Science.gov

Sample records for lateral ankle sprain

  1. Lateral ankle sprains and instability problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, S H; Jason, W J

    1994-10-01

    The lateral ankle complex is the most frequently injured single structure in athletes, consisting of 38% to 45% of all injuries. One-sixth of all sports injury loss time is from ankle sprains. In North America, ankle inversion sprains are considered "de rigeur" for basketball participation. PMID:7805107

  2. Syndesmosis and lateral ankle sprains in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Osbahr, Daryl C; Drakos, Mark C; O'Loughlin, Padhraig F; Lyman, Stephen; Barnes, Ronnie P; Kennedy, John G; Warren, Russell F

    2013-11-01

    Syndesmosis sprains in the National Football League (NFL) can be a persistent source of disability, especially compared with lateral ankle injuries. This study evaluated syndesmosis and lateral ankle sprains in NFL players to allow for better identification and management of these injuries. Syndesmosis and lateral ankle sprains from a single NFL team database were reviewed over a 15-year period, and 32 NFL team physicians completed a questionnaire detailing their management approach. A comparative analysis was performed analyzing several variables, including diagnosis, treatment methods, and time lost from sports participation. Thirty-six syndesmosis and 53 lateral ankle sprains occurred in the cohort of NFL players. The injury mechanism typically resulted from direct impact in the syndesmosis and torsion in the lateral ankle sprain group (P=.034). All players were managed nonoperatively. The mean time lost from participation was 15.4 days in the syndesmosis and 6.5 days in the lateral ankle sprain groups (P⩽.001). National Football League team physicians varied treatment for syndesmosis sprains depending on the category of diastasis but recommended nonoperative management for lateral ankle sprains. Syndesmosis sprains in the NFL can be a source of significant disability compared with lateral ankle sprains. Successful return to play with nonoperative management is frequently achieved for syndesmosis and lateral ankle sprains depending on injury severity. With modern treatment algorithms for syndesmosis sprains, more aggressive nonoperative treatment is advocated. Although the current study shows that syndesmosis injuries require longer rehabilitation periods when compared with lateral ankle sprains, the time lost from participation may not be as prolonged as previously reported. PMID:24200441

  3. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  4. Lateral and syndesmotic ankle sprain injuries: a narrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Joshua C.; Comeau, Doug; McClelland, Rebecca I.; Dubin, Rachel A.; Ferrel, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to review the literature that discusses normal anatomy and biomechanics of the foot and ankle, mechanisms that may result in a lateral ankle sprain or syndesmotic sprain, and assessment and diagnostic procedures, and to present a treatment algorithm based on normal ligament healing principles. Methods Literature was searched for years 2000 to 2010 in PubMed and CINAHL. Key search terms were ankle sprain$, ankle injury and ankle injuries, inversion injury, proprioception, rehabilitation, physical therapy, anterior talofibular ligament, syndesmosis, syndesmotic injury, and ligament healing. Discussion Most ankle sprains respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment, such as those offered by physical therapists, doctors of chiropractic, and rehabilitation specialists. A comprehensive history and examination aid in diagnosing the severity and type of ankle sprain. Based on the diagnosis and an understanding of ligament healing properties, a progressive treatment regimen can be developed. During the acute inflammatory phase, the goal of care is to reduce inflammation and pain and to protect the ligament from further injury. During the reparative and remodeling phase, the goal is to progress the rehabilitation appropriately to facilitate healing and restore the mechanical strength and proprioception. Radiographic imaging techniques may need to be used to rule out fractures, complete ligament tears, or instability of the ankle mortise. A period of immobilization and ambulating with crutches in a nonweightbearing gait may be necessary to allow for proper ligament healing before commencing a more active treatment approach. Surgery should be considered in the case of grade 3 syndesmotic sprain injuries or those ankle sprains that are recalcitrant to conservative care. Conclusion An accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment can minimize an athlete's time lost from sport and prevent future reinjury. Most ankle sprains can be successfully

  5. Sprained Ankles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body I think my child has sprained her ankle. How can I tell for sure? Sprains are injuries to the ligaments that connect bones ... away before the ligament is injured. Types of Sprains In young children, the ankle is the most commonly sprained joint, followed by ...

  6. Return to Play Following Ankle Sprain and Lateral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shawen, Scott B; Dworak, Theodora; Anderson, Robert B

    2016-10-01

    Ankle sprains are the most common musculoskeletal injury occurring during athletics. Proper initial treatment with supportive pain control, limited immobilization, early return to weight bearing and range of motion, and directed physical therapy are essential for preventing recurrent injury. Reconstruction of the lateral ligaments is indicated for patients with continued instability and dysfunction despite physical therapy. Return to athletic activity should be reserved for athletes who have regained strength, proprioception, and range of motion of the injured ankle. Athletes with a history of an ankle sprain should be prophylactically braced or tapped to reduce risk of recurrent injury. PMID:27543408

  7. The relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Stephanie; Moore, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    The lateral ligament complex of the ankle is the most frequently injured structure in the body. Although most simple ankle sprains do not result in long-term disability, a significant number do not completely resolve, leading to residual symptoms that may persist for years. The most commonly reported symptoms, particularly among athletes, include instability, re-injury, and tendinitis. Ballet dancers are a combination of artist and high-performance athlete; consequently, they are subjected to the same types of injuries as other athletes, including lateral ankle sprains and their sequelae. Furthermore, ballet dancers perform in unusual positions such as en pointe, which places the ankle in extreme plantar flexion, requiring stabilization by surrounding muscles. Dancers' extraordinary performance demands place them at risk for other ankle injuries as well, including inflammation ofseveral tendons, especially the peroneals. This report reviews the relevant literature to characterize the scope of lateral ankle sprains and sequelae, discuss the importance of the peroneal muscles in ankle stability, and explore a relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers. Informal interviews were conducted with physical therapists who specialize in treating ballet dancers, providing a clinical context for this report. An extensive review of the literature was conducted, including electronic databases, reference lists from papers, and relevant reference texts. Numerous studies have investigated ankle sprains and residual complaints; nearly all report that lateral ankle sprains commonly lead to chronic ankle instability. Studies exploring ankle stability have demonstrated that the peroneal muscles play a crucial role in ankle stabilization; EMG studies confirm they are the first to contract during ankle inversion stress. The dancer's need for exceptional ankle stabilization may lead to peroneal overuse and tendinitis. Studies have linked peroneal

  8. Risk factors for lateral ankle sprain: a prospective study among military recruits.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Shlamkovitch, N; Finestone, A; Eldad, A; Laor, A; Danon, Y L; Lavie, O; Wosk, J; Simkin, A

    1991-08-01

    In a prospective study of risk factors for lateral ankle sprain among 390 male Israeli infantry recruits, a 18% incidence of lateral ankle sprains was found in basic training. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of lateral ankle sprains between recruits who trained in modified basketball shoes or standard lightweight infantry boots. By multivariate stepwise logistic regression a statistically significant relationship was found between body weight x height (a magnitude which is proportional to the mass moment of inertia of the body around a horizontal axis through the ankle), a previous history of ankle sprain, and the incidence of lateral ankle sprains. Recruits who were taller and heavier and thus had larger mass moments of inertia (P = 0.004), and those with a prior history of ankle sprain (P = 0.01) had higher lateral ankle sprain morbidity in basic training. PMID:1959831

  9. Kinematics and kinetics of an accidental lateral ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Kristianslund, Eirik; Bahr, Roald; Krosshaug, Tron

    2011-09-23

    Ankle sprains are common during sporting activities and can have serious consequences. Understanding of injury mechanisms is essential to prevent injuries, but only two previous studies have provided detailed descriptions of the kinematics of lateral ankle sprains and measures of kinetics are missing. In the present study a female handball player accidentally sprained her ankle during sidestep cutting in a motion analysis laboratory. Kinematics and kinetics were calculated from 240 Hz recordings with a full-body marker setup. The injury trial was compared with two previous (non-injury) trials. The injury trial showed a sudden increase in inversion and internal rotation that peaked between 130 and 180 ms after initial contact. We observed an attempted unloading of the foot from 80 ms after initial contact. As the inversion and internal rotation progressed, the loads were likely to exceed injury threshold between 130 and 180 ms. There was a considerable amount of dorsiflexion in the injury trial compared to neutral flexion in the control trials, similar to the previously published kinematical descriptions of lateral ankle sprains. The present study also adds valuable kinetic information that improves understanding of the injury mechanism. PMID:21824618

  10. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's the Treatment for a Sprained Ankle? More Serious Sprains en español Esguinces de tobillo As a field hockey player, Jill was used to twisting her ankle. She'd always been able to walk it off and get back in the game. But one day she stepped on another player's ...

  11. Can Chronic Ankle Instability Be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To pose the question, “Can chronic ankle instability be prevented?” The evaluation and treatment of chronic ankle instability is a significant challenge in athletic health care. The condition affects large numbers of athletes and is associated with reinjury and impaired performance. The management of acute injuries varies widely but in athletic training has traditionally focused on initial symptom management and rapid return to activity. A review of practice strategies and philosophies suggests that a more detailed evaluation of all joints affected by the injury, correction of hypomobility, and protection of healing structures may lead to a more optimal long-term outcome. Background: Sprains to the lateral ankle are common in athletes, and the reinjury rate is high. These injuries are often perceived as being isolated to the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. It is, however, becoming apparent that a lateral ankle sprain can injure other tissues and result in joint dysfunction throughout the ankle complex. Description: We begin by addressing the relationship between mechanical and functional instability. We then discuss normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics. Finally, tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and the management of acute lateral ankle sprain are reviewed, with an emphasis on restoring normal mechanics of the ankle-joint complex. A treatment model based on assessment of joint function, treatment of hypomobile segments, and protection of healing tissues at hypermobile segments is described. PMID:12937564

  12. Ankle sprain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An ankle sprain is a common injury to the ankle. The most common way the ankle is injured is when ... swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle. An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many ...

  13. Gait Biomechanics in Participants, Six Months after First-time Lateral Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2016-06-01

    No research currently exists predicating a link between the injury-affiliated sensorimotor deficits of acute ankle sprain and those of chronic ankle instability during gait. This analysis evaluates participants with a 6-month history of ankle sprain injury to affirm this link. 69 participants with a 6-month history of acute first-time lateral ankle sprain were divided into subgroups ('chronic ankle instability' and 'coper') based on their self-reported disability and compared to 20 non-injured participants during a gait task. Lower extremity kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-heel strike (period 1) and from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-toe off (period 2). The 'chronic ankle instability' subgroup (who reported greater disability) displayed increased knee flexion during period 1. During period 2, this subgroup exhibited greater total displacement at their ankle joint and greater extensor dominance at their knee. That many of these features are present, both in individuals with acute ankle sprain and those with chronic ankle instability may advocate a link between acute deficits and long-term outcome. Clinicians must be aware that the sensorimotor deficits of ankle sprain may persevere beyond the acute stage of injury and be cognizant of the capacity for impairments to pervade proximally. PMID:27136507

  14. Supervised exercises for adults with acute lateral ankle sprain: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van Rijn, Rogier M; van Os, Anton G; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Bernsen, Roos MD; Verhaar, Jan AN; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita MA

    2007-01-01

    Background During the recovery period after acute ankle sprain, it is unclear whether conventional treatment should be supported by supervised exercise. Aim To evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of conventional treatment combined with supervised exercises compared with conventional treatment alone in patients with an acute ankle sprain. Design Randomised controlled clinical trial. Setting A total of 32 Dutch general practices and the hospital emergency department. Method Adults with an acute lateral ankle sprain consulting general practices or the hospital emergency department were allocated to either conventional treatment combined with supervised exercises or conventional treatment alone. Primary outcomes were subjective recovery (0–10 point scale) and the occurrence of a re-sprain. Measurements were carried out at intake, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year after injury. Data were analysed using intention-to-treat analyses. Results A total of 102 patients were enrolled and randomised to either conventional treatment alone or conventional treatment combined with supervised exercise. There was no significant difference between treatment groups concerning subjective recovery or occurrence of re-sprains after 3 months and 1-year of follow-up. Conclusion Conventional treatment combined with supervised exercises compared to conventional treatment alone during the first year after an acute lateral ankle sprain does not lead to differences in the occurrence of re-sprains or in subjective recovery. PMID:17925136

  15. Motor-Neuron Pool Excitability of the Lower Leg Muscles After Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Klykken, Lindsey W.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Kim, Kyung-Min; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Hertel, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Context: Neuromuscular deficits in leg muscles that are associated with arthrogenic muscle inhibition have been reported in people with chronic ankle instability, yet whether these neuromuscular alterations are present in individuals with acute sprains is unknown. Objective: To compare the effect of acute lateral ankle sprain on the motor-neuron pool excitability (MNPE) of injured leg muscles with that of uninjured contralateral leg muscles and the leg muscles of healthy controls. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten individuals with acute ankle sprains (6 females, 4 males; age = 19.2 ± 3.8 years, height = 169.4 ± 8.5 cm, mass = 66.3 ±11.6 kg) and 10 healthy individuals (6 females, 4 males; age = 20.6 ± 4.0 years, height = 169.9 ± 10.6 cm, mass = 66.3 ± 10.2 kg) participated. Intervention(s): The independent variables were group (acute ankle sprain, healthy) and limb (injured, uninjured). Separate dependent t tests were used to determine differences in MNPE between legs. Main Outcome Measure(s): The MNPE of the soleus, fibularis longus, and tibialis anterior was measured by the maximal Hoffmann reflex (Hmax) and maximal muscle response (Mmax) and was then normalized using the Hmax:Mmax ratio. Results: The soleus MNPE in the ankle-sprain group was higher in the injured limb (Hmax:Mmax = 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46, 0.80) than in the uninjured limb (Hmax:Mmax = 0.47; 95% CI, 0.08, 0.93) (t6 = 3.62, P = .01). In the acute ankle-sprain group, tibialis anterior MNPE tended to be lower in the injured ankle (Hmax:Mmax = 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01, 0.10) than in the uninjured ankle (Hmax:Mmax = 0.22; 95% CI, 0.09, 0.35), but this finding was not different (t9 = −2.01, P = .07). No differences were detected between injured (0.22; 95% CI, 0.14, 0.29) and uninjured (0.25; 95% CI, 0.12, 0.38) ankles for the fibularis longus in the ankle-sprain group (t9 = −0.739, P = .48). We found no side-to-side differences in

  16. Treatment of lateral collateral ligament sprains of the ankle: a critical appraisal of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shrier, I

    1995-07-01

    Although sprains of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle are extremely common, controversy still exists over the proper treatment. Some authors recommend early mobilization of the ankle, others recommend cast immobilization for 1-6 weeks, and others insist that sprains should be treated with primary surgical repair. A critical appraisal of the literature supports the concepts of early mobilization with a proper rehabilitation program. The review of treatment is followed by a discussion of the potential causes of persistent pain and functional instability. PMID:7670975

  17. How to Care for a Sprained Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprained Ankle How to Care for a Sprained Ankle Page Content Ankle sprains are very common injuries. ... Grade I, II or III. Treating your Sprained Ankle Treating your sprained ankle properly may prevent chronic ...

  18. Joint Stability Characteristics of the Ankle Complex in Female Athletes With Histories of Lateral Ankle Sprain, Part II: Clinical Experience Using Arthrometric Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Hollis, J. M.; Liu, Wei; IV, Albert W. Pearsall

    2014-01-01

    Context: This is part II of a 2-part series discussing stability characteristics of the ankle complex. In part I, we used a cadaver model to examine the effects of sectioning the lateral ankle ligaments on anterior and inversion motion and stiffness of the ankle complex. In part II, we wanted to build on and apply these findings to the clinical assessment of ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with a history of unilateral ankle sprain. Objective: To examine ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with reported history of lateral ankle sprain. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five female college athletes (age = 19.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 170.2 ± 7.4 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 10.0 kg) with histories of unilateral ankle sprain. Intervention(s): All ankles underwent loading with an ankle arthrometer. Ankles were tested bilaterally. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Results: Anterior displacement of the ankle complex did not differ between the uninjured and sprained ankles (P = .37), whereas ankle-complex rotation was greater for the sprained ankles (P = .03). The sprained ankles had less anterior and inversion end-range stiffness than the uninjured ankles (P < .01). Conclusions: Changes in ankle-complex laxity and end-range stiffness were detected in ankles with histories of sprain. These results indicate the presence of altered mechanical characteristics in the soft tissues of the sprained ankles. PMID:24568223

  19. Early mobilization versus immobilization in the treatment of lateral ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Eiff, M P; Smith, A T; Smith, G E

    1994-01-01

    We conducted a prospective trial at a military medical center to determine which treatment for first-time ankle sprains, early mobilization or immobilization, is more effective. Eighty-two patients with a lateral ankle sprain were randomly selected for one of two treatment groups. The Early Mobilization Group received an elastic wrap for 2 days followed by functional bracing for 8 days. Two days after injury, this group began weight-bearing and an ankle rehabilitation program. Patients in the Immobilization Group were placed in a nonweight-bearing plaster splint for 10 days followed by weight-bearing and the same rehabilitation program. Patients in the Early Mobilization Group had less pain at 3 weeks (57% versus 87%, P = 0.02); otherwise, there were no significant differences between groups in the frequency of residual symptoms. Only one patient in each group had residual symptoms 1 year after injury. Three patients (8%) in each group resprained their ankles. Ten days after injury, patients in the Early Mobilization Group were more likely to be back to full work (54% versus 13%, P < 0.001). We conclude that in first-time lateral ankle sprains, although both immobilization and early mobilization prevent late residual symptoms and ankle instability, early mobilization allows earlier return to work and may be more comfortable for patients. PMID:8129116

  20. Update on acute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Tiemstra, Jeffrey D

    2012-06-15

    Ankle sprains are a common problem seen by primary care physicians, especially among teenagers and young adults. Most ankle sprains are inversion injuries to the lateral ankle ligaments, although high sprains representing damage to the tibiofibular syndesmosis are becoming increasingly recognized. Physicians should apply the Ottawa ankle rules to determine whether radiography is needed. According to the Ottawa criteria, radiography is indicated if there is pain in the malleolar or midfoot zone, and either bone tenderness over an area of potential fracture (i.e., lateral malleolus, medial malleolus, base of fifth metatarsal, or navicular bone) or an inability to bear weight for four steps immediately after the injury and in the emergency department or physician's office. Patients with ankle sprain should use cryotherapy for the first three to seven days to reduce pain and improve recovery time. Patients should wear a lace-up ankle support or an air stirrup brace combined with an elastic compression wrap to reduce swelling and pain, speed recovery, and protect the injured ligaments as they become more mobile. Early mobilization speeds healing and reduces pain more effectively than prolonged rest. Pain control options for patients with ankle sprain include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and mild opioids. Because a previous ankle sprain is the greatest risk factor for an acute ankle sprain, recovering patients should be counseled on prevention strategies. Ankle braces and supports, ankle taping, a focused neuromuscular training program, and regular sport-specific warm-up exercises can protect against ankle injuries, and should be considered for patients returning to sports or other high-risk activities. PMID:22962897

  1. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series To use the sharing features on ... 4 out of 4 Normal anatomy Overview The ankle joint connects the foot with the leg. The ...

  2. Acute ankle sprain: an update.

    PubMed

    Ivins, Douglas

    2006-11-15

    Acute ankle injury, a common musculoskeletal injury, can cause ankle sprains. Some evidence suggests that previous injuries or limited joint flexibility may contribute to ankle sprains. The initial assessment of an acute ankle injury should include questions about the timing and mechanism of the injury. The Ottawa Ankle and Foot Rules provide clinical guidelines for excluding a fracture in adults and children and determining if radiography is indicated at the time of injury. Reexamination three to five days after injury, when pain and swelling have improved, may help with the diagnosis. Therapy for ankle sprains focuses on controlling pain and swelling. PRICE (Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) is a well-established protocol for the treatment of ankle injury. There is some evidence that applying ice and using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs improves healing and speeds recovery. Functional rehabilitation (e.g., motion restoration and strengthening exercises) is preferred over immobilization. Superiority of surgical repair versus functional rehabilitation for severe lateral ligament rupture is controversial. Treatment using semirigid supports is superior to using elastic bandages. Support devices provide some protection against future ankle sprains, particularly in persons with a history of recurrent sprains. Ankle disk or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercise regimens also may be helpful, although the literature supporting this is limited. PMID:17137000

  3. Comparison of 3 Methods of External Support for Management of Acute Lateral Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Riemann, Bryan L.; Onate, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of 3 different types of injury support systems (standard elastic wrap with horseshoe, Aircast Sport Stirrup, and Omni Multiphase orthosis) used in treating acute inversion ankle sprains. Subjects: We recruited 30 physically active college-aged subjects who had sustained a grade 1 + or 2 lateral ankle sprain within the previous 24 hours for the study. Design and Setting: Subjects were randomly placed into one of 3 groups, the first treated with standard elastic wrap with horseshoe, the second with an Aircast Sport Stirrup, and the third with an Omni Multiphase orthosis. Subjects reported to the athletic training room on days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 postinjury. Measurements: We assessed subjects for ankle volume, functional performance, and self-perception of symptoms during the 5 postinjury assessments. Results: We found no significant differences among the 3 groups on measures of volume, level of function, and self-perception of symptoms. Conclusions: Our results suggest that none of these methods is superior to the others for reducing swelling, restoring function, or relieving symptoms during the acute management of lateral ankle sprains. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:16558549

  4. Ankle Sprains. A Round Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Types of ankle sprains, surgical versus nonsurgical treatment, tape versus brace for support, rehabilitation, exercise, and prevention of ankle sprains are discussed by a panel of experts. An acute ankle taping technique is illustrated. (MT)

  5. The sprained ankle.

    PubMed

    Puffer, J C

    2001-01-01

    The sprained ankle is the most common musculoskeletal injury seen by physicians caring for active youngsters and adults. It accounts for approximately one fourth of all sports-related injuries and is commonly seen in athletes participating in basketball, soccer, or football. It has been shown that one third of West Point cadets suffer an ankle sprain during their 4 years at the military academy. While diagnosis and management of the sprained ankle is usually straightforward, several serious injuries can masquerade as an ankle sprain, and it is important for the clinician to recognize these to prevent long-term morbidity. In this article the basic anatomy of the ankle, mechanisms by which the ankle is injured, and the differential diagnosis of the acutely injured ankle are reviewed. Appropriate evaluation of the injured ankle and the criteria that should be utilized for determining the necessity of radiographs are discussed as well as management of the acutely sprained ankle and the role of prevention in reducing the risk of ankle injury. PMID:11464730

  6. Development of a fulcrum methodology to replicate the lateral ankle sprain mechanism and measure dynamic inversion speed.

    PubMed

    Knight, Adam C; Weimar, Wendi H

    2012-09-01

    When the ankle is forced into inversion, the speed at which this movement occurs may affect the extent of injury. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a fulcrum device to mimic the mechanism of a lateral ankle sprain and to determine the reliability and validity of the temporal variables produced by this device. Additionally, this device was used to determine if a single previous lateral ankle sprain or ankle taping effected the time to maximum inversion and/or mean inversion speed. Twenty-six participants (13 with history of a single lateral ankle sprain and 13 with no history of injury) completed the testing. The participants completed testing on three separate days, performing 10 trials with the fulcrum per leg on each testing day, and tape was applied to both ankles on one testing day. No significant interactions or main effects were found for either previous injury or ankle taping, but good reliability was found for time to maximum inversion (ICC = .81) and mean inversion speed (ICC = .79). The findings suggest that although neither variable was influenced by the history of a single previous lateral ankle sprain or ankle taping, both variables demonstrated good reliability and construct validity, but not discriminative validity. PMID:23072050

  7. HOW DOES THE BRAZILIAN ORTHOPEDIC SURGEONS TREAT ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE SPRAIN?

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara; Nakama, Gilberto Yoshinobu; Shoiti, Marcus Vinicius; Gomes, Rodrigo Vick Fernandes; Belloti, João Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Acute lateral ankle sprain (ALAS) is a common injury, but its treatment has yet to be firmly established. The purpose of this study was to investigate how Brazilian Orthopedists (including residents) manage the diagnosis, classification, treatment and complications of ALAS. Methods: A multiple-choice questionnaire was developed with the aim of addressing the main aspects of the treatment of ALAS. The questionnaire was made available on the official website of the Brazilian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology between June 15 and August 1, 2004. Results: 444 questionnaires were included in the analysis. The results showed agreement among most of the interviewees in the following regards: 90.8% used a classification method to guide treatment of the sprain; 59% classified the ankle sprain with certainty; 63.7% used rigid immobilization in cases of totally torn ligaments; 60.6% used anti-inflammatory medication in cases of partial ligament tears; and 75.9% reported that residual pain was the most frequent complication. There was no consensus regarding the immobilization method for partial ALAS, given that immobilization and functional treatment were chosen with the same frequency (47%). There was no significant difference between the responses from residents and from orthopedists (p = 0.81). Conclusions: Orthopedists and orthopedic residents in Brazil have difficulty classifying ALAS and there is no consensus about the best therapeutic option for partial ALAS. PMID:27022596

  8. Muscle Reaction Time During a Simulated Lateral Ankle Sprain After Wet-Ice Application or Cold-Water Immersion

    PubMed Central

    Thain, Peter K.; Bleakley, Christopher M.; Mitchell, Andrew C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Cryotherapy is used widely in sport and exercise medicine to manage acute injuries and facilitate rehabilitation. The analgesic effects of cryotherapy are well established; however, a potential caveat is that cooling tissue negatively affects neuromuscular control through delayed muscle reaction time. This topic is important to investigate because athletes often return to exercise, rehabilitation, or competitive activity immediately or shortly after cryotherapy. Objective To compare the effects of wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, and an untreated control condition on peroneus longus and tibialis anterior muscle reaction time during a simulated lateral ankle sprain. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting University of Hertfordshire human performance laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 54 physically active individuals (age = 20.1 ± 1.5 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.07 m, mass = 66.7 ± 5.4 kg) who had no injury or history of ankle sprain. Intervention(s) Wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, or an untreated control condition applied to the ankle for 10 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s) Muscle reaction time and muscle amplitude of the peroneus longus and tibialis anterior in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain were calculated. The ankle-sprain simulation incorporated a combined inversion and plantar-flexion movement. Results We observed no change in muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude after cryotherapy for either the peroneus longus or tibialis anterior (P > .05). Conclusions Ten minutes of joint cooling did not adversely affect muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain. These findings suggested that athletes can safely return to sporting activity immediately after icing. Further evidence showed that ice can be applied before ankle rehabilitation without adversely affecting dynamic neuromuscular control. Investigation in patients with acute ankle sprains is

  9. Intrinsic Predictive Factors of Noncontact Lateral Ankle Sprain in Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yoshida, Makoto; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) is one of the most common injuries in sports. Despite extensive research, intrinsic factors that predict initial and recurrent noncontact LAS remain undefined. Purpose: To identify the predictive factors of initial and recurrent noncontact LAS, focusing on ankle flexibility and/or alignment in collegiate athletes. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 191 athletes were assessed during the preseason for factors predictive of noncontact LAS. The baseline measurements included weightbearing dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), leg-heel angle, foot internal rotation angle in plantar flexion, classification according to the mortise test, and navicular–medial malleolus (NMM) distance. Occurrence of noncontact LAS and participation in practice and games were prospectively recorded for 11 months. Results: Of the 191 athletes assessed, 169 (145 males, 24 females) completed the study; 125 athletes had a history of ankle sprain. During the observational period, 16 athletes suffered noncontact LAS (0.58 per 1000 athlete-exposures) consisting of 4 initial sprains and 12 recurrences. The hazard ratio estimated by a Cox regression analysis showed that athletes with an NMM distance ≥4.65 cm were 4.14 times more likely to suffer an initial noncontact LAS than were athletes with a shorter NMM distance (95% confidence interval, 1.12-14.30) and that athletes with a weightbearing dorsiflexion ROM >49.5° were 1.12 times as likely to suffer a recurrent noncontact LAS compared with athletes with a lower ROM (95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20). Conclusion: NMM distance predicts initial noncontact LAS, and weightbearing dorsiflexion ROM predicts recurrent noncontact LAS. PMID:26535263

  10. Syndesmotic ankle sprains in athletes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Glenn N; Jones, Morgan H; Amendola, Annunziato

    2007-07-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common athletic injuries and represent a significant source of persistent pain and disability. Despite the high incidence of ankle sprains in athletes, syndesmosis injuries have historically been underdiagnosed, and assessment in terms of severity and optimal treatment has not been determined. More recently, a heightened awareness in sports medicine has resulted in more frequent diagnoses of syndesmosis injuries. However, there is a low level of evidence and a paucity of literature on this topic compared with lateral ankle sprains. As a result, no clear guidelines are available to help the clinician assess the severity of injury, choose an imaging modality to visualize the injury, make a decision in terms of operative versus nonoperative treatment, or decide when the athlete may return to play. Increased knowledge and understanding of these injuries by clinicians and researchers are essential to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of this significant condition. This review will discuss the anatomy, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment of syndesmosis sprains of the ankle while identifying controversies in management and topics for future research. PMID:17519439

  11. Electrical stimulation as a treatment intervention to improve function, edema or pain following acute lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feger, Mark A; Goetschius, John; Love, Hailey; Saliba, Sue A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether electrical stimulation (ES), when used in conjunction with a standard treatment, can reduce levels of functional impairment, edema, and pain compared to a standard treatment alone, in patients following a lateral ankle sprain. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and Medline (OVID) databases through June 2014 using the terms "ankle sprain or ankle sprains or ligament injury or ligamentous injury," and "electric stimulation or electric stimulation or electrotherapy." Our search identified four randomized control trials, of which, neuromuscular ES and high-voltage pulsed stimulation were the only two ES modalities utilized. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cohen's d for comparison between treatment groups. Three of four effect sizes for function had 95% CI that crossed zero. Twenty-four of the thirty-two effect sizes for edema had 95% CI that crossed zero. All effect sizes for pain had 95% CI that crossed zero. Therefore, the use of ES is not recommended as a means to improve function, reduce edema, or decrease pain in the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains. PMID:25791198

  12. Early ankle mobilization, Part II: A one-year follow-up of acute, lateral ankle sprains (a randomized clinical trial).

    PubMed

    Dettori, J R; Basmania, C J

    1994-01-01

    A 1-year follow-up of military members who received either early ankle mobilization or cast immobilization following a moderate or severe lateral ankle sprain was conducted to determine the long-term effects between these two forms of conservative treatment. Functional job- and sports-related disabilities together with subjective complaints were assessed. A significantly large proportion (44%) of all subjects were symptomatic at follow-up. Those receiving early ankle mobilization had slightly more residual subjective complaints compared with those receiving cast immobilization. There was, however, little effect on functional job- or sports-related disability, the early mobilization group having slightly fewer functional problems. There was no difference in subjective complaints or functional limitations by the degree of injury for moderate or severe lateral ankle sprains. PMID:8164861

  13. An Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain Significantly Decreases Physical Activity across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A.; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We do not know the impact an ankle sprain has on physical activity levels across the lifespan. With the negative consequences of physical inactivity well established, understanding the effect of an ankle sprain on this outcome is critical. The objective of this study was to measure physical activity across the lifespan after a single ankle sprain in an animal model. Thirty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL)/CFL group, and a SHAM group. Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in a cage containing a solid surface running wheel. Physical activity levels were recorded and averaged every week across the mouse’s lifespan. The SHAM mice ran significantly more distance each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p = 0.011). Daily duration was different between the three running groups (p = 0.048). The SHAM mice ran significantly more minutes each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p=0.046) while the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly less minutes each day (post hoc p = 0.028) compared to both the SHAM and CFL only group. The SHAM mice ran at a faster daily speed versus the remaining two groups of mice (post hoc p = 0.019) and the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly slower each day compared to the SHAM and CFL group (post hoc p = 0.005). The results of this study indicate that a single ankle sprain significantly decreases physical activity across the lifespan in mice. This decrease in physical activity can potentially lead to the development of numerous chronic diseases. An ankle sprain thus has the potential to lead to significant long term health risks if not treated appropriately. Key points A single ankle significantly decreased physical activity levels in mice across the lifespan. Decreased physical activity could significantly negatively impact overall health if not

  14. Doctor, I sprained my ankle.

    PubMed

    How, Choon How; Tan, Ken Jin

    2014-10-01

    Ankle sprains constitute the majority of ankle injuries, and result in pain, limited mobility/exercise and loss of school/work days. Ankle sprains involve at least one of the ankle ligaments and range from a micro tear to complete tear of the ligament or group of ligaments. The most common mechanism of ankle sprains is inversion stress of a plantar-flexed foot, while the most frequently injured ligament is the anterior talofibular ligament. The attending clinician needs to stratify the risk of fracture through history-taking and physical examination, manage the pain, assess long‑term complications and provide certification for rest and recovery. The Ottawa ankle rules may be useful. Graduated exercises to maintain the ankle's range of motion should be started early, after the resolution of initial pain and swelling. The risk of recurrent ankle injuries is often a combination of both mechanical and functional disabilities. PMID:25631892

  15. Doctor, I sprained my ankle

    PubMed Central

    How, Choon How; Tan, Ken Jin

    2014-01-01

    Ankle sprains constitute the majority of ankle injuries, and result in pain, limited mobility/exercise and loss of school/work days. Ankle sprains involve at least one of the ankle ligaments and range from a micro tear to complete tear of the ligament or group of ligaments. The most common mechanism of ankle sprains is inversion stress of a plantar-flexed foot, while the most frequently injured ligament is the anterior talofibular ligament. The attending clinician needs to stratify the risk of fracture through history-taking and physical examination, manage the pain, assess long-term complications and provide certification for rest and recovery. The Ottawa ankle rules may be useful. Graduated exercises to maintain the ankle’s range of motion should be started early, after the resolution of initial pain and swelling. The risk of recurrent ankle injuries is often a combination of both mechanical and functional disabilities. PMID:25631892

  16. The prognosis of ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    de Bie, R A; de Vet, H C; van den Wildenberg, F A; Lenssen, T; Knipschild, P G

    1997-05-01

    We developed a new diagnostic tool for predicting the severity of ankle sprains just after injury. Since hard data obtained by diagnostic imaging techniques are still imperfect, we decided to use data from individual medical history and signs and symptoms that are part of the admission routine. During a three month-period data were collected on thirty-five patients with lateral ankle sprains who visited the first aid department of the University Hospital of Maastricht. Assessments took place at admission and at two and four weeks after injury. Assessors were the first-aid physician, a physiotherapist and the patient. Dependent variables were healed ankle in two and four weeks. Predicting variables were the data obtained at admission by the physician, the physiotherapist and the patient. The ability to predict outcome after two and four weeks was determined in a bivariate analysis, followed by logistic modelling. Accurate prediction of recovery time at admission appeared to be possible. Best two weeks predictor was the modified function score, an accuracy of 97% was achieved. Four weeks prediction was most accurate when function score was used together with the report mark from the doctor and the palpation score (accuracy of 81%). PMID:9231846

  17. Single-leg drop landing movement strategies 6 months following first-time acute lateral ankle sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2015-12-01

    No research exists predicating a link between acute ankle sprain injury-affiliated movement patterns and those of chronic ankle instability (CAI) populations. The aim of the current study was to perform a biomechanical analysis of participants, 6 months after they sustained a first-time acute lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury to establish this link. Fifty-seven participants with a 6-month history of first-time LAS and 20 noninjured participants completed a single-leg drop landing task on both limbs. Three-dimensional kinematic (angular displacement) and sagittal plane kinetic (moment of force) data were acquired for the joints of the lower extremity, from 200 ms pre-initial contact (IC) to 200 ms post-IC. Individual joint stiffnesses and the peak magnitude of the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRF) were also computed. LAS participants displayed increases in hip flexion and ankle inversion on their injured limb (P < 0.05); this coincided with a reduction in the net flexion-extension moment at the hip joint, with an increase in its stiffness (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the magnitude of the peak vertical GRF for either limb compared with controls. These results demonstrate that altered movement strategies persist in participants, 6 months following acute LAS, which may precipitate the onset of CAI. PMID:25545409

  18. Ankle sprain - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ankle joint connects the foot with the leg. The ankle joint allows the foot to move upward and ... outward motion. Muscles, tendons, and ligaments surround the ankle providing the stability the ankle joint needs for ...

  19. Effectiveness of additional supervised exercises compared with conventional treatment alone in patients with acute lateral ankle sprains: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van Ochten, John; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2010-01-01

    Objective To summarise the effectiveness of adding supervised exercises to conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone in patients with acute lateral ankle sprains. Design Systematic review. Data sources Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cinahl, and reference screening. Study selection Included studies were randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials, or clinical trials. Patients were adolescents or adults with an acute lateral ankle sprain. The treatment options were conventional treatment alone or conventional treatment combined with supervised exercises. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias, and one reviewer extracted data. Because of clinical heterogeneity we analysed the data using a best evidence synthesis. Follow-up was classified as short term (up to two weeks), intermediate (two weeks to three months), and long term (more than three months). Results 11 studies were included. There was limited to moderate evidence to suggest that the addition of supervised exercises to conventional treatment leads to faster and better recovery and a faster return to sport at short term follow-up than conventional treatment alone. In specific populations (athletes, soldiers, and patients with severe injuries) this evidence was restricted to a faster return to work and sport only. There was no strong evidence of effectiveness for any of the outcome measures. Most of the included studies had a high risk of bias, with few having adequate statistical power to detect clinically relevant differences. Conclusion Additional supervised exercises compared with conventional treatment alone have some benefit for recovery and return to sport in patients with ankle sprain, though the evidence is limited or moderate and many studies are subject to bias. PMID:20978065

  20. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  1. Lower extremity function during gait in participants with first time acute lateral ankle sprain compared to controls.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory analyses of chronic ankle instability populations during gait have elucidated a number of anomalous movement patterns. No current research exists analysing these movement patterns in a group in the acute phase of lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury. It is possible that participants with an acute LAS display movement patterns continuous with their chronically impaired counterparts. Sixty eight participants with acute LAS and nineteen non-injured participants completed five gait trials. 3D lower extremity temporal kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-heel strike (period 1) and from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-toe off (period 2). During period 1, the LAS group displayed increased knee flexion with increased net extensor pattern at the knee joint, increased ankle inversion with a greater inversion moment, and reduced ankle plantar flexion, compared to the non-injured control group. During period 2, the LAS group displayed decreased hip extension with a decrease in the flexor moment at the hip, and decreased ankle plantar flexion with a decrease in the net plantar flexion moment, compared to the non-injured control group. These results indicate that participants with acute LAS display coordination strategies which may play a role in the onset of chronicity or recovery. PMID:25443172

  2. Coordination and symmetry patterns during the drop vertical jump, 6-months after first-time lateral ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Sweeney, Kevin; Patterson, Matthew R; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the adaptive movement and motor control patterns of a group with a 6-month history of first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury during a drop vertical jump (DVJ) task. Fifty-one participants with a 6-month history of first-time acute LAS injury and twenty controls performed a DVJ task. 3D kinematic and sagittal plane kinetic profiles were plotted for the lower extremity joints of both limbs for the drop jump (phase 1) and drop landing (phase 2) phases of the DVJ. Inter-limb symmetry and the rate of impact modulation (RIM) relative to bodyweight (BW) during both phases of the DVJ were also determined. LAS participants displayed bilateral increases in knee flexion and an increase in ankle inversion during phases 1 and 2, respectively. They also displayed reduced ankle plantar flexion on their injured limb during both phases of the DVJ (p < 0.05); increased inter-limb asymmetry of RIM was noted for both phases of the DVJ, while the moment-of-force profile exhibited bilaterally greater hip extensor dominance during phase 1. Participants with a 6-month history of first-time LAS display some movement patterns consistent with those observed in chronic ankle instability populations during similar tasks. PMID:25940807

  3. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brendan; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Study Selection Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings. Data Syntheses Most studies (n=7) had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants. Conclusions It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control) and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely. PMID

  4. Study protocol: the effect of whole body vibration on acute unilateral unstable lateral ankle sprain- a biphasic randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely caused by damage to passive structures and neuromuscular impairment. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method improving those impaired neurologic parameters. The aim of this study is to compare the current gold standard functional treatment to functional treatment plus WBV in patients with acute unilateral unstable inversion ankle sprains. Methods/Design 60 patients, aged 18–40 years, presenting with an isolated, unilateral, acute unstable inversion ankle sprain will be included in this bicentric, biphasic, randomized controlled trial. Samples will be randomized by envelope drawing. All patients will be allowed early mobilization and pain-dependent weight bearing, limited functional immobilization by orthosis, PRICE, NSARDs as well as home and supervised physiotherapy. Supervised physical therapy will take place twice a week, for 30 minutes for a period of 6 weeks, following a standardized intervention protocol. During supervised physical therapy, the intervention group will perform exercises similar to those of the control group, on a side-alternating sinusoidal vibration platform. Two time-dependent primary outcome parameters will be assessed: short-term outcome after six weeks will be postural control quantified by the sway index; mid-term outcome after one year will be assessed by subjective instability, defined by the presence of giving-way attacks. Secondary outcome parameters include: return to pre-injury level of activities, residual pain, recurrence, objective instability, energy/coordination, Foot and Ankle Disability Index and EQ 5D. Discussion This is the first trial investigating the effects of WBV in patients with acute soft tissue injury. Inversion ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely due to damage of neurological structures. Due to its unique, frequency dependent, influence on various neuromuscular parameters, WBV

  5. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Ryan P; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI), interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27042147

  6. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Ryan P; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI), interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27042147

  7. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  8. Sprained ankles as they relate to the basketball player.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Teasdall, R D

    1993-04-01

    Concepts based on newer medical information concerning ankle injuries have changed in recent years. With these changing concepts, the method of treatment has also changed. It is the purpose of this article to review some of the commonly known information concerning ankle sprains, to emphasize the association of subtalar injury with the ankle sprain complex, to outline new information concerning the static stabilizers on the lateral aspect of the ankle, and finally, to utilize this information in producing a rationale for a new type of surgical treatment for chronic instability of the ankle. PMID:8481971

  9. A surgical ankle sprain pain model in the rat: Effects of morphine and indomethacin

    PubMed Central

    Young Kim, Hee; Wang, Jigong; Chung, Kyungsoon; Mo Chung, Jin

    2008-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a frequent injury in humans that results in pain, swelling and difficulty in walking on the affected ankle. Currently a suitable animal model resembling human ankle sprain is lacking. Here, we describe an animal ankle sprain model induced by ankle ligament injury (ALI) in rats. Cutting combinations of the lateral ankle ligament complex produced pain, edema and difficulty of weight bearing, thereby mimicking severe (grade III) ankle sprain in humans. Analgesic compounds, morphine and indomethacin, significantly reversed the reduced weight bearing, thus indicating that reduction of weight bearing is partially due to pain. The ALI model is a new ankle sprain model that may be useful for the study of ankle sprain pain mechanisms and treatments and for the screening of new analgesic drugs. PMID:18620022

  10. The role of ankle bracing for prevention of ankle sprain injuries.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael T; Liu, Hsin-Yi

    2003-10-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries incurred in recreational and competitive athletics. These injuries have a significant impact in terms of cost, athletic participation, and activities of daily living. Prophylactic ankle braces are often used to reduce the risk of injury recurrence when individuals return to athletic participation. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the literature and provide our own experience relative to the use of prophylactic ankle bracing. Relatively high incidence rates of ankle sprain injury have been reported for basketball and soccer athletes, military trainees, and individuals with a previous history of ankle sprain injury. Semirigid and laced ankle braces have significantly reduced the incidence of initial and recurrent ankle sprain injuries in athletic and military samples. With few exceptions, these braces do not appear to affect functional performance adversely. The prophylactic use of semirigid ankle braces appears warranted to reduce the incidence of initial and, in particular, recurrent ankle sprain injuries for individuals who participate in activities that have the highest risk for these injuries. Additional research is needed to evaluate the many new braces that are available and in use and their influence on the incidence of ankle sprain injury and functional performance. PMID:14620786

  11. Assessment of acute foot and ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Louise

    2006-07-01

    Acute ankle and foot trauma is a regular emergency presentation and prompt strategic assessment skills are required to enable nurses to categorise and prioritise these injuries appropriately. This article provides background information on the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb to help nurses to identify various grades of ankle sprain as well as injuries that are limb threatening PMID:16878848

  12. Sprained Ankle Could Pose Longer-Term Harms to Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprained Ankle Could Pose Longer-Term Harms to Health Study finds link between adult injury, more heart ... or federal policy. Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ankle Injuries and Disorders Sprains and Strains ...

  13. Isolated posterior high ankle sprain: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Botchu, Rajesh; Allen, Patricia; Rennie, Winston J

    2013-12-01

    High ankle sprains are difficult to diagnose and account for 10% of all ankle sprains. A high index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis. High ankle sprains are managed symptomatically, with prolonged rehabilitation. The posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament is the strongest syndesmotic ligament; isolated injury of it is rare. We present 3 cases of isolated posterior high ankle sprain and discuss the relevant anatomy, mechanism of injury, and management. PMID:24366808

  14. Rehabilitation of Syndesmotic (High) Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Glenn N.; Allen, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: High ankle sprains are common in athletes who play contact sports. Most high ankle sprains are treated nonsurgically with a rehabilitation program. Evidence Acquisition: All years of PUBMED, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL PLUS, SPORTDiscuss, Google Scholar, and Web of Science were searched to August 2010, cross-referencing existing publications. Keywords included syndesmosis ankle sprain or high ankle sprain and the following terms: rehabilitation, treatment, cryotherapy, braces, orthosis, therapeutic modalities, joint mobilization, massage, pain, pain medications, TENS (ie, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation), acupuncture, aquatic therapy, strength, neuromuscular training, perturbation training, and outcomes. Results: Level of evidence, 5. A 3-phase rehabilitation program is described. The acute phase is directed at protecting the joint while minimizing pain, inflammation, muscle weakness, and loss of motion. Most patients are treated with some form of immobilization and have weightbearing restrictions. A range of therapeutic modalities are used to minimize pain and inflammation. Gentle mobilization and resistance exercises are used to gain mobility and maintain muscle size and strength. The subacute phase is directed at normalizing range of motion, strength, and function in activities of daily living. Progressive mobilization and strengthening are hallmarks of this phase. Neuromuscular training is begun and becomes the central component of rehabilitation. The advanced training phase focuses on preparing the patient for return to sports participation. Perturbation of support surfaces, agility drills, plyometrics, and sport-specific training are central components of this phase. Conclusion: The rehabilitation guidelines discussed may assist clinicians in managing syndesmotic ankle sprains. PMID:23015976

  15. Laboratory Measures of Postural Control During the Star Excursion Balance Test After Acute First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris M.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context No researchers, to our knowledge, have investigated the immediate postinjury-movement strategies associated with acute first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) as quantified by center of pressure (COP) and kinematic analyses during performance of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). Objective To analyze the kinematic and COP patterns of a group with acute first-time LAS and a noninjured control group during performance of the SEBT. Design Case-control study. Setting University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 81 participants with acute first-time LAS (53 men, 28 women; age = 23.22 ± 4.93 years, height = 1.73 ± 0.09 m, mass = 75.72 ± 13.86 kg) and 19 noninjured controls (15 men, 4 women; age = 22.53 ± 1.68 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.08 m, mass = 71.55 ± 11.31 kg). Intervention Participants performed the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed 3-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremity joints and associated fractal dimension (FD) of the COP path during performance of the SEBT. Results The LAS group had decreased normalized reach distances in the ANT, PL, and PM directions when compared with the control group on their injured (ANT: 58.16% ± 6.86% versus 64.86% ± 5.99%; PL: 85.64% ± 10.62% versus 101.14% ± 8.39%; PM: 94.89% ± 9.26% versus 107.29 ± 6.02%) and noninjured (ANT: 60.98% ± 6.74% versus 64.76% ± 5.02%; PL: 88.95% ± 11.45% versus 102.36% ± 8.53%; PM: 97.13% ± 8.76% versus 106.62% ± 5.78%) limbs (P < .01). This observation was associated with altered temporal sagittal-plane kinematic profiles throughout each reach attempt and at the point of maximum reach (P < .05). This result was associated with a reduced FD of the COP path for each reach direction on the injured limb only (P < .05). Conclusions Acute first-time LAS was associated with bilateral deficits in postural control, as evidenced by the bilateral

  16. Intrinsic predictive factors for ankle sprain in active university students: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    de Noronha, M; França, L C; Haupenthal, A; Nunes, G S

    2013-10-01

    The ankle is the joint most affected among the sports-related injuries. The current study investigated whether certain intrinsic factors could predict ankle sprains in active students. The 125 participants were submitted to a baseline assessment in a single session were then followed-up for 52 weeks regarding the occurrence of sprain. The baseline assessment were performed in both ankles and included the questionnaire Cumberland ankle instability tool - Portuguese, the foot lift test, dorsiflexion range of motion, Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), the side recognition task, body mass index, and history of previous sprain. Two groups were used for analysis: one with those who suffered an ankle sprain and the other with those who did not suffer an ankle sprain. After Cox regression analysis, participants with history of previous sprain were twice as likely to suffer subsequent sprains [hazard ratio (HR) 2.21 and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-4.57] and people with better performance on the SEBT in the postero-lateral (PL) direction were less likely to suffer a sprain (HR 0.96 and 95% CI 0.92-0.99). History of previous sprain was the strongest predictive factor and a weak performance on SEBT PL was also considered a predictive factor for ankle sprains. PMID:22260485

  17. How to Stretch Your Ankle After a Sprain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Decide If You Need to See an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Specialist How to Care for a Sprained Ankle How to Be Non- ... 10. Repeat 10 times. ​ Additional Resources How to Care for a Sprained Ankle How to Strengthen Your ... American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) offers information on this site ...

  18. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint. PMID:26072625

  19. A systematic review on the treatment of acute ankle sprain: brace versus other functional treatment types.

    PubMed

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, Ingrid; Backx, Frank; van Dijk, C Niek

    2011-03-01

    Ankle injuries, especially ankle sprains, are a common problem in sports and medical care. Ankle sprains result in pain and absenteeism from work and/or sports participation, and can lead to physical restrictions such as ankle instability. Nowadays, treatment of ankle injury basically consists of taping the ankle. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of ankle braces as a treatment for acute ankle sprains compared with other types of functional treatments such as ankle tape and elastic bandages. A computerized literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Clinical Trial Register. This review includes randomized controlled trials in English, German and Dutch, published between 1990 and April 2009 that compared ankle braces as a treatment for lateral ankle sprains with other functional treatments. The inclusion criteria for this systematic review were (i) individuals (sports participants as well as non-sports participants) with an acute injury of the ankle (acute ankle sprains); (ii) use of an ankle brace as primary treatment for acute ankle sprains; (iii) control interventions including any other type of functional treatment (e.g. Tubigrip™, elastic wrap or ankle tape); and (iv) one of the following reported outcome measures: re-injuries, symptoms (pain, swelling, instability), functional outcomes and/or time to resumption of sports, daily activities and/or work. Eight studies met all inclusion criteria. Differences in outcome measures, intervention types and patient characteristics precluded pooling of the results, so best evidence syntheses were conducted. A few individual studies reported positive outcomes after treatment with an ankle brace compared with other functional methods, but our best evidence syntheses only demonstrated a better treatment result in terms of functional outcome. Other studies have suggested that ankle brace treatment is a more cost-effective method, so the use of braces after acute

  20. [Ankle sprains: from diagnosis to management. the physiatric view].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Vítor; Antunes, Filipe

    2008-01-01

    Ankle injuries are the most frequently encountered injuries in clinical practice. They are often managed by general practicians, and not only by orthopaedic or physiatric physicians. This injury is usually non-complicated, but some care should be taken to assure an adequate management and to exclude severe lesions. The stability of the ankle is necessary for functional activity of lower extremity, allowing walking and participation in other high demanding activities like running or jumping. There is a constant concern in adopting the best diagnostic and treatment procedures to enhance the recovery and to prevent the chronic joint instability. According to this, there should be proposed comprehensive strategies focusing the rehabilitation view. The ankle is a complex articular structure with contributions from the talocrural, subtalar, and inferior tibiofibular joints. The full understanding of the functional anatomy and biomechanics is the first step for the evaluation of the etiologic factors. The recognition of the mechanism of injury, and the risk factors, should be carefully addressed to make an accurate diagnosis, proper management and to implement prophylactic measures, knowing that the lateral ligamentous complex is the most commonly injured. As always, diagnosis can be made taking an adequate history, performing a thorough physical examination, and when necessary, requesting complementary studies. The priority in initial assessment it's to clear out some severe complications, like fractures, that can mimic or that can be associated with ankle sprains. Although the conventional radiology is suitable for most cases, that has been greatly improved through the institution of the Ottawa Rules, in selected patients the severity of the damage is best evaluated with other imaging resources. Treatment of acute ankle sprains depends on the severity of the injury. Most acute lateral ligament injuries are best treated nonsurgically and will regain satisfactory ankle

  1. A mechanical supination sprain simulator for studying ankle supination sprain kinematics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yue-Yan; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Fung, Kwai-Yau; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2008-08-01

    This study presents a free-fall mechanical supination sprain simulator for evaluating the ankle joint kinematics during a simulated ankle supination sprain injury. The device allows the foot to be in an anatomical position before the sudden motion, and also allows different degrees of supination, or a combination of inversion and plantarflexion. Five subjects performed simulated supination sprain trials in five different supination angles. Ankle motion was captured by a motion analysis system, and the ankle kinematics were reported in plantarflexion/dorsiflexion, inversion/eversion and internal/external rotation planes. Results showed that all sprain motions were not pure single-plane motions but were accompanied by motion in other two planes, therefore, different degrees of supination were achieved. The presented sprain simulator allows a more comprehensive study of the kinematics of ankle sprain when compared with some previous laboratory research designs. PMID:18617179

  2. The Role of Shoe Design in Ankle Sprain Rates Among Collegiate Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Claudia K; Laudner, Kevin G; McLoda, Todd A; McCaw, Steven T

    2008-01-01

    Context: Much of the recent focus in shoe design and engineering has been on improving athletic performance. Currently, this improvement has been in the form of “cushioned column systems,” which are spring-like in design and located under the heel of the shoe in place of a conventional heel counter. Concerns have been raised about whether this design alteration has increased the incidence of ankle sprains. Objective: To examine the incidence of lateral ankle sprains in collegiate basketball players with regard to shoe design. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Certified athletic trainers at 1014 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)-affiliated schools sponsoring basketball during the 2005–2006 regular season were notified of an online questionnaire. Athletic trainers at 22 of the 1014 schools participated. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 230 basketball players (141 males, 89 females; age  =  20.2 ± 1.5 years) from NCAA Division I–III basketball programs sustained lateral ankle sprains. Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle sprain information and type of shoe worn (cushioned column or noncushioned column) were collected via online survey. The incidence of lateral ankle sprains and type of shoes worn were compared using a chi-square analysis. Results: No difference was noted in ankle sprain incidence between groups (χ2  =  2.44, P  =  .20, relative risk  =  1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]  =  0.32, 6.86). The incidence of ankle sprains was 1.33 per 1000 exposures in the cushioned column group (95% CI  =  0.62, 3.51) and 1.96 per 1000 exposures in the noncushioned column group (95% CI  =  0.51, 4.22). Conclusions: No increased incidence of ankle sprains was associated with shoe design. PMID:18523571

  3. The Anatomy and Mechanisms of Syndesmotic Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To present a comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and mechanisms of tibiofibular syndesmosis ankle sprains. Data Sources: MEDLINE (1966–1998) and CINAHL (1982–1998) searches using the key words syndesmosis, tibiofibular, ankle injuries, and ankle injuries–etiology. Data Synthesis: Stability of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis is necessary for proper functioning of the ankle and lower extremity. Much of the ankle's stability is provided by the mortise formed around the talus by the tibia and fibula. The anterior and posterior inferior tibiofibular ligaments, the interosseous ligament, and the interosseous membrane act to statically stabilize the joint. During dorsiflexion, the wider portion anteriorly more completely fills the mortise, and contact between the articular surfaces is maximal. The distal structures of the lower leg primarily prevent lateral displacement of the fibula and talus and maintain a stable mortise. A variety of mechanisms individually or combined can cause syndesmosis injury. The most common mechanisms, individually and particularly in combination, are external rotation and hyperdorsiflexion. Both cause a widening of the mortise, resulting in disruption of the syndesmosis and talar instability. Conclusions and Recommendation: Syndesmosis ankle injuries are less common than lateral ankle injuries, are difficult to evaluate, have a long recovery period, and may disrupt normal joint functioning. To effectively evaluate and treat this injury, clinicians should have a full understanding of the involved structures, functional anatomy, and etiologic factors. PMID:16404437

  4. Clinical assessment and management of ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Myrick, Karen M

    2014-01-01

    Ankle sprains are a common occurrence and are frequently either undertreated or overtreated. With the incidence estimated at more than 3 million a year and at a rate of 2.15/1,000 in the United States alone, this is an orthopaedic injury that providers should be acutely aware of and successfully able to evaluate and treat. This clinical feature will provide a thorough review of the mechanism of injury, the history and physical examination, and the classification and management of these injuries. Clinical red flags are discussed. PMID:25233201

  5. The Anatomic Pattern of Injuries in Acute Inversion Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Yuet Peng; Tan, Ken Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are little data on the incidence and patterns of injuries seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute inversion ankle sprains. This study may help in the understanding of the pathomechanics, natural history, and outcomes of this common injury. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: From June 2011 to June 2013, a total of 64 consecutive patients had MRI of the ankle performed for acute inversion injury to the ankle. All injuries/pathologies reported were recorded. Results: Only 22% of patients had isolated lateral ligament complex injuries. Twenty-two percent of patients had other pathologies but no lateral ligament injury, and 53% had lateral ligament injuries in combination with other pathologies or injuries. The most common associated finding with lateral ligament injuries was bone bruising (76%) followed by deltoid ligament injury (50%). The overall incidence of bone bruising was 50%. Thirty percent of ankles had tendon pathology, 27% had deltoid ligament injury, and 22% had occult fractures. Conclusion: Isolated lateral ligament ankle injury is not as common as is believed. The pattern of injury seems complex, and most patients appear to have more injuries than expected. MRI reveals additional information that may have significance in terms of diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis in this common injury. PMID:26535261

  6. Analgesia for people with acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Carter, David; Amblum-Almer, Jeshni

    2015-04-01

    Around 302,000 people with soft-tissue ankle injuries present to UK emergency departments every year (Ferran and Maffulli 2006). These patients are generally treated conservatively with analgesia, ice, compression and elevation, and rest. There is some discussion in the literature about whether or not people with these injuries should be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with some authors claiming that the inflammatory response following injury is part of the healing process and should not be halted. This article examines the literature on the efficacy of administering NSAIDs as the first-line drug management for ankle sprain. It also considers cost of treatment, prescribing practice and contraindications of NSAIDs. PMID:25854742

  7. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  8. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  9. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  10. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  11. Ankle sprain: pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2010-01-01

    With the high percentage (up to 75%) of initial lateral ankle sprains (LAS) leading to repetitive sprains and chronic symptoms, it is imperative to better understand how best to treat and rehabilitate LAS events. The purpose of this paper is to review LAS pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and the current evidence regarding therapeutic modalities and exercises used in the treatment of LAS. Functional rehabilitation, early mobilization with support, is the current standard of care for LAS. However, the high percentage of reinjury occurrence and development of chronic symptoms (up to 75%) after a LAS, suggests the current standard of care may not be effective. Recent evidence has shown the need for more stringent immobilization to facilitate ligament healing and restoration of joint stability and function after a LAS. Additionally, the importance of adding adjunctive therapies, specifically joint mobilizations and balance training have been shown to improve function and decrease the incidence of reinjury after a LAS. Modifying current rehabilitation protocols to include protecting the ankle joint with stringent immobilization, and including joint mobilizations and balance training may be the first step to decreasing the incidence of short and long term ankle joint dysfunction. PMID:24198549

  12. Ankle sprain: pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2010-01-01

    With the high percentage (up to 75%) of initial lateral ankle sprains (LAS) leading to repetitive sprains and chronic symptoms, it is imperative to better understand how best to treat and rehabilitate LAS events. The purpose of this paper is to review LAS pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and the current evidence regarding therapeutic modalities and exercises used in the treatment of LAS. Functional rehabilitation, early mobilization with support, is the current standard of care for LAS. However, the high percentage of reinjury occurrence and development of chronic symptoms (up to 75%) after a LAS, suggests the current standard of care may not be effective. Recent evidence has shown the need for more stringent immobilization to facilitate ligament healing and restoration of joint stability and function after a LAS. Additionally, the importance of adding adjunctive therapies, specifically joint mobilizations and balance training have been shown to improve function and decrease the incidence of reinjury after a LAS. Modifying current rehabilitation protocols to include protecting the ankle joint with stringent immobilization, and including joint mobilizations and balance training may be the first step to decreasing the incidence of short and long term ankle joint dysfunction. PMID:24198549

  13. Endoscopic Ankle Lateral Ligament Graft Anatomic Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Michels, Frederick; Cordier, Guillaume; Guillo, Stéphane; Stockmans, Filip

    2016-09-01

    Chronic instability is a common complication of lateral ankle sprains. If nonoperative treatment fails, a surgical repair or reconstruction may be indicated. Today, endoscopic techniques to treat ankle instability are becoming more popular. This article describes an endoscopic technique, using a step-by-step approach, to reconstruct the ATFL and CFL with a gracilis graft. The endoscopic technique is reproducible and safe with regard to the surrounding anatomic structures. Short and midterm results confirm the benefits of this technique. PMID:27524711

  14. Ankle Ligament Healing After an Acute Ankle Sprain: An Evidence-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Hicks-Little, Charlie A

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To perform a systematic review to determine the healing time of the lateral ankle ligaments after an acute ankle sprain. Data Sources: We identified English-language research studies from 1964 to 2007 by searching MEDLINE, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), SportDiscus, and CINAHL using the terms ankle sprain, ankle rehabilitation, ankle injury, ligament healing, and immobilization. Study Selection: We selected studies that described randomized, controlled clinical trials measuring ligament laxity either objectively or subjectively immediately after injury and at least 1 more time after injury. Data Extraction: Two reviewers independently scored the 7 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Because of differences in study designs, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Effect sizes and confidence intervals could be calculated only for 1 study. The percentages of subjective and objective instability were calculated for the remaining studies. Data Synthesis: Ankle laxity improved over a period of 6 weeks to 1 year. One author showed stress talar tilt values of 16.10 ± 8.8° immediately after injury and 3.4 ± 3.6° at 3 months after injury. In 2 articles, the authors reported that positive anterior drawer tests were still present in 3% to 31% of participants at 6 months after injury. Additionally, feelings of instability affected 7% to 42% of participants up to 1 year after injury. Conclusions/Recommendations: In the studies that we examined, it took at least 6 weeks to 3 months before ligament healing occurred. However, at 6 weeks to 1 year after injury, a large percentage of participants still had objective mechanical laxity and subjective ankle instability. Direct comparison among articles is difficult because of differences in methods. More research focusing on more reliable methods of measuring ankle laxity is needed so that clinicians can know how long ligament healing takes after injury. This knowledge will help clinicians to make better

  15. Evaluating fracture risk in acute ankle sprains: Any news since the Ottawa Ankle Rules? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jonckheer, Pascale; Willems, Tine; De Ridder, Roel; Paulus, Dominique; Holdt Henningsen, Kirsten; San Miguel, Lorena; De Sutter, An; Roosen, Philip

    2016-03-01

    Background Ankle sprain is frequently encountered, both in primary care and in emergency departments. Since 1992, the Ottawa ankle rules (OAR) can assist clinicians in determining whether an X-ray should be performed to exclude a fracture. Several guidelines recommend the use of OAR based on a systematic review from 2003. Ten years later, one can wonder if this recommendation should be changed. Objective To review systematically the current evidence on the most accurate method to assess the fracture risk after an ankle sprain in adults. Methods A methodical search for systematic reviews, meta-analyses and primary studies was carried out in Medline, Cochrane Database of systematic reviews, Embase, Pedro, CINAHL, Medion and specific guideline search engines. At least two independent researchers performed selection, quality appraisal (with validated checklists) and data extraction. Results One systematic review and 21 primary studies were selected. Sensitivity and specificity of the OAR range from 92-100% and from 16-51%, respectively. To improve the OAR specificity, other tools are proposed such as the Bernese ankle rules. Vibrating tuning fork test and ultrasound could be useful in patient with OAR positive to decrease the need for radiographs. No evidence was found in favour of the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) in the acute phase of ankle sprain. Conclusion The findings confirm the value of the OAR at ruling out fractures after an ankle sprain and propose other or additional tools to decrease the need for X-rays. PMID:26691309

  16. Acute and chronic lateral ankle instability in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Chan, Keith W; Ding, Bryan C; Mroczek, Kenneth J

    2011-01-01

    Ankle sprain injuries are the most common injury sustained during sporting activities. Three-quarters of ankle injuries involve the lateral ligamentous complex, comprised of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL). The most common mechanism of injury in lateral ankle sprains occurs with forced plantar flexion and inversion of the ankle as the body's center of gravity rolls over the ankle. The ATFL followed by the CFL are the most commonly injured ligaments. Eighty percent of acute ankle sprains make a full recovery with conservative management, while 20% of acute ankle sprains develop mechanical or functional instability, resulting in chronic ankle instability. Treatment of acute ankle sprains generally can be successfully managed with a short period of immobilization that is followed by functional rehabilitation. Patients with chronic ankle instability who fail functional rehabilitation are best treated with a Brostrom-Gould anatomic repair or, in those patients with poor tissue quality or undergoing revision surgery, an anatomic reconstruction. PMID:21332435

  17. [Ankle sprain during a volleyball game].

    PubMed

    Boersma, Anton R; Munzebrock, Arvid V E

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year old woman was admitted to the emergency room after her left ankle rolled inward during a volleyball game. On physical examination a bony prominence on the lateral side of the left foot was noticeable, without neurovascular injury. An X-ray (anterior-posterior view) showed a subtalar dislocation without associated fractures. PMID:26420145

  18. The initial effects of a Mulligan's mobilization with movement technique on dorsiflexion and pain in subacute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Collins, Natalie; Teys, Pamela; Vicenzino, Bill

    2004-05-01

    Physiotherapists frequently use manipulative therapy techniques to treat dysfunction and pain resulting from ankle sprain. This study investigated whether a Mulligan's mobilization with movement (MWM) technique improves talocrural dorsiflexion, a major impairment following ankle sprain, and relieves pain in subacute populations. Fourteen subjects with subacute grade II lateral ankle sprains served as their own control in a repeated measures, double-blind randomized controlled trial that measured the initial effects of the MWM treatment on weight bearing dorsiflexion and pressure and thermal pain threshold. The subacute ankle sprain group studied displayed deficits in dorsiflexion and local pressure pain threshold in the symptomatic ankle. Significant improvements in dorsiflexion occurred initially post-MWM ( F(2,26) = 7.82, P = 0.002 ), but no significant changes in pressure or thermal pain threshold were observed after the treatment condition. Results indicate that the MWM treatment for ankle dorsiflexion has a mechanical rather than hypoalgesic effect in subacute ankle sprains. The mechanism by which this occurs requires investigation if we are to better understand the role of manipulative therapy in ankle sprain management. PMID:15040966

  19. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports. PMID:17190537

  20. How to sprain your ankle - a biomechanical case report of an inversion trauma.

    PubMed

    Gehring, D; Wissler, S; Mornieux, G; Gollhofer, A

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop preventive measures against lateral ankle sprains, it is essential to have a detailed understanding of the injury mechanism. Under laboratory experimental conditions the examination of the joint load has to be restricted with clear margins of safety. However, in the present case one athlete sprained his ankle while performing a run-and-cut movement during a biomechanical research experiment. 3D kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activity of the lower limb were recorded and compared to 16 previously performed trials. Motion patterns of global pelvis orientation, hip flexion, and knee flexion in the sprain trail deviated from the reference trials already early in the preparatory phase before ground contact. During ground contact, the ankle was rapidly plantar flexed (up to 1240°/s), inverted (up to 1290°/s) and internally rotated (up to 580°/s) reaching its maximum displacement within the first 150 ms after heel strike. Rapid neuromuscular activation bursts of the m. tibialis anterior and the m. peroneus longus started 40-45 ms after ground contact and overshot the activation profile of the reference trials with peak activation at 62 ms and 74 ms respectively. Therefore, it may be suggested that neuromuscular reflexes played an important role in joint control during the critical phase of excessive ankle displacement. The results of this case report clearly indicate that (a) upper leg mechanics, (b) pre-landing adjustments, and (c) neuromuscular contribution have to be considered in the mechanism of lateral ankle sprains. PMID:23078945

  1. Peroneal muscle weakness in female basketballers following chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Rottigni, S A; Hopper, D

    1991-01-01

    Female A-grade basketballers were examined for invertor and evertor muscle strength. Two test groups participated. The injured group were players who had persisting disability following ankle sprains. The control group were players who had never sustained an ankle sprain. Test apparatus was the Orthotron isokinetic dynamometer at contraction speed of 180° per second. Trends towards higher invertor and evertor strength in uninjured group when compared with the injured group found in the present study have been supported by one other report. Invertors were found to be significantly stronger than evertors in both injured and uninjured groups, with the exception of the dominant leg of the uninjured group. A significant weakness in non-dominant evertors of the uninjured group was detected. Dominance did not significantly alter strength differences in the invertor or evertor muscle groups within the uninjured population. The clinical importance of strengthening the peroneal muscles in ankle sprain rehabilitation is discussed, and further research considerations provided. PMID:25025187

  2. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles. PMID:26077988

  3. Comparison of two main treatment modalities for acute ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Serkan; Durusu, Murat; Aliyev, Bahtiyar; Akpancar, Serkan; Ersen, Omer; Yasar, S.Mehmet; Ardic, Sukru

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Acute ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in emergency departments. Immobilization is widely accepted as the basic treatment modality for acute ankle sprains; however, immobilization method remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to compare two treatment modalities: splint and elastic bandage for the management of acute ankle sprains. Methods: This prospective study was conducted in the emergency department. Fifty-one consecutive patients who were admitted to the emergency department owing to the complaint of ankle sprain and who were treated with an elastic bandage or a splint were included in the study. After bone injury was ruled out, treatment choice was left to the on-shift physicians’ discretion. The extent of edema was evaluated before and after the treatment by using a small, graduated container filled with warm water. Volume differences were calculated by immersing both lower extremities in a container filled to a constant level. Pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale. Results: There were 25 patients in the elastic bandage group and 26 patients in the splint group. VAS scores of these groups before and after the treatment were similar. Although edema size before and after the treatment were similar between the groups, edema size reduction was significantly more in the elastic bandage group [p=0,025]. Conclusions: This study showed that treatment of acute ankle sprains with an elastic bandage was more effective than splint in reducing edema. Therefore, an elastic bandage could be preferred over a splint for the treatment of acute ankle sprains. PMID:26870123

  4. Syndesmosis sprains of the ankle: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jones, Morgan H; Amendola, Annunziato

    2007-02-01

    Syndesmosis sprains have received increasing recognition during recent years because of a heightened awareness of the mechanism, symptoms, and signs of injury. Syndesmosis injuries take longer to recover than lateral ankle sprains, and no consensus exists regarding optimal treatment of these injuries. Therefore, we undertook a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the effect of treatment on outcome following syndesmosis injury. We identified six articles that evaluated treatment of syndesmosis injuries. All studies were case series including prospectively collected data of young, active patients with a minimum of 6 months followup and represented the highest level of evidence available. Three specifically addressed patient outcomes at final followup: one indicated 44 percent of patients had acceptable outcomes, and two rated patient outcomes as good to excellent. Time lost from sport ranged from 0 to 137 days, with averages ranging from approximately 10 to 14 days up to 52 days. The studies did not employ consistent diagnosis or grading schemes, did not use uniform treatment protocols, and did not compare treatments. Therefore, this review generates several prospective areas for additional investigation rather than providing strong evidence to support a particular method of treatment. PMID:17146360

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Predictor of Return to Play Following Syndesmosis (High) Ankle Sprains in Professional Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Daniel R.; Rubin, David A.; Hillen, Travis J.; Nissman, Daniel B.; Lomax, James; Williams, Tyler; Scott, Reggie; Cunningham, Byron; Matava, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Syndesmosis ankle sprains cause greater disability and longer duration of recovery than lateral ankle sprains. Objective: To describe the severity of syndesmosis sprains using several accepted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria and to assess the interrater reliability of diagnosing syndesmosis injury using these same criteria in professional American football players. Hypothesis: There is a high degree of interrater reliability of MRI findings in American football players with syndesmosis ankle sprains. These radiographic findings will correlate with time lost to injury, indicating severity of the sprain. Study Design: Uncontrolled retrospective review. Methods: Player demographics and time lost to play were recorded among professional football players who had sustained a syndesmosis ankle sprain and underwent standardized ankle MRI. Each image was independently read by 3 blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Results: Seventeen players met study criteria. There was almost perfect agreement among the radiologists for diagnosing injury to the syndesmotic membrane; substantial agreement for diagnosing injury to the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL) and in determining the proximal extent of syndesmotic edema/injury; but only fair agreement for diagnosing injury to the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament and in determining the width of syndesmotic separation. There was a significant correlation between the width of syndesmotic separation and time lost, but no significant correlation between individual syndesmotic ligament injury or proximal extent of syndesmotic edema/injury and time lost. Conclusion: While ankle MRI can identify syndesmotic disruption with a high degree of interobserver agreement, no association was demonstrated between the extent of injury on MRI and the time to return to play following a high ankle sprain. Clinical Relevance: In athletes with suspected high ankle sprains, MRI may help confirm diagnosis or suggest

  6. Responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to foot movements in rats with a sprained ankle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2011-05-01

    Acute ankle injuries are common problems and often lead to persistent pain. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ankle sprain pain, the response properties of spinal dorsal horn neurons were examined after ankle sprain. Acute ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending the ankle of a rat hindlimb in a direction of plantarflexion and inversion. The weight-bearing ratio (WBR) of the affected foot was used as an indicator of pain. Single unit activities of dorsal horn neurons in response to plantarflexion and inversion of the foot or ankle compression were recorded from the medial part of the deep dorsal horn, laminae IV-VI, in normal and ankle-sprained rats. One day after ankle sprain, rats showed significantly reduced WBRs on the affected foot, and this reduction was partially restored by systemic morphine. The majority of deep dorsal horn neurons responded to a single ankle stimulus modality. After ankle sprain, the mean evoked response rates were significantly increased, and afterdischarges were developed in recorded dorsal horn neurons. The ankle sprain-induced enhanced evoked responses were significantly reduced by morphine, which was reversed by naltrexone. The data indicate that movement-specific dorsal horn neuron responses were enhanced after ankle sprain in a morphine-dependent manner, thus suggesting that hyperactivity of dorsal horn neurons is an underlying mechanism of pain after ankle sprain. PMID:21389306

  7. Exercise and ankle sprain injuries: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Colado, Juan Carlos; Flandez, Jorge; Page, Phil; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-02-01

    Ankle sprains are common in team sports and sports played on courts, and often result in structural and functional alterations that lead to a greater reinjury risk. Specific exercises are often used to promote neuromuscular improvements in the prevention and rehabilitation of ankle injuries. This literature review summarizes the neuromuscular characteristics of common ankle sprains and the effectiveness of exercise as an intervention for improving neuromuscular function and preventing reinjury. Our review found that appropriate exercise prescription can increase static and dynamic balance and decrease injury recurrence. In particular, the addition of dynamic activities in the exercise program can be beneficial because of the anticipatory postural adjustments identified as a key factor in the injury mechanism. PMID:24565825

  8. Diclofenac epolamine topical patch relieves pain associated with ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lionberger, David R; Joussellin, Eric; Lanzarotti, Arturo; Yanchick, Jillmarie; Magelli, Merrell

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sports-related injuries, such as sprains and strains, commonly occur during exercise and athletic events. Current therapy includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which have a high incidence of upper gastrointestinal side effects. The present study assessed the efficacy and safety of the diclofenac epolamine topical patch (DETP, 1.3%), a topical NSAID for the treatment of acute minor sprains and strains. Methods: This multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study enrolled adult patients (n = 134) with acute ankle pain (due to a minor sprain) occurring less than 48 hours prior to entering the study. Patients were treated with either the DETP or a placebo topical patch daily for seven days. Pain intensity was evaluated during the first six hours after application of the patch, and on treatment days 1, 2, 3, and 7. Results: Patients treated with the DETP experienced a significantly greater reduction in pain associated with their ankle injury compared with placebo, beginning four hours after the first patch application (P = 0.02). The DETP was well tolerated and was comparable with placebo in terms of safety. Conclusion: Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that the DETP is an effective analgesic for local treatment of pain in mild acute ankle sprain. PMID:21559350

  9. PA03.03. Effect of manjishtadi lepa in management of ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Patil, S Suraj; Kumar, P Hemantha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of Manjisthadi Lepa in the Management of Ankle Sprain. To compare the effectiveness of Sheeta and Ushna Manjisthadi Lepa on Ankle Sprain. Method: Cases presenting with classical signs and symptoms of Ankle Sprain were selected from the outpatient and in patient department of Shalya Tantra. They were randomly allocated into two groups with 20 patients. Group – A / Sheeta Group– Sheeta Manjishtadi Lepa. Group – B / Ushna Group– Sheeta Manjishtadi Lepa. Lepa was applied twice daily for one week duration and daily assessment of the clinical parameters was done according to the proforma and weekly follow up for four weeks Result: Duration of one week treatment has provided significant relief with a value of 88.23% in pain, 85.71% in tenderness, 75% in swelling, 100% in loss of function and 100% in discoloration. 100% result is obtained in the movements of joint as dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, adduction, abduction, inversion and eversion after the application of Sheeta Manjisthadi Lepa. After the application of Ushna Manjisthadi Lepa pain reduced by 91.17%, tenderness by 86.%, swelling by 76.4%, loss of function by, discoloration and movements of the joints by 100% with P < 0.001 in both groups. On the second follow up only 100% relief was noted in all the parameters in both the groups. Conclusion: Group A / Sheeta group patients showed better improvement in the initial days of treatment i.e. in conditions of Acute Ankle Sprain, where as in Group B / Ushna group showed better improvement in later stage i.e. in Chronic Ankle Sprain. Complete remission was seen in 75% of patients, marked improvement in 17.5%, moderate improvement in 7% and no patient showed unchanged results after one week treatment.

  10. Tibiofemoral angle and its relation to ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Karagounis, Panagiotis; Tsiganos, Georgios; Armenis, Elias; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-12-01

    The lack of a normal joint orientation generates translational or shear forces across the joint. These forces can put abnormally high strain on the cartilage and the surrounding capsuloligamentous tissues. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the tibiofemoral (TFA) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains because its value provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). TFA measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type followed by body mass index (BMI) and age. On the contrary, TFA was proven to be statistically nonsignificant. When the BMI variable was substituted with body inertia propensity, a derived variable, the TFA remained statistically nonsignificant. TFA magnitude does not seem to be a determinant factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. PMID:20400424

  11. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries. PMID:19825746

  12. Bracing superior to neuromuscular training for the prevention of self-reported recurrent ankle sprains: a three-arm randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Kasper W; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert A L M

    2014-01-01

    Background Ankle sprain is the most common sports-related injury with a high rate of recurrence and associated costs. Recent studies have emphasised the effectiveness of both neuromuscular training and bracing for the secondary prevention of ankle sprains. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of combined bracing and neuromuscular training, or bracing alone, against the use of neuromuscular training on recurrences of ankle sprain after usual care. Methods 384 athletes, aged 18–70, who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain, were included (training group n=120; brace group n=126; combi group n=138). The training group received an 8-week home-based neuromuscular training programme, the brace group received a semirigid ankle brace to be worn during all sports activities for 12 months, and the combi group received both the training programme, as well as the ankle brace, to be worn during all sports activities for 8 weeks. The main outcome measure was self-reported recurrence of the ankle sprain. Results During the 1-year follow-up, 69 participants (20%) reported a recurrent ankle sprain: 29 (27%) in the training group, 17 (15%) in the brace group and 23 (19%) in the combi group. The relative risk for a recurrent ankle sprain in the brace group versus the training group was 0.53 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.97). No significant differences were found for time losses or costs due to ankle sprains between the intervention groups. Conclusions Bracing was superior to neuromuscular training in reducing the incidence but not the severity of self-reported recurrent ankle sprains after usual care. PMID:24398222

  13. The Effects of Ankle Sprain on Balance Tests in Adolescent Volleyball Players with Previous History of Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Sarıal, Ceyda; Tayfur, Abdulhamıt; Kap, Beyza; Donder, Dılara; Ertuzun, Ozum Melıs; Tunay, Volga Bayrakcı

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the impact of having previous history of inversion ankle sprain on balance tests in adolescent volleyball players. Methods: Fourty-five adolescent volleyball players with mean age of 15.26±1.03 participated in our study. Twenty-nine were uninjured (control group) and sixteen had previously experienced inversion injuries on right ankle. 9 players had the injury more than than one year ago and 7 players had it before six to twelf months. Balancing abilities were evaluated by Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and Single Limb Hurdle Test (SLHT). The fact that players with history of injury had the ankle sprain at right foot led us to perform the measurements in the control group also for the right foot. We compared the results of injured and uninjured players on both tests. Results: Uninjured players' reaching distance on right foot was found out to be significantly more than in players with ankle sprain at medial and posteromedial directions of SEBT(p<.05), whereas there were no differences detected for the other directions (p>.05). For comparing athletes' performances with SLHT, finishing time was found significantly better in uninjured players (p<.05). Conclusion: Adolescent volleyball players with history of injury show lower performance on balance tests compared to uninjured players. This demonstrates that they should be given a training including balance and stabilization programs.

  14. Therapeutic Interventions for Increasing Ankle Dorsiflexion After Ankle Sprain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Masafumi; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Clinicians perform therapeutic interventions, such as stretching, manual therapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, and exercises, to increase ankle dorsiflexion. However, authors of previous studies have not determined which intervention or combination of interventions is most effective. Objective: To determine the magnitude of therapeutic intervention effects on and the most effective therapeutic interventions for restoring normal ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain. Data Sources: We performed a comprehensive literature search in Web of Science and EBSCO HOST from 1965 to May 29, 2011, with 19 search terms related to ankle sprain, dorsiflexion, and intervention and by cross-referencing pertinent articles. Study Selection: Eligible studies had to be written in English and include the means and standard deviations of both pretreatment and posttreatment in patients with acute, subacute, or chronic ankle sprains. Outcomes of interest included various joint mobilizations, stretching, local vibration, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, and mental-relaxation interventions. Data Extraction: We extracted data on dorsiflexion improvements among various therapeutic applications by calculating Cohen d effect sizes with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and evaluated the methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Data Synthesis: In total, 9 studies (PEDro score = 5.22 ± 1.92) met the inclusion criteria. Static-stretching interventions with a home exercise program had the strongest effects on increasing dorsiflexion in patients 2 weeks after acute ankle sprains (Cohen d = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.12, 2.42). The range of effect sizes for movement with mobilization on ankle dorsiflexion among individuals with recurrent ankle sprains was small (Cohen d range = 0.14 to 0.39). Conclusions: Static-stretching intervention as a part of standardized care yielded the strongest effects on dorsiflexion after acute ankle sprains. The

  15. Treatment algorithm for chronic lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Sandro; Ruffilli, Alberto; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Mazzotti, Antonio; Evangelisti, Giulia; Buda, Roberto; Faldini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: ankle sprains are a common sports-related injury. A 20% of acute ankle sprains results in chronic ankle instability, requiring surgery. Aim of this paper is to report the results of a series of 38 patients treated for chronic lateral ankle instability with anatomic reconstruction. Materials and methods: thirty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. Seventeen patients underwent a surgical repair using the Brostrom-modified technique, while the remaining underwent anatomic reconstruction with autologous or allogenic graft. Results: at a mean follow-up of 5 years the AOFAS score improved from 66.1 ± 5.3 to 92.2 ± 5.6. Discussion: the findings of this study confirm that anatomic reconstruction is an effective procedure with satisfactory subjective and objective results which persist at long-term follow-up along with a low complication rate. No differences, in term of clinical and functional outcomes, were observed between the Brostrom-modified repair and the anatomic reconstruction technique. Level of evidence: level IV. PMID:25767783

  16. Prospective evaluation of syndesmotic ankle sprains without diastasis.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, E D; Hosea, T M; Sieler, S D; Incremona, B R; Kessler, D E

    2001-01-01

    Sixty consecutive collegiate athletes with "high" ankle symptoms were prospectively evaluated over a 3-year period in an effort to better define this debilitating ankle injury. All athletes included in this study had tenderness over the distal anterior tibiofibular ligament, tenderness proximally along the interosseous membrane, and functional disability. No study subject had a fracture or frank tibia-fibula diastasis. The severity of the sprain was quantified using the interosseous "tenderness length." A standard rehabilitation protocol was followed by all patients. Athletes returned to competition when they could perform all functional testing without difficulty. Time to return to full competitive activity averaged 13.4 days. The number of days missed from competition was statistically related to the interosseous tenderness length (P = 0.0001) and to positive results on the squeeze test (P = 0.03). Fifty-three of the 60 injured athletes were evaluated at least 6 months after injury. Patients rated their outcomes as good or excellent. Six of the patients experienced occasional ankle pain and stiffness, four patients reported recurrent ankle sprains, and one patient had heterotopic ossification formation. PMID:11206253

  17. Acupuncture for ankle sprain: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle sprain is one of the most frequently encountered musculoskeletal injuries; however, the efficacy of acupuncture in treating ankle sprains remains uncertain. We therefore performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence regarding acupuncture for ankle sprains. Methods We searched 15 data sources and two trial registries up to February 2012. Randomized controlled trials of acupuncture were included if they involved patients with ankle sprains and reported outcomes of symptom improvement, including pain. A Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool was used. Risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in a random effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed based on acupuncture type, grade of sprain, and control type. Sensitivity analyses were also performed with respect to risk of bias, sample size, and outcomes reported. Results Seventeen trials involving 1820 participants were included. Trial quality was generally poor, with just three reporting adequate methods of randomization and only one a method of allocation concealment. Significantly more participants in acupuncture groups reported global symptom improvement compared with no acupuncture groups (RR of symptoms persisting with acupuncture = 0.56, 95% CI 0.42–0.77). However, this is probably an overestimate due to the heterogeneity (I2 = 51%) and high risk of bias of the included studies. Acupuncture as an add-on treatment also improved global symptoms compared with other treatments only, without significant variability (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.51–0.73, I2 = 1%). The benefit of acupuncture remained significant when the analysis was limited to two studies with a low risk of bias. Acupuncture was more effective than various controls in relieving pain, facilitating return to normal activity, and promoting quality of life, but these analyses were based on only a small number of studies. Acupuncture did not appear to be associated with

  18. Misdiagnosis of Talar Body or Neck Fractures as Ankle Sprains in Low Energy Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki-Won; Kim, Jin-Su; Cho, Hun-Ki; Choo, Ho-Sik; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The talus has a very complex anatomical morphology and is mainly fractured by a major force caused by a fall or a traffic accident. Therefore, a talus fracture is not common. However, many recent reports have shown that minor injuries, such as sprains and slips during sports activities, can induce a talar fracture especially in the lateral or posterior process. Still, fractures to the main parts of the talus (neck and body) after ankle sprains have not been reported as occult fractures. Methods Of the total 102 cases from January 2005 to December 2012, 7 patients had confirmed cases of missed/delayed diagnosis of a talus body or neck fracture and were included in the study population. If available, medical records, X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the confirmed cases were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results In the 7-patient population, there were 3 talar neck fractures and 4 talar body fractures (coronal shearing type). The mechanisms of injuries were all low energy trauma episodes. The causes of the injuries included twisting of the ankle during climbing (n = 2), jumping to the ground from a 1-m high wall (n = 2), and twisting of the ankle during daily activities (n = 3). Conclusions A talar body fracture and a talar neck fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute and chronic ankle pain after a minor ankle injury. PMID:27583114

  19. The association between the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism and noncontact acute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xuya; Li, Zongyu; Cao, Xuecheng; Xie, Chen; Gu, Mingyong; Chen, Pei; Yang, Xiaoqing; Cai, Jinfang

    2015-01-01

    Ankle sprains are one of the most severe musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries during physical activity. Although many risk factors have been offered, it is unclear why some individuals develop noncontact ankle sprains when participating in comparable levels of physical exertion under identical environmental conditions and others do not. The ACTN3 gene that encodes the α-actinin-3 protein, which is, only expressed in the Z line of fast glycolytic muscle fibres was found to associate with power/strength performance. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether the ACTN3 gene polymorphism is associated with noncontact acute ankle sprains. One hundred and forty-two participants with clinically diagnosed noncontact acute ankle sprains as well as 280 physically active controls participants without any history of ankle sprains were included in this case-control genetic association study. The RR genotype (odds ratio (OR) = 0.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32-0.65, P = 0.011) and R allele (OR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.37-0.68, P = 0.002) of the ACTN3 were significantly low-represented in the acute ankle sprains group compared with the control group. The ACTN3 R577X is associated with acute ankle sprains in Chinese participants in this study. This is the first study to suggest that an individual with a RR genotype is at a decreased risk of acute ankle sprains. PMID:25687200

  20. RMI study and clinical correlations of ankle retinacula damage and outcomes of ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Stecco, Antonio; Stecco, Carla; Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Ferraro, Claudio; Masiero, Stefano; De Caro, Raffaele

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies reveal the role of the ankle retinacula in proprioception and functional stability of the ankle, but there is no clear evidence of their role in the outcomes of ankle sprain. 25 patients with outcomes of ankle sprain were evaluated by MRI to analyze possible damage to the ankle retinacula. Patients with damage were subdivided into two groups: group A comprised cases with ankle retinacula damage only, and group B those also with anterior talofibular ligament rupture or bone marrow edema. Both groups were examined by VAS, CRTA and static posturography and underwent three treatments of deep connective tissue massage (Fascial Manipulation technique). All evaluations were repeated after the end of treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 months. At MRI, alteration of at least one of the ankle retinacula was evident in 21 subjects, and a further lesion was also identified in 7 subjects. After treatment, VAS and CRTA evaluations showed a statistically significant decrease in values with respect to those before treatment (p < 0.0001). There were also significant improvements (p < 0.05) in stabilometric platform results. No significant difference was found between groups A and B. The initial benefit was generally maintained at follow-up. The alteration of retinacula at MRI clearly corresponds to the proprioceptive damage revealed by static posturography and clinical examination. Treatment focused on the retinacula may improve clinical outcomes and stabilometric data. PMID:21305286

  1. Wii Fit™ exercise therapy for the rehabilitation of ankle sprains: Its effect compared with physical therapy or no functional exercises at all.

    PubMed

    Punt, I M; Ziltener, J-L; Monnin, D; Allet, L

    2016-07-01

    Lateral ankle sprains represent the most common sports-related injuries. The Nintendo Wii Fit™ could be useful in the treatment of ankle sprains. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of exercise training using the Wii Fit™ in ankle sprain patients: (a) with physical therapy; and (b) a control group not receiving any treatment. Ninety lateral ankle sprain patients were randomized to a Wii Fit™, physical therapy, or control group. We assessed the following outcome measures before, and 6 weeks after starting the allocated treatment: Foot and Ankle Ability Measure, pain during rest and walking, delay before return to sport, patient satisfaction, and effectiveness of the allocated treatment. Six weeks after the baseline measures, foot and ankle ability scores had improved in all groups, and pain had decreased during walking (P < 0.050). No between-group differences were detected between Wii Fit™ treatment, and both other groups (P > 0.050). In conclusion, the Wii Fit™ could be used as an exercise therapy to treat ankle sprain patients. However, Wii Fit™ was not more effective than only physical therapy, or no exercise therapy at all. Patients who did not receive treatment showed similar results as people who got any kind of exercise therapy. PMID:26076737

  2. Ankle Sprain Injuries: A 2-Year Prospective Cohort Study in Female Greek Professional Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Kofotolis, Nikolaos; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2007-01-01

    Context: Ankle sprains are a common basketball injury. Therefore, examination of risk factors for injury in female professional basketball players is worthwhile. Objective: To examine rates of ankle sprains, associated time missed from participation, and risk factors for injury during 2 consecutive seasons. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Eighteen professional basketball facilities. Patients or Other Participants: We observed 204 players from 18 female professional basketball teams for 2 consecutive seasons during a 2-year period. Main Outcome Measure(s): Using questionnaires, we recorded the incidence of ankle sprains, participation time missed, and mechanisms of injury in games and practice sessions. Potential risk factors, such as age, body mass, height, training experience, and history of ankle sprain, were examined using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Fifty of the 204 participants sustained ankle injuries; injuries included 32 ankle sprains, which translated to an ankle sprain rate of 1.12 per 1000 hours of exposure to injury. The 32 players missed 224.4 training and game sessions and an average of 7.01 sessions per injury. Most injuries occurred in the key area of the basketball court and were the result of contact. Injury rates during games were higher than injury rates during practice sessions. Centers, followed by guards and forwards, had the highest rate of injury. Players who did not wear an external ankle support had an odds ratio of 2.481 for sustaining an ankle sprain. Conclusions: Female professional basketball athletes who did not wear an external ankle support, who played in the key area, or who functioned as centers had a higher risk for ankle sprain than did other players. PMID:18059995

  3. Increased Ligament Thickness in Previously Sprained Ankles as Measured by Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kathy; Gustavsen, Geoff; Royer, Todd; Wikstrom, Erik A.; Glutting, Joseph; Kaminski, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lateral ankle sprains are among the most common injuries in sport, with the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) most susceptible to damage. Although we understand that after a sprain, scar tissue forms within the ligament, little is known about the morphologic changes in a ligament after injury. Objective: To examine whether morphologic differences exist in the thickness of the ATFL in healthy, coper, and unstable-ankle groups. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 80 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate athletes (43 women, 37 men, age = 18.2 ± 1.1 years, height = 175.8 ± 11.1 cm, body mass = 75.0 ± 16.9 kg) participated in this study. They were categorized into the healthy, coper, or unstable group by history of ankle sprains and score on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Main Outcome Measure(s): A musculoskeletal sonographic image of the ATFL was obtained from each ankle. Thickness of the ATFL was measured at the midpoint of the ligament between the attachments on the lateral malleolus and talus. Results: A group-by-limb interaction was evident (P = .038). The ATFLs of the injured limb for the coper group (2.20 ± 0.47 mm) and the injured limb for the unstable group (2.28 ± 0.53 mm) were thicker than the ATFL of the “injured” limb of the healthy group (1.95 ± 0.29 mm) at P = .015 and P = .015, respectively. No differences were seen in the uninjured limbs among groups. Conclusions: Because ATFL thicknesses of the healthy group's uninjured ankles were similar, we contend that lasting morphologic changes occurred in those with a previous injury to the ankle. Similar differences were seen between the injured limbs of the coper and unstable groups, so there must be another explanation for the sensations of instability and the reinjuries in the unstable group. PMID:25384002

  4. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE treatment after injuries of the ankle ligaments): what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain? : a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to prove the benefit of external support devices in these types of treatment. The hypothesis of our study is that external ankle support devices will not result in better outcome in the treatment of acute ankle sprains, compared to a purely functional treatment strategy. Overall objective is to compare the results of three different strategies of functional treatment for acute ankle sprain, especially to determine the advantages of external support devices in addition to functional treatment strategy, based on balance and coordination exercises. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled multi-centre trial with one-year follow-up. Adult and healthy patients (N = 180) with acute, single sided and first inversion trauma of the lateral ankle ligaments will be included. They will all follow the same schedule of balancing exercises and will be divided into 3 treatment groups, 1. pressure bandage and tape, 2. pressure bandage and brace and 3. no external support. Primary outcome measure is the Karlsson scoring scale; secondary outcomes are FAOS (subscales), number of recurrent ankle injuries, Visual Analogue Scales of pain and satisfaction and adverse events. They will be measured after one week, 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. Discussion The ANKLE TRIAL is a randomized controlled trial in which a purely functional treated control group, without any external support is investigated. Results of this study could lead to other opinions about usefulness of external support devices in the treatment of acute ankle sprain. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2151 PMID:22340371

  5. Expecting ankle tilts and wearing an ankle brace influence joint control in an imitated ankle sprain mechanism during walking.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Dominic; Wissler, Sabrina; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the functional aspects of ankle joint control is essential to developing effective injury prevention. It is of special interest to understand how neuromuscular control mechanisms and mechanical constraints stabilize the ankle joint. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine how expecting ankle tilts and the application of an ankle brace influence ankle joint control when imitating the ankle sprain mechanism during walking. Ankle kinematics and muscle activity were assessed in 17 healthy men. During gait rapid perturbations were applied using a trapdoor (tilting with 24° inversion and 15° plantarflexion). The subjects either knew that a perturbation would definitely occur (expected tilts) or there was only the possibility that a perturbation would occur (potential tilts). Both conditions were conducted with and without a semi-rigid ankle brace. Expecting perturbations led to an increased ankle eversion at foot contact, which was mediated by an altered muscle preactivation pattern. Moreover, the maximal inversion angle (-7%) and velocity (-4%), as well as the reactive muscle response were significantly reduced when the perturbation was expected. While wearing an ankle brace did not influence muscle preactivation nor the ankle kinematics before ground contact, it significantly reduced the maximal ankle inversion angle (-14%) and velocity (-11%) as well as reactive neuromuscular responses. The present findings reveal that expecting ankle inversion modifies neuromuscular joint control prior to landing. Although such motor control strategies are weaker in their magnitude compared with braces, they seem to assist ankle joint stabilization in a close-to-injury situation. PMID:24365326

  6. Syndesmotic Ankle Sprains in Football: A Survey of National Football League Athletic Trainers

    PubMed Central

    Doughtie, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To obtain information regarding syndesmotic ankle sprains and to identify a specific treatment modality that reduces the recovery time for syndesmotic ankle sprains. Design and Setting: A mailed survey conducted from the Sports Medicine Department of Tufts University. Subjects: I sent a survey to the head athletic trainers of all 30 National Football League teams. Of the surveys mailed, 23 (77%) were returned. Measurements: The survey consisted of 8 questions pertaining to syndesmotic ankle sprains with respect to mechanism of injury, playing surface, diagnostic tests, immediate and follow-up treatment modalities, best treatment, recovery time, and taping procedure. Results: A variety of causes were noted as being responsible for syndesmotic ankle sprains; the most frequently described mechanism of injury involved a rotational component. Playing surface was not thought to be a factor in the incidence of syndesmotic ankle sprains. Most athletic trainers (96%) indicated that plain radiographs were part of the diagnostic process, while 52% noted that magnetic resonance imaging was also ordered for suspected syndesmotic ankle sprains. The most frequently used modalities during the acute stage were ice, electrical muscle stimulation, casting or bracing (or both), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Proprioception training, ultrasound, and taping were the most commonly used modalities during follow-up treatment. Immobilization, cortico-steroid injection, and ice and exercise were reported to be the best treatments for reducing recovery time of syndesmotic ankle sprains. Conclusions: To date, no treatment plan or modality for syndesmotic ankle sprains has been shown to effectively provide an early and safe return to football. Therefore, the need is clear for prospective studies comparing treatment protocols and severity of injury. PMID:16558541

  7. What Is the Evidence for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation Therapy in the Treatment of Ankle Sprains in Adults?

    PubMed Central

    van den Bekerom, Michel P.J; Struijs, Peter A.A; Blankevoort, Leendert; Welling, Lieke; van Dijk, C. Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.M.J

    2012-01-01

    Context: Ankle sprains are common problems in acute medical care. The variation in treatment observed for the acutely injured lateral ankle ligament complex in the first week after the injury suggests a lack of evidence-based management strategies for this problem. Objective: To analyze the effectiveness of applying rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) therapy begun within 72 hours after trauma for patients in the initial period after ankle sprain. Study Selection: Eligible studies were published original randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials concerning at least 1 of the 4 subtreatments of RICE therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains in adults. Data Sources: MEDLINE, Cochrane Clinical Trial Register, CINAHL, and EMBASE. The lists of references of retrieved publications also were checked manually. Data Extraction: We extracted relevant data on treatment outcome (pain, swelling, ankle mobility or range of motion, return to sports, return to work, complications, and patient satisfaction) and assessed the quality of included studies. If feasible, the results of comparable studies were pooled using fixed- or random-effects models. Data Synthesis: After deduction of the overlaps among the different databases, evaluation of the abstracts, and contact with some authors, 24 potentially eligible trials remained. The full texts of these articles were retrieved and thoroughly assessed as described. This resulted in the inclusion of 11 trials involving 868 patients. The main reason for exclusion was that the authors did not describe a well-defined control group without the intervention of interest. Conclusions: Insufficient evidence is available from randomized controlled trials to determine the relative effectiveness of RICE therapy for acute ankle sprains in adults. Treatment decisions must be made on an individual basis, carefully weighing the relative benefits and risks of each option, and must be based on expert opinions and national guidelines

  8. Structural abnormalities and persistent complaints after an ankle sprain are not associated: an observational case control study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    van Ochten, John M; Mos, Marinka CE; van Putte-Katier, Nienke; Oei, Edwin HG; Bindels, Patrick JE; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita MA; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2014-01-01

    Background Persistent complaints are very common after a lateral ankle sprain. Aim To investigate possible associations between structural abnormalities on radiography and MRI, and persistent complaints after a lateral ankle sprain. Design and setting Observational case control study on primary care patients in general practice. Method Patients were selected who had visited their GP with an ankle sprain 6–12 months before the study; all received a standardised questionnaire, underwent a physical examination, and radiography and MRI of the ankle. Patients with and without persistent complaints were compared regarding structural abnormalities found on radiography and MRI; analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index. Results Of the 206 included patients, 98 had persistent complaints and 108 did not. No significant differences were found in structural abnormalities between patients with and without persistent complaints. In both groups, however, many structural abnormalities were found on radiography in the talocrural joint (47.2% osteophytes and 45.1% osteoarthritis) and the talonavicular joint (36.5% sclerosis). On MRI, a high prevalence was found of bone oedema (33.8%) and osteophytes (39.5) in the talocrural joint; osteophytes (54.4%), sclerosis (47.2%), and osteoarthritis (55.4%, Kellgren and Lawrence grade >1) in the talonavicular joint, as well as ligament damage (16.4%) in the anterior talofibular ligament. Conclusion The prevalence of structural abnormalities is high on radiography and MRI in patients presenting in general practice with a previous ankle sprain. There is no difference in structural abnormalities, however, between patients with and without persistent complaints. Using imaging only will not lead to diagnosis of the explicit reason for the persistent complaint. PMID:25179068

  9. The prevention of ankle sprains in sports. A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Thacker, S B; Stroup, D F; Branche, C M; Gilchrist, J; Goodman, R A; Weitman, E A

    1999-01-01

    To assess the published evidence on the effectiveness of various approaches to the prevention of ankle sprains in athletes, we used textbooks, journals, and experts in the field of sports medicine to identify citations. We identified 113 studies reporting the risk of ankle sprains in sports, methods to provide support, the effect of these interventions on performance, and comparison of prevention efforts. The most common risk factor for ankle sprain in sports is history of a previous sprain. Ten citations of studies involving athletes in basketball, football, soccer, or volleyball compared alternative methods of prevention. Methods tested included wrapping the ankle with tape or cloth, orthoses, high-top shoes, or some combination of these methods. Most studies indicate that appropriately applied braces, tape, or orthoses do not adversely affect performance. Based on our review, we recommend that athletes with a sprained ankle complete supervised rehabilitation before returning to practice or competition, and those athletes suffering a moderate or severe sprain should wear an appropriate orthosis for at least 6 months. Both coaches and players must assume responsibility for prevention of injuries in sports. Methodologic limitations of published studies suggested several areas for future research. PMID:10569362

  10. Ankle manual therapy for individuals with post-acute ankle sprains: description of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains are common within the general population and can result in prolonged disablement. Limited talocrural dorsiflexion range of motion (DF ROM) is a common consequence of ankle sprain. Limited talocrural DF ROM may contribute to persistent symptoms, disability, and an elevated risk for re-injury. As a result, many health care practitioners use hands-on passive procedures with the intention of improving talocrural joint DF ROM in individuals following ankle sprains. Dosage of passive hands-on procedures involves a continuum of treatment speeds. Recent evidence suggests both slow- and fast-speed treatments may be effective to address disablement following ankle sprains. However, these interventions have yet to be longitudinally compared against a placebo study condition. Methods/Design We developed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to test the hypotheses that hands-on treatment procedures administered to individuals following ankle sprains during the post-acute injury period can improve short-, intermediate-, and long-term disablement, as well as reduce the risk for re-injury. Discussion This study is designed to measure the clinical effects of hands-on passive stretching treatment procedures directed to the talocrural joint that vary in treatment speed during the post-acute injury period, compared to hands-on placebo control intervention. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00888498. PMID:20958995

  11. The 2BFit study: is an unsupervised proprioceptive balance board training programme, given in addition to usual care, effective in preventing ankle sprain recurrences? Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hupperets, Maarten DW; Verhagen, Evert ALM; van Mechelen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence that athletes have a twofold risk for re-injury after a previous ankle sprain, especially during the first year post-injury. These ankle sprain recurrences could result in disability and lead to chronic pain or instability in 20 to 50% of these cases. When looking at the high rate of ankle sprain recurrences and the associated chronic results, ankle sprain recurrence prevention is important. Objective To evaluate the effect of a proprioceptive balance board training programme on ankle sprain recurrences, that was applied to individual athletes after rehabilitation and treatment by usual care. Methods/Design This study was designed as a randomized controlled trial with a follow-up of one year. Healthy individuals between 12 and 70 years of age, who were actively participating in sports and who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain up to two months prior to inclusion, were eligible for inclusion in the study. The intervention programme was compared to usual care. The intervention programme consisted of an eight-week proprioceptive training, which started after finishing usual care and from the moment that sports participation was again possible. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and every month for 12 months. The primary outcome of this study was the incidence of recurrent ankle injuries in both groups within one year after the initial sprain. Secondary outcomes were severity and etiology of re-injury and medical care. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated from a societal perspective. A process evaluation was conducted for the intervention programme. Discussion The 2BFit trial is the first randomized controlled trial to study the effect of a non-supervised home-based proprioceptive balance board training programme in addition to usual care, on the recurrence of ankle sprains in sports. Results of this study could possibly lead to changes in practical guidelines on the treatment of ankle sprains. Results will become available in 2009

  12. Myoelectric stimulation on peroneal muscles with electrodes of the muscle belly size attached to the upper shank gives the best effect in resisting simulated ankle sprain motion.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Wang, Dan; Chu, Vikki Wing-Shan; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2013-04-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports related injury that may be caused by incorrect positioning of the foot prior to and at initial contact during landing from a jump or gait. Furthermore a delayed reaction of the peroneal muscle may also contribute to the injury mechanism. A recent study demonstrated that myoelectric stimulation of the peroneal muscles within 15 ms of a simulated inversion event would significantly resist an ankle spraining motion. This study further investigated its effect with three different electrode sizes and three different lateral shank attachment positions. Twelve male subjects with healthy ankles performed simulated ankle supination spraining motion on a pair of mechanical sprain simulators. A pair of electrodes of one of the three sizes (large, medium, small) was attached to one of the three positions (upper 1/4, middle, lower 1/4) along the lateral shank to deliver an electrical signal of 130 V for 0.5s when the sprain simulator started. Ankle kinematics data were collected by a tri-axial gyroscope motion sensor and the peak inward heel tilting velocity was obtained to represent the effect in resisting the simulated ankle spraining motion. Repeated measures one-way analysis of variance was performed and showed a significant drop from 273.3 (control, no stimulation) to 215.8 deg/s (21%) when small electrodes were attached to the upper 1/4 position. Decrease was found in all other conditions but the drops (11-18%) were not statistically significant. The small electrodes used in this study fitted the width of the peroneal muscle belly at the upper 1/4 position, so the electrical current may have well flowed to the motor points of the muscles to initiate quick contraction. PMID:23453396

  13. Time to Return to Play After High Ankle Sprains in Collegiate Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bruce S.; Downie, Brian K.; Johnson, Philip D.; Schmidt, Paul W.; Nordwall, Stephen J.; Kijek, Theresa G.; Jacobson, Jon A.; Carpenter, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Determining the severity of high ankle sprains in athletes and predicting the time that an athlete can return to unrestricted sport activities following this injury remain significant challenges. Purpose: The objectives of this study were (1) to determine if objective measurements of injury severity after high ankle sprains could predict the time to return to play in Division I football players and (2) to determine whether physical examination or diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound was more predictive of return to play. The hypothesis was that objective measures of injury severity of a high ankle sprain can be predictive of time to return to athletic participation in collegiate football players. Study Design: Prospective case series. Methods: Twenty consecutive Division I collegiate football players with a diagnosis of a grade I high ankle sprain (syndesmosis sprain without diastasis) were studied. Two clinical measurements of injury severity were determined: the height of the zone of injury on physical examination and the height of the zone of injury as defined by diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound examination. All athletes followed a standardized treatment program and return-to-play criteria. A regression model and Cox proportional hazards model were developed to determine time to return to unrestricted play as a function of injury severity and player position. Results: Physical examination but not ultrasound was significantly correlated with time to return to play. Regression and Cox analyses revealed that injury severity on physical examination and player position were significant predictors of time to return to unrestricted play following high ankle sprain. Conclusions: Injury severity on physical examination and player position are associated with the time to return to unrestricted athletic activity after injury. A model based on the data can be applied to help predict the time to return to unrestricted play in Division I collegiate football

  14. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Conservative Management and Prevention of Ankle Sprains in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Thomas W.; Hertel, Jay; Amendola, Ned; Docherty, Carrie L.; Dolan, Michael G.; Hopkins, J. Ty; Nussbaum, Eric; Poppy, Wendy; Richie, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals in the conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes. Background: Because ankle sprains are a common and often disabling injury in athletes, athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals must be able to implement the most current and evidence-supported treatment strategies to ensure safe and rapid return to play. Equally important is initiating preventive measures to mitigate both first-time sprains and the chance of reinjury. Therefore, considerations for appropriate preventive measures (including taping and bracing), initial assessment, both short- and long-term management strategies, return-to-play guidelines, and recommendations for syndesmotic ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability are presented. Recommendations: The recommendations included in this position statement are intended to provide athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals with guidelines and criteria to deliver the best health care possible for the prevention and management of ankle sprains. An endorsement as to best practice is made whenever evidence supporting the recommendation is available. PMID:23855363

  15. Editorial Commentary: Does Early Arthroscopy of Subtle Instability in High Ankle Sprains Hasten Return to Play in Elite Athletes?

    PubMed

    Feldman, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    Anterior inferior tibial fibular ligament tenderness to palpation, a positive squeeze test, and a positive external rotation test correlate well with syndesmosis instability after high ankle sprain. However, it is still unknown whether subtle unstable high ankle sprains (grade IIB) could heal satisfactorily with nonoperative treatment and whether their recovery would be prolonged compared with operative treatment. PMID:27039685

  16. A wearable device for monitoring and prevention of repetitive ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Attia, Mohammed; Taher, Mona F

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the design and implementation of a wearable wireless device, connected to a smart phone, which monitors and prevents repetitive ankle sprain due to chronic ankle instability (CAI). The device prevents this common foot injury by electrical stimulation of the peroneal muscles using surface electrodes which causes dorsiflexion of the foot. This is done after measuring ankle kinematics using inertial motion sensors and predicting ankle sprain. The prototype implemented here has a fast response time of 7 msec which enables prevention of ankle sprain before ligament damage occurs. Wireless communication between the components of the device, in addition to their small size, low cost and low power consumption, makes it unobtrusive, easy to wear and not hinder normal activities. The device connects via Bluetooth to an android smart phone application for continuous data logging and reporting to keep track of the incidences of possible ankle sprain and correction. This is a significant feature of this device since it enables monitoring of patients with CAI and quantifying progression of the condition or improvement in the case of treatment. PMID:26737335

  17. Use of infrared thermography for the diagnosis and grading of sprained ankle injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, João; Vardasca, Ricardo; Pimenta, Madalena; Gabriel, Joaquim; Torres, João

    2016-05-01

    Ankle joint sprains are a common medical condition estimated to be responsible for 15-25% of all musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. The pathophysiology of the lesion can represent considerable time lost to injury, as well as long-term disability in up to 60% of patients. A percentage between 10% and 20% may complicate with chronic instability of the ankle joint and disability in walking, contributing to morbidity and poor life quality. Ankle sprains can be classified as grade I, II, or III, based on the extent of damage and number of ligaments affected. The diagnostic grading is important for setting further treatment and rehabilitation, since more severe injuries carries risk of recurrence, added morbidity and decrease in life quality. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adequacy of infrared thermography as a potential complimentary diagnostic tool of the distinct lesions grades. Evaluation of different thermographic values of the ankle region (in both affected and non-affected foot) was conducted for this purpose. The principal results to be highlighted are that some of the regions, namely anterior view for non defined time after injury analysis, and anterior, frontal, posterior and anterior talofibular ligament regions and proximal calcaneofibular ligament regions in acute lesions (herein defined as less than 6 h post-traumatic event) presented consistent profiles of variation. The analyses were performed considering affected and non-affected ankles results on plotted graphics representing termographic evaluation and grading of these lesions performed using ultrasound by experimented medical radiologists. An increase in temperature values was observed when progressing from mild to severe ankle sprain injuries, with these regions presenting lower values for the affected ankle when compared to the non-affected ankle in all the analysis performed. The remaining analysed regions did not present the same variations. Statistical analysis using Kruskal

  18. Single-leg drop landing motor control strategies following acute ankle sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2015-08-01

    No research currently exists investigating the effect of acute injury on single-limb landing strategies. The aim of the current study was to analyze the coordination strategies of participants in the acute phase of lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury. Thirty-seven participants with acute, first-time LAS and 19 uninjured participants completed a single-leg drop landing task on both limbs. Three-dimensional kinematic (angular displacement) and sagittal plane kinetic (moment-of-force) data were acquired for the joints of the lower extremity from 200 ms pre-initial contact (IC) to 200 ms post-IC. The peak magnitude of the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRF) was also computed. Injured participants displayed a bilateral increase in hip flexion, with altered transverse plane kinematic profiles at the knee and ankle for both limbs (P < 0.05). This coincided with a reduction in the net-supporting flexor moment of the lower extremity (P < 0.05) and magnitude of the peak vertical GRF for the injured limb (21.82 ± 2.44 N/kg vs 24.09 ± 2.77 N/kg; P = 0.013) in injured participants compared to control participants. These results demonstrate that compensatory movement strategies are utilized by participants with acute LAS to successfully reduce the impact forces of landing. PMID:24975875

  19. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  20. Lateral ankle ligament anesthesia significantly alters single limb postural control.

    PubMed

    McKeon, P O; Booi, M J; Branam, B; Johnson, D L; Mattacola, C G

    2010-07-01

    Lateral ankle anesthesia has been used as a model to explore effects of ligament deafferentation related to ankle sprain on single limb postural control with conflicting results. Time-to-boundary (TTB) is a postural control measurement technique found to be sensitive in detecting subtle deficits in postural control in those with chronic ankle instability. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of lateral ankle ligament anesthesia on TTB measures of single limb postural control in healthy adults. Twenty-two healthy adults with no history of lower extremity injury within the past 6 months or balance disorders participated in the study. All subjects received a lidocaine injection to the lateral ankle structures on one of two testing days. On both testing days, subjects performed 3 eyes open and 3 eyes closed, 10-s trials of barefoot single limb stance on a forceplate. The dependent variables were the mean of TTB minima(s) and standard deviation of TTB minima(s) in mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) directions. Separate condition (anesthesia, control) by vision (eyes open, eyes closed) ANOVAs with repeated measures were used for each TTB variable to determine the effects of anesthesia on postural control. Alpha level was set a priori at p≤0.05. The anesthesia day TTBAP magnitude (p=0.008) and variability (p=0.044) measures were significantly lower than the control day, regardless of vision. Anesthesia of the lateral ankle ligamentous structures significantly reduced the magnitude and variability of TTBAP measures. These findings are similar to deficits found in those with chronic ankle instability. PMID:20663671

  1. Rehabilitation of the Ankle After Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To outline rehabilitation concepts that are applicable to acute and chronic injury of the ankle, to provide evidence for current techniques used in the rehabilitation of the ankle, and to describe a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into consideration empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. Background: Important considerations in the rehabilitation of ankle injuries include controlling the acute inflammatory process, regaining full ankle range of motion, increasing muscle strength and power, and improving proprioceptive abilities. These goals can be achieved through various modalities, flexibility exercises, and progressive strength- and balance-training exercises. In this article, we discuss the deleterious effects of ankle injury on ankle-joint proprioception and muscular strength and how these variables can be quantifiably measured to follow progress through a rehabilitation program. Evidence to support the effectiveness of applying orthotics and ankle braces during the acute and subacute phases of ankle rehabilitation is provided, along with recommendations for functional rehabilitation of ankle injuries, including a structured progression of exercises. Recommendations: Early functional rehabilitation of the ankle should include range-of-motion exercises and isometric and isotonic strength-training exercises. In the intermediate stage of rehabilitation, a progression of proprioception-training exercises should be incorporated. Advanced rehabilitation should focus on sport-specific activities to prepare the athlete for return to competition. Although it is important to individualize each rehabilitation program, this well-structured template for ankle rehabilitation can be adapted as needed. PMID:12937563

  2. Management and prevention of acute and chronic lateral ankle instability in athletic patient populations

    PubMed Central

    McCriskin, Brendan J; Cameron, Kenneth L; Orr, Justin D; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic lateral ankle instability are common in high-demand patient populations. If not managed appropriately, patients may experience recurrent instability, chronic pain, osteochondral lesions of the talus, premature osteoarthritis, and other significant long-term disability. Certain populations, including young athletes, military personnel and those involved in frequent running, jumping, and cutting motions, are at increased risk. Proposed risk factors include prior ankle sprain, elevated body weight or body mass index, female gender, neuromuscular deficits, postural imbalance, foot/ankle malalignment, and exposure to at-risk athletic activity. Prompt, accurate diagnosis is crucial, and evidence-based, functional rehabilitation regimens have a proven track record in returning active patients to work and sport. When patients fail to improve with physical therapy and external bracing, multiple surgical techniques have been described with reliable results, including both anatomic and non-anatomic reconstructive methods. Anatomic repair of the lateral ligamentous complex remains the gold standard for recurrent ankle instability, and it effectively restores native ankle anatomy and joint kinematics while preserving physiologic ankle and subtalar motion. Further preventative measures may minimize the risk of ankle instability in athletic cohorts, including prophylactic bracing and combined neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programs. These interventions have demonstrated benefit in patients at heightened risk for lateral ankle sprain and allow active cohorts to return to full activity without adversely affecting athletic performance. PMID:25793157

  3. Prospective epidemiological study of basketball injuries during one competitive season: ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to assess the overall incidence of acute and overuse basketball injuries and identifies risk factors associated with ankle sprains and knee overuse injuries. In total, 164 senior players (23.7 years ± 7.0) of all levels of play, and including both men and women, participated voluntarily during one season. A total of 139 acute and 87 overuse injuries were reported, resulting in an overall injury incidence of 9.8 (8.5 to 11.1) per 1,000 hours. The incidence of acute injuries was 6.0/1,000 hours. Ankle sprains (n = 34) accounted for most acute injuries, and 52.9% of all players with ankle sprains reported a previous ankle sprain. Relative Risks (RR) and Odds Ratio (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated to determine significant differences. Landing on an opponent's foot was the major inciting event, significantly more so than non contact mechanisms (RR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2]). Acute knee injuries resulted in the highest playing absence (7 weeks 2 days ± 9 weeks 1 day). Overuse injury incidence was 3.8/1,000 hours. The knee (1.5/1,000 hours) was the most common site. Forward players sustained less knee overuse injuries than players of all other playing positions, and significantly less than center players (OR=0.5 [95% CI: 0.2-0.9]). This study showed that ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries are the most common injuries in basketball, both accounting for 14.8%. Injury prevention programmes however should not concentrate on those injuries only, but might one to consider that acute knee injuries, in spite of the fact that they occur less frequently, also merit further research. Key pointsAnkle sprains are the most common acute injuries in basketball with the inciting event being landing on an opponent's foot or changing direction.Anterior knee pain is the most common overuse injury. Etiologic factors are well described in literature, but prevention strategies are lacking.Acute knee injuries account for the

  4. Congenital Pseudoarthrosis of Medial Malleolus in A Young Soccer Player - Diagnosis in Clinical setting of Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Cerulli, Giuliano; Fabiano, Fantasia; Gabriele, Potalivo; Giacomo, Placella; Enrico, Sebastiani

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We report a case of a young female soccer player affected by congenital medial bilateral malleolus pseudoarthrosis and os subfibulare. Congenital pseudoarthrosis is the failure of the bones to fuse prior or at birth. The etiology is still unknown, although frequency is high in subjects affected by neurofibromatosis or correlated syndromes, so it has been suggested that these congenital disorders may be the cause of congenital pseudoarthrosis. Case Report: Our patient, a 16-year-old female, high level soccer player, was referred to us following a right ankle sprain during a match. She reported no medical history of tibia-tarsus joint injuries or disease. Pain, swelling and functional impairment were noted immediately after the accident. Standard radiographs in the emergency department revealed a displaced fracture of the medial malleolus and the presence of os subfibularis. The patient was transferred to our Traumatology and Orthopaedic Department to undergo malleolus ostheosynthesis. Before surgery swelling, functional impairment and intense pain at the medial malleolus level were confirmed. However, there was no radiological opening of ankle, instability or pronation pain; furthermore the flexion-extension was preserved with slight pain. Twenty-four hours later a considerable remission of symptoms was evident with increased range of motion and reduction in the swelling and post-traumatic edema. A radiograph on the left ankle to compare with that of the right ankle was necessary to overcome the discrepancy between the radiological diagnosis and the clinical examination. The radiographic results of both medial malleoli were comparable although on the left the os subfibularis was absent. Since the diagnosis of fracture by the association between the radiographs and the symptomatology was doubtful, a bilateral CT was performed. The scan revealed a medial bilateral malleolus pseudoarthrosis and an accessory right subfibularis nucleus. The patient was

  5. Rehabilitation of the Ankle after Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines rehabilitation concepts applicable to acute and chronic ankle injury, providing evidence for current techniques used in ankle rehabilitation and describing a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into account empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. The article notes that…

  6. How to Strengthen Your Ankle After a Sprain

    MedlinePlus

    ... back to the starting position. Repeat 10 times. Tie the resistance bands around a fixed object and ... starting position and cycle your ankle 10 times. Tie the bands around an object to the outer ...

  7. IINCIDENCE OF ANKLE SPRAINS IN SOCCER PLAYERS WITH JOINT HYPERMOBILITY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; Bertolini, Fabricio Melo; Vieira, Tallys Campos; Aguiar, Rodrigo Manso; Pinheiro, Guilherme Baldez; Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Eighty-three soccer players aged between 14 and 19 years, in the basic category of a professional soccer club in the city of Belo Horizonte, were followed up during the 2009 season. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was conducted, in which these soccer players were divided randomly into two groups. The first consisted of individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), totaling 22 players, and the second was a control group with 61 players without this syndrome, determined through a physical examinati. Results: Both groups were studied with regard to incidence of ankle sprains. At the end of this period, the data were compiled and statistical analysis was performed. A total of 43 cases of ankle injury due to sprains were recorded, of which nine episodes were in players with JHS, thus making p = 0.106. The significance level was 5%. Conclusion: We were able to conclude that in our study there was insufficient evidence to assert that there is an association with increased incidence of ankle sprains among patients with JHS. PMID:27047888

  8. Eversion during external rotation of the human cadaver foot produces high ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Post, Joel M; Braman, Jerrod E; Meyer, Eric G; Powell, John W; Haut, Roger C

    2012-09-01

    While high ankle sprains are often clinically ascribed to excessive external foot rotation, no experimental study documents isolated anterior tibiofibular ligament (ATiFL) injury under this loading. We hypothesized that external rotation of a highly everted foot would generate ATiFL injury, in contrast to deltoid ligament injury from external rotation of a neutral foot. Twelve (six pairs) male cadaveric lower extremity limbs underwent external foot rotation until gross failure. All limbs were positioned in 20° of dorsiflexion and restrained with elastic athletic tape. Right limbs were in neutral while left limbs were everted 20°. Talus motion relative to the tibia was measured using motion capture. Rotation at failure for everted limbs (46.8 ± 6.1°) was significantly greater than for neutral limbs (37.7 ± 5.4°). Everted limbs showed ATiFL injury only, while neutral limbs mostly demonstrated deltoid ligament failure. This is the first biomechanical study to produce isolated ATiFL injury under external foot rotation. Eversion of the axially loaded foot predisposes the ATiFL to injury, forming a basis for high ankle sprain. The study helps clarify a mechanism of high ankle sprain and may heighten clinical awareness of isolated ATiFL injury in cases of foot eversion prior to external rotation. It may also provide guidance to investigate the effect of prophylactic measures for this injury. PMID:22328337

  9. EFFECT OF ATHLETIC TAPING AND KINESIOTAPING® ON MEASUREMENTS OF FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE IN BASKETBALL PLAYERS WITH CHRONIC INVERSION ANKLE SPRAINS

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Nihan; Baltaci, Gul

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic inversion ankle sprains are common in basketball players. The effect of taping on functional performance is disputed in the literature. Kinesiotaping® (KT®) is a new method that is being used as both a therapeutic and performance enhancement tool. To date, it appears that no study has investigated the effect of ankle KT® on functional performance. Purpose: To investigate the effects of different types of taping (KT® using Kinesio Tex®, athletic taping) on functional performance in athletes with chronic inversion sprains of the ankle. Study Design: Crossover Study Design Methods: Fifteen male basketball players with chronic inversion ankle sprains between the ages of 18 and 22 participated in this study. Functional performance tests (Hopping test by Amanda et al, Single Limb Hurdle Test, Standing Heel Rise test, Vertical Jump Test, The Star Excursion Balance Test [SEBT] and Kinesthetic Ability Trainer [KAT] Test) were used to quantify agility, endurance, balance, and coordination. These tests were conducted four times at one week intervals using varied conditions: placebo tape, without tape, standard athletic tape, and KT®. One-way ANOVA tests were used to examine difference in measurements between conditions. Bonferroni correction was applied to correct for repeated testing. Results: There were no significant differences among the results obtained using the four conditions for SEBT (anterior p=0.0699; anteromedial p=0.126; medial p=0.550; posteromedial p=0.587; posterior p=0.754; posterolateral p=0.907; lateral p=0.124; anterolateral p=0.963) and the KAT dynamic measurement (p=0.388). Faster performance times were measured with KT® and athletic tape in single limb hurdle test when compared to placebo and non-taped conditions (Athletic taping- placebo taping: p=0.03; athletic taping- non tape p=0.016;KT®- Placebo taping p=0.042; KT®-Non tape p=0.016). In standing heel rise test and vertical jump test, athletic taping led to decreased

  10. Estimation of ligament strains and joint moments in the ankle during a supination sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Kai-Ming; Haut, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the ankle ligament strains and ankle joint moments during an accidental injury event diagnosed as a grade I anterior talofibular ligament (ATaFL) sprain. A male athlete accidentally sprained his ankle while performing a cutting motion in a laboratory setting. The kinematic data were input to a three-dimensional rigid-body foot model for simulation analyses. Maximum strains in 20 ligaments were evaluated in simulations that investigated various combinations of the reported ankle joint motions. Temporal strains in the ATaFL and the calcaneofibular ligament (CaFL) were then compared and the three-dimensional ankle joint moments were evaluated from the model. The ATaFL and CaFL were highly strained when the inversion motion was simulated (10% for ATaFL and 12% for CaFL). These ligament strains were increased significantly when either or both plantarflexion and internal rotation motions were added in a temporal fashion (up to 20% for ATaFL and 16% for CaFL). Interestingly, at the time strain peaked in the ATaFL, the plantarflexion angle was not large but apparently important. This computational simulation study suggested that an inversion moment of approximately 23 N m plus an internal rotation moment of approximately 11 N m and a small plantarflexion moment may have generated a strain of 15-20% in the ATaFL to produce a grade I ligament injury in the athlete's ankle. This injury simulation study exhibited the potentially important roles of plantarflexion and internal rotation, when combined with a large inversion motion, to produce a grade I ATaFL injury in the ankle of this athlete. PMID:23654290

  11. Ankle sprain and postural sway in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Wykman, A; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    The present study compares postural ankle stability between previously injured basketball players, uninjured players and a control/group. Postural sway was recorded and analysed by stabilometry using a specially designed computer-assisted forceplate. Recordings were obtained for 60 s on each foot. The stabilometric results in the players with no previous injuries did not differ from those in the controls. Players with a previously injured ankle differed significantly from the control group. These players had a larger mean postural sway and used a larger sway area. PMID:8536030

  12. Medial compressible forefoot sole elements reduce ankle inversion in lateral SSC jumps.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Jana; Mornieux, Guillaume; Gehring, Dominic; Gollhofer, Albert

    2013-06-01

    Sideward movements are associated with high incidences of lateral ankle sprains. Special shoe constructions might be able to reduce these injuries during lateral movements. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether medial compressible forefoot sole elements can reduce ankle inversion in a reactive lateral movement, and to evaluate those elements' influence on neuromuscular and mechanical adjustments in lower extremities. Foot placement and frontal plane ankle joint kinematics and kinetics were analyzed by 3-dimensional motion analysis. Electromyographic data of triceps surae, peroneus longus, and tibialis anterior were collected. This modified shoe reduced ankle inversion in comparison with a shoe with a standard sole construction. No differences in ankle inversion moments were found. With the modified shoe, foot placement occurred more internally rotated, and muscle activity of the lateral shank muscles was reduced. Hence, lateral ankle joint stability during reactive sideward movements can be improved by these compressible elements, and therefore lower lateral shank muscle activity is required. As those elements limit inversion, the strategy to control inversion angles via a high external foot rotation does not need to be used. PMID:22923308

  13. Treatment of acute lateral ankle ligament rupture in the athlete. Conservative versus surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S A; Renström, P A

    1999-01-01

    Acute lateral ankle ligament sprains are common in young athletes (15 to 35 years of age). Diagnostic and treatment protocols vary. Therapies range from cast immobilisation or acute surgical repair to functional rehabilitation. The lateral ligament complex includes 3 capsular ligaments: the anterior tibiofibular (ATFL), calcaneofibular (CFL) and posterior talofibular (PTFL) ligaments. Injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion; the ATFL is most commonly torn. The CFL and the PTFL can also be injured and, after severe inversion, subtalar joint ligaments are also affected. Commonly, an athlete with a lateral ankle ligament sprain reports having 'rolled over' the outside of their ankle. The entire ankle and foot must be examined to ensure there are no other injuries. Clinical stability tests for ligamentous disruption include the anterior drawer test of ATFL function and inversion tilt test of both ATFL and CFL function. Radiographs may rule out treatable fractures in severe injuries or when pain or tenderness are not associated with lateral ligaments. Stress radiographs do not affect treatment. Ankle sprains are classified from grades I to III (mild, moderate or severe). Grade I and II injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. A non-operative 'functional treatment' programme includes immediate use of RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation), a short period of immobilisation and protection with a tape or bandage, and early range of motion, weight-bearing and neuromuscular training exercises. Proprioceptive training on a tilt board after 3 to 4 weeks helps improve balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Treatment for grade III injuries is more controversial. A comprehensive literature evaluation and meta-analysis showed that early functional treatment provided the fastest recovery of ankle mobility and earliest return to work and physical activity without affecting late mechanical stability. Functional treatment was complication

  14. Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and improving ankle mobility after acute ankle sprain: A multicentre, randomised, blinded, controlled and non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    González de Vega, C; Speed, C; Wolfarth, B; González, J

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute ankle sprains are common and activity limiting injuries, and topical diclofenac gel has proven efficacy in alleviating pain and restoring function. This trial aimed to compare a topical natural agent, Traumeel with topical diclofenac gel (1%) in the management of acute ankle sprain. Methods This prospective, multicentre, randomised, blinded, active-control and non-inferiority study involved 449 physically active adults sustaining unilateral grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain within the past 24 h. Participants were randomised to receive 2 g of Traumeel ointment (T-O) (n = 152) or Traumeel gel (T-G) (n = 150) or diclofenac gel (D-G) (n = 147), administered topically to the ankle three times a day for 14 days, with 6-weeks follow up. Results Day 7 median percentage reductions in Visual Analogue Scale pain score were 60.6%, 71.1% and 68.9% for the T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Total pain relief was reported by 12 (8.5%), 7 (5.0%) and 8 (5.9%) participants in each group, respectively. Median improvements in Foot and Ankle Ability Measure Activities of Daily Living subscale score were 26.2, 26.2 and 25.0 points for T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Mann–Whitney effect sizes and lower bound confidence intervals demonstrated non-inferiority of Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and functional improvement. At 6 weeks, participants reported total pain relief and normal functioning. Adverse events (n = 43) were reported by 31/447 participants (6.9%). Treatments were equally well tolerated. Conclusions T-O and T-G decreased pain and improved joint function to the same extent as D-G in acute ankle sprain, and were well tolerated. PMID:23889885

  15. Volume Decreases After Elevation and Intermittent Compression of Postacute Ankle Sprains Are Negated by Gravity-Dependent Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Jay; Denegar, Craig R.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Elevation and intermittent compression are routinely prescribed after soft tissue injury. Individuals must, however, resume activity in an upright position. The effect of gravity-dependent positioning after elevation and intermittent compression has not been extensively examined. Our purpose was to examine the effects of gravity-dependent positioning after elevation and intermittent compression on the volume of injured ankles. Design and Setting: Ankle-injured subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups: elevation or elevation and intermittent compression. Each treatment lasted 30 minutes. Subjects: Twelve college students with inversion ankle sprains 2 to 4 days earlier participated. Measurements: Measurements of ankle volume were performed before treatment and at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after treatment. Results: Regardless of treatment, ankle volume decreased (by 17.25 ± 4.05 mL) between the pretreatment measurement and the immediate posttreatment measurement (P < .05). The effects of both treatments, however, lasted less than 5 minutes after the limb was returned to a gravity-dependent position. Conclusions: These results suggest that elevation or elevation and intermittent compression do not effectively decrease ankle volume for a prolonged period of time in patients with postacute ankle sprains. PMID:14737214

  16. Electroacupuncture-induced analgesia in a rat model of ankle sprain pain is mediated by spinal alpha-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sung Tae; Lim, Kyu Sang; Chung, Kyungsoon; Ju, Hyunsu; Chung, Jin Mo

    2008-03-01

    In a previous study, we showed that electroacupuncture (EA) applied to the SI-6 point on the contralateral forelimb produces long-lasting and powerful analgesia in pain caused by ankle sprain in a rat model. To investigate the underlying mechanism of EA analgesia, the present study tested the effects of various antagonists on known endogenous analgesic systems in this model. Ankle sprain was induced in anesthetized rats by overextending their right ankle with repeated forceful plantar flexion and inversion of the foot. When rats developed pain behaviors (a reduction in weight-bearing of the affected hind limb), EA was applied to the SI-6 point on the contralateral forelimb for 30 min under halothane anesthesia. EA significantly improved the weight-bearing capacity of the affected hind limb for 2h, suggesting an analgesic effect. The alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (2mg/kg, i.p. or 30 microg, i.t.) completely blocked the EA-induced analgesia, whereas naloxone (1mg/kg, i.p.) failed to block the effect. These results suggest that EA-induced analgesia is mediated by alpha-adrenoceptor mechanisms. Further experiments showed that intrathecal administration of yohimbine, an alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist, reduced the EA-induced analgesia in a dose-dependent manner, whereas terazosin, an alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist, did not produce any effect. These data suggest that the analgesic effect of EA in ankle sprain pain is, at least in part, mediated by spinal alpha(2)-adrenoceptor mechanisms. PMID:17537577

  17. Treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability: a modified broström technique using three suture anchors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Ankle sprains are very common injuries seen in the athletic and young population. Majority of patients will improve with a course of rest and physical therapy. However, with conservative management about twenty percent of all patients will go on to develop chronic lateral ankle instability. This manuscript describes our detailed surgical technique of a modification to the original Broström procedure using three suture anchors to anatomically reconstruct the lateral ankle ligaments to treat high demand patients who have developed chronic lateral ankle instability. The rationale for this modification along with patient selection and workup are discussed. Both the functional outcomes at the two year follow up along with the complications and the detailed postoperative rehabilitation protocol for the high demand athletes are also presented. This modified Broström procedure is shown in both illustrative format and intra-operative photos. PMID:19954540

  18. An unusual cause of ankle pain: fracture of a talocalcaneal coalition as a differential diagnosis in an acute ankle sprain: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The acute ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries seen in trauma departments. Ankle sprains have an incidence of about one injury per 10 000 people a day. In contrast tarsal coalition is a rare condition occurring in not more than one percent of the population. Case presentation We present the case of a 23 year old male patient with pain and local swelling after an acute ankle sprain. Initial clinical and radiological examination showed no pathologies. Due to prolonged pain, swelling and the inability of the patient to weight bear one week after trauma further diagnostics was performed. Imaging studies (MRI and CT) revealed a fracture of a talocalcaneal coalition. To the knowledge of the authors no fracture of a coalition was reported so far. Conclusion This report highlights the presentation of symptomatic coalitions following trauma and furthermore, it points out the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of a rare entity after a common injury. A diagnostic algorithm has been developed to ensure not to miss a severe injury. PMID:23530869

  19. Imaging evaluation of traumatic ligamentous injuries of the ankle and foot.

    PubMed

    Nazarenko, Anna; Beltran, Luis S; Bencardino, Jenny T

    2013-05-01

    Sports ankle injuries are very common worldwide. In the United States, it is estimated that 2 million acute ankle sprains occur each year, averaging to $318 to $914 per sprain. Magnetic resonance imaging is excellent for depicting normal ankle anatomy and can elegantly demonstrate ligamentous injuries of the ankle and associated conditions after ankle sprain. This article encompasses epidemiology, biomechanics, normal anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the ankle and foot ligaments. The specific ligaments discussed include the syndesmotic ligaments, lateral ligament complex of the ankle, deltoid ligament, spring ligament, ligaments of the sinus tarsi, and the Lisfranc ligament. PMID:23622094

  20. Reliability and Validity Study of the Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale for People with Sprained Ankles, Walking with Forearm Crutches

    PubMed Central

    Ridao-Fernández, Carmen; Ojeda, Joaquín; Benítez-Lugo, Marisa; Sevillano, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to design and validate a functional assessment scale for assisted gait with forearm crutches (Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale—CHAGS) and to assess its reliability in people with sprained ankles. Design Thirty subjects who suffered from sprained ankle (anterior talofibular ligament first and second degree) were included in the study. A modified Delphi technique was used to obtain the content validity. The selected items were: pelvic and scapular girdle dissociation(1), deviation of Center of Gravity(2), crutch inclination(3), steps rhythm(4), symmetry of step length(5), cross support(6), simultaneous support of foot and crutch(7), forearm off(8), facing forward(9) and fluency(10). Two raters twice visualized the gait of the sample subjects which were recorded. The criterion-related validity was determined by correlation between CHAGS and Coding of eight criteria of qualitative gait analysis (Viel Coding). Internal consistency and inter and intra-rater reliability were also tested. Results CHAGS obtained a high and negative correlation with Viel Coding. We obtained a good internal consistency and the intra-class correlation coefficients oscillated between 0.97 and 0.99, while the minimal detectable changes were acceptable. Conclusion CHAGS scale is a valid and reliable tool for assessing assisted gait with crutches in people with sprained ankles to perform partial relief of lower limbs. PMID:27168236

  1. Peroneal tendon subluxation: the other lateral ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Roth, Jennifer A; Taylor, Walter C; Whalen, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Ankle injuries are a frequent cause of patient visits to the emergency department and orthopaedic and primary care offices. Although lateral ligament sprains are the most common pathologic conditions, peroneal tendon subluxations occur with a similar inversion mechanism. Multiple grades of subluxation have been described with a recent addition of intrasheath subluxation. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality to view the peroneal tendons at the retrofibular groove. Currently, point-of-care ultrasound is gaining clinical ground, especially for the dynamic viewing capability to capture an episodic subluxation. Although conservative treatment may be attempted for an acute injury, it has a low rate of success for the prevention of recurrent subluxation. Surgical procedures of various techniques have resulted in excellent recovery rates and faster return to play. The aim of this paper was to give a complete review of the current literature on peroneal tendon subluxation and to propose a clinical algorithm to help guide diagnosis and treatment. The goal of this study was to heighten clinical awareness to improve earlier detection and treatment of this sometimes elusive diagnosis. PMID:19945971

  2. High- versus low-top shoes for the prevention of ankle sprains in basketball players. A prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J R; Tanji, J L; Drake, C; Fuller, D; Kawasaki, R I; Fenton, R M

    1993-01-01

    Using a prospective, randomized experimental design, 622 college intramural basketball players were stratified by a previous history of ankle sprains to wear a new pair of either high-top, high-top with inflatable air chambers, or low-top basketball shoes during all games for a complete season. Subjects were asked to complete a history questionnaire and were given a complete ankle examination. They were allowed to wear these shoes only during basketball competition. Followed over the course of a 2-month intramural season, 15 ankle injuries occurred during 39,302 minutes of player-time: 7 in high-top shoes, 4 in low-top shoes, and 4 in high-top shoes with inflatable air chambers. The injury rates (injuries per player-minute) were 4.80 x 10(-4) in high-top shoes, 4.06 x 10(-4) in low-top shoes, and 2.69 x 10(-4) in high-top shoes with inflatable air chambers. There was no significant difference among these 3 groups, leading to the conclusion that there is no strong relationship between shoe type and ankle sprains. PMID:8368420

  3. Electroacupuncture-induced analgesia in a rat model of ankle sprain pain is mediated by spinal alpha-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Sung Tae; Lim, Kyu Sang; Chung, Kyungsoon; Ju, Hyunsu; Chung, Jin Mo

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that electroacupuncture (EA) applied to the SI-6 point on the contralateral forelimb produces long-lasting and powerful analgesia in pain caused by ankle sprain in a rat model. To investigate the underlying mechanism of EA analgesia, the present study tested the effects of various antagonists to known endogenous analgesic systems in this model. Ankle sprain was induced in anesthetized rats by overextending their right ankle with repeated forceful plantar flexion and inversion of the foot. When rats developed pain behaviors (a reduction in weight bearing of the affected hind limb), EA was applied to the SI-6 point on the contralateral forelimb for 30 minutes under halothane anesthesia. EA significantly improved the weight-bearing capacity of the affected hind limb for 2 hours, suggesting an analgesic effect. The alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (2 mg/kg, i.p. or 30 μg, i.t.) completely blocked the EA-induced analgesia, whereas naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) and failed to block the effect. These results suggest that EA-induced analgesia is mediated by alpha-adrenoceptor mechanisms. Further experiments showed that intrathecal administration of yohimbine (10 μg), an α2-adrenergic antagonist, reduced the EA-induced analgesia in a dose-dependent manner, whereas terazosin (10 μg), an α1-adrenergic antagonist, did not produce any effect. These data suggest that the analgesic effect of EA in ankle sprain pain is, at least in part, mediated by spinal α2-adrenoceptor mechanisms. PMID:17537577

  4. Musculoskeletal Management of a Patient With a History of Chronic Ankle Sprains: Identifying Rupture of Peroneal Brevis and Peroneal Longus With Diagnostic Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Bruin, Dick B.; von Piekartz, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of mobilization and eccentric exercise training for a patient with ankle pain and a history of chronic ankle sprains and discuss the course of diagnostic decision making when the patient did not respond to care. Clinical Features A 48-year-old police officer who had sustained multiple ankle sprains throughout his life presented with pain and restriction in his ability to walk, run, and work. The Global Rating of Change Scale score was − 6, the Numeric Pain Rating Scale score was 7/10, and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale score was − 33. Palpation of the peroneus longus and brevis muscles and inversion with overpressure reproduced the chief concern (Numeric Pain Rating Scale 7/10). The patient was initially diagnosed with chronic peroneal tendinopathy. Intervention and Outcome Treatment included lateral translation mobilization of the talocrural joint combined with eccentric exercise using an elastic band for the peroneal muscles. The patient reported improvement in pain and function during the course of intervention but not as rapidly as expected. Therefore, follow-up ultrasonographic imaging and radiography were performed. These studies revealed partial rupture of the peroneal brevis muscle and total rupture of the peroneal longus muscle. Conclusion A patient with long-term concerns of the foot complex with a diagnosis of peroneal tendinopathy showed slight improvement with eccentric exercises combined with manual therapy of the talocrural joint. After a course of treatment but minimal response, a diagnosis of tendon rupture was confirmed with diagnostic ultrasonography. Clinicians should be aware that when injuries do not improve with care, tendon rupture should be considered. PMID:25225470

  5. The effect of taping versus semi-rigid bracing on patient outcome and satisfaction in ankle sprains: a prospective, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Functional treatment is a widely used and generally accepted treatment for ankle sprain. A meta-analysis comparing the different functional treatment options could not make definitive conclusions regarding the effectiveness, and until now, little was known about patient satisfaction in relation to the outcome. Methods Patients with acute ankle sprain received rest, ice, compression and elevation with an compressive bandage at the emergency department. After 5-7 days, 100 patients with grade II and III sprains were randomized into two groups: one group was treated with tape and the other with a semi-rigid ankle brace, both for 4 weeks. Post-injury physical and proprioceptive training was standardized. As primary outcome parameter patient satisfaction and skin complications were evaluated using a predefined questionnaire and numeric rating scale. As secondary outcome parameter the ankle joint function was assessed using the Karlsson scoring scale and range of motion. Results Patient-reported comfort and satisfaction during treatment with a semi-rigid brace was significantly increased. The rate of skin complication in this group was significantly lower compared to the tape group (14.6% versus 59.1%, P < 0.0001). Functional outcome of the ankle joint was similar between the two treatment groups, as well as reported pain. Conclusion Treatment of acute ankle sprain with semi-rigid brace leads to significantly higher patient comfort and satisfaction, both with similar good outcome. PMID:22639864

  6. In vivo cartilage contact strains in patients with lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Johanna E.; Spritzer, Charles E.; Caputo, Adam M.; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2010-01-01

    Damage to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and cacaneofibular ligament (CFL) during ankle sprain may be linked to the development of osteoarthritis. Altered tibiotalar kinematics have been demonstrated in these patients, but the effects of lateral ankle instability (LAI) on in vivo cartilage strains have not been described. We hypothesized that peak cartilage strains increase, and the location is shifted in patients with ATFL injuries. We used 3-D MRI models and biplanar fluoroscopy to evaluate in vivo cartilage contact strains in seven patients with unilateral LAI. Subjects had chronic unilateral ATFL injury or combined ATFL and CFL injury, and were evaluated with increasing load while stepping onto a force plate. Peak cartilage strain and the location of the peak strain were measured using the contralateral normal ankle as a control. Ankles with LAI demonstrated significantly increased peak strain when compared with ATFL-intact controls. For example, at 100% body weight, peak strain was 29±8% on the injured side compared to 21±5% on the intact side. The position of peak strain on the injured ankle also showed significant anterior translation and medial translation. At 100% body weight, the location of peak strain in the injured ankle translated anteriorly by 15.5±7.1mm and medially by 12.9±4.3mm relative to the intact ankle. These changes correspond to the region of clinically-observed osteoarthritis. Chronic LAI, therefore, may contribute to the development of tibiotalar cartilage degeneration due to altered cartilage strains. PMID:20605154

  7. Gastrocnemius muscle herniation as a rare differential diagnosis of ankle sprain: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Muscle herniation of the leg is a rare clinical entity. Yet, knowing this condition is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. In the extremities, muscle herniation most commonly occurs as a result of an acquired fascial defect, often due to trauma. Different treatment options for symptomatic extremity muscle herniation in the extremities, including conservative treatment, fasciotomy and mesh repair have been described. Case presentation We present the case of a patient who presented with prolonged symptoms after an ankle sprain. The clinical picture showed a fascial insufficiency with muscle bulging under tension. Ultrasound and MRI imaging confirmed the diagnosis of muscle hernia of the medial gastrocnemius on the right leg. Conservative treatment did not lead to success. Therefore, the fascial defect was treated surgically by repairing the muscle herniation using a synthetic vicryl propylene patch. Conclusions Muscle hernias should be taken into consideration as a rare differential diagnosis whenever patients present with persisting pain or soft tissue swelling after ankle sprain. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical aspect and physical examination, but can be confirmed by radiologic imaging techniques, including (dynamic) ultrasound and MRI. If conservative treatment fails, we recommend the closure with mesh patches for large fascial defects. PMID:22417228

  8. The Effect of Velocity of Joint Mobilization on Corticospinal Excitability in Individuals With a History of Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Piraino, Andrew; Lee, Ya-Yun; Smith, Jo Armour; Johnson, Sean; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Joint mobilization and manipulation decrease pain and improve patient function. Yet, the processes underlying these changes are not well understood. Measures of corticospinal excitability provide insight into potential mechanisms mediated by the central nervous system. Objectives To investigate the differential effects of joint mobilization and manipulation at the talocrural joint on corticospinal excitability in individuals with resolved symptoms following ankle sprain. Methods Twenty-seven participants with a history of ankle sprain were randomly assigned to the control, joint mobilization, or thrust manipulation group. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) and cortical silent period (CSP) of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were obtained with transcranial magnetic stimulation at rest and during active contraction of the tibialis anterior. The slopes of MEP/CSP input/output curves and the maximal MEP/CSP values were calculated to indicate corticospinal excitability. Behavioral measures, including ankle dorsiflexion and dynamic balance, were evaluated. Results A repeated-measures analysis of variance of the MEP slope showed a significant group-by-time interaction for the tibialis anterior at rest (P = .002) and during active contraction (P = .042). After intervention, the thrust manipulation group had an increase in corticospinal excitability, while the corticospinal excitability decreased in the mobilization group. The thrust manipulation group, but not other groups, also demonstrated a significant increase in the maximal MEP amplitude of the tibialis anterior after intervention. Conclusion The findings suggest that joint manipulation and mobilization have different effects on corticospinal excitability. The increased corticospinal excitability following thrust manipulation may provide a window for physical therapists to optimize muscle recruitment and subsequently movement. The trial was registered at

  9. Ankle Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... intense you're unable to walk on the ankle? Yes You may have a FRACTURE or a severe SPRAIN. Don't walk on the injured foot. Raise the leg and place ice on the swollen area. See your doctor promptly. No ... but you're still able to walk on the ankle? Yes You may have a SPRAINED ANKLE, or ...

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Split Peroneal Tendon Lateral Ankle Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Bazán, D Issac; Evans, Andrew M; Agarwal, Monica R; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is a common condition. Split peroneal tendon lateral ankle stabilization, a modification of the Chrisman-Snook procedure, is biomechanically stable and often used for severe and/or recurrent chronic lateral ankle instability. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this technique. Specifically, the midterm recurrence of instability and postoperative complications, such as stiffness, neurologic pain, and wound healing complications, were evaluated. We evaluated 30 consecutive procedures with a minimal follow-up period of 1 year. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 13 (median 19, range 13 to 62) months. Five patients (17%) developed recurrent ankle instability, of whom 4 underwent revision surgery. One superficial infection and two wound disruptions developed. Two patients experienced stiffness and eight (27%) surgically induced neurologic complaints, such as sural neuritis. Finally, 2 patients developed complex regional pain syndrome. PMID:26364699

  11. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    PubMed

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients. PMID:27089717

  12. Naproxen Twice Daily Versus as Needed (PRN) Dosing: Efficacy and Tolerability for Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain, a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hajimaghsoudi, Majid; Jalili, Mohammad; Mokhtari, Mehdi; Nejati, Amir; Mesbahi, Javad; Paydary, Koosha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of naproxen 500 mg twice daily (BID) versus naproxen 500 mg as needed (PRN) for treatment of ankle sprain. Methods In this seven-day, randomized, parallel group trial, 135 patients with ankle sprain occurring less than 48 hours prior to the first dose of study medication were randomized to receive naproxen 500 mg BID (67 patients) and naproxen 500 mg as needed (PRN) (68 patients). The ankle pain was assessed at rest and on full weight bearing using Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) from 0 (no pain) to 10 (the worst imaginable pain). Ankle swelling was assessed as a 4-point scale ranging from 0 (no swelling) to 3 (severe swelling) rated by the investigator. The primary efficacy end point was the patient's assessment of ankle pain via NRS and the degree of swelling on day seven. Results Results showed a significant decrease in pain on weight bearing, pain at rest and the extent of swelling (P<0.001) in both groups, but there was no substantial difference between the two groups (P>0.05) after seven days. Assessing the safety profile of the two different dosing, 13.3% of the naproxen BID group and 6.7% of the as needed group had adverse events, showing that the as needed regimen was safer (P<0.001). Conclusion Results showed that naproxen as needed may reduce the pain and edema of the sprained ankle with no significant difference compared to the BID regimen, while it possesses better safety profile and lower total drug use. PMID:24799999

  13. Pooled analysis of clinical trial data evaluating the safety and effectiveness of diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% for the treatment of acute ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lionberger, David R; Joussellin, Eric; Yanchick, Jillmarie; Magelli, Merrell; Lanzarotti, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    This pooled analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of the diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% (DETP) for the treatment of acute mild-to-moderate ankle sprain. Data from 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies enrolling 274 male and female patients aged 18 to 65 years with acute ankle sprain were pooled and evaluated. The primary end point was pain reduction on movement assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Beginning approximately 3 hours after initial treatment, DETP-treated patients experienced statistically significant and sustained lower mean VAS scores in pain intensity on movement (mean ± SD, 54.1 ± 20.0 mm versus 60.3 ± 16.8 mm) compared with placebo-treated patients, representing a 20% versus 13% reduction in VA S pain scores from baseline (P = 0.012). This statistically significant difference in mean VAS score was maintained through day 7 (9.4 ± 14.4 mm versus 18.4 ± 18.2 mm, P < 0.0001). The DETP and placebo patches were well tolerated. These results further confirm the efficacy and safety of DETP for the treatment of acute pain from ankle sprains. PMID:24198574

  14. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hung, You-jou

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable. PMID:26085985

  15. Ankle Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one ... muscles and tendons move it. The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is ...

  16. Assessment of the Injured Ankle in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To present appropriate tools to assist in the assessment and evaluation of ankle injuries in athletes. Data Sources: A MEDLINE search was performed for the years 1980–2001 using the terms ankle injuries and ankle sprains. Data Synthesis: Ankle sprains are the most common injuries sustained by athletes. In order to render appropriate treatment, a proper evaluation must be made. Assessment of ankle injuries includes obtaining a good history of the mechanism of injury, a thorough physical examination, and judicious use of radiographic evaluation and special tests. I will outline techniques for diagnosing the most common ankle injuries among athletes. Conclusions/Recommendations: In order to provide appropriate treatment, the examiner must differentiate among injuries to the lateral ankle-ligament complex, subtalar joint, deltoid ligament, and syndesmosis. It is important to realize that injury can occur to any or all of these structures simultaneously. PMID:12937562

  17. Ultrasonography in the Assessment of Lateral Ankle Ligament Injury, Instability, and Anterior Ankle Impingement: A Diagnostic Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Patrick J.; Craig, Kate; Kettner, Norman W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the diagnostic value of ultrasonography (US) in a patient with injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle with concomitant ankle joint osteoarthritis and anterior impingement. Clinical Features A 28-year-old male had a history of an inversion injury of the left ankle. Diagnostic US of the left ankle using an 8- to 15-MHz linear array transducer demonstrated a full thickness tear of the anterior talofibular ligament, partial thickness tearing of the calcaneofibular ligament, and laxity of the ankle with varus stress testing. In addition, US was able to demonstrate degeneration of the ankle and talonavicular joints and anterior impingement with dorsiflexion. Osteoarthritic changes were confirmed with radiography. Other US findings included remote deltoid ligamentous complex injury, multiple sites of tenosynovitis, and a large ankle joint effusion with synovial hypertrophy and synovitis. Intervention and Outcome Using US, an accurate diagnosis was established with respect to the pathology and functional impairments of the patient’s ankle. Conclusion This case report exemplifies the value and utility of US in diagnosing derangement in ligamentous, tendinous, articular, and osseous injuries of the ankle. PMID:26793038

  18. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... News, Videos & Podcasts » Articles » Text Size Print Bookmark Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed Long-term Complications Result from Poor Recovery Mistaking an ankle fracture for an ankle sprain has serious consequences ...

  19. A novel dynamic ankle-supinating device.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Gregory M; Kaminski, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) are among the most common joint injuries, and although most are resolved with conservative treatment, others develop chronic ankle instability (AI). Considerable attention has been directed toward understanding the underlying causes of this pathology; however, little is known concerning the neuromuscular mechanisms behind AI. A biomechanical analysis of the landing phase of a drop jump onto a device that simulates the mechanism of a LAS may give insight into the dynamic restraint mechanisms of the ankle by individuals with AI. Furthermore, work evaluating subjects who have a history of at least one lateral ankle sprain, yet did not develop AI, may help elucidate compensatory mechanisms following a LAS event. Identifying proper neuromuscular control strategies is crucial in reducing the incidence of AI. PMID:20147765

  20. Repair of acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle by suture anchors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang-Fei; Fang, Yang; Cao, Zhong-Hua; Li, Guang-Feng; Yang, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical curative effect of stage I repair of acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle by the application of suture anchors. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 18 cases of III degree acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle. Results: There were statistically significant differences in preoperative and last follow-up VAS pain scores and AOFAS ankle hind-foot function scores. The X-ray talus displacement values in the anterior drawer test and pressure anteroposterior X-ray talar tilt in the ankle talar tilt test also showed statistically significant differences. Complications occurred in 2 patients, incision surface infection in one, and postoperative lateral dorsal skin numbness in one. All these cases were cured after symptomatic treatment. At the last follow-up all patients’ ankle joint activity recovered to their preinjury function levels. Conclusion: The application of suture anchors for small incision stage I repair of the lateral collateral ligament of ankle joint degree III injury, can effectively restored the stability of ankle joint, and prevent the occurrence of chronic ankle instability complications. It is effective and feasible for the treatment of ankle joint lateral collateral ligament injuries. PMID:26885144

  1. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School 5-12yrs. Teen 12- ... 2015 Source Care of the Young Athlete Patient Education Handouts (Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics) The ...

  2. Ankle sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, ...

  3. A double-blind study of the efficacy of topical ketorolac tromethamine gel in the treatment of ankle sprain, in comparison to placebo and etofenamate.

    PubMed

    Diebschlag, W; Nocker, W; Bullingham, R

    1990-01-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the efficacy and safety of topical ketorolac tromethamine were assessed in the reduction of inflammation and pain due to ankle sprain. Ketorolac 2% gel was compared with etofenamate and placebo (ketorolac vehicle) in a 15-day study. Patients attended for visits on days 1 (admission), 2, 3, 4, 8, and 15 of the study. Measurements of efficacy were ankle volume, pain measured on visual analogue scales (VAS) and verbal rating of pain. Safety was assessed by volunteered adverse events and vital signs. A total of 37 patients was admitted to the study of whom 13 received ketorolac, 12 placebo, and 12 etofenamate. One patient receiving ketorolac was lost to follow-up on day 15 owing to an unrelated accident. The remaining 36 patients completed the study. Ketorolac was significantly better than placebo in reducing the volume of the injured ankle based on the maximum, the area under the curve, and the day 15 percentage changes in ankle volume. Results for etofenamate were similar to those for ketorolac for all three variables and there were no significant differences between the active treatments. Reductions in VAS pain at rest were more marked in the ketorolac group than either of the other groups at all visits. On day 4 the differences between ketorolac and each of the other groups were statistically significant. Reductions in VAS pain on movement were also greatest for the ketorolac group at all visits. The differences between ketorolac and each of the other groups achieved statistical significance on days 4 and 8, but were marginal in terms of significance on day 2.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2105985

  4. The in vivo kinematics of the tibiotalar joint after lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Adam M.; Lee, Jun Y.; Spritzer, Chuck E.; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous studies have suggested injury to the anterior talofibular ligament may be linked to altered kinematics and the development of osteoarthritis of the ankle joint. However, the effects of ATFL injury on the in vivo kinematics of the ankle joint are unclear. HYPOTHESIS Based on the orientation of the ATFL fibers, we hypothesized that ATFL deficiency would lead to increased anterior translation and increased internal rotation of the talus relative to the tibia. STUDY DESIGN Controlled laboratory study. METHODS The ankles of 9 patients with unilateral ATFL injuries were compared as they stepped onto a level surface. Kinematic measurements were made as a function of increasing load. Using magnetic resonance imaging and orthogonal fluoroscopy, the in vivo kinematics of the tibiotalar joint were measured in the ATFL deficient and intact ankles from the same individuals. RESULTS A statistically significant increase in internal rotation, anterior translation, and superior translation of the talus was measured in ATFL deficient ankles as compared to intact, contralateral controls. For example, at 100% body weight, ATFL deficient ankles demonstrated a statistically significant increase in anterior translation of 0.9 ± 0.5mm (p = 0.008). At 100% body weight, the ATFL deficient ankle was internally rotated relative to the intact ankle by 5.7 ± 3.6° (p = 0.008). There was a slight increase of 0.2 ± 0.2mm in the superior translation of the ATFL deficient ankle compared to the intact ankle at 100% body weight (p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS ATFL deficiency increases anterior translation, internal rotation, and superior translation of the talus. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Altered kinematics may contribute to the degenerative changes observed with chronic lateral ankle instability. These findings might help to explain the degenerative changes frequently observed on the medial talus in patients with chronic ATFL insufficiency and provide a baseline for improving ankle ligament

  5. [Chronic ankle instability in sports -- a review for sports physicians].

    PubMed

    Valderrabano, V; Leumann, A; Pagenstert, G; Frigg, A; Ebneter, L; Hintermann, B

    2006-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability represents a typical sports injury which can mostly be seen in basketball, soccer, orienteering and other high risk sports. 20 to 40 % of the acute ankle sprains develop into chronic ankle instability. From a sports orthopaedic point of view, chronic ankle instability can be subdivided into a lateral, medial or a combination of both so called rotational ankle instability. From a pathophysiological point of view, chronic ankle instability can be either mechanical with a structural ligament lesion or functional with loss of the neuromuscular control. For the sports physician, the chronic ankle instability is a difficult entity as the diagnosis is usually complex and the therapy usually surgical. This review on chronic ankle instability addresses pathomechanism, diagnostics, indications for conservative and surgical treatments, and possible long-term sequelae, as ligamentous osteoarthritis. PMID:17279471

  6. Ankle injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Nemeth, G; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the frequency of ankle sprains in basketball players. A questionnaire about previous ankle injuries, time off after such injuries, current ankle problems, personal data, number of practice hours and the use of prophylactic measures was sent out to 102 basketball players in a second division league in Sweden. Ninety-six players answered. 92% of them had suffered an ankle sprain while playing basketball, and of these 83% reported repeated sprains of one ankle. In the last two seasons, 78% of the players had injured at least one ankle. The injury frequency in the investigation was 5.5 ankle injuries per 1000 activity hours. 22% of the players used some kind of prophylactic support of their ankle joints. Because of the great number of ankle sprains and the disability in terms of time away from sports that they cause, prevention of these injuries is essential. PMID:8536029

  7. Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle (frozen ankle).

    PubMed

    van Moppes, F I; van den Hoogenband, C R; Greep, J M

    1979-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis or "frozen ankle" is a syndrome resulting from repeated ankle sprains, or perhaps following immobilization after trauma. Ankle arthrography is a useful and safe diagnostic procedure in this syndrome. Typical arthrographic features are described together with case histories of two patients with frozen ankle. We suggest that early mobilization of the patient following trauma is particularly important in preventing the development of a forzen ankle syndrome. PMID:508071

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF ULTRASONOGRAPHY IN DIAGNOSING CHRONIC LATERAL ANKLE INSTABILITY:A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Bakowski, Jordan; Dew, Stephanie; Greenwald, Bridget; Hyde, Eryn; Webber, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a condition that often develops after repeated ankle sprains, increasing the suceptability of the ankle to move into excessive inversion when walking on unstable surfaces. Treatment for CAI costs approximately three billion health care dollars annually. Currently, common diagnostic tools used to identify ankle instability are arthroscopy, imaging, manual laxity testing, and self-reported questionnaires. Purpose The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography in diagnosing CAI, in comparison with other diagnostic tools. Methods Search limits: articles published between the years 2000-2015, and articles that were peer reviewed and published in the English language. Databases searched: CINAHL, PubMed, Medline, Medline Plus, Science Direct, OVID, Cochrane, and EBSCO. Titles and abstracts of the 1,420 articles were screened for the inclusion criteria by two independent raters, with discrepancies solved by a third rater. The modified 14-point Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) scale was used to assess methodological quality of included articles. Results Six high quality articles were included in this systematic review, as indicated by high scores on the QUADAS scale, ranging from 10 to 13. Sensitivity of US ranged from: 84.6 % -100%, specificity of US ranged from: 90.9% − 100% and accuracy ranged from: 87% − 90.9%. Discussion The results of the included studies suggest that US is able to accurately differentiate between the grades of ankle sprains and between a lax ligament, torn ligament, thick ligament, absorbed ligament and a non-union avulsion fracture. These findings indicate that US is a reliable method for diagnosing CAI, and that US is able to classify the degree of instability. Conclusion Researchers found that US is effective, reliable, and accurate in the diagnosis of CAI. Clinical Implications US would allow for earlier diagnosis, which

  9. Effects of Kinesio taping on joint position sense of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Do; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Jung-Eun; Lim, Ga-Hee; Jung, Seong-In; Park, So-Hyun; Cheon, Song-Hee; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Kinesio taping on the joint position sense of the ankle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 nomal adults who had experienced ankle sprain. Kinesio taping was applied over the ankle medial ligament and ankle lateral ligament with eight pattern reinforcement taping. Joint position sense was measured using isokinetic equipment (Biodex System 4 pro dynamometer, Biodex Medical systems Inc., USA) during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion, before and after taping. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 for Windows. [Results] Joint position sense after Kinesio taping was improved in the dorsiflexion and inversion positions. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, Kinesio taping of the ankle is effective for the prevention of ankle sprain. PMID:27190446

  10. Effects of Kinesio taping on joint position sense of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyun-Do; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Jung-Eun; Lim, Ga-Hee; Jung, Seong-In; Park, So-Hyun; Cheon, Song-Hee; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Kinesio taping on the joint position sense of the ankle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 nomal adults who had experienced ankle sprain. Kinesio taping was applied over the ankle medial ligament and ankle lateral ligament with eight pattern reinforcement taping. Joint position sense was measured using isokinetic equipment (Biodex System 4 pro dynamometer, Biodex Medical systems Inc., USA) during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion, before and after taping. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 for Windows. [Results] Joint position sense after Kinesio taping was improved in the dorsiflexion and inversion positions. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, Kinesio taping of the ankle is effective for the prevention of ankle sprain. PMID:27190446

  11. Prevalence of chronic ankle instability and associated symptoms in university dance majors: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Janet; Hall, Emily; Docherty, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations have established that dancers suffer a large number of injuries to the lower leg, foot, and ankle, with a portion of these being significant time loss injuries or in some cases career ending. Lateral ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers and can often lead to recurrent instability and repetitive injuries. Research in other active populations has linked ankle sprains to the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of CAI and related symptoms of ankle sprain in a student dance population. Individuals were included if they were currently a modern or ballet dance major at the investigators' university (exclusion criterion: a history of fracture or surgery in the lower extremities). A self-reported demographic questionnaire and the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability survey were used to identify the presence and characteristics of CAI. A total of 83 questionnaires were collected, and after exclusions, 77 participants remained: 43 modern dancers and 34 ballet dancers (10 males and 67 females, mean age 19.61 ± 2.53 years, mean dance experience 13.61 ± 3.16 years). Of all dancers surveyed, 41 (53.2%) had CAI, and of those 24 (58.5%) were modern dancers, and 17 (41.5%) were ballet dancers. When looking only at those dancers who had a previous lateral ankle sprain, 75.9% were identified as having CAI. Chronic Ankle Instability can create long-term problems for anyone but especially female dancers, who place extreme stress on their feet and ankles from being en pointe or demi-pointe. It is important to educate dancers, instructors, and medical staff of the importance of recognizing CAI and seeking medical care for ankle sprains and their residual symptoms. PMID:25474297

  12. The Effect of Modified Brostrom-Gould Repair for Lateral Ankle Instability on In Vivo Tibiotalar Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Wainright, William B; Spritzer, Charles E.; Lee, Jun Young; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lateral ankle instability leads to an increased risk of tibiotalar joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have found abnormal tibiotalar joint motions with lateral ankle instability that may contribute to this increased incidence of osteoarthritis, including increased anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under weight-bearing loading. Surgical repairs for lateral ankle instability have shown good clinical results, but the effects of repair on in vivo ankle motion are not well understood. Hypothesis The modified Broström-Gould lateral ligament reconstruction decreases anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under in vivo weight-bearing loading conditions. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Seven patients underwent modified Brostöm-Gould repair for unilateral lateral ankle instability. Ankle joint kinematics as a function of increasing body weight were studied with magnetic resonance imaging and biplanar fluoroscopy. Tibiotalar kinematics were measured in unstable ankles preoperatively and postoperatively at a mean follow-up of 12 months, as well as in the uninjured contralateral ankles of the same individuals. Results Surgical repair resulted in statistically significant decreases in anterior translation of the talus (0.9±0.3mm, p=0.018) at 100% bodyweight and internal rotation of the talus at 75% (2.6±0.8°, p=0.019) and 100% (2.7±0.8°, p=0.013) bodyweight compared to ankle kinematics measured before repair. No statistically significant differences were detected between repaired ankles and contralateral normal ankles. Conclusion The modified Broström-Gould repair improved the abnormal joint motion observed in patients with lateral ankle instability, decreasing anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus. Clinical Relevance Altered kinematics may contribute to the tibiotalar joint degeneration that occurs with chronic lateral ankle instability. The findings of the current study support

  13. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint. PMID:26252560

  14. Arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair for lateral instability of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Matsui, Kentaro; Stone, James W; Glazebrook, Mark A; Kennedy, John G; Guillo, Stephane; Calder, James D; Karlsson, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Although several arthroscopic procedures for lateral ligament instability of the ankle have been reported recently, it is difficult to augment the reconstruction by arthroscopically tightening the inferior extensor retinaculum. There is also concern that when using the inferior extensor retinaculum, this is not strictly an anatomical repair since its calcaneal attachment is different to that of the calcaneofibular ligament. If a ligament repair is completed firmly, it is unnecessary to add argumentation with inferior extensor retinaculum. The authors describe a simplified technique, repair of the lateral ligament alone using a lasso-loop stitch, which avoids additionally tighten the inferior extensor retinaculum. In this paper, it is described an arthroscopic anterior talofibular ligament repair using lasso-loop stitch alone for lateral instability of the ankle that is likely safe for patients and minimal invasive. Level of evidence Therapeutic study, Level V. PMID:25982624

  15. Dynamic Evaluation of the Contact Characteristics and Three-Dimensional Motion for the Ankle Joint with Lateral Ligament Injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Kensaku; Omori, Go; Terashima, Shojiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Hara, Toshiaki

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the dynamic changes in contact pressure distribution and three-dimensional ankle joint motion before and after lateral ligament injuries. Five fresh and frozen intact cadaveric ankles were examined. Each ankle was mounted on a specially designed frame that preserved five degrees of freedom motion. The direct linear transformation technique was used to measure the three-dimensional ankle motion, and a pressure-sensitive conductive rubber sensor was inserted into the talocrural joint space to determine the contact pressure distribution. The contact area on the talus for intact ankle moved anteriorly and laterally with increasing dorsiflexion. An area of high pressure was observed in the medial aspect of the articular surface after the ligament was cut. Supination significantly increased after a combined anterior talofibular ligament (ATF) and calcaneofibular ligament (CF) were cut in comparison with after only an ATF was cut, and no significant differences were observed in motional properties under each experimental condition.

  16. How to Tape an Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Decide If You Need to See an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Specialist How to Care for a Sprained Ankle How to Be Non-weightbearing After Surgery Footwear All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / How To... / Foot Injury / How to Tape an Ankle How to ...

  17. Comparative study of therapies for fibular ligament rupture of the lateral ankle joint in competitive basketball players.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Höher, J; Tiling, T

    1993-01-01

    This retrospective study compares the results of different therapies for fibular ligament rupture in a homogenous group of professional athletes. The endpoint "competitive sports" was an outcome consideration. Subjects were examined by means of a standardized questionnaire and a structured interview. One hundred and seventy-nine of the questionnaires were completed and returned for evaluation. All of the basketball players with severe ankle sprain (supination trauma with swelling, pain, and inability to bear stress) were included. Those players with fractures of the foot, pronation trauma, or additional distal fibula or tibia fractures were excluded from this study. Of the 179 basketball players 160 (89%) had suffered severe ankle sprain. The treatment was divided into three groups: primary surgery (N = 35), plaster cast (N = 39), and functional treatment (N = 89). While simple ligament injuries (Grade I and II) were mostly treated functionally, complex ligament injuries (Grade III) were usually operated on. A total of 119 (74%) of the players reported no further pain. For pain reduction surgical and functional treatments showed advantages over plaster treatment. In the surgical group 63% of the players judged their regained stability to be equivalent to that of their healthy leg. Only 50% of the players in the plaster and functional groups believed their ankle joints to have regained the same stability as before their injuries. Despite the achievement of good results through surgery, there were clear differences in the players' assessments of their performance in competitive sports. Most subjects (92%) did not have any problems in everyday life regardless of which kind of therapy had been chosen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8406246

  18. The anterior talo-fibular ligament reconstruction in surgical treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Trč, Tomáš; Handl, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability causes significant problems in physical activity and accelerates development of osteoarthritic changes. The results of treatment for chronic ankle instability are often meets controversial. A surgical reconstruction of ATFL as described in this paper was performed during the period 1997–2005 on 47 patients (26 male, 21 female), with a mean age of 29.3 years. The average follow-up period was 46.2 months. All patients had clinical examination, X-ray and MRI. The mean values of the Good score improved from an average 3.32 prior to surgery to 1.19 one year after the operation. Paired t-tests showed improvements of great significance (p < 10−28). The Good score prior to surgery ranged from 2–4, whereas the scores one year after surgery were either 1 or 2, with a score of 1 being recorded in 38 cases (81%). In the postoperative follow-up, MRI showed a newly-formed ligament structure in all cases. The authors describe their own technique for a reconstruction of lateral ankle instability using remnants of the former ATFL. The scar tissue seems to be sufficient to form a new duplicated structure providing good stability. MRI proved to be a sensitive and specific method for identifying the extent of talo-fibular ligament injury. PMID:20431880

  19. Treatment of complete rupture of the lateral ligaments of the ankle: a randomized clinical trial comparing cast immobilization with functional treatment.

    PubMed

    Ardèvol, Jordi; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Belda, Víctor; Argilaga, Sílvia

    2002-11-01

    This study compared the therapeutic efficacy between cast immobilization and functional treatment of grade III ruptures of the lateral ankle ligaments. Subjects ( n=121) had closed physeal cartilage, age under 35 years, grade III rupture without previous or associated injuries, and practiced regular sports. Patients were randomized into an immobilization group (21 days plaster cast) or a functional one (15 days strapping plus early controlled mobilization). Symptoms (pain, swelling, stiffness, subjective instability), joint laxity, return to preinjury activity (time and level) and rate of reinjury were assessed 3, 6, and 12 months after sprain. Objective joint laxity was related to constitutional laxity, creating a new variable [talar tilt at injury - talar tilt at control]/contralateral talar tilt. The functional group showed significantly earlier and better return to physical activity, fewer symptoms at 3 and 6 months but no intergroup difference at 12 months. Functional treatment also showed better decrease in joint laxity. No intergroup differences were found in the reinjury rate. We conclude that functional treatment is safe, associated with a more rapid recovery, and particularly suitable in athletic populations. PMID:12444517

  20. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury.

    PubMed

    Faqi, Mohammed Khalid; AlJawder, Abdulla; Alkhalifa, Fahad; Almajed, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The Lauge-Hansen (LH) classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed. PMID:27313928

  1. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury

    PubMed Central

    AlJawder, Abdulla; Almajed, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    The Lauge-Hansen (LH) classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed. PMID:27313928

  2. Conservative management of posterior ankle impingement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, Isabelle; Richer, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the pain and functional improvements of a patient with posterior ankle impingement following a treatment plan incorporating soft tissue therapy, chiropractic adjustment and a progressive rehabilitation program. Clinical Features: A 37-year- old male presented with posterolateral ankle pain exacerbated by plantar flexion two weeks after sustaining an inversion ankle sprain. Oedema was present and the patient was describing a sensation of instability while walking. The initial diagnosis of lateral ankle sprain was found to be complicated by a posterior ankle impingement caused by a tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus sheath suspected during the physical examination and confirmed by MRI. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was treated over a 14-week period. Soft tissue therapy, a rehabilitation program and cortisone injection were used to treat this condition. A precise description of the rehabilitation program that contains open kinetic chain, closed kinetic chain, proprioception, and conditioning exercises prescribed to the patient is given. After the treatment plan, the patient returned to play pain free and had no daily living restrictions. Summary: A protocol including rest, soft tissue therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises, sport-specific exercises and cortisone injection appeared to facilitate complete recovery of this patient’s posterior ankle impingement. PMID:27385836

  3. Prophylactic Ankle Taping and Bracing: A Numbers-Needed-to-Treat and Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    PubMed

    Olmsted, Lauren C.; Vela, Luzita I.; Denegar, Craig R.; Hertel, Jay

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: Taping and bracing are thought to decrease the incidence of ankle sprains; however, few investigators have addressed the effect of preventive measures on the rate of ankle sprains. Our purpose was to examine the effectiveness of ankle taping and bracing in reducing ankle sprains by applying a numbers-needed-to-treat (NNT) analysis to previously published studies. DATA SOURCES: We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SPORT Discus, and PEDro for original research from 1966 to 2002 with key words ankle taping, ankle sprains, injury incidence, prevention, ankle bracing, ankle prophylaxis, andnumbers needed to treat. We eliminated articles that did not address the effects of ankle taping or bracing on ankle injury rates using an experimental design. DATA SYNTHESIS: The search produced 8 articles, of which 3 permitted calculation of NNT, which addresses the clinical usefulness of an intervention by providing estimates of the number of treatments needed to prevent 1 injury occurrence. In a study of collegiate intramural basketball players, the prevention of 1 ankle sprain required the taping of 26 athletes with a history of ankle sprain and 143 without a prior history. In a military academy intramural basketball program, prevention of 1 sprain required bracing of 18 athletes with a history of ankle sprain and 39 athletes with no history. A study of ankle bracing in competitive soccer players produced an NNT of 5 athletes with a history of previous sprain and 57 without a prior injury. A cost- benefit analysis of ankle taping versus bracing revealed taping to be approximately 3 times more expensive than bracing. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Greater benefit is achieved in applying prophylactic ankle taping or bracing to athletes with a history of ankle sprain, compared with those without previous sprains. The generalizability of these results to other physically active populations is unknown. PMID:15085217

  4. Incidence and Severity of Foot and Ankle Injuries in Men’s Collegiate American Football

    PubMed Central

    Lievers, W. Brent; Adamic, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: American football is an extremely physical game with a much higher risk of injury than other sports. While many studies have reported the rate of injury for particular body regions or for individual injuries, very little information exists that compares the incidence or severity of particular injuries within a body region. Such information is critical for prioritizing preventative interventions. Purpose: To retrospectively analyze epidemiological data to identify the most common and most severe foot and ankle injuries in collegiate men’s football. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Injury data were obtained from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) for all foot and ankle injuries during the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 seasons. Injuries were analyzed in terms of incidence and using multiple measures of severity (time loss, surgeries, medical disqualifications). This frequency and severity information is summarized in tabular form as well as in a 4 × 4 quantitative injury risk assessment matrix (QIRAM). Results: The rate of foot and ankle injuries was 15 per 10,000 athletic exposures (AEs). Five injuries were found to be responsible for more than 80% of all foot and ankle injuries: lateral ankle ligament sprains, syndesmotic (high ankle) sprains, medial ankle ligament sprains, midfoot injuries, and first metatarsophalangeal joint injuries. Ankle dislocations were found to be the most severe in terms of median time loss (100 days), percentage of surgeries (83%), and percentage of medical disqualifications (94%), followed by metatarsal fractures (38 days, 36%, and 49%, respectively) and malleolus fractures (33 days, 41%, and 59%, respectively). Statistical analysis suggests that the 3 measures of severity are highly correlated (r > 0.94), thereby justifying the use of time loss as a suitable proxy for injury severity in the construction of the QIRAM. Conclusion: Based on the QIRAM analysis

  5. Minimum reporting standards for copers in chronic ankle instability research.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Erik A; Brown, Cathleen N

    2014-02-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LASs) are among the most common sports-related injuries and a high percentage of individuals who sprain their ankle go on to develop chronic ankle instability (CAI). The condition of CAI is often classified as having pain, loss of function, and a restriction of, or failure to, return to levels of previous activity. Historically, uninjured healthy controls are used as a comparison group to study the biomechanical and neuromuscular consequences of CAI. However, this model is not ideal to determine why a portion of the population experiencing an ankle sprain does not recover. A more appropriate comparison may be individuals who had an ankle sprain, and thus the exposure, but did not go on to develop CAI (i.e., copers). Thus, the purpose of this review was to determine the existing discrepancies and common standards in definitions of, terminology used for, and the inclusionary/exclusionary criteria used to describe copers within the CAI literature. Multiple databases were searched by keywords and specific authors. Potential studies were screened independently by both authors. Inclusion criteria consisted of an explicit definition of copers and explicit inclusionary/exclusionary criteria. A total of 21 studies were included in the current study and had four outcomes extracted: (1) the definition of copers; (2) the terminology used; (3) specific inclusionary/exclusionary criteria; and (4) injury characteristics of the copers. Based on the included operational definitions, it is recommend that future operational definitions of copers include three key components: (1) an initial LAS; (2) subsequent lack of CAI symptoms (i.e., no complaints of disability or giving way); and (3) a time since injury component. The term coper was overwhelming used within the existing literature (n = 15) and is thus recommended to be used in future studies when describing individuals who have suffered an LAS but failed to develop CAI. Minimal inclusionary criteria should

  6. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    % CIs that did not overlap. No other significant differences were identified. Conclusion: Patients with CAI demonstrate atrophy of intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle musculature accompanied by lower ankle strength. Clinical Relevance: Clinicians should be aware of the muscle atrophy and strength deficits when prescribing rehabilitation for patients with lateral ankle sprain or CAI.

  7. Short-term motor compensations to denervation of feline soleus and lateral gastrocnemius result in preservation of ankle mechanical output during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, Boris I; Maas, Huub; Bulgakova, Margarita; Hodson-Tole, Emma F; Gregor, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Denervation of selected ankle extensors in animals results in locomotor changes. These changes have been suggested to permit preservation of global kinematic characteristics of the hindlimb during stance. The peak ankle joint moment is also preserved immediately after denervation of several ankle extensors in the cat, suggesting that the animal's response to peripheral nerve injury may also be aimed at preserving ankle mechanical output. We tested this hypothesis by comparing joint moments and power patterns during walking before and after denervation of soleus and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. Hindlimb kinematics, ground reaction forces and electromyographic activity of selected muscles were recorded during level, downslope (-50%) and upslope (50%) walking before and 1-3 weeks after nerve denervation. Denervation resulted in increased activity of the intact medial gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles, greater ankle dorsiflexion, smaller knee flexion, and the preservation of the peak ankle moment during stance. Surprisingly, ankle positive power generated in the propulsion phase of stance was increased (up to 50%) after denervation in all walking conditions (p < 0.05). The obtained results suggest that the short-term motor compensation to denervation of lateral gastrocnemius and soleus muscles may allow for preservation of mechanical output at the ankle. The additional mechanical energy generated at the ankle during propulsion can result, in part, from increased activity of intact synergists, the use of passive tissues around the ankle and by the tendon action of ankle two-joint muscles and crural fascia. PMID:21411965

  8. Short-Term Motor Compensations to Denervation of Feline Soleus and Lateral Gastrocnemius Result in Preservation of Ankle Mechanical Output during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Prilutsky, Boris I.; Maas, Huub; Bulgakova, Margarita; Hodson-Tole, Emma F.; Gregor, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Denervation of selected ankle extensors in animals results in locomotor changes. These changes have been suggested to permit preservation of global kinematic characteristics of the hindlimb during stance. The peak ankle joint moment is also preserved immediately after denervation of several ankle extensors in the cat, suggesting that the animal's response to peripheral nerve injury may also be aimed at preserving ankle mechanical output. We tested this hypothesis by comparing joint moments and power patterns during walking before and after denervation of soleus and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. Hindlimb kinematics, ground reaction forces and electromyographic activity of selected muscles were recorded during level, downslope (−50%) and upslope (50%) walking before and 1–3 weeks after nerve denervation. Denervation resulted in increased activity of the intact medial gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles, greater ankle dorsiflexion, smaller knee flexion, and the preservation of the peak ankle moment during stance. Surprisingly, ankle positive power generated in the propulsion phase of stance was increased (up to 50%) after denervation in all walking conditions (p < 0.05). The obtained results suggest that the short-term motor compensation to denervation of lateral gastrocnemius and soleus muscles may allow for preservation of mechanical output at the ankle. The additional mechanical energy generated at the ankle during propulsion can result, in part, from increased activity of intact synergists, the use of passive tissues around the ankle and by the tendon action of ankle two-joint muscles and crural fascia. PMID:21411965

  9. Rehabilitation of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis sprains: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Pajaczkowski, Jason A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To present the epidemiology, etiology, diagnostic criteria and therapeutic interventions for an important clinical entity – tibiofibular syndesmosis or “high ankle” sprains. Clinical Features The most common mechanism of injury is forced external rotation in a dorsiflexed foot. Pain is located anteriorly over the anterior tibiofibular ligament, and is elicited through a variety of tests designed to stress this articulation through diastatic forces. Pain with ambulation is typical, and is usually present during the push-off phase of gait. Radiographs may be useful in determining the extent of this injury, as syndesmotic sprains with malleolar fractures are more common than those without. Intervention and Outcome Convalescence is generally protracted compared with a lateral ankle sprain, and care must be taken to avoid stressing the supporting ligaments during the early course of therapy. Initial treatment is aimed at reducing pain and inflammation using modalities such as microcurrent, electroacupuncture and P.R.I.C.E. principles. Treatment over subsequent weeks involves progressive resistance exercises, proprioceptive challenges, plyometric exercises and sport-specific agility drills, while maintaining cardiovascular fitness. Conclusion The practitioner should also be cognizant of the indolent nature of this injury and possibility for sequelae. Anterior ankle pain and pain with a deep squat or during the push-off phase of gait are typical of this injury. Radiographs to rule out fracture and evaluate the extent of the injury may be warranted. Conservative therapy involving rehabilitation and tissue injury care is appropriate for Grade I and II injuries, while Grade III injuries require a surgical intervention. PMID:17657290

  10. Treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability using the Broström-Gould procedure in athletes: long-term results

    PubMed Central

    RUSSO, ADRIANO; GIACCHÈ, PAOLO; MARCANTONI, ENRICO; ARRIGHI, ANNALISA; MOLFETTA, LUIGI

    2016-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to evaluate long-term results following treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability using the Broström-Gould technique in athletes. Methods eighteen athletes involved in competitive sports at different levels, who suffered from chronic lateral ankle instability, underwent Broström-Gould ligamentoplasty between 2000 and 2005. The results of the surgery were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale. Results the results at 10–15 years of follow-up were excellent in 94.5% of these cases and good in the remaining 5.5%. An increase of 31.2 points in the AOFAS scale score was recorded at follow-up (with the score rising to 98.8, from 67.6 preoperatively). All the athletes returned to their respective sports at the same level as prior to the surgery. Imaging at long-term follow-up showed no signs of arthritic degeneration. Conclusions the results of this study show that the Broström-Gould technique is an effective procedure for the treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability in the athlete, giving excellent long-term results. Level of evidence therapeutic case series, level IV. PMID:27602349

  11. [Ankle braces prevent ligament injuries].

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jon

    2002-09-01

    The Cochrane collaboration has performed a meta-analysis of all studies found on the prevention of ankle ligament injuries, frequent in sports like soccer, European handball and basketball. Interventions include the use of modified footwear and associated supports, training programmes and health education. Five randomized trials totalling 3,954 participants were included. With the exception of ankle disc training, all prophylactic interventions entailed the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis, air-cast or high top shoes. The studies showed a significant reduction in the number of ankle sprains in individuals allocated to external ankle support. This reduction was greater for those with a previous history of ankle sprains. PMID:12362747

  12. Search the Foot and Ankle: Interactive Foot Diagram

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Search the Foot and Ankle Foot conditions in this region: Bunions (Hallux Valgus) » ... Injuries » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) » Tarsal Coalition » Ankle Fractures » Ankle Sprain » Chronic Ankle Instability » Equinus » Gout » ...

  13. Developing a Framework for Ankle Function: A Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Kelli R.; Evans, Todd A.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Addressing clinical outcomes is paramount to providing effective health care, yet there is no consensus regarding the appropriate outcomes to address after ankle injuries. Compounding the problem is the repetitive nature of lateral ankle sprains, referred to as functional (FAI) or chronic (CAI) ankle instability. Although they are commonly used terms in practice and research, FAI and CAI are inconsistently defined and assessed. Objective: To establish definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, FAI, and CAI, as well as their characteristics and assessment techniques. Design: Delphi study. Setting: Telephone interviews and electronic surveys. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen experts representing the fields of ankle function and treatment, ankle research, and outcomes assessment and research were selected as panelists. Data Collection and Analysis: A telephone interview produced feedback regarding the definition of, functional characteristics of, and assessment techniques for a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and FAI/CAI. Those data were compiled, reduced, and returned through electronic surveys and were either included by reaching consensus (80% agreement) or excluded. Results: The definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI reached consensus. Experts did not agree on a definition of CAI. Eleven functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, 32 functional characteristics of an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and 13 characteristics of FAI were agreed upon. Conclusions: Although a consensus was reached regarding the definitions and functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI, the experts could only agree on 1 characteristic to include in the FAI definition. Several experts did, however, provide additional comments that reinforced the differences in the interpretation of those concepts. Although the experts could not agree on the definition of CAI, its

  14. Distraction-free ankle arthroscopy for anterolateral impingement.

    PubMed

    Rouvillain, Jean Louis; Daoud, Wael; Donica, Adrian; Garron, Emmanuel; Uzel, André Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The origin of chronic pain after external ankle sprain is better known with arthroscopy's contribution. Chronic hypertrophic synovitis of the anterolateral ankle region is seemingly the cause, resulting in "anterolateral ankle impingement." But is partial synovectomy with fibrosis resection under arthroscopy always possible without any distraction? Are results affected? This retrospective study concerned only patients with soft tissue ankle impingement. All cases with bone and joint diseases were excluded. The final sample of 24 patients had a mean age of 35 years (21-54 years) and presented anterolateral mechanical pain associated with oedema following external ankle sprain. Medical and rehabilitative treatment was undertaken for more than 6 months before arthroscopy. Average time between trauma and arthroscopy was 21 months (5-60 months). Clinical examination revealed no ankle instability or laxity. Debridement with joint lavage was systematically performed under arthroscopy without any distraction. Average patient follow-up was 22 months (12-92 months). All patients had a good Kitaoka score, with 22 patients registering excellent results. There were no septic complications or algodystrophy. Two transient hypoesthesias were observed in the dorsal surface and lateral border of the foot with full postoperative recovery at 6 months. Distraction was never used and simple dorsiflexion was sufficient to perform arthroscopic debridement. In this study, anterolateral ankle impingement diagnosis was primarily clinical. Arthroscopic treatment yielded significant benefits on pain, oedema and resumption of sport activities. Arthroscopic treatment of anterolateral ankle impingements is thus possible with simple dorsiflexion and no distraction, resulting in a possible decrease in complication rates. Level of evidence Retrospective cohort study, Level IV. PMID:24220747

  15. Surgical treatment of ankle instability in athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, B.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen athletes with symptoms of recurrent sprain and instability of the ankle during activity were treated by reconstructing the lateral ligament by the Evans technique. Before the operation 55 per cent had given up all athletic activities because of pain, swelling or instability, and 17 per cent had restricted their activities. The average age at operation was 24.6 years and the average follow-up period 3.1 years. Normal stability was achieved in 67 per cent and improved stability in 11 per cent, but only 33 per cent were still engaged in athletic activities without any complaints from the ankle. The results are similar to other methods of surgical repair. Images p40-a Fig. 2a Fig. 2b Fig. 3a Fig. 3b PMID:6802212

  16. Strains and Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children's Sports Injuries Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries Knee Injuries Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains Strains and Sprains ... Pain Going to a Physical Therapist Hamstring Strain Knee Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Dealing With Sports Injuries ...

  17. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... Ankle replacement surgery is most often done while you are under general anesthesia. This means you will ...

  18. Evidence-based treatment for ankle injuries: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Hiller, Claire E; de Bie, Rob A

    2010-01-01

    The most common ankle injuries are ankle sprain and ankle fracture. This review discusses treatments for ankle sprain (including the management of the acute sprain and chronic instability) and ankle fracture, using evidence from recent systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials. After ankle sprain, there is evidence for the use of functional support and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. There is weak evidence suggesting that the use of manual therapy may lead to positive short-term effects. Electro-physical agents do not appear to enhance outcomes and are not recommended. Exercise may reduce the occurrence of recurrent ankle sprains and may be effective in managing chronic ankle instability. After surgical fixation for ankle fracture, an early introduction of activity, administered via early weight-bearing or exercise during the immobilization period, may lead to better outcomes. However, the use of a brace or orthosis to enable exercise during the immobilization period may also lead to a higher rate of adverse events, suggesting that this treatment regimen needs to be applied judiciously. After the immobilization period, the focus of treatment for ankle fracture should be on a progressive exercise program. PMID:21655420

  19. Basketball injuries of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    McDermott, E P

    1993-04-01

    Foot and ankle injuries in basketball are discussed in three unrelated categories in this article. This includes a practical differential diagnosis of ankle sprains, acute conditions of the mid and hindfoot, overuse syndromes of nerve entrapment, fascial strain, synovitis, joint subluxation, and inflammation resulting from repetitive stress. The diagnosis and treatment of tendon inflammation of the extrinsic foot musculature is also reviewed. PMID:8097679

  20. Dynamic postural control but not mechanical stability differs among those with and without chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, E A; Tillman, M D; Chmielewski, T L; Cauraugh, J H; Naugle, K E; Borsa, P A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare dynamic postural control and mechanical ankle stability among patients with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI) and controls. Seventy-two subjects were divided equally into three groups: uninjured controls, people with previous ankle injury but without CAI, and people with CAI. Subjects completed a single-leg hop-stabilization task, and then had an anterior drawer test and lateral ankle radiograph performed bilaterally. The dynamic postural stability index was calculated from the ground reaction forces of the single-leg hop-stabilization task. Ankle joint stiffness (N/m) was measured with an instrumented arthrometer during the anterior drawer test, and fibula position was assessed from the radiographic image. Patients with previous ankle injuries but without CAI demonstrated higher frontal plane dynamic postural stability scores than both the uninjured control and CAI groups (P<0.01). Patients with and without CAI had significantly higher sagittal plane dynamic postural stability scores (P<0.01) and increased ankle joint stiffness (P=0.045) relative to the control group. The increased frontal plane dynamic postural control may represent a component of a coping mechanism that limits recurrent sprains and the development of CAI. Mechanical stability alterations are speculated to result from the initial ankle trauma. PMID:19422654

  1. What Are Sprains and Strains?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sprain, one or more ligaments is stretched or torn. What Causes a Sprain? Where Do Sprains Usually ... strain, a muscle or tendon is stretched or torn. What Causes Strains? A strain is caused by ...

  2. Intra-articular Lesions in Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability: Comparison of Arthroscopy with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Soo; Chung, Soo Tai; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Park, Jai Hyung; Kim, Joo Hak; Hyung, Jae Won

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic lateral ankle instability often accompanies intra-articular lesions, and arthroscopy is often useful in diagnosis and treatment of intra-articular lesions. Methods Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations and arthroscopic findings were reviewed retrospectively and compared in 65 patients who underwent surgery for chronic lateral ankle instability from January 2006 to January 2010. MR images obtained were assessed by two radiologists, and the inter- and intra-observer reliability was calculated. American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were evaluated. Results Abnormalities of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) were found in all 65 (100%) cases. In arthroscopy examinations, 33 (51%) cases had talar cartilage lesions, and 3 (5%) cases had 'tram-track' cartilage lesion. Additionally, 39 (60%) cases of synovitis, 9 (14%) cases of anterior impingement syndrome caused by osteophyte, 14 (22%) cases of impingement syndrome caused by fibrotic band and tissue were found. Sensitivity of MRI examination for each abnormality was: ATFL, 60%; osteochondral lesion of talus (OLT), 46%; syndesmosis injury, 21%; synovitis, 21%; anterior impingement syndrome caused by osteophyte, 22%. Paired intra-observer reliability was measured by a kappa statistic of 0.787 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.641 to 0.864) for ATFL injury, 0.818 (95% CI, 0.743 to 0.908) for OLT, 0.713 (95% CI, 0.605 to 0.821) for synovitis, and 0.739 (95% CI, 0.642 to 0.817) for impingement. Paired inter-observer reliability was measured by a kappa statistic of 0.381 (95% CI, 0.241 to 0.463) for ATFL injury, 0.613 (95% CI, 0.541 to 0.721) for OLT, 0.324 (95% CI, 0.217 to 0.441) for synovitis, and 0.394 (95% CI, 0.249 to 0.471) for impingement. Mean AOFAS score increased from 64.5 to 87.92 (p < 0.001) when there was no intra-articular lesion, from 61.07 to 89.04 (p < 0.001) in patients who had one intra-articular lesion, and from

  3. Mechanical Joint Laxity Associated With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, Mitchell L.; Sefton, JoEllen M.; Hubbard, Tricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Lateral ankle sprains can manifest into chronic mechanical joint laxity when not treated effectively. Joint laxity is often measured through the use of manual stress tests, stress radiography, and instrumented ankle arthrometers. Purpose: To systematically review the literature to establish the influence of chronic ankle instability (CAI) on sagittal and frontal plane mechanical joint laxity. Data Sources: Articles were searched with MEDLINE (1966 to October 2008), CINAHL (1982 to October 2008), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (to October 2008) using the key words chronic ankle instability and joint laxity, functional ankle instability and joint laxity, and lateral ankle sprains and joint laxity. Study Selection: To be included, studies had to employ a case control design; mechanical joint laxity had to be measured via a stress roentogram, an instrumented ankle arthrometer, or ankle/foot stress-testing device; anteroposterior inversion or eversion ankle-subtalar joint complex laxity had to be measured; and means and standard deviations of CAI and control groups had to be provided. Data Extraction: One investigator assessed each study based on the criteria to ensure its suitability for analysis. The initial search yielded 1378 potentially relevant articles, from which 8 were used in the final analysis. Once the study was accepted for inclusion, its quality was assessed with the PEDro scale. Data Synthesis: Twenty-one standardized effect sizes and their 95% confidence intervals were computed for each group and dependent variable. CAI produced the largest effect on inversion joint laxity; 45% of the effects ranged from 0.84 to 2.61. Anterior joint laxity measures were influenced second most by CAI (effects, 0.32 to 1.82). CAI had similar but less influence on posterior joint laxity (effects, −0.06 to 0.68) and eversion joint laxity (effects, 0.03 to 0.69). Conclusion: CAI has the largest effect with the most variability on anterior and

  4. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations. PMID:25442161

  5. Ankle arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle surgery; Arthroscopy - ankle; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopy; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopic ... You will likely receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means you will be asleep and unable ...

  6. Intraarticular Entrapment of Os Subfibulare Following a Severe Inversion Injury of the Ankle: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Ozkan; Kilicaslan, Omer Faruk; Guler, Ferhat; Aktan, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior Talofibular Ligament (ATFL) rupture is the most commonly injured anatomic structure in lateral ankle sprain. In some cases, ATFL avulsion fracture from the lateral malleolus may occur instead of purely ligamentous injuries. The ATFL avulsion fracture is detected as a small ossicle at the tip of lateral malleolus on direct radiographs, which is called os subfibulare in chronic cases. Case Presentation: Severe displacement of this ossicle to the tibiotalar joint space is an extremely rare injury. Herein, a case of intra-articular entrapment of os subfibulare following a severe inversion injury of the ankle, which caused a diagnostic challenge was presented. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of entrapment of os subfibulare in the talotibial joint space. Fixation of the os subfibulare to lateral malleolus resulted in union and excellent functional results. PMID:26101763

  7. Ankle Bracing and the Neuromuscular Factors Influencing Joint Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Zinder, Steven M; Granata, Kevin P; Shultz, Sandra J; Gansneder, Bruce M

    2009-01-01

    Context: Health care professionals commonly prescribe external stabilization to decrease the incidence and severity of ankle sprains. The mechanism for this decrease is not clearly understood. Examining the effects of ankle bracing on biomechanical stability and influencing factors may provide important information regarding the neuromuscular effects of bracing. Objective: To study the effects of 2 different ankle braces on the neuromuscular factors influencing ankle stiffness. Design: Mixed-model repeated-measures design. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-eight physically active participants composing 2 groups: 14 with unilateral functional ankle instability (age  =  26.19 ± 6.46 years, height  =  166.07 ± 12.90 cm, mass  =  69.90 ± 13.46 kg) and 14 with bilaterally stable ankles (age  =  23.76 ± 5.82 years, height  =  174.00 ± 11.67 cm, mass  =  68.60 ± 13.12 kg). Intervention(s): Participants were fitted with surface electromyography electrodes over the peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, tibialis anterior, and soleus muscles. Each participant received transient motion oscillations to his or her ankle on a custom-built medial-lateral swaying cradle in each of 3 conditions: no ankle brace (NB), lace-up brace (LU), and semirigid brace (SR). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle stiffness as measured by the cradle and preactivation levels (percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction) of the 4 test muscles. Results: Stiffness levels increased across brace conditions (NB  =  24.79 ± 6.59 Nm/rad, LU  =  28.29 ± 7.05 Nm/rad, SR  =  33.22 ± 8.78 Nm/rad; F2,52  =  66.185, P < .001). No differences were found between groups for rotational stiffness (stable  =  27.36 ± 6.17 Nm/rad, unstable  =  30.18 ± 8.21 Nm/rad; F1,26  =  1.084, P  =  .307). Preactivation levels did not change for any of the tested muscles with the application of an ankle brace (F2,52  =  1.326, P

  8. Assessment of Ankle and Hindfoot Stability and Joint Pressures Using a Human Cadaveric Model of a Large Lateral Talar Process Excision

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Andrew; White, Charles; Blankstein, Michael; Zderic, Ivan; Wahl, Dieter; Ernst, Manuela; Windolf, Markus; Hagen, Jennifer E.; Richards, R. Geoff; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lateral talar process fragment excision may be followed by hindfoot instability and altered biomechanics. There is controversy regarding the ideal fragment size for internal fixation versus excision and a concern that excision of a large fragment may lead to significant instability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability. A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5 cm3 and 10 cm3 lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment. In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10 cm3 lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm3 fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P = .04. No significant change of the ankle joint pressure and contact area was detected after 5 and 10-cm3 excision in comparison with the pre-excison state. An excision of up to 10 cm3 of the lateral talar process does not cause a significant instability at the level of the subtalar joint but might be a destabilizing factor at the ankle joint under inversion stress. The latter could be related to extensive soft tissue dissection required for resection. PMID:25789950

  9. Ankle Sprains: Healing and Preventing Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... you to stand on your foot. Ice--Using ice packs, ice slush baths or ice massages can decrease ... after your injury. Ice treatments can consist of ice packs, ice slush baths or ice massages. To use ...

  10. Outcome and patients' satisfaction after functional treatment of acute lateral ankle injuries at emergency departments versus family doctor offices

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Patrik R; Benneker, Lorin M; Eggli, Stefan; Zimmermann, Heinz; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2008-01-01

    Background In some Western countries, more and more patients seek initial treatment even for minor injuries at emergency units of hospitals. The initial evaluation and treatment as well as aftercare of these patients require large amounts of personnel and logistical resources, which are limited and costly, especially if compared to treatment by a general practitioner. In this study, we investigated whether outsourcing from our level 1 trauma center to a general practitioner has an influence on patient satisfaction and compliance. Methods This prospective, randomized study, included n = 100 patients who suffered from a lateral ankle ligament injury grade I-II (16, 17). After radiological exclusion of osseous lesions, the patients received early functional treatment and were shown physical therapy exercises to be done at home, without immobilization or the use of stabilizing ortheses. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups of 50 patients each: Group A (ER): Follow-up and final examination in the hospital's emergency unit. Group B (GP): Follow-up by general practitioner, final examination at hospital's emergency unit. The patients were surveyed regarding their satisfaction with the treatment and outcome of the treatment. Results Female and male patients were equally represented in both groups. The age of the patients ranged from 16 – 64 years, with a mean age of 34 years (ER) and 35 years (GP). 98% (n = 98) of all patients were satisfied with their treatment, and 93% (n = 93) were satisfied with the outcome. For these parameters no significant difference between the two groups could be noted (p = 0.7406 and 0.7631 respectively). 39% of all patients acquired stabilizing ortheses like ankle braces (Aircast, Malleoloc etc.) on their own initiative. There was a not significant tendency for more self-acquired ortheses in the group treated by general practicioners (p = 0,2669). Conclusion Patients who first present at the ER with a lateral ankle ligament

  11. Foot sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Mid-foot sprain ... There are many bones and ligaments in your foot. A ligament is a strong flexible tissue that holds bones together. When the foot lands awkwardly, some ligaments can stretch and tear. ...

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries: development of an evidence-based algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Polzer, Hans; Kanz, Karl Georg; Prall, Wolf Christian; Haasters, Florian; Ockert, Ben; Mutschler, Wolf; Grote, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are among the most common injuries in emergency departments. However, there are still no standardized examination procedures or evidence-based treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to systematically search the current literature, classify the evidence, and develop an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database for randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, systematic reviews or, if applicable, observational studies and classified them according to their level of evidence. According to the currently available literature, the following recommendations have been formulated: i) the Ottawa Ankle/Foot Rule should be applied in order to rule out fractures; ii) physical examination is sufficient for diagnosing injuries to the lateral ligament complex; iii) classification into stable and unstable injuries is applicable and of clinical importance; iv) the squeeze-, crossed leg- and external rotation test are indicative for injuries of the syndesmosis; v) magnetic resonance imaging is recommended to verify injuries of the syndesmosis; vi) stable ankle sprains have a good prognosis while for unstable ankle sprains, conservative treatment is at least as effective as operative treatment without the related possible complications; vii) early functional treatment leads to the fastest recovery and the least rate of reinjury; viii) supervised rehabilitation reduces residual symptoms and re-injuries. Taken these recommendations into account, we present an applicable and evidence-based, step by step, decision pathway for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries, which can be implemented in any emergency department or doctor's practice. It provides quality assurance for the patient and promotes confidence in the attending physician. PMID:22577506

  13. The contribution of anterior deltoid ligament to ankle stability in isolated lateral malleolar fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Jang, Kyu Sun; Choi, Gi Won; Jeong, Chan Dong; Hong, Suk Joo; Yoon, Min A; Kim, Hak Jun

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of isolated lateral malleolar fractures with deltoid ligament rupture remains controversial. We prospectively analysed 35 patients with isolated lateral malleolar fractures during 2006-2013. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed to assess the degree of reduction, ligament damage, and stability. Internal fixation was performed for all unstable valgus fractures with unacceptable fracture parameters. Fractures with residual valgus instability after fixation underwent anterior deltoid repair. The mean anterior deltoid ligament grade based on MRI was significantly different between the high-grade unstable group and the stable and low-grade unstable groups (p=0.037 and 0.004, respectively). Postoperative medial clear space measurements were not significantly different between groups. MRI was shown to be a useful tool in the preoperative identification of isolated lateral malleolus fractures prone to valgus instability. In the case of high-grade unstable fractures of the lateral malleolus, repair of the anterior deltoid ligament is adequate for restoring medial stability. PMID:27133289

  14. Systematic review of chronic ankle instability in children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a disabling condition often encountered after ankle injury. Three main components of CAI exist; perceived instability; mechanical instability (increased ankle ligament laxity); and recurrent sprain. Literature evaluating CAI has been heavily focused on adults, with little attention to CAI in children. Hence, the objective of this study was to systematically review the prevalence of CAI in children. Methods Studies were retrieved from major databases from earliest records to March 2013. References from identified articles were also examined. Studies involving participants with CAI, classified by authors as children, were considered for inclusion. Papers investigating traumatic instability or instability arising from fractures were excluded. Two independent examiners undertook all stages of screening, data extraction and methodological quality assessments. Screening discrepancies were resolved by reaching consensus. Results Following the removal of duplicates, 14,263 papers were screened for eligibility against inclusion and exclusion criteria. Nine full papers were included in the review. Symptoms of CAI evaluated included perceived and mechanical ankle instability along with recurrent ankle sprain. In children with a history of ankle sprain, perceived instability was reported in 23-71% whilst mechanical instability was found in 18-47% of children. A history of recurrent ankle sprain was found in 22% of children. Conclusion Due to the long-lasting impacts of CAI, future research into the measurement and incidence of ankle instability in children is recommended. PMID:24641786

  15. Ankle dislocation without accompanying malleolar fracture. A case report.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Masahito; Kotajima, Satoshi; Smith, Richard A; Kokubun, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Dislocation of the tibiotalar joint without associated fracture is rare. We present here a 21-year-old man who sustained open posteromedial dislocation of the left ankle without malleolar facture when he jumped and sprained his right ankle while playing basketball. The most likely mechanism is forced flexion applied to the ankle joint leading to a rupture of the anterior capsule and lateral structures of the ankle followed by an accelerating inversion stress leading to a posteromedial dislocation of the talus from the tibial condyle. Transient paresthesia was noted in the area of the superficial peroneal nerve. At surgery, the anterior part of the tibiotalar joint capsule and anterior talofibular ligament were detached from their original sites. The calcaneofibular ligament was also detached with its associated periosteum and a tiny avulsed bony fragment. The articular facets of the tibia and talus were intact. The treatment consisted of wound irrigation, debridement, reduction and capsular suture followed by immobilization with a short leg cast. About 10 degrees of loss in the range of dorsiflexion was observed. The patient achieved good long-term functional results. PMID:16961183

  16. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF US HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS-RELATED LIGAMENTOUS ANKLE INJURIES, 2005/06-2010/11

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, David M.; Collins, Christy L.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Objective Describe ankle injury epidemiology among US high school athletes in 20 sports. Design Descriptive prospective epidemiology study. Setting Sports injury data for the 2005/06–2010/11 academic years were collected using an internet-based injury surveillance system, Reporting Information Online (RIO). Participants A nationwide convenience sample of US high schools. Assessment of Risk Factors Injuries sustained as a function of sport and gender. Main Outcome Measures Ankle sprain rates and patterns, outcomes, and mechanisms. Results From 2005/06–2010/11, certified athletic trainers reported 5,373 ankle sprains in 17,172,376 athlete exposures [AEs], for a rate of 3.13 ankle sprains per 10,000 AEs. Rates were higher for girls than boys (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.17–1.34) in gender-comparable sports and higher in competition than practice for boys (RR 3.42, 95% CI 3.20–3.66) and girls (RR 2.71, 95% CI 2.48–2.95). The anterior talofibular ligament was most commonly injured (involved in 85.3% of sprains). Overall, 49.7% of sprains resulted in loss of participation from 1–6 days. While 0.5% of all ankle sprains required surgery, 6.6% of those involving the deltoid ligament required surgery. Athletes were wearing ankle braces in 10.6% of all sprains. The most common injury mechanism was contact with another person (42.4% of all ankle sprains). Conclusions Ankle sprains are a serious problem in high school sports, with high rates of recurrent injury and loss of participation from sport. PMID:23328403

  17. Sprains and Strains - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... العربية) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ... 足首のねんざ - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Ankle Sprain 발목 염좌 - 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual ...

  18. The gender issue: epidemiology of ankle injuries in athletes who participate in basketball.

    PubMed

    Hosea, T M; Carey, C C; Harrer, M F

    2000-03-01

    The increased participation of women in organized athletics has resulted in an interest in gender-related injury patterns. Previous reports have indicated an increased incidence in anterior cruciate knee injuries among female intercollegiate basketball players compared with their male counterparts. The current epidemiologic study prospectively evaluated the relative risk of ankle injuries in scholastic and collegiate basketball players during a 2-year period. Eleven thousand seven hundred eighty athletes participated in this study, 4940 females and 6840 males. There were 1052 ankle injuries. Overall, females had a 25% greater risk of sustaining a Grade I ankle sprain compared with their male counterparts. This increased risk was present in the interscholastic and intercollegiate players. There was no significant difference in the risk for Grades II and III ankle sprains, ankle fractures, or syndesmotic sprains. Male and female athletes doubled their risk for sustaining an ankle injury at the intercollegiate level compared with the interscholastic level. PMID:10738413

  19. Rehabilitation of Ankle and Foot Injuries in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Lisa; Hertel, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Foot and ankle injuries are extremely common among athletes and other physically active individuals. Rehabilitation programs that emphasize the use of therapeutic exercise to restore joint range of motion, muscle strength, neuromuscular coordination, and gait mechanics have been shown to have clinical success for patients suffering various foot and ankle pathologies. Rehabilitation programs are discussed for ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and turf toe. PMID:19945591

  20. MRI in acute ligamentous injuries of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Martella, Ilenia; Azzali, Emanuele; Milanese, Gianluca; Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Ruggirello, Margherita; Trunfio, Vincenzo; Parziale, Raffaele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Capasso, Raffaella; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains are the most common lower limb injuries and affect more frequently young athletes; imaging is needed for an accurate diagnosis of such traumatic injuries. The purpose of this review is to analyse the magnetic resonance (MR) findings of both normal and pathological ankle's ligaments; indeed, MRI is the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute traumatic injuries and is useful for differentiation of the causes of ankle instability as well as for pre-operative planning. PMID:27467862

  1. The effect of osseous ankle configuration on chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Frigg, Arno; Magerkurth, Olaf; Valderrabano, Victor; Ledermann, Hans‐Peter; Hintermann, Beat

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a common orthopaedic entity in sport. Although other risk factors have been studied extensively, little is known about how it is influenced by the osseous joint configuration. Aim To study the effect of osseous ankle configuration on CAI. Design Case–control study, level III. Setting Radiological examination with measurement of lateral x rays by an independent radiologist using a digital DICOM/PACS system. Patients A group of 52 patients who had had at least three recurrent sprains was compared with an age‐matched and sex‐matched control group of 52 healthy subjects. Main outcome measures The radius of the talar surface, the tibial coverage of the talus (tibiotalar sector) and the height of the talar body were measured. Results The talar radius was found to be larger in patients with CAI (21.2 (2.4) mm) than in controls (17.7 (1.9) mm; p<0.001, power >95%). The tibiotalar sector, representing the tibial coverage of the talus, was smaller in patients with CAI (80° (5.1°)) than in controls (88.4° (7.2°); p<0.001, power >95%). No significant difference was observed in the height of the talar body between patients with CAI (28.8 (2.6) mm) and controls (27.5 (4.0) mm; p = 0.055). Conclusion CAI is associated with an unstable osseous joint configuration characterised by a larger radius of the talus and a smaller tibiotalar sector. There is evidence that a higher talus might also play some part, particularly in women. PMID:17261556

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic ankle pain.

    PubMed

    Wukich, Dane K; Tuason, Dominick A

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for chronic ankle pain is quite broad. Ankle pain can be caused by intra-articular or extra-articular pathology and may be a result of a traumatic or nontraumatic event. A detailed patient history and physical examination, coupled with judicious selection of the appropriate imaging modalities, are vital in making an accurate diagnosis and providing effective treatment. Chronic ankle pain can affect all age groups, ranging from young athletes to elderly patients with degenerative joint and soft-tissue disorders. It has been estimated that 23,000 ankle sprains occur each day in the United States, representing approximately 1 sprain per 10,000 people per day. Because nearly one in five ankle injuries result in chronic symptoms, orthopaedic surgeons are likely to see patients with chronic ankle pain. Many patients with chronic ankle pain do not recall any history of trauma. Reviewing the management of the various disorders that can cause chronic ankle pain will help orthopaedic surgeons provide the best treatment for their patients. PMID:21553785

  3. Deltoid Ligament and Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Injury in Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation at 3T and Comparison with Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ka-Young; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min-Sun; Kim, Dae-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Materials and Methods Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. Results On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential. PMID:26356649

  4. Strains and Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... move the injured part, and you might even think you have broken a bone. How Does a Strain or Sprain Happen? Strains often happen when you put a lot of pressure on a muscle or you push it too far, such as when lifting a heavy object. Strains may be more likely to happen if ...

  5. A multimodal approach to ankle instability: Interrelations between subjective and objective assessments of ankle status in athletes.

    PubMed

    Golditz, Tobias; Welsch, Goetz H; Pachowsky, Milena; Hennig, Friedrich F; Pfeifer, Klaus; Steib, Simon

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study is to investigate the association between different subjective and objective assessments of ankle function in a population of athletes with or without functional ankle instability (FAI). 29 athletes with a history of ankle spraining were divided into two groups according to their ankle status: 16 with FAI (initial ankle sprain with residual functional instability) (age 24.6 ± 3.1 years), and 13 COPERS (initial ankle sprain without residual instability) (age 25.3 ± 4.4 years). The assessment of each individual's ankle function was based on three approaches: The "functional-ankle-ability-measure" (FAAM) assessing subjective ankle functionality, measures of sensorimotor control as objective functional measurements and MRI-based T2-mapping as a quantitative marker of compositional joint status. Pearson's product-moment-correlation coefficient, student's t-test and analysis-of-variance were used for statistical analysis. Significant group differences existed for subjective ankle function (FAAM, p = 0.04) and MRI-data mainly in the medial compartment of the ankle joint (p ≤ 0.05). We found unique associations between T2-mapping results and sensorimotor scores in the COPER (r = -0.756-0.849), and "FAI"-group (r = 0.630-0.657). The location and magnitude differed between groups. No correlations existed between these measures and the FAAM. This exploratory study provides preliminary evidence for potential interrelations between various diagnostic measures of ankle function and structure in individuals with and without FAI. We found associations between MRI-results and selected measures of sensorimotor control, indicating a potential link between loss of ankle function and early joint degeneration. Despite these interrelations, each of the different assessment options appears to contain unique information on ankle functionality important in a clinical assessment. PMID:26309042

  6. Foot and Ankle Injuries in Runners.

    PubMed

    Tenforde, Adam S; Yin, Amy; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-02-01

    Foot and ankle injuries account for nearly one-third of running injuries. Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciopathy, and ankle sprains are 3 of the most common types of injuries sustained during training. Other common injuries include other tendinopathies of the foot and ankle, bone stress injuries, nerve conditions including neuromas, and joint disease including osteoarthritis. This review provides an evidence-based framework for the evaluation and optimal management of these conditions to ensure safe return to running participation and reduce risk for future injury. PMID:26616180

  7. Proprioception and ankle injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Ergen, Emin; Ulkar, Bülent

    2008-01-01

    Because soccer attracts many participants and leads to a substantial number of injuries, especially of the lower extremities, it is important to study possibilities for injury prevention and proper rehabilitation to return safely to activities. Ankle sprains can be prevented by external ankle supports and proprioceptive-coordination training, especially in athletes with previous ankle sprains. Proprioception is a broad concept that includes balance and postural control with visual and vestibular contributions, joint kinesthesia, position sense, and muscle reaction time. Proprioceptive feedback is crucial in the conscious and unconscious awareness of a joint or limb in motion. Enhancement of functional joint stability by proprioceptive (or neuromuscular) training is important both in prevention and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. PMID:18206575

  8. Simultaneous strain measurement with determination of a zero strain reference for the medial and lateral ligaments of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Satoru; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Yamakoshi, Kenichi; Yamanoi, Takahiro

    2002-09-01

    The strain changes of the central part of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL), the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and the tibiocalcaneal ligament (TCL) were measured simultaneously for a full range of ankle motion. Twelve fresh frozen amputated ankles were used. To measure the strain changes of the ligaments, a Galium-Indium-filled silastic strain transducer was implanted in the center of each ligament. The zero strain reference was determined immediately after the measurement of strain changes in five of the 12 ankles by tensile testing of each bone-ligament-bone preparation. The maximum strain change of the ATFL, the PTFL, the CFL and the TFL were 7.9%, 5.9%, 5.3% and 5.2%, respectively. The ATFL was elongated in plantar flexion and shortened in dorsiflexion. The PTFL and the CFL were shortened in plantar flexion and elongated in dorsiflexion. The TCL was the longest around the neutral position and became shorter in planter flexion and dorsiflexion. The results showed that the ATFL was taut in plantar flexion over 16.2 degrees, the PTFL and the CFL were taut in dorsiflexion over 18 degrees and 17.8 degrees respectively, and the TCL was taut between 9.5 degrees of dorsiflexion and 9.5 degrees of plantar flexion. The length change pattern was different among the ankle ligaments, although there was only a slight difference between that of the PTFL and the CFL. This study provides fundamental data useful in studying ankle ligament reconstruction. PMID:12356180

  9. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  10. Ankle flexibility and injury patterns in dancers.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, E R; Hunter, D M; Martin, D F; Curl, W W; Hoen, H

    1996-01-01

    Lower-extremity injuries are common among dancers and cause significant absences from rehearsals and performances. For this study of lower-extremity injuries in 101 ballet and 47 modern dance students, injuries requiring medical attention sustained over 1 academic year were associated with the following data obtained at the beginning of the school year: ankle flexibility, sex, dance discipline, previous injury, body mass index, and years of training. Eighty-three of the 148 students (age range, 12 to 28 years) reported prior lower-limb injuries, the most common being ankle sprains (28% of all dancers). Previous leg injuries correlated significantly with lower dorsiflexion measurements and with more new injuries. Female students had greater ankle and first metatarsophalangeal flexibility. Modern dancers had greater ankle inversion. Ninety-four students sustained 177 injuries during the study, including 75 sprains or strains and 71 cases of tendinitis. Thirty-nine percent (N = 69) were ankle injuries; 18% (N = 33) were knee injuries; 23% (N = 40) were foot injuries; and 20% (N = 35) were either hip or thigh injuries. Sixty-seven percent (N = 78) of the injured students were ballet dancers. Age, years of training, body mass index, sex, and ankle range of motion measurement had no predictive value for injury; previous injury and dance discipline both correlated with increased risk of injury. PMID:8947396

  11. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES – IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas; Tang, Lars; Zebis, Mette; Nielsen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used balance devices (Airex®, BOSU® Ball and wobble board). Design Descriptive exploratory laboratory study. Methods Nineteen healthy subjects performed single-legged balance with eyes open on an Airex® mat, BOSU® Ball, wobble board, and floor (reference condition). Ankle kinematics were measured using reflective markers and 3-dimensional recordings and expressed as inversion-eversion range of motion variability, peak velocity of inversion and number of inversion-eversion direction changes. Peroneus longus EMG activity was averaged and normalized to maximal activity during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and in addition amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) between 90 and 10% was calculated as a measure of muscle activation variability. Results Balancing on BOSU® Ball and wobble board generally resulted in increased ankle kinematic and muscle activity variables, compared to the other surfaces. BOSU® Ball was the most challenging in terms of inversion-eversion variability while wobble board was associated with a higher number of inversion-eversion direction changes. No differences in average muscle activation level were found between these two surfaces, but the BOSU® Ball did show a more variable activation pattern in terms of APDF. Conclusion The results showed large kinematic variability among different balance training devices and

  12. Which X-ray views are required in juvenile ankle trauma?

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Blankstein, A; Israeli, A; Horoszowski, H

    1990-01-01

    Although ankle sprains are probably the most common injury in adolescent sports people, epiphyseal injuries are missed on the presumption of a ligamentous tear. The risk of damaged ligaments has been overemphasized while the potentially dangerous epiphyseolysis has been understressed. An oblique X-ray of the ankle joint is indicated prior to "stress" pictures. PMID:2346717

  13. The influence of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ki-sik; Park, Kyungyeon; Choi, Bo-ram

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 university students with no history of ankle sprain. They descended stairs while wearing the medio-lateral unstable sole or with bare feet. Electromyography was used to record the activity of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscles and paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] The medio-lateral unstable sole group showed increased tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscle activation compared to the barefoot group. [Conclusion] Medio-lateral unstable sole can be used with exercises to prevent further ankle damage by activating both the inversion and eversion muscles.

  14. Ankle proprioception is not targeted by exercises on an unstable surface.

    PubMed

    Kiers, Henri; Brumagne, Simon; van Dieën, Jaap; van der Wees, Philip; Vanhees, Luc

    2012-04-01

    Laboratory study using a repeated measures design. The aim of this study was to determine if ankle proprioception is targeted in exercises on unstable surfaces. Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) has recurrence rates over 70%, which are believed to be due to a reduced accuracy of proprioceptive signals from the ankle. Proprioceptive exercises in rehabilitation of LAS mostly consist of balancing activities on an unstable surface. The methods include 100 healthy adults stood barefoot on a solid surface and a foam pad over a force plate, with occluded vision. Mechanical vibration was used to stimulate proprioceptive output of muscle spindles of triceps surae and lumbar paraspinal musculature. Each trial lasted for 60 s; vibration was applied from the 15th till the 30th second. Changes in mean velocity and mean position of the center of pressure (CoP) as a result of muscle vibration were calculated. Results show that on foam, the effect of triceps surae vibration on mean CoP velocity was significantly smaller than on a solid surface, while for paraspinal musculature vibration the effect was bigger on foam than on solid surface. Similar effects were seen for mean CoP displacement as outcome. Exercises on unstable surfaces appear not to target peripheral ankle proprioception. Exercises on an unstable surface may challenge the capacity of the central nervous system to shift the weighting of sources of proprioceptive signals on balance. PMID:21858665

  15. Peroneal Tendon Reconstruction and Coverage for Treatment of Septic Peroneal Tenosynovitis: A Devastating Complication of Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction With a Tendon Allograft.

    PubMed

    Schade, Valerie L; Harsha, Wayne; Rodman, Caitlin; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Septic peroneal tenosynovitis is a rare and significant challenge. A search of peer-reviewed published studies revealed only 5 case reports to guide treatment, none of which resulted in significant loss of both peroneal tendons necessitating reconstruction. No clear guidance is available regarding how to provide reliable reconstruction of both peroneal tendons after a significant loss secondary to septic tenosynovitis. In the present report, we describe the case of a young, active-duty soldier who underwent lateral ankle ligament reconstruction with a tendon allograft whose postoperative course was complicated by septic peroneal tenosynovitis resulting in significant loss of both peroneal tendons. Reconstruction was achieved in a staged fashion with the use of silicone rods and external fixation to maintain physiologic tension and preserve peroneal tendon function, followed by reconstruction of both peroneal tendons and the superior peroneal retinaculum with a tensor fascia lata autograft. Soft tissue coverage was obtained with an anterolateral thigh free tissue transfer and a split-thickness skin graft. The patient returned to full activity as an active-duty soldier with minimal pain and no instability of the right lower extremity. The muscle strength of both peroneal tendons remained at 5 of 5, and no objective findings of ankle instability were seen at 3.5 years postoperatively. PMID:26002675

  16. Beware the Emergency Ankle Fracture Referral: An Unusual Case of Lateral Subtalar Joint Dislocation Secondary to Calcaneal Fracture with associated Lateral Malleolus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Colegate-Stone, TJ; James, SE; Koka, SR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The referral of a lateral malleolus fracture is one of the commonest orthopaedic trauma presentations. Failure to fully assess the patient and radiography can lead to missing associated injuries in the hindfoot. Case Report: We describe an unusual hindfoot injury with an atypical combination of lateral subtalar dislocation and calcaneal fracture with associated lateral malleolus fracture that was initially not appreciated by the referring emergency department. This case is of particular interest as subtalar dislocation is a rare injury and lateral subtalar dislocation is even rarer. Conclusion: Failure to fully assess such injuries and manage non-operatively leads to early degenerative tibia-talar, hindfoot and midfoot changes and a difficult situation for the surgeon to salvage. We advocate early CT scan and open reduction with fixation for such cases. PMID:27299009

  17. Arthroscopic Repair of Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Matthew D; Baca, John; Arbuckle, Keith

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization procedures have been described for many years. New technological advances and a deeper understanding of the pathobiomechanics involved in chronic lateral ankle instability have allowed an expansion of arthroscopic approaches to this common pathology. As experience is gained and outcomes within the patient profile are understood, the authors feel that the arthroscopic approach to lateral ankle stabilization may prove superior to traditional methods secondary to the risk and traditional complications that are mitigated within minimally invasive arthroscopic approaches. Additionally, the arthroscopic approach may allow a quicker return to ballistic sport and decrease time for rehabilitation. PMID:27599440

  18. POPLITEUS STRAIN WITH CONCURRENT DELTOID LIGAMENT SPRAIN IN AN ELITE SOCCER ATHLETE: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Josh; Tarnay, Lorena; Silvers, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report (Differential diagnosis) Background and Purpose: Differential diagnosis of knee pathology after trauma may be difficult when diagnosing an isolated popliteus strain and concurrent medial deltoid ligament sprain. Upon a thorough search of the published literature, the authors found no reports delineating a popliteus strain in professional soccer in the United States. The joints most affected by injury in soccer players are the knee and ankle joints. The purpose of this case report is to describe the presentation of and difficulties encountered in diagnosing a popliteus strain in a Major League Soccer athlete. Case Description: During an in-season away game, an outside defender was slide-tackled from behind when his right shank was caught in an externally rotated position underneath himself and the opposing player. The initial point of contact was made to the proximal third of the posterior right shank with an anteromedially directed force. The medial longitudinal arch of the foot was forced into a more midfoot pronated position and the subtalar joint was forced into eversion. Diagnosis: The athlete was diagnosed with a moderate strain of the right popliteus muscle with a concurrent medial deltoid ligament sprain of the right ankle. This mechanism of injury, pain with passive knee flexion and internal rotation during McMurray's test, pain with Garrick's Test and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study confirmed the diagnosis. The athlete returned to full ninety-minute game participation after an intensive 15-day rehabilitation program. Discussion: This case is unique because the injury manifested itself at multiple joints and specifically involved the popliteus muscle. The mechanism of injury can be associated with many other soft tissue injuries to the knee, and thus, may not lead the clinician initially to consider the diagnosis of a popliteus strain. Diagnosis of this entity may be difficult due to the possible shared attachment of the

  19. Foot and ankle injuries in the barefoot sports.

    PubMed

    Vormittag, Kara; Calonje, Ronald; Briner, William W

    2009-01-01

    Playing sports barefoot has been contested since the very beginnings of athletic competition. Even today, some data suggest that shoes may limit the adaptive pronation that occurs after footstrike during running gait. This pronation likely protects runners from injury. Boardsport participants who perform their sports barefoot on the water seem to be at risk for foot and ankle injuries. The high-impact forces in gymnastics place participants at risk for foot and ankle injuries, as well. Swimming and diving have a low rate of foot and ankle injuries. The risk of ankle sprain in beach volleyball, which is played barefoot, seems to be lower than that for indoor volleyball, played wearing shoes. Martial arts place competitors at risk for injuries to the foot and ankle from torsional and impact mechanisms. Athletes who hope to return to barefoot competition after injury should perform their rehabilitation in their bare feet. PMID:19741354

  20. Ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Kyle P; McHale, Kevin J; Rossy, William H; Theodore, George

    2016-01-01

    Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed. PMID:27608626

  1. Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Elmlund, Anna O; Winson, Ian G

    2015-03-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a good option for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. The surgical technique involving the use of a standard 4.5-mm arthroscope is described. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals are used. Joint surfaces except the lateral gutter are prepared to point bleeding with motorized burr, abraider, and curettes. Rigid fixation is achieved with cannulated screws. The postoperative regime includes 12 weeks protection, staged from non-weight bearing through partial to full weight bearing. Advantages compared with the open procedure include shorter hospital stay and shorter time to union with similar or better union rates. PMID:25726484

  2. Sprained Ankle Could Pose Longer-Term Harms to Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... an associate professor at the Center for Biomedical Engineering Systems at the University of North Carolina at ... Ph.D., ATC, associate professor, Center for Biomedical Engineering Systems, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; June ...

  3. Changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after hip strength training for single-sided ankle dorsiflexion restriction.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hitoshi; Someya, Fujiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries suffered while playing sports, and abnormal forward- and inward-directed ground reaction force occurs during a jumping task. However, the influence of hip muscle strength training on jumping performance after ankle injuries has not been fully examined. This study thus examined changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after training to strengthen hip muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Ten of 30 female high school basketball players were assigned as subjects who showed a difference of 7 or more degrees in dorsiflexion ranges between the bilateral ankles. The subjects underwent 12 weeks of training to strengthen hip abductors and external rotators. Comparisons between before and after training were made regarding ground reaction force components, hip and knee joint angles, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in leg muscles, and muscle strength of hip muscles during the rebound-jump task. [Results] After training, the subjects showed increased strength of external rotator muscles, increased percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in the gluteus medius muscle, decreased inward ground reaction force, and increased flexion angles of the hip and knee joints. [Conclusion] This study suggests that training to strengthen hip muscles may ameliorate the inward ground reaction force in athletes with ankle dorsiflexion restriction. PMID:27065513

  4. Changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after hip strength training for single-sided ankle dorsiflexion restriction

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hitoshi; Someya, Fujiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries suffered while playing sports, and abnormal forward- and inward-directed ground reaction force occurs during a jumping task. However, the influence of hip muscle strength training on jumping performance after ankle injuries has not been fully examined. This study thus examined changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after training to strengthen hip muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Ten of 30 female high school basketball players were assigned as subjects who showed a difference of 7 or more degrees in dorsiflexion ranges between the bilateral ankles. The subjects underwent 12 weeks of training to strengthen hip abductors and external rotators. Comparisons between before and after training were made regarding ground reaction force components, hip and knee joint angles, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in leg muscles, and muscle strength of hip muscles during the rebound-jump task. [Results] After training, the subjects showed increased strength of external rotator muscles, increased percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in the gluteus medius muscle, decreased inward ground reaction force, and increased flexion angles of the hip and knee joints. [Conclusion] This study suggests that training to strengthen hip muscles may ameliorate the inward ground reaction force in athletes with ankle dorsiflexion restriction. PMID:27065513

  5. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the cut bony surfaces. A special glue/bone cement may be used to hold them in place. A piece of plastic is then inserted between the two metal parts. Screws maybe placed to stabilize your ankle. The surgeon ...

  6. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  7. Effect of exercise therapy combining electrical therapy and balance training on functional instability resulting from ankle sprain—focus on stability of jump landing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takaki; Tanino, Yoshitsugu; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Functional instability leads to a delay in the muscle reaction time and weakness of the peroneal muscles. The present study examined the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation during balance exercise on patients with functional instability of the ankles, including the ability to land after jumping at the center of foot pressure. [Subjects] The subjects were seven males with a history of ankle sprain. All had a sprained ankle score of ≤80 points on Karlson’s functional instability test. [Methods] They were asked to jump over a 20-cm-high platform sideways for 10 consecutive seconds on a force plate with one leg. The length of the center of pressure was measured for comparison of balance exercise and balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Results] The length of the center of foot pressure on the sprain side was significantly greater than on the non-sprain side under both conditions. Under the balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy condition, the length of the center of foot pressure on the sprain side was significantly reduced, with the values being 627.0 ± 235.4 and 551.8 ± 171.1 mm before and after the challenge, respectively. [Conclusion] Ankle instability on the sprain side was significantly reduced under the balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy condition before and after the challenge. Peroneal muscles showed increased activity caused by common peroneal innervation. PMID:26644645

  8. Management of Syndesmotic Ankle Injuries in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shore, Benjamin J; Kramer, Dennis E

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric ankle injuries are common, especially in athletes; however, the incidence of syndesmosis injuries in children has been scarcely reported. Injuries to the ankle syndesmosis, termed "high ankle sprains," can affect high-level and recreational athletes and have been related to delayed return to play, persistent pain, and adult injuries have been associated with long-term disability. Syndesmotic injuries do occur in children, especially those who participate in sports that involve cutting and pivoting (football, soccer) or sports with rigid immobilization of the ankle (skiing, hockey). Unstable pediatric syndesmosis injuries requiring surgical fixation are often associated with concomitant fibular fracture in skeletally mature children. Physician vigilance and careful clinical examination coupled with appropriate radiographs can determine the extent of the injury in the majority of circumstances. PMID:27100034

  9. A historical perspective on ankle ligaments reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Tarabella, Vittorio; Filardo, Giuseppe; Tomba, Patrizia; Viganò, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Ankle sprains are by far the most common injuries treated by sport medicine physicians. Treatment is mainly conservative, but in some cases surgical intervention is required. The aim of the present manuscript is to give an insight into the origins and developments of ankle ligaments reconstructive surgery, underlining the fundamental steps that marked the transition from a mere conservative approach to surgical treatment options. In this historical note, the most illustrious figures who contributed to this particular field of orthopaedic practice are also acknowledged. Level of evidence V. PMID:26718639

  10. [Taping like in professional sports: targeted stabilization and early mobilization of the ankle].

    PubMed

    Feiler, Stefan

    2006-10-01

    Taping is used in the prophylaxis, initial care, therapy and rehabilitation of injuries, such as for example, sprained ankles with damage to peroneal ligament, and for diseases and degenerative changes in the locomotor system. The tape stabilizes, activates and influences sensorimotoric perception (proprioception). PMID:17334132