Assessment of Symbiodinium sp. cultures was used here as a model to show the effects of UV irradiance and induction of potential latent viruses. The unique host-virus system described here provides insight into the role of latent infections in zooxanthellae through environmentally regulated viral induction mechanisms. PMID:17351090

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing of Herpesviruses Limits Productive and Latent Infections.

    PubMed

    van Diemen, Ferdy R; Kruse, Elisabeth M; Hooykaas, Marjolein J G; Bruggeling, Carlijn E; Schürch, Anita C; van Ham, Petra M; Imhof, Saskia M; Nijhuis, Monique; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Lebbink, Robert Jan

    2016-06-01

    Herpesviruses infect the majority of the human population and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 causes cold sores and herpes simplex keratitis, whereas HSV-2 is responsible for genital herpes. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common viral cause of congenital defects and is responsible for serious disease in immuno-compromised individuals. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a broad range of malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Hodgkin's disease, and post-transplant lymphomas. Herpesviruses persist in their host for life by establishing a latent infection that is interrupted by periodic reactivation events during which replication occurs. Current antiviral drug treatments target the clinical manifestations of this productive stage, but they are ineffective at eliminating these viruses from the infected host. Here, we set out to combat both productive and latent herpesvirus infections by exploiting the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target viral genetic elements important for virus fitness. We show effective abrogation of HCMV and HSV-1 replication by targeting gRNAs to essential viral genes. Simultaneous targeting of HSV-1 with multiple gRNAs completely abolished the production of infectious particles from human cells. Using the same approach, EBV can be almost completely cleared from latently infected EBV-transformed human tumor cells. Our studies indicate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be effectively targeted to herpesvirus genomes as a potent prophylactic and therapeutic anti-viral strategy that may be used to impair viral replication and clear latent virus infection. PMID:27362483

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing of Herpesviruses Limits Productive and Latent Infections

    PubMed Central

    van Diemen, Ferdy R.; Bruggeling, Carlijn E.; Schürch, Anita C.; van Ham, Petra M.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Nijhuis, Monique; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.; Lebbink, Robert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses infect the majority of the human population and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 causes cold sores and herpes simplex keratitis, whereas HSV-2 is responsible for genital herpes. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common viral cause of congenital defects and is responsible for serious disease in immuno-compromised individuals. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a broad range of malignancies, including Burkitt’s lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Hodgkin’s disease, and post-transplant lymphomas. Herpesviruses persist in their host for life by establishing a latent infection that is interrupted by periodic reactivation events during which replication occurs. Current antiviral drug treatments target the clinical manifestations of this productive stage, but they are ineffective at eliminating these viruses from the infected host. Here, we set out to combat both productive and latent herpesvirus infections by exploiting the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target viral genetic elements important for virus fitness. We show effective abrogation of HCMV and HSV-1 replication by targeting gRNAs to essential viral genes. Simultaneous targeting of HSV-1 with multiple gRNAs completely abolished the production of infectious particles from human cells. Using the same approach, EBV can be almost completely cleared from latently infected EBV-transformed human tumor cells. Our studies indicate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be effectively targeted to herpesvirus genomes as a potent prophylactic and therapeutic anti-viral strategy that may be used to impair viral replication and clear latent virus infection. PMID:27362483

  4. Sensing of latent EBV infection through exosomal transfer of 5'pppRNA.

    PubMed

    Baglio, S Rubina; van Eijndhoven, Monique A J; Koppers-Lalic, Danijela; Berenguer, Jordi; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Gibbs, Susan; Léveillé, Nicolas; Rinkel, Rico N P M; Hopmans, Erik S; Swaminathan, Sankar; Verkuijlen, Sandra A W M; Scheffer, George L; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Bultink, Irene E M; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; Hackenberg, Michael; Piersma, Sander R; Knol, Jaco C; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Wurdinger, Thomas; Jiménez, Connie R; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Pegtel, D Michiel

    2016-02-01

    Complex interactions between DNA herpesviruses and host factors determine the establishment of a life-long asymptomatic latent infection. The lymphotropic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seems to avoid recognition by innate sensors despite massive transcription of immunostimulatory small RNAs (EBV-EBERs). Here we demonstrate that in latently infected B cells, EBER1 transcripts interact with the lupus antigen (La) ribonucleoprotein, avoiding cytoplasmic RNA sensors. However, in coculture experiments we observed that latent-infected cells trigger antiviral immunity in dendritic cells (DCs) through selective release and transfer of RNA via exosomes. In ex vivo tonsillar cultures, we observed that EBER1-loaded exosomes are preferentially captured and internalized by human plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) that express the TIM1 phosphatidylserine receptor, a known viral- and exosomal target. Using an EBER-deficient EBV strain, enzymatic removal of 5'ppp, in vitro transcripts, and coculture experiments, we established that 5'pppEBER1 transfer via exosomes drives antiviral immunity in nonpermissive DCs. Lupus erythematosus patients suffer from elevated EBV load and activated antiviral immunity, in particular in skin lesions that are infiltrated with pDCs. We detected high levels of EBER1 RNA in such skin lesions, as well as EBV-microRNAs, but no intact EBV-DNA, linking non-cell-autonomous EBER1 presence with skin inflammation in predisposed individuals. Collectively, our studies indicate that virus-modified exosomes have a physiological role in the host-pathogen stand-off and may promote inflammatory disease. PMID:26768848

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important occupational risks for healthcare workers (HCWs) in South Korea. Many policies regarding the control and prevention of TB in healthcare settings recommend that HCWs are tested for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in addition to active TB. Moreover, the Korean Tuberculosis Prevention Act also recommends that HCWs receive regular testing for LTBI. However, there are no specific or detailed guidelines for dealing with LTBI in HCWs. Herein, we discuss the diagnosis and treatment of LTBI in HCWs and focus particularly on the baseline screening of hired HCWs, routine follow-up, and contact investigation. PMID:27433172

  6. CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Latent Antigen EBNA-1 and Lytic Antigen BZLF-1 during Persistent Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Leskowitz, R. M.; Zhou, X. Y.; Villinger, F.; Fogg, M. H.; Kaur, A.; Lieberman, P. M.; Wang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leads to lifelong viral persistence through its latency in B cells. EBV-specific T cells control reactivations and prevent the development of EBV-associated malignancies in most healthy carriers, but infection can sometimes cause chronic disease and malignant transformation. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) is the only viral protein consistently expressed during all forms of latency and in all EBV-associated malignancies and is a promising target for a therapeutic vaccine. Here, we studied the EBNA-1-specific immune response using the EBV-homologous rhesus lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV) infection in rhesus macaques. We assessed the frequency, phenotype, and cytokine production profiles of rhLCV EBNA-1 (rhEBNA-1)-specific T cells in 15 rhesus macaques and compared them to the lytic antigen of rhLCV BZLF-1 (rhBZLF-1). We were able to detect rhEBNA-1-specific CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells in 14 of the 15 animals screened. In comparison, all 15 animals had detectable rhBZLF-1 responses. Most peptide-specific CD4+ T cells exhibited a resting phenotype of central memory (TCM), while peptide-specific CD8+ T cells showed a more activated phenotype, belonging mainly to the effector cell subset. By comparing our results to the human EBV immune response, we demonstrate that the rhLCV model is a valid system for studying chronic EBV infection and for the preclinical development of therapeutic vaccines. PMID:23698300

  7. Emphysematous lung destruction by cigarette smoke. The effects of latent adenoviral infection on the lung inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Meshi, Bernard; Vitalis, Timothy Z; Ionescu, Diana; Elliott, W Mark; Liu, Chun; Wang, Xiang-Dong; Hayashi, Shizu; Hogg, James C

    2002-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and emphysema are amplified by the presence of latent adenoviral (Ad) infection, and to determine whether this emphysematous process can be reversed by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment. The results confirm that in guinea pigs, chronic cigarette-smoke exposure caused lesions similar to human centrilobular emphysema. They also show that latent Ad infection combined with cigarette-smoke exposure caused an excess increase in lung volume (P < 0.001), air-space volume (P < 0.001), and lung weight (P < 0.01), and further decrease in surface-to-volume ratio (P < 0.001) compared with smoke exposure alone. RA treatment failed to reverse these emphysematous changes. Analysis of inflammatory response in parenchymal and airway tissue showed that smoking caused an increase of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) (P < 0.0002), macrophages (P < 0.001), and CD4 cells (P < 0.0009), and that latent Ad infection independently increased PMNs (P < 0.001), macrophages (P = 0.003), and CD8 cells (P < 0.001). We conclude that latent Ad infection amplifies the emphysematous lung destruction and increases the inflammatory response produced by cigarette-smoke exposure. In this study, the increase in CD4 was associated with cigarette smoke and the increase in CD8 cells with latent Ad infection. PMID:11751203

  8. Ocular and neural distribution of feline herpesvirus-1 during active and latent experimental infection in cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) cause extensive intra-ocular and neural infections in humans and are closely related to Felid herpes virus 1 (FeHV-1). We report the extent of intra-ocular replication and the extent and morphological aspects of neural replication during the acute and latent phases of FeHV-1 infection. Juvenile, SPF cats were inoculated with FeHV-1. Additional cats were used as negative controls. Cats were euthanized on days 6, 10, and 30 post-inoculation. Results FeHV-1 was isolated from the conjunctiva, cornea, uveal tract, retina, optic nerve, ciliary ganglion (CG), pterygopalatine ganglion (PTPG), trigeminal ganglion (TG), brainstem, visual cortex, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb of infected cats during the acute phase, but not the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG) and optic chiasm. Viral DNA was detected in all tissues during acute infection by a real-time quantitative PCR assay. On day 30, viral DNA was detected in all TG, all CCG, and 2 PTPG. Histologically mild inflammation and ganglion cell loss were noted within the TG during acute, but not latent infection. Using linear regression, a strong correlation existed between clinical score and day 30 viral DNA copy number within the TG. Conclusions The correlation between clinical score and day 30 viral DNA copy number suggests the severity of the acute clinical infection is related to the quantity of latent viral DNA. The histologic response was similar to that seen during HSV-1 or VZV infection. To the author’s knowledge this is the first report of FeHV-1 infection involving intraocular structures and autonomic ganglia. PMID:24053192

  9. Three Distinct Regions of the Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Genome Are Transcriptionally Active in Latently Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Virgin, Herbert W.; Presti, Rachel M.; Li, Xi-Yang; Liu, Carl; Speck, Samuel H.

    1999-01-01

    The program(s) of gene expression operating during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (γHV68) latency is undefined, as is the relationship between γHV68 latency and latency of primate gammaherpesviruses. We used a nested reverse transcriptase PCR strategy (sensitive to approximately one copy of γHV68 genome for each genomic region tested) to screen for the presence of viral transcripts in latently infected mice. Based on the positions of known latency-associated genes in other gammaherpesviruses, we screened for the presence of transcripts corresponding to 11 open reading frames (ORFs) in the γHV68 genome in RNA from spleens and peritoneal cells of latently infected B-cell-deficient (MuMT) mice which have been shown contain high levels of reactivable latent γHV68 (K. E. Weck, M. L. Barkon, L. I. Yoo, S. H. Speck, and H. W. Virgin, J. Virol. 70:6775–6780, 1996). To control for the possible presence of viral lytic activity, we determined that RNA from latently infected peritoneal and spleen cells contained few or no detectable transcripts corresponding to seven ORFs known to encode viral gene products associated with lytic replication. However, we did detect low-level expression of transcripts arising from the region of gene 50 (encoding the putative homolog of the Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 transactivator) in peritoneal but not spleen cells. Latently infected peritoneal cells consistently scored for expression of RNA derived from 4 of the 11 candidate latency-associated ORFs examined, including the regions of ORF M2, ORF M11 (encoding v-bcl-2), gene 73 (a homolog of the Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [human herpesvirus 8] gene encoding latency-associated nuclear antigen), and gene 74 (encoding a G-protein coupled receptor homolog, v-GCR). Latently infected spleen cells consistently scored positive for RNA derived from 3 of the 11 candidate latency-associated ORFs examined, including ORF M2, ORF M3, and ORF M9. To further characterize transcription of these

  10. Latent virus infection upregulates CD40 expression facilitating enhanced autoimmunity in a model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Casiraghi, Costanza; Citlali Márquez, Ana; Shanina, Iryna; Steven Horwitz, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been identified as a putative environmental trigger of multiple sclerosis (MS) by multiple groups working worldwide. Previously, we reported that when experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice latently infected with murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (γHV-68), the murine homolog to EBV, a disease more reminiscent of MS developed. Specifically, MS-like lesions developed in the brain that included equal numbers of IFN-γ producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and demyelination, none of which is observed in MOG induced EAE. Herein, we demonstrate that this enhanced disease was dependent on the γHV-68 latent life cycle and was associated with STAT1 and CD40 upregulation on uninfected dendritic cells. Importantly, we also show that, during viral latency, the frequency of regulatory T cells is reduced via a CD40 dependent mechanism and this contributes towards a strong T helper 1 response that resolves in severe EAE disease pathology. Latent γ-herpesvirus infection established a long-lasting impact that enhances subsequent adaptive autoimmune responses. PMID:26356194

  11. A fifth Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein (EBNA3C) is expressed in latently infected growth-transformed lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Petti, L; Sample, J; Wang, F; Kieff, E

    1988-01-01

    Three distantly homologous neighboring long open reading frames in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome are preceded by short open reading frames. The leftmost short and long open reading frames encode EBNA3, a nuclear protein which is slightly smaller (145 kilodaltons [kDa]) than two other nuclear proteins (150 to 155 kDa) detected in Western blots (immunoblots) of latently infected cell protein (K. Hennessy, F. Wang, E. Woodland-Bushman, and E. Kieff, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:5693-5697, 1986; I. Joab, D. T. Rowe, M. Bodescot, J.-C. Nicolas, P. J. Farrell, and M. Perricaudet, J. Virol. 61:3340-3344, 1987). We have demonstrated that the most rightward short (BERF3) and long (BERF4) open reading frames are spliced in frame at the 3' end of a 5-kilobase latently infected cell RNA and that this RNA begins within or upstream of the EBV long internal repeat. EBV-immune human antibodies specific for the long open reading frame translation product identified a 155-kDa protein on Western blots of latently infected cell protein and specifically reacted with large nonnucleolar nuclear granules in every latently infected cell. Expression of the cDNA in BALB/c 3T3 cells resulted in translation of full-size EBNA3C but had no effect on cell morphology, contact inhibition, or serum independence. Images PMID:2831394

  12. Pulmonary responses to pathogen-specific antigens in latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jarvela, Jessica R; Tuscano, Lori; Lee, Hung; Silver, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used ELISPOT to quantify frequencies of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood T cells capable of producing IFNγ in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and Mtb-specific antigens CFP-10 and ESAT-6 in individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and Mtb-naïve controls. Compared to peripheral blood, BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant enrichment for T cells responding to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10, but not to ESAT-6. Baseline BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant production of Mig (CXCL9) in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10 as well. These findings suggest that enrichment for Mtb-specific T cells within BAL is not unique to active pulmonary tuberculosis and may, to the contrary, contribute to protection from re-infection in Mtb immune individuals. PMID:26732045

  13. Amplification of inflammation in emphysema and its association with latent adenoviral infection.

    PubMed

    Retamales, I; Elliott, W M; Meshi, B; Coxson, H O; Pare, P D; Sciurba, F C; Rogers, R M; Hayashi, S; Hogg, J C

    2001-08-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that the cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory process is amplified in severe emphysema and explores the association of this response with latent adenoviral infection. Lung tissue from patients with similar smoking histories and either no (n = 7), mild (n = 7), or severe emphysema (n = 7) was obtained by lung resection. Numbers of polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), macrophages, B cells, CD4, CD8 lymphocytes, and eosinophils present in tissue and airspaces and of epithelial cells expressing adenoviral E1A protein were determined using quantitative techniques. Severe emphysema was associated with an absolute increase in the total number of inflammatory cells in the lung tissue and airspaces. The computed tomography (CT) determined extent of lung destruction was related to the number of cells/m(2) surface area by R(2) values that ranged from 0.858 (CD8 cells) to 0.483 (B cells) in the tissue and 0.630 (CD4 cells) to 0.198 (B cells) in the airspaces. These changes were associated with a 5- to 40-fold increase in the number of alveolar epithelial cells expressing adenoviral E1A protein in mild and severe disease, respectively. We conclude that cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation is amplified in severe emphysema and that latent expression of the adenoviral E1A protein expressed by alveolar epithelial cells influenced this amplification process. PMID:11500352

  14. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen and Angiogenin Interact with Common Host Proteins, Including Annexin A2, Which Is Essential for Survival of Latently Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Nitika; Sadagopan, Sathish; Balasubramanian, Sandhya

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection and latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA-1) upregulate the multifunctional protein angiogenin (ANG). Our studies demonstrate that silencing ANG or inhibiting its nuclear translocation downregulates KSHV LANA-1 expression and ANG is necessary for KSHV latency, anti-apoptosis and angiogenesis (Sadagopan et al., J. Virol. 83:3342–3364, 2009; Sadagopan et al., J Virol. 85:2666–2685, 2011). Here we show that LANA-1 interacts with ANG and colocalizes in latently infected endothelial telomerase-immortalized human umbilical vein endothelial (TIVE-LTC) cells. Mass spectrometric analyses of TIVE-LTC proteins immunoprecipitated by anti-LANA-1 and ANG antibodies identified 28 common cellular proteins such as ribosomal proteins, structural proteins, tRNA synthetases, metabolic pathway enzymes, chaperons, transcription factors, antioxidants, and ubiquitin proteosome proteins. LANA-1 and ANG interaction with one of the proteins, annexin A2, was validated. Annexin A2 has been shown to play roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, plasmin generation, exocytosis, endocytosis, and cytoskeleton reorganization. It is also known to associate with glycolytic enzyme 3-phosphoglyceratekinase in the primer recognition protein (PRP) complex that interacts with DNA polymerase α in the lagging strand of DNA during replication. A higher level of annexin A2 is expressed in KSHV+ but not in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+ B-lymphoma cell lines. Annexin A2 colocalized with several LANA-1 punctate spots in KSHV+ body cavity B-cell lymphoma (BCBL-1) cells. In triple-staining analyses, we observed annexin A2-ANG-LANA-1, annexin A2-ANG, and ANG-LANA-1 colocalizations. Annexin A2 appeared as punctate nuclear dots in LANA-1-positive TIVE-LTC cells. In LANA-1-negative TIVE-LTC cells, annexin A2 was detected predominately in the cytoplasm, with some nuclear spots, and colocalization with ANG was observed mostly in the cytoplasm. Annexin A2

  15. Sensing of latent EBV infection through exosomal transfer of 5′pppRNA

    PubMed Central

    Baglio, S. Rubina; van Eijndhoven, Monique A. J.; Koppers-Lalic, Danijela; Berenguer, Jordi; Lougheed, Sinéad M.; Gibbs, Susan; Léveillé, Nicolas; Rinkel, Rico N. P. M.; Hopmans, Erik S.; Swaminathan, Sankar; Verkuijlen, Sandra A. W. M.; Scheffer, George L.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Bultink, Irene E. M.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.; Hackenberg, Michael; Piersma, Sander R.; Knol, Jaco C.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Wurdinger, Thomas; Jiménez, Connie R.; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Pegtel, D. Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Complex interactions between DNA herpesviruses and host factors determine the establishment of a life-long asymptomatic latent infection. The lymphotropic Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) seems to avoid recognition by innate sensors despite massive transcription of immunostimulatory small RNAs (EBV-EBERs). Here we demonstrate that in latently infected B cells, EBER1 transcripts interact with the lupus antigen (La) ribonucleoprotein, avoiding cytoplasmic RNA sensors. However, in coculture experiments we observed that latent-infected cells trigger antiviral immunity in dendritic cells (DCs) through selective release and transfer of RNA via exosomes. In ex vivo tonsillar cultures, we observed that EBER1-loaded exosomes are preferentially captured and internalized by human plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) that express the TIM1 phosphatidylserine receptor, a known viral- and exosomal target. Using an EBER-deficient EBV strain, enzymatic removal of 5′ppp, in vitro transcripts, and coculture experiments, we established that 5′pppEBER1 transfer via exosomes drives antiviral immunity in nonpermissive DCs. Lupus erythematosus patients suffer from elevated EBV load and activated antiviral immunity, in particular in skin lesions that are infiltrated with pDCs. We detected high levels of EBER1 RNA in such skin lesions, as well as EBV-microRNAs, but no intact EBV-DNA, linking non–cell-autonomous EBER1 presence with skin inflammation in predisposed individuals. Collectively, our studies indicate that virus-modified exosomes have a physiological role in the host–pathogen stand-off and may promote inflammatory disease. PMID:26768848

  16. Latent Tuberculosis Infection and the Risk of Subsequent Cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Yen, Yung-Feng; Pan, Sheng-Wei; Chuang, Pei-Hung; Feng, Jia-Yih; Chou, Kun-Ta; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Wei-Juin

    2016-01-01

    The association of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) with subsequent cancer remains unclear. We investigated the risk of future cancer among tuberculosis (TB) contacts with or without subsequent TB activation. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we conducted a nationwide population-based study. TB contacts during 1997 to 2012 were included as the study cohort. Patients with antecedent cancer and TB were excluded. Data from 11,522 TB contacts and 46,088 age-, sex-, and enrollment date-matched subjects during 1997 to 2012 were analyzed. The 2 cohorts were monitored until December 31, 2012 for incidence of cancer and TB infection. LTBI was defined as a TB contact with subsequent TB activation. The primary endpoint was occurrence of newly diagnosed cancer. There was no difference in cancer development between the TB contact cohort and comparison cohort (log-rank test, P = 0.714). After multivariate adjustment, the hazard ratio (HR) for cancer among the LTBI patients was 2.29 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.26-4.17; P = 0.007]. There was increase in cancer incidences for several specific cancer types, including multiple myeloma (HR 340.28), lung (HR 2.69), kidney and bladder (HR 6.16), hepatobiliary (HR 2.36), and gastrointestinal (HR 2.99) cancers. None of the 136 TB contacts who received isoniazid prophylaxis developed cancer. LTBI patients had a higher risk of future cancer. PMID:26825880

  17. Characterisation of DNA forms associated with cassava latent virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, J; Townsend, R

    1985-01-01

    In addition to the major encapsidated DNA species found in preparations of cassava latent virus (genomic DNAs 1 and 2) there are minor DNA populations of twice (dimeric) and approximately half genome length. Both minor species resemble the genomic DNAs in that they are composed of predominantly circular single-stranded DNA. All of these size groups have a corresponding covalently-closed circular double-stranded DNA form in infected tissue. Infectivity studies using cloned DNAs 1 and 2 show that dimeric DNA routinely appears, suggesting it to be an intermediate in the DNA replicative cycle that can be encapsidated at low efficiency. In contrast, half unit length DNA has not yet been detected after multiple passaging of virus derived from the cloned DNA inoculum. Half unit length DNAs appear to be derived exclusively from DNA 2 and consist of a population of molecules exhibiting a relatively specific deletion. As they have an inhibitory effect on virus multiplication, their encapsidated forms are analogous to defective interfering particles associated with other eukaryotic DNA containing viruses. Small primer molecules associated with the genomic single-stranded DNAs, as reported for another geminivirus, have not been detected in CLV. Images PMID:4000956

  18. Monitoring latent tuberculosis infection diagnosis and management in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Erkens, Connie G M; Slump, Erika; Verhagen, Maurits; Schimmel, Henrieke; de Vries, Gerard; Cobelens, Frank; van den Hof, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Targeted diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) among persons with a high risk of exposure to TB or of developing TB when infected has been performed and monitored routinely in the Netherlands since 1993. We describe trends in target groups, diagnostic methods and treatment regimens, and explore determinants for treatment initiation, treatment completion and adverse events.In total, 37 729 persons were registered with LTBI from 1993 to 2013, of whom 28 931 (77%) started preventive treatment; 82% of those completed preventive treatment and 8% stopped preventive treatment due to adverse events. Two-thirds of the notified cases were detected through contact investigation.Increasing numbers of persons with immunosuppressive disorders, elderly persons and foreign-born persons were notified in recent years, due to policy changes and the introduction of the interferon-γ release assay. Children (96%) and the immunosuppressed (95%) were more likely to start preventive treatment. Children (93%) were also more likely to complete preventive treatment, as were persons treated with rifampicin or rifampicin/isoniazid regimens (91% and 92%, respectively). The latter groups were also 40% less likely to stop preventive treatment due to adverse events.Under these operational conditions, the estimated risk reduction on incident TB in the target population for LTBI management is 40-60%. PMID:26917614

  19. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Infection of Sensory Neurons Alters Neuronal Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Martha F.; Cook, W. James; Roth, Frederick P.; Zhu, Jia; Holman, Holly; Knipe, David M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2003-01-01

    The persistence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the diseases that it causes in the human population can be attributed to the maintenance of a latent infection within neurons in sensory ganglia. Little is known about the effects of latent infection on the host neuron. We have addressed the question of whether latent HSV infection affects neuronal gene expression by using microarray transcript profiling of host gene expression in ganglia from latently infected versus mock-infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. 33P-labeled cDNA probes from pooled ganglia harvested at 30 days postinfection or post-mock infection were hybridized to nylon arrays printed with 2,556 mouse genes. Signal intensities were acquired by phosphorimager. Mean intensities (n = 4 replicates in each of three independent experiments) of signals from mock-infected versus latently infected ganglia were compared by using a variant of Student's t test. We identified significant changes in the expression of mouse neuronal genes, including several with roles in gene expression, such as the Clk2 gene, and neurotransmission, such as genes encoding potassium voltage-gated channels and a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. We confirmed the neuronal localization of some of these transcripts by using in situ hybridization. To validate the microarray results, we performed real-time reverse transcriptase PCR analyses for a selection of the genes. These studies demonstrate that latent HSV infection can alter neuronal gene expression and might provide a new mechanism for how persistent viral infection can cause chronic disease. PMID:12915567

  20. Kinase Control of Latent HIV-1 Infection: PIM-1 Kinase as a Major Contributor to HIV-1 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Anderson, Joshua C.; Wagner, Frederic; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente; Willey, Christopher; Cron, Randall Q.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance of latent HIV-1 infection as a block to HIV-1 eradication, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency remains incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the presence of a gatekeeper kinase function that controls latent HIV-1 infection. Using kinase array analysis, we here expand on this finding and demonstrate that the kinase activity profile of latently HIV-1-infected T cells is altered relative to that of uninfected T cells. A ranking of altered kinases generated from these kinome profile data predicted PIM-1 kinase as a key switch involved in HIV-1 latency control. Using genetic and pharmacologic perturbation strategies, we demonstrate that PIM-1 activity is indeed required for HIV-1 reactivation in T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. The presented results thus confirm that kinases are key contributors to HIV-1 latency control. In addition, through mutational studies we link the inhibitory effect of PIM-1 inhibitor IV (PIMi IV) on HIV-1 reactivation to an AP-1 motif in the CD28-responsive element of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). The results expand our conceptual understanding of the dynamic interactions of the host cell and the latent HIV-1 integration event and position kinome profiling as a research tool to reveal novel molecular mechanisms that can eventually be targeted to therapeutically trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:24155393

  1. Kinase control of latent HIV-1 infection: PIM-1 kinase as a major contributor to HIV-1 reactivation.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Anderson, Joshua C; Wagner, Frederic; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente; Willey, Christopher; Cron, Randall Q; Kutsch, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance of latent HIV-1 infection as a block to HIV-1 eradication, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency remains incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the presence of a gatekeeper kinase function that controls latent HIV-1 infection. Using kinase array analysis, we here expand on this finding and demonstrate that the kinase activity profile of latently HIV-1-infected T cells is altered relative to that of uninfected T cells. A ranking of altered kinases generated from these kinome profile data predicted PIM-1 kinase as a key switch involved in HIV-1 latency control. Using genetic and pharmacologic perturbation strategies, we demonstrate that PIM-1 activity is indeed required for HIV-1 reactivation in T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. The presented results thus confirm that kinases are key contributors to HIV-1 latency control. In addition, through mutational studies we link the inhibitory effect of PIM-1 inhibitor IV (PIMi IV) on HIV-1 reactivation to an AP-1 motif in the CD28-responsive element of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). The results expand our conceptual understanding of the dynamic interactions of the host cell and the latent HIV-1 integration event and position kinome profiling as a research tool to reveal novel molecular mechanisms that can eventually be targeted to therapeutically trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:24155393

  2. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dormancy Antigen Differentiates Latently Infected Bacillus Calmette–Guérin-vaccinated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Delfina; Rovetta, Ana I.; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E.; Amiano, Nicolás O.; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Pellegrini, Joaquín M.; Tateosian, Nancy L.; Rolandelli, Agustín; Gutierrez, Marisa; Musella, Rosa M.; Palmero, Domingo J.; Gherardi, María M.; Iovanna, Juan; Chuluyan, H. Eduardo; García, Verónica E.

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are better indicators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection than the tuberculin skin test (TST) in Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated populations. However, IGRAs do not discriminate active and latent infections (LTBI) and no gold standard for LTBI diagnosis is available. Thus, since improved tests to diagnose M. tuberculosis infection are required, we assessed the efficacy of several M. tuberculosis latency antigens. BCG-vaccinated healthy donors (HD) and tuberculosis (TB) patients were recruited. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, TST and clinical data were used to differentiate LTBI. IFN-γ production against CFP-10, ESAT-6, Rv2624c, Rv2626c and Rv2628 antigens was tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. LTBI subjects secreted significantly higher IFN-γ levels against Rv2626c than HD. Additionally, Rv2626c peptide pools to which only LTBI responded were identified, and their cumulative IFN-γ response improved LTBI discrimination. Interestingly, whole blood stimulation with Rv2626c allowed the discrimination between active and latent infections, since TB patients did not secrete IFN-γ against Rv2626c, in contrast to CFP-10 + ESAT-6 stimulation that induced IFN-γ response from both LTBI and TB patients. ROC analysis confirmed that Rv2626c discriminated LTBI from HD and TB patients. Therefore, since only LTBI recognizes specific epitopes from Rv2626c, this antigen could improve LTBI diagnosis, even in BCG-vaccinated people. PMID:26425695

  3. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dormancy Antigen Differentiates Latently Infected Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-vaccinated Individuals.

    PubMed

    Peña, Delfina; Rovetta, Ana I; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Amiano, Nicolás O; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Pellegrini, Joaquín M; Tateosian, Nancy L; Rolandelli, Agustín; Gutierrez, Marisa; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gherardi, María M; Iovanna, Juan; Chuluyan, H Eduardo; García, Verónica E

    2015-08-01

    IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are better indicators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection than the tuberculin skin test (TST) in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated populations. However, IGRAs do not discriminate active and latent infections (LTBI) and no gold standard for LTBI diagnosis is available. Thus, since improved tests to diagnose M. tuberculosis infection are required, we assessed the efficacy of several M. tuberculosis latency antigens. BCG-vaccinated healthy donors (HD) and tuberculosis (TB) patients were recruited. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, TST and clinical data were used to differentiate LTBI. IFN-γ production against CFP-10, ESAT-6, Rv2624c, Rv2626c and Rv2628 antigens was tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. LTBI subjects secreted significantly higher IFN-γ levels against Rv2626c than HD. Additionally, Rv2626c peptide pools to which only LTBI responded were identified, and their cumulative IFN-γ response improved LTBI discrimination. Interestingly, whole blood stimulation with Rv2626c allowed the discrimination between active and latent infections, since TB patients did not secrete IFN-γ against Rv2626c, in contrast to CFP-10 + ESAT-6 stimulation that induced IFN-γ response from both LTBI and TB patients. ROC analysis confirmed that Rv2626c discriminated LTBI from HD and TB patients. Therefore, since only LTBI recognizes specific epitopes from Rv2626c, this antigen could improve LTBI diagnosis, even in BCG-vaccinated people. PMID:26425695

  4. A Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculosis Infection to Study Intervention Strategies to Prevent Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Kupz, Andreas; Zedler, Ulrike; Stäber, Manuela; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading cause of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)+ individuals, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Management of this deadly co-infection is a significant global health challenge that is exacerbated by the lack of efficient vaccines against both Mtb and HIV, as well as the lack of reliable and robust animal models for Mtb/HIV co-infection. Here we describe a tractable and reproducible mouse model to study the reactivation dynamics of latent Mtb infection following the loss of CD4+ T cells as it occurs in HIV-co-infected individuals. Whereas intradermally (i.d.) infected C57BL/6 mice contained Mtb within the local draining lymph nodes, depletion of CD4+ cells led to progressive systemic spread of the bacteria and induction of lung pathology. To interrogate whether reactivation of Mtb after CD4+ T cell depletion can be reversed, we employed interleukin (IL)-2/anti-IL-2 complex-mediated cell boost approaches. Although populations of non-CD4 lymphocytes, such as CD8+ memory T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and double-negative (DN) T cells significantly expanded after IL-2/anti-IL-2 complex treatment, progressive development of bacteremia and pathologic lung alterations could not be prevented. These data suggest that the failure to reverse Mtb reactivation is likely not due to anergy of the expanded cell subsets and rather indicates a limited potential for IL-2-complex-based therapies in the management of Mtb/HIV co-infection. PMID:27391012

  5. A Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculosis Infection to Study Intervention Strategies to Prevent Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kupz, Andreas; Zedler, Ulrike; Stäber, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading cause of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)+ individuals, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Management of this deadly co-infection is a significant global health challenge that is exacerbated by the lack of efficient vaccines against both Mtb and HIV, as well as the lack of reliable and robust animal models for Mtb/HIV co-infection. Here we describe a tractable and reproducible mouse model to study the reactivation dynamics of latent Mtb infection following the loss of CD4+ T cells as it occurs in HIV-co-infected individuals. Whereas intradermally (i.d.) infected C57BL/6 mice contained Mtb within the local draining lymph nodes, depletion of CD4+ cells led to progressive systemic spread of the bacteria and induction of lung pathology. To interrogate whether reactivation of Mtb after CD4+ T cell depletion can be reversed, we employed interleukin (IL)-2/anti-IL-2 complex-mediated cell boost approaches. Although populations of non-CD4 lymphocytes, such as CD8+ memory T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and double-negative (DN) T cells significantly expanded after IL-2/anti-IL-2 complex treatment, progressive development of bacteremia and pathologic lung alterations could not be prevented. These data suggest that the failure to reverse Mtb reactivation is likely not due to anergy of the expanded cell subsets and rather indicates a limited potential for IL-2-complex-based therapies in the management of Mtb/HIV co-infection. PMID:27391012

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Hop Latent Virus Infecting Hop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong

    2015-01-01

    The hop latent virus is a single-stranded RNA virus that mainly infects hop plants. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a hop latent virus, which was de novo assembled by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Our study indicates that transcriptome data are useful for identifying a complete viral genome. PMID:25908127

  7. Screening Optimization of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bella; Zapantis, Ekaterini; Petryna, Olga; Efthimiou, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are at increased risk of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) but there are no clear guidelines for LTBI screening with Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) or Quantiferon TB Gold testing (QFT-G). Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in a high risk, largely foreign-born, inner city, RA population. After screening 280 RA patients, 134 patients who had both TST and QFT-G testing performed during their initial evaluation were included. Results. Out of 132 RA patients included in our analysis, 50 (37.8%) patients were diagnosed with LTBI with either positive TST 42 (31.8%) or QFT-G 23 (17.4%). 15 (11.4%) were positive and 82 (62.1%) were negative for both tests. The agreement between TST and QFT-G was 73.5% (Kappa 0.305, CI = 95% 0.147–0.463, p = 0.081).  Conclusions. There was low-moderate agreement (κ = 0.305) between TST and QFT-G. In the absence of clearly defined gold standard and limitations associated with both tests, we propose early screening with both tests for patients who need prompt treatment with BRMs. Patients who are not immediate candidates for BRM treatment may be safely and cost effectively screened with a two-step process: initial screening with TST and if negative, IGRA testing. Patients positive for either test should be promptly treated. PMID:26294972

  8. Genes expressed in grapevine leaves reveal latent wood infection by the fungal pathogen Neofusicoccum parvum.

    PubMed

    Czemmel, Stefan; Galarneau, Erin R; Travadon, Renaud; McElrone, Andrew J; Cramer, Grant R; Baumgartner, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    Some pathogenic species of the Botryosphaeriaceae have a latent phase, colonizing woody tissues while perennial hosts show no apparent symptoms until conditions for disease development become favorable. Detection of these pathogens is often limited to the later pathogenic phase. The latent phase is poorly characterized, despite the need for non-destructive detection tools and effective quarantine strategies, which would benefit from identification of host-based markers in leaves. Neofusicoccum parvum infects the wood of grapevines and other horticultural crops, killing the fruit-bearing shoots. We used light microscopy and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) to examine the spatio-temporal relationship between pathogen colonization and anatomical changes in stem sections. To identify differentially-expressed grape genes, leaves from inoculated and non-inoculated plants were examined using RNA-Seq. The latent phase occurred between 0 and 1.5 months post-inoculation (MPI), during which time the pathogen did not spread significantly beyond the inoculation site nor were there differences in lesion lengths between inoculated and non-inoculated plants. The pathogenic phase occurred between 1.5 and 2 MPI, when recovery beyond the inoculation site increased and lesion lengths of inoculated plants tripled. By 2 MPI, inoculated plants also had decreased starch content in xylem fibers and rays, and increased levels of gel-occluded xylem vessels, the latter of which HRCT revealed at a higher frequency than microscopy. RNA-Seq and screening of 21 grape expression datasets identified 20 candidate genes that were transcriptionally-activated by infection during the latent phase, and confirmed that the four best candidates (galactinol synthase, abscisic acid-induced wheat plasma membrane polypeptide-19 ortholog, embryonic cell protein 63, BURP domain-containing protein) were not affected by a range of common foliar and wood pathogens or abiotic stresses. Assuming such host

  9. Genes Expressed in Grapevine Leaves Reveal Latent Wood Infection by the Fungal Pathogen Neofusicoccum parvum

    PubMed Central

    Czemmel, Stefan; Galarneau, Erin R.; Travadon, Renaud; McElrone, Andrew J.; Cramer, Grant R.; Baumgartner, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    Some pathogenic species of the Botryosphaeriaceae have a latent phase, colonizing woody tissues while perennial hosts show no apparent symptoms until conditions for disease development become favorable. Detection of these pathogens is often limited to the later pathogenic phase. The latent phase is poorly characterized, despite the need for non-destructive detection tools and effective quarantine strategies, which would benefit from identification of host-based markers in leaves. Neofusicoccum parvum infects the wood of grapevines and other horticultural crops, killing the fruit-bearing shoots. We used light microscopy and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) to examine the spatio-temporal relationship between pathogen colonization and anatomical changes in stem sections. To identify differentially-expressed grape genes, leaves from inoculated and non-inoculated plants were examined using RNA-Seq. The latent phase occurred between 0 and 1.5 months post-inoculation (MPI), during which time the pathogen did not spread significantly beyond the inoculation site nor were there differences in lesion lengths between inoculated and non-inoculated plants. The pathogenic phase occurred between 1.5 and 2 MPI, when recovery beyond the inoculation site increased and lesion lengths of inoculated plants tripled. By 2 MPI, inoculated plants also had decreased starch content in xylem fibers and rays, and increased levels of gel-occluded xylem vessels, the latter of which HRCT revealed at a higher frequency than microscopy. RNA-Seq and screening of 21 grape expression datasets identified 20 candidate genes that were transcriptionally-activated by infection during the latent phase, and confirmed that the four best candidates (galactinol synthase, abscisic acid-induced wheat plasma membrane polypeptide-19 ortholog, embryonic cell protein 63, BURP domain-containing protein) were not affected by a range of common foliar and wood pathogens or abiotic stresses. Assuming such host

  10. Rapid Detection of Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3 in Latently Infected Koi by Recombinase Polymerase Amplification.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Meagan A; Reed, Aimee N; Jin, Ling; Pastey, Manoj K

    2016-09-01

    Since the emergence of cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), outbreaks have been devastating to Common Carp Cyprinus carpio and koi (a variant of Common Carp), leading to high economic losses. Current diagnostics for detecting CyHV-3 are limited in sensitivity and are further complicated by latency. Here we describe the detection of CyHV-3 by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The RPA assay can detect as low as 10 copies of the CyHV-3 genome by an isothermal reaction and yields results in approximately 20 min. Using the RPA assay, the CyHV-3 genome can be detected in the total DNA of white blood cells isolated from koi latently infected with CyHV-3, while less than 10% of the latently infected koi can be detected by a real-time PCR assay in the total DNA of white blood cells. In addition, RPA products can be detected in a lateral flow device that is cheap and fast and can be used outside of the diagnostic lab. The RPA assay and lateral flow device provide for the rapid, sensitive, and specific amplification of CyHV-3 that with future modifications for field use and validation could lead to enhanced surveillance and early diagnosis of CyHV-3 in the laboratory and field. Received September 14, 2015; accepted April 9, 2016. PMID:27485254

  11. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Michael P.; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E. R.; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M.; Proença, João T.; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir. PMID:27055281

  12. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Michael P; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E R; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir. PMID:27055281

  13. Treatment: Latent TB Infection (LTBI) and TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  14. T-cell reprogramming through targeted CD4-coreceptor and T-cell receptor expression on maturing thymocytes by latent Circoviridae family member porcine circovirus type 2 cell infections in the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Klausmann, Stefanie; Sydler, Titus; Summerfield, Artur; Lewis, Fraser I; Weilenmann, Roseline; Sidler, Xaver; Brugnera, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Although porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-associated diseases have been evaluated for known immune evasion strategies, the pathogenicity of these viruses remained concealed for decades. Surprisingly, the same viruses that cause panzootics in livestock are widespread in young, unaffected animals. Recently, evidence has emerged that circovirus-like viruses are also linked to complex diseases in humans, including children. We detected PCV2 genome-carrying cells in fetal pig thymi. To elucidate virus pathogenicity, we developed a new pig infection model by in vivo transfection of recombinant PCV2 and the immunosuppressant cofactor cyclosporine A. Using flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found evidence that PCV2 dictates positive and negative selection of maturing T cells in the thymus. We show for the first time that PCV2-infected cells reside at the corticomedullary junction of the thymus. In diseased animals, we found polyclonal deletion of single positive cells (SPs) that may result from a loss of major histocompatibility complex class-II expression at the corticomedullary junction. The percentage of PCV2 antigen-presenting cells correlated with the degree of viremia and, in turn, the severity of the defect in thymocyte maturation. Moreover, the reversed T-cell receptor/CD4-coreceptor expression dichotomy on thymocytes at the CD4+CD8interm and CD4SP cell stage is viremia-dependent, resulting in a specific hypo-responsiveness of T-helper cells. We compare our results with the only other better-studied member of Circoviridae, chicken anemia virus. Our data show that PCV2 infection leads to thymocyte selection dysregulation, adding a valuable dimension to our understanding of virus pathogenicity. PMID:26038767

  15. Vascular dysfunction in young, mid-aged and aged mice with latent cytomegalovirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Gombos, R. B.; Brown, J. C.; Teefy, J.; Gibeault, R. L.; Conn, K. L.; Schang, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is associated with vascular diseases in both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent individuals. CMV infections cycle between active and latent phases throughout life. We and others have shown vascular dysfunction during active mouse CMV (mCMV) infections. Few studies have examined changes in physiology during latent CMV infections, particularly vascular responses or whether the negative effects of aging on vascular function and fertility will be exacerbated under these conditions. We measured vascular responses in intact mesenteric and uterine arteries dissected from young, mid-aged, and aged latently mCMV-infected (mCMV genomes are present but infectious virus is undetectable) and age-matched uninfected mice using a pressure myograph. We tested responses to the α1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine, the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, and the endothelium-dependent vasodilator methacholine. In young latently mCMV-infected mice, vasoconstriction was increased and vasodilation was decreased in mesenteric arteries, whereas both vasoconstriction and vasodilation were increased in uterine arteries compared with those in age-matched uninfected mice. In reproductively active mid-aged latently infected mice, mesenteric arteries showed little change, whereas uterine arteries showed greatly increased vasoconstriction. These vascular effects may have contributed to the decreased reproductive success observed in mid-aged latently mCMV-infected compared with age-matched uninfected mice (16.7 vs. 46.7%, respectively). In aged latently infected mice, vasodilation is increased in mesenteric and uterine arteries likely to compensate for increased vasoconstriction to mediators other than phenylephrine. The novel results of this study show that even when active mCMV infections become undetectable, vascular dysfunction continues and differs with age and artery origin. PMID:23125213

  16. Immune Protection against Virus Challenge in Aging Mice Is Not Affected by Latent Herpesviral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Marandu, Thomas F.; Oduro, Jennifer D.; Borkner, Lisa; Dekhtiarenko, Iryna; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Drabig, Anja; Kröger, Andrea; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2015-01-01

    Latent herpesvirus infections alter immune homeostasis. To understand if this results in aging-related loss of immune protection against emerging infections, we challenged old mice carrying latent mouse cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), and/or murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) with influenza virus, West Nile virus (WNV), or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We observed no increase in mortality or weight loss compared to results seen with herpesvirus-negative counterparts and a relative but not absolute reduction in CD8 responses to acute infections. Therefore, the presence of herpesviruses does not appear to increase susceptibility to emerging infections in aging patients. PMID:26339051

  17. Therapeutic Immunization with a Mixture of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein D-Derived “Asymptomatic” Human CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes Decreases Spontaneous Ocular Shedding in Latently Infected HLA Transgenic Rabbits: Association with Low Frequency of Local PD-1+ TIM-3+ CD8+ Exhausted T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Geertsema, Roger; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Dasgupta, Gargi; Osorio, Nelson; Kalantari, Mina; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most blinding ocular herpetic disease is due to reactivation of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) from latency rather than to primary acute infection. No herpes simplex vaccine is currently available for use in humans. In this study, we used the HLA-A*02:01 transgenic (HLA Tg) rabbit model of ocular herpes to assess the efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine based on HSV-1 gD epitopes that are recognized mainly by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HLA-A*02:01-positive, HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell epitopes (gD53–61, gD70–78, and gD278–286) were linked with a promiscuous CD4+ T-cell epitope (gD287–317) to create 3 separate pairs of CD4-CD8 peptides, which were then each covalently coupled to an Nε-palmitoyl-lysine moiety, a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) ligand. This resulted in the construction of 3 CD4-CD8 lipopeptide vaccines. Latently infected HLA Tg rabbits were immunized with a mixture of these 3 ASYMP lipopeptide vaccines, delivered as eye drops in sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The ASYMP therapeutic vaccination (i) induced HSV-specific CD8+ T cells that prevent HSV-1 reactivation ex vivo from latently infected explanted trigeminal ganglia (TG), (ii) significantly reduced HSV-1 shedding detected in tears, (iii) boosted the number and function of HSV-1 gD epitope-specific CD8+ T cells in draining lymph nodes (DLN), conjunctiva, and TG, and (iv) was associated with fewer exhausted HSV-1 gD-specific PD-1+ TIM-3+ CD8+ T cells. The results underscore the potential of an ASYMP CD8+ T-cell epitope-based therapeutic vaccine strategy against recurrent ocular herpes. IMPORTANCE Seventy percent to 90% of adults harbor herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), which establishes lifelong latency in sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. This latent state sporadically switches to spontaneous reactivation, resulting in viral shedding in tears. Most

  18. CCL2/MCP-I Genotype-Phenotype Relationship in Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Rabia; Ansari, Ambreen; Talat, Najeeha; Hasan, Zahra; Dawood, Ghaffar

    2011-01-01

    Among the known biomarkers, chemokines, secreted by activated macrophages and T cells, attract groups of immune cells to the site of infection and may determine the clinical outcome. Association studies of CCL-2/MCP-1 -2518 A/G functional SNP linked to high and low phenotypes with tuberculosis disease susceptibility have shown conflicting results in tuberculosis. Some of these differences could be due the variability of latent infection and recent exposure in the control groups. We have therefore carried out a detailed analysis of CCL-2 genotype SNP -2518 (A/G transition) with plasma CCL-2 levels and related these levels to tuberculin skin test positivity in asymptomatic community controls with no known exposure to tuberculosis and in recently exposed household contacts of pulmonary tuberculosis patients. TST positivity was linked to higher concentrations of plasma CCL2 (Mann Whitney U test; p = 0.004) and was more marked when the G allele was present in TST+ asymptomatic controls (A/G; p = 0.01). Recent exposure also had a significant effect on CCL-2 levels and was linked to the G allele (p = 0.007). Therefore association studies for susceptibility or protection from disease should take into consideration the PPD status as well as recent exposure of the controls group used for comparison. Our results also suggest a role for CCL-2 in maintaining the integrity of granuloma in asymptomatic individuals with latent infection in high TB burden settings. Therefore additional studies into the role of CCL-2 in disease reactivation and progression are warranted. PMID:21991356

  19. CCL2/MCP-I genotype-phenotype relationship in latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rabia; Ansari, Ambreen; Talat, Najeeha; Hasan, Zahra; Dawood, Ghaffar

    2011-01-01

    Among the known biomarkers, chemokines, secreted by activated macrophages and T cells, attract groups of immune cells to the site of infection and may determine the clinical outcome. Association studies of CCL-2/MCP-1 -2518 A/G functional SNP linked to high and low phenotypes with tuberculosis disease susceptibility have shown conflicting results in tuberculosis. Some of these differences could be due the variability of latent infection and recent exposure in the control groups. We have therefore carried out a detailed analysis of CCL-2 genotype SNP -2518 (A/G transition) with plasma CCL-2 levels and related these levels to tuberculin skin test positivity in asymptomatic community controls with no known exposure to tuberculosis and in recently exposed household contacts of pulmonary tuberculosis patients. TST positivity was linked to higher concentrations of plasma CCL2 (Mann Whitney U test; p = 0.004) and was more marked when the G allele was present in TST+ asymptomatic controls (A/G; p = 0.01). Recent exposure also had a significant effect on CCL-2 levels and was linked to the G allele (p = 0.007). Therefore association studies for susceptibility or protection from disease should take into consideration the PPD status as well as recent exposure of the controls group used for comparison. Our results also suggest a role for CCL-2 in maintaining the integrity of granuloma in asymptomatic individuals with latent infection in high TB burden settings. Therefore additional studies into the role of CCL-2 in disease reactivation and progression are warranted. PMID:21991356

  20. Selecting antagonists for control of postharvest brown rot of stone fruits originating from latent infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In contrast to biological control of postharvest decays (BCPD) of fruits originating from wound infections after harvest, BCPD originating from latent infections occurring in the orchard has not been developed. This is largely due to the lack of methodology to screen and evaluate microbes for bioco...

  1. A novel method for selecting antagonists against postharvest fruit decays originating from latent infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological control of fruit decays originating from wound infections after harvest has made great progress during the past two decades and several products are commercially available. However, this is not the case for postharvest decays originating from latent infections which occur in the orchard....

  2. RNA from an immediate early region of the type 1 herpes simplex virus genome is present in the trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice

    SciTech Connect

    Deatly, A.M.; Spivack, J.G.; Lavi, E.; Fraser, N.W.

    1987-05-01

    Transcription of the type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) genome in trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice was studied using in situ hybridization. Probes representative of each temporal gene class were used to determine the regions of the genome that encode the transcripts present in latently infected cells. Probes encoding HSV-1 sequences of the five immediate early genes and representative early (thymidine kinase), early-late (major capsid protein), and late (glycoprotein C) genes were used in these experiments. Of the probes tested, only those encoding the immediate early gene product infected-cell polypeptide (ICP) 0 hybridized to RNA in latently infected tissues. Probes containing the other immediate early genes (ICP4, ICP22, ICP27, and ICP47) and the representative early, early-late, and late genes did not hybridize. Two probes covering approx. = 30% of the HSV-1 genome and encoding over 20 early and late transcripts also did not hybridize to RNA in latently infected tissues. These results, with probes spanning > 60% of the HSV-1 genome, suggest that transcription of the HSV-1 genome is restricted to one region in latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia.

  3. Latent Toxoplasma gondii infection leads to deficits in goal-directed behavior in healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Beste, Christian; Getzmann, Stephan; Gajewski, Patrick D; Golka, Klaus; Falkenstein, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Goal-directed behavior is well-known to show declines in elderly individuals, possibly because of alterations in dopaminergic neural transmission. The dopaminergic system is modulated by a number of other different factors. One of these factors, which has attracted a considerable amount of interest in neurobiology, but has only rarely been examined with respect to its possible modulatory role for cognitive functions in elderly individuals, is latent Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection. Latent T. gondii infection may be of relevance to goal-directed behavior as it alters dopaminergic neural transmission. We examine goal-directed behavior in T. gondii IgG positive and negative elderly subjects in auditory distraction paradigm. We apply event-related potentials to examine which cognitive subprocesses are affected by latent T. gondii infection on a neurophysiological level. We show that latent T. gondii infection compromises the management of auditory distraction in elderly by specifically delaying processes of attentional allocation and disengagement. The results show that latent T. gondii infection is neglected but an important neurobiological modulator of cognitive functions in elderly individuals. PMID:24315729

  4. Latent progenitor cells as potential regulators for tympanic membrane regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Won; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Yeon Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Lim, Ki-Taek; Tian, Chunjie; Chung, Jong Hoon; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Tympanic membrane (TM) perforation, in particular chronic otitis media, is one of the most common clinical problems in the world and can present with sensorineural healing loss. Here, we explored an approach for TM regeneration where the latent progenitor or stem cells within TM epithelial layers may play an important regulatory role. We showed that potential TM stem cells present highly positive staining for epithelial stem cell markers in all areas of normal TM tissue. Additionally, they are present at high levels in perforated TMs, especially in proximity to the holes, regardless of acute or chronic status, suggesting that TM stem cells may be a potential factor for TM regeneration. Our study suggests that latent TM stem cells could be potential regulators of regeneration, which provides a new insight into this clinically important process and a potential target for new therapies for chronic otitis media and other eardrum injuries.

  5. Determination of Urinary Neopterin/Creatinine Ratio to Distinguish Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael; Hargreaves, Dougal S.; Scott, Anne; Housley, David; Walters, Andrew; Mulla, Rohinton

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biomarkers to distinguish latent from active Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis infection in clinical practice are lacking. The urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio can quantify the systemic interferon-gamma effect in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. Methods. In a prospective observational study, urinary neopterin levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with active tuberculosis, in people with latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in healthy controls and the urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio was calculated. Results. We included a total of 44 patients with M. tuberculosis infection and nine controls. 12 patients had active tuberculosis (8 of them culture-confirmed). The median age was 15 years (range 4.5 to 49). Median urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio in patients with active tuberculosis was 374.1 micromol/mol (129.0 to 1072.3), in patients with latent M. tuberculosis infection it was 142.1 (28.0 to 384.1), and in controls it was 146.0 (40.3 to 200.0), with significantly higher levels in patients with active tuberculosis (p < 0.01). The receiver operating characteristics curve had an area under the curve of 0.84 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.97) (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Urinary neopterin/creatinine ratios are significantly higher in patients with active tuberculosis compared to patients with latent infection and may be a significant predictor of active tuberculosis in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27433370

  6. Latent tuberculosis infection: screening and treatment in an urban setting.

    PubMed

    Morano, Jamie P; Walton, Mary R; Zelenev, Alexei; Bruce, R Douglas; Altice, Frederick L

    2013-10-01

    Despite its benefit for treating active tuberculosis, directly observed therapy (DOT) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been largely understudied among challenging inner city populations. Utilizing questionnaire data from a comprehensive mobile healthcare clinic in New Haven, CT from 2003 to July 2011, a total of 2,523 completed tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) resulted in 356 new LTBIs. Multivariate logistic regression correlated covariates of the two outcomes (a) initiation of isoniazid preventative therapy (IPT) and (b) completion of 9 months of IPT. Of the 357 newly positive TSTs, 86.3 % (n = 308) completed screening chest radiographs (CXRs): 90.3 % (n = 278) were normal, and 0.3 % (n = 1) had active tuberculosis. Of those completing CXR screening, 44.0 % (n = 135) agreed to IPT: 69.6 % (n = 94) selected DOT, and 30.4 % (n = 41) selected self-administered therapy (SAT). Initiating IPT was correlated with undocumented status (AOR = 3.43; p < 0.001) and being born in a country of highest and third highest tuberculosis prevalence (AOR = 14.09; p = 0.017 and AOR = 2.25; p = 0.005, respectively). Those selecting DOT were more likely to be Hispanic (83.0 vs 53.7 %; p < 0.0001), undocumented (57.4 vs 41.5 %; p = 0.012), employed (p < 0.0001), uninsured (p = 0.014), and have stable housing (p = 0.002), no prior cocaine or crack use (p = 0.013) and no recent incarceration (p = 0.001). Completing 9 months of IPT was correlated with no recent incarceration (AOR 5.95; p = 0.036) and younger age (AOR 1.03; p = 0.031). SAT and DOT participants did not significantly differ for IPT duration (6.54 vs 5.68 months; p = 0.216) nor 9-month completion (59.8 vs 46.3 %; p = 0.155). In an urban mobile healthcare sample, screening completion for LTBI was high with nearly half initiating IPT. Undocumented, Hispanic immigrants from high prevalence tuberculosis countries were more likely to self-select DOT at the mobile

  7. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  8. Protection against Recurrent Ocular Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Disease after Therapeutic Vaccination of Latently Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Richards, C. M.; Case, R.; Hirst, T. R.; Hill, T. J.; Williams, N. A.

    2003-01-01

    The potential of therapeutic vaccination of animals latently infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to enhance protective immunity to the virus and thereby reduce the incidence and severity of recurrent ocular disease was assessed in a mouse model. Mice latently infected with HSV-1 were vaccinated intranasally with a mixture of HSV-1 glycoproteins and recombinant Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (rEtxB) as an adjuvant. The systemic immune response induced was characterized by high levels of virus-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) in serum and very low levels of IgG2a. Mucosal immunity was demonstrated by high levels of IgA in eye and vaginal secretions. Proliferating T cells from lymph nodes of vaccinated animals produced higher levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) than were produced by such cells from mock-vaccinated animals. This profile suggests that vaccination of latently infected mice modulates the Th1-dominated proinflammatory response usually induced upon infection. After reactivation of latent virus by UV irradiation, vaccinated mice showed reduced viral shedding in tears as well as a reduction in the incidence of recurrent herpetic corneal epithelial disease and stromal disease compared with mock-vaccinated mice. Moreover, vaccinated mice developing recurrent ocular disease showed less severe signs and a quicker recovery rate. Spread of virus to other areas close to the eye, such as the eyelid, was also significantly reduced. Encephalitis occurred in a small percentage (11%) of mock-vaccinated mice, but vaccinated animals were completely protected from such disease. The possible immune mechanisms involved in protection against recurrent ocular herpetic disease in therapeutically vaccinated animals are discussed. PMID:12767989

  9. Single-Cell Cytokine Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Cells Correlates with Latent Tuberculosis Status

    PubMed Central

    Lakehal, Karim; Davidow, Amy L.; Pine, Richard; Tyagi, Sanjay; Bushkin, Yuri; Lardizabal, Alfred; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2015-01-01

    RNA flow cytometry (FISH-Flow) achieves high-throughput measurement of single-cell gene expression by combining in-situ nucleic acid hybridization with flow cytometry. We tested whether antigen-specific T-cell responses detected by FISH-Flow correlated with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), a condition affecting one-third of the world population. Peripheral-blood mononuclear cells from donors, identified as positive or negative for LTBI by current medical practice, were stimulated ex vivo with mycobacterial antigen. IFNG and IL2 mRNA production was assayed by FISH-Flow. Concurrently, immunophenotypes of the cytokine mRNA-positive cells were characterized by conventional, antibody-based staining of cell-surface markers. An association was found between donor LTBI status and antigen-specific induction of IFNG and IL2 transcripts. Induction of these cytokine genes, which was detected by FISH-Flow in a quarter the time required to see release of the corresponding proteins by ELISA, occurred primarily in activated CD4+ T cells via T-cell receptor engagement. Moreover, NK cells contributed to IFNG gene induction. These results show that antigen-driven induction of T-cell cytokine mRNA is a measurable single-cell parameter of the host responses associated with latent tuberculosis. FISH-Flow read-outs contribute a multi-scale dimension to the immunophenotyping afforded by antibody-based flow cytometry. Multi-scale, single-cell analyses may satisfy the need to determine disease stage and therapy response for tuberculosis and other infectious pathologies. PMID:26658491

  10. Vitamin D3 inhibits TNFα-induced latent HIV reactivation in J-LAT cells.

    PubMed

    Nunnari, G; Fagone, P; Lazzara, F; Longo, A; Cambria, D; Di Stefano, G; Palumbo, M; Malaguarnera, L; Di Rosa, Michelino

    2016-07-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) is known to suppress NF-kB activity by interfering with its pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of 1,25(OH)2D3 in reducing the reactivation of the HIV virus J-LAT cells, an established model of latently infected cells, which were treated with TNFalpha (100 ng/ml) for 2 h with or without 24 h 1,25(OH)2D3 (100 nM) pretreatment. Reactivation of HIV RNA in J-LAT was evaluated in terms of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. The same experimental setting was repeated on T cells from HIV-infected patients. Treatment with TNFalpha was associated with a 16 % increase in GFP+ cells and a five-fold increase in unspliced HIV RNA expression (p < 0.04). Pretreatment of J-LAT cells with 1,25(OH)2D3 for 24 h followed by TNFalpha (100 ng/ml) for 2 h reduced the percentage of GFP+ cells by 8 %; moreover, a 2.4-fold decrease in unspliced HIV RNA expression was observed (p < 0.002). In T cells from patients, treatment with TNFalpha significantly increased unspliced HIV RNA expression (sixfold increase, p < 0.02), whereas prestimulation with 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced its expression (2.5-fold decrease, p < 0.02) compared to controls.1,25(OH)2D3 is able to reduce the ability of TNFalpha to upregulate the transcription of HIV RNA from latently infected cells. These data provide further understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms regulating viral reactivation from latent reservoirs, along with new insight in viral internalization. PMID:27295094

  11. Prevention of Tumor Formation by Latent Gammaherpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Raffegerst, S.; Steer, B.; Hohloch, M.; Adler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports suggested that chronic herpesvirus infection, as a constituent of the so-called virome, may not only exert harmful effects but may also be beneficial to the host, for example mediating increased resistance to secondary infections or to tumors. To further challenge this concept, specifically regarding increased resistance to tumors, we infected chimeric HLA-DR4-H2-E (DR4) mice, a mouse strain which spontaneously develops hematological tumors, with the rodent herpesvirus murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68). Using this model, we observed that infection with wildtype MHV-68 completely prevented tumor formation. This happened, however, at the cost of hyposplenism. In contrast to wildtype infection, infection with a latency-deficient mutant of MHV-68 neither prevented tumor formation nor induced hyposplenism. The underlying mechanisms are not known but might be related to an infection-mediated priming of the immune response, resulting in the suppression of a tumor promoting endogenous retrovirus. Thus, under certain circumstances, chronic herpesvirus infection may prevent the development of tumors. PMID:26714031

  12. Isoniazid Completion Rates for Latent Tuberculosis Infection among College Students Managed by a Community Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Karl; Goad, Jeffery; Wu, Joanne; Johnson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors' objective was to document 9-month and previously recommended 6-month treatment completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in a pharmacist-managed LTBI clinic in a community pharmacy on a college campus, and to describe patient characteristics. Participants: Participants were university students diagnosed with…

  13. Latent Gammaherpesvirus 68 Infection Induces Distinct Transcriptional Changes in Different Organs

    PubMed Central

    Canny, Susan P.; Goel, Gautam; Reese, Tiffany A.; Zhang, Xin; Xavier, Ramnik

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies identified a role for latent herpesvirus infection in cross-protection against infection and exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases. Here, we identified more than 500 genes differentially expressed in spleens, livers, or brains of mice latently infected with gammaherpesvirus 68 and found that distinct sets of genes linked to different pathways were altered in the spleen compared to those in the liver. Several of the most differentially expressed latency-specific genes (e.g., the gamma interferon [IFN-γ], Cxcl9, and Ccl5 genes) are associated with known latency-specific phenotypes. Chronic herpesvirus infection, therefore, significantly alters the transcriptional status of host organs. We speculate that such changes may influence host physiology, the status of the immune system, and disease susceptibility. PMID:24155394

  14. Anatomical Response and Infection of Soybean during Latent and Pathogenic Infection by Type A and B of Phialophora gregata

    PubMed Central

    Impullitti, Ann E.; Malvick, Dean K.

    2014-01-01

    Growth and anatomical responses of plants during latent and pathogenic infection by fungal pathogens are not well understood. The interactions between soybean (Glycine max) and two types of the pathogen Phialophora gregata were investigated to determine how plants respond during latent and pathogenic infection. Stems of soybean cultivars with different or no genes for resistance to infection by P. gregata were inoculated with wildtype or GFP and RFP-labeled strains of types A or B of P. gregata. Plants were sectioned during latent and pathogenic infection, examined with transmitted light or fluorescent microscopy, and quantitative differences in vessels and qualitative differences in infection were assessed using captured images. During latent infection, the number of vessels was similar in resistant and susceptible plants infected with type A or B compared to the control, and fungal infection was rarely observed in vessels. During pathogenic infection, the resistant cultivars had 20 to 25% more vessels than the uninfected plants, and fungal hyphae were readily observed in the vessels. Furthermore, during the pathogenic phase in a resistant cultivar, P.gregata type A-GFP was limited to outside of the primary xylem, while P.gregata type B-RFP was observed in the primary xylem. The opposite occurred with the susceptible cultivar, where PgA-GFP was observed in the primary xylem and PgB-RFP was limited to the interfascicular region. In summary, soybean cultivars with resistance to BSR produced more vessels and can restrict or exclude P. gregata from the vascular system compared to susceptible cultivars. Structural resistance mechanisms potentially compensate for loss of vessel function and disrupted water movement. PMID:24879418

  15. Protection from genital herpes disease, seroconversion and latent infection in a non-lethal murine genital infection model by immunization with an HSV-2 replication-defective mutant virus.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Fernando M; Knipe, David M

    2016-01-15

    Viral vaccines have traditionally protected against disease, but for viruses that establish latent infection, it is desirable for the vaccine to reduce infection to reduce latent infection and reactivation. While seroconversion has been used in clinical trials of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccines to measure protection from infection, this has not been modeled in animal infection systems. To measure the ability of a genital herpes vaccine candidate to protect against various aspects of infection, we established a non-lethal murine model of genital HSV-2 infection, an ELISA assay to measure antibodies specific for infected cell protein 8 (ICP8), and a very sensitive qPCR assay. Using these assays, we observed that immunization with HSV-2 dl5-29 virus reduced disease, viral shedding, seroconversion, and latent infection by the HSV-2 challenge virus. Therefore, it may be feasible to obtain protection against genital disease, seroconversion and latent infection by immunization, even if sterilizing immunity is not achieved. PMID:26609935

  16. IFN-γ release assays in the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection among immunocompromised adults.

    PubMed

    Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Sepkowitz, Kent A

    2013-08-15

    Immunocompromised persons with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are at increased risk for tuberculosis reactivation compared with the general population. The tuberculin skin test, the traditional assay for diagnosing LTBI, has reduced accuracy in immunocompromised patients. IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are in vitro blood tests that measure T-cell release of IFN-γ after stimulation with antigens unique to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we review the data for the use of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB, the two currently available IGRAs, in immunocompromised adults, including persons infected with HIV, patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders, candidates for treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, patients receiving hemodialysis, solid-organ transplant recipients, and patients with cancer. On the basis of the available data, IGRAs have advantages over the tuberculin skin test in specific patient populations and in certain situations. Further studies are needed to more accurately define the usefulness of IGRAs in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23262514

  17. Detection of the latency-associated transcript in neuronal cultures during the latent infection with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Doerig, C; Pizer, L I; Wilcox, C L

    1991-07-01

    The transcriptional studies reported in this paper indicate that the latency-associated transcript (LAT) is present in neuronal cultures during the latent infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). During the latent infection glycoprotein D (gD) mRNA, a mRNA characteristic of the productive infection, is not detected. However, following reactivation by nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation, gD mRNA is detected in the neuronal cultures. Thus, the restricted viral gene expression in the in vitro neuronal model indicates that the latent infection in culture is analogous to that observed in vivo. PMID:1647075

  18. Stimulating the RIG-I pathway to kill cells in the latent HIV reservoir following viral reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Lampiris, Harry W.; Kim, Peggy; Yukl, Steven A.; Havlir, Diane V.; Greene, Warner C.; Wong, Joseph K.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of latent HIV proviruses in long-lived CD4+ T cells despite antiretroviral therapy (ART)1–3 is a major obstacle to viral eradication4–6. Because current candidate latency-reversing agents (LRAs) induce HIV transcription but fail to clear these cellular reservoirs,7–8 new approaches for killing these reactivated latent HIV reservoir cells are urgently needed. HIV latency depends upon transcriptional quiescence of the integrated provirus and circumvention of immune defense mechanisms4–6,9. These defenses include cell-intrinsic innate responses that use pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) to detect viral pathogens and subsequently induce apoptosis of the infected cell10. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) forms one class of pattern-recognition receptors that mediates apoptosis and elimination of infected cells after recognition of viral RNA11–14. Here we show that acitretin, an FDA-approved retinoic-acid derivative, enhances RIG-I signaling ex vivo, increases HIV transcription, and induces preferential apoptosis of HIV-infected cells. These effects are abrogated by RIG-I knockdown. Acitretin also decreases proviral DNA levels in CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected subjects on suppressive ART, an effect amplified by combination with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Pharmacologic enhancement of an innate cellular defense network could provide a means to eliminate reactivated cells in the latent HIV reservoir. PMID:27294875

  19. Recognition of Stage-Specific Mycobacterial Antigens Differentiates between Acute and Latent Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Demissie, Abebech; Leyten, Eliane M. S.; Abebe, Markos; Wassie, Liya; Aseffa, Abraham; Abate, Getahun; Fletcher, Helen; Owiafe, Patrick; Hill, Philip C.; Brookes, Roger; Rook, Graham; Zumla, Alimuddin; Arend, Sandra M.; Klein, Michel; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Andersen, Peter; Doherty, T. Mark

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is estimated to infect 80 to 100 million people annually, the majority of whom do not develop clinical tuberculosis (TB) but instead maintain the infection in a latent state. These individuals generally become positive in response to a tuberculin skin test and may develop clinical TB at a later date, particularly if their immune systems are compromised. Latently infected individuals are interesting for two reasons. First, they are an important reservoir of M. tuberculosis, which needs to be considered for TB control. Second, if detected prior to recrudescence of the disease, they represent a human population that is making a protective immune response to M. tuberculosis, which is very important for defining correlates of protective immunity. In this study, we show that while responsiveness to early secretory antigenic target 6 is a good marker for M. tuberculosis infection, a strong response to the 16-kDa Rv2031c antigen (HspX or α-crystallin) is largely restricted to latently infected individuals, offering the possibility of differential immunodiagnosis of, or therapeutic vaccination against, TB. PMID:16467323

  20. Localization of latency-associated transcripts in the uterovaginal plexus of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 latently infected mice.

    PubMed

    Podlech, J; Hengerer, F; Fleck, M; Kunkel, J; Falke, D

    1997-05-01

    The vagina and medulla of the adrenal gland of mice vaginally infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 were examined in the latent stage of infection (5 to 51 weeks post-infection). RNA in situ hybridization with HSV-1 and -2 latency-associated transcript (LAT) RNA probes resulted in positively stained neuronal cell nuclei in the uterovaginal plexus, but not in the medulla of the adrenal gland. These organs were chosen because HSV antigens can be detected not only in the vaginal epithelium, but also in neurons of the uterovaginal plexus and in the medulla of the adrenal gland at the acute stage of genital infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing LATs in neurons of the uterovaginal plexus in the genital tract of latently HSV-infected mice. PMID:9152429

  1. Transcription of genes involved in sulfolipid and polyacyltrehalose biosynthesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in experimental latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Jimmy E; Ramírez, Ana S; Salas, Laura P; Helguera-Repetto, Cecilia; Gonzalez-y-Merchand, Jorge; Soto, Carlos Y; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    The Influence of trehalose-based glycolipids in the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is recognised; however, the actual role of these cell-wall glycolipids in latent infection is unknown. As an initial approach, we determined by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography the sulfolipid (SL) and diacyltrehalose/polyacyltrehalose (DAT/PAT) profile of the cell wall of hypoxic Mtb. Then, qRT-PCR was extensively conducted to determine the transcription profile of genes involved in the biosynthesis of these glycolipids in non-replicating persistent 1 (NRP1) and anaerobiosis (NRP2) models of hypoxia (Wayne model), and murine models of chronic and progressive pulmonary tuberculosis. A diminished content of SL and increased amounts of glycolipids with chromatographic profile similar to DAT were detected in Mtb grown in the NRP2 stage. A striking decrease in the transcription of mmpL8 and mmpL10 transporter genes and increased transcription of the pks (polyketidesynthase) genes involved in SL and DAT biosynthesis were detected in both the NRP2 stage and the murine model of chronic infection. All genes were found to be up-regulated in the progressive disease. These results suggest that SL production is diminished during latent infection and the DAT/PAT precursors can be accumulated inside tubercle bacilli and are possibly used in reactivation processes. PMID:23472191

  2. Incidence of occupational latent tuberculosis infection in South African healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Adams, Shahieda; Ehrlich, Rodney; Baatjies, Roslynn; van Zyl-Smit, Richard N; Said-Hartley, Qonita; Dawson, Rodney; Dheda, Keertan

    2015-05-01

    The test-specific incidence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in healthcare workers from sub-Saharan Africa is unknown. 505 healthcare workers from South Africa were screened at baseline, and after 12 months, with a questionnaire, the tuberculin skin test (TST), and two T-cell assays (T-SPOT.TB and QuantiFERON-TB Gold-In-Tube). Test-specific conversion rates were calculated. The prevalence of presumed LTBI at baseline was 84, 69 and 62% using the TST, QuantiFERON-TB Gold-In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB, respectively. The annual test-specific conversion rate, depending on the cut-off point used, was as follows: TST 38%; QuantiFERON-TB Gold-In-Tube 13-22%; and T-SPOT.TB 18-22%. Annual reversion rates were 4, 7 and 16%, respectively. The annual TST conversion rate was significantly higher than that derived from published local community-based data (IRR 3.53, 95% CI 1.81-6.88). Factors associated with conversion (any test) included healthcare sector of employment, counselling of tuberculosis patients, and a baseline positive TST (for T-SPOT.TB). The annual rate of tuberculosis infection in South African healthcare workers was very high, irrespective of the testing method used, and may be explained by occupational exposure, as the rate was considerably higher than non-healthcare workers from the same community. Collectively, these data support the need for implementation of tuberculosis-specific infection control measures in Africa. PMID:25700382

  3. De Novo Herpes Simplex Virus VP16 Expression Gates a Dynamic Programmatic Transition and Sets the Latent/Lytic Balance during Acute Infection in Trigeminal Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Sawtell, Nancy M; Thompson, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    The life long relationship between herpes simplex virus and its host hinges on the ability of the virus to aggressively replicate in epithelial cells at the site of infection and transport into the nervous system through axons innervating the infection site. Interaction between the virus and the sensory neuron represents a pivot point where largely unknown mechanisms lead to a latent or a lytic infection in the neuron. Regulation at this pivot point is critical for balancing two objectives, efficient widespread seeding of the nervous system and host survival. By combining genetic and in vivo in approaches, our studies reveal that the balance between latent and lytic programs is a process occurring early in the trigeminal ganglion. Unexpectedly, activation of the latent program precedes entry into the lytic program by 12 -14hrs. Importantly, at the individual neuronal level, the lytic program begins as a transition out of this acute stage latent program and this escape from the default latent program is regulated by de novo VP16 expression. Our findings support a model in which regulated de novo VP16 expression in the neuron mediates entry into the lytic cycle during the earliest stages of virus infection in vivo. These findings support the hypothesis that the loose association of VP16 with the viral tegument combined with sensory axon length and transport mechanisms serve to limit arrival of virion associated VP16 into neuronal nuclei favoring latency. Further, our findings point to specialized features of the VP16 promoter that control the de novo expression of VP16 in neurons and this regulation is a key component in setting the balance between lytic and latent infections in the nervous system. PMID:27607440

  4. Detection of herpes simplex virus-specific DNA sequences in latently infected mice and in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, S; Minson, A C; Field, H J; Anderson, J R; Wildy, P

    1986-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-specific DNA sequences have been detected by Southern hybridization analysis in both central and peripheral nervous system tissues of latently infected mice. We have detected virus-specific sequences corresponding to the junction fragment but not the genomic termini, an observation first made by Rock and Fraser (Nature [London] 302:523-525, 1983). This "endless" herpes simplex virus DNA is both qualitatively and quantitatively stable in mouse neural tissue analyzed over a 4-month period. In addition, examination of DNA extracted from human trigeminal ganglia has shown herpes simplex virus DNA to be present in an "endless" form similar to that found in the mouse model system. Further restriction enzyme analysis of latently infected mouse brainstem and human trigeminal DNA has shown that this "endless" herpes simplex virus DNA is present in all four isomeric configurations. Images PMID:3003377

  5. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals. PMID:26851588

  6. Molecular and pathologic insights from latent HIV-1 infection in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Desplats, Paula; Dumaop, Wilmar; Smith, David; Adame, Anthony; Everall, Ian; Letendre, Scott; Ellis, Ronald; Cherner, Mariana; Grant, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate whether HIV latency in the CNS might have adverse molecular, pathologic, and clinical consequences. Methods: This was a case-control comparison of HIV-1 seropositive (HIV+) patients with clinical and neuropathologic examination. Based on the levels of HIV-1 DNA, RNA, and p24 in the brain, cases were classified as controls, latent HIV CNS infection, and HIV encephalitis (HIVE). Analysis of epigenetic markers including BCL11B, neurodegeneration, and neuroinflammation was performed utilizing immunoblot, confocal microscopy, immunochemistry/image analysis, and qPCR. Detailed antemortem neurocognitive data were available for 23 out of the 32 cases. Results: HIV+ controls (n = 12) had no detectable HIV-1 DNA, RNA, or p24 in the CNS; latent HIV+ cases (n = 10) showed high levels of HIV-1 DNA but no HIV RNA or p24; and HIVE cases (n = 10) had high levels of HIV-1 DNA, RNA, and p24. Compared to HIV+ controls, the HIV+ latent cases displayed moderate cognitive impairment with neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory alterations, although to a lesser extent than HIVE cases. Remarkably, HIV+ latent cases showed higher levels of BCL11B and other chromatin modifiers involved in silencing. Increased BCL11B was associated with deregulation of proinflammatory genes like interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor–α, and CD74. Conclusion: Persistence of latent HIV-1 infection in the CNS was associated with increased levels of chromatin modifiers, including BCL11B. Alteration of these epigenetic factors might result in abnormal transcriptomes, leading to inflammation, neurodegeneration, and neurocognitive impairment. BCL11B and other epigenetic factors involved in silencing might represent potential targets for HIV-1 involvement of the CNS. PMID:23486877

  7. [Role of in vitro tests in the diagnosis of latent tubercular infections].

    PubMed

    Richeldi, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Recent advancements in the understanding of pathogenetic mechanisms in tuberculosis infection, allowed the identification of target molecules and antigens, playing a crucial role in an effective M. tuberculosis immune control. Thanks to this new information, the diagnostic approach to latent tuberculosis infection may be complemented today with two new blood assays, based on the detection and the quantification of the key cytokine interferon-gamma by peripheral blood T cells stimulated with M. tuberculosis-specific antigens. These new tests, QuantiFERON-TB Gold and T-SPOT.TB, being certainly more specific than the tuberculin skin test and probably more sensitive in some subgroups of patients, might represent a crucially relevant tool to achieve to goal of global tuberculosis control. Both assays have logistic advantages over the skin test, thus making them ideal candidates in situations where the tests need to be repeated over time (like in the setting of occupational medicine). In particular, the limited occurrence of the so-called "boosting" effect, the fact that there is no need for a return visit, the reduced variability in reading and reporting of the results and the quantitative response obtained with these assays are all elements that, altogether with the high specificity in BCG-vaccinated individuals, should favor the inclusion of these assays in the process of evaluation of the biologic risk for health care workers. Nonetheless, since these tests have been recently introduced in clinical practice, there are several aspects that still need to be clarified, such as the meaning of the quantitative responses and the interpretation of indeterminate results. It's therefore desirable that new documents will be produced soon to guide the use of these new tests in clinical routine. PMID:21061708

  8. High Levels of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA in Latently Infected Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Julie L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Thorne, Leigh B.; Elmore, Sandra H.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Booker, Jessica K.; Gulley, Margaret L.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present in the malignant cells of approximately 10% of cases. It is unclear whether EBV is being missed in some gastric adenocarcinomas due to insensitive test methods or partial EBV genome loss. In the current study, we screened 113 gastric adenocarcinomas from low and high incidence regions (United States and Central America) for the presence of EBV using a battery quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) assays targeting disparate segments of the EBV genome (BamH1W, EBNA1, LMP1, LMP2, BZLF1, EBER1) and histochemical stains targeting EBV-encoded RNA (EBER), the latent proteins LMP1 and LMP2, and the lytic proteins BMRF1 and BZLF1. EBV DNA was detected by Q-PCR in 48/75 United States cancers (64%) and in 38/38 Central American cancers (100%), which was a significant differrence. EBER was localized to malignant epithelial cells in 8/48 (17%) United States and 3/38 (8%) Central American cancers. Viral loads were considerably higher for EBER-positive versus EBER-negative cancers (mean 162,986 versus 62 EBV DNA copies per 100,000 cells). A viral load of 2,000 copies per 100,000 cells is recommended as the threshold distinguishing EBER-positive from EBER-negative tumors. One infected cancer selectively failed to amplify the LMP2 gene because of a point mutation, while another cancer had an atypical pattern of Q-PCR positivity suggesting deletion of large segments of the EBV genome. Three different viral latency profiles were observed in the cancers based on constant expression of EBER and focal or variable expression of LMP1 or LMP2, without lytic protein expression. We conclude that EBV DNA levels generally reflect EBER status, and a panel of at least two Q-PCR assays is recommended for sensitive identification of infected cancers. PMID:19002111

  9. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L.; Straus, S.E.

    1987-09-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation.

  10. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockout strains enable functional analysis of genes required for cyst development and latent infection.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Weiss, Louis M; Bzik, David J

    2011-09-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we targeted the deletion of four parasite antigen genes (GRA4, GRA6, ROP7, and tgd057) that encode characterized CD8(+) T cell epitopes that elicit corresponding antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell populations associated with control of infection. Cyst development in these type II mutant strains was not found to be strictly dependent on antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell host responses. In contrast, a significant biological role was revealed for the dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 in cyst development since brain tissue cyst burdens were drastically reduced specifically in mutant strains with GRA4 and/or GRA6 deleted. Complementation of the Δgra4 and Δgra6 mutant strains using a functional allele of the deleted GRA coding region placed under the control of the endogenous UPRT locus was found to significantly restore brain cyst burdens. These results reveal that GRA proteins play a functional role in establishing cyst burdens and latent infection. Collectively, our results suggest that a type II Δku80 Δhxgprt genetic background enables a higher-throughput functional analysis of the parasite genome to reveal fundamental aspects of parasite biology controlling virulence, pathogenesis, and transmission. PMID:21531875

  11. Antagonistic Determinants Controlling Replicative and Latent States of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Umashankar, Mahadevaiah; Rak, Michael; Bughio, Farah; Zagallo, Patricia; Caviness, Katie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms by which viruses persist and particularly those by which viruses actively contribute to their own latency have been elusive. Here we report the existence of opposing functions encoded by genes within a polycistronic locus of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome that regulate cell type-dependent viral fates: replication and latency. The locus, referred to as the UL133-UL138 (UL133/8) locus, encodes four proteins, pUL133, pUL135, pUL136, and pUL138. As part of the ULb′ region of the genome, the UL133/8 locus is lost upon serial passage of clinical strains of HCMV in cultured fibroblasts and is therefore considered dispensable for replication in this context. Strikingly, we could not reconstitute infection in permissive fibroblasts from bacterial artificial chromosome clones of the HCMV genome where UL135 alone was disrupted. The loss of UL135 resulted in complex phenotypes and could ultimately be overcome by infection at high multiplicities. The requirement for UL135 but not the entire locus led us to hypothesize that another gene in this locus suppressed virus replication in the absence of UL135. The defect associated with the loss of UL135 was largely rescued by the additional disruption of the UL138 latency determinant, indicating a requirement for UL135 for virus replication when UL138 is expressed. In the CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor model of latency, viruses lacking only UL135 were defective for viral genome amplification and reactivation. Taken together, these data indicate that UL135 and UL138 comprise a molecular switch whereby UL135 is required to overcome UL138-mediated suppression of virus replication to balance states of latency and reactivation. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms by which viruses persist in their host remain one of the most poorly understood phenomena in virology. Herpesviruses, including HCMV, persist in an incurable, latent state that has profound implications for immunocompromised individuals, including transplant

  12. Hit-and-Run Stimulation: a Novel Concept To Reactivate Latent HIV-1 Infection without Cytokine Gene Induction▿

    PubMed Central

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Wagner, Frederic H.; Huff, Jason; Benjamin, William H.; Saag, Michael S.; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently controls HIV-1 replication but fails to eradicate the virus. Even after years of successful ART, HIV-1 can conceal itself in a latent state in long-lived CD4+ memory T cells. From this latent reservoir, HIV-1 rebounds during treatment interruptions. Attempts to therapeutically eradicate this viral reservoir have yielded disappointing results. A major problem with previously utilized activating agents is that at the concentrations required for efficient HIV-1 reactivation, these stimuli trigger high-level cytokine gene expression (hypercytokinemia). Therapeutically relevant HIV-1-reactivating agents will have to trigger HIV-1 reactivation without the induction of cytokine expression. We present here a proof-of-principle study showing that this is a possibility. In a high-throughput screening effort, we identified an HIV-1-reactivating protein factor (HRF) secreted by the nonpathogenic bacterium Massilia timonae. In primary T cells and T-cell lines, HRF triggered a high but nonsustained peak of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While this short NF-κB peak potently reactivated latent HIV-1 infection, it failed to induce gene expression of several proinflammatory NF-κB-dependent cellular genes, such as those for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Dissociation of cellular and viral gene induction was achievable, as minimum amounts of Tat protein, synthesized following application of a short NF-κB pulse, triggered HIV-1 transactivation and subsequent self-perpetuated HIV-1 expression. In the absence of such a positive feedback mechanism, cellular gene expression was not sustained, suggesting that strategies modulating the NF-κB activity profile could be used to selectively trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:20538859

  13. Hit-and-run stimulation: a novel concept to reactivate latent HIV-1 infection without cytokine gene induction.

    PubMed

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Wagner, Frederic H; Huff, Jason; Benjamin, William H; Saag, Michael S; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2010-09-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently controls HIV-1 replication but fails to eradicate the virus. Even after years of successful ART, HIV-1 can conceal itself in a latent state in long-lived CD4(+) memory T cells. From this latent reservoir, HIV-1 rebounds during treatment interruptions. Attempts to therapeutically eradicate this viral reservoir have yielded disappointing results. A major problem with previously utilized activating agents is that at the concentrations required for efficient HIV-1 reactivation, these stimuli trigger high-level cytokine gene expression (hypercytokinemia). Therapeutically relevant HIV-1-reactivating agents will have to trigger HIV-1 reactivation without the induction of cytokine expression. We present here a proof-of-principle study showing that this is a possibility. In a high-throughput screening effort, we identified an HIV-1-reactivating protein factor (HRF) secreted by the nonpathogenic bacterium Massilia timonae. In primary T cells and T-cell lines, HRF triggered a high but nonsustained peak of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activity. While this short NF-kappaB peak potently reactivated latent HIV-1 infection, it failed to induce gene expression of several proinflammatory NF-kappaB-dependent cellular genes, such as those for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). Dissociation of cellular and viral gene induction was achievable, as minimum amounts of Tat protein, synthesized following application of a short NF-kappaB pulse, triggered HIV-1 transactivation and subsequent self-perpetuated HIV-1 expression. In the absence of such a positive feedback mechanism, cellular gene expression was not sustained, suggesting that strategies modulating the NF-kappaB activity profile could be used to selectively trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:20538859

  14. Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Liver Transplant Recipients—Controversies in Current Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopala, Srinivas; Olithselvan, A; Varghese, Joy; Shanmugam, Naresh; Rela, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Liver transplantation for end-stage liver disease is increasingly being undertaken in India.1 Routine tuberculin skin testing (TST) for latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and isoniazid prophylaxis in TST-positive liver-transplant recipients (LTRs) is recommended2,3 but seldom implemented worldwide.4–7 The role of TST-testing and isoniazid prophylaxis in LTRs remains further undefined in high prevalence areas, including India. We describe the burden of LTBI in LTRs; the epidemiological aspects of M. tuberculosis infection in high prevalence areas; identifiable risk factors for M. tuberculosis infection; the limitations of current diagnostic techniques for LTBI in LTRs and the efficacy and toxicity of isoniazid prophylaxis in TST-positive LTRs and suggest directions for future investigations in this area. PMID:25755308

  15. Cruzipain Activates Latent TGF-β from Host Cells during T. cruzi Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ferrão, Patrícia Mello; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini; Araujo-Jorge, Tania Cremonini; Degrave, Wim Maurits; Gonçalves, Antônio da Silva; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Lima, Ana Paula; Feige, Jean Jacques; Bailly, Sabine; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas

    2015-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the activity of cruzipain, the main lysosomal cysteine peptidase of Trypanosoma cruzi, contributes to parasite infectivity. In addition, the parasitic invasion process of mammalian host cells is described to be dependent on the activation of the host TGF-β signaling pathway by T. cruzi. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cruzipain could be an important activator of latent TGF-β and thereby trigger TGF-β-mediated events crucial for the development of Chagas disease. We found that live epimastigotes of T. cruzi, parasite lysates and purified cruzipain were able to activate latent TGF-β in vitro. This activation could be inhibited by the cysteine peptidase inhibitor Z-Phe-Ala-FMK. Moreover, transfected parasites overexpressing chagasin, a potent endogenous cruzipain inhibitor, prevented latent TGF-β activation. We also observed that T. cruzi invasion, as well as parasite intracellular growth, were inhibited by the administration of Z-Phe-Ala-FMK or anti-TGF-β neutralizing antibody to Vero cell cultures. We further demonstrated that addition of purified cruzipain enhanced the invasive activity of trypomastigotes and that this effect could be completely inhibited by addition of a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the activities of cruzipain and TGF-β in the process of cell invasion are functionally linked. Our data suggest that cruzipain inhibition is an interesting chemotherapeutic approach for Chagas disease not only because of its trypanocidal activity, but also due to the inhibitory effect on TGF-β activation. PMID:25938232

  16. Cruzipain Activates Latent TGF-β from Host Cells during T. cruzi Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ferrão, Patrícia Mello; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini; Araujo-Jorge, Tania Cremonini; Degrave, Wim Maurits; Gonçalves, Antônio da Silva; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Lima, Ana Paula; Feige, Jean Jacques; Bailly, Sabine; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas

    2015-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the activity of cruzipain, the main lysosomal cysteine peptidase of Trypanosoma cruzi, contributes to parasite infectivity. In addition, the parasitic invasion process of mammalian host cells is described to be dependent on the activation of the host TGF-β signaling pathway by T. cruzi. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cruzipain could be an important activator of latent TGF-β and thereby trigger TGF-β-mediated events crucial for the development of Chagas disease. We found that live epimastigotes of T. cruzi, parasite lysates and purified cruzipain were able to activate latent TGF-β in vitro. This activation could be inhibited by the cysteine peptidase inhibitor Z-Phe-Ala-FMK. Moreover, transfected parasites overexpressing chagasin, a potent endogenous cruzipain inhibitor, prevented latent TGF-β activation. We also observed that T. cruzi invasion, as well as parasite intracellular growth, were inhibited by the administration of Z-Phe-Ala-FMK or anti-TGF-β neutralizing antibody to Vero cell cultures. We further demonstrated that addition of purified cruzipain enhanced the invasive activity of trypomastigotes and that this effect could be completely inhibited by addition of a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the activities of cruzipain and TGF-β in the process of cell invasion are functionally linked. Our data suggest that cruzipain inhibition is an interesting chemotherapeutic approach for Chagas disease not only because of its trypanocidal activity, but also due to the inhibitory effect on TGF-β activation. PMID:25938232

  17. Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Associated Factors among Health Care Workers in Kigali, Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Rutanga, Claude; Lowrance, David W.; Oeltmann, John E.; Mutembayire, Grace; Willis, Matt; Uwizeye, Claude Bernard; Hinda, Ruton; Bassirou, Chitou; Gutreuter, Steve; Gasana, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Data are limited regarding tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB infection prevalence in Rwandan health facilities. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey among healthcare workers (HCWs) in Kigali during 2010. We purposively selected the public referral hospital, both district hospitals, and randomly selected 7 of 17 health centers. School workers (SWs) from the nearest willing public schools served as a local reference group. We tested for latent TB infection (LTBI) using tuberculin skin testing (TST) and asked about past TB disease. We assessed risk of LTBI and past history of TB disease associated with hospital employment. Among HCWs, we assessed risk associated with facility type (district hospital, referral hospital, health center), work setting (inpatient, outpatient), and occupation. Results Age, gender, and HIV status was similar between the enrolled 1,131 HCWs and 381 SWs. LTBI was more prevalent among HCWs (62%) than SWs (39%). Adjusted odds of a positive TST result were 2.71 (95% CI 2.01–3.67) times greater among HCWs than SWs. Among HCWs, there was no detectable difference between prevalence of LTBI according to facility type, work setting, or occupation. Conclusion HCWs are at greater risk of LTBI, regardless of facility type, work setting, or occupation. The current status of TB infection control practices should be evaluated in the entire workforce in all Rwandan healthcare facilities. PMID:25919759

  18. Isolation of Mycobacterium kumamotonense from a patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Fanourios; Mavromanolakis, Dimitrios Nikitas; Zande, Marina Chari; Gitti, Zoe Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kumamotonense is a novel, slow-growing non-chromogenic nontuberculous mycobacterium, which belongs to Mycobacterium terrae complex. We report, for the first time in Greece, the isolation of M. kumamotonense from an immunocompetent patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis. M. kumamotonense was identified by sequencing analysis of 16S rDNA and 65-kDa heat shock protein genes while by commercial molecular assays it was misidentified as Mycobacterium celatum. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the reference broth microdilution method. The strain was susceptible to amikacin, clarithromycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifabutin, ethambutol and linezolid. PMID:27080783

  19. Directly Infected Resting CD4+T Cells Can Produce HIV Gag without Spreading Infection in a Model of HIV Latency

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Matthew J.; Graf, Erin H.; Agosto, Luis M.; Mexas, Angela M.; Male, Frances; Brady, Troy; Bushman, Frederic D.; O'Doherty, Una

    2012-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in treating individuals infected with HIV, HAART is not a cure. A latent reservoir, composed mainly of resting CD4+T cells, drives viral rebound once therapy is stopped. Understanding the formation and maintenance of latently infected cells could provide clues to eradicating this reservoir. However, there have been discrepancies regarding the susceptibility of resting cells to HIV infection in vitro and in vivo. As we have previously shown that resting CD4+T cells are susceptible to HIV integration, we asked whether these cells were capable of producing viral proteins and if so, why resting cells were incapable of supporting productive infection. To answer this question, we spinoculated resting CD4+T cells with or without prior stimulation, and measured integration, transcription, and translation of viral proteins. We found that resting cells were capable of producing HIV Gag without supporting spreading infection. This block corresponded with low HIV envelope levels both at the level of protein and RNA and was not an artifact of spinoculation. The defect was reversed upon stimulation with IL-7 or CD3/28 beads. Thus, a population of latent cells can produce viral proteins without resulting in spreading infection. These results have implications for therapies targeting the latent reservoir and suggest that some latent cells could be cleared by a robust immune response. PMID:22911005

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4(+) T-cell response is increased, and Treg cells decreased, in anthelmintic-treated patients with latent TB.

    PubMed

    Toulza, Frederic; Tsang, Lillian; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Brown, Michael; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2016-03-01

    In many settings, adults with active or latent tuberculosis will also be coinfected with helminths. Our study aimed to investigate how anthelmintic treatment modulates antimycobacterial immunity, in a setting where helminth reinfection should not occur. We investigated the potential impact of helminth infection on immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in patients with latent Mtb infection with or without helminth infection (Strongyloides or Schistosoma), and tested T-cell responses before and after anthelmintic treatment. The study was performed in migrants resident in the United Kingdom, where reexposure and reinfection following anthelmintic treatment would not occur. The frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells was measured following stimulation with Mtb Purified Protein Derivative or ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigen, and concentrations of IFN-γ in culture supernatants measured by ELISA and multiplex bead array. Helminth infection was associated with a lower frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, which increased following treatment. Patients with helminth infection showed a significant increase in CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T cells (Treg) compared to those without helminth infection. There was a decrease in the frequency of Treg cells, and an associated increase in CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells after the anthelmintic treatment. Here, we show a potential role of Treg cells in reducing the frequency and function of antimycobacterial CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, and that these effects are reversed after anthelmintic treatment. PMID:26638865

  1. Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-assisted photodynamic diagnosis of subclinical and latent HPV infection of external genital region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhang, Ling-Lin; Guo, Ming-Xia; Huang, Zheng

    2008-12-01

    The relatively high recurrence rate of genital warts can be attributed to the unsuccessful elimination of viruses in areas of subclinical and latent infection. Therefore, the identification and treatment of the subclinical and latent infection is a key to reduce the recurrence. The goal of this study is to investigate the usefulness of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-assisted in situ fluorescence diagnosis of subclinical lesion and latent HPV infection. A total of 30 patients with histologically confirmed genital warts (condylomata acuminata) were subjected to topical application of ALA, acetic acid test, histopathologic examination and HPV DNA subtyping. Topical application of ALA was performed by applying 20% ALA cream to the lesion plus 2-cm margin for 2h followed by fluorescence examination. Correlations between histopathologic examination, aceto-whitening test, HPV DNA subtyping and fluorescence were examined. All warty lesions and subclinical lesions (n=25) showed red fluorescence and harbored HPV DNA (HPV6 or 11). Latent HPV infections at 0.5-2 cm away from the warty lesion also showed red fluorescence. Nonspecific fluorescence was associated with mucosa, inflammatory infiltration and erosive lesion. ALA-assisted photodynamic diagnosis could be employed for the detection of the lesion and subclinical lesion of genital warts. It is also useful in detecting latent HPV infection. PMID:19356665

  2. Epstein-Barr Viruses (EBVs) Deficient in EBV-Encoded RNAs Have Higher Levels of Latent Membrane Protein 2 RNA Expression in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines and Efficiently Establish Persistent Infections in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gregorovic, Goran; Boulden, Elizabeth A.; Bosshard, Rachel; Elgueta Karstegl, Claudio; Skalsky, Rebecca; Cullen, Bryan R.; Gujer, Cornelia; Rämer, Patrick; Münz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Functions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNAs (EBERs) were tested in lymphoblastoid cell lines containing EBER mutants of EBV. Binding of EBER1 to ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22) was confirmed. Deletion of EBER1 or EBER2 correlated with increased levels of cytoplasmic EBV LMP2 RNA and with small effects on specific cellular microRNA (miRNA) levels, but protein levels of LMP1 and LMP2A were not affected. Wild-type EBV and EBER deletion EBV had approximately equal abilities to infect immunodeficient mice reconstituted with a human hematopoietic system. PMID:26339045

  3. Epstein-Barr Viruses (EBVs) Deficient in EBV-Encoded RNAs Have Higher Levels of Latent Membrane Protein 2 RNA Expression in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines and Efficiently Establish Persistent Infections in Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Gregorovic, Goran; Boulden, Elizabeth A; Bosshard, Rachel; Elgueta Karstegl, Claudio; Skalsky, Rebecca; Cullen, Bryan R; Gujer, Cornelia; Rämer, Patrick; Münz, Christian; Farrell, Paul J

    2015-11-01

    Functions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNAs (EBERs) were tested in lymphoblastoid cell lines containing EBER mutants of EBV. Binding of EBER1 to ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22) was confirmed. Deletion of EBER1 or EBER2 correlated with increased levels of cytoplasmic EBV LMP2 RNA and with small effects on specific cellular microRNA (miRNA) levels, but protein levels of LMP1 and LMP2A were not affected. Wild-type EBV and EBER deletion EBV had approximately equal abilities to infect immunodeficient mice reconstituted with a human hematopoietic system. PMID:26339045

  4. Language discordance and testing for latent tuberculosis infection among recent Asian and Latino immigrants.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jennifer C F; Changrani, Jyotsna; Gany, Francesca M

    2011-04-01

    The foreign-born population is disproportionately affected by tuberculosis (TB). Testing to identify persons with latent TB infection is critical. The aim of this study was to assess clinic-based testing for latent tuberculosis infection among recent Asian and Latino immigrants. A randomized controlled trial of interpreting methods and their impact on medical outcomes was conducted at the primary care clinic of a New York City municipal hospital. This study is a nested cohort of recruited patients with an indication to receive tuberculin testing, based on recent migration to the US from endemic areas. Medical record data were abstracted to determine referral for, and completion of, tuberculin testing. Bivariate analyses were used to test for differences in tuberculin testing between language concordant and discordant groups. Seven hundred and eighty-two patients were enrolled. One hundred and ninety-one had migrated within 5 years of enrollment from endemic areas. None spoke English as a primary language. Seventy percentage of patient-provider encounters were language discordant. Seventeen of 191 were referred for testing. Fifteen (88%) completed testing. Six (40%) had positive results. There were no significant differences between language concordant and discordant patients. In this at-risk population, every patient in clinical care should be considered for testing if indicated by country of origin. PMID:20697787

  5. The emergence of latent infection in the early evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Rebecca H; Tanaka, Mark M

    2016-05-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has an unusual natural history in that the vast majority of its human hosts enter a latent state that is both non-infectious and devoid of any symptoms of disease. From the pathogen perspective, it seems counterproductive to relinquish reproductive opportunities to achieve a détente with the host immune response. However, a small fraction of latent infections reactivate to the disease state. Thus, latency has been argued to provide a safe harbour for future infections which optimizes the persistence of M. tuberculosis in human populations. Yet, if a pathogen begins interactions with humans as an active disease without latency, how could it begin to evolve latency properties without incurring an immediate reproductive disadvantage? We address this question with a mathematical model. Results suggest that the emergence of tuberculosis latency may have been enabled by a mechanism akin to cryptic genetic variation in that detrimental latency properties were hidden from natural selection until their expression became evolutionarily favoured. PMID:27194699

  6. Brief Report: Prevalence of Latent Rheumatic Heart Disease Among HIV-Infected Children in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Brigette; Mirembe, Grace; Namuyonga, Judith; Okello, Emmy; Lwabi, Peter; Lubega, Irene; Lubega, Sulaiman; Musiime, Victor; Kityo, Cissy; Salata, Robert A; Longenecker, Chris T

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains highly prevalent in resource-constrained settings around the world, including countries with high rates of HIV/AIDS. Although both are immune-mediated diseases, it is unknown whether HIV modifies the risk or progression of RHD. We performed screening echocardiography to determine the prevalence of latent RHD in 488 HIV-infected children aged 5-18 in Kampala, Uganda. The overall prevalence of borderline/definite RHD was 0.82% (95% confidence interval: 0.26% to 2.23%), which is lower than the published prevalence rates of 1.5%-4% among Ugandan children. There may be protective factors that decrease the risk of RHD in HIV-infected children. PMID:26413847

  7. Association of autophagy-related IRGM polymorphisms with latent versus active tuberculosis infection in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Li, Qian; Peng, Jing; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Feng; Wang, Chunyu; Wang, Xiong

    2016-03-01

    The autophagy-related immunity-related GTPase family M protein, IRGM, plays an important role in the defense against tuberculosis (TB) infection. IRGM polymorphisms are associated with TB infection susceptibility, and recent studies demonstrate host genetic differences between active and latent TB. Here, we investigated the association between IRGM polymorphisms and TB infection type in a Chinese population. We recruited 268 and 321 patients with confirmed or latent TB, respectively, and 475 TB-free healthy controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs10065172, rs10051924, and rs13361189 within IRGM were genotyped using TaqMan-based assays. Interferon-gamma release levels were tested by T-SPOT. rs10065172 (P = 0.024, OR 0.67 (95% CI 0.48-0.95)), rs10051924 (P = 0.01, OR 0.64 (95% CI 0.46-0.90)), and rs13361189 (P = 0.055, OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.51-1.01)) were associated with a protective role against latent TB progression. Haplotype analysis showed that TCC was protective for latent TB (P = 0.022, OR 0.74 (95% CI 0.57-0.96)) whereas TTC conferred a higher risk of active TB. Additionally, patients with the rs10065172 TT genotype had a higher response to TB specific antigens. Thus, IRGM polymorphism differences between latent and active TB suggests that genetic differences in autophagy might partly affect host TB infection status. PMID:26980495

  8. Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals slow growth and low mutation rates during latent infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Colangeli, Roberto; Arcus, Vic L; Cursons, Ray T; Ruthe, Ali; Karalus, Noel; Coley, Kathy; Manning, Shannon D; Kim, Soyeon; Marchiano, Emily; Alland, David

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the growth and mutation rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latent infection in humans. However, studies in rhesus macaques have suggested that latent infections have mutation rates that are higher than that observed during active tuberculosis disease. Elevated mutation rates are presumed risk factors for the development of drug resistance. Therefore, the investigation of mutation rates during human latency is of high importance. We performed whole genome mutation analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from a multi-decade tuberculosis outbreak of the New Zealand Rangipo strain. We used epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis to identify four cases of tuberculosis acquired from the same index case. Two of the tuberculosis cases occurred within two years of exposure and were classified as recently transmitted tuberculosis. Two other cases occurred more than 20 years after exposure and were classified as reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infections. Mutation rates were compared between the two recently transmitted pairs versus the two latent pairs. Mean mutation rates assuming 20 hour generation times were 5.5 X 10(-10) mutations/bp/generation for recently transmitted tuberculosis and 7.3 X 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation for latent tuberculosis. Generation time versus mutation rate curves were also significantly higher for recently transmitted tuberculosis across all replication rates (p = 0.006). Assuming identical replication and mutation rates among all isolates in the final two years before disease reactivation, the u 20 hr mutation rate attributable to the remaining latent period was 1.6 × 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation, or approximately 30 fold less than that calculated during the two years immediately before disease. Mutations attributable to oxidative stress as might be caused by bacterial exposure to the host immune system were not increased in latent infections. In conclusion, we did not find any evidence to suggest

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals Slow Growth and Low Mutation Rates during Latent Infections in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Colangeli, Roberto; Arcus, Vic L.; Cursons, Ray T.; Ruthe, Ali; Karalus, Noel; Coley, Kathy; Manning, Shannon D.; Kim, Soyeon; Marchiano, Emily; Alland, David

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the growth and mutation rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latent infection in humans. However, studies in rhesus macaques have suggested that latent infections have mutation rates that are higher than that observed during active tuberculosis disease. Elevated mutation rates are presumed risk factors for the development of drug resistance. Therefore, the investigation of mutation rates during human latency is of high importance. We performed whole genome mutation analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from a multi-decade tuberculosis outbreak of the New Zealand Rangipo strain. We used epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis to identify four cases of tuberculosis acquired from the same index case. Two of the tuberculosis cases occurred within two years of exposure and were classified as recently transmitted tuberculosis. Two other cases occurred more than 20 years after exposure and were classified as reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infections. Mutation rates were compared between the two recently transmitted pairs versus the two latent pairs. Mean mutation rates assuming 20 hour generation times were 5.5X10−10 mutations/bp/generation for recently transmitted tuberculosis and 7.3X10−11 mutations/bp/generation for latent tuberculosis. Generation time versus mutation rate curves were also significantly higher for recently transmitted tuberculosis across all replication rates (p = 0.006). Assuming identical replication and mutation rates among all isolates in the final two years before disease reactivation, the u20hr mutation rate attributable to the remaining latent period was 1.6×10−11 mutations/bp/generation, or approximately 30 fold less than that calculated during the two years immediately before disease. Mutations attributable to oxidative stress as might be caused by bacterial exposure to the host immune system were not increased in latent infections. In conclusion, we did not find any evidence to suggest

  10. Testing for latent tuberculosis infection using interferon gamma release assays in commercial sex workers at an outreach clinic in Birmingham.

    PubMed

    Daly, R; Khatib, N; Larkins, A; Dedicoat, M

    2016-07-01

    This report demonstrates that using interferon gamma release assays to screen for latent tuberculosis infection in female commercial sex workers in an outreach sexual health clinic is feasible and acceptable. Routine interferon gamma release assay use successfully identified high numbers of latent tuberculosis infection. Innovative approaches to treatment and follow up were required to improve treatment adherence in this group. Direct observation of therapy within the sexual health clinic was also feasible. Successful follow up was dependent on the support of outreach workers, interpreters and tuberculosis nurses. PMID:26589629

  11. Identification of cytotoxic T cell epitopes within Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) oncogene latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1): evidence for HLA A2 supertype-restricted immune recognition of EBV-infected cells by LMP1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Khanna, R; Burrows, S R; Nicholls, J; Poulsen, L M

    1998-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) and latent membrane proteins (LMP) are the only antigens consistently expressed in malignancies such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and Hodgkin's disease (HD). Since EBNA1 is not recognized by EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), there is increasing interest in the identification of the potential target epitopes within LMP1. Although LMP1-specific CTL have been isolated from seropositive individuals, earlier attempts to identify the peptide epitopes recognized by these T cells have been unsuccessful. In the present report we used a novel protocol to identify CTL epitopes within LMP1 which can be recognized by both polyclonal and clonal CTL. Firstly, a computer-based program was employed to identify the potential HLA-binding peptides within LMP1. Polyclonal CD8+ CTL were then isolated from seropositive donors that recognized the peptide epitopes YLLEMLWRL and YLQQNWWTL from LMP1 in association with HLA A2. Limiting dilution analysis of the memory CTL response revealed that the LMP1-specific CTL response constitutes a minor component of the CTL response in healthy virus carriers. Interestingly, analysis of YLLEMLWRL-specific CTL revealed that these CTL were able to lyse EBV-infected B cells expressing different HLA A2 supertype alleles including A*0201, A*0202, A*0203, A*0204, A*0206, A*6802 and A*6901. These data strongly support the notion that HLA class I supertype-restricted CTL may be of significant use in the development of peptide-based immunotherapeutics against EBV-associated malignancies in different ethnic populations. PMID:9521052

  12. β-Catenin, a Transcription Factor Activated by Canonical Wnt Signaling, Is Expressed in Sensory Neurons of Calves Latently Infected with Bovine Herpesvirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yilin; Hancock, Morgan; Workman, Aspen; Doster, Alan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Like many Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily members, bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) expresses an abundant transcript in latently infected sensory neurons, the latency-related (LR)-RNA. LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) that inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch family members, interferes with Notch-mediated transcription, and stimulates neurite formation in cells expressing Notch. An LR mutant virus containing stop codons at the amino terminus of ORF2 does not reactivate from latency or replicate efficiently in certain tissues, indicating that LR gene products are important. In this study, β-catenin, a transcription factor activated by the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, was frequently detected in ORF2-positive trigeminal ganglionic neurons of latently infected, but not mock-infected, calves. Conversely, the lytic cycle regulatory protein (BoHV-1 infected cell protein 0, or bICP0) was not frequently detected in β-catenin-positive neurons in latently infected calves. During dexamethasone-induced reactivation from latency, mRNA expression levels of two Wnt antagonists, Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) and secreted Frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2), were induced in bovine trigeminal ganglia (TG), which correlated with reduced β-catenin protein expression in TG neurons 6 h after dexamethasone treatment. ORF2 and a coactivator of β-catenin, mastermind-like protein 1 (MAML1), stabilized β-catenin protein levels and stimulated β-catenin-dependent transcription in mouse neuroblastoma cells more effectively than MAML1 or ORF2 alone. Neuroblastoma cells expressing ORF2, MAML1, and β-catenin were highly resistant to cell death following serum withdrawal, whereas most cells transfected with only one of these genes died. The Wnt signaling pathway interferes with neurodegeneration but promotes neuronal differentiation, suggesting that stabilization of β-catenin expression by ORF2 promotes neuronal survival and differentiation. IMPORTANCE Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) is an

  13. Bifurcation in Disease Dynamics with Latent Period of Infection and Media Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harkaran; Dhar, Joydip; Bhatti, Harbax Singh

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, an SIS epidemic model with a latent period of infection and media awareness as control strategy is proposed. The asymptotic stability of the model is studied for both disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium states with respect to the basic reproduction number R0. It is observed that the coefficient of media awareness m does not affect R0, but significantly affects the level of endemic equilibrium. Further, the specific conditions for the existence of Hopf bifurcation have been obtained for the endemic equilibrium state. We also performed the sensitivity analysis of the basic reproduction number and state variables at endemic steady state with respect to the model parameter and identified the respective sensitive parameters. Numerical simulations have been presented in support of our analytic findings.

  14. TRANSMISSION AND RISK FACTORS FOR LATENT TUBERCULOSIS INFECTIONS AMONG INDEX CASE-MATCHED HOUSEHOLD CONTACTS.

    PubMed

    Faksri, Kiatichai; Reechaipichitkul, Wipa; Pimrin, Wilailuk; Bourpoern, Janpen; Prompinij, Supapim

    2015-05-01

    An understanding of the risk factors associated with acquiring and transmitting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is required for controlling tuberculosis (TB). We aimed to determine the risk factors and transmission factors for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in northeastern Thailand. Household contact persons (n = 70) and matched index patients with pulmonary TB (n = 42) who presented to Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand were interviewed from September 1, 2012 to March 31, 2014. LTBI was determined by positive results on both a tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test. Multivariate analysis of host and environmental risk factors was performed. Among contact persons, being aged 20 years (adjusted OR=14.0; 95% CI: 1.2-159.5), having a family relationship with a TB subject such as being a spouse or parent (adjusted OR=24.9; 95% CI: 2.4-263.9) and exposure to a TB subject for 5 hours/day (adjusted OR=9.2; 95% CI: 1.4-58.1) were risk factors for LTBI. Having a high bacillary load (adjusted OR=2; 95% CI: 1.26-3.17) or a moderate bacillary load (adjusted OR=1.39; 95% CI: 1.04-1.84) among TB subjects correlated with increased transmissibility compared to having a low bacillary load. The type of dwelling and density of household members were not found to be risk factors for LTBI in our study. We conclude being aged 20 years and having a relationship with a TB patient as a spouse or parent were risk factors for acquiring LTBI, and having a higher bacillary load was a risk factor for transmitting TB. Keywords: latent tuberculosis infection, transmission factor, risk factor, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, interferon-gamma release assay, Thailand PMID:26521523

  15. Prevalence of tuberculosis symptoms and latent tuberculous infection among prisoners in northeastern Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, B.; Al-Darraji, H. A. A.; Wickersham, J. A.; Kamarulzaman, A.; Altice, F. L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING There are currently no routine screening procedures for active tuberculosis (TB) or latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) in Malaysian prisons. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence and correlates of LTBI and active TB symptoms among Malaysian prisoners with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the World Health Organization TB symptom-based screening instrument. DESIGN A cross-sectional survey of 266 prisoners was performed in Kelantan, Malaysia. Consenting participants underwent two-step TST and were screened for active TB symptoms. Standardized cut-offs of respectively ≥5 and ≥10 mm were used to define reactive TST among prisoners with and without HIV. Clinical and behavioral data were assessed and HIV-infected prisoners were stratified by CD4 status. RESULTS Overall LTBI prevalence was 87.6%, with significantly lower TST reactivity among HIV-infected than non-HIV-infected prisoners (83.6% vs. 91.5%, P < 0.05); however, TB symptoms were similar (16.9% vs. 10.1%, P = 0.105). On multivariate analysis, previous incarceration (aOR 4.61, 95%CI 1.76–12.1) was the only significant correlate of LTBI. Increasing age (aOR 1.07, 95%CI 1.01–1.13), lower body mass index (aOR 0.82, 95%CI 0.70–0.96) and TST-reactive status (aOR 3.46, 95%CI 1.20–9.97) were correlated with TB symptoms. CONCLUSION LTBI is highly prevalent, associated with previous incarceration, and suggests the need for routine TB screening on entry to Malaysian prisons. PMID:24200265

  16. Sensitivity of IFN-γ Release Assay to Detect Latent Tuberculosis Infection Is Retained in HIV-Infected Patients but Dependent on HIV/AIDS Progression

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Farba; Mbow, Fatou; Fletcher, Helen; Senghor, Cheikh S.; Coulibaly, Koura D.; LeFevre, Andrea M.; Ngom Gueye, Ndeye F.; Dieye, Tandakha; Sow, Papa S.; Mboup, Souleymane; Lienhardt, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background Detection and treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI) in HIV infected individuals is strongly recommended to decrease morbidity and mortality in countries with high levels of HIV. Objective To assess the validity of a newly developed in-house ELISPOT interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) for the detection of LTBI amongst HIV infected individuals, in comparison with the Tuberculin Skin Test (TST). Methodology/Principal Findings ESAT6/CFP10 (EC) ELISPOT assays were performed, together with a TST, in 285 HIV infected individuals recruited in HIV clinics in Dakar, Senegal, who had no signs of active TB at time of enrolment. Thirty eight of the subjects (13.3%) failed to respond to PHA stimulation and were excluded from the analysis. In the 247 remaining patients, response to PHA did not vary according to CD4 cell count categories (p = 0.51). EC ELISPOT was positive in 125 (50.6%) subjects, while 53 (21.5%) had a positive TST. Concordance between EC ELISPOT and TST was observed in 151 patients (61.1%) (kappa = 0.23). The proportion of subjects with a positive response to the EC ELISPOT assay decreased with declining CD4 counts (p trend = 0.001), but were consistently higher than the proportion of TST responders. In multivariate analysis, the risk of being EC-ELISPOT positive in HIV infected individuals was associated with age, CD4 count and HIV-1 strain. Conclusion Our study indicates that IGRAs using M. tuberculosis specific antigens are likely to retain their validity for the diagnosis of LTBI among HIV positive individuals, but may be impaired by T-cell anergy in severely immuno-suppressed individuals. PMID:18197251

  17. Trypanosome-induced Interferon-γ production in whole blood stimulation assays is associated with latent Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections.

    PubMed

    Ilboudo, Hamidou; Jamonneau, Vincent; Koffi, Mathurin; Kaboré, Jacques; Amoussa, Roukiyath; Holzmuller, Philippe; Garcia, André; Bucheton, Bruno; Courtin, David

    2016-06-01

    Control of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is highly dependent on the ability to detect and treat infected individuals. However, a number of individuals exposed to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense are able to control infection to undetectable levels in blood. They are long-term potential reservoirs and thus a threat for control strategies. Cytokine responses in whole blood stimulation assays were quantified in individuals with contrasting HAT status. Trypanosome-induced IFN-γ production was only observed in "trypanotolerant" subjects suspected of harboring latent infections. This result contributes new insights into the immune responses associated with infection control and opens novel diagnosis perspectives regarding HAT elimination. PMID:26993030

  18. Characterization of Host and Microbial Determinants in Individuals with Latent Tuberculosis Infection Using a Human Granuloma Model

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Evelyn; Mbawuike, Uchenna; Keiser, Tracy L.; Arcos, Jesus; Azad, Abul K.; Wang, Shu-Hua

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Granulomas sit at the center of tuberculosis (TB) immunopathogenesis. Progress in biomarkers and treatment specific to the human granuloma environment is hindered by the lack of a relevant and tractable infection model that better accounts for the complexity of the host immune response as well as pathogen counterresponses that subvert host immunity in granulomas. Here we developed and characterized an in vitro granuloma model derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and autologous serum. Importantly, we interrogated this model for its ability to discriminate between host and bacterial determinants in individuals with and without latent TB infection (LTBI). By the use of this model, we provide the first evidence that granuloma formation, bacterial survival, lymphocyte proliferation, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and lipid body accumulation are significantly altered in LTBI individuals. Moreover, we show a specific transcriptional signature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated with survival within human granuloma structures depending on the host immune status. Our report provides fundamentally new information on how the human host immune status and bacterial transcriptional signature may dictate early granuloma formation and outcome and provides evidence for the validity of the granuloma model and its potential applications. PMID:25691598

  19. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries

    PubMed Central

    Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D. Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh Jr, C. Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J.; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K.; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3–4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3–4 month rifampicin alone. PMID:26405286

  20. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh, C Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R; Sterling, Timothy R; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3-4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3-4 month rifampicin alone. PMID:26405286

  1. Latent cytomegalovirus infection exacerbates experimental pulmonary fibrosis by activating TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghuai; Gao, Jian; Wang, Guoliang; Fei, Guanghe

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the hypotheses that cytomegalovirus (CMV) may trigger idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in a susceptible host and/or that the presence of CMV may alter IPF in response to a well-defined trigger of pulmonary fibrosis. A mouse model of murine CMV (MCMV) infection was established, and the mice were divided into a control group, bleomycin group and an MCMV+bleomycin group. Changes in the weights of the mice were determined in the three groups. Pulmonary fibrosis was detected using a histopathological method. The activity of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1 was measured, and the levels of E‑cadherin, Vimentin and phosphorylated (phospho)‑small mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD)2 were determined using western blot analysis. MCMV was found to invade the lungs, however, it did not cause pulmonary fibrosis. The progression of fibrosis in the mice treated with MCMV+bleomycin was more rapid, compared with that in the control mice. The protein levels of Vimentin and phospho-SMAD2 were upregulated, whereas the level of E‑cadherin was downregulated in the MCMV+bleomycin group,. The results suggested that latent MCMV infection aggravated pulmonary fibrosis in the mouse model, possibly through the activation of TGF-β1. PMID:27279470

  2. HIV-1 Vpr Protein Induces Proteasomal Degradation of Chromatin-associated Class I HDACs to Overcome Latent Infection of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Romani, Bizhan; Baygloo, Nima Shaykh; Hamidi-Fard, Mojtaba; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Allahbakhshi, Elham

    2016-02-01

    Mechanisms underlying HIV-1 latency remain among the most crucial questions that need to be answered to adopt strategies for purging the latent viral reservoirs. Here we show that HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr induces depletion of class I HDACs, including HDAC1, 2, 3, and 8, to overcome latency in macrophages. We found that Vpr binds and depletes chromatin-associated class I HDACs through a VprBP-dependent mechanism, with HDAC3 as the most affected class I HDAC. De novo expression of Vpr in infected macrophages induced depletion of HDAC1 and 3 on the HIV-1 LTR that was associated with hyperacetylation of histones on the HIV-1 LTR. As a result of hyperacetylation of histones on HIV-1 promotor, the virus established an active promotor and this contributed to the acute infection of macrophages. Collectively, HIV-1 Vpr down-regulates class I HDACs on chromatin to counteract latent infections of macrophages. PMID:26679995

  3. Latent tuberculosis infection in a Malaysian prison: implications for a comprehensive integrated control program in prisons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prisons continue to fuel tuberculosis (TB) epidemics particularly in settings where access to TB screening and prevention services is limited. Malaysia is a middle-income country with a relatively high incarceration rate of 138 per 100,000 population. Despite national TB incidence rate remaining unchanged over the past ten years, data about TB in prisons and its contribution to the overall national rates does not exist. This survey was conducted to address the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) in Malaysia’s largest prison. Methods From July to December 2010, all HIV-infected and a comparative group of HIV-uninfected prisoners housed separately in Kajang prison were asked to participate in the survey after explaining the study protocol. Subjects providing informed consent were interviewed using a structured questionnaire followed by the placement of tuberculin skin test (TST) with 2 TU of PPD RT-23 to subjects not being treated for active TB. TST was read after 48-72 hours and indurations of ≥ 5 mm and ≥ 10 mm were considered positive among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects, respectively. Additionally, HIV-infected inmates underwent phlebotomy for CD4 lymphocyte count assessment. A logistic regression model was explored to determine factors associated with TST positivity. Results Overall, 286 subjects (138 HIV-infected and 148 HIV-uninfected) had complete data and TST results. The majority were men (95.1%), less than 40 years old (median age 36.0, SD 7.87), and Malaysians (93.3%). Most (82.5%) had been previously incarcerated and more than half (53.1%) reported sharing needles just prior to their incarceration. TST was positive in 88.8% (84.7% among HIV-infected and 92.5% among HIV-uninfected subjects) and was independently associated with being HIV-uninfected (AOR = 2.97, p = 0.01) and with frequent previous incarcerations (AOR = 1.22 for every one previous incarceration, p = 0.01) after adjusting for other

  4. Eligibility for and outcome of treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in a cohort of HIV-infected people in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection (TLTBI) in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, but few studies have investigated the operational aspects of implementing TLTBI in the co-infected population.The study objectives were to describe eligibility for TLTBI as well as treatment prescription, initiation and completion in an HIV-infected Spanish cohort and to investigate factors associated with treatment completion. Methods Subjects were prospectively identified between 2000 and 2003 at ten HIV hospital-based clinics in Spain. Data were obtained from clinical records. Associations were measured using the odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results A total of 1242 subjects were recruited and 846 (68.1%) were evaluated for TLTBI. Of these, 181 (21.4%) were eligible for TLTBI either because they were tuberculin skin test (TST) positive (121) or because their TST was negative/unknown but they were known contacts of a TB case or had impaired immunity (60). Of the patients eligible for TLTBI, 122 (67.4%) initiated TLTBI: 99 (81.1%) were treated with isoniazid for 6, 9 or 12 months; and 23 (18.9%) with short-course regimens including rifampin plus isoniazid and/or pyrazinamide. In total, 70 patients (57.4%) completed treatment, 39 (32.0%) defaulted, 7 (5.7%) interrupted treatment due to adverse effects, 2 developed TB, 2 died, and 2 moved away. Treatment completion was associated with having acquired HIV infection through heterosexual sex as compared to intravenous drug use (OR:4.6; 95% CI:1.4-14.7) and with having taken rifampin and pyrazinamide for 2 months as compared to isoniazid for 9 months (OR:8.3; 95% CI:2.7-24.9). Conclusions A minority of HIV-infected patients eligible for TLTBI actually starts and completes a course of treatment. Obstacles to successful implementation of this intervention need to be addressed. PMID:20840743

  5. Epstein–Barr virus latent genes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Kieff, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    Latent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection has a substantial role in causing many human disorders. The persistence of these viral genomes in all malignant cells, yet with the expression of limited latent genes, is consistent with the notion that EBV latent genes are important for malignant cell growth. While the EBV-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and latent membrane protein-2A (LMP-2A) are critical, the EBNA-leader proteins, EBNA-2, EBNA-3A, EBNA-3C and LMP-1, are individually essential for in vitro transformation of primary B cells to lymphoblastoid cell lines. EBV-encoded RNAs and EBNA-3Bs are dispensable. In this review, the roles of EBV latent genes are summarized. PMID:25613728

  6. Identifying components for programmatic latent tuberculosis infection control in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Andreas; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Jannigje M; Oordt-Speets, Anouk M; van Kessel, Gerarda B; de Vlas, Sake J; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2016-08-25

    Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are the reservoir of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a population and as long as this reservoir exists, elimination of tuberculosis (TB) will not be feasible. In 2013, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) started an assessment of benefits and risks of introducing programmatic LTBI control, with the aim of providing guidance on how to incorporate LTBI control into national TB strategies in European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) Member States and candidate countries. In a first step, experts from the Member States, candidate countries, and international and national organisations were consulted on the components of programmatic LTBI control that should be considered and evaluated in literature reviews, mathematical models and cost-effectiveness studies. This was done through a questionnaire and two interactive discussion rounds. The main components identified were identification and targeting of risk groups, determinants of LTBI and progression to active TB, optimal diagnostic tests for LTBI, effective preventive treatment regimens, and to explore the potential for combining LTBI control with other health programmes. Political commitment, a solid healthcare infrastructure, and favourable economic situation in specific countries were identified as essential to facilitate the implementation of programmatic LTBI control. PMID:27589214

  7. Latent Tuberculosis Infection Among Immigrant and Refugee Children Arriving in the United States: 2010.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Eboni M; Painter, John; Posey, Drew L; Zhou, Weigong; Shetty, Sharmila

    2016-10-01

    Immigrants and refugees age 2-14 years entering the United States from countries with estimated tuberculosis (TB) incidence rate ≥20 per 100,000 population are screened for TB. Children with TB disease are treated before US arrival. Children with positive tuberculin skin tests (TST), but negative TB evaluation during their pre-immigration examination, are classified with latent TB infection (LTBI) and are recommended for re-evaluation post-arrival. We examined post-immigration TB evaluation and therapy for children arriving with LTBI. We reviewed medical exam data from immigrant children with medical conditions and all refugee children arriving during 2010. Medical examination data were available for 67,334 children. Of these, 8231 (12 %) had LTBI pre-immigration; 5749 (70 %) were re-evaluated for TB post-immigration, and 64 % were retested by TST or IGRA. The pre-immigration LTBI diagnosis was changed for 38 % when retested by TST and for 71 % retested by IGRA. Estimated LTBI therapy initiation and completion rates were 68 and 12 %. In this population, testing with IGRA may limit the number of children targeted for therapy. Increased pre-immigration TB screening with post-immigration follow-up evaluation leading to completion of LTBI therapy should be encouraged to prevent TB reactivation. PMID:26364054

  8. Can Social History Variables Predict Prison Inmates' Risk for Latent Tuberculosis Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Weant, Tyler E.; Turner, Abigail Norris; Murphy-Weiss, Maureen; Murray, David M.; Wang, Shu-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Improved screening and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in correctional facilities may improve TB control. The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (ODRC) consists of 32 prisons. Inmates are screened upon entry to ODRC and yearly thereafter. The objective of the study was to determine if social history factors such as tobacco, alcohol, and drug use are significant predictors of LTBI and treatment outcomes. We reviewed the medical charts of inmates and randomly selected age-matched controls at one ODRC facility for 2009. We used a conditional logistic regression to assess associations between selected social history variables and LTBI diagnosis. Eighty-nine inmates with a history of LTBI and 88 controls were identified. No social history variable was a significant predictor of LTBI. Medical comorbidities such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and hepatitis C were significantly higher in inmates with LTBI. 84% of inmates diagnosed with LTBI had either completed or were on treatment. Annual TB screening may not be cost-effective in all inmate populations. Identification of factors to help target screening populations at risk for TB is critical. Social history variables did not predict LTBI in our inmate population. Additional studies are needed to identify inmates for the targeted TB testing. PMID:23320160

  9. Knowledge and Perceptions of Latent Tuberculosis Infection among Chinese Immigrants in a Canadian Urban Centre

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Berry, Nicole S.; Taylor, Darlene; Venners, Scott A.; Cook, Victoria J.; Mayhew, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Since most tuberculosis (TB) cases in immigrants to British Columbia (BC), Canada, develop from latent TB infection (LTBI), treating immigrants for LTBI can contribute to the eradication of TB. However, adherence to LTBI treatment is a challenge that is influenced by knowledge and perceptions. This research explores Chinese immigrants' knowledge and perceptions towards LTBI in Greater Vancouver. Methods. This mixed methods study included a cross-sectional patient survey at BC's Provincial TB clinics and two focus group discussions (FGDs) with Chinese immigrants. Data from FGDs were coded and analyzed in Simplified Chinese. Codes, themes, and selected quotes were then translated into English. Results. The survey identified a mean basic knowledge score: 40.0% (95% CI: 38.3%, 41.7%). FGDs confirmed that Chinese immigrants' knowledge of LTBI was low, and they confused it with TB disease to the extent of experiencing LTBI associated stigma. Participants also expressed difficulties navigating the health system which impeded testing and treatment of LTBI. Online videos were the preferred format for receiving health information. Conclusion. We identified striking gaps in knowledge surrounding an LTBI diagnosis. Concerns of stigma may influence acceptance and adherence of LTBI treatment in Chinese immigrants. Integrating these findings into routine health care is recommended. PMID:26690263

  10. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among health care workers in a hospital for pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schablon, Anja; Beckmann, Gudrun; Harling, Melanie; Diel, Roland; Nienhaus, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infections (LTBI) in health care workers (HCW) in low-incidence countries especially in hospitals for pulmonary diseases. With Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA), a new method for diagnosis of LTBI is available which is more specific than the tuberculin skin test (TST). Objectives The study was designed to estimate prevalence of LTBI among 270 HCW in a Hospital of Pulmonary Diseases routinely screened for TB. Methods LTBI was assessed by the QuantiFERON-Gold In Tube (QFT-IT). Information on gender, age, workplace, job title, BCG vaccination and history of both TB and TST were collected using a standardised questionnaire. Adjusted odds ratios for potential risk factors for LTBI were calculated. Results The prevalence of LTBI was 7.2%. In HCW younger than 30 years LTBI prevalence was 3.5% and in those older than 50 years 22%. Physicians and nurses showed a higher prevalence rate than other professions (10.8% to 4.5%). The putative risk factors for LTBI were age (>50 year OR 9.3, 95%CI 2.5–33.7), working as physicians/nurses (OR 3. 95%CI 1.2–10.4) and no previous TST in medical history (OR 4.4, 95%CI 1.01–18.9) when compared to those with a negative TST. Conclusion Prevalence of LTBI assessed by QFT-IT is low, this indicates a low infection risk even in hospitals for pulmonary diseases. No statement can be made regarding the occupational risk as compared to the general population because there are no LTBI prevalence data from Germany available. The higher LTBI prevalence rate in older HCWs might be due to the cohort effect or the longer time at risk. PMID:19134168

  11. Modulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in active and latent tuberculosis by coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Jaganathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    Helminth infections are known to induce modulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating systemic cytokine responses in active and latent tuberculosis (LTB) is not known. To define the systemic cytokine levels in helminth-TB coinfection, we measured the circulating plasma levels of Type 1, Type 2, Type 17, other pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in individuals with active TB (ATB) with or without coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection by multiplex ELISA. Similarly, we also measured the same cytokine levels in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant Ss infection in a cross-sectional study. Our data reveal that individuals with ATB or LTB and coexistent Ss infection have significantly lower levels of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2) and Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines compared to those without Ss infection. In contrast, those with ATB and LTB with Ss infection have significantly higher levels of the regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGFβ), and those with LTB and Ss infection also have significantly higher levels of Type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13) as well. Finally, those with LTB (but not ATB) exhibit significantly lower levels of other pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNα, IFNβ, IL-6, IL-12 and GM-CSF). Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the systemic cytokine responses in ATB and LTB and indicate that coincident helminth infections might influence pathogenesis of TB infection and disease. PMID:26542223

  12. Mucosal and Parenteral Vaccination against Acute and Latent Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) Infection by Using an Attenuated MCMV Mutant

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Margaret R.; Li, Xi-Yang; Stenberg, Richard M.; Campbell, Ann E.; Virgin, Herbert W.

    1998-01-01

    We used a live attenuated murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) mutant to analyze mechanisms of vaccination against acute and latent CMV infection. We selected MCMV mutant RV7 as a vaccine candidate since this virus grows well in tissue culture but is profoundly attenuated for growth in normal and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice (V. J. Cavanaugh et al., J. Virol. 70:1365–1374, 1996). BALB/c mice were immunized twice (0 and 14 days) subcutaneously (s.c.) with tissue culture-passaged RV7 and then challenged with salivary gland-passaged wild-type MCMV (sgMCMV) intraperitoneally (i.p.) on day 28. RV7 vaccination protected mice against challenge with 105 PFU of sgMCMV, a dose that killed 100% of mock-vaccinated mice. RV7 vaccination reduced MCMV replication 100- to 500-fold in the spleen between 1 and 8 days after challenge. We used the capacity to control replication of MCMV in the spleen 4 days after challenge as a surrogate for protection. Protection was antigen specific and required both live RV7 and antigen-specific lymphocytes. Interestingly, RV7 was effective when administered s.c., i.p., perorally, intranasally, and intragastrically, demonstrating that attenuated CMV applied to mucosal surfaces can elicit protection against parenteral virus challenge. B cells and immunoglobulin G were not essential for RV7-induced immunity since B-cell-deficient mice were effectively vaccinated by RV7. CD8 T cells, but not CD4 T cells, were critical for RV7-induced protection. Depletion of CD8 T cells by passive transfer of monoclonal anti-CD8 (but not anti-CD4) antibody abrogated RV7-mediated protection, and RV7 vaccination was less efficient in CD8 T-cell-deficient mice with a targeted mutation in the β2-microglobulin gene. Although gamma interferon is important for innate resistance to MCMV, it was not essential for RV7 vaccination since gamma interferon receptor-deficient mice were protected by RV7 vaccination. Establishment of and/or reactivation from latency by sg

  13. Differentially proteomic analysis of the Chinese shrimp at WSSV latent and acute infection stages by iTRAQ approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Sun, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-07-01

    As the direct executors of biological function, the expression level of proteins will reveal the molecular mechanisms regulating WSSV acute infection more directly. In the present study, the iTRAQ approach was applied to identifying differentially expressed proteins in Chinese shrimp during WSSV latent infection and acute infection. A total of 4051 unique peptides corresponding to 1286 proteins were identified. 118 unique proteins showed differential up-regulation and 122 proteins were down-regulated in shrimp during WSSV acute infection compared with those in WSSV latent infection stage. A number of proteins related to actin-myosin cytoskeleton process, including myosin, actin, tubulin, clathrin, and tropomyosin were found up-regulated in shrimp at WSSV AI stage, indicating that the phagocytosis process was involved in WSSV AI stage. The apoptosis process in shrimp during WSSV AI seemed to be inhibited because some proteins suppressive on apoptosis were up-regulated, such as ALG-2 interacting protein x, Hsp90, 14-3-3-like protein, peroxiredoxin 5, peroxiredoxin 6 and adenine nucleotide translocase 2. Association analysis between the proteomic data and the previous transcriptome data was performed. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot were carried out to verify the reliability of the proteomics data. The present study provided a comprehensive view of molecular mechanisms regulating WSSV acute infection at the protein level. PMID:27192146

  14. An AP-1 binding site in the enhancer/core element of the HIV-1 promoter controls the ability of HIV-1 to establish latent infection.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Zhang, Mingce; Wagner, Fredric; Hatcher, Brandon; Jones, Jennifer; Cron, Randall Q; van der Sluis, Renee M; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Berkhout, Ben; Kutsch, Olaf

    2013-02-01

    Following integration, HIV-1 in most cases produces active infection events; however, in some rare instances, latent infection events are established. The latter have major clinical implications, as latent infection allows the virus to persist despite antiretroviral therapy. Both the cellular factors and the viral elements that potentially determine whether HIV-1 establishes active or latent infection events remain largely elusive. We detail here the contribution of different long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences for the establishment of latent HIV-1 infection. Using a panel of full-length replication-competent virus constructs that reflect naturally occurring differences of HIV-1 subtype-specific LTRs and targeted LTR mutants, we found the primary ability of HIV-1 to establish latent infection in this system to be controlled by a four-nucleotide (nt) AP-1 element just upstream of the NF-κB element in the viral promoter. Deletion of this AP-1 site mostly deprived HIV-1 of the ability to establish latent HIV-1 infection. Extension of this site to a 7-nt AP-1 sequence massively promoted latency establishment, suggesting that this promoter region represents a latency establishment element (LEE). Given that these minimal changes in a transcription factor binding site affect latency establishment to such large extent, our data support the notion that HIV-1 latency is a transcription factor restriction phenomenon. PMID:23236059

  15. An AP-1 Binding Site in the Enhancer/Core Element of the HIV-1 Promoter Controls the Ability of HIV-1 To Establish Latent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Zhang, Mingce; Wagner, Fredric; Hatcher, Brandon; Jones, Jennifer; Cron, Randall Q.; van der Sluis, Renee M.; Jeeninga, Rienk E.; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Following integration, HIV-1 in most cases produces active infection events; however, in some rare instances, latent infection events are established. The latter have major clinical implications, as latent infection allows the virus to persist despite antiretroviral therapy. Both the cellular factors and the viral elements that potentially determine whether HIV-1 establishes active or latent infection events remain largely elusive. We detail here the contribution of different long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences for the establishment of latent HIV-1 infection. Using a panel of full-length replication-competent virus constructs that reflect naturally occurring differences of HIV-1 subtype-specific LTRs and targeted LTR mutants, we found the primary ability of HIV-1 to establish latent infection in this system to be controlled by a four-nucleotide (nt) AP-1 element just upstream of the NF-κB element in the viral promoter. Deletion of this AP-1 site mostly deprived HIV-1 of the ability to establish latent HIV-1 infection. Extension of this site to a 7-nt AP-1 sequence massively promoted latency establishment, suggesting that this promoter region represents a latency establishment element (LEE). Given that these minimal changes in a transcription factor binding site affect latency establishment to such large extent, our data support the notion that HIV-1 latency is a transcription factor restriction phenomenon. PMID:23236059

  16. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A is a B-cell receptor mimic and essential for B-cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Mancao, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Many cells latently infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), including certain virus-associated tumors, express latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A), suggesting an important role for this protein in viral latency and oncogenesis. LMP2A mimics B-cell receptor signaling but can also act as a decoy receptor blocking B-cell receptor (BCR) activation. Studies of peripheral B cells have not resolved this apparent contradiction because LMP2A seems to be dispensable for EBV-induced transformation of these B cells in vitro. We show here that LMP2A is essential for growth transformation of germinal center B cells, which do not express the genuine BCR because of deleterious somatic hypermutations in their immunoglobulin genes. BCR-positive (BCR+) and BCR-negative (BCR−) B cells are readily transformed with a recombinant EBV encoding a conditional, floxed LMP2A allele, but the survival and continued proliferation of both BCR+ and BCR− B cells is strictly dependent on LMP2A. These findings indicate that LMP2A has potent, distinct antiapoptotic and/or transforming characteristics and point to its role as an indispensable BCR mimic in certain B cells from which human B-cell tumors such as Hodgkin lymphoma originate. PMID:17682125

  17. Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a New Host Cell in Latent Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M.; Bagirova, Melahat; Elcicek, Serhat; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Baydar, Serap Yesilkir; Findikli, Necati; Oztel, Olga N.

    2011-01-01

    Some protozoan infections such as Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Plasmodium can be transmitted through stem cell transplantations. To our knowledge, so far, there is no study about transmission of Leishmania parasites in stem cell transplantation and interactions between parasites and stem cells in vitro. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between different species of Leishmania parasites and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs). ADMSCs have been isolated, cultured, characterized, and infected with different species of Leishmania parasites (L. donovani, L. major, L. tropica, and L. infantum). Infectivity was examined by Giemsa staining, microculture, and polymerase chain reaction methods. As a result, infectivity of ADMSCs by Leishmania parasites has been determined for the first time in this study. According to our findings, it is very important that donors are screened for Leishmania parasites before stem cell transplantations in regions where leishmaniasis is endemic. PMID:21896818

  18. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a new host cell in latent leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Elcicek, Serhat; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Baydar, Serap Yesilkir; Findikli, Necati; Oztel, Olga N

    2011-09-01

    Some protozoan infections such as Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Plasmodium can be transmitted through stem cell transplantations. To our knowledge, so far, there is no study about transmission of Leishmania parasites in stem cell transplantation and interactions between parasites and stem cells in vitro. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between different species of Leishmania parasites and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs). ADMSCs have been isolated, cultured, characterized, and infected with different species of Leishmania parasites (L. donovani, L. major, L. tropica, and L. infantum). Infectivity was examined by Giemsa staining, microculture, and polymerase chain reaction methods. As a result, infectivity of ADMSCs by Leishmania parasites has been determined for the first time in this study. According to our findings, it is very important that donors are screened for Leishmania parasites before stem cell transplantations in regions where leishmaniasis is endemic. PMID:21896818

  19. A Homogeneous Immunoassay Method for Detecting Interferon-Gamma in Patients with Latent Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Wang, Lin; Guo, Qiaomei; Zhao, Mingna; Gu, Hongchen; Xu, Hong; Lou, Jiatao

    2016-03-28

    IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) have been developed as viable alternative diagnostic tools for detecting latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). A customized homogeneous sandwich luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassay (LOCI) was used to quantify IFN-γ levels in IGRAs. Samples were collected from healthy volunteers (n = 40) who were T-Spot-negative and T-Spot-positive patients (n = 32) at rest. Then the amount of IFN-γ in the supernatant of IGRAs was measured by LOCI. The results demonstrated a low background, and high sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and reproducibility, and a short assay time (only 30 min) with LOCI for IFN-γ. The recovery range was 81.63-102.06%, the coefficients of variation were below 5%, and the limit of detection was 19.0 mIU/ml. Excellent agreement between LOCI IFN-γ and the T-SPOT.TB test was obtained (97.2% agreement, κ = 0.94). The LOCI IFN-γ concentrations were significantly higher in T-Spot-positive patients than in the healthy group (p < 0.001). Moreover, as observed for the comparative LOCI IFN-γ assay, IFN-γ concentrations were related to the numbers of T-SPOT.TB spots. We have established an in vitro blood test for LTBI diagnosis, defined as LOCI IFN-γ. A high level of agreement between the LOCI IFN-γ method and T-SPOT.TB assay was observed in clinical studies that showed the LOCI IFN-γ method could determine LTBI. This study shows acceptable performance characteristics of the LOCI IFN-γ assay to diagnose LTBI. PMID:26628252

  20. Gender Disparities in Latent Tuberculosis Infection in High-Risk Individuals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Wen-Ying; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Lee, Ming-Che; Lin, Yung-Yang; Lee, Yu-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Male predominance in active tuberculosis (TB) is widely-reported globally. Gender inequalities in socio-cultural status are frequently regarded as contributing factors for disparities in sex in active TB. The disparities of sex in the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) are less frequently investigated and deserve clarification. In this cross-sectional study conducted in a TB endemic area, we enrolled patients at high-risk for LTBI and progression from LTBI to active TB from 2011 to 2012. Diagnosis of LTBI was made by QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Differences in sex in terms of prevalence of LTBI and clinical predictors for LTBI were investigated. Associations among age, smoking status, and sex disparities in LTBI were also analyzed. A total of 1018 high-risk individuals with definite QFT-GIT results were included for analysis, including 534 males and 484 females. The proportion of LTBI was significantly higher in males than in females (32.6% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.010). Differences in the proportion of LTBI between sexes were most prominent in older patients (age ≥55 years). In multivariate analysis, independent clinical factors associated with LTBI were age (p = 0.014), smoking (p = 0.048), and fibro-calcified lesions on chest radiogram (p = 0.009). Male sex was not an independent factor for LTBI (p = 0.88). When stratifying patients according to the smoking status, the proportion of LTBI remained comparable between sexes among smokers and non-smokers. In conclusion, although the proportion of LTBI is higher in men, there is no significant disparity in terms of sex in LTBI among high-risk individuals after adjusting for age, smoking status, and other clinical factors. PMID:25369472

  1. Dynamics of the resting CD4+ T-cell latent HIV reservoir in infants initiating HAART less than 6 months of age

    PubMed Central

    Persaud, Deborah; Palumbo, Paul E.; Ziemniak, Carrie; Hughes, Michael D.; Alvero, Carmelita G.; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Yogev, Ram; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Chadwick, Ellen G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Identification of HIV infection in exposed infants facilitates early therapy, which may limit viral reservoirs that maintain HIV infection under HAART. Methods The dynamics of the resting CD4+ T-cell latent HIV reservoir was determined over the first 2 years of life in 17 HIV-infected infants initiating lopinavir/ritonavir-based HAART at a median age of 8.1 weeks and achieving adequate suppression of plasma viral load by 24 weeks. Results The resting CD4+ T-cell latent HIV reservoir was detected in 12 of 14 (86%) infants tested at 24 weeks of HAART [median frequency 1.88 infectious units per million (IUPM); range <0.22 to 81.7), and remained measurable (median IUPM =0.32; range < 0.22 to 3.25) in six of 10 (60%) children retested at 96 weeks. The reservoir declined, from 24 to 96 weeks of HAART, at an estimated mean rate of 0.028 log10 IUPM/month, corresponding to a half-life of 11 months (95% confidence interval 6–30 months]. A strong relationship was found between the frequency of latently infected CD4+T cells at 96 weeks of HAART and time to first undetectable plasma viral load (Spearman r =0.91, P <0.001). Conclusion Although the resting CD4+ T-cell latent reservoir remains detectable over the first 2 years of HAART in a substantial proportion of infants, its size is associated with time to first undetectable viral load. To minimize HIV reservoirs in infants, rapid curtailment of viremia may limit HIV reservoirs and should be a therapeutic goal of early HAART in infants. PMID:22555165

  2. Diminished Systemic and Antigen-Specific Type 1, Type 17, and Other Proinflammatory Cytokines in Diabetic and Prediabetic Individuals With Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Kumaran, Paul; Dolla, Chandra Kumar; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background. Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) is known to be a major risk factor for the development of active tuberculosis, although its influence on latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (hereafter, “latent infection”) remains poorly characterized. Methods. We examined circulating plasma cytokine levels in individuals with latent infection with DM or pre-DM (ie, intermediate hyperglycemia) and compared them to levels in patients with latent infection and normal glycemic control. Results. In persons with DM or pre-DM, latent infection is characterized by diminished circulating levels of type 1 (interferon γ, interleukin 2, and tumor necrosis factor α) and type 17 (interleukin 17F) cytokines. This was associated with decreased systemic levels of other proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 1β and interleukin 18) and the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 but not with decreased systemic levels of type 2 cytokines. Moreover, latently infected individuals with DM had diminished levels of spontaneous and M. tuberculosis antigen–specific levels of type 1 and type 17 cytokines when antigen-stimulated whole blood was examined. Finally, there was no significant correlation between the levels of any of the cytokines measured (with the exception of interleukin 22) with hemoglobin A1c levels. Conclusions. Our data reveal that latent infection in the presence of DM or pre-DM, is characterized by diminished production of cytokines, implicated in the control of M. tuberculosis activation, allowing for a potential immunological mechanism that could account for the increased risk of active tuberculosis in latently infected individuals with DM. PMID:24907382

  3. High frequency of latent Chlamydia trachomatis infection in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Boiko, Ernest V.; Pozniak, Alexei L.; Maltsev, Dmitrii S.; Suetov, Alexei A.; Nuralova, Irina V.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency of detection of ocular and extraocular Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection in non-high myopes with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). METHODS This was a single-center, nonrandomized, prospective, case-control study. One hundred and four patients were divided into a study group with RRD (n=63) and a control group with traumatic retinal detachment (n=41). Samples of subretinal fluid (SFR), conjunctival, urethral/cervical swabs, and blood were collected. The frequency of detection of CT infection in SRF samples was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), direct fluorescence assay (DFA) and cell culture, whereas that in conjunctival swabs was determined by PCR and DFA, and those in urethral/cervical swabs and blood were determined by DFA. Yates Chi-square test (with Bonferroni correction) and two-tailed Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS SRF CT infection was detected more frequently in the study group (50.8%-71.4%) than in the control group (9.8%-12.2%) by all the methods used (P<0.01). The frequency of detection of conjunctival CT infection by DFA was higher in the RRD patients compared with the controls (81.0% vs 24.4%, P=0.004). The PCR detected conjunctival CT infection more often in the study group than in the controls (46.0% vs 9.8%, P=0.007). The DFA detected CT in blood specimens almost as frequently as in urogenital specimens, for the RRD patients (61.2% vs 63.5%) and the controls (7.3% vs 9.8%). CONCLUSION CT infection is detected with high frequency in non-high myopes with RRD. PMID:27366689

  4. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 Knockout Strains Enable Functional Analysis of Genes Required for Cyst Development and Latent Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M.; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P.; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Weiss, Louis M.; Bzik, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we targeted the deletion of four parasite antigen genes (GRA4, GRA6, ROP7, and tgd057) that encode characterized CD8+ T cell epitopes that elicit corresponding antigen-specific CD8+ T cell populations associated with control of infection. Cyst development in these type II mutant strains was not found to be strictly dependent on antigen-specific CD8+ T cell host responses. In contrast, a significant biological role was revealed for the dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 in cyst development since brain tissue cyst burdens were drastically reduced specifically in mutant strains with GRA4 and/or GRA6 deleted. Complementation of the Δgra4 and Δgra6 mutant strains using a functional allele of the deleted GRA coding region placed under the control of the endogenous UPRT locus was found to significantly restore brain cyst burdens. These results reveal that GRA proteins play a functional role in establishing cyst burdens and latent infection. Collectively, our results suggest that a type II Δku80 Δhxgprt genetic background enables a higher-throughput functional analysis of the parasite genome to reveal fundamental aspects of parasite biology controlling virulence, pathogenesis, and transmission. PMID:21531875

  5. MUC1 induced by Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 causes dissociation of the cell-matrix interaction and cellular invasiveness via STAT signaling.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Satoru; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu; Wakisaka, Naohiro; Horikawa, Toshiyuki; Murono, Shigeyuki; Jang, Kyung Lib; Joab, Irene; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Pagano, Joseph S

    2007-02-01

    Disruption of cellular adhesion is an essential pathobiologic step leading to tumor dissemination. Mucin 1 (MUC1) is a mucinous glycoprotein expressed at the surfaces of epithelial cells in many tissues and their carcinomas. MUC1 plays crucial roles in tumor invasion and metastasis, especially in opposing cell adhesion. We have shown that virus infection, specifically by the human tumor virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induces a spectrum of cellular invasiveness and metastasis factors. Here we show that expression of MUC1 is increased in diverse latently EBV-infected cell lines that express latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), the main viral oncoprotein, and that the level of MUC1 was suppressed by expression of a dominant-negative mutant of LMP1. Expression of LMP1 in EBV-negative nasopharyngeal cell lines induces expression of MUC1 through activation of the MUC1 promoter via binding of STAT1 and STAT3. Finally, LMP1 reduces cell adhesion ability, which is restored by inhibition of MUC1 expression with MUC1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, LMP1 increases cell invasiveness, which is suppressed by MUC1 siRNA. Thus, LMP1 induces MUC1, a factor important in an early step of detachment and release of tumor cells, which along with induction of other invasiveness and angiogenic factors may combine to act in a complex sequential process that culminates in metastasis of EBV-infected tumor cells. PMID:17151127

  6. Induction of apoptosis accelerates reactivation of latent HSV-1 in ganglionic organ cultures and replication in cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Du, Te; Zhou, Guoying; Roizman, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses replicate at the portal of entry into the body and are transported retrograde to sensory neurons in which they can establish a silent, latent infection characterized by the expression of a noncoding latency-associated transcript and a set of microRNAs. At the portal of entry into the body and in cell culture a viral protein, VP16, recruits cellular proteins that initiate a sequential derepression of several kinetic classes of viral genes. Earlier studies have shown that upon reactivation of latent virus in ganglionic organ cultures all genes are derepressed at once, thus obviating the need for VP16 to initiate sequential derepression of viral genes. One hypothesis that could explain the data is that the massive reactivation of all classes of viral genes is the consequence of activation of an apoptotic pathway. Here we show that two proapoptotic drugs, dexamethasone and 2[[3-(2,3-dichlorophenoxy)propyl]amino]-ethanol, each accelerates viral gene expression in ganglionic organ cultures. We also show that in cultured cells apoptosis induced by dexamethasone accelerates viral gene expression and accumulation of infectious virus. The results are surprising in light of the relatively large number of viral proteins that independently block apoptosis induced by viral gene products or exogenous agents. The results suggest that the virus may rely on apoptosis to exit from latency but that apoptosis may be detrimental for virus replication or spread at the portal of entry into the body. PMID:22908263

  7. Bioactive Molecules Released From Cells Infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Luganini, Anna; Terlizzi, Maria E.; Gribaudo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Following primary infection in humans, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists in a latent state throughout the host’s lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive extracellular environment that

  8. Bioactive Molecules Released From Cells Infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Luganini, Anna; Terlizzi, Maria E; Gribaudo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Following primary infection in humans, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists in a latent state throughout the host's lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive extracellular environment that

  9. Short Communication: The Broad-Spectrum Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Vorinostat and Panobinostat Activate Latent HIV in CD4(+) T Cells In Part Through Phosphorylation of the T-Loop of the CDK9 Subunit of P-TEFb.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Hu, Pei-Wen; Jan, Yih; Siwak, Edward B; Rice, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    Cessation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected individual leads to a rebound of viral replication due to reactivation of a viral reservoir composed largely of latently infected memory CD4(+) T cells. Efforts to deplete this reservoir have focused on reactivation of transcriptionally silent latent proviruses. HIV provirus transcription depends critically on the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), whose core components are cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and cyclin T1. In resting CD4(+) cells, the functional levels of P-TEFb are extremely low. Cellular activation upregulates cyclin T1 protein levels and CDK9 T-loop (T186) phosphorylation. The broad-spectrum histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) vorinostat and panobinostat have been shown to reactivate latent virus in vivo in HAART-treated individuals. In this study, we have found that vorinostat and panobinostat activate P-TEFb in resting primary CD4(+) T cells through induction of CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation. In contrast, tacedinaline and romidepsin, HDAC 1 and 2 inhibitors, were unable to activate CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation. We used a CCL19 primary CD4(+) T-cell model HIV latency to assess the correlation between induction of CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation and reactivation of latent HIV virus by HDACis. Vorinostat and panobinostat treatment of cells harboring latent HIV increased CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation and reactivation of latent virus, whereas tacedinaline and romidepsin failed to induce T-loop phosphorylation or reactivate latent virus. We conclude that the ability of vorinostat and panobinostat to induce latent HIV is, in part, likely due to the ability of the broad-spectrum HDACis to upregulate P-TEFb through increased CDK9 T-loop phosphorylation. PMID:26727990

  10. Lolium latent virus (Alphaflexiviridae) coat proteins: expression and functions in infected plant tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lolium latent virus (LoLV, Lolavirus, Alphaflexiviridae) viral genome is encapsidated by two carboxy-coterminal coat protein (CP) variants (about 28 and 33 kDa), in equimolar proportion. The CP ORF contains two 5'-proximal AUGs, encoding Met 1 and Met 49, respectively promoting translation of th...

  11. Targeting the latent reservoir to achieve functional HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV-infected individuals, current treatments are unable to completely eradicate the virus. This is due to the presence of HIV latently infected cells which harbor transcriptionally silent HIV. Latent HIV does not replicate or produce viral proteins, thereby preventing efficient targeting by anti-retroviral drugs. Strategies to target the HIV latent reservoir include viral reactivation, enhancing host defense mechanisms, keeping latent HIV silent, and using gene therapy techniques to knock out or reactivate latent HIV. While research into each of these areas has yielded promising results, currently no one mechanism eradicates latent HIV. Instead, combinations of these approaches should be considered for a potential HIV functional cure. PMID:27303638

  12. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Larisa M.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical “activate-and-kill” strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV–GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime. PMID:26138068

  13. A Herpesviral Lytic Protein Regulates the Structure of Latent Viral Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Priya; Lee, Jennifer S.; Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent infections by viruses usually involve minimizing viral protein expression so that the host immune system cannot recognize the infected cell through the viral peptides presented on its cell surface. Herpes simplex virus (HSV), for example, is thought to express noncoding RNAs such as latency-associated transcripts (LATs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) as the only abundant viral gene products during latent infection. Here we describe analysis of HSV-1 mutant viruses, providing strong genetic evidence that HSV-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) is expressed during establishment and/or maintenance of latent infection in murine sensory neurons in vivo. Studies of an ICP0 nonsense mutant virus showed that ICP0 promotes heterochromatin and latent and lytic transcription, arguing that ICP0 is expressed and functional. We propose that ICP0 promotes transcription of LATs during establishment or maintenance of HSV latent infection, much as it promotes lytic gene transcription. This report introduces the new concept that a lytic viral protein can be expressed during latent infection and can serve dual roles to regulate viral chromatin to optimize latent infection in addition to its role in epigenetic regulation during lytic infection. An additional implication of the results is that ICP0 might serve as a target for an antiviral therapeutic acting on lytic and latent infections. PMID:27190217

  14. Histone deacetylases and the nuclear receptor corepressor regulate lytic-latent switch gene 50 in murine gammaherpesvirus 68-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Megan M; Molleston, Jerome M; Canny, Susan; Abou El Hassan, Mohamed; Willert, Erin K; Bremner, Rod; Virgin, Herbert W

    2010-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses are important oncogenic pathogens that transit between lytic and latent life cycles. Silencing the lytic gene expression program enables the establishment of latency and a lifelong chronic infection of the host. In murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68, γHV68), essential lytic switch gene 50 controls the interchange between lytic and latent gene expression programs. However, negative regulators of gene 50 expression remain largely undefined. We report that the MHV68 lytic cycle is silenced in infected macrophages but not fibroblasts and that histone deacetylases (HDACs) mediate silencing. The HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) acts on the gene 50 promoter to induce lytic replication of MHV68. HDAC3, HDAC4, and the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) are required for efficient silencing of gene 50 expression. NCoR is critical for transcriptional repression of cellular genes by unliganded nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid, a known ligand for the NCoR complex, derepresses gene 50 expression and enhances MHV68 lytic replication. Moreover, HDAC3, HDAC4, and NCoR act on the gene 50 promoter and are recruited to this promoter in a retinoic acid-responsive manner. We provide the first example of NCoR-mediated, HDAC-dependent regulation of viral gene expression. PMID:20719946

  15. Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Angela; Meyering, Shabana S.; Lepene, Ben; Iordanskiy, Sergey; van Hoek, Monique L.; Hakami, Ramin M.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    Infections that result in natural or manmade spread of lethal biological agents are a concern and require national and focused preparedness. In this manuscript, as part of an early diagnostics and pathogen treatment strategy, we have focused on extracellular vesicles (EVs) that arise following infections. Although the field of biodefense does not currently have a rich resource in EVs literature, none the less, similar pathogens belonging to the more classical emerging and non-emerging diseases have been studied in their EV/exosomal contents and function. These exosomes are formed in late endosomes and released from the cell membrane in almost every cell type in vivo. These vesicles contain proteins, RNA, and lipids from the cells they originate from and function in development, signal transduction, cell survival, and transfer of infectious material. The current review focuses on how different forms of infection exploit the exosomal pathway and how exosomes can be exploited artificially to treat infection and disease and potentially also be used as a source of vaccine. Virally-infected cells can secrete viral as well as cellular proteins and RNA in exosomes, allowing viruses to cause latent infection and spread of miRNA to nearby cells prior to a subsequent infection. In addition to virally-infected host cells, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi can all release small vesicles that contain pathogen-associated molecular patterns, regulating the neighboring uninfected cells. Examples of exosomes from both virally and bacterially infected cells point toward a re-programming network of pathways in the recipient cells. Finally, many of these exosomes contain cytokines and miRNAs that in turn can effect gene expression in the recipient cells through the classical toll-like receptor and NFκB pathway. Therefore, although exosomes do not replicate as an independent entity, they however facilitate movement of infectious material through tissues and may be the cause of many

  16. Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Angela; Meyering, Shabana S; Lepene, Ben; Iordanskiy, Sergey; van Hoek, Monique L; Hakami, Ramin M; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    Infections that result in natural or manmade spread of lethal biological agents are a concern and require national and focused preparedness. In this manuscript, as part of an early diagnostics and pathogen treatment strategy, we have focused on extracellular vesicles (EVs) that arise following infections. Although the field of biodefense does not currently have a rich resource in EVs literature, none the less, similar pathogens belonging to the more classical emerging and non-emerging diseases have been studied in their EV/exosomal contents and function. These exosomes are formed in late endosomes and released from the cell membrane in almost every cell type in vivo. These vesicles contain proteins, RNA, and lipids from the cells they originate from and function in development, signal transduction, cell survival, and transfer of infectious material. The current review focuses on how different forms of infection exploit the exosomal pathway and how exosomes can be exploited artificially to treat infection and disease and potentially also be used as a source of vaccine. Virally-infected cells can secrete viral as well as cellular proteins and RNA in exosomes, allowing viruses to cause latent infection and spread of miRNA to nearby cells prior to a subsequent infection. In addition to virally-infected host cells, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi can all release small vesicles that contain pathogen-associated molecular patterns, regulating the neighboring uninfected cells. Examples of exosomes from both virally and bacterially infected cells point toward a re-programming network of pathways in the recipient cells. Finally, many of these exosomes contain cytokines and miRNAs that in turn can effect gene expression in the recipient cells through the classical toll-like receptor and NFκB pathway. Therefore, although exosomes do not replicate as an independent entity, they however facilitate movement of infectious material through tissues and may be the cause of many

  17. The Ozobranchus leech as a mechanical vector for the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpes virus found latently infecting skin tumors on Hawaiian green turtles (Chelonia mydas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenblatt, R.J.; Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.; Sutton, C.A.; Casey, R.N.; Casey, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Fibropapillomatosis (FP) of marine turtles is a neoplastic disease of ecological concern. A fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) is consistently present, usually at loads exceeding one virus copy per tumor cell. DNA from an array of parasites of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) was examined with quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine whether any carried viral loads are sufficient to implicate them as vectors for FPTHV. Marine leeches (Ozobranchus spp.) were found to carry high viral DNA loads; some samples approached 10 million copies per leech. Isopycnic sucrose density gradient/qPCR analysis confirmed that some of these copies were associated with particles of the density of enveloped viruses. The data implicate the marine leech Ozobranchus as a mechanical vector for FPTHV. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of FPTHV gene expression indicated that most of the FPTHV copies in a fibropapilloma have restricted DNA polymerase expression, suggestive of latent infection.

  18. Prevalence of Latent and Active Tuberculosis among Dairy Farm Workers Exposed to Cattle Infected by Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Gonzalez, Pedro; Soberanis-Ramos, Orbelin; Martinez-Gamboa, Areli; Chavez-Mazari, Barbara; Barrios-Herrera, Ma Teresa; Torres-Rojas, Martha; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Singh, Mahavir; Gonzalez-Aguirre, Adrian; Ponce de Leon-Garduño, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Background Human tuberculosis caused by M. bovis is a zoonosis presently considered sporadic in developed countries, but remains a poorly studied problem in low and middle resource countries. The disease in humans is mainly attributed to unpasteurized dairy products consumption. However, transmission due to exposure of humans to infected animals has been also recognized. The prevalence of tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors have been insufficiently characterized among dairy farm workers (DFW) exposed in settings with poor control of bovine tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Tuberculin skin test (TST) and Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) were administered to 311 dairy farm and abattoir workers and their household contacts linked to a dairy production and livestock facility in Mexico. Sputa of individuals with respiratory symptoms and samples from routine cattle necropsies were cultured for M. bovis and resulting spoligotypes were compared. The overall prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) was 76.2% (95% CI, 71.4–80.9%) by TST and 58.5% (95% CI, 53.0–64.0%) by IGRA. Occupational exposure was associated to TST (OR 2.72; 95% CI, 1.31–5.64) and IGRA (OR 2.38; 95% CI, 1.31–4.30) adjusting for relevant variables. Two subjects were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, both caused by M. bovis. In one case, the spoligotype was identical to a strain isolated from bovines. Conclusions We documented a high prevalence of latent and pulmonary TB among workers exposed to cattle infected with M. bovis, and increased risk among those occupationally exposed in non-ventilated spaces. Interspecies transmission is frequent and represents an occupational hazard in this setting. PMID:23638198

  19. Chromatin organization of gammaherpesvirus latent genomes.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Italo; Lieberman, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    The gammaherpesviruses are a subclass of the herpesvirus family that establish stable latent infections in proliferating lymphoid and epithelial cells. The latent genomes are maintained as multicopy chromatinized episomes that replicate in synchrony with the cellular genome. Importantly, most of the episomes do not integrate into the host chromosome. Therefore, it is essential that the viral "minichromosome" establish a chromatin structure that is suitable for gene expression, DNA replication, and chromosome segregation. Evidence suggests that chromatin organization is important for each of these functions and plays a regulatory role in the establishment and maintenance of latent infection. Here, we review recent studies on the chromatin organization of the human gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). We discuss the potential role of viral origins of DNA replication and viral encoded origin-binding proteins like EBNA1 and LANA in establishment of viral chromosome organization during latent infection. We also discuss the roles of host cell factors, like CTCF and cohesins, that contribute to higher-order chromosome structures that may be important for stable gene expression programs during latent infection in proliferating cells. PMID:19853673

  20. Identification and Sequencing of a Novel Rodent Gammaherpesvirus That Establishes Acute and Latent Infection in Laboratory Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Joy; Zhao, Guoyan; Nelson, Christopher A.; Coder, Penny; Droit, Lindsay; Handley, Scott A.; Johnson, L. Steven; Vachharajani, Punit; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.; Wang, David; Fremont, Daved H.; Virgin, Herbert W.

    2011-01-01

    Gammaherpesviruses encode numerous immunomodulatory molecules that contribute to their ability to evade the host immune response and establish persistent, lifelong infections. As the human gammaherpesviruses are strictly species specific, small animal models of gammaherpesvirus infection, such as murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (γHV68) infection, are important for studying the roles of gammaherpesvirus immune evasion genes in in vivo infection and pathogenesis. We report here the genome sequence and characterization of a novel rodent gammaherpesvirus, designated rodent herpesvirus Peru (RHVP), that shares conserved genes and genome organization with γHV68 and the primate gammaherpesviruses but is phylogenetically distinct from γHV68. RHVP establishes acute and latent infection in laboratory mice. Additionally, RHVP contains multiple open reading frames (ORFs) not present in γHV68 that have sequence similarity to primate gammaherpesvirus immunomodulatory genes or cellular genes. These include ORFs with similarity to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), C-type lectins, and the mouse mammary tumor virus and herpesvirus saimiri superantigens. As these ORFs may function as immunomodulatory or virulence factors, RHVP presents new opportunities for the study of mechanisms of immune evasion by gammaherpesviruses. PMID:21209105

  1. Experimental infections of rabbits with proliferative and latent stages of Besnoitia besnoiti.

    PubMed

    Liénard, Emmanuel; Pop, Loredana; Prevot, Françoise; Grisez, Christelle; Mallet, Virginie; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Bouhsira, Émilie; Franc, Michel; Jacquiet, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Cattle besnoitiosis due to Besnoitia besnoiti is spreading across Europe and is responsible for severe economic losses in newly infected herds. Experimentally speaking, rabbits have been found to be susceptible to this parasite. The adaptation of B. besnoiti to rabbits may offer a new, easier and cheaper model of investigation for this disease. This study compared the virulence between tachyzoites and bradyzoites of B. besnoiti in rabbits. Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were allocated into three groups of six animals each. The rabbits from the control (group C), "tachyzoite" (group T) and "bradyzoite" (group B) groups were subcutaneously injected in the right flank with 66 μg of ovalbumin, 6.10(6) tachyzoites (125th passage on Vero cells) and 6.10(6) bradyzoites (collected from a natural infected cow) of B. besnoiti, respectively. Clinical follow-up and blood sampling for serological survey and qPCR were performed during 10 weeks until euthanasia. Molecular and immunohistochemistry examination was achieved on 25 samples of tissue per rabbit. Seroconversion occurred in group T without any clinical signs. Rabbits of group B exhibited a febrile condition (temperature above 40 °C from day 8 to day 11 following injection) with positive qPCR in blood. Cysts of B. besnoiti were found on skin samples and organs of rabbits from group B in tissue explored with threshold cycle (Ct) values below 30. These results suggest a higher virulence of bradyzoites in rabbits than Vero cell-cultivated tachyzoites. The proposed model could be used to assess the in vivo effectiveness of vaccine or drugs against cattle besnoitiosis. PMID:26143866

  2. The Prevalence of Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Smear Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in People with Household Close Contact with Tuberculosis in North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Khanjani, Narges; Parsaee, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    One of the recommended strategies for preventing tuberculosis is to screen high-risk populations with respect to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection. The aim of the present study was to investigate latent infection and active tuberculosis in people with close household contact. It was a cross-sectional descriptive, analytical study with the sample size of 668 people from homes with one infected resident. In order to diagnose tuberculosis latent infection, the PPD test was done. To determine patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis, three sputum samples were taken from every patient and were examined using direct microscopy and culture. Data was analyzed by SPSS20 software. The prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were 42.8% and 0.9% respectively. The prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in people with close household contact were less than that of other studies. However, smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in people with close household contact was 199.5 times more than that of the general population. PMID:25821296

  3. Quantifying the Turnover of Transcriptional Subclasses of HIV-1-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Althaus, Christian L.; Joos, Beda; Perelson, Alan S.; Günthard, Huldrych F.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-infected cells in peripheral blood can be grouped into different transcriptional subclasses. Quantifying the turnover of these cellular subclasses can provide important insights into the viral life cycle and the generation and maintenance of latently infected cells. We used previously published data from five patients chronically infected with HIV-1 that initiated combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Patient-matched PCR for unspliced and multiply spliced viral RNAs combined with limiting dilution analysis provided measurements of transcriptional profiles at the single cell level. Furthermore, measurement of intracellular transcripts and extracellular virion-enclosed HIV-1 RNA allowed us to distinguish productive from non-productive cells. We developed a mathematical model describing the dynamics of plasma virus and the transcriptional subclasses of HIV-1-infected cells. Fitting the model to the data allowed us to better understand the phenotype of different transcriptional subclasses and their contribution to the overall turnover of HIV-1 before and during cART. The average number of virus-producing cells in peripheral blood is small during chronic infection. We find that a substantial fraction of cells can become defectively infected. Assuming that the infection is homogenous throughout the body, we estimate an average in vivo viral burst size on the order of 104 virions per cell. Our study provides novel quantitative insights into the turnover and development of different subclasses of HIV-1-infected cells, and indicates that cells containing solely unspliced viral RNA are a good marker for viral latency. The model illustrates how the pool of latently infected cells becomes rapidly established during the first months of acute infection and continues to increase slowly during the first years of chronic infection. Having a detailed understanding of this process will be useful for the evaluation of viral eradication strategies that aim to deplete the

  4. Genes expressed in grapevine leaves reveal latent wood infection by the fungal pathogen Neofusicoccum parvum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of wood-infecting pathogens is often limited to the late stage of infection, when disease symptoms are obvious. Detection of the early stage of infection would benefit from identification of host-based markers in asymptomatic leaves. The fungus Neofusicoccum parvum (Botryosphaeria diebac...

  5. Comparison of human sera reactivities in immunoblots with recombinant human herpesvirus (HHV)-8 proteins associated with the latent (ORF73) and lytic (ORFs 65, K8.1A, and K8.1B) replicative cycles and in immunofluorescence assays with HHV-8-infected BCBL-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L; Wang, R; Sweat, A; Goldstein, E; Horvat, R; Chandran, B

    1999-04-10

    The development of reliable, sensitive, and specific serological methods for the detection of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) antibodies is critical for a thorough understanding of HHV-8 prevalence and pathogenesis. To evaluate the potential usefulness of HHV-8 proteins in measuring the responses against both latent and lytic antigens, we selected 1 latent [open reading frame (ORF) 73] antigen and 3 HHV-8 lytic antigens (ORFs 65, K8.1A, and K8.1B) previously identified as immunogenic [Virology (1998) 243, 208-217]. Full-length genomic ORF 73 and full-length ORFs 65, K8.1A, and K8.1B from the cDNA clones were cloned, expressed in bacterial and baculovirus-insect cell expression systems, and purified as GST fusion proteins. These recombinant proteins were used in Western blot reactions to test sera from 104 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)+/Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)+ homosexual men, 77 HIV+/KS- homosexual men, and 84 age-matched HIV-/KS- men. These sera were also tested in immunofluorescence assays (IFAs) with uninduced and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced B cell lymphoma-1 cells to detect antibodies against latency-associated nuclear antigens (LANA) and antibodies against lytic antigens (cytoplasmic fluorescence). These sera exhibited differential reactivities reflecting different titers of antibodies against HHV-8 proteins, and variable reactivities were seen more commonly with the sera from HIV-/KS- adult men. In the Western blot assay, 89% (93 of 104) of HIV+/KS + sera, 60% (46 of 77) of HIV+/KS- sera, and 7% (6 of 84) HIV+/KS- sera were reactive with both latent and lytic recombinant antigens. Western blot reactions with ORF 73 protein were more sensitive than LANA-IFA results. The lytic IFA and lytic Western blot (ORFs 65 and K8.1A) assays were more sensitive than the ORF 73 Western blots and LANA-IFA. With an exception of 2 sera from the HIV-/KS- group, all sera positive for lytic IFA antibodies and ORF 65 and K8.1A antibodies were also positive for

  6. Progress toward curing HIV infections with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Smiley, Stephen T; Singh, Anjali; Read, Sarah W; Sharma, Opendra K; Finzi, Diana; Lane, Clifford; Rice, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-15

    Combination antiretroviral therapy can suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but cannot completely eradicate the virus. A major obstacle in the quest for a cure is the difficulty in targeting and measuring latently infected cells. To date, a single person seems to have been cured of HIV. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) preceded this cancer patient's long-term sustained HIV remission, but researchers have been unable to replicate this cure, and the mechanisms that led to HIV remission remain to be established. In February 2014, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored a workshop that provided a venue for in-depth discussion of whether HSCT could be exploited to cure HIV in cancer patients requiring such procedures. Participants also discussed how HSCT might be applied to a broader community of HIV-infected persons in whom the risks of HSCT currently outweigh the likelihood and benefits of HIV cure. PMID:25273081

  7. Targeted screening and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold is cost-effective in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, J. L.; Kahn, J. G.; Strathdee, S. A.; Valencia-Mendoza, A.; Bautista-Arredondo, S.; Laniado-Laborin, R.; Castañeda, R.; Deiss, R.; Garfein, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVE To assess the cost-effectiveness of screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using a commercially available detection test and treating individuals at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a middle-income country. DESIGN We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost per LTBI case detected, TB case averted and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for a cohort of 1000 individuals at high risk for HIV infection over 20 years. Baseline model inputs for LTBI prevalence were obtained from published literature and cross-sectional data from tuberculosis (TB) screening using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) testing among sex workers and illicit drug users at high risk for HIV recruited through street outreach in Tijuana, Mexico. Costs are reported in 2007 US dollars. Future costs and QALYs were discounted at 3% per year. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate model robustness. RESULTS Over 20 years, we estimate the program would prevent 78 cases of active TB and 55 TB-related deaths. The incremental cost per case of LTBI detected was US$730, cost per active TB averted was US$529 and cost per QALY gained was US$108. CONCLUSIONS In settings of endemic TB and escalating HIV incidence, targeting LTBI screening and treatment among high-risk groups may be highly cost-effective. PMID:19723375

  8. The herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early protein ICP0 is necessary for the efficient establishment of latent infection.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C L; Smith, R L; Everett, R D; Mysofski, D

    1997-09-01

    The immediate-early protein ICP0 of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is not essential for viral replication. However, ICP0 is important for efficient viral replication during the productive infection and for reactivation of latent HSV-1 in vivo. The in vitro model of HSV-1 latency in dorsal root ganglia neurons was used to examine the role of ICP0 in the individual steps that could lead to the appearance of a decreased reactivation phenotype of ICP0 mutant viruses. After establishment of latent infections in the neuronal cultures, induction of reactivation by nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation resulted in the production of infectious virus with delayed kinetics and a burst size that was significantly decreased for the ICP0 mutants compared with wild-type HSV-1. The efficiency of establishment of latency with the ICP0 mutants was similarly decreased at least 10-fold, as measured by three criteria: (i) the percentage of neurons expressing the major latency-associated transcript during the latent infection, (ii) the amount of viral DNA detected in the neuronal cultures, and (iii) the percentage of neurons expressing ICP4 immunoreactivity after the induction of reactivation. The most striking finding was that ICP0 supplied by an adenovirus vector significantly restored the ability of an ICP0 mutant to establish latency and reactivation. These results strongly indicate a critical role for ICP0 in the establishment of the latent HSV-1 infection in the in vitro neuronal model. PMID:9261402

  9. Localization of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 DNA in Latently Infected BALB/c Mice Neurons Using in situ Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Khansarinejad, Behzad; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Ghaemi, Amir; Tiraihi, Taki; Pour Beiranvand, Shahram

    2010-01-01

    Background: Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) establishes a lifelong latent infection in neurons following primary infection. The existence of latent HSV-1 DNA in the trigeminal ganglia of infected BALB/c mice was examined using a direct in situ PCR technique, based on Digoxigenin-11-dUTP detection system with anti-digoxigenin-peroxidase and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) substrate. Methods: Eight-week-old male BALB/c mice were inoculated via the eye by 104 plaque forming unit of wild type Iranian isolates of HSV-1. After establishment of latency, trigeminal ganglia were removed and examined using in situ PCR to detect HSV-1 genome. Finally, the results of in situ PCR were verified by a two-round PCR method, using amplification cocktail of in situ reaction, as a template for a conventional gel base PCR. Results and Conclusion: The results suggest that a direct in situ PCR method using a peroxidase and DAB detection system is a useful means for detection of latent HSV-1 DNA in the latently infected ganglia. PMID:21079658

  10. Completion Rate and Side-Effect Profile of Three-Month Isoniazid and Rifapentine Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in an Urban County Jail

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Reyes, Maria; Gallivan, Mark; Chyorny, Alexander; O'Keeffe, Linda; Shah, Neha S.

    2016-01-01

    In an urban jail population, 3 months of isoniazid and rifapentine (3HP) was associated with an 85% latent tuberculosis infection treatment completion rate compared with 18% in a standard 9-month isoniazid treatment group. Among the 91 patients who started 3HP therapy, there were 2 treatment discontinuations from adverse drug reactions. PMID:26885547

  11. ß-catenin, a transcription factor activated by canonical Wnt signaling, is expressed in sensory neurons of calves latently infected with bovine herpesvirus 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Like many a-herpesvirinae subfamily members, bovine herpes virus 1 (BoHV-1) expresses an abundant transcript in latently infected sensory neurons: the latency-related (LR) RNA. LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) that inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch family members, interferes with Notch mediate...

  12. Attenuation of Toll-Like Receptor Expression and Function in Latent Tuberculosis by Coexistent Filarial Infection with Restoration Following Antifilarial Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Bhat, Sajid Q.; Kumar, N. Pavan; Anuradha, R.; Kumaran, Paul; Gopi, P. G.; Kolappan, C.; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and filarial coinfection is highly prevalent, and the presence of filarial infections may regulate the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent immune response needed to control Mtb infection. By analyzing the baseline and mycobacterial antigen–stimulated expression of TLR1, 2, 4, and 9 (in individuals with latent tuberculosis [TB] with or without filarial infection), we were able to demonstrate that filarial infection, coincident with Mtb, significantly diminishes both baseline and Mtb antigen-specific TLR2 and TLR9 expression. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to TLR2 and 9 ligands are significantly diminished in filaria/TB-coinfected individuals. Definitive treatment of lymphatic filariasis significantly restores the pro-inflammatory cytokine responses in individuals with latent TB. Coincident filarial infection exerted a profound inhibitory effect on protective mycobacteria-specific TLR-mediated immune responses in latent tuberculosis and suggests a novel mechanism by which concomitant filarial infections predispose to the development of active tuberculosis in humans. PMID:19636364

  13. Estimation of test characteristics of real-time PCR and bacterial culture for diagnosis of subclinical intramammary infections with Streptococcus agalactiae in Danish dairy cattle in 2012 using latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmmod, Yasser S; Toft, Nils; Katholm, Jørgen; Grønbæk, Carsten; Klaas, Ilka C

    2013-05-01

    The misdiagnosis of intramammary infections (IMI) with Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) could lead farmers to treat or cull animals unnecessarily. The objective of this field study was to estimate the sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of real-time PCR at different cut-offs for cycle threshold (Ct) values against bacterial culture (BC) for diagnosis of S. agalactiae IMI using latent class analysis to avoid the assumption of a perfect reference test. A total of 614 dairy cows were randomly selected from 6 herds with bulk tank PCR Ct value ≤ 39 for S. agalactiae and S. aureus. At milk recording, 2456 quarter milk samples were taken aseptically for BC and the routinely taken cow level milk samples were analyzed by PCR. Results showed that 53 cows (8.6%) were positive for S. agalactiae IMI by BC. Sensitivity of PCR at cut-offs; ≤ 39, ≤ 37, ≤ 34, and ≤ 32, was 96.2%, 91.9%, 87.2% and 73.9%, while Se of BC was 25.7%, 29.9%, 59.9% and 72.1%. Specificity of PCR at cut-offs; ≤ 39, ≤ 37, ≤ 34, and ≤ 32, was 96.8%, 96.9%, 96.7%, and 97.22%, while Sp of BC was 99.7%, 99.5%, 99.2%, and 98.9%. The estimated prevalence of S. agalactiae IMI by PCR was higher than the apparent prevalence at the tested cut-offs, indicating under estimation of S. agalactiae IMI in the examined dairy cows. In conclusion, Se of PCR is always higher than Se of BC at all tested cut-offs. The lower cut-off, the more comparable becomes Se of PCR and Se of BC. The changes in Se in both PCR and BC at different Ct-value cut-offs may indicate a change in the definition of the latent infection. The similar Se of both tests at cut-off ≤ 32 may indicate high concentrations of S. agalactiae viable cells, representing a cow truly/heavily infected with S. agalactiae and thus easier to detect with BC. At cut-off ≤ 39 the latent definition of infection may reflect a more general condition of cows being positive for S. agalactiae. Our findings indicate that PCR Ct-value cut-offs should

  14. Human tissue mast cells are an inducible reservoir of persistent HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, J Bruce; Ellis, Jane E; Hair, Gregory A; Kirshenbaum, Arnold S; Metcalfe, Dean D; Yi, Hong; Cardona, Adriana C; Lindsay, Michael K; Ansari, Aftab A

    2007-06-15

    We have proposed that, unlike other HIV-vulnerable cell lineages, progenitor mast cells (prMCs), cultured in vitro from undifferentiated bone marrow-derived CD34(+) pluripotent progenitors (PPPs), are susceptible to infection during a limited period of their ontogeny. As infected prMCs mature in culture, they lose expression of viral chemokine coreceptors necessary for viral entry and develop into long-lived, latently infected mature tissue mast cells (MCs), resistant to new infection. In vivo recruitment of prMCs to different tissue compartments occurs in response to tissue injury, growth, and remodeling or allergic inflammation, allowing populations of circulating and potentially HIV-susceptible prMCs to spread persistent infection to diverse tissue compartments. In this report, we provide in vivo evidence to confirm this model by demonstrating that HIV-infected women have both circulating prMCs and placental tissue MCs (PLMCs) that harbor inducible infectious HIV even after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy. Furthermore, infectious virus, capable of infecting alloactivated fetal cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs), could be induced in isolated latently infected PLMCs after weeks in culture in vitro. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that tissue MCs, developed from infected circulating prMCs, comprise a long-lived inducible reservoir of persistent HIV in infected persons during HAART. PMID:17351109

  15. Human tissue mast cells are an inducible reservoir of persistent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jane E.; Hair, Gregory A.; Kirshenbaum, Arnold S.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Yi, Hong; Cardona, Adriana C.; Lindsay, Michael K.; Ansari, Aftab A.

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed that, unlike other HIV-vulnerable cell lineages, progenitor mast cells (prMCs), cultured in vitro from undifferentiated bone marrow–derived CD34+ pluripotent progenitors (PPPs), are susceptible to infection during a limited period of their ontogeny. As infected prMCs mature in culture, they lose expression of viral chemokine coreceptors necessary for viral entry and develop into long-lived, latently infected mature tissue mast cells (MCs), resistant to new infection. In vivo recruitment of prMCs to different tissue compartments occurs in response to tissue injury, growth, and remodeling or allergic inflammation, allowing populations of circulating and potentially HIV-susceptible prMCs to spread persistent infection to diverse tissue compartments. In this report, we provide in vivo evidence to confirm this model by demonstrating that HIV-infected women have both circulating prMCs and placental tissue MCs (PLMCs) that harbor inducible infectious HIV even after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy. Furthermore, infectious virus, capable of infecting alloactivated fetal cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs), could be induced in isolated latently infected PLMCs after weeks in culture in vitro. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that tissue MCs, developed from infected circulating prMCs, comprise a long-lived inducible reservoir of persistent HIV in infected persons during HAART. PMID:17351109

  16. Systematic Expression Profiling Analysis Identifies Specific MicroRNA-Gene Interactions that May Differentiate between Active and Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second most common cause of death from infectious diseases. About 90% of those infected are asymptomatic—the so-called latent TB infections (LTBI), with a 10% lifetime chance of progressing to active TB. To further understand the molecular pathogenesis of TB, several molecular studies have attempted to compare the expression profiles between healthy controls and active TB or LTBI patients. However, the results vary due to diverse genetic backgrounds and study designs and the inherent complexity of the disease process. Thus, developing a sensitive and efficient method for the detection of LTBI is both crucial and challenging. For the present study, we performed a systematic analysis of the gene and microRNA profiles of healthy individuals versus those affected with TB or LTBI. Combined with a series of in silico analysis utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and published literature data, we have uncovered several microRNA-gene interactions that specifically target both the blood and lungs. Some of these molecular interactions are novel and may serve as potential biomarkers of TB and LTBI, facilitating the development for a more sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective diagnostic assay for TB and LTBI for the Taiwanese population. PMID:25276827

  17. 'Tipping the Balance': Karl Friedrich Meyer, Latent Infections, and the Birth of Modern Ideas of Disease Ecology.

    PubMed

    Honigsbaum, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The Swiss-born medical researcher Karl Friedrich Meyer (1884-1974) is best known as a 'microbe hunter' who pioneered investigations into diseases at the intersection of animal and human health in California in the 1920s and 1930s. In particular, historians have singled out Meyer's 1931 Ludwig Hektoen Lecture in which he described the animal kingdom as a 'reservoir of disease' as a forerunner of 'one medicine' approaches to emerging zoonoses. In so doing, however, historians risk overlooking Meyer's other intellectual contributions. Developed in a series of papers from the mid-1930s onwards, these were ordered around the concept of latent infections and sought to link microbial behavior to broader bio-ecological, environmental, and social factors that impact hostpathogen interactions. In this respect Meyer-like the comparative pathologist Theobald Smith and the immunologist Frank Macfarlane Burnet-can be seen as a pioneer of modern ideas of disease ecology. However, while Burnet's and Smith's contributions to this scientific field have been widely acknowledged, Meyer's have been largely ignored. Drawing on Meyer's published writings and private correspondence, this paper aims to correct that lacuna while contributing to a reorientation of the historiography of bacteriological epidemiology. In particular I trace Meyer's intellectual exchanges with Smith, Burnet and the animal ecologist Charles Elton, over brucellosis, psittacosis and plague-exchanges that not only showed how environmental and ecological conditions could 'tip the balance' in favor of parasites but which transformed Meyer thinking about resistance to infection and disease. PMID:26612760

  18. Interleukin-2 from Adaptive T Cells Enhances Natural Killer Cell Activity against Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeguang; Frascaroli, Giada; Bayer, Carina; Schmal, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) requires a continuous immune surveillance, thus HCMV is the most important viral pathogen in severely immunocompromised individuals. Both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the control of HCMV. Here, we report that peripheral blood natural killer cells (PBNKs) from HCMV-seropositive donors showed an enhanced activity toward HCMV-infected autologous macrophages. However, this enhanced response was abolished when purified NK cells were applied as effectors. We demonstrate that this enhanced PBNK activity was dependent on the interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion of CD4+ T cells when reexposed to the virus. Purified T cells enhanced the activity of purified NK cells in response to HCMV-infected macrophages. This effect could be suppressed by IL-2 blocking. Our findings not only extend the knowledge on the immune surveillance in HCMV—namely, that NK cell-mediated innate immunity can be enhanced by a preexisting T cell antiviral immunity—but also indicate a potential clinical implication for patients at risk for severe HCMV manifestations due to immunosuppressive drugs, which mainly suppress IL-2 production and T cell responsiveness. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is never cleared by the host after primary infection but instead establishes a lifelong latent infection with possible reactivations when the host′s immunity becomes suppressed. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity are important for the control of viral infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are main innate effectors providing a rapid response to virus-infected cells. Virus-specific T cells are the main adaptive effectors that are critical for the control of the latent infection and limitation of reinfection. In this study, we found that IL-2 secreted by adaptive CD4+ T cells after reexposure to HCMV enhances the activity of NK cells in response to HCMV-infected target cells. This is the first direct evidence that the adaptive T cells can

  19. Prevalence and correlates of latent tuberculosis infection among employees of a high security prison in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Tan, Cynthia; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although prison employees share the same tuberculosis (TB) risk environment with prisoners, the magnitude of TB problems among prison employees is unknown in most resource-limited prisons. This survey was conducted to investigate the prevalence and correlates of tuberculin skin test (TST) positivity among employees in Malaysia’s largest prison. Methods Consented, full-time prison employees were interviewed using a structured questionnaire that included sociodemographic data, history of working in the correctional system and TB-related risk. TST was placed intradermally and read after 48–72 h. Induration size of ≥10 mm was considered positive. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore associations with TST positivity. Results Of the 445 recruited prison employees, 420 (94.4%) had complete data. Most were young (median=30.0 years) men (88.8%) who had only worked at this prison (76.4%) for a median total employment period of 60 months (IQR 34.5–132.0). The majority were correctional officers, while civilian employees represented only 7.6% of the sample. Only 26 (6.2%) reported having ever been screened for TB since employment. Prevalence of TST positivity was 81% and was independently associated with longer (≥12 months) prison employment (AOR 4.9; 95% CI 1.5 to 15.9) and current tobacco smoking (AOR=1.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.2). Conclusions Latent TB prevalence was high in this sample, approximating that of prisoners in this setting, perhaps suggesting within prison TB transmission in this facility. Formal TB control programmes for personnel and prisoners alike are urgently needed within the Malaysian correctional system. PMID:25794506

  20. Aggressive Peripheral CD70-positive T-cell Lymphoma Associated with Severe Chronic Active EBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Donald R.; Sheehan, Andrea M.; Yi, Zhongzhen; Rodgers, Cheryl C; Bollard, Catherine M; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Severe chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) in T or NK cells is a rare complication of latent EBV infection. CAEBV associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) consists of polyclonal lesions as well as aggressive lymphomas. Here we report such a patient. In addition, we show that this primary CAEBV associated T-cell lymphoma expresses CD70 and is sensitive to killing by CD70-specific T cells, identifying CD70 as a potential immunotherapeutic target for CAEBV-associated T-cell lymphoma. PMID:21994111

  1. The Latent Reservoir for HIV-1: How Immunologic Memory and Clonal Expansion Contribute to HIV-1 Persistence.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexandra J; Kwon, Kyungyoon J; Farber, Donna L; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-07-15

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1 infection reduces plasma virus levels to below the limit of detection of clinical assays. However, even with prolonged suppression of viral replication with ART, viremia rebounds rapidly after treatment interruption. Thus, ART is not curative. The principal barrier to cure is a remarkably stable reservoir of latent HIV-1 in resting memory CD4(+) T cells. In this review, we consider explanations for the remarkable stability of the latent reservoir. Stability does not appear to reflect replenishment from new infection events but rather normal physiologic processes that provide for immunologic memory. Of particular importance are proliferative processes that drive clonal expansion of infected cells. Recent evidence suggests that in some infected cells, proliferation is a consequence of proviral integration into host genes associated with cell growth. Efforts to cure HIV-1 infection by targeting the latent reservoir may need to consider the potential of latently infected cells to proliferate. PMID:27382129

  2. EBV latent membrane proteins (LMPs) 1 and 2 as immunotherapeutic targets: LMP-specific CD4+ cytotoxic T cell recognition of EBV-transformed B cell lines.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Tracey A; Lin, Xiaorong; Jia, Hui; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Rickinson, Alan B; Taylor, Graham S

    2008-02-01

    The EBV-latent membrane proteins (LMPs) 1 and 2 are among only three viral proteins expressed in EBV-associated Hodgkin's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Since these tumors are HLA class I and class II-positive, the LMPs could serve as both CD8+ and CD4+ T cell targets. In contrast to CD8 responses, very little is known about CD4 responses to LMPs. In this study, we describe CD4+ T cell clones defining four LMP1- and three LMP2-derived peptide epitopes and their restricting alleles. All clones produced Th1-like cytokines in response to peptide and most killed peptide-loaded target cells by perforin-mediated lysis. Although clones to different epitopes showed different functional avidities in peptide titration assays, avidity per se was a poor predictor of the ability to recognize naturally infected B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) expressing LMPs at physiologic levels. Some epitopes, particularly within LMP1, consistently mediated strong LCL recognition detectable in cytokine release, cytotoxicity, and outgrowth inhibition assays. Using cyclosporin A to selectively block cytokine release, we found that CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity is the key effector of LCL outgrowth control. We therefore infer that cytotoxic CD4+ T cells to a subset of LMP epitopes could have therapeutic potential against LMP-expressing tumors. PMID:18209060

  3. A prospective large-scale study of methods for the detection of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in refugee children.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Michaela; Nicol, Pam; McKinnon, Elizabeth; Whidborne, Rebecca; Lucas, Andrew; Thambiran, Aesen; Burgner, David; Waring, Justin; French, Martyn

    2010-05-01

    BACKGROUND Diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a cornerstone of the health assessment of resettled high incidence populations, particularly in children. Two blood-based interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), T-SPOT.TB and QFT-Gold in-tube (QFT-GIT), have greater sensitivity and specificity than the tuberculin skin test (TST), but their performance as screening tools for LTBI in children, especially refugee children, remains unclear. METHODS 524 African and ethnic Burmese children, including 107 under 3 years of age, were prospectively enrolled in a comparison of the T-SPOT.TB and QFT-GIT. The TST was also performed in 342 of the children. RESULTS The T-SPOT.TB and QFT-GIT had similar rates of positivity (8% and 10%, respectively) and showed good concordance when both tests gave definitive results (kappa=0.78; p<0.0001). However, the IGRAs had significant failure rates: 15% of QFT-GIT gave indeterminate results due to failed mitogen response and 14% of T-SPOT.TB results were inconclusive, largely because of insufficient mononuclear leucocyte yields. Failure of the QFT-GIT mitogen response was associated with African ethnicity and co-morbid infections, particularly with helminths. The TST results showed poor concordance ( approximately 50%) with both IGRAs. CONCLUSIONS It is reasonable to screen using either IGRA with follow-up by the alternative if the test fails. In general, the QFT-GIT is the preferred option for non-African populations but the T-SPOT.TB is recommended when there are epidemiological and/or clinical high risk factors for TB infection. However, both IGRAs have methodological and performance characteristics that limit their usefulness in refugee children, highlighting the need for continued development of screening strategies. PMID:20435869

  4. Decoded calreticulin-deficient embryonic stem cell transcriptome resolves latent cardiophenotype.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Randolph S; Chiriac, Anca; Niederlander, Nicolas J; Nelson, Timothy J; Behfar, Atta; Mishra, Prasanna K; Macura, Slobodan; Michalak, Marek; Terzic, Andre; Perez-Terzic, Carmen

    2010-07-01

    Genomic perturbations that challenge normal signaling at the pluripotent stage may trigger unforeseen ontogenic aberrancies. Anticipatory systems biology identification of transcriptome landscapes that underlie latent phenotypes would offer molecular diagnosis before the onset of symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of calreticulin-deficient embryonic stem cell transcriptomes on molecular functions and physiological systems. Bioinformatic surveillance of calreticulin-null stem cells, a monogenic insult model, diagnosed a disruption in transcriptome dynamics, which re-prioritized essential cellular functions. Calreticulin-calibrated signaling axes were uncovered, and network-wide cartography of undifferentiated stem cell transcripts suggested cardiac manifestations. Calreticulin-deficient stem cell-derived cardiac cells verified disorganized sarcomerogenesis, mitochondrial paucity, and cytoarchitectural aberrations to validate calreticulin-dependent network forecasts. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology detected a ventricular septal defect, revealing organogenic manifestation of calreticulin deletion. Thus, bioinformatic deciphering of a primordial calreticulin-deficient transcriptome decoded at the pluripotent stem cell stage a reconfigured multifunctional molecular registry to anticipate predifferentiation susceptibility toward abnormal cardiophenotype. PMID:20506533

  5. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world's population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations. PMID:26484340

  6. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world’s population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations. PMID:26484340

  7. Change in the Prevalence of Testing for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the United States: 1999–2012

    PubMed Central

    Vozoris, Nicholas T.; Batt, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. There is no information on the change in prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) testing in the United States (US) following the introduction of the interferon gamma release assay (IGRA), a new and alternative diagnostic method for LTBI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential changes in the prevalence of LTBI testing in the US following the introduction of IGRA. Methods. This was a multiyear cross-sectional study using nationally representative data from the 1999-2000 and 2011-2012 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Self-reported prevalence of LTBI testing was estimated among groups known to have increased LTBI risk. Descriptive statistics were used. Results. Compared to 1999-2000, significantly fewer individuals self-reported being tested for LTBI in 2011-2012 among Hispanic Americans (68.0% versus 60.7%, p < 0.0001) and among those with comorbidities (74.7% versus 72.0%, p = 0.02). There were also nonsignificant trends towards less self-reported LTBI testing in 2011-2012 versus 1999-2000 among household contacts of active TB cases, foreign-born individuals, and African Americans. Conclusions. Despite the introduction of IGRA, LTBI testing occurs less frequently in the US among vulnerable groups. Possibly inadequate targeted LTBI testing could result in increased active TB in the US in the future.

  8. Abandonment of Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Socioeconomic Factors in Children and Adolescents: Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Angela Marcia Cabral; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Sant’Anna, Clemax Couto

    2016-01-01

    Background Routine data on the use of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) in children and adolescents are scarce in high tuberculosis (TB) burden countries. Objective To describe the factors related to abandonment of IPT in children and adolescents with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) receiving routine care. Methods Retrospective (2005–2009) descriptive study of 286 LTBI cases with indication of IPT and serviced at a pediatric hospital in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Survival analysis of the risk of abandonment of IPT over six months was performed, including multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Out of the 245 cases of LTBI included, 62 abandoned IPT (25.3%; 95% CI: 20%-31%). On multivariate analysis, the variables related to the IPT abandonment hazard ratio were the Human Development Index (HDI) (hazard ratio—HR: 0.004; 0.000–0.569) of the place of residence and the contact with adults that were not undergoing anti-TB treatment (HR: 7.30; 1.00–53.3). Conclusion This study reveals the relevance of the relation of abandonment of IPT to the socioeconomic conditions at the place of residence and poor adherence to the active TB treatment. Educational measures to stimulate preventive treatment of child contacts and curative treatment of index cases should target the full familial setting. PMID:27149514

  9. High Latent TB Infection Rate and Associated Risk Factors in the Eastern China of Low TB Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijian; Peng, Hong; Kong, Wen; Zhou, Yang; Shao, Yan; Zhu, Limei; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To disclose the associated risk factors for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and the current situation of LTBI in the eastern China. Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken to evaluate the LTBI rate and risk factors. Results A total of 5305 subjects were finally included, with the IGRA positive rate of 19.98% (1060/5305). The LTBI rates were increasing with age (ORs were in significance from 6.60 to 20.92). Male gender significantly increased the risk of LTBI by 0.52 fold (OR = 1.52). Both smoking and drinking significantly increased the risk of LTBI (OR = 1.83 and OR = 1.67, respectively). Meanwhile, overweight and close contact with tuberculosis were risk factors for LTBI (OR = 1.36 and OR = 2.38, respectively). However, higher level of education and BCG vaccination lowered the risk of LTBI (OR = 0.16 and OR = 0.39, respectively). The multivariate logistic regression showed that age, male gender, smoking, overweight and close contacting with tuberculosis were risk factors for LTBI, but BCG vaccination was a protective factor for LTBI. Conclusions BCG vaccination exerted protective effect on tuberculosis. However, LTBI rate in the Chinese rural area was critical and subjects above 30 years, male, smoking, overweight and close contact with tuberculosis wound be the targets for LTBI screening and source of tuberculosis. PMID:26505997

  10. Coordinated expansion of both memory T cells and NK cells in response to CMV infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Bayard, Charles; Lepetitcorps, Hélène; Roux, Antoine; Larsen, Martin; Fastenackels, Solène; Salle, Virginie; Vieillard, Vincent; Marchant, Arnaud; Stern, Marc; Boddaert, Jacques; Bajolle, Fanny; Appay, Victor; Sauce, Delphine

    2016-05-01

    NK cells are key players in the fight against persistent viruses. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is associated with the presence of a population of CD16(+) CD56(dim) NKG2C(+) NK cells in both acutely and latently infected individuals. Here, we studied the nature of these terminally differentiated NK cells in different human populations infected with HCMV: healthy donors stratified by age, thymectomized individuals, pregnant women suffering from primary CMV infection, and lung transplant patients. Both CD16(+) CD56(dim) NK- and CD8 T-cell phenotypes as well as functional capacities were determined and stratified according to age and/or CMV event. Similarly to T-cell responsiveness, we observe an accumulation over time of NKG2C(+) NK cells, which preferentially expressed CD57. This accumulation is particularly prominent in elderly and amplified further by CMV infection. Latent HCMV infection (without replication) is sufficient for NKG2C(+) CD57(+) NK cells to persist in healthy individuals but is not necessarily required in old age. Collectively, the present work supports the emerging concept that CMV shapes both innate and adaptive immunity in humans. PMID:26910859